WorldWideScience

Sample records for controls mitochondrial biogenesis

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Control of Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar D. Yoboue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process. It necessitates the contribution of both the nuclear and the mitochondrial genomes and therefore crosstalk between the nucleus and mitochondria. It is now well established that cellular mitochondrial content can vary according to a number of stimuli and physiological states in eukaryotes. The knowledge of the actors and signals regulating the mitochondrial biogenesis is thus of high importance. The cellular redox state has been considered for a long time as a key element in the regulation of various processes. In this paper, we report the involvement of the oxidative stress in the regulation of some actors of mitochondrial biogenesis.

  2. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    neurodevelopmental disorders. In the context of neural differentiation, Martine Uittenbogaard and Anne Chiaramello (Department of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, USA) [7] thoroughly describe the implication of mitochondrial biogenesis on neuronal differentiation, its timing, its regulation by specific signaling pathways and new potential therapeutic strategies. The maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis is crucial for neuronal development. A mitochondrial dynamic balance is necessary between mitochondrial fusion, fission and quality control systems and mitochondrial biogenesis. Concerning the signaling pathways leading to mitochondrial biogenesis this review highlights the implication of different regulators such as AMPK, SIRT1, PGC-1α, NRF1, NRF2, Tfam, etc. on the specific case of neuronal development, providing examples of diseases in which these pathways are altered and transgenic mouse models lacking these regulators. A common hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases (Huntington´s Disease, Alzheimer´s Disease and Parkinson´s Disease) is the impaired function or expression of PGC-1α, the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Among the promising strategies to ameliorate mitochondrial-based diseases these authors highlight the induction of PGC-1α via activation of PPAR receptors (rosiglitazone, bezafibrate) or modulating its activity by AMPK (AICAR, metformin, resveratrol) or SIRT1 (SRT1720 and several isoflavone-derived compounds). This article also presents a review of the current animal and cellular models useful to study mitochondriogenesis. Although it is known that many neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases are originated in mitochondria, the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis has never been extensively studied. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  3. Mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Francisca; Moraes, Carlos T

    2008-07-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process involving the coordinated expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the import of the products of the latter into the organelle and turnover. The mechanisms associated with these events have been intensively studied in the last 20 years and our understanding of their details is much improved. Mitochondrial biogenesis requires the participation of calcium signaling that activates a series of calcium-dependent protein kinases that in turn activate transcription factors and coactivators such as PGC-1alpha that regulates the expression of genes coding for mitochondrial components. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis involves the balance of mitochondrial fission-fusion. Mitochondrial malfunction or defects in any of the many pathways involved in mitochondrial biogenesis can lead to degenerative diseases and possibly play an important part in aging.

  4. Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz, Francisca; Moraes, Carlos T.

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process involving the coordinated expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the import of the products of the latter into the organelle and turnover. The mechanisms associated with these events have been intensively studied in the last twenty years and our understanding of their details is much improved. Mitochondrial biogenesis requires the participation of calcium signaling that activates a series of calcium dependent protein kinases that in turn a...

  5. Redox regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantadosi, Claude A; Suliman, Hagir B

    2012-12-01

    The cell renews, adapts, or expands its mitochondrial population during episodes of cell damage or periods of intensified energy demand by the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. This bigenomic program is modulated by redox-sensitive signals that respond to physiological nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. This review summarizes our current ideas about the pathways involved in the activation of mitochondrial biogenesis by the physiological gases leading to changes in the redox milieu of the cell, with an emphasis on the responses to oxidative stress and inflammation. The cell's energy supply is protected from conditions that damage mitochondria by an inducible transcriptional program of mitochondrial biogenesis that operates in large part through redox signals involving the nitric oxide synthase and the heme oxygenase-1/CO systems. These redox events stimulate the coordinated activities of several multifunctional transcription factors and coactivators also involved in the elimination of defective mitochondria and the expression of counterinflammatory and antioxidant genes, such as IL10 and SOD2, as part of a unified damage-control network. The redox-regulated mechanisms of mitochondrial biogenesis schematically outlined in the graphical abstract link mitochondrial quality control to an enhanced capacity to support the cell's metabolic needs while improving its resistance to metabolic failure and avoidance of cell death during periods of oxidative stress.

  6. Mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbaud, Stéphanie; Garnier, Anne; Ventura-Clapier, Renée

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac performance depends on a fine balance between the work the heart has to perform to satisfy the needs of the body and the energy that it is able to produce. Thus, energy production by oxidative metabolism, the main energy source of the cardiac muscle, has to be strictly regulated to adapt to cardiac work. Mitochondrial biogenesis is the mechanism responsible for mitochondrial component synthesis and assembly. This process controls mitochondrial content and thus correlates with energy production that, in turn, sustains cardiac contractility. Mitochondrial biogenesis should be finely controlled to match cardiac growth and cardiac work. When the heart is subjected to an increase in work in response to physiological and pathological challenges, it adapts by increasing its mass and expressing a new genetic program. In response to physiological stimuli such as endurance training, mitochondrial biogenesis seems to follow a program involving increased cardiac mass. But in the context of pathological hypertrophy, the modifications of this mechanism remain unclear. What appears clear is that mitochondrial biogenesis is altered in heart failure, and the imbalance between cardiac work demand and energy production represents a major factor in the development of heart failure.

  7. PGC-1α controls mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in lead-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, Aleksandra; Venero, Jose Luis; Iwasawa, Ryota; Hankir, Mohammed-Khair; Rahman, Sunniyat; Boobis, Alan; Hajji, Nabil

    2015-09-01

    Due to its role in regulation of mitochondrial function, PGC1α is emerging as an important player in ageing and neurodegenerative disorders. PGC1α exerts its neuroprotective effects by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) and functioning. However, the precise regulatory role of PGC1α in the control of mitochondrial dynamics (MD) and neurotoxicity is still unknown. Here we elucidate the role of PGC1αin vitro and in vivo in the regulatory context of MB and MD in response to lead (II) acetate as a relevant model of neurotoxicity. We show that there is an adaptive response (AR) to lead, orchestrated by the BAP31-calcium signalling system operating between the ER and mitochondria. We find that this hormetic response is controlled by a cell-tolerated increase of PGC1α expression, which in turn induces a balanced expression of fusion/fission genes by binding to their promoters and implying its direct role in regulation of MD. However, dysregulation of PGC1α expression through either stable downregulation or overexpression, renders cells more susceptible to lead insult leading to mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death. Our data provide novel evidence that PGC1α expression is a key regulator of MD and the maintenance of tolerated PGC1α expression may offer a promising strategy for neuroprotective therapies.

  8. AKT3 controls mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy via regulation of the major nuclear export protein CRM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corum, Daniel G; Tsichlis, Philip N; Muise-Helmericks, Robin C

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that Akt3 is required for mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human endothelial cells (ECs) and in Akt3-null mice; Akt3 affects subcellular localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1α), the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. The purpose of this study is to determine the mechanism by which Akt3 controls the subcellular distribution of PGC-1α and to explore the effect on mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover during angiogenesis. Here we use standard biochemical analyses and Akt3-knockdown strategies to show that Akt3 controls the stabilization of chromosome maintenance region-1 (CRM-1), the major nuclear export receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis and association analyses show that PGC-1α nuclear export is CRM-1 dependent. Akt3 knockdown and CRM-1 overexpression cause 3-fold reductions in PGC-1α target gene expression, compared to control levels. Akt3 inhibition causes autophagy, as measured by autophagosome formation, in a CRM-1-dependent, Akt1/mTOR-independent pathway. In vivo, Akt3-null and heterozygous mice show dose-dependent decreases in angiogenesis compared to wild-type littermates (~5- and 2.5-fold decreases, respectively), as assessed by Matrigel plug assays. This correlates with an ~1.5-fold decrease in mitochondrial Cox IV expression. Our studies suggest that Akt3 is a regulator of mitochondrial dynamics in the vasculature via regulation of CRM-1-dependent nuclear export.

  9. Mitochondrial biogenesis in plants during seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Simon R; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondria occupy a central role in the eukaryotic cell. In addition to being major sources of cellular energy, mitochondria are also involved in a diverse range of functions including signalling, the synthesis of many essential organic compounds and a role in programmed cell death. The active proliferation and differentiation of mitochondria is termed mitochondrial biogenesis and necessitates the coordinated communication of mitochondrial status within an integrated cellular network. Two models of mitochondrial biogenesis have been defined previously, the growth and division model and the maturation model. The former describes the growth and division of pre-existing mature organelles through a form of binary fission, while the latter describes the propagation of mitochondria from structurally and biochemically simple promitochondrial structures that upon appropriate stimuli, mature into fully functional mitochondria. In the last decade, a number of studies have utilised seed germination in plants as a platform for the examination of the processes occurring during mitochondrial biogenesis. These studies have revealed many new aspects of the tightly regulated procession of events that define mitochondrial biogenesis during this period of rapid development. A model for mitochondrial biogenesis that supports the maturation of mitochondria from promitochondrial structures has emerged, where mitochondrial signalling plays a crucial role in the early steps of seed germination.

  10. Rosiglitazone induces mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strum, Jay C; Shehee, Ron; Virley, David; Richardson, Jill; Mattie, Michael; Selley, Paula; Ghosh, Sujoy; Nock, Christina; Saunders, Ann; Roses, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Rosiglitazone was found to simulate mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse brain in an apolipoprotein (Apo) E isozyme-independent manner. Rosiglitazone induced both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and estrogen-stimulated related receptor alpha (ESRRA) mRNA, a key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Transcriptomics and proteomics analysis suggested the mitochondria produced in the presence of human ApoE3 and E4 were not as metabolically efficient as those in the wild type or ApoE knockout mice. Thus, we propose that PPARgamma agonism induces neuronal mitochondrial biogenesis and improves glucose utilization leading to improved cellular function and provides mechanistic support for the improvement in cognition observed in treatment of Alzheimer's patients with rosiglitazone.

  11. The Drosophila inner-membrane protein PMI controls crista biogenesis and mitochondrial diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Marc; El Fissi, Najla; Tufi, Roberta; Bentobji, Mélanie; Liévens, Jean-Charles; Martins, L Miguel; Royet, Julien; Rival, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Cristae are mitochondrial inner-membrane structures that concentrate respiratory chain complexes and hence regulate ATP production. Mechanisms controlling crista morphogenesis are poorly understood and few crista determinants have been identified. Among them are the Mitofilins that are required to establish crista junctions and ATP-synthase subunits that bend the membrane at the tips of the cristae. We report here the phenotypic consequences associated with the in vivo inactivation of the inner-membrane protein Pantagruelian Mitochondrion I (PMI) both at the scale of the whole organism, and at the level of mitochondrial ultrastructure and function. We show that flies in which PMI is genetically inactivated experience synaptic defects and have a reduced life span. Electron microscopy analysis of the inner-membrane morphology demonstrates that loss of PMI function increases the average length of mitochondrial cristae in embryonic cells. This phenotype is exacerbated in adult neurons in which cristae form a dense tangle of elongated membranes. Conversely, we show that PMI overexpression is sufficient to reduce crista length in vivo. Finally, these crista defects are associated with impaired respiratory chain activity and increases in the level of reactive oxygen species. Since PMI and its human orthologue TMEM11 are regulators of mitochondrial morphology, our data suggest that, by controlling crista length, PMI influences mitochondrial diameter and tubular shape.

  12. Mitochondrial biogenesis of astrocytes is increased under experimental septic conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yang; Chen Zhijiang; Zhang Yu; Fang Suzhen; Zeng Qiyi

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported to be one of the contributing factors of sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE).Mitochondrial biogenesis controls mitochondrial homeostasis and responds to changes in cellular energy demand.In addition,it is enhanced or decreased due to mitochondrial dysfunction during SAE.The aim of this study was to explore the changes of mitochondrial biogenesis of astrocytes under septic conditions.Methods Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 ng/ml) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ; 200 U/ml) were incubated with astrocytes to model the effects of a septic insult on astrocytes in vitro.The mitochondrial ultrastructure and volume density were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy.Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were detected by the firefly luciferase system.The expression of protein markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and the binding ability of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were determined by western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assays,respectively.The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results The number of mildly damaged mitochondria was found to be significantly greater after treatment for 6 hours,as compared with at 0 hour (P<0.05).The mitochondrial volume density was significantly elevated at 24 hours,as compared with at 0 hour (P<0.05).The ATP levels at 6 hours,12 hours,and 24 hours were significantly greater than those at 0 hour (P<0.05).The protein markers of mitochondrial biogenesis were significantly increased at 6 hours and 12 hours,as compared with at 0 hour (P<0.05).The TFAM binding activity was not significantly changed among the four time points analyzed.The mtDNA contents were significantly increased at 12 hours and 24 hours,as compared with at 0 hour (P<0.05).Conclusions Under septic conditions,mitochonddal biogenesis of astrocytes increased to meet the high-energy demand and to promote mitochondrial recovery

  13. Staphylococcus aureus sepsis induces early renal mitochondrial DNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel R Bartz

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI contributes to the high morbidity and mortality of multi-system organ failure in sepsis. However, recovery of renal function after sepsis-induced AKI suggests active repair of energy-producing pathways. Here, we tested the hypothesis in mice that Staphyloccocus aureus sepsis damages mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA in the kidney and activates mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis. Sepsis was induced in wild-type C57Bl/6J and Cox-8 Gfp-tagged mitochondrial-reporter mice via intraperitoneal fibrin clots embedded with S. aureus. Kidneys from surviving mice were harvested at time zero (control, 24, or 48 hours after infection and evaluated for renal inflammation, oxidative stress markers, mtDNA content, and mitochondrial biogenesis markers, and OGG1 and UDG mitochondrial DNA repair enzymes. We examined the kidneys of the mitochondrial reporter mice for changes in staining density and distribution. S. aureus sepsis induced sharp amplification of renal Tnf, Il-10, and Ngal mRNAs with decreased renal mtDNA content and increased tubular and glomerular cell death and accumulation of protein carbonyls and 8-OHdG. Subsequently, mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis was evidenced by elevated OGG1 levels and significant increases in NRF-1, NRF-2, and mtTFA expression. Overall, renal mitochondrial mass, tracked by citrate synthase mRNA and protein, increased in parallel with changes in mitochondrial GFP-fluorescence especially in proximal tubules in the renal cortex and medulla. Sub-lethal S. aureus sepsis thus induces widespread renal mitochondrial damage that triggers the induction of the renal mtDNA repair protein, OGG1, and mitochondrial biogenesis as a conspicuous resolution mechanism after systemic bacterial infection.

  14. Coordination of plant mitochondrial biogenesis: keeping pace with cellular requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina eWelchen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant mitochondria are complex organelles that carry out numerous metabolic processes related with the generation of energy for cellular functions and the synthesis and degradation of several compounds. Mitochondria are semiautonomous and dynamic organelles changing in shape, number and composition depending on tissue or developmental stage. The biogenesis of functional mitochondria requires the coordination of genes present both in the nucleus and the organelle. In addition, due to their central role, all processes held inside mitochondria must be finely coordinated with those in other organelles according to cellular demands. Coordination is achieved by transcriptional control of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins by specific transcription factors that recognize conserved elements in their promoter regions. In turn, the expression of most of these transcription factors is linked to developmental and environmental cues, according to the availability of nutrients, light-dark cycles and warning signals generated in response to stress conditions. Among the signals impacting in the expression of nuclear genes, retrograde signals that originate inside mitochondria help to adjust mitochondrial biogenesis to organelle demands. Adding more complexity, several nuclear encoded proteins are dual localized to mitochondria and either chloroplasts or the nucleus. Dual targeting might establish a crosstalk between the nucleus and cell organelles to ensure a fine coordination of cellular activities. In this article, we discuss how the different levels of coordination of mitochondrial biogenesis interconnect to optimize the function of the organelle according to both internal and external demands.

  15. Etoposide Induces ATM-Dependent Mitochondrial Biogenesis through AMPK Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yi Lisa; Liu, Leroy F.; Qi, Haiyan

    2008-01-01

    Background DNA damage such as double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) has been reported to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. The major player in response to DSBs is ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated). Upon sensing DSBs, ATM is activated through autophosphorylation and phosphorylates a number of substrates for DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. ATM has been reported to phosphorylate the α subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which senses AMP/ATP ratio in cells, and can be activated by upstream kinases. Here we provide evidence for a novel role of ATM in mitochondrial biogenesis through AMPK activation in response to etoposide-induced DNA damage. Methodology/Principal Findings Three pairs of human ATM+ and ATM- cells were employed. Cells treated with etoposide exhibited an ATM-dependent increase in mitochondrial mass as measured by 10-N-Nonyl-Acridine Orange and MitoTracker Green FM staining, as well as an increase in mitochondrial DNA content. In addition, the expression of several known mitochondrial biogenesis regulators such as the major mitochondrial transcription factor NRF-1, PGC-1α and TFAM was also elevated in response to etoposide treatment as monitored by RT-PCR. Three pieces of evidence suggest that etoposide-induced mitochondrial biogenesis is due to ATM-dependent activation of AMPK. First, etoposide induced ATM-dependent phosphorylation of AMPK α subunit at Thr172, indicative of AMPK activation. Second, inhibition of AMPK blocked etoposide-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Third, activation of AMPK by AICAR (an AMP analogue) stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in an ATM-dependent manner, suggesting that ATM may be an upstream kinase of AMPK in the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that activation of ATM by etoposide can lead to mitochondrial biogenesis through AMPK activation. We propose that ATM-dependent mitochondrial

  16. Etoposide induces ATM-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis through AMPK activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Fu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA damage such as double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs has been reported to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. The major player in response to DSBs is ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated. Upon sensing DSBs, ATM is activated through autophosphorylation and phosphorylates a number of substrates for DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. ATM has been reported to phosphorylate the alpha subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, which senses AMP/ATP ratio in cells, and can be activated by upstream kinases. Here we provide evidence for a novel role of ATM in mitochondrial biogenesis through AMPK activation in response to etoposide-induced DNA damage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three pairs of human ATM+ and ATM- cells were employed. Cells treated with etoposide exhibited an ATM-dependent increase in mitochondrial mass as measured by 10-N-Nonyl-Acridine Orange and MitoTracker Green FM staining, as well as an increase in mitochondrial DNA content. In addition, the expression of several known mitochondrial biogenesis regulators such as the major mitochondrial transcription factor NRF-1, PGC-1alpha and TFAM was also elevated in response to etoposide treatment as monitored by RT-PCR. Three pieces of evidence suggest that etoposide-induced mitochondrial biogenesis is due to ATM-dependent activation of AMPK. First, etoposide induced ATM-dependent phosphorylation of AMPK alpha subunit at Thr172, indicative of AMPK activation. Second, inhibition of AMPK blocked etoposide-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Third, activation of AMPK by AICAR (an AMP analogue stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in an ATM-dependent manner, suggesting that ATM may be an upstream kinase of AMPK in the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that activation of ATM by etoposide can lead to mitochondrial biogenesis through AMPK activation. We propose that ATM

  17. The effect of ethidium bromide and chloramphenicol on mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Li-Pin; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Wolvetang, Ernst

    2012-05-15

    The expression of mitochondrial components is controlled by an intricate interplay between nuclear transcription factors and retrograde signaling from mitochondria. The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mtDNA-encoded proteins in mitochondrial biogenesis is, however, poorly understood and thus far has mainly been studied in transformed cell lines. We treated primary human fibroblasts with ethidium bromide (EtBr) or chloramphenicol for six weeks to inhibit mtDNA replication or mitochondrial protein synthesis, respectively, and investigated how the cells recovered from these insults two weeks after removal of the drugs. Although cellular growth and mitochondrial gene expression were severely impaired after both inhibitor treatments we observed marked differences in mitochondrial structure,membrane potential, glycolysis, gene expression, and redox status between fibroblasts treated with EtBr and chloramphenicol. Following removal of the drugs we further detected clear differences in expression of both mtDNA-encoded genes and nuclear transcription factors that control mitochondrial biogenesis, suggesting that the cells possess different compensatory mechanisms to recover from drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Our data reveal new aspects of the interplay between mitochondrial retrograde signaling and the expression of nuclear regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, a process with direct relevance to mitochondrial diseases and chloramphenicol toxicity in humans.

  18. The effect of ethidium bromide and chloramphenicol on mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Li-Pin; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Wolvetang, Ernst, E-mail: e.wolvetang@uq.edu.au

    2012-05-15

    The expression of mitochondrial components is controlled by an intricate interplay between nuclear transcription factors and retrograde signaling from mitochondria. The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mtDNA-encoded proteins in mitochondrial biogenesis is, however, poorly understood and thus far has mainly been studied in transformed cell lines. We treated primary human fibroblasts with ethidium bromide (EtBr) or chloramphenicol for six weeks to inhibit mtDNA replication or mitochondrial protein synthesis, respectively, and investigated how the cells recovered from these insults two weeks after removal of the drugs. Although cellular growth and mitochondrial gene expression were severely impaired after both inhibitor treatments we observed marked differences in mitochondrial structure, membrane potential, glycolysis, gene expression, and redox status between fibroblasts treated with EtBr and chloramphenicol. Following removal of the drugs we further detected clear differences in expression of both mtDNA-encoded genes and nuclear transcription factors that control mitochondrial biogenesis, suggesting that the cells possess different compensatory mechanisms to recover from drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Our data reveal new aspects of the interplay between mitochondrial retrograde signaling and the expression of nuclear regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, a process with direct relevance to mitochondrial diseases and chloramphenicol toxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► Cells respond to certain environmental toxins by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis. ► We investigated the effect of Chloramphenicol and EtBr in primary human fibroblasts. ► Inhibiting mitochondrial protein synthesis or DNA replication elicit different effects. ► We provide novel insights into the cellular responses toxins and antibiotics.

  19. Mitochondrial nutrients stimulate performance and mitochondrial biogenesis in exhaustively exercised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M; Qian, F; Shen, W; Tian, C; Hao, J; Sun, L; Liu, J

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a combination of nutrients on physical performance, oxidative stress and mitochondrial biogenesis in rats subjected to exhaustive exercise. Rats were divided into sedentary control (SC), exhaustive exercise (EC) and exhaustive exercise with nutrient supplementation (EN). The nutrients include (mg/kg/day): R-α-lipoic acid 50, acetyl-L-carnitine 100, biotin 0.1, nicotinamide 15, riboflavin 6, pyridoxine 6, creatine 50, CoQ10 5, resveratrol 5 and taurine 100. Examination of running distances over the 4-week period revealed that EN rats ran significantly longer throughout the entire duration of the exhaustive exercise period compared with the EC rats. Nutrient supplementation significantly inhibited the increase in activities of alanine transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase, reversed increases in malondialdehyde, inhibited decreases in glutathione S-transferase and total antioxidant capacity in plasma, and suppressed the elevation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in splenic lymphocytes. Nutrient supplementation increased the protein expression of mitochondrial complexes I, II and III, mtDNA number and transcription factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and fusion in skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that mitochondrial nutrient supplementation can reduce exhaustive exercise-induced oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction, thus leading to enhancement of physical performance and of fatigue recovery.

  20. Calorie restriction increases muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in healthy humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony E Civitarese

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction without malnutrition extends life span in a range of organisms including insects and mammals and lowers free radical production by the mitochondria. However, the mechanism responsible for this adaptation are poorly understood.The current study was undertaken to examine muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics in response to caloric restriction alone or in combination with exercise in 36 young (36.8 +/- 1.0 y, overweight (body mass index, 27.8 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2 individuals randomized into one of three groups for a 6-mo intervention: Control, 100% of energy requirements; CR, 25% caloric restriction; and CREX, caloric restriction with exercise (CREX, 12.5% CR + 12.5% increased energy expenditure (EE. In the controls, 24-h EE was unchanged, but in CR and CREX it was significantly reduced from baseline even after adjustment for the loss of metabolic mass (CR, -135 +/- 42 kcal/d, p = 0.002 and CREX, -117 +/- 52 kcal/d, p = 0.008. Participants in the CR and CREX groups had increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial function such as PPARGC1A, TFAM, eNOS, SIRT1, and PARL (all, p < 0.05. In parallel, mitochondrial DNA content increased by 35% +/- 5% in the CR group (p = 0.005 and 21% +/- 4% in the CREX group (p < 0.004, with no change in the control group (2% +/- 2%. However, the activity of key mitochondrial enzymes of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle (citrate synthase, beta-oxidation (beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and electron transport chain (cytochrome C oxidase II was unchanged. DNA damage was reduced from baseline in the CR (-0.56 +/- 0.11 arbitrary units, p = 0.003 and CREX (-0.45 +/- 0.12 arbitrary units, p = 0.011, but not in the controls. In primary cultures of human myotubes, a nitric oxide donor (mimicking eNOS signaling induced mitochondrial biogenesis but failed to induce SIRT1 protein expression, suggesting that additional factors may regulate SIRT1 content during CR.The observed increase in

  1. A new live-cell reporter strategy to simultaneously monitor mitochondrial biogenesis and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodneland Nilsson, Linn Iren; Nitschke Pettersen, Ina Katrine; Nikolaisen, Julie; Micklem, David; Avsnes Dale, Hege; Vatne Røsland, Gro; Lorens, James; Tronstad, Karl Johan

    2015-11-24

    Changes in mitochondrial amount and shape are intimately linked to maintenance of cell homeostasis via adaptation of vital functions. Here, we developed a new live-cell reporter strategy to simultaneously monitor mitochondrial biogenesis and morphology. This was achieved by making a genetic reporter construct where a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), controls expression of mitochondria targeted green fluorescent protein (mitoGFP). HeLa cells with the reporter construct demonstrated inducible expression of mitoGFP upon activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) with AICAR. We established stable reporter cells where the mitoGFP reporter activity corresponded with mitochondrial biogenesis both in magnitude and kinetics, as confirmed by biochemical markers and confocal microscopy. Quantitative 3D image analysis confirmed accordant increase in mitochondrial biomass, in addition to filament/network promoting and protecting effects on mitochondrial morphology, after treatment with AICAR. The level of mitoGFP reversed upon removal of AICAR, in parallel with decrease in mtDNA. In summary, we here present a new GFP-based genetic reporter strategy to study mitochondrial regulation and dynamics in living cells. This combinatorial reporter concept can readily be transferred to other cell models and contexts to address specific physiological mechanisms.

  2. Melatonin enhances mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rats with carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Woo; Hong, Jeong-Min; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-05-01

    Liver fibrosis leads to liver cirrhosis and failure, and no effective treatment is currently available. Growing evidence supports a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and liver fibrogenesis and mitochondrial quality control-based therapy has emerged as a new therapeutic target. We investigated the protective mechanisms of melatonin against mitochondrial dysfunction-involved liver fibrosis, focusing on mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis. Rats were treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) dissolved in olive oil (0.5 mL/kg, twice a week, i.p.) for 8 wk. Melatonin was administered orally at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg once a day. Chronic CCl4 exposure induced collagen deposition, hepatocellular damage, and oxidative stress, and melatonin attenuated these increases. Increases in mRNA and protein expression levels of transforming growth factor β1 and α-smooth muscle actin in response to CCl4 were attenuated by melatonin. Melatonin attenuated hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, such as mitochondrial swelling and glutamate dehydrogenase release. Chronic CCl4 exposure impaired mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis, and melatonin attenuated this impairment, as indicated by increases in mitochondrial DNA and in protein levels of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1); Parkin; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α); nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1); and transcription factor A, mitochondrial (TFAM). CCl4-mediated decreases in mitochondrial fission- and fusion-related proteins, such as dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) and mitofusin 2, were also attenuated by melatonin. Moreover, melatonin induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. These results suggest that melatonin protects against liver fibrosis via upregulation of mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis, and may be useful as an anti-fibrotic treatment.

  3. Etoposide Induces ATM-Dependent Mitochondrial Biogenesis through AMPK Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Xuan Fu; Shan Wan; Yi Lisa Lyu; Liu, Leroy F.; Haiyan Qi

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: DNA damage such as double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) has been reported to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. The major player in response to DSBs is ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated). Upon sensing DSBs, ATM is activated through autophosphorylation and phosphorylates a number of substrates for DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. ATM has been reported to phosphorylate the alpha subunit of AMP-activated protein k...

  4. Efficient mitochondrial biogenesis drives incomplete penetrance in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Carla; Iommarini, Luisa; Giordano, Luca; Maresca, Alessandra; Pisano, Annalinda; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Caporali, Leonardo; Liguori, Rocco; Deceglie, Stefania; Roberti, Marina; Fanelli, Francesca; Fracasso, Flavio; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; D'Adamo, Pio; Hudson, Gavin; Pyle, Angela; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Chinnery, Patrick F; Zeviani, Massimo; Salomao, Solange R; Berezovsky, Adriana; Belfort, Rubens; Ventura, Dora Fix; Moraes, Milton; Moraes Filho, Milton; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Federico; De Negri, Annamaria; Sadun, Alfredo A; Tancredi, Andrea; Mancini, Massimiliano; d'Amati, Giulia; Loguercio Polosa, Paola; Cantatore, Palmiro; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited blinding disease caused as a result of homoplasmic point mutations in complex I subunit genes of mitochondrial DNA. It is characterized by incomplete penetrance, as only some mutation carriers become affected. Thus, the mitochondrial DNA mutation is necessary but not sufficient to cause optic neuropathy. Environmental triggers and genetic modifying factors have been considered to explain its variable penetrance. We measured the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass indicators in blood cells from affected and carrier individuals, screening three large pedigrees and 39 independently collected smaller families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, as well as muscle biopsies and cells isolated by laser capturing from post-mortem specimens of retina and optic nerves, the latter being the disease targets. We show that unaffected mutation carriers have a significantly higher mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass compared with their affected relatives and control individuals. Comparative studies of fibroblasts from affected, carriers and controls, under different paradigms of metabolic demand, show that carriers display the highest capacity for activating mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore we postulate that the increased mitochondrial biogenesis in carriers may overcome some of the pathogenic effect of mitochondrial DNA mutations. Screening of a few selected genetic variants in candidate genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis failed to reveal any significant association. Our study provides a valuable mechanism to explain variability of penetrance in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and clues for high throughput genetic screening to identify the nuclear modifying gene(s), opening an avenue to develop predictive genetic tests on disease risk and therapeutic strategies.

  5. Does calorie restriction induce mitochondrial biogenesis? A reevaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Chad R.; Han, Dong-Ho; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Kim, Sang Hyun; Holloszy, John O.

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that 30% calorie restriction (CR) for 3 mo results in large increases in mitochondrial biogenesis in heart, brain, liver, and adipose tissue, with concomitant increases in respiration and ATP synthesis. We found these results surprising, and performed this study to determine whether 30% CR does induce an increase in mitochondria in heart, brain, liver, adipose tissue, and/or skeletal muscle. To this end, we measured the levels of a range of mitochondrial proteins, and mRNAs. With the exception of long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase protein level, which was increased ∼60% in adipose tissue, none of the mitochondrial proteins or mRNAs that we measured were increased in rats subjected to 30% CR for 14 wk. There was also no increase in citrate synthase activity. Because it is not possible to have an increase in mitochondria without any increase in key mitochondrial proteins, we conclude that 30% CR does not induce an increase in mitochondria in heart, brain, liver, adipose tissue, or skeletal muscle in laboratory rodents.—Hancock, C. R., Han, D.-H., Higashida, K., Kim, S. H., Holloszy, J. O. Does calorie restriction induce mitochondrial biogenesis? A reevaluation. PMID:21048043

  6. Computationally driven, quantitative experiments discover genes required for mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Hess

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are central to many cellular processes including respiration, ion homeostasis, and apoptosis. Using computational predictions combined with traditional quantitative experiments, we have identified 100 proteins whose deficiency alters mitochondrial biogenesis and inheritance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, we used computational predictions to perform targeted double-mutant analysis detecting another nine genes with synthetic defects in mitochondrial biogenesis. This represents an increase of about 25% over previously known participants. Nearly half of these newly characterized proteins are conserved in mammals, including several orthologs known to be involved in human disease. Mutations in many of these genes demonstrate statistically significant mitochondrial transmission phenotypes more subtle than could be detected by traditional genetic screens or high-throughput techniques, and 47 have not been previously localized to mitochondria. We further characterized a subset of these genes using growth profiling and dual immunofluorescence, which identified genes specifically required for aerobic respiration and an uncharacterized cytoplasmic protein required for normal mitochondrial motility. Our results demonstrate that by leveraging computational analysis to direct quantitative experimental assays, we have characterized mutants with subtle mitochondrial defects whose phenotypes were undetected by high-throughput methods.

  7. Biogenesis of the mitochondrial phosphate carrier

    OpenAIRE

    Zara, Vincenzo; Rassow, Joachim; Wachter, Elmar; Tropschug, Maximilian; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Neupert, Walter; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    1991-01-01

    The mitochondrial phosphate carrier (PiC) is a member of the family of inner-membrane carrier proteins which are generally synthesized without a cleavable presequence. Surprisingly, the cDNA sequences of bovine and rat PiC suggested the existence of an amino-terminal extension sequence in the precursor of PiC. By expressing PiC in vitro, we found that PiC is indeed synthesized as a larger precursor. This precursor was imported and proteolytically processed by mitochondria, whereby the correct...

  8. Leucine Modulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and SIRT1-AMPK Signaling in C2C12 Myotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunzi Liang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies from this laboratory demonstrate that dietary leucine protects against high fat diet-induced mitochondrial impairments and stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis and energy partitioning from adipocytes to muscle cells through SIRT1-mediated mechanisms. Moreover, β-hydroxy-β-methyl butyrate (HMB, a metabolite of leucine, has been reported to activate AMPK synergistically with resveratrol in C2C12 myotubes. Therefore, we hypothesize that leucine-induced activation of SIRT1 and AMPK is the central event that links the upregulated mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. Thus, C2C12 myotubes were treated with leucine (0.5 mM, alanine (0.5 mM, valine (0.5 mM, EX527 (SIRT1 inhibitor, 25 μM, and Compound C (AMPK inhibitor, 25 μM alone or in combination to determine the roles of AMPK and SIRT1 in leucine-modulation of energy metabolism. Leucine significantly increased mitochondrial content, mitochondrial biogenesis-related genes expression, fatty acid oxidation, SIRT1 activity and gene expression, and AMPK phosphorylation in C2C12 myotubes compared to the controls, while EX527 and Compound C markedly attenuated these effects. Furthermore, leucine treatment for 24 hours resulted in time-dependent increases in cellular NAD+, SIRT1 activity, and p-AMPK level, with SIRT1 activation preceding that of AMPK, indicating that leucine activation of SIRT1, rather than AMPK, is the primary event.

  9. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Saurabh [Experimental Biology Division, Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi, 110054 (India); Shukla, Dhananjay [Department of Biotechnology, Gitam University, Gandhi Nagar, Rushikonda, Visakhapatnam-530 045 Andhra Pradesh (India); Bansal, Anju, E-mail: anjubansaldipas@gmail.com [Experimental Biology Division, Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi, 110054 (India)

    2012-11-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning. -- Highlights: ► We supplemented rats with CoCl{sub 2} for 15 days along with training. ► Co

  10. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling and calorie restriction increase fasting eNOS, akt and mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M Cerqueira

    Full Text Available Enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis promoted by eNOS activation is believed to play a central role in the beneficial effects of calorie restriction (CR. Since treatment of mice with dinitrophenol (DNP promotes health and lifespan benefits similar to those observed in CR, we hypothesized that it could also impact biogenesis. We found that DNP and CR increase citrate synthase activity, PGC-1α, cytochrome c oxidase and mitofusin-2 expression, as well as fasting plasma levels of NO• products. In addition, eNOS and Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle and visceral adipose tissue was activated in fasting CR and DNP animals. Overall, our results indicate that systemic mild uncoupling activates eNOS and Akt-dependent pathways leading to mitochondrial biogenesis.

  11. Mitochondrial biogenesis in the pulmonary vasculature during inhalation lung injury and fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell survival and injury repair is facilitated by mitochondrial biogenesis; however, the role of this process in lung repair is unknown. We evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis in the mouse lung in two injuries that cause acute inflammation and in two that cause chronic inflammatio...

  12. Chitooligosaccharide induces mitochondrial biogenesis and increases exercise endurance through the activation of Sirt1 and AMPK in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Woo Jeong

    Full Text Available By catabolizing glucose and lipids, mitochondria produce ATPs to meet energy demands. When the number and activity of mitochondria are not sufficient, the human body becomes easily fatigued due to the lack of ATP, thus the control of the quantity and function of mitochondria is important to optimize energy balance. By increasing mitochondrial capacity? it may be possible to enhance energy metabolism and improve exercise endurance. Here, through the screening of various functional food ingredients, we found that chitooligosaccharide (COS is an effective inducer of mitochondrial biogenesis. In rodents, COS increased the mitochondrial content in skeletal muscle and enhanced exercise endurance. In cultured myocytes, the expression of major regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis and key components of mitochondrial electron transfer chain was increased upon COS treatment. COS-mediated induction of mitochondrial biogenesis was achieved in part by the activation of silent information regulator two ortholog 1 (Sirt1 and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. Taken together, our data suggest that COS could act as an exercise mimetic by inducing mitochondrial biogenesis and enhancing exercise endurance through the activation of Sirt1 and AMPK.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA copy numbers in pyramidal neurons are decreased and mitochondrial biogenesis transcriptome signaling is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease hippocampi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Ann C; Keeney, Paula M; Algarzae, Norah K; Ladd, Amy C; Thomas, Ravindar R; Bennett, James P

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of adult-onset dementia and is characterized in its pre-diagnostic stage by reduced cerebral cortical glucose metabolism and in later stages by reduced cortical oxygen uptake, implying reduced mitochondrial respiration. Using quantitative PCR we determined the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene copy numbers from multiple groups of 15 or 20 pyramidal neurons, GFAP(+) astrocytes and dentate granule neurons isolated using laser capture microdissection, and the relative expression of mitochondrial biogenesis (mitobiogenesis) genes in hippocampi from 10 AD and 9 control (CTL) cases. AD pyramidal but not dentate granule neurons had significantly reduced mtDNA copy numbers compared to CTL neurons. Pyramidal neuron mtDNA copy numbers in CTL, but not AD, positively correlated with cDNA levels of multiple mitobiogenesis genes. In CTL, but not in AD, hippocampal cDNA levels of PGC1α were positively correlated with multiple downstream mitobiogenesis factors. Mitochondrial DNA copy numbers in pyramidal neurons did not correlate with hippocampal Aβ1-42 levels. After 48 h exposure of H9 human neural stem cells to the neurotoxic fragment Aβ25-35, mtDNA copy numbers were not significantly altered. In summary, AD postmortem hippocampal pyramidal neurons have reduced mtDNA copy numbers. Mitochondrial biogenesis pathway signaling relationships are disrupted in AD, but are mostly preserved in CTL. Our findings implicate complex alterations of mitochondria-host cell relationships in AD.

  14. Repositioning of antibiotic levofloxacin as a mitochondrial biogenesis inhibitor to target breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Min [Galactophore Department, JingZhou Central Hospital, JingZhou (China); Li, Ruishu, E-mail: liruishu2016@yahoo.com [Forensic Surgery Department, JingZhou Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, JingZhou (China); Zhang, Juan [Endocrinology Department, JingZhou Central Hospital, JingZhou (China)

    2016-03-18

    Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis has become a potential therapeutic strategy in cancer due to their unique metabolic dependencies. In this study, we show that levofloxacin, a FDA-approved antibiotic, is an attractive candidate for breast cancer treatment. This is achieved by the inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in a panel of breast cancer cell lines while sparing normal breast cells. It also acts synergistically with conventional chemo drug in two independent in vivo breast xenograft mouse models. Importantly, levofloxacin inhibits mitochondrial biogenesis as shown by the decreased level of mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential and ATP. In addition, the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of levofloxacin are reversed by acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR, a mitochondrial fuel), confirming that levofloxacin's action in breast cancer cells is through inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis. A consequence of mitochondrial biogenesis inhibition by levofloxacin in breast cancer cells is the deactivation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/ERK pathways. We further demonstrate that breast cancer cells have increased mitochondrial biogenesis than normal breast cells, and this explains their different sensitivity to levofloxacin. Our work suggest that levofloxacin is a useful addition to breast cancer treatment. Our work also establish the essential role of mitochondrial biogenesis on the activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/ERK pathways in breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Levofloxacin targets a panel of breast cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. • Levofloxacin acts synergistically with 5-Fluorouracil in breast cancer. • Levofloxacin targets breast cancer cells via inhibiting mitochondrial biogenesis. • Breast cancer cells have increased mitochondrial biogenesis than normal cells. • Mitochondrial biogenesis inhibition lead to deactivation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA deletion and impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis are mediated by reactive oxygen species in ionizing radiation-induced premature senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee [Radiation Biotechnology Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Sang [College of Natural Sciences, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion is a well-known marker for oxidative stress and aging, and contributes to harmful effects in cultured cells and animal tissues. mtDNA biogenesis genes (NRF-1, TFAM) are essential for the maintenance of mtDNA, as well as the transcription and replication of mitochondrial genomes. Considering that oxidative stress is known to affect mitochondrial biogenesis, we hypothesized that ionizing radiation (IR)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes mtDNA deletion by modulating the mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby leading to cellular senescence. Therefore, we examined the effects of IR on ROS levels, cellular senescence, mitochondrial biogenesis, and mtDNA deletion in IMR-90 human lung fibroblast cells. Young IMR-90 cells at population doubling (PD) 39 were irradiated at 4 or 8 Gy. Old cells at PD55, and H2O2-treated young cells at PD 39, were compared as a positive control. The IR increased the intracellular ROS level, senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) activity, and mtDNA common deletion (4977 bp), and it decreased the mRNA expression of NRF-1 and TFAM in IMR-90 cells. Similar results were also observed in old cells (PD 55) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated young cells. To confirm that a increase in ROS level is essential for mtDNA deletion and changes of mitochondrial biogenesis in irradiated cells, the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) were examined. In irradiated and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated cells, 5 mM NAC significantly attenuated the increases of ROS, mtDNA deletion, and SA-{beta}-gal activity, and recovered from decreased expressions of NRF-1 and TFAM mRNA. These results suggest that ROS is a key cause of IR-induced mtDNA deletion, and the suppression of the mitochondrial biogenesis gene may mediate this process.

  16. Aluminium induced oxidative stress results in decreased mitochondrial biogenesis via modulation of PGC-1α expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Kandimalla, Ramesh J L; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2013-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the effects of aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream targets i.e. Nuclear respiratory factor-1(NRF-1), Nuclear respiratory factor-2(NRF-2) and Mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10mg/kgb.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of exposure, we found an increase in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and decrease in citrate synthase activity in the Hippocampus (HC) and Corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits-NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits i.e. ND1, ND2, ND3, Cytochrome b (Cytb), Cytochrome oxidase (COX) subunits i.e. COX1, COX3, ATP synthase (ATPase) subunit 6 along with reduced expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A, COX5B of Electron transport chain (ETC). Besides, a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was down-regulated in aluminium treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α in aluminium treated rats. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant increase in the mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae, chromatin condensation and decreases in mitochondrial number in case of aluminium treated rats as compared to control. So, PGC-1α seems to be a potent target for aluminium neurotoxicity, which makes it an almost ideal target to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in neurodegenerative diseases. © 2013.

  17. Resveratrol Induces Hepatic Mitochondrial Biogenesis Through the Sequential Activation of Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide Production

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seul-Ki; Joe, Yeonsoo; Min ZHENG; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Yu, Jae-Kyoung; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Chang, Ki Churl; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin; Ryter, Stefan W.; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Nitric oxide (NO) can induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cultured cells, through increased guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP), and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). We sought to determine the role of NO, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and its reaction product (carbon monoxide [CO]) in the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis by the natural antioxidant resveratrol. Results: S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), an NO donor, induced ...

  18. Mitochondrial DNA deletion and impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis by reactive oxygen species in ionizing radiation-induced premature senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an increase of ROS level in cellular senescence induced by IR could mediate mtDNA deletion via impairment of mitochondria biogenesis in IMR-90 human lung fibroblast cells. Our results showed that IR induced cellular senescence, intracellular ROS, and mtDNA deletion, and in particular, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes (NRF-1, TFAM). Furthermore, these IR-induced events were abolished using a potent antioxidant, NAC, which suggests that ROS is a key cause of mtDNA deletion in IR-induced cellular senescence, and that the alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis may mediate these processes

  19. MicroRNA-761 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse skeletal muscle in response to exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yanli [Affiliated Hospital of Hebei Engineering University, Handan, 056002, Hebei (China); Zhao, Chaoxian; Sun, Xuewen [Medical College of Hebei Engineering University, Handan, 056002, Hebei (China); Liu, Zhijun, E-mail: liuzhij1207@163.com [Affiliated Hospital of Hebei Engineering University, Handan, 056002, Hebei (China); Zhang, Jianzhong, E-mail: zhangjianzhong@icdc.cn [National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention (ICDC), Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC), Beijing, 102206 (China)

    2015-11-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to play critical roles in skeletal muscle in response to exercise. Previous study has shown that miR-761 was involved in a novel model regulating the mitochondrial network. However, its role in mitochondrial biogenesis remains poorly understood. Therefore, the current study was aimed to examine the effect of miR-761 on mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that aberrantly expressed miR-761 is involved in exercise activity and miR-761 is decreased by exercise training compared with the sedentary control mice. miR-761 suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis of C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myocytes by targeting the 3′-UTR of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) coactivator-1 (PGC-1α). Overexpression of miR-761 was capable of inhibiting the protein expression levels of PGC-1α. Moreover, miR-761 overexpression suppressed the p38 MAPK signaling pathway and down-regulated the expression of phosphorylated MAPK-activated protein kinase-2 (P-MK2), a downstream kinase of p38 MAPK. The phosphorylation of activating transcription factors 2 (ATF2) that plays a functional role in linking the activation of the p38 MAPK pathway to enhanced transcription of the PGC-1α was also inhibited by the overexpression of miR-761. These findings revealed a novel regulation mechanism for miR-761 in skeletal myocytes, and contributed to a better understanding of the modulation of skeletal muscle in response to exercise. - Highlights: • Endurance exercise decreases miR-761 expression in skeletal muscle. • MiR-761 suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis in C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myocytes. • MiR-761 directly targeted PGC-1α expression. • MiR-761 suppresses p38 MAPK signaling pathways in C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myocytes. • A novel mechanism for miR-761 in skeletal myocytes is demonstrated.

  20. PGC-1α is dispensable for exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn C Rowe

    Full Text Available Exercise confers numerous health benefits, many of which are thought to stem from exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis (EIMB in skeletal muscle. The transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α, a potent regulator of metabolism in numerous tissues, is widely believed to be required for EIMB. We show here that this is not the case. Mice engineered to lack PGC-1α specifically in skeletal muscle (Myo-PGC-1αKO mice retained intact EIMB. The exercise capacity of these mice was comparable to littermate controls. Induction of metabolic genes after 2 weeks of in-cage voluntary wheel running was intact. Electron microscopy revealed no gross abnormalities in mitochondria, and the mitochondrial biogenic response to endurance exercise was as robust in Myo-PGC-1αKO mice as in wildtype mice. The induction of enzymatic activity of the electron transport chain by exercise was likewise unperturbed in Myo-PGC-1αKO mice. These data demonstrate that PGC-1α is dispensable for exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle, in sharp contrast to the prevalent assumption in the field.

  1. Regular postexercise cooling enhances mitochondrial biogenesis through AMPK and p38 MAPK in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihsan, Mohammed; Markworth, James F; Watson, Greig; Choo, Hui Cheng; Govus, Andrew; Pham, Toan; Hickey, Anthony; Cameron-Smith, David; Abbiss, Chris R

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of regular postexercise cold water immersion (CWI) on muscle aerobic adaptations to endurance training. Eight males performed 3 sessions/wk of endurance training for 4 wk. Following each session, subjects immersed one leg in a cold water bath (10°C; COLD) for 15 min, while the contralateral leg served as a control (CON). Muscle biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis of both CON and COLD legs prior to training and 48 h following the last training session. Samples were analyzed for signaling kinases: p38 MAPK and AMPK, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), enzyme activities indicative of mitochondrial biogenesis, and protein subunits representative of respiratory chain complexes I-V. Following training, subjects' peak oxygen uptake and running velocity were improved by 5.9% and 6.2%, respectively (P 0.8) were noted with changes in protein content of p38 (d = 1.02, P = 0.064), PGC-1α (d = 0.99, P = 0.079), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (d = 0.93, P = 0.10) in COLD compared with CON. No differences between conditions were observed in the representative protein subunits of respiratory complexes II, IV, and V and in the activities of several mitochondrial enzymes (P > 0.05). These findings indicate that regular CWI enhances p38, AMPK, and possibly mitochondrial biogenesis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Mitochondrial biogenesis and fission in axons in cell culture and animal models of diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Andrea M; Edwards, James L; McLean, Lisa L; Hong, Yu; Cerri, Federica; Lopez, Ignazio; Quattrini, Angelo; Feldman, Eva L

    2010-10-01

    Mitochondrial-mediated oxidative stress in response to high glucose is proposed as a primary cause of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neuron injury in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. In the present study, we report a greater number of mitochondria in both myelinated and unmyelinated dorsal root axons in a well-established model of murine diabetic neuropathy. No similar changes were seen in younger diabetic animals without neuropathy or in the ventral motor roots of any diabetic animals. These findings led us to examine mitochondrial biogenesis and fission in response to hyperglycemia in the neurites of cultured DRG neurons. We demonstrate overall mitochondrial biogenesis via increases in mitochondrial transcription factors and increases in mitochondrial DNA in both DRG neurons and axons. However, this process occurs over a longer time period than a rapidly observed increase in the number of mitochondria in DRG neurites that appears to result, at least in part, from mitochondrial fission. We conclude that during acute hyperglycemia, mitochondrial fission is a prominent response, and excessive mitochondrial fission may result in dysregulation of energy production, activation of caspase 3, and subsequent DRG neuron injury. During more prolonged hyperglycemia, there is evidence of compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis in axons. Our data suggest that an imbalance between mitochondrial biogenesis and fission may play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy.

  3. Optimizing intramuscular adaptations to aerobic exercise: effects of carbohydrate restriction and protein supplementation on mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Lee M; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a critical metabolic adaptation to aerobic exercise training that results in enhanced mitochondrial size, content, number, and activity. Recent evidence has shown that dietary manipulation can further enhance mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic exercise training, which may delay skeletal muscle fatigue and enhance exercise performance. Specifically, studies have demonstrated that combining carbohydrate restriction (endogenous and exogenous) with a single bout of aerobic exercise potentiates the beneficial effects of exercise on markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. Additionally, studies have demonstrated that high-quality protein supplementation enhances anabolic skeletal muscle intracellular signaling and mitochondrial protein synthesis following a single bout of aerobic exercise. Mitochondrial biogenesis is stimulated by complex intracellular signaling pathways that appear to be primarily regulated by 5'AMP-activated protein kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediated through proliferator-activated γ receptor co-activator 1 α activation, resulting in increased mitochondrial DNA expression and enhanced skeletal muscle oxidative capacity. However, the mechanisms by which concomitant carbohydrate restriction and dietary protein supplementation modulates mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic exercise training remains unclear. This review summarizes intracellular regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and the effects of carbohydrate restriction and protein supplementation on mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic exercise.

  4. Effects of resveratrol and SIRT1 on PGC-1α activity and mitochondrial biogenesis: a reevaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Kazuhiko; Kim, Sang Hyun; Jung, Su Ryun; Asaka, Meiko; Holloszy, John O; Han, Dong-Ho

    2013-07-01

    It has been reported that feeding mice resveratrol activates AMPK and SIRT1 in skeletal muscle leading to deacetylation and activation of PGC-1α, increased mitochondrial biogenesis, and improved running endurance. This study was done to further evaluate the effects of resveratrol, SIRT1, and PGC-1α deacetylation on mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle. Feeding rats or mice a diet containing 4 g resveratrol/kg diet had no effect on mitochondrial protein levels in muscle. High concentrations of resveratrol lowered ATP concentration and activated AMPK in C₂C₁₂ myotubes, resulting in an increase in mitochondrial proteins. Knockdown of SIRT1, or suppression of SIRT1 activity with a dominant-negative (DN) SIRT1 construct, increased PGC-1α acetylation, PGC-1α coactivator activity, and mitochondrial proteins in C₂C₁₂ cells. Expression of a DN SIRT1 in rat triceps muscle also induced an increase in mitochondrial proteins. Overexpression of SIRT1 decreased PGC-1α acetylation, PGC-1α coactivator activity, and mitochondrial proteins in C₂C₁₂ myotubes. Overexpression of SIRT1 also resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial proteins in rat triceps muscle. We conclude that, contrary to some previous reports, the mechanism by which SIRT1 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis is by inhibiting PGC-1α coactivator activity, resulting in a decrease in mitochondria. We also conclude that feeding rodents resveratrol has no effect on mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle.

  5. Effects of resveratrol and SIRT1 on PGC-1α activity and mitochondrial biogenesis: a reevaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Higashida

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that feeding mice resveratrol activates AMPK and SIRT1 in skeletal muscle leading to deacetylation and activation of PGC-1α, increased mitochondrial biogenesis, and improved running endurance. This study was done to further evaluate the effects of resveratrol, SIRT1, and PGC-1α deacetylation on mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle. Feeding rats or mice a diet containing 4 g resveratrol/kg diet had no effect on mitochondrial protein levels in muscle. High concentrations of resveratrol lowered ATP concentration and activated AMPK in C₂C₁₂ myotubes, resulting in an increase in mitochondrial proteins. Knockdown of SIRT1, or suppression of SIRT1 activity with a dominant-negative (DN SIRT1 construct, increased PGC-1α acetylation, PGC-1α coactivator activity, and mitochondrial proteins in C₂C₁₂ cells. Expression of a DN SIRT1 in rat triceps muscle also induced an increase in mitochondrial proteins. Overexpression of SIRT1 decreased PGC-1α acetylation, PGC-1α coactivator activity, and mitochondrial proteins in C₂C₁₂ myotubes. Overexpression of SIRT1 also resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial proteins in rat triceps muscle. We conclude that, contrary to some previous reports, the mechanism by which SIRT1 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis is by inhibiting PGC-1α coactivator activity, resulting in a decrease in mitochondria. We also conclude that feeding rodents resveratrol has no effect on mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle.

  6. Aluminium induced oxidative stress results in decreased mitochondrial biogenesis via modulation of PGC-1α expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Kandimalla, Ramesh J.L. [Department of Biochemistry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Bal, Amanjit [Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Gill, Kiran Dip, E-mail: kdgill2002@yahoo.co.in [Department of Biochemistry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012 (India)

    2013-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the effects of aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream targets i.e. Nuclear respiratory factor-1(NRF-1), Nuclear respiratory factor-2(NRF-2) and Mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10 mg/kg b.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of exposure, we found an increase in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and decrease in citrate synthase activity in the Hippocampus (HC) and Corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits–NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits i.e. ND1, ND2, ND3, Cytochrome b (Cytb), Cytochrome oxidase (COX) subunits i.e. COX1, COX3, ATP synthase (ATPase) subunit 6 along with reduced expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A, COX5B of Electron transport chain (ETC). Besides, a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was down-regulated in aluminium treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α in aluminium treated rats. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant increase in the mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae, chromatin condensation and decreases in mitochondrial number in case of aluminium treated rats as compared to control. So, PGC-1α seems to be a potent target for aluminium neurotoxicity, which makes it an almost ideal target to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in neurodegenerative diseases. - Highlights: • Aluminium decreases the mRNA levels of mitochondrial and nuclear encoded

  7. Stimulatory Effects of Balanced Deep Sea Water on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Geun Ha

    Full Text Available The worldwide prevalence of metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes, is increasing. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recognized as a core feature of these diseases. Emerging evidence also suggests that defects in mitochondrial biogenesis, number, morphology, fusion, and fission, contribute to the development and progression of metabolic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that balanced deep-sea water (BDSW has potential as a treatment for diabetes and obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism by which BDSW regulates diabetes and obesity by studying its effects on mitochondrial metabolism. To determine whether BDSW regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function, we investigated its effects on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and the expression of transcription factors and mitochondria specific genes, as well as on the phosphorylation of signaling molecules associated with mitochondria biogenesis and its function in C2C12 myotubes. BDSW increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a time and dose-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that BDSW enhances gene expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM for mitochondrial transcription; MFN1/2 and DRP1 for mitochondrial fusion; OPA1 for mitochondrial fission; TOMM40 and TIMM44 for mitochondrial protein import; CPT-1α and MCAD for fatty acid oxidation; CYTC for oxidative phosphorylation. Upregulation of these genes was validated by increased mitochondria staining, CS activity, CytC oxidase activity, NAD+ to NADH ratio, and the phosphorylation of signaling molecules such as AMPK and SIRT1. Moreover, drinking BDSW remarkably improved mtDNA content in the muscles of HFD-induced obese mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the stimulatory effect of BDSW on mitochondrial biogenesis and function may provide further insights into the regulatory mechanism of BDSW-induced anti-diabetic and anti-obesity action.

  8. Hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis hormones stimulate mitochondrial function and biogenesis in human hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidali, Silvia; Knuever, Jana; Lerchner, Johannes; Giesen, Melanie; Bíró, Tamás; Klinger, Matthias; Kofler, Barbara; Funk, Wolfgang; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Paus, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate mitochondrial function. As other hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis hormones, i.e., thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), are expressed in human hair follicles (HFs) and regulate mitochondrial function in human epidermis, we investigated in organ-cultured human scalp HFs whether TRH (30 nM), TSH (10 mU ml(-1)), thyroxine (T4) (100 nM), and triiodothyronine (T3) (100 pM) alter intrafollicular mitochondrial energy metabolism. All HPT-axis members increased gene and protein expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunit 1 of cytochrome c oxidase (MTCO1), a subunit of respiratory chain complex IV, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and Porin. All hormones also stimulated intrafollicular complex I/IV activity and mitochondrial biogenesis. The TSH effects on MTCO1, TFAM, and porin could be abolished by K1-70, a TSH-receptor antagonist, suggesting a TSH receptor-mediated action. Notably, as measured by calorimetry, T3 and TSH increased follicular heat production, whereas T3/T4 and TRH stimulated ATP production in cultured HF keratinocytes. HPT-axis hormones did not increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Rather, T3 and T4 reduced ROS formation, and all tested HPT-axis hormones increased the transcription of ROS scavengers (catalase, superoxide dismutase 2) in HF keratinocytes. Thus, mitochondrial biology, energy metabolism, and redox state of human HFs are subject to profound (neuro-)endocrine regulation by HPT-axis hormones. The neuroendocrine control of mitochondrial biology in a complex human mini-organ revealed here may be therapeutically exploitable.

  9. Curcumin Attenuates Gentamicin-Induced Kidney Mitochondrial Alterations: Possible Role of a Mitochondrial Biogenesis Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Negrette-Guzmán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that curcumin (CUR, a polyphenol derived from Curcuma longa, exerts a protective effect against gentamicin- (GM- induced nephrotoxicity in rats, associated with a preservation of the antioxidant status. Although mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark in the GM-induced renal injury, the role of CUR in mitochondrial protection has not been studied. In this work, LLC-PK1 cells were preincubated 24 h with CUR and then coincubated 48 h with CUR and 8 mM GM. Treatment with CUR attenuated GM-induced drop in cell viability and led to an increase in nuclear factor (erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α cell expression attenuating GM-induced losses in these proteins. In vivo, Wistar rats were injected subcutaneously with GM (75 mg/Kg/12 h during 7 days to develop kidney mitochondrial alterations. CUR (400 mg/Kg/day was administered orally 5 days before and during the GM exposure. The GM-induced mitochondrial alterations in ultrastructure and bioenergetics as well as decrease in activities of respiratory complexes I and IV and induction of calcium-dependent permeability transition were mostly attenuated by CUR. Protection of CUR against GM-induced nephrotoxicity could be in part mediated by maintenance of mitochondrial functions and biogenesis with some participation of the nuclear factor Nrf2.

  10. Curcumin Attenuates Gentamicin-Induced Kidney Mitochondrial Alterations: Possible Role of a Mitochondrial Biogenesis Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Tapia, Edilia; Zazueta, Cecilia; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Aparicio-Trejo, Omar Emiliano; Madero, Magdalena; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that curcumin (CUR), a polyphenol derived from Curcuma longa, exerts a protective effect against gentamicin- (GM-) induced nephrotoxicity in rats, associated with a preservation of the antioxidant status. Although mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark in the GM-induced renal injury, the role of CUR in mitochondrial protection has not been studied. In this work, LLC-PK1 cells were preincubated 24 h with CUR and then coincubated 48 h with CUR and 8 mM GM. Treatment with CUR attenuated GM-induced drop in cell viability and led to an increase in nuclear factor (erythroid-2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear accumulation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) cell expression attenuating GM-induced losses in these proteins. In vivo, Wistar rats were injected subcutaneously with GM (75 mg/Kg/12 h) during 7 days to develop kidney mitochondrial alterations. CUR (400 mg/Kg/day) was administered orally 5 days before and during the GM exposure. The GM-induced mitochondrial alterations in ultrastructure and bioenergetics as well as decrease in activities of respiratory complexes I and IV and induction of calcium-dependent permeability transition were mostly attenuated by CUR. Protection of CUR against GM-induced nephrotoxicity could be in part mediated by maintenance of mitochondrial functions and biogenesis with some participation of the nuclear factor Nrf2.

  11. Effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate on thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissues of diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mak-Soon; Shin, Yoonjin; Jung, Sunyoon; Kim, Yangha

    2017-01-01

    Background: Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major polyphenol in green tea and has been considered a natural agent that can help to reduce the risk of obesity. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of EGCG on thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of diet-induced obese mice. Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were provided a high-fat diet for 8 weeks to induce obesity, following which they were divided into two groups: one on a high-fat control diet and the other on a 0.2% EGCG (w/w)-supplemented high-fat diet for another 8 weeks. Results: The EGCG-supplemented group showed decreased body weight gain, and plasma and liver lipids. EGCG-fed mice exhibited higher body temperature and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in BAT. The messenger RNA levels of genes related to thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis in BAT were increased by EGCG. Moreover, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in BAT was stimulated by EGCG. Conclusions: The results suggest that EGCG may have anti-obesity properties through BAT thermogenesis and mitochondria biogenesis, which are partially associated with the regulation of genes related to thermogenesis and mitochondria biogenesis, and the increase in mtDNA replication and AMPK activation in BAT of diet-induced obese mice.

  12. Directing experimental biology: a case study in mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, Matthew A; Myers, Chad L; Huttenhower, Curtis; Hess, David C; Li, Kai; Caudy, Amy A; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2009-03-01

    Computational approaches have promised to organize collections of functional genomics data into testable predictions of gene and protein involvement in biological processes and pathways. However, few such predictions have been experimentally validated on a large scale, leaving many bioinformatic methods unproven and underutilized in the biology community. Further, it remains unclear what biological concerns should be taken into account when using computational methods to drive real-world experimental efforts. To investigate these concerns and to establish the utility of computational predictions of gene function, we experimentally tested hundreds of predictions generated from an ensemble of three complementary methods for the process of mitochondrial organization and biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The biological data with respect to the mitochondria are presented in a companion manuscript published in PLoS Genetics (doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000407). Here we analyze and explore the results of this study that are broadly applicable for computationalists applying gene function prediction techniques, including a new experimental comparison with 48 genes representing the genomic background. Our study leads to several conclusions that are important to consider when driving laboratory investigations using computational prediction approaches. While most genes in yeast are already known to participate in at least one biological process, we confirm that genes with known functions can still be strong candidates for annotation of additional gene functions. We find that different analysis techniques and different underlying data can both greatly affect the types of functional predictions produced by computational methods. This diversity allows an ensemble of techniques to substantially broaden the biological scope and breadth of predictions. We also find that performing prediction and validation steps iteratively allows us to more completely characterize a biological

  13. Directing experimental biology: a case study in mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Hibbs

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Computational approaches have promised to organize collections of functional genomics data into testable predictions of gene and protein involvement in biological processes and pathways. However, few such predictions have been experimentally validated on a large scale, leaving many bioinformatic methods unproven and underutilized in the biology community. Further, it remains unclear what biological concerns should be taken into account when using computational methods to drive real-world experimental efforts. To investigate these concerns and to establish the utility of computational predictions of gene function, we experimentally tested hundreds of predictions generated from an ensemble of three complementary methods for the process of mitochondrial organization and biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The biological data with respect to the mitochondria are presented in a companion manuscript published in PLoS Genetics (doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000407. Here we analyze and explore the results of this study that are broadly applicable for computationalists applying gene function prediction techniques, including a new experimental comparison with 48 genes representing the genomic background. Our study leads to several conclusions that are important to consider when driving laboratory investigations using computational prediction approaches. While most genes in yeast are already known to participate in at least one biological process, we confirm that genes with known functions can still be strong candidates for annotation of additional gene functions. We find that different analysis techniques and different underlying data can both greatly affect the types of functional predictions produced by computational methods. This diversity allows an ensemble of techniques to substantially broaden the biological scope and breadth of predictions. We also find that performing prediction and validation steps iteratively allows us to more completely

  14. Peroxynitrite induced mitochondrial biogenesis following MnSOD knockdown in normal rat kidney (NRK cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Marine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide is widely regarded as the primary reactive oxygen species (ROS which initiates downstream oxidative stress. Increased oxidative stress contributes, in part, to many disease conditions such as cancer, atherosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion, diabetes, aging, and neurodegeneration. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide into hydrogen peroxide which can then be further detoxified by other antioxidant enzymes. MnSOD is critical in maintaining the normal function of mitochondria, thus its inactivation is thought to lead to compromised mitochondria. Previously, our laboratory observed increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a novel kidney-specific MnSOD knockout mouse. The current study used transient siRNA mediated MnSOD knockdown of normal rat kidney (NRK cells as the in vitro model, and confirmed functional mitochondrial biogenesis evidenced by increased PGC1α expression, mitochondrial DNA copy numbers and integrity, electron transport chain protein CORE II, mitochondrial mass, oxygen consumption rate, and overall ATP production. Further mechanistic studies using mitoquinone (MitoQ, a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant and L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor demonstrated that peroxynitrite (at low micromolar levels induced mitochondrial biogenesis. These findings provide the first evidence that low levels of peroxynitrite can initiate a protective signaling cascade involving mitochondrial biogenesis which may help to restore mitochondrial function following transient MnSOD inactivation.

  15. Chronic Arsenic Exposure-Induced Oxidative Stress is Mediated by Decreased Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Rat Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Chandra; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-09-01

    The present study was executed to study the effect of chronic arsenic exposure on generation of mitochondrial oxidative stress and biogenesis in rat liver. Chronic sodium arsenite treatment (25 ppm for 12 weeks) decreased mitochondrial complexes activity in rat liver. There was a decrease in mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity in arsenic-treated rats that might be responsible for increased protein and lipid oxidation as observed in our study. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits of complexes I (ND1 and ND2) and IV (COX I and COX IV) was downregulated in arsenic-treated rats only. The protein and mRNA expression of MnSOD was reduced suggesting increased mitochondrial oxidative damage after arsenic treatment. There was activation of Bax and caspase-3 followed by release of cytochrome c from mitochondria suggesting induction of apoptotic pathway under oxidative stress. The entire phenomenon was associated with decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis as evident by decreased protein and mRNA expression of nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in arsenic-treated rat liver. The results of the present study indicate that arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis in rat liver that may present one of the mechanisms for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity.

  16. Quercetin protects against aluminium induced oxidative stress and promotes mitochondrial biogenesis via activation of the PGC-1α signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Verma, Deepika; Priyanka, Kumari; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2015-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the protective effect of quercetin administration against aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of PGC-1α and its downstream targets, i.e. NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10mg/kg b.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats, which were pre-treated with quercetin 6h before aluminium (10mg/kg b.wt./day, intragastrically) for 12 weeks. We found a decrease in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and citrate synthase activity in the hippocampus (HC) and corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain treated with quercetin. Besides this an increase in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits - ND1, ND2, ND3, Cyt b, COX1, COX3 and ATPase6 along with increased expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A and COX5B of electron transport chain (ETC). In quercetin treated group an increase in the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both the regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was up regulated in quercetin treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant decrease in the mitochondrial cross-section area, mitochondrial perimeter length and increase in mitochondrial number in case of quercetin treated rats as compared to aluminium treated ones. Therefore it seems quercetin increases mitochondrial biogenesis and makes it an almost ideal flavanoid to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in many neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiac mitochondrial damage and biogenesis in a chronic model of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xia; Zheng, Shirong; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Xu, Ming; Pierce, William M; Klein, Jon B; Epstein, Paul N

    2004-11-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a common complication leading to heightened risk of heart failure and death. In the present report, we performed proteomic analysis on total cardiac proteins from the OVE26 mouse model of type 1 diabetes to identify protein changes that may contribute to diabetic cardiomyopathy. This analysis revealed that a surprising high proportion (12 of 20) of the altered proteins that could be identified by mass spectrometry were of mitochondrial origin. All but one of these proteins were upregulated by diabetes. Quantitative RT-PCR, performed for two of these proteins, indicated that part of the upregulation was attributed to increased messenger RNA levels. Morphological study of diabetic hearts showed significantly increased mitochondrial area and number as well as focal regions with severe damage to mitochondria. Diabetic mitochondria also showed reduced respiratory control ratio (9.63 +/- 0.20 vs. 6.13 +/- 0.41, P factor A and two mitochondrial encoded proteins. Taken together, these results show that mitochondria are a primary target in the diabetic heart, probably due to oxidative stress, and that this damage coincides with and may stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis.

  18. Effect of regional muscle location but not adiposity on mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponce-González, Jesús Gustavo; Ara, Ignacio; Larsen, Steen;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine if the expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins SIRT1, SIRT3 and PGC-1alpha in human skeletal muscle is influenced by adiposity. METHOD: Twenty-nine male subjects were recruited into three groups: control (n = 10), obese (n = 10......) and post-obese (n = 9). Intentionally, groups were matched by age, aerobic capacity and in addition the control and post-obese groups also by BMI. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the m. deltoid and vastus lateralis. PGC-1alpha, SIRT1 and SIRT3 protein expression was analyzed by Western blot. RESULT: PGC......-1alpha, SIRT1 and SIRT3 protein expression was similar regardless of the level of adiposity. Only a main effect of group on SIRT1 protein showed a trend toward higher expression in post-obese than control and obese (P = 0.09). Despite similar muscle fiber-type composition (previously reported), PGC...

  19. Mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis from molecular understanding to clinical disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadhel, Majid; Nashabat, Marwan; Abu Ali, Qais; Hundallah, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Iron_sulfur clusters (ISCs) are known to play a major role in various protein functions. Located in the mitochondria, cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus, they contribute to various core cellular functions. Until recently, only a few human diseases related to mitochondrial ISC biogenesis defects have been described. Such diseases include Friedreich ataxia, combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 19, infantile complex II/III deficiency defect, hereditary myopathy with lactic acidosis and mitochondrial muscle myopathy, lipoic acid biosynthesis defects, multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndromes and non ketotic hyperglycinemia due to glutaredoxin 5 gene defect. Disorders of mitochondrial import, export and translation, including sideroblastic anemia with ataxia, EVEN-PLUS syndrome and mitochondrial complex I deficiency due to nucleotide-binding protein-like protein gene defect, have also been implicated in ISC biogenesis defects. With advances in next generation sequencing technologies, more disorders related to ISC biogenesis defects are expected to be elucidated. In this article, we aim to shed the light on mitochondrial ISC biogenesis, related proteins and their function, pathophysiology, clinical phenotypes of related disorders, diagnostic approach, and future implications.

  20. Pioglitazone induces mitochondrial biogenesis in human subcutaneous adipose tissue in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacka, Iwona; Xie, Hui; Bray, George A; Smith, Steven R

    2005-05-01

    Thiazolidenediones such as pioglitazone improve insulin sensitivity in diabetic patients by several mechanisms, including increased uptake and metabolism of free fatty acids in adipose tissue. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of pioglitazone on mitochondrial biogenesis and expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation in subcutaneous fat. Patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly divided into two groups and treated with placebo or pioglitazone (45 mg/day) for 12 weeks. Mitochondrial DNA copy number and expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis were quantified by real-time PCR. Pioglitazone treatment significantly increased mitochondrial copy number and expression of factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma coactivator-1alpha and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Treatment with pioglitazone stimulated the expression of genes in the fatty acid oxidation pathway, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, malonyl-CoA decarboxylase, and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The expression of PPAR-alpha, a transcriptional regulator of genes encoding mitochondrial enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation, was higher after pioglitazone treatment. Finally, the increased mitochondrial copy number and the higher expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes may contribute to the hypolipidemic effects of pioglitazone.

  1. Loss of p16INK4A stimulates aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis through a CDK4/Rb-independent pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chelsea; Liu, Tong; Rutter, Jared; Grossman, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p16INK4A (p16) inhibits cell cycle progression through the CDK4/Rb pathway. We have previously shown that p16 regulates cellular oxidative stress, independent of its role in cell cycle control. We investigated whether loss of p16 had a direct impact on the mitochondria. We found that p16-null primary mouse fibroblasts (PMFs) displayed increased mitochondrial mass and expression of mitochondrial respiratory subunit proteins compared to wild-type (WT) PMFs. These findings in p16-null PMFs were associated with increased expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis transcription factors PRC and TFAM. On the other hand, p16-deficient PMFs demonstrated reduced mitochondrial respiration capacity consistent with electron microscopy findings showing that mitochondria in p16-deficient PMFs have abnormal morphology. Consistent with increased mitochondrial mass and reduced respiratory capacity, p16-deficient PMFs generated increased mitochondrial superoxide. One biological consequence of elevated ROS in p16-deficient PMFs was enhanced migration, which was reduced by the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine. Finally, p16-deficient PMFs displayed increased mitochondrial membrane potential, which was also required for their enhanced migration. The mitochondrial and migration phenotype was restored in p16-deficient PMFs by forced expression of p16. Similarly, over-expression of p16 in human melanocytes and A375 melanoma cells led to decreased expression of some mitochondrial respiratory proteins, enhanced respiration, and decreased migration. Inhibition of Rb phosphorylation in melanocytes and melanoma cells, either by addition of chemical CDK4 inhibitors or RNAi-mediated knockdown of CDK4, did not mimic the effects of p16 loss. These results suggest that p16 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function, which is independent of the canonical CDK4/Rb pathway. PMID:28915557

  2. Carbon monoxide, skeletal muscle oxidative stress, and mitochondrial biogenesis in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, Michael A.; Carraway, Martha Sue; Piantadosi, Claude A.; Reynolds, Crystal M; Cherry, Anne D.; Wester, T. E.; Natoli, Michael J.; Massey, E. Wayne; Moon, Richard E.; Suliman, Hagir B.

    2009-01-01

    Given that the physiology of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) encompasses mitochondrial biogenesis, we tested the hypothesis that the HO-1 product, carbon monoxide (CO), activates mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and enhances maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2max) in humans. In 10 healthy subjects, we biopsied the vastus lateralis and performed V̇o2max tests followed by blinded randomization to air or CO breathing (1 h/day at 100 parts/million for 5 days), a contralateral muscle biopsy on day 5, a...

  3. Morinda citrifolia leaf enhanced performance by improving angiogenesis, mitochondrial biogenesis, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory & stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Shalan, Nor Aijratul Asikin; Mustapha, Noordin M; Mohamed, Suhaila

    2016-12-01

    Morinda citrifolia fruit, (noni), enhanced performances in athletes and post-menopausal women in clinical studies. This report shows the edible noni leaves water extract enhances performance in a weight-loaded swimming animal model better than the fruit or standardized green tea extract. The 4weeks study showed the extract (containing scopoletin and epicatechin) progressively prolonged the time to exhaustion by threefold longer than the control, fruit or tea extract. The extract improved (i) the mammalian antioxidant responses (MDA, GSH and SOD2 levels), (ii) tissue nutrient (glucose) and metabolite (lactate) management, (iii) stress hormone (cortisol) regulation; (iv) neurotransmitter (dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin) expressions, transporter or receptor levels, (v) anti-inflammatory (IL4 & IL10) responses; (v) skeletal muscle angiogenesis (VEGFA) and (v) energy and mitochondrial biogenesis (via PGC, UCP3, NRF2, AMPK, MAPK1, and CAMK4). The ergogenic extract helped delay fatigue by enhancing energy production, regulation and efficiency, which suggests benefits for physical activities and disease recovery.

  4. Biogenesis of cytochrome oxidase-sophisticated assembly lines in the mitochondrial inner membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Johannes M; Funes, Soledad

    2005-07-18

    Biogenesis of the cytochrome oxidase complex in the mitochondrial inner membrane depends on the concerted action of a variety of proteins. Recent studies shed light on this biological assembly process revealing an astonishingly complex procedure by which the different subunits of the enzymes are put together and the required cofactors are supplied. In this review we present a hypothetical model for the assembly process of cytochrome oxidase based on the current knowledge of the functions of specific assembly factors. According to this model the two largest subunits of the complex are first equipped with their respective cofactors on independent assembly lines. Prior to their assembly with the residual subunits that complete the whole complex, these two subcomplexes remain bound to substrate-specific chaperones. We propose that these chaperones, Mss51 for subunit 1 and Cox20 for subunit 2, control the coordinate assembly process to prevent potentially harmful redox reactions of unassembled or misassembled subunits.

  5. Increase in mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative stress, and glycolysis in murine lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, Enrique; Morgado, Lucia; Estrada, Juan C; Bernad, Antonio; Hubbard, Alan; Cadenas, Susana; Melov, Simon

    2009-02-01

    Lymphomas adapt to their environment by undergoing a complex series of biochemical changes that are currently not well understood. To better define these changes, we examined the gene expression and gene ontology profiles of thymic lymphomas from a commonly used model of carcinogenesis, the p53(-/-) mouse. These tumors show a highly significant upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial protein translation, mtDNA copy number, reactive oxygen species, antioxidant defenses, proton transport, ATP synthesis, hypoxia response, and glycolysis, indicating a fundamental change in the bioenergetic profile of the transformed T cell. Our results suggest that T cell tumorigenesis involves a simultaneous upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial respiration, and glycolytic activity. These processes would allow cells to adapt to the stressful tumor environment by facilitating energy production and thereby promote tumor growth. Understanding these adaptations is likely to result in improved therapeutic strategies for this tumor type.

  6. Increase in mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative stress, and glycolysis in murine lymphomas

    OpenAIRE

    Samper, Enrique; Morgado, Lucia; Estrada, Juan C.; Bernad, Antonio; Hubbard, Alan; Cadenas, Susana; Melov, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Lymphomas adapt to their environment by undergoing a complex series of biochemical changes that are currently not well understood. To better define these changes, we examined the gene expression and gene ontology profiles of thymic lymphomas from a commonly used model of carcinogenesis, the p53-/- mouse. These tumors show a highly significant upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial protein translation, mtDNA copy number, reactive oxygen species, antioxidant defenses, proton tr...

  7. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane.

  8. Utilizing small nutrient compounds as enhancers of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Craig

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endurance exercise, when performed regularly as part of a training program, leads to increases in whole-body and skeletal muscle-specific oxidative capacity. At the cellular level, this adaptive response is manifested by an increased number of oxidative fibres (Type I and IIA myosin heavy chain, an increase in capillarity and an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis. The increase in mitochondrial biogenesis (increased volume and functional capacity is fundamentally important as it leads to greater rates of oxidative phosphorylation and an improved capacity to utilize fatty acids during sub-maximal exercise. Given the importance of mitochondrial biogenesis for skeletal muscle performance, considerable attention has been given to understanding the molecular cues stimulated by endurance exercise that culminate in this adaptive response. In turn, this research has led to the identification of pharmaceutical compounds, functional foods and small nutritional bioactive ingredients that appear able to amplify exercise-responsive signaling pathways in skeletal muscle. The aim of this review is to discuss these purported exercise mimetics and bioactive ingredients in the context of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. We will examine proposed modes of action, discuss evidence of application in skeletal muscle in vivo and finally comment on the feasibility of such approaches to support endurance-training applications in humans.

  9. Cybrid models of Parkinson's disease show variable mitochondrial biogenesis and genotype-respiration relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, Paula M; Dunham, Lisa D; Quigley, Caitlin K; Morton, Stephanie L; Bergquist, Kristen E; Bennett, James P

    2009-12-01

    Sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD) is a nervous system-wide disease that presents with a bradykinetic movement disorder and frequently progresses to include depression and cognitive impairment. Cybrid models of sPD are based on expression of sPD platelet mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in neural cells and demonstrate some similarities to sPD brains. In sPD and CTL cybrids we characterized aspects of mitochondrial biogenesis, mtDNA genomics, composition of the respirasome and the relationships among isolated mitochondrial and intact cell respiration. Cybrid mtDNA levels varied and correlated with expression of PGC-1 alpha, a transcriptional co-activator regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Levels of mtDNA heteroplasmic mutations were asymmetrically distributed across the mitochondrial genome; numbers of heteroplasmies were more evenly distributed. Neither levels nor numbers of heteroplasmies distinguished sPD from CTL. sPD cybrid mitochondrial ETC subunit protein levels were not altered. Isolated mitochondrial complex I respiration rates showed limited correlation with whole cell complex I respiration rates in both sPD and CTL cybrids. Intact cell respiration during the normoxic-anoxic transition yielded K(m) values for oxygen that directly related to respiration rates in CTL but not in sPD cell lines. Both sPD and CTL cybrid cells are substantially heterogeneous in mitochondrial genomic and physiologic properties. Our results suggest that mtDNA depletion may occur in sPD neurons and could reflect impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Cybrids remain a valuable model for some aspects of sPD but their heterogeneity mitigates against a simple designation of sPD phenotype in this cell model.

  10. Nebivolol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chenglin; Chen, Dongrui; Xie, Qihai [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200025 (China); Yang, Ying, E-mail: yangying_sh@yahoo.com [Department of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200025 (China); Shen, Weili, E-mail: weili_shen@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Nebivolol may act as a partial agonist of β3-adrenergic receptor (AR). •Nebivolol stimulates mitochondrial DNA replication and protein expression. •Nebivolol promotes mitochondrial synthesis via activation of eNOS by β3-AR. -- Abstract: Nebivolol is a third-generation β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) blocker with additional beneficial effects, including the improvement of lipid and glucose metabolism in obese individuals. However, the underlying mechanism of nebivolol’s role in regulating the lipid profile remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of nebivolol in mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Exposure of 3T3-L1 cells to nebivolol for 24 h increased mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial protein levels and the expression of transcription factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, including PPAR-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3), mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1 (Nrf1). These changes were accompanied by an increase in oxygen consumption and in the expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and antioxidant enzymes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, including nebivolol-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as well as an increase in the formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) attenuated nebivolol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis, as did the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ. Treatment with nebivolol and β3-AR blocker SR59230A markedly attenuated PGC-1α, Sirt3 and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) protein levels in comparison to treatment with nebivolol alone. These data indicate that the mitochondrial synthesis and metabolism in adipocytes that is promoted by nebivolol is primarily mediated through the eNOS/cGMP-dependent pathway and is initiated by the activation of β3-AR receptors.

  11. Frataxin and Mitochondrial FeS Cluster Biogenesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmler, Timothy L.; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Pain, Debkumar; Dancis, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by frataxin deficiency. Frataxin is a conserved mitochondrial protein that plays a role in FeS cluster assembly in mitochondria. FeS clusters are modular cofactors that perform essential functions throughout the cell. They are synthesized by a multistep and multisubunit mitochondrial machinery that includes the scaffold protein Isu for assembling a protein-bound FeS cluster intermediate. Frataxin interacts with Isu, iron, and the cysteine desulfurase Nfs1, which supplies sulfide, thus placing it at the center of mitochondrial FeS cluster biosynthesis. PMID:20522547

  12. Cilostazol promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells through activating the expression of PGC-1α

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Luning [Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Department of Cardiology, Yantaishan Hospital, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Li, Qiang; Sun, Bei; Xu, Zhiying [Department of Cardiology, Yantaishan Hospital, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Ge, Zhiming, E-mail: zhimingge2000@hotmail.com [Department of Cardiology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► First time to show that cilostazol promotes the expressions of PGC-1α. ► First time to show that cilostazol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in HUVECs. ► PKA/CREB pathway mediates the effect of cilostazol on PGC-1α expression. ► Suggesting the roles of cilostazol in mitochondrial dysfunction related disease. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is frequently observed in vascular diseases. Cilostazol is a drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of intermittent claudication. Cilostazol increases intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels through inhibition of type III phosphodiesterase. The effects of cilostazol in mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated in this study. Cilostazol treated HUVECs displayed increased levels of ATP, mitochondrial DNA/nuclear DNA ratio, expressions of cytochrome B, and mitochondrial mass, suggesting an enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis induced by cilostazol. The promoted mitochondrial biogenesis could be abolished by Protein kinase A (PKA) specific inhibitor H-89, implying that PKA pathway played a critical role in increased mitochondrial biogenesis after cilostazol treatment. Indeed, expression levels of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), NRF 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were significantly increased in HUVECs after incubation with cilostazol at both mRNA levels and protein levels. Importantly, knockdown of PGC-1α could abolish cilostazol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Enhanced expression of p-CREB and PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by H-89. Moreover, the increased expression of PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by downregulation of CREB using CREB siRNA at both mRNA and protein levels. All the results indicated that cilostazol promoted mitochondrial biogenesis through activating the expression of PGC-1α in

  13. Interfacing mitochondrial biogenesis and elimination to enhance host pathogen defense and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palikaras, Konstantinos; Lionaki, Eirini; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic and semi-autonomous organelles, essential for many fundamental cellular processes, including energy production, metabolite synthesis and calcium homeostasis, among others. Alterations in mitochondrial activity not only influence individual cell function but also, through non-cell autonomous mechanisms, whole body metabolism, healthspan and lifespan. Energy homeostasis is orchestrated by the complex interplay between mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondria-selective autophagy (mitophagy). However, the cellular and molecular pathways that coordinate these 2 opposing processes remained obscure. In our recent study, we demonstrate that DCT-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of the mammalian BNIP3 and BNIP3L/NIX, is a key mediator of mitophagy, and functions in the same genetic pathway with PINK-1 and PDR-1 (the nematode homologs of PINK1 and Parkin respectively) to promote longevity and prevent cell damage under stress conditions. Interestingly, accumulation of damaged mitochondria activates SKN-1 (SKiNhead-1), the nematode homolog of NRF2, which in turn initiates a compensatory retrograde signaling response that impinges on both mitochondrial biogenesis and removal. In this commentary, we discuss the implications of these new findings in the context of innate immunity and aging. Unraveling the regulatory network that governs the crosstalk between mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy will enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that link aberrant energy metabolism to aging and disease.

  14. Carbon monoxide, skeletal muscle oxidative stress, and mitochondrial biogenesis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Michael A; Carraway, Martha Sue; Piantadosi, Claude A; Reynolds, Crystal M; Cherry, Anne D; Wester, T E; Natoli, Michael J; Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E; Suliman, Hagir B

    2009-07-01

    Given that the physiology of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) encompasses mitochondrial biogenesis, we tested the hypothesis that the HO-1 product, carbon monoxide (CO), activates mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and enhances maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2max)) in humans. In 10 healthy subjects, we biopsied the vastus lateralis and performed Vo(2max) tests followed by blinded randomization to air or CO breathing (1 h/day at 100 parts/million for 5 days), a contralateral muscle biopsy on day 5, and repeat Vo(2max) testing on day 8. Six independent subjects underwent CO breathing and two muscle biopsies without exercise testing. Molecular studies were performed by real-time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunochemistry. After Vo(2max) testing plus CO breathing, significant increases were found in mRNA levels for nuclear respiratory factor-1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha, mitochondrial transcription factor-A (Tfam), and DNA polymerase gamma (Polgamma) with no change in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number or Vo(2max). Levels of myosin heavy chain I and nuclear-encoded HO-1, superoxide dismutase-2, citrate synthase, mitofusin-1 and -2, and mitochondrial-encoded cytochrome oxidase subunit-I (COX-I) and ATPase-6 proteins increased significantly. None of these responses were reproduced by Vo(2max) testing alone, whereas CO alone increased Tfam and Polgamma mRNA, and COX-I, ATPase-6, mitofusin-2, HO-1, and superoxide dismutase protein. These findings provide evidence linking the HO/CO response involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in rodents to skeletal muscle in humans through a set of responses involving regulation of the mtDNA transcriptosome and mitochondrial fusion proteins autonomously of changes in exercise capacity.

  15. Impact of Resistance Training on Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis, Content, and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Groennebaek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle metabolic and contractile properties are reliant on muscle mitochondrial and myofibrillar protein turnover. The turnover of these specific protein pools is compromised during disease, aging, and inactivity. Oppositely, exercise can accentuate muscle protein turnover, thereby counteracting decay in muscle function. According to a traditional consensus, endurance exercise is required to drive mitochondrial adaptations, while resistance exercise is required to drive myofibrillar adaptations. However, concurrent practice of traditional endurance exercise and resistance exercise regimens to achieve both types of muscle adaptations is time-consuming, motivationally demanding, and contended to entail practice at intensity levels, that may not comply with clinical settings. It is therefore of principle interest to identify effective, yet feasible, exercise strategies that may positively affect both mitochondrial and myofibrillar protein turnover. Recently, reports indicate that traditional high-load resistance exercise can stimulate muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial respiratory function. Moreover, fatiguing low-load resistance exercise has been shown capable of promoting muscle hypertrophy and expectedly entails greater metabolic stress to potentially enhance mitochondrial adaptations. Consequently, fatiguing low-load resistance exercise regimens may possess the ability to stimulate muscle mitochondrial adaptations without compromising muscle myofibrillar accretion. However, the exact ability of resistance exercise to drive mitochondrial adaptations is debatable, not least due to some methodological challenges. The current review therefore aims to address the evidence on the effects of resistance exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis, content and function. In prolongation, a perspective is taken on the specific potential of low-load resistance exercise on promoting mitochondrial adaptations.

  16. Salidroside Stimulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Protects against H2O2-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shasha; Yang, Xiaoyan; Li, Wenjing; Bian, Fang; Wu, Dan; Chi, Jiangyang; Xu, Gao; Zhang, Yonghui; Jin, Si

    2014-01-01

    Salidroside (SAL) is an active component of Rhodiola rosea with documented antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study is to explore the mechanism of the protective effect of SAL on hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced endothelial dysfunction. Pretreatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with SAL significantly reduced the cytotoxicity brought by H2O2. Functional studies on the rat aortas found that SAL rescued the endothelium-dependent relaxation and reduced superoxide anion (O2∙−) production induced by H2O2. Meanwhile, SAL pretreatment inhibited H2O2-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. The underlying mechanisms involve the inhibition of H2O2-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and Akt, as well as the redox sensitive transcription factor, NF-kappa B (NF-κB). SAL also increased mitochondrial mass and upregulated the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) in the endothelial cells. H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, as demonstrated by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and ATP production, was rescued by SAL pretreatment. Taken together, these findings implicate that SAL could protect endothelium against H2O2-induced injury via promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function, thus preventing the overactivation of oxidative stress-related downstream signaling pathways. PMID:24868319

  17. Roles of Oxidative Stress, Apoptosis, PGC-1α and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-I Yang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary physiological function of mitochondria is to generate adenosine triphosphate through oxidative phosphorylation via the electron transport chain. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS as byproducts generated from mitochondria have been implicated in acute brain injuries such as stroke from cerebral ischemia. It was well-documented that mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway involves pro- and anti-apoptotic protein binding, release of cytochrome c, leading ultimately to neuronal death. On the other hand, mitochondria also play a role to counteract the detrimental effects elicited by excessive oxidative stress. Recent studies have revealed that oxidative stress and the redox state of ischemic neurons are also implicated in the signaling pathway that involves peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ (PPARγ co-activator 1α (PGC1-α. PGC1-α is a master regulator of ROS scavenging enzymes including manganese superoxide dismutase 2 and the uncoupling protein 2, both are mitochondrial proteins, and may contribute to neuronal survival. PGC1-α is also involved in mitochondrial biogenesis that is vital for cell survival. Experimental evidence supports the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress as determinants of neuronal death as well as endogenous protective mechanisms after stroke. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge focusing on the molecular mechanisms underlying cerebral ischemia involving ROS, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, mitochondrial proteins capable of ROS scavenging, and mitochondrial biogenesis.

  18. Salidroside Stimulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Protects against H2O2-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shasha Xing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salidroside (SAL is an active component of Rhodiola rosea with documented antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study is to explore the mechanism of the protective effect of SAL on hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2- induced endothelial dysfunction. Pretreatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs with SAL significantly reduced the cytotoxicity brought by H2O2. Functional studies on the rat aortas found that SAL rescued the endothelium-dependent relaxation and reduced superoxide anion (O2∙- production induced by H2O2. Meanwhile, SAL pretreatment inhibited H2O2-induced nitric oxide (NO production. The underlying mechanisms involve the inhibition of H2O2-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK, and Akt, as well as the redox sensitive transcription factor, NF-kappa B (NF-κB. SAL also increased mitochondrial mass and upregulated the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM in the endothelial cells. H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, as demonstrated by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm and ATP production, was rescued by SAL pretreatment. Taken together, these findings implicate that SAL could protect endothelium against H2O2-induced injury via promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function, thus preventing the overactivation of oxidative stress-related downstream signaling pathways.

  19. Phytoestrogens and mitochondrial biogenesis in breast cancer. Influence of estrogen receptors ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Pilar; Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Blanquer-Rosselló, Ma del Mar; Oliver, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens were originally identified as compounds having a close similarity in structure to estrogens and harboring weak estrogen activity. The interest in phytoestrogens as potential therapeutic agents has recently risen in the field of oncology, since population based studies have linked phytoestrogens consumption with a decreased risk of mortality due to several types of cancer. This review departs from the main focus of these articles by describing recent advances in our understanding of phytoestrogen potential action on mitochondria, specifically on mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and functionality, as well as mitoptosis in breast cancer. Further studies are necessary to explain the effects of individual phytoestrogens on mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics and for designing of new therapy targets for cancer treatment, nevertheless area promising therapeutic approach.

  20. Cannabidiol Protects against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Modulating Mitochondrial Function and Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Enkui; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Cao, Zongxian; Erdélyi, Katalin; Holovac, Eileen; Liaudet, Lucas; Lee, Wen-Shin; Haskó, György; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2015-01-06

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used, potent chemotherapeutic agent; however, its clinical application is limited because of its dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX's cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative/nitrative stress, impaired mitochondrial function in cardiomyocytes/endothelial cells and cell death. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotropic constituent of marijuana, which is well tolerated in humans, with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and recently discovered antitumor properties. We aimed to explore the effects of CBD in a well-established mouse model of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. DOX-induced cardiomyopathy was characterized by increased myocardial injury (elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels), myocardial oxidative and nitrative stress (decreased total glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase 1 activity, increased lipid peroxidation, 3-nitrotyrosine formation and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA), myocardial cell death (apoptotic and poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase 1 [PARP]-dependent) and cardiac dysfunction (decline in ejection fraction and left ventricular fractional shortening). DOX also impaired myocardial mitochondrial biogenesis (decreased mitochondrial copy number, mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, estrogen-related receptor alpha), reduced mitochondrial function (attenuated complex I and II activities) and decreased myocardial expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA. Treatment with CBD markedly improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction, oxidative/nitrative stress and cell death. CBD also enhanced the DOX-induced impaired cardiac mitochondrial function and biogenesis. These data suggest that CBD may represent a novel cardioprotective strategy against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and the above-described effects on mitochondrial function and biogenesis may

  1. Hypoxia mediates mitochondrial biogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma to promote tumor growth through HMGB1 and TLR9 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Samer; Yazdani, Hamza O; Liu, Yao; Loughran, Patricia; van der Windt, Dirk J; Huang, Hai; Simmons, Richard L; Shiva, Sruti; Tai, Sheng; Tsung, Allan

    2017-07-01

    The ability of cancer cells to survive and grow under hypoxic conditions has been known for decades, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Under certain conditions, cancer cells undergo changes in their bioenergetic profile to favor mitochondrial respiration by activating the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and up-regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. In this study, we hypothesized that augmented mitochondrial biogenesis plays a critical role for cancer cells to survive hypoxia. Consistent with this hypothesis, both hypoxic human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors and HCC cell lines subjected to hypoxia increase mitochondrial biogenesis. Silencing of PGC-1α in hypoxic HCC cell lines halts their proliferation. Mechanistic investigations in vitro indicated that intracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, a nuclear protein overexpressed in HCC, is essential for the process. Silencing of HMGB1 in hypoxic HCC cell lines resulted in a significant decrease in PGC-1α activation and mitochondrial biogenesis. Without HMGB1, hypoxic HCC cells had significantly reduced adenosine triphosphate production, decreased cellular proliferation, and increased apoptosis. In a diethylnitrosamine-induced murine model of HCC, genetic blocking of HMGB1 in hypoxic tumors resulted in a significant decrease in tumor growth. Tumors lacking HMGB1 had a significant reduction in mitochondrial biogenesis and a significant increase in mitochondrial dysfunction. Further in vitro mechanistic experiments indicated that during hypoxia HMGB1 translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and binds to cytoplasmic Toll-like receptor-9. This binding leads to activation of p38 and subsequent phosphorylation of PGC-1α, with resultant up-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Taken together, our findings suggest that during hypoxia HMGB1 up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis in HCC cancer cells, promoting tumor survival and proliferation

  2. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zheng, Ruimao, E-mail: rmzheng@pku.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zhu, Shigong, E-mail: sgzhu@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  3. Rosiglitazone-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in white adipose tissue is independent of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Pardo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thiazolidinediones, a family of insulin-sensitizing drugs commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes, are thought to exert their effects in part by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis in white adipose tissue through the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Coactivator-1α. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess the role of PGC-1α in the control of rosiglitazone-induced mitochondrial biogenesis, we have generated a mouse model that lacks expression of PGC-1α specifically in adipose tissues (PGC-1α-FAT-KO mice. We found that expression of genes encoding for mitochondrial proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid cycle or fatty acid oxidation, was similar in white adipose tissue of wild type and PGC-1α-FAT-KO mice. Furthermore, the absence of PGC-1α did not prevent the positive effect of rosiglitazone on mitochondrial gene expression or biogenesis, but it precluded the induction by rosiglitazone of UCP1 and other brown fat-specific genes in white adipose tissue. Consistent with the in vivo findings, basal and rosiglitazone-induced mitochondrial gene expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes was unaffected by the knockdown of PGC-1α but it was impaired when PGC-1β expression was knockdown by the use of specific siRNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that in white adipose tissue PGC-1α is dispensable for basal and rosiglitazone-induced mitochondrial biogenesis but required for the rosiglitazone-induced expression of UCP1 and other brown adipocyte-specific markers. Our study suggests that PGC-1α is important for the appearance of brown adipocytes in white adipose tissue. Our findings also provide evidence that PGC-1β and not PGC-1α regulates basal and rosiglitazone-induced mitochondrial gene expression in white adipocytes.

  4. Amla Enhances Mitochondrial Spare Respiratory Capacity by Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Antioxidant Systems in a Murine Skeletal Muscle Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Yamamoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amla is one of the most important plants in Indian traditional medicine and has been shown to improve various age-related disorders while decreasing oxidative stress. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a proposed cause of aging through elevated oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of Amla on mitochondrial function in C2C12 myotubes, a murine skeletal muscle cell model with abundant mitochondria. Based on cell flux analysis, treatment with an extract of Amla fruit enhanced mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, which enables cells to overcome various stresses. To further explore the mechanisms underlying these effects on mitochondrial function, we analyzed mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant systems, both proposed regulators of mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity. We found that Amla treatment stimulated both systems accompanied by AMPK and Nrf2 activation. Furthermore, we found that Amla treatment exhibited cytoprotective effects and lowered reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in cells subjected to t-BHP-induced oxidative stress. These effects were accompanied by increased oxygen consumption, suggesting that Amla protected cells against oxidative stress by using enhanced spare respiratory capacity to produce more energy. Thus we identified protective effects of Amla, involving activation of mitochondrial function, which potentially explain its various effects on age-related disorders.

  5. Amla Enhances Mitochondrial Spare Respiratory Capacity by Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Antioxidant Systems in a Murine Skeletal Muscle Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hirotaka; Morino, Katsutaro; Mengistu, Lemecha; Ishibashi, Taishi; Kiriyama, Kohei; Ikami, Takao; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Amla is one of the most important plants in Indian traditional medicine and has been shown to improve various age-related disorders while decreasing oxidative stress. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a proposed cause of aging through elevated oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of Amla on mitochondrial function in C2C12 myotubes, a murine skeletal muscle cell model with abundant mitochondria. Based on cell flux analysis, treatment with an extract of Amla fruit enhanced mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, which enables cells to overcome various stresses. To further explore the mechanisms underlying these effects on mitochondrial function, we analyzed mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant systems, both proposed regulators of mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity. We found that Amla treatment stimulated both systems accompanied by AMPK and Nrf2 activation. Furthermore, we found that Amla treatment exhibited cytoprotective effects and lowered reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in cells subjected to t-BHP-induced oxidative stress. These effects were accompanied by increased oxygen consumption, suggesting that Amla protected cells against oxidative stress by using enhanced spare respiratory capacity to produce more energy. Thus we identified protective effects of Amla, involving activation of mitochondrial function, which potentially explain its various effects on age-related disorders. PMID:27340504

  6. Potential role of lipin-1 in exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Kazuhiko; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Terada, Shin

    2008-09-26

    Endurance exercise induces mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. It has been shown that lipin-1 acts as a transcriptional coactivator in liver, and stimulates gene expression of mitochondrial enzymes. We hypothesized that lipin-1 might be involved in exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The present investigation first demonstrated that lipin-1 mRNA in rat triceps muscle was increased by approximately 2-fold after an acute bout of endurance swimming exercise. Second, ectopic expression of lipin-1 in L6 myotube increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and delta-aminolevulinate synthase gene expression. Finally, lipin-1 mRNA expression in rat triceps muscle was significantly elevated at 6h after subcutaneous injections of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) or clenbuterol, which are 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2-AR) activators, respectively. These results may suggest that enhanced expression of lipin-1 is involved in exercise-induced mitochondrial enzyme adaptations, possibly through AMPK- and beta2-AR-related mechanisms.

  7. Role of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator 3 (CRTC3) in the initiation of mitochondrial biogenesis and stress response in liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Tin Aung; Lou, Huan; Ji, Cheng; Win, Sanda; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2011-06-24

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. PGC-1α expression is under the control of the transcription factor, cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). In searching for candidate transcription factors that mediate mitochondrial stress-initiated mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, we assessed the effect of silencing CREB-regulated transcription co-activators (CRTC). CRTC isoforms are co-activators of CREB-regulated transcription by a CREB phosphorylation-independent pathway. Using cultured HepG2 cells and primary mouse hepatocytes, we determined that mitochondrial stress imposed by the complex I inhibitor rotenone elicited mitochondrial biogenesis, which was dependent on an induction of PGC-1α, which was inhibited by silencing PGC-1α. PGC-1α induction in response to rotenone was inhibited by silencing the expression of CRTC3, which blocked downstream mitochondria biogenesis. In contrast, silencing CRTC2 did not affect the induction of this pathway in response to rotenone. Thus, CRTC3 plays a selective role in mitochondrial biogenesis in response to rotenone.

  8. Number matters: control of mammalian mitochondrial DNA copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay Montier, Laura L; Deng, Janice J; Bai, Yidong

    2009-03-01

    Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis is essential for proper cellular functioning. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and the resulting mitochondrial malfunction have been implicated in cancer, neurodegeneration, diabetes, aging, and many other human diseases. Although it is known that the dynamics of the mammalian mitochondrial genome are not linked with that of the nuclear genome, very little is known about the mechanism of mtDNA propagation. Nevertheless, our understanding of the mode of mtDNA replication has advanced in recent years, though not without some controversies. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA copy number control in mammalian cells, while focusing on both mtDNA replication and turnover. Although mtDNA copy number is seemingly in excess, we reason that mtDNA copy number control is an important aspect of mitochondrial genetics and biogenesis and is essential for normal cellular function.

  9. Mitochondrial quality control systems sustain brain mitochondrial bioenergetics in early stages of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, R X; Correia, S C; Alves, M G; Oliveira, P F; Cardoso, S; Carvalho, C; Seiça, R; Santos, M S; Moreira, P I

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondria have a crucial role in the supply of energy to the brain. Mitochondrial alterations can lead to detrimental consequences on the function of brain cells and are thought to have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of several neurologic disorders. This study was aimed to evaluate mitochondrial function, fusion-fission and biogenesis and autophagy in brain cortex of 6-month-old Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, an animal model of nonobese type 2 diabetes (T2D). No statistically significant alterations were observed in mitochondrial respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation system. A significant decrease in the protein levels of OPA1, a protein that facilitates mitochondrial fusion, was observed in brain cortex of GK rats. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the protein levels of LC3-II and a significant increase in protein levels of mTOR phosphorylated at serine residue 2448 were observed in GK rats suggesting a suppression of autophagy in diabetic brain cortex. No significant alterations were observed in the parameters related to mitochondrial biogenesis. Altogether, these results demonstrate that during the early stages of T2D, brain mitochondrial function is maintained in part due to a delicate balance between mitochondrial fusion-fission and biogenesis and autophagy. However, future studies are warranted to evaluate the role of mitochondrial quality control pathways in late stages of T2D.

  10. Mitochondrial biogenesis drives a vicious cycle of metabolic insufficiency and mitochondrial DNA deletion mutation accumulation in aged rat skeletal muscle fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Herbst

    Full Text Available Aged muscles possess dysfunctional fibers that contain intracellular expansions of somatically derived mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations. At high abundance, these mutations disrupt the expression of mitochondrially-encoded protein subunits of the electron transport chain resulting in aerobic respiration deficient muscle fiber segments. These fiber segments atrophy and break contributing to the loss of muscle mass and function that occurs with age. By combining micro-dissection of individual muscle fibers with microarray analysis, we observed the response induced within these abnormal muscle fibers and detected an increase in many genes affecting metabolism and metabolic regulation. The transcriptional profile and subsequent protein validation suggested that a non-compensatory program of mitochondrial biogenesis was initiated. We hypothesized that this non-adaptive program of mitochondrial biogenesis was driving mtDNA deletion mutation accumulation. We tested this hypothesis by treating aged rats with β-Guanidinopropionic acid, a compound that stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis. β-Guanidinopropionic acid treatment increased muscle mitochondrial genome copy number and resulted in a 3.7 fold increase in the abundance of electron transport chain negative muscle fiber segments. We conclude that in electron transport system abnormal muscle fiber segments, a vicious cycle of metabolic insufficiency and non-compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis drive mtDNA deletion mutation accumulation.

  11. Mitochondrial biogenesis is decreased in skeletal muscle of pig fetuses exposed to maternal high-energy diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, T D; Yu, B; Yu, J; Mao, X B; Zheng, P; He, J; Huang, Z Q; He, D T; Chen, D W

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Moreover, mitochondrial biogenesis accompanies skeletal myogenesis, and we previously reported that maternal high-energy diet repressed skeletal myogenesis in pig fetuses. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of moderately increased maternal energy intake on skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and function of the pig fetuses. Primiparous purebred Large White sows were allocated to a normal energy intake group (NE) as recommended by the National Research Council (NRC) and a high energy intake group (HE, 110% of NRC recommendations). On day 90 of gestation, fetal umbilical vein blood and longissimus (LM) muscle were collected. Results showed that the weight gain of sows fed HE diet was higher than NE sows on day 90 of gestation (Penergy supply during gestation decreases mitochondrial biogenesis, function and antioxidative capacity in skeletal muscle of pig fetuses.

  12. Evolution of mitochondrial chaperones utilized in Fe-S cluster biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilke, Brenda; Williams, Barry; Knieszner, Helena; Pukszta, Sebastian; D'Silva, Patrick; Craig, Elizabeth A; Marszalek, Jaroslaw

    2006-08-22

    Biogenesis of Fe-S clusters is an essential process [1]. In both Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, insertion of clusters into an apoprotein requires interaction between a scaffold protein on which clusters are assembled and a molecular chaperone system--an unusually specialized mitochondrial Hsp70 (mtHsp70) and its J protein cochaperone [2]. It is generally assumed that mitochondria inherited their Fe-S cluster assembly machinery from prokaryotes via the endosymbiosis of a bacterium that led to formation of mitochondria. Indeed, phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the S. cerevisiae J protein, Jac1, and the scaffold, Isu, are orthologous to their bacterial counterparts [3, 4]. However, our analyses indicate that the specialized mtHsp70, Ssq1, is only present in a subset of fungi; most eukaryotes have a single mtHsp70, Ssc1. We propose that an Hsp70 having a role limited to Fe-S cluster biogenesis arose twice during evolution. In the fungal lineage, the gene encoding multifunctional mtHsp70, Ssc1, was duplicated, giving rise to specialized Ssq1. Therefore, Ssq1 is not orthologous to the specialized Hsp70 from E. coli (HscA), but shares a striking level of convergence at the biochemical level. Thus, in the vast majority of eukaryotes, Jac1 and Isu function with the single, multifunctional mtHsp70 in Fe-S cluster biogenesis.

  13. Physical exercise regulates p53 activity targeting SCO2 and increases mitochondrial COX biogenesis in cardiac muscle with age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengtang Qi

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to outline the timelines of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and cytochrome c oxidase complex (COX biogenesis in cardiac muscle with age, and to evaluate whether and how these age-related changes were attenuated by exercise. ICR/CD-1 mice were treated with pifithrin-μ (PFTμ, sacrificed and studied at different ages; ICR/CD-1 mice at younger or older ages were randomized to endurance treadmill running and sedentary conditions. The results showed that mRNA expression of p53 and its protein levels in mitochondria increased with age in cardiac muscle, accompanied by increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, reduced expression of COX subunits and assembly proteins, and decreased expression of most markers in mitochondrial biogenesis. Most of these age-related changes including p53 activity targeting cytochrome oxidase deficient homolog 2 (SCO2, p53 translocation to mitochondria and COX biogenesis were attenuated by exercise in older mice. PFTμ, an inhibitor blocking p53 translocation to mitochondria, increased COX biogenesis in older mice, but not in young mice. Our data suggest that physical exercise attenuates age-related changes in mitochondrial COX biogenesis and p53 activity targeting SCO2 and mitochondria, and thereby induces antisenescent and protective effects in cardiac muscle.

  14. Rutin Increases Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis with AMPK Activation in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sangjin; Lee, Mak-Soon; Chang, Eugene; Shin, Yoonjin; Oh, Soojung; Kim, In-Hwan; Kim, Yangha

    2015-09-22

    Decreased mitochondrial number and dysfunction in skeletal muscle are associated with obesity and the progression of obesity-associated metabolic disorders. The specific aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of rutin on mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle of high-fat diet-induced obese rats. Supplementation with rutin reduced body weight and adipose tissue mass, despite equivalent energy intake (p increased mitochondrial size and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content as well as gene expression related to mitochondrial biogenesis, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), transcription factor A (Tfam), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent deacetylase, sirtulin1 (SIRT1) in skeletal muscle (p increased muscle adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity by 40% (p muscle mitochondria and AMPK activation in the rutin-mediated beneficial effect on obesity.

  15. MicroRNA-149 inhibits PARP-2 and promotes mitochondrial biogenesis via SIRT-1/PGC-1α network in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Junaith S; Hajira, Ameena; Pardo, Patricia S; Boriek, Aladin M

    2014-05-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) plays a central role in the initiation of mitochondrial dysfunction that significantly contributes to skeletal muscle metabolic disorders in obesity. However, the mechanism by which HFD weakens skeletal muscle metabolism by altering mitochondrial function and biogenesis is unknown. Given the emerging roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism, we sought to determine whether activation of a specific miRNA pathway would rescue the HFD-induced mitochondrial dysfunction via the sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1)/ peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) pathway, a pathway that governs genes necessary for mitochondrial function. We here report that miR-149 strongly controls SIRT-1 expression and activity. Interestingly, miR-149 inhibits poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) and so increased cellular NAD(+) levels and SIRT-1 activity that subsequently increases mitochondrial function and biogenesis via PGC-1α activation. In addition, skeletal muscles from HFD-fed obese mice exhibit low levels of miR-149 and high levels of PARP-2, and they show reduced mitochondrial function and biogenesis due to a decreased activation of the SIRT-1/PGC-1α pathway, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction in the skeletal muscle of obese mice may be because of, at least in part, miR-149 dysregulation. Overall, miR-149 may be therapeutically useful for treating HFD-induced skeletal muscle metabolic disorders in such pathophysiological conditions as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  16. SIRT1 facilitates hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis by promoting PGC-1α-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuming; Xu, Shangcheng; Li, Jing; Zheng, Lu; Feng, Min; Wang, Xiaoya; Han, Keqiang; Pi, Huifeng; Li, Min; Huang, Xiaobing; You, Nan; Tian, Yewang; Zuo, Guohua; Li, Hongyan; Zhao, Hongzhi; Deng, Ping; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou; Liang, Ping

    2016-05-17

    SIRT1 is a multifaceted NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase known to act as a tumor promoter or suppressor in different cancers. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of SIRT1-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis. SIRT1 overexpression was frequently detected in human HCC specimens and was associated with microvascular invasion (P = 0.0039), advanced tumor node metastasis (TNM) stages (P = 0.0016), HCC recurrence (P = 0.021) and poor outcomes (P = 0.039). Lentivirus-mediated knockdown of SIRT1 in MHCC97H cells reduced invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. SIRT1 depletion attenuated mitochondrial biogenesis and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production but did not affect epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Elevated SIRT1 expression strongly correlated with the upregulation of PGC-1α in HCC specimens, and ectopic expression of SIRT1 increased PGC-1α levels. In cell assays and an orthotopic transplantation model, PGC-1α overexpression reversed the inhibitory effects of SIRT1 depletion on invasion and metastasis by enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis. These findings reveal the involvement of SIRT1 in HCC metastasis and provide a rationale for exploring therapeutic targets against the SIRT1/PGC-1α axis.

  17. SIRT1 facilitates hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis by promoting PGC-1α-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zheng, Lu; Feng, Min; Wang, Xiaoya; Han, Keqiang; Pi, Huifeng; Li, Min; Huang, Xiaobing; You, Nan; Tian, Yewang; Zuo, Guohua; Li, Hongyan; Zhao, Hongzhi; Deng, Ping; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou; Liang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    SIRT1 is a multifaceted NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase known to act as a tumor promoter or suppressor in different cancers. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of SIRT1-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis. SIRT1 overexpression was frequently detected in human HCC specimens and was associated with microvascular invasion (P = 0.0039), advanced tumor node metastasis (TNM) stages (P = 0.0016), HCC recurrence (P = 0.021) and poor outcomes (P = 0.039). Lentivirus-mediated knockdown of SIRT1 in MHCC97H cells reduced invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. SIRT1 depletion attenuated mitochondrial biogenesis and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production but did not affect epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Elevated SIRT1 expression strongly correlated with the upregulation of PGC-1α in HCC specimens, and ectopic expression of SIRT1 increased PGC-1α levels. In cell assays and an orthotopic transplantation model, PGC-1α overexpression reversed the inhibitory effects of SIRT1 depletion on invasion and metastasis by enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis. These findings reveal the involvement of SIRT1 in HCC metastasis and provide a rationale for exploring therapeutic targets against the SIRT1/PGC-1α axis. PMID:27081083

  18. Neural stem cell transplantation enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Gu, Guo-Jun; Shen, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Gang-Min; Wang, Pei-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, especially a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis, is an early and prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that the number of mitochondria is significantly reduced in susceptible hippocampal neurons from AD patients. Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation in AD-like mice can compensate for the neuronal loss resulting from amyloid-beta protein deposition. The effects of NSC transplantation on mitochondrial biogenesis and cognitive function in AD-like mice, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we injected NSCs or vehicle into 12-month-old amyloid precursor protein (APP)/PS1 transgenic mice, a mouse model of AD-like pathology. The effects of NSC transplantation on cognitive function, the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondria-related proteins, and mitochondrial morphology were investigated. Our results show that in NSC-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-NSC) mice, the cognitive function, number of mitochondria, and expression of mitochondria-related proteins, specifically the mitochondrial fission factors (dynamin-related protein 1 [Drp1] and fission 1 [Fis1]) and the mitochondrial fusion factor optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), were significantly increased compared with those in age-matched vehicle-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-Veh) mice, whereas the expression of mitochondrial fusion factors mitofusion 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2 was significantly decreased. These data indicate that NSC transplantation may enhance mitochondria biogenesis and further rescue cognitive deficits in AD-like mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting; Zheng, Ruimao; Zhu, Shigong

    2014-07-18

    14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  20. Gamma rays induce a p53-independent mitochondrial biogenesis that is counter-regulated by HIF1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoletti-Stella, A; Mariani, E; Kurelac, I; Maresca, A; Caratozzolo, M F; Iommarini, L; Carelli, V; Eusebi, L H; Guido, A; Cenacchi, G; Fuccio, L; Rugolo, M; Tullo, A; Porcelli, A M; Gasparre, G

    2013-06-13

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is an orchestrated process that presides to the regulation of the organelles homeostasis within a cell. We show that γ-rays, at doses commonly used in the radiation therapy for cancer treatment, induce an increase in mitochondrial mass and function, in response to a genotoxic stress that pushes cells into senescence, in the presence of a functional p53. Although the main effector of the response to γ-rays is the p53-p21 axis, we demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis is only indirectly regulated by p53, whose activation triggers a murine double minute 2 (MDM2)-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) degradation, leading to the release of peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1β inhibition by HIF1α, thus promoting mitochondrial biogenesis. Mimicking hypoxia by HIF1α stabilization, in fact, blunts the mitochondrial response to γ-rays as well as the induction of p21-mediated cell senescence, indicating prevalence of the hypoxic over the genotoxic response. Finally, we also show in vivo that post-radiotherapy mitochondrial DNA copy number increase well correlates with lack of HIF1α increase in the tissue, concluding this may be a useful molecular tool to infer the trigger of a hypoxic response during radiotherapy, which may lead to failure of activation of cell senescence.

  1. Peroxiredoxin 3 is a key molecule regulating adipocyte oxidative stress, mitochondrial biogenesis, and adipokine expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Joo Young; Kim, Yunghee; Jeong, Jaeho; Park, Jehyun; Kim, Inok; Huh, Kyu Ha; Kim, Yu Seun; Woo, Hyun Ae; Rhee, Sue Goo; Lee, Kong-Joo; Ha, Hunjoo

    2012-02-01

    Increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in obese adipocytes contribute to adipokine dysregulation, inflammation, and insulin resistance. Through an advanced proteomic analysis, we found that peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3), a thioredoxin-dependent mitochondrial peroxidase, is highly expressed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes compared to preadipocytes. Interestingly, in obese db/db mice and human subjects, adipose Prx3 levels were significantly decreased, indicating its association with obesity. We therefore employed Prx3 knockout (KO) mice and transfected 3T3-L1 cells to examine the role of endogenous Prx3 in adipocyte metabolism. Prx3 KO mice had increased fat mass compared to wild-type due to adipocyte hypertrophy. Increased adipogenic transcription factors and lipogenic gene expression during differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells from Prx3-deficient mice confirmed that these adipocytes are likely to accumulate fat. Mitochondrial protein carbonylation in Prx3 KO adipose tissue and mitochondrial superoxide level in Prx3 knockdown 3T3-L1 cells were increased showing aberrant regulation of oxidative stress. Proteomic analysis and gene expression analysis of Prx3 KO mice adipocytes also showed defect in mitochondria biogenesis along with enzymes involved in glucose/lipid metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, expression level of adiponectin was downregulated and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 was upregulated in Prx3 KO adipocytes. Impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance further implied metabolic dysregulation in Prx3 KO mice. These data suggest that endogenous Prx3 may play an essential role in maintaining normal characteristics of adipocytes and that defect in Prx3 alters mitochondrial redox state and function, and adipokine expression in adipocytes leading to metabolic alteration.

  2. The Forkhead Transcription Factor Hcm1 Promotes Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Stress Resistance in Yeast*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Colman, Maria José; Reverter-Branchat, Gemma; Sorolla, M. Alba; Tamarit, Jordi; Ros, Joaquim; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2010-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the forkhead transcription factor Hcm1 is involved in chromosome segregation, spindle pole dynamics, and budding. We found that Hcm1 interacts with the histone deacetylase Sir2 and shifts from cytoplasm to the nucleus in the G1/S phase or in response to oxidative stress stimuli. The nuclear localization of Hcm1 depends on the activity of Sir2 as revealed by activators and inhibitors of the sirtuins and the Δsir2 mutant. Hcm1-overexpressing cells display more mitochondria that can be attributed to increased amounts of Abf2, a protein involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. These cells also show higher rates of oxygen consumption and improved resistance to oxidative stress that would be explained by increased catalase and Sod2 activities and molecular chaperones such as Hsp26, Hsp30, and members of Hsp70 family. Microarray analyses also reveal increased expression of genes involved in mitochondrial energy pathways and those allowing the transition from the exponential to the stationary phase. Taken together, these results describe a new and relevant role of Hcm1 for mitochondrial functions, suggesting that this transcription factor would participate in the adaptation of cells from fermentative to respiratory metabolism. PMID:20847055

  3. The forkhead transcription factor Hcm1 promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and stress resistance in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Colman, Maria José; Reverter-Branchat, Gemma; Sorolla, M Alba; Tamarit, Jordi; Ros, Joaquim; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2010-11-19

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the forkhead transcription factor Hcm1 is involved in chromosome segregation, spindle pole dynamics, and budding. We found that Hcm1 interacts with the histone deacetylase Sir2 and shifts from cytoplasm to the nucleus in the G(1)/S phase or in response to oxidative stress stimuli. The nuclear localization of Hcm1 depends on the activity of Sir2 as revealed by activators and inhibitors of the sirtuins and the Δsir2 mutant. Hcm1-overexpressing cells display more mitochondria that can be attributed to increased amounts of Abf2, a protein involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. These cells also show higher rates of oxygen consumption and improved resistance to oxidative stress that would be explained by increased catalase and Sod2 activities and molecular chaperones such as Hsp26, Hsp30, and members of Hsp70 family. Microarray analyses also reveal increased expression of genes involved in mitochondrial energy pathways and those allowing the transition from the exponential to the stationary phase. Taken together, these results describe a new and relevant role of Hcm1 for mitochondrial functions, suggesting that this transcription factor would participate in the adaptation of cells from fermentative to respiratory metabolism.

  4. Mechanisms of control of microRNA biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Davis-Dusenbery, Brandi N.; Hata, Akiko

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of ∼22 nt non-coding RNAs that control diverse biological functions in animals, plants and unicellular eukaryotes by promoting degradation or inhibition of translation of target mRNAs. miRNA expression is often tissue specific and developmentally regulated. Aberrant expression of miRNAs has been linked to developmental abnormalities and human diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disorders. The recent identification of mechanisms of miRNA biogenesis regu...

  5. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate prevents oxidative phosphorylation deficit and promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in human cells from subjects with Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Daniela; De Rasmo, Domenico; Signorile, Anna; Rossi, Leonardo; de Bari, Lidia; Scala, Iris; Granese, Barbara; Papa, Sergio; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2013-04-01

    A critical role for mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed in the pathogenesis of Down's syndrome (DS), a human multifactorial disorder caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, associated with mental retardation and early neurodegeneration. Previous studies from our group demonstrated in DS cells a decreased capacity of the mitochondrial ATP production system and overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria. In this study we have tested the potential of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) - a natural polyphenol component of green tea - to counteract the mitochondrial energy deficit found in DS cells. We found that EGCG, incubated with cultured lymphoblasts and fibroblasts from DS subjects, rescued mitochondrial complex I and ATP synthase catalytic activities, restored oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and counteracted oxidative stress. These effects were associated with EGCG-induced promotion of PKA activity, related to increased cellular levels of cAMP and PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the NDUFS4 subunit of complex I. In addition, EGCG strongly promoted mitochondrial biogenesis in DS cells, as associated with increase in Sirt1-dependent PGC-1α deacetylation, NRF-1 and T-FAM protein levels and mitochondrial DNA content. In conclusion, this study shows that EGCG is a promoting effector of oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial biogenesis in DS cells, acting through modulation of the cAMP/PKA- and sirtuin-dependent pathways. EGCG treatment promises thus to be a therapeutic approach to counteract mitochondrial energy deficit and oxidative stress in DS.

  6. A cardiac-specific robotized cellular assay identified families of human ligands as inducers of PGC-1α expression and mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Ruiz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial function is dramatically altered in heart failure (HF. This is associated with a decrease in the expression of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α, which plays a key role in the coordination of energy metabolism. Identification of compounds able to activate PGC-1α transcription could be of future therapeutic significance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We thus developed a robotized cellular assay to screen molecules in order to identify new activators of PGC-1α in a cardiac-like cell line. This screening assay was based on both the assessment of activity and gene expression of a secreted luciferase under the control of the human PGC-1α promoter, stably expressed in H9c2 cells. We screened part of a library of human endogenous ligands and steroid hormones, B vitamins and fatty acids were identified as activators of PGC-1α expression. The most responsive compounds of these families were then tested for PGC-1α gene expression in adult rat cardiomyocytes. These data highly confirmed the primary screening, and the increase in PGC-1α mRNA correlated with an increase in several downstream markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. Moreover, respiration rates of H9c2 cells treated with these compounds were increased evidencing their effectiveness on mitochondrial biogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using our cellular reporter assay we could identify three original families, able to activate mitochondrial biogenesis both in cell line and adult cardiomyocytes. This first screening can be extended to chemical libraries in order to increase our knowledge on PGC-1α regulation in the heart and to identify potential therapeutic compounds able to improve mitochondrial function in HF.

  7. Yeast mitochondrial biogenesis: a role for the PUF RNA-binding protein Puf3p in mRNA localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Saint-Georges

    Full Text Available The asymmetric localization of mRNA plays an important role in coordinating posttranscriptional events in eukaryotic cells. We investigated the peripheral mitochondrial localization of nuclear-encoded mRNAs (MLR in various conditions in which the mRNA binding protein context and the translation efficiency were altered. We identified Puf3p, a Pumilio family RNA-binding protein, as the first trans-acting factor controlling the MLR phenomenon. This allowed the characterization of two classes of genes whose mRNAs are translated to the vicinity of mitochondria. Class I mRNAs (256 genes have a Puf3p binding motif in their 3'UTR region and many of them have their MLR properties deeply affected by PUF3 deletion. Conversely, mutations in the Puf3p binding motif alter the mitochondrial localization of BCS1 mRNA. Class II mRNAs (224 genes have no Puf3p binding site and their asymmetric localization is not affected by the absence of PUF3. In agreement with a co-translational import process, we observed that the presence of puromycin loosens the interactions between most of the MLR-mRNAs and mitochondria. Unexpectedly, cycloheximide, supposed to solidify translational complexes, turned out to destabilize a class of mRNA-mitochondria interactions. Classes I and II mRNAs, which are therefore transported to the mitochondria through different pathways, correlated with different functional modules. Indeed, Class I genes code principally for the assembly factors of respiratory chain complexes and the mitochondrial translation machinery (ribosomes and translation regulators. Class II genes encode proteins of the respiratory chain or proteins involved in metabolic pathways. Thus, MLR, which is intimately linked to translation control, and the activity of mRNA-binding proteins like Puf3p, may provide the conditions for a fine spatiotemporal control of mitochondrial protein import and mitochondrial protein complex assembly. This work therefore provides new openings

  8. A combination of nutriments improves mitochondrial biogenesis and function in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent evidence indicates that insulin resistance in skeletal muscle may be related to reduce mitochondrial number and oxidation capacity. However, it is not known whether increasing mitochondrial number and function improves insulin resistance. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a combination of nutrients on insulin resistance and mitochondrial biogenesis/function in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated that defect of glucose and lipid metabolism is associated with low mitochondrial content and reduced mitochondrial enzyme activity in skeletal muscle of the diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. The treatment of combination of R-alpha-lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, nicotinamide, and biotin effectively improved glucose tolerance, decreased the basal insulin secretion and the level of circulating free fatty acid (FFA, and prevented the reduction of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The nutrients treatment also significantly increased mRNA levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (Ppar alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (Ppar delta, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (Mcpt-1 and activity of mitochondrial complex I and II in skeletal muscle. All of these effects of mitochondrial nutrients are comparable to that of the antidiabetic drug, pioglitazone. In addition, the treatment with nutrients, unlike pioglitazone, did not cause body weight gain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that a combination of mitochondrial targeting nutrients may improve skeletal mitochondrial dysfunction and exert hypoglycemic effects, without causing weight gain.

  9. Aging and calorie restriction oppositely affect mitochondrial biogenesis through TFAM binding at both origins of mitochondrial DNA replication in rat liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Picca

    Full Text Available Aging affects mitochondria in a tissue-specific manner. Calorie restriction (CR is, so far, the only intervention able to delay or prevent the onset of several age-related changes also in mitochondria. Using livers from middle age (18-month-old, 28-month-old and 32-month-old ad libitum-fed and 28-month-old calorie-restricted rats we found an age-related decrease in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM amount, fully prevented by CR. We revealed also an age-related decrease, completely prevented by CR, for the proteins PGC-1α NRF-1 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV, supporting the efficiency of CR to forestall the age-related decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, CR counteracted the age-related increase in oxidative damage to proteins, represented by the increased amount of oxidized peroxiredoxins (PRX-SO3 in the ad libitum-fed animals. An unexpected age-related decrease in the mitochondrial proteins peroxiredoxin III (Prx III and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2, usually induced by increased ROS and involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, suggested a prevailing relevance of the age-reduced mitochondrial biogenesis above the induction by ROS in the regulation of expression of these genes with aging. The partial prevention of the decrease in Prx III and SOD2 proteins by CR also supported the preservation of mitochondrial biogenesis in the anti-aging action of CR. To investigate further the age- and CR-related effects on mitochondrial biogenesis we analyzed the in vivo binding of TFAM to specific mtDNA regions and demonstrated a marked increase in the TFAM-bound amounts of mtDNA at both origins of replication with aging, fully prevented by CR. A novel, positive correlation between the paired amounts of TFAM-bound mtDNA at these sub-regions was found in the joined middle age ad libitum-fed and 28-month-old calorie-restricted groups, but not in the 28-month-old ad libitum-fed counterpart suggesting

  10. Effects of dairy consumption on SIRT1 and mitochondrial biogenesis in adipocytes and muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruckbauer Antje

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent data from this laboratory suggest that components of dairy foods may serve as activators of SIRT1 (Silent Information Regulator Transcript 1, and thereby participate in regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. In this study, an ex-vivo/in-vitro approach was used to examine the integrated effects of dairy diets on SIRT1 activation in two key target tissues (adipose and muscle tissue. Methods Serum from overweight and obese subjects fed low or high dairy diets for 28 days was added to culture medium (similar to conditioned media to treat cultured adipocytes and muscle cells for 48 hours. Results Treatment with high dairy group conditioned media resulted in 40% increased SIRT1 gene expression in both tissues (p Conclusions These data indicate that dairy consumption leads to systemic effects, which may promote mitochondrial biogenesis in key target tissues such as muscle and adipose tissue both by direct activation of SIRT1 as well as by SIRT1-independent pathways.

  11. Alternative function for the mitochondrial SAM complex in biogenesis of alpha-helical TOM proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovski, Diana; Guiard, Bernard; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2007-12-03

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains two preprotein translocases: the general translocase of outer membrane (TOM) and the beta-barrel-specific sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM functions as the central entry gate for nuclear-encoded proteins. The channel-forming Tom40 is a beta-barrel protein, whereas all Tom receptors and small Tom proteins are membrane anchored by a transmembrane alpha-helical segment in their N- or C-terminal portion. Synthesis of Tom precursors takes place in the cytosol, and their import occurs via preexisting TOM complexes. The precursor of Tom40 is then transferred to SAM for membrane insertion and assembly. Unexpectedly, we find that the biogenesis of alpha-helical Tom proteins with a membrane anchor in the C-terminal portion is SAM dependent. Each SAM protein is necessary for efficient membrane integration of the receptor Tom22, whereas assembly of the small Tom proteins depends on Sam37. Thus, the substrate specificity of SAM is not restricted to beta-barrel proteins but also includes the majority of alpha-helical Tom proteins.

  12. Low-Dose Methylmercury-Induced Genes Regulate Mitochondrial Biogenesis via miR-25 in Immortalized Human Embryonic Neural Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjin Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are essential organelles and important targets for environmental pollutants. The detection of mitochondrial biogenesis and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and p53 levels following low-dose methylmercury (MeHg exposure could expand our understanding of underlying mechanisms. Here, the sensitivity of immortalized human neural progenitor cells (ihNPCs upon exposure to MeHg was investigated. We found that MeHg altered cell viability and the number of 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU-positive cells. We also observed that low-dose MeHg exposure increased the mRNA expression of cell cycle regulators. We observed that MeHg induced ROS production in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, mRNA levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gammacoactivator-1α (PGC-1α, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM and p53-controlled ribonucleotide reductase (p53R2 were significantly elevated, which were correlated with the increase of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA copy number at a concentration as low as 10 nM. Moreover, we examined the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs known as regulatory miRNAs of p53 (i.e., miR-30d, miR-1285, miR-25. We found that the expression of these miRNAs was significantly downregulated upon MeHg treatment. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-25 resulted in significantly reducted p53 protein levels and decreased mRNA expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis regulation. Taken together, these results demonstrated that MeHg could induce developmental neurotoxicity in ihNPCs through altering mitochondrial functions and the expression of miRNA.

  13. Coordinated Upregulation of Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Autophagy in Breast Cancer Cells: The Role of Dynamin Related Protein-1 and Implication for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive mitochondrial fission was shown to promote cell transformation and tumor growth. It remains elusive how mitochondrial quality is regulated in such conditions. Here, we show that upregulation of mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin related protein-1 (Drp1, was accompanied with increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers (PGC1α, NRF1, and Tfam in breast cancer cells. However, mitochondrial number was reduced, which was associated with lower mitochondrial oxidative capacity in breast cancer cells. This contrast might be owing to enhanced mitochondrial turnover through autophagy, because an increased population of autophagic vacuoles engulfing mitochondria was observed in the cancer cells. Consistently, BNIP3 (a mitochondrial autophagy marker and autophagic flux were significantly upregulated, indicative of augmented mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy. The upregulation of Drp1 and BNIP3 was also observed in vivo (human breast carcinomas. Importantly, inhibition of Drp1 significantly suppressed mitochondrial autophagy, metabolic reprogramming, and cancer cell viability. Together, this study reveals coordinated increase of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy in which Drp1 plays a central role regulating breast cancer cell metabolism and survival. Given the emerging evidence of PGC1α contributing to tumor growth, it will be of critical importance to target both mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy for effective cancer therapeutics.

  14. Coordinated Upregulation of Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Autophagy in Breast Cancer Cells: The Role of Dynamin Related Protein-1 and Implication for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Peng; Liu, Longhua; Zheng, Louise D.; Payne, Kyle K.; Idowu, Michael O.; Zhang, Jinfeng; Schmelz, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Overactive mitochondrial fission was shown to promote cell transformation and tumor growth. It remains elusive how mitochondrial quality is regulated in such conditions. Here, we show that upregulation of mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin related protein-1 (Drp1), was accompanied with increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers (PGC1α, NRF1, and Tfam) in breast cancer cells. However, mitochondrial number was reduced, which was associated with lower mitochondrial oxidative capacity in breast cancer cells. This contrast might be owing to enhanced mitochondrial turnover through autophagy, because an increased population of autophagic vacuoles engulfing mitochondria was observed in the cancer cells. Consistently, BNIP3 (a mitochondrial autophagy marker) and autophagic flux were significantly upregulated, indicative of augmented mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy). The upregulation of Drp1 and BNIP3 was also observed in vivo (human breast carcinomas). Importantly, inhibition of Drp1 significantly suppressed mitochondrial autophagy, metabolic reprogramming, and cancer cell viability. Together, this study reveals coordinated increase of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy in which Drp1 plays a central role regulating breast cancer cell metabolism and survival. Given the emerging evidence of PGC1α contributing to tumor growth, it will be of critical importance to target both mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy for effective cancer therapeutics. PMID:27746856

  15. Mia40 and MINOS act in parallel with Ccs1 in the biogenesis of mitochondrial Sod1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varabyova, Aksana; Topf, Ulrike; Kwiatkowska, Paulina; Wrobel, Lidia; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2013-10-01

    Superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1) is a major superoxide-scavenging enzyme in the eukaryotic cell, and is localized in the cytosol and intermembrane space of mitochondria. Sod1 requires its specific chaperone Ccs1 and disulfide bond formation in order to be retained in the intermembrane space. Our study identified a pool of Sod1 that is present in the reduced state in mitochondria that lack Ccs1. We created yeast mutants with mutations in highly conserved amino acid residues corresponding to human mutations that cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and found that some of the mutant proteins were present in the reduced state. These mutant variants of Sod1 were efficiently localized in mitochondria. Localization of the reduced, Ccs1-independent forms of Sod1 relied on Mia40, an essential component of the mitochondrial intermembrane space import and assembly pathway that is responsible for the biogenesis of intermembrane space proteins. Furthermore, the mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS), which is responsible for mitochondrial membrane architecture, differentially modulated the presence of reduced Sod1 in mitochondria. Thus, we identified novel mitochondrial players that are possibly involved in pathological conditions caused by changes in the biogenesis of Sod1. © 2013 FEBS.

  16. Senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew S; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana M; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A T; Feagins, Alicia R; Basler, Christopher F; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J; Lavin, Martin F; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) has been linked to the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here we identified a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells that had undergone depletion of SETX and SETX-deficient cells derived from patients with AOA2 had higher expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection than did wild-type cells. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates the activity of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) at genes stimulated after a virus is sensed and thus controls the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of various RNA viruses (e.g., influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link among inborn errors in SETX, susceptibility to infection and the development of neurologic disorders.

  17. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis signaling by the upregulation of PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in C2C12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoo; Park, Yeonhwa

    2015-04-01

    Along with its effect on body fat reduction, dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been reported to improve physical activity and endurance capacity in mice. It has been suggested these effects may in part be due to physiological changes in skeletal muscle, however, the mode of action is not completely understood. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the relevant mechanisms of CLA isomers for mitochondrial biogenesis, one of the most important adaptive responses in skeletal muscle. Both cis-9,trans-11 (c9,t11) and trans-10,cis-12 (t10,c12) CLA isomers increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), however, only the t10,c12 isomer, but not c9,t11, increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) compared to the control. Among downstream biomarkers of PGC-1α, the CLA mixed isomer enhanced the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPARδ). Both c9,t11 and t10,c12 CLA isomers increased expression of nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), while the c9,t11 increased expression of cytochrome c (Cyt C) and t10,c12 CLA increased expression of voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), respectively. Both CLA isomers significantly increased mitochondrial DNA copy number compared to that of control. These findings suggest that the individual CLA isomers potentiate mitochondrial biogenesis via PGC-1α-NRF-1-Tfam signaling cascade, although downstream regulation may be isomer dependent.

  18. Mitofusin 2 Deficiency Affects Energy Metabolism and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in MEF Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kawalec

    Full Text Available Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2, mitochondrial outer membrane protein which is involved in rearrangement of these organelles, was first described in pathology of hypertension and diabetes, and more recently much attention is paid to its functions in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A neuropathy (CMT2A. Here, cellular energy metabolism was investigated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF differing in the presence of the Mfn2 gene; control (MEFwt and with Mfn2 gene depleted MEFMfn2-/-. These two cell lines were compared in terms of various parameters characterizing mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here, we have shown that relative rate of proliferation of MEFMfn2-/- cells versus control fibroblasts depend on serum supplementation of the growth media. Moreover, MEFMfn2-/- cells exhibited significantly increased respiration rate in comparison to MEFwt, regardless of serum supplementation of the medium. This effect was correlated with increased level of mitochondrial markers (TOM20 and NAO as well as mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α protein levels and unchanged total ATP content. Interestingly, mitochondrial DNA content in MEFMfn2-/- cells was not reduced. Fundamentally, these results are in contrast to a commonly accepted belief that mitofusin 2 deficiency inevitably results in debilitation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. However, we suggest a balance between negative metabolic consequences of mitofusin 2 deficiency and adaptive processes exemplified by increased level of PGC-1α and TFAM transcription factor which prevent an excessive depletion of mtDNA and severe impairment of cell metabolism.

  19. Sam37 is crucial for formation of the mitochondrial TOM-SAM supercomplex, thereby promoting β-barrel biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Ellenrieder, Lars; Qiu, Jian; Bohnert, Maria; Zufall, Nicole; van der Laan, Martin; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils; Becker, Thomas

    2015-09-28

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins requires two preprotein translocases, the general translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM and SAM form a supercomplex that promotes transfer of β-barrel precursors. The SAM core complex contains the channel protein Sam50, which cooperates with Sam35 in precursor recognition, and the peripheral membrane protein Sam37. The molecular function of Sam37 has been unknown. We report that Sam37 is crucial for formation of the TOM-SAM supercomplex. Sam37 interacts with the receptor domain of Tom22 on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane and links TOM and SAM complexes. Sam37 thus promotes efficient transfer of β-barrel precursors to the SAM complex. We conclude that Sam37 functions as a coupling factor of the translocase supercomplex of the mitochondrial outer membrane. © 2015 Wenz et al.

  20. SOD2 deficient erythroid cells up-regulate transferrin receptor and down-regulate mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent M Martin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mice irradiated and reconstituted with hematopoietic cells lacking manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2 show a persistent hemolytic anemia similar to human sideroblastic anemia (SA, including characteristic intra-mitochondrial iron deposition. SA is primarily an acquired, clonal marrow disorder occurring in individuals over 60 years of age with uncertain etiology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To define early events in the pathogenesis of this murine model of SA, we compared erythroid differentiation of Sod2⁻/⁻ and normal bone marrow cells using flow cytometry and gene expression profiling of erythroblasts. The predominant transcriptional differences observed include widespread down-regulation of mitochondrial metabolic pathways and mitochondrial biogenesis. Multiple nuclear encoded subunits of complexes I-IV of the electron transport chain, ATP synthase (complex V, TCA cycle and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins were coordinately down-regulated in Sod2⁻/⁻ erythroblasts. Despite iron accumulation within mitochondria, we found increased expression of transferrin receptor, Tfrc, at both the transcript and protein level in SOD2 deficient cells, suggesting deregulation of iron delivery. Interestingly, there was decreased expression of ABCb7, the gene responsible for X-linked hereditary SA with ataxia, a component required for iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that in erythroblasts, mitochondrial oxidative stress reduces expression of multiple nuclear genes encoding components of the respiratory chain, TCA cycle and mitochondrial protein synthesis. An additional target of particular relevance for SA is iron:sulfur cluster biosynthesis. By decreasing transcription of components of cluster synthesis machinery, both iron utilization and regulation of iron uptake are impacted, contributing to the sideroblastic phenotype.

  1. PGC-1α mediates mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation in cancer cells to promote metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBleu, Valerie S; O'Connell, Joyce T; Gonzalez Herrera, Karina N; Wikman, Harriet; Pantel, Klaus; Haigis, Marcia C; de Carvalho, Fernanda Machado; Damascena, Aline; Domingos Chinen, Ludmilla Thome; Rocha, Rafael M; Asara, John M; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-10-01

    Cancer cells can divert metabolites into anabolic pathways to support their rapid proliferation and to accumulate the cellular building blocks required for tumour growth. However, the specific bioenergetic profile of invasive and metastatic cancer cells is unknown. Here we report that migratory/invasive cancer cells specifically favour mitochondrial respiration and increased ATP production. Invasive cancer cells use the transcription coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha (PPARGC1A, also known as PGC-1α) to enhance oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial biogenesis and the oxygen consumption rate. Clinical analysis of human invasive breast cancers revealed a strong correlation between PGC-1α expression in invasive cancer cells and the formation of distant metastases. Silencing of PGC-1α in cancer cells suspended their invasive potential and attenuated metastasis without affecting proliferation, primary tumour growth or the epithelial-to-mesenchymal program. Inherent genetics of cancer cells can determine the transcriptome framework associated with invasion and metastasis, and mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration induced by PGC-1α are also essential for functional motility of cancer cells and metastasis.

  2. Chronic electrical stimulation drives mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle of a lizard, Varanus exanthematicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Paul J; Nichols, Scott D; Lindstedt, Stan L

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the capacity for phenotypic plasticity of skeletal muscle from Varanus exanthematicus, the savannah monitor lizard. Iliofibularis muscle from one leg of each lizard was electrically stimulated for 8 weeks. Both stimulated and contralateral control muscles were collected and processed for electron microscopy. We used stereological analysis of muscle cross-sections to quantify the volume densities of contractile elements, sarcoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and intracellular lipids. We found that mitochondrial volume density was approximately fourfold higher in the stimulated muscle compared to controls, which were similar to previously reported values. Sarcoplasmic reticulum volume density was reduced by an amount similar to the increase in mitochondrial volume density while the volume density of contractile elements remained unchanged. Intracellular lipid accumulation was visibly apparent in many stimulated muscle sections but the volume density of lipids did not reach a significant difference. Although monitor lizards lack the highly developed aerobic metabolism of mammals, they appear to possess the capacity for muscle plasticity.

  3. Methionine restriction decreases endogenous oxidative molecular damage and increases mitochondrial biogenesis and uncoupling protein 4 in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudí, Alba; Caro, Pilar; Jové, Mariona; Gómez, José; Boada, Jordi; Ayala, Victoria; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Barja, Gustavo; Pamplona, Reinald

    2007-12-01

    Aging plays a central role in the occurrence of neurodegenerative diseases. Caloric restriction (CR) mitigates oxidative stress by decreasing the rate of generation of endogenous damage, a mechanism that can contribute to the slowing of the aging rate induced by this intervention. Various reports have recently linked methionine to aging, and methionine restriction (MetR) without energy restriction also increases life span. We have thus hypothesized that MetR can be responsible, at least in part, for the decrease in endogenous oxidative damage in CR. In this investigation we subjected male rats to exactly the same dietary protocol of MetR that is known to increase their life span. We have found that MetR: (1) decreases the mitochondrial complex I content and activity, as well as complex III content, while the complex II and IV, the mitochondrial flavoprotein apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and ATP content are unchanged; (2) increases the mitochondrial biogenesis factor PGC-1alpha; (3) increases the resistance of brain to metabolic and oxidative stress by increasing mitochondrial uncoupling protein 4 uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4); and (4) decreases mitochondrial oxidative DNA damage and all five different markers of protein oxidation measured and lowers membrane unsaturation in rat brain. No changes were detected for protein amino acid composition. These beneficial MetR-induced changes likely derived from metabolic reprogramming at the cellular and tissue level can play a key role in the protection against aging-associated neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Quality control mechanisms of protein biogenesis: proteostasis dies hard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Jan Bergmann

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis of proteins entails a complex series of chemical reactions that transform the information stored in the nucleic acid sequence into a polypeptide chain that needs to properly fold and reach its functional location in or outside the cell. It is of no surprise that errors might occur that alter the polypeptide sequence leading to a non-functional proteins or that impede delivery of proteins at the appropriate site of activity. In order to minimize such mistakes and guarantee the synthesis of the correct amount and quality of the proteome, cells have developed folding, quality control, degradation and transport mechanisms that ensure and tightly regulate protein biogenesis. Genetic mutations, harsh environmental conditions or attack by pathogens can subvert the cellular quality control machineries and perturb cellular proteostasis leading to pathological conditions. This review summarizes basic concepts of the flow of information from DNA to folded and active proteins and to the variable fidelity (from incredibly high to quite sloppy characterizing these processes. We will give particular emphasis on events that maintain or recover the homeostasis of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, a major site of proteins synthesis and folding in eukaryotic cells. Finally, we will report on how cells can adapt to stressful conditions, how perturbation of ER homeostasis may result in diseases and how these can be treated.

  5. The neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to confer tolerance of neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells to the mitochondrial stressor rotenone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Kristin Kathleen; Uittenbogaard, Martine [Department of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Chiaramello, Anne, E-mail: achiaram@gwu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The fundamental question of how and which neuronal specific transcription factors tailor mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to the need of developing neuronal cells has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we report that the neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 possesses mitochondrial biogenic properties by amplifying the mitochondrial DNA content and TFAM expression levels, a key regulator for mitochondrial biogenesis. NeuroD6-mediated increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in the neuronal progenitor-like PC12-NEUROD6 cells is concomitant with enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetic functions, including increased expression levels of specific subunits of respiratory complexes of the electron transport chain, elevated mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic capacity of PC12-NEUROD6 cells to generate an energetic reserve, which confers tolerance to the mitochondrial stressor, rotenone. We found that NeuroD6 induces an adaptive bioenergetic response throughout rotenone treatment involving maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels in conjunction with preservation of the actin network. In conclusion, our results support the concept that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in regulating and coordinating the onset of neuronal differentiation with acquisition of adequate mitochondrial mass and energetic capacity to ensure energy demanding events, such as cytoskeletal remodeling, plasmalemmal expansion, and growth cone formation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 induces mitochondrial biogenesis in neuroprogenitor-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic reserve of the neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 increases the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 confers tolerance to rotenone via an adaptive

  6. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) biogenesis: visualization and duel incorporation of BrdU and EdU into newly synthesized mtDNA in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Stephen I; Edwards, James L; Backus, Carey; McLean, Lisa L; Haines, Kristine M; Feldman, Eva L

    2010-02-01

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular energy and are the focus of a large number of studies examining the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and biogenesis in healthy and diseased conditions. One approach to monitoring mitochondrial biogenesis is to measure the rate of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. We developed a sensitive technique to visualize newly synthesized mtDNA in individual cells to study mtDNA replication within subcellular compartments of neurons. The technique combines the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and/or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into mtDNA, together with a tyramide signal amplification protocol. Employing this technique, we visualized and measured mtDNA biogenesis in individual cells. The labeling procedure for EdU allows for more comprehensive results by allowing the comparison of its incorporation with other intracellular markers, because it does not require the harsh acid or enzyme digests necessary to recover the BrdU epitope. In addition, the utilization of both BrdU and EdU permits sequential pulse-chase experiments to follow the intracellular localization of mtDNA replication. The ability to quantify mitochondrial biogenesis provides an essential tool for investigating the alterations in mitochondrial dynamics involved in the pathogenesis of multiple cellular disorders, including neuropathies and neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is associated with mTOR regulation in hepatocytes of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagland, Hanne R.; Nilsson, Linn I.H. [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway); Burri, Lena [Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Haukeland University Hospital (Norway); Nikolaisen, Julie [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway); Berge, Rolf K. [Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Haukeland University Hospital (Norway); Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital (Norway); Tronstad, Karl J., E-mail: karl.tronstad@biomed.uib.no [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated mechanisms of mitochondrial regulation in rat hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) was employed to activate mitochondrial oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was confirmed that PPAR target genes were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism involved activation mTOR. -- Abstract: The hypolipidemic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators has been explained by increasing mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, as observed in livers of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA). PPAR-activation does, however, not fully explain the metabolic adaptations observed in hepatocytes after treatment with TTA. We therefore characterized the mitochondrial effects, and linked this to signalling by the metabolic sensor, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In hepatocytes isolated from TTA-treated rats, the changes in cellular content and morphology were consistent with hypertrophy. This was associated with induction of multiple mitochondrial biomarkers, including mitochondrial DNA, citrate synthase and mRNAs of mitochondrial proteins. Transcription analysis further confirmed activation of PPAR{alpha}-associated genes, in addition to genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Analysis of mitochondrial respiration revealed that the capacity of both electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were increased. These effects coincided with activation of the stress related factor, ERK1/2, and mTOR. The protein level and phosphorylation of the downstream mTOR actors eIF4G and 4E-BP1 were induced. In summary, TTA increases mitochondrial respiration by inducing hypertrophy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rat hepatocytes, via adaptive regulation of PPARs as well as mTOR.

  8. A novel mechanism involved in the coupling of mitochondrial biogenesis to oxidative phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Ostojić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are essential organelles that are central to a multitude of cellular processes, including oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, which produces most of the ATP in animal cells. Thus it is important to understand not only the mechanisms and biogenesis of this energy production machinery but also how it is regulated in both physiological and pathological contexts. A recent study by Ostojić et al. [Cell Metabolism (2013 18, 567-577] has uncovered a regulatory loop by which the biogenesis of a major enzyme of the OXPHOS pathway, the respiratory complex III, is coupled to the energy producing activity of the mitochondria.

  9. Mitochondrial gene therapy improves respiration, biogenesis, and transcription in G11778A Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and T8993G Leigh's syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Shilpa; Bergquist, Kristen; Young, Kisha; Gnaiger, Erich; Rao, Raj R; Bennett, James P

    2012-06-01

    Many incurable mitochondrial disorders result from mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and impaired respiration. Leigh's syndrome (LS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of infants, and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) causes blindness in young adults. Treatment of LHON and LS cells harboring G11778A and T8993G mutant mtDNA, respectively, by >90%, with healthy donor mtDNA complexed with recombinant human mitochondrial transcription factor A (rhTFAM), improved mitochondrial respiration by ∼1.2-fold in LHON cells and restored >50% ATP synthase function in LS cells. Mitochondrial replication, transcription, and translation of key respiratory genes and proteins were increased in the short term. Increased NRF1, TFAMB1, and TFAMA expression alluded to the activation of mitochondrial biogenesis as a mechanism for improving mitochondrial respiration. These results represent the development of a therapeutic approach for LHON and LS patients in the near future.

  10. Lipoamide Acts as an Indirect Antioxidant by Simultaneously Stimulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Phase II Antioxidant Enzyme Systems in ARPE-19 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lin; Liu, Zhongbo; Jia, Haiqun; Feng, Zhihui; Liu, Jiankang; Li, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that pretreatment with lipoamide (LM) more effectively than alpha-lipoic acid (LA) protected retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from the acrolein-induced damage. However, the reasons and mechanisms for the greater effect of LM than LA are unclear. We hypothesize that LM, rather than the more direct antioxidant LA, may act more as an indirect antioxidant. In the present study, we treated ARPE-19 cells with LA and LM and compared their effects on activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and induction of phase II enzyme systems. It is found that LM is more effective than LA on increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and inducing the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its translocation to the nucleus, leading to an increase in expression or activity of phase II antioxidant enzymes (NQO-1, GST, GCL, catalase and Cu/Zn SOD). Further study demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II enzyme induction are closely coupled via energy requirements. These results suggest that LM, compared with the direct antioxidant LA, plays its protective effect on oxidative damage more as an indirect antioxidant to simultaneously stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and induction of phase II antioxidant enzymes.

  11. Tim50a, a nuclear isoform of the mitochondrial Tim50, interacts with proteins involved in snRNP biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Melvin L

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cajal body (CB is a nuclear suborganelle involved in the biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs, which are vital for pre-mRNA splicing. Newly imported Sm-class snRNPs traffic through CBs, where the snRNA component of the snRNP is modified, and then target to other nuclear domains such as speckles and perichromatin fibrils. It is not known how nascent snRNPs localize to the CB and are released from this structure after modification. The marker protein for CBs, coilin, may play a role in snRNP biogenesis given that it can interact with snRNPs and SMN, the protein mutated in Spinal Muscular Atrophy. Loss of coilin function in mice leads to significant viability and fertility problems and altered CB formation. Results In this report, we identify a minor isoform of the mitochondrial Tim50, Tim50a, as a coilin interacting protein. The Tim50a transcript can be detected in some cancer cell lines and normal brain tissue. The Tim50a protein differs only from Tim50 in that it contains an additional 103 aa N-terminal to the translation start of Tim50. Importantly, a putative nuclear localization signal is found within these 103 residues. In contrast to Tim50, which localizes to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, Tim50a is strictly nuclear and is enriched in speckles with snRNPs. In addition to coilin, Tim50a interacts with snRNPs and SMN. Competition binding experiments demonstrate that coilin competes with Sm proteins of snRNPs and SMN for binding sites on Tim50a. Conclusion Tim50a may play a role in snRNP biogenesis given its cellular localization and protein interaction characteristics. We hypothesize that Tim50a takes part in the release of snRNPs and SMN from the CB.

  12. Exercise, but not quercetin, ameliorates inflammation, mitochondrial biogenesis, and lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle after strenuous exercise by high-fat diet mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soon Mi; Park, Hee Geun; Jun, Jong Kui; Lee, Wang Lok

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether moderate exercise and quercetin intake with a low fat diet contribute to inflammatory cytokine production, mitochondrial biogenesis, and lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle after strenuous exercise by high-fat diet mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into four groups: (1) High-fat for 12 weeks and low-fat diet control (C; n = 6); (2) high-fat diet for 12 weeks and low-fat diet with quercetin (Q; n = 4); (3) high-fat diet for 12 weeks and low-fat diet with exercise (E; n = 4); or (4) high-fat diet for 12 weeks and low-fat diet with exercise and quercetin (EQ; n = 5). Quercetin (10 mg/kg) was administered once per day, 5 day/week for 8 weeks. Exercise training was performed at moderate intensity for 8 weeks, 5 days/week for 30-60 min/day. Mice were subjected to a strenuous exercise bout of 60 min at a speed of 25 m/min (VO2 max 85%) conducted as an exercise-induced fatigue just before sacrifice. As results, body weights were significantly different among the groups. Exercise training significantly reduced inflammatory cytokines after strenuous exercise in skeletal muscle of high-fat diet mice. Exercise training increased Tfam mRNA in the soleus muscle after strenuous exercise. Exercise training significantly decreased lipogenesis markers in skeletal muscle of obese mice after strenuous exercise. Moderate exercise significantly increased lipolysis markers in the tibialis anterior muscle. These findings suggest that exercise training reduced inflammatory cytokine levels and improved mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid metabolism. However quercetin supplementation did not affect these parameters. Thus, long-term moderate exercise training has positive effects on obesity.

  13. The effects of exercise and cold exposure on mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Nana; Park, Jonghoon; Lim, Kiwon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise or/and cold exposure regulate mitochondria biogenesis-related gene expression in soleus and inguinal adipose tissue of mice. [Methods] Forty ICR 5-week old male mice were divided into four groups: thermoneutrality-untrained (23 ± 1 °C in room temperature, n=10), cold-water immersion (24 ± 1 °C, n=10), exercise in neutral temperature (34 ± 1 °C, n=10), and exercise in cold temperature (24 ± 1 °C, n=10). The mice performed swimming exercise (30 min to 60 min, 5 times) for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, we confirmed mitochondrial biogenesis-related gene expression changes for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factors 1 (NRF1), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in soleus muscle and inguinal adipose tissue, and the related protein expression in soleus muscle. [Results] In soleus muscle, PGC-1α expression significantly increased in response to cold exposure (p = 0.006) and exercise (p = 0.05). There was also significant interaction between exercise and cold exposure (p = 0.005). Only exercise had a significant effect on NRF1 relative expression (p=0.001). Neither cold exposure nor the interaction showed significant effects (p = 0.1222 and p = 0.875, respectively). Relative Tfam expression did not show any significant effect from exercise. In inguinal adipose tissue, relative PGC-1α expression did not significantly change in any group. NRF1 expression showed a significant change from exercise (p = 0.01) and cold exposure (p = 0.011). There was also a significant interaction between exercise and cold exposure (p = 0.000). Tfam mRNA expression showed a significant effect from exercise (p=0.000) and an interaction between exercise and cold exposure (p=0.001). Only temperature significantly affected PGC-1α protein levels (p=0.045). Neither exercise nor the interaction were significant (p = 0.397 and p = 0.292, respectively

  14. Microprocessor activity controls differential miRNA biogenesis In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Thomas; Marsico, Annalisa; Gehre, Maja; Orom, Ulf Andersson

    2014-10-23

    In miRNA biogenesis, pri-miRNA transcripts are converted into pre-miRNA hairpins. The in vivo properties of this process remain enigmatic. Here, we determine in vivo transcriptome-wide pri-miRNA processing using next-generation sequencing of chromatin-associated pri-miRNAs. We identify a distinctive Microprocessor signature in the transcriptome profile from which efficiency of the endogenous processing event can be accurately quantified. This analysis reveals differential susceptibility to Microprocessor cleavage as a key regulatory step in miRNA biogenesis. Processing is highly variable among pri-miRNAs and a better predictor of miRNA abundance than primary transcription itself. Processing is also largely stable across three cell lines, suggesting a major contribution of sequence determinants. On the basis of differential processing efficiencies, we define functionality for short sequence features adjacent to the pre-miRNA hairpin. In conclusion, we identify Microprocessor as the main hub for diversified miRNA output and suggest a role for uncoupling miRNA biogenesis from host gene expression.

  15. Rosiglitazone Induces Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Differentiated Murine 3T3-L1 and C3H/10T1/2 Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, James X; Klein, Jean-Louis D; Qiu, Yang; Xie, Mi; Johnson, Jennifer H; Waters, K Michelle; Zhang, Vivian; Kashatus, Jennifer A; Remlinger, Katja S; Bing, Nan; Crosby, Renae M; Jackson, Tymissha K; Witherspoon, Sam M; Moore, John T; Ryan, Terence E; Neill, Sue D; Strum, Jay C

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that PPARγ agonists, including rosiglitazone (RSG), induce adipose mitochondrial biogenesis. By systematically analyzing mitochondrial gene expression in two common murine adipocyte models, the current study aimed to further establish the direct role of RSG and capture temporal changes in gene transcription. Microarray profiling revealed that in fully differentiated 3T3-L1 and C3H/10T1/2 adipocytes treated with RSG or DMSO vehicle for 1, 2, 4, 7, 24, and 48 hrs, RSG overwhelmingly increased mitochondrial gene transcripts time dependently. The timing of the increases was consistent with the cascade of organelle biogenesis, that is, initiated by induction of transcription factor(s), followed by increases in the biosynthesis machinery, and then by increases in functional components. The transcriptional increases were further validated by increased mitochondrial staining, citrate synthase activity, and O(2) consumption, and were found to be associated with increased adiponectin secretion. The work provided further insight on the mechanism of PPARγ-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in differentiated adipocytes.

  16. Evidences that maternal swimming exercise improves antioxidant defenses and induces mitochondrial biogenesis in the brain of young Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino, T B; Longoni, A; Kudo, K Y; Stone, V; Rech, A; de Assis, A M; Scherer, E B S; da Cunha, M J; Wyse, A T S; Pettenuzzo, L F; Leipnitz, G; Matté, C

    2013-08-29

    Physical exercise during pregnancy has been considered beneficial to mother and child. Recent studies showed that maternal swimming improves memory in the offspring, increases hippocampal neurogenesis and levels of neurotrophic factors. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of maternal swimming during pregnancy on redox status and mitochondrial parameters in brain structures from the offspring. Adult female Wistar rats were submitted to five swimming sessions (30 min/day) prior to mating with adult male Wistar rats, and then trained during the pregnancy (five sessions of 30-min swimming/week). The litter was sacrificed when 7 days old, when cerebellum, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum were dissected. We evaluated the production of reactive species and antioxidant status, measuring the activities of superoxide-dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-peroxidase (GPx), as well as non-enzymatic antioxidants. We also investigated a potential mitochondrial biogenesis regarding mitochondrion mass and membrane potential, through cytometric approaches. Our results showed that maternal swimming exercise promoted an increase in reactive species levels in cerebellum, parietal cortex, and hippocampus, demonstrated by an increase in dichlorofluorescein oxidation. Mitochondrial superoxide was reduced in cerebellum and parietal cortex, while nitrite levels were increased in cerebellum, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. Antioxidant status was improved in cerebellum, parietal cortex, and hippocampus. SOD activity was increased in parietal cortex, and was not altered in the remaining brain structures. CAT and GPx activities, as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant potential, were increased in cerebellum, parietal cortex, and hippocampus of rats whose mothers were exercised. Finally, we observed an increased mitochondrial mass and membrane potential, suggesting mitochondriogenesis, in cerebellum and parietal cortex of pups subjected to

  17. Amla Enhances Mitochondrial Spare Respiratory Capacity by Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Antioxidant Systems in a Murine Skeletal Muscle Cell Line

    OpenAIRE

    Hirotaka Yamamoto; Katsutaro Morino; Lemecha Mengistu; Taishi Ishibashi; Kohei Kiriyama; Takao Ikami; Hiroshi Maegawa

    2016-01-01

    Amla is one of the most important plants in Indian traditional medicine and has been shown to improve various age-related disorders while decreasing oxidative stress. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a proposed cause of aging through elevated oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of Amla on mitochondrial function in C2C12 myotubes, a murine skeletal muscle cell model with abundant mitochondria. Based on cell flux analysis, treatment with an extract of Amla fruit enhanced mi...

  18. miR-125b affects mitochondrial biogenesis and impairs brite adipocyte formation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maude Giroud

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-125b-5p plays an important role in the repression of brite adipocyte function by modulating oxygen consumption and mitochondrial gene expression.

  19. Postnatal Hyperoxia Exposure Durably Impairs Right Ventricular Function and Mitochondrial Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Kara N; Kumari, Santosh; Tetri, Laura H; Barton, Greg; Braun, Rudolf K; Hacker, Timothy A; Eldridge, Marlowe W

    2017-05-01

    Prematurity complicates 12% of births, and young adults with a history of prematurity are at risk to develop right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy and impairment. The long-term risk for pulmonary vascular disease, as well as mechanisms of RV dysfunction and ventricular-vascular uncoupling after prematurity, remain poorly defined. Using an established model of prematurity-related lung disease, pups from timed-pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to normoxia or hyperoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen, 0.85) exposure for the first 14 days of life. After aging to 1 year in standard conditions, rats underwent hemodynamic assessment followed by tissue harvest for biochemical and histological evaluation. Aged hyperoxia-exposed rats developed significantly greater RV hypertrophy, associated with a 40% increase in RV systolic pressures. Although cardiac index was similar, hyperoxia-exposed rats demonstrated a reduced RV ejection fraction and significant RV-pulmonary vascular uncoupling. Hyperoxia-exposed RV cardiomyocytes demonstrated evidence of mitochondrial dysregulation and mitochondrial DNA damage, suggesting potential mitochondrial dysfunction as a cause of RV dysfunction. Aged rats exposed to postnatal hyperoxia recapitulate many features of young adults born prematurely, including increased RV hypertrophy and decreased RV ejection fraction. Our data suggest that postnatal hyperoxia exposure results in mitochondrial dysregulation that persists into adulthood with eventual RV dysfunction. Further evaluation of long-term mitochondrial function is warranted in both animal models of premature lung disease and in human adults who were born preterm.

  20. Control of mitochondrial volume by mitochondrial metabolic water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteilla, Louis; Devin, Anne; Carriere, Audrey; Salin, Bénédicte; Schaeffer, Jacques; Rigoulet, Michel

    2011-11-01

    It is well-known that mitochondrial volume largely controls mitochondrial functioning. We investigate whether metabolic water produced by oxidative phosphorylation could be involved in mitochondrial volume regulation. We modulated the generation of this water in liver mitochondria and assess their volume by two independent techniques. In liver mitochondria, the mitochondrial volume was specifically decreased when no water was produced independently of energetic parameters and uncoupling activity. In all other conditions associated with water generation, there was no significant change in mitochondrial metabolic volume. Altogether these data demonstrate that mitochondrial volume is regulated, independently of energetic status, by the mitochondrial metabolic water that acts as a signal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

  1. A Crucial Role of the Mitochondrial Protein Import Receptor MOM19 for the Biogenesis of Mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkness, Troy A.A.; Nargang, Frank E.; Klei, Ida van der; Neupert, Walter; Lill, Roland

    1994-01-01

    The novel genetic method of "sheltered RIP" (repeat induced point mutation) was used to generate a Neurospora crassa mutant in which MOM19, a component of the protein import machinery of the mitochondrial outer membrane, can be depleted. Deficiency in MOM19 resulted in a severe growth defect, but

  2. Dual Role of Mitofilin in Mitochondrial Membrane Organization and Protein Biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von der Malsburg, Karina; Mueller, Judith M.; Bohnert, Maria; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Kwiatkowska, Paulina; Becker, Thomas; Loniewska-Lwowska, Adrianna; Wiese, Sebastian; Rao, Sanjana; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Hutu, Dana P.; Zerbes, Ralf M.; Schulze-Specking, Agnes; Meyer, Helmut E.; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Rospert, Sabine; Rehling, Peter; Meisinger, Chris; Veenhuis, Marten; Warscheid, Bettina; van der Klei, Ida J.; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Chacinska, Agnieszka; van der Laan, Martin; Müller, Judith M.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial inner membrane consists of two domains, inner boundary membrane and cristae membrane that are connected by crista junctions. Mitofilin/Fcj1 was reported to be involved in formation of crista junctions, however, different views exist on its function and possible partner proteins. We

  3. Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Abates Hyperglycaemia-Induced Neuronal Injury in Experimental Models of Diabetic Neuropathy: Effects on Mitochondrial Biogenesis, Autophagy and Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerra, Veera Ganesh; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2017-04-01

    Impaired adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) signalling under hyperglycaemic conditions is known to cause mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic sensory neurons. Facilitation of AMPK signalling is previously reported to ameliorate inflammation and induce autophagic response in various complications related to diabetes. The present study assesses the role of AMPK activation on mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and neuroinflammation in experimental diabetic neuropathy (DN) using an AMPK activator (A769662). A769662 (15 and 30 mg/kg, i.p) was administered to Sprague-Dawley rats (250-270 g) for 2 weeks after 6 weeks of streptozotocin (STZ) injection (55 mg/kg, i.p.). Behavioural parameters (mechanical/thermal hyperalgesia) and functional characteristics (motor/sensory nerve conduction velocities (MNCV and SNCV) and sciatic nerve blood flow (NBF)) were assessed. For in vitro studies, Neuro2a (N2A) cells were incubated with 25 mM glucose to simulate high glucose condition and then studied for mitochondrial dysfunction and protein expression changes. STZ administration resulted in significant hyperglycaemia (>250 mg/dl) in rats. A769662 treatment significantly improved mechanical/thermal hyperalgesia threshold and enhanced MNCV, SNCV and NBF in diabetic animals. A769662 exposure normalised the mitochondrial superoxide production, membrane depolarisation and markedly increased neurite outgrowth of N2A cells. Further, AMPK activation also abolished the NF-κB-mediated neuroinflammation. A769662 treatment increased Thr-172 phosphorylation of AMPK results in stimulated PGC-1α-directed mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy induction. Our study supports that compromised AMPK signalling in hyperglycaemic conditions causes defective mitochondrial biogenesis ultimately leading to neuronal dysfunction and associated deficits in DN and activation of AMPK can be developed as an attractive therapeutic strategy for the management of DN.

  4. Research progress of mitochondrial biogenesis and cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury%线粒体生成与脑缺血再灌注损伤的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王来; 祝世功

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are important intracellular energy supply organelles .As semi-autonomous organelles , the mitochondrial biogenesis , damage and clearance were the dynamic processes , which are dual-regulated by mitochondrial genes and nuclear genes , and maintain mitochondrial homeostasis according to the needs of the cells for energy .Recent studies provide evidence that the disorder of mitochondrial biogenesis in the neurons participates in the pathological process after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion, resulting in metabolic disturbance and cell apoptosis .This paper reviews the research progress of mitochondrion and cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury .

  5. Chromosomal localization of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TCF6), single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSBP), and endonuclease G (ENDOG), three human housekeeping genes involving in mitochondrial biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiranti, V.; Rossi, G.; DiDonato, S. [Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Carlo Besta (Italy)] [and others

    1995-01-20

    By using a PCR-based screening of a somatic cell hybrid panel and FISH, we have assigned the loci of mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSBP), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TCF6), and mitochondrial endonuclease G (ENDOG) genes to human chromosomes 7q34, 10q21, and 9q34.1, respectively. The products of these three genes are involved in fundamental aspects of mitochondrial biogenesis, such as replication and transcription of the mitochondrial genome. The chromosomal localization of these genes is important to testing whether the corresponding proteins may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of human disorders associated with qualitative or quantitative abnormalities of mitochondrial DNA. 20 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Green Tea Polyphenols Stimulate Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Improve Renal Function after Chronic Cyclosporin A Treatment in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Hasibur; Krishnasamy, Yasodha; Haque, Khujista; Lemasters, John J.; Schnellmann, Rick G.; Zhong, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that an extract from Camellia sinenesis (green tea), which contains several polyphenols, attenuates nephrotoxicity caused by cyclosporine A (CsA). Since polyphenols are stimulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (MB), this study investigated whether stimulation of MB plays a role in green tea polyphenol protection against CsA renal toxicity. Rats were fed a powdered diet containing green tea polyphenolic extract (0.1%) starting 3 days prior to CsA treatment (25 mg/kg, i.g. daily for 3 weeks). CsA alone decreased renal nuclear DNA-encoded oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) protein ATP synthase-β (AS-β) by 42%, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded OXPHOS protein NADH dehydrogenase-3 (ND3) by 87% and their associated mRNAs. Mitochondrial DNA copy number was also decreased by 78% by CsA. Immunohistochemical analysis showed decreased cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX-IV), an OXPHOS protein, in tubular cells. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α, the master regulator of MB, and mitochondrial transcription factor-A (Tfam), the transcription factor that regulates mtDNA replication and transcription, were 42% and 90% lower, respectively, in the kidneys of CsA-treated than in untreated rats. These results indicate suppression of MB by chronic CsA treatment. Green tea polyphenols alone and following CsA increased AS-β, ND3, COX-IV, mtDNA copy number, PGC-1α mRNA and protein, decreased acetylated PGC-1α, and increased Tfam mRNA and protein. In association with suppressed MB, CsA increased serum creatinine, caused loss of brush border and dilatation of proximal tubules, tubular atrophy, vacuolization, apoptosis, calcification, and increased neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin expression, leukocyte infiltration, and renal fibrosis. Green tea polyphenols markedly attenuated CsA-induced renal injury and improved renal function. Together, these results demonstrate that green tea polyphenols attenuate Cs

  7. Biogenesis of the mitochondrial TOM complex: Mim1 promotes insertion and assembly of signal-anchored receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Thomas; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Guiard, Bernard; Stojanovski, Diana; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Kutik, Stephan; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris; Wiedemann, Nils

    2008-01-04

    The translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) is the central entry gate for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial precursor proteins. All Tom proteins are also encoded by nuclear genes and synthesized as precursors in the cytosol. The channel-forming beta-barrel protein Tom40 is targeted to mitochondria via Tom receptors and inserted into the outer membrane by the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex). A further outer membrane protein, Mim1, plays a less defined role in assembly of Tom40 into the TOM complex. The three receptors Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70 are anchored in the outer membrane by a single transmembrane alpha-helix, located at the N terminus in the case of Tom20 and Tom70 (signal-anchored) or in the C-terminal portion in the case of Tom22 (tail-anchored). Insertion of the precursor of Tom22 into the outer membrane requires pre-existing Tom receptors while the import pathway of the precursors of Tom20 and Tom70 is only poorly understood. We report that Mim1 is required for efficient membrane insertion and assembly of Tom20 and Tom70, but not Tom22. We show that Mim1 associates with SAM(core) components to a large SAM complex, explaining its role in late steps of the assembly pathway of Tom40. We conclude that Mim1 is not only required for biogenesis of the beta-barrel protein Tom40 but also for membrane insertion and assembly of signal-anchored Tom receptors. Thus, Mim1 plays an important role in the efficient assembly of the mitochondrial TOM complex.

  8. Short-Chain Fatty Acid Acetate Stimulates Adipogenesis and Mitochondrial Biogenesis via GPR43 in Brown Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiamiao; Kyrou, Ioannis; Tan, Bee K; Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Ramanjaneya, Manjunath; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Patel, Vanlata; James, Sean; Kawan, Mohamed; Chen, Jing; Randeva, Harpal S

    2016-05-01

    Short-chain fatty acids play crucial roles in a range of physiological functions. However, the effects of short-chain fatty acids on brown adipose tissue have not been fully investigated. We examined the role of acetate, a short-chain fatty acid formed by fermentation in the gut, in the regulation of brown adipocyte metabolism. Our results show that acetate up-regulates adipocyte protein 2, peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, and uncoupling protein-1 expression and affects the morphological changes of brown adipocytes during adipogenesis. Moreover, an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis was observed after acetate treatment. Acetate also elicited the activation of ERK and cAMP response element-binding protein, and these responses were sensitive to G(i/o)-type G protein inactivator, Gβγ-subunit inhibitor, phospholipase C inhibitor, and MAPK kinase inhibitor, indicating a role for the G(i/o)βγ/phospholipase C/protein kinase C/MAPK kinase signaling pathway in these responses. These effects of acetate were mimicked by treatment with 4-chloro-α-(1-methylethyl)-N-2-thiazolylbenzeneacetamide, a synthetic G protein-coupled receptor 43 (GPR43) agonist and were impaired in GPR43 knockdown cells. Taken together, our results indicate that acetate may have important physiological roles in brown adipocytes through the activation of GPR43.

  9. Age associated low mitochondrial biogenesis may be explained by lack of response of PGC-1α to exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbré, Frederic; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Nascimento, Ana Lucia; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Martinez-Bello, Vladimir Essau; Tresguerres, Jesus A F; Fuentes, Teresa; Gratas-Delamarche, Arlette; Monsalve, Maria; Viña, Jose

    2012-06-01

    Low mitochondriogenesis is critical to explain loss of muscle function in aging and in the development of frailty. The aim of this work was to explain the mechanism by which mitochondriogenesis is decreased in aging and to determine to which extent it may be prevented by exercise training. We used aged rats and compared them with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α deleted mice (PGC-1α KO). PGC-1α KO mice showed a significant decrease in the mitochondriogenic pathway in muscle. In aged rats, we found a loss of exercise-induced expression of PGC-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), and of cytochrome C. Thus muscle mitochondriogenesis, which is activated by exercise training in young animals, is not in aged or PGC-1α KO ones. Other stimuli to increase PGC-1α synthesis apart from exercise training, namely cold induction or thyroid hormone treatment, were effective in young rats but not in aged ones. To sum up, the low mitochondrial biogenesis associated with aging may be due to the lack of response of PGC-1α to different stimuli. Aged rats behave as PGC-1α KO mice. Results reported here highlight the role of PGC-1α in the loss of mitochondriogenesis associated with aging and point to this important transcriptional coactivator as a target for pharmacological interventions to prevent age-associated sarcopenia.

  10. Mitochondrial quality control in cardiac diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Campos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis is a hallmark of cardiac diseases. Therefore, maintenance of mitochondrial integrity through different surveillance mechanisms is critical for cardiomyocyte survival. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings on the central role of mitochondrial quality control processes including regulation of mitochondrial redox balance, aldehyde metabolism, proteostasis, dynamics and clearance in cardiac diseases, highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets.

  11. α-Lipoic acid treatment increases mitochondrial biogenesis and promotes beige adipose features in subcutaneous adipocytes from overweight/obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Galilea, Marta; Pérez-Matute, Patricia; Prieto-Hontoria, Pedro L; Houssier, Marianne; Burrell, María A; Langin, Dominique; Martínez, J Alfredo; Moreno-Aliaga, María J

    2015-03-01

    α-Lipoic acid (α-Lip) is a natural occurring antioxidant with beneficial anti-obesity properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the putative effects of α-Lip on mitochondrial biogenesis and the acquirement of brown-like characteristics by subcutaneous adipocytes from overweight/obese subjects. Thus, fully differentiated human subcutaneous adipocytes were treated with α-Lip (100 and 250μM) for 24h for studies on mitochondrial content and morphology, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number, fatty acid oxidation enzymes and brown/beige characteristic genes. The involvement of the Sirtuin1/Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha (SIRT1/PGC-1α) pathway was also evaluated. Our results showed that α-Lip increased mitochondrial content in cultured human adipocytes as revealed by electron microscopy and by mitotracker green labeling. Moreover, an enhancement in mtDNA content was observed. This increase was accompanied by an up-regulation of SIRT1 protein levels, a decrease in PGC-1α acetylation and up-regulation of Nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1) and Mitochondrial transcription factor (Tfam) transcription factors. Enhanced oxygen consumption and fatty acid oxidation enzymes, Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 and Acyl-coenzyme A oxidase (CPT-1 and ACOX) were also observed. Mitochondria from α-Lip-treated adipocytes exhibited some morphological characteristics of brown mitochondria, and α-Lip also induced up-regulation of some brown/beige adipocytes markers such as cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector a (Cidea) and T-box 1 (Tbx1). Moreover, α-Lip up-regulated PR domain containing 16 (Prdm16) mRNA levels in treated adipocytes. Therefore, our study suggests the ability of α-Lip to promote mitochondrial biogenesis and brown-like remodeling in cultured white subcutaneous adipocytes from overweight/obese donors.

  12. Sirtuin 3, a new target of PGC-1alpha, plays an important role in the suppression of ROS and mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Kong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3 is one of the seven mammalian sirtuins, which are homologs of the yeast Sir2 gene. SIRT3 is the only sirtuin with a reported association with the human life span. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha plays important roles in adaptive thermogenesis, gluconeogenesis, mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. PGC-1alpha induces several key reactive oxygen species (ROS-detoxifying enzymes, but the molecular mechanism underlying this is not well understood. RESULTS: Here we show that PGC-1alpha strongly stimulated mouse Sirt3 gene expression in muscle cells and hepatocytes. Knockdown of PGC-1alpha led to decreased Sirt3 gene expression. PGC-1alpha activated the mouse SIRT3 promoter, which was mediated by an estrogen-related receptor (ERR binding element (ERRE (-407/-399 mapped to the promoter region. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that ERRalpha bound to the identified ERRE and PGC-1alpha co-localized with ERRalpha in the mSirt3 promoter. Knockdown of ERRalpha reduced the induction of Sirt3 by PGC-1alpha in C(2C(12 myotubes. Furthermore, Sirt3 was essential for PGC-1alpha-dependent induction of ROS-detoxifying enzymes and several components of the respiratory chain, including glutathione peroxidase-1, superoxide dismutase 2, ATP synthase 5c, and cytochrome c. Overexpression of SIRT3 or PGC-1alpha in C(2C(12 myotubes decreased basal ROS level. In contrast, knockdown of mSIRT3 increased basal ROS level and blocked the inhibitory effect of PGC-1alpha on cellular ROS production. Finally, SIRT3 stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis, and SIRT3 knockdown decreased the stimulatory effect of PGC-1alpha on mitochondrial biogenesis in C(2C(12 myotubes. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that Sirt3 functions as a downstream target gene of PGC-1alpha and mediates the PGC-1alpha effects on cellular ROS production and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus

  13. Overexpression of human selenoprotein H in neuronal cells enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and function through activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase B, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Suresh L; Mendelev, Natalia; Kumari, Santosh; Andy Li, P

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is activated by nuclear encoded transcription co-activator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), which is regulated by several upstream factors including protein kinase A and Akt/protein kinase B. We have previously shown that selenoprotein H enhances the levels of nuclear regulators for mitochondrial biogenesis, increases mitochondrial mass and improves mitochondrial respiratory rate, under physiological condition. Furthermore, overexpression of selenoprotein H protects neuronal HT22 cells from ultraviolet B irradiation-induced cell damage by lowering reactive oxygen species production, and inhibiting activation of caspase-3 and -9, as well as p53. The objective of this study is to identify the cell signaling pathways by which selenoprotein H initiates mitochondrial biogenesis. We first confirmed our previous observation that selenoprotein H transfected HT22 cells increased the protein levels of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial biogenesis factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. We then observed that total and phosphorylation of protein kinase A, Akt/protein kinase B and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) were significantly increased in selenoprotein H transfected cells compared to vector transfected HT22 cells. To verify whether the observed stimulating effects on mitochondrial biogenesis pathways are caused by selenoprotein H and mediated through CREB, we knocked down selenoprotein H mRNA level using siRNA and inhibited CREB with napthol AS-E phosphate in selenoprotein H transfected cells and repeated the measurements of the aforementioned biomarkers. Our results revealed that silencing of selenoprotein H not only decreased the protein levels of PGC-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, but also decreased the total and

  14. Regulation and quantification of cellular mitochondrial morphology and content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronstad, Karl J; Nooteboom, Marco; Nilsson, Linn I H; Nikolaisen, Julie; Sokolewicz, Maciek; Grefte, Sander; Pettersen, Ina K N; Dyrstad, Sissel; Hoel, Fredrik; Willems, Peter H G M; Koopman, Werner J H

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in signal transduction, redox homeostasis and cell survival, which extends far beyond their classical functioning in ATP production and energy metabolism. In living cells, mitochondrial content ("mitochondrial mass") depends on the cell-controlled balance between mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation. These processes are intricately linked to changes in net mitochondrial morphology and spatiotemporal positioning ("mitochondrial dynamics"), which are governed by mitochondrial fusion, fission and motility. It is becoming increasingly clear that mitochondrial mass and dynamics, as well as its ultrastructure and volume, are mechanistically linked to mitochondrial function and the cell. This means that proper quantification of mitochondrial morphology and content is of prime importance in understanding mitochondrial and cellular physiology in health and disease. This review first presents how cellular mitochondrial content is regulated at the level of mitochondrial biogenesis, degradation and dynamics. Next we discuss how mitochondrial dynamics and content can be analyzed with a special emphasis on quantitative live-cell microscopy strategies.

  15. Viral control of mitochondrial apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Galluzzi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the process of pathogen-host co-evolution, viruses have developed a battery of distinct strategies to overcome biochemical and immunological defenses of the host. Thus, viruses have acquired the capacity to subvert host cell apoptosis, control inflammatory responses, and evade immune reactions. Since the elimination of infected cells via programmed cell death is one of the most ancestral defense mechanisms against infection, disabling host cell apoptosis might represent an almost obligate step in the viral life cycle. Conversely, viruses may take advantage of stimulating apoptosis, either to kill uninfected cells from the immune system, or to induce the breakdown of infected cells, thereby favoring viral dissemination. Several viral polypeptides are homologs of host-derived apoptosis-regulatory proteins, such as members of the Bcl-2 family. Moreover, viral factors with no homology to host proteins specifically target key components of the apoptotic machinery. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the viral modulation of mitochondrial apoptosis, by focusing in particular on the mechanisms by which viral proteins control the host cell death apparatus.

  16. Plant i - AAA protease controls the turnover of the essential mitochondrial protein import component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalińska, Magdalena; Parys, Katarzyna; Murcha, Monika W; Jańska, Hanna

    2017-03-06

    Mitochondria are multifunctional organelles that play a central role in energy metabolism. Due to life-essential functions of these organelles, mitochondrial content, quality, and dynamics are tightly controlled. Across the species, highly conserved ATP - dependent proteases prevent malfunction of mitochondria through versatile activities. This study focuses on a molecular function of plant mitochondrial inner membrane-embedded i - AAA protease, FTSH4, providing its first bona fide substrate. Here, we report that the abundance of Tim17-2 protein, the essential component of the TIM17:23 translocase, is directly controlled by the proteolytic activity of FTSH4. Plants that are lacking functional FTSH4 protease are characterized by significantly enhanced capacity of preprotein import through the TIM17:23 - dependent pathway. Together with the observation that FTSH4 prevents accumulation of Tim17-2, our data points towards the role of this i - AAA protease in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in plants.

  17. A Biogenesis Step Upstream of Microprocessor Controls miR-17∼92 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Peng; Wang, Longfei; Sliz, Piotr; Gregory, Richard I

    2015-08-13

    The precise control of miR-17∼92 microRNA (miRNA) is essential for normal development, and overexpression of certain miRNAs from this cluster is oncogenic. Here, we find that the relative expression of the six miRNAs processed from the primary (pri-miR-17∼92) transcript is dynamically regulated during embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation. Pri-miR-17∼92 is processed to a biogenesis intermediate, termed "progenitor-miRNA" (pro-miRNA). Pro-miRNA is an efficient substrate for Microprocessor and is required to selectively license production of pre-miR-17, pre-miR-18a, pre-miR-19a, pre-miR-20a, and pre-miR-19b from this cluster. Two complementary cis-regulatory repression domains within pri-miR-17∼92 are required for the blockade of miRNA processing through the formation of an autoinhibitory RNA conformation. The endonuclease CPSF3 (CPSF73) and the spliceosome-associated ISY1 are responsible for pro-miRNA biogenesis and expression of all miRNAs within the cluster except miR-92. Thus, developmentally regulated pro-miRNA processing is a key step controlling miRNA expression and explains the posttranscriptional control of miR-17∼92 expression in development.

  18. OM2, a Novel Oligomannuronate-Chromium(III Complex, Promotes Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Lipid Metabolism in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes via the AMPK-PGC1α Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiejie Hao

    Full Text Available In our previous studies, we prepared novel oligomannuronate-chromium(III complexes (OM2, OM4 from marine alginate, and found that these compounds sensitize insulin action better than oligomannuronate(OM, chromium, and metformin in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. In the present study, we studied their effects on mitochondrial biogenesis, lipid metabolism, and the underlying molecular mechanisms in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes.We firstly used the pGL3-PGC1α and pGL3-ATGL promoter plasmids to compare their effects on PGC1α and ATGL transcription activities. Then mitochondrial biogenesis was quantified by transmission electron microscopy and MitoTracker staining. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption and fatty acid oxidation were measured by an oxygen biosensor system and ³H-labelled water scintillation. The mitochondrial DNA and mRNA involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid oxidation were evaluated by real-time PCR. AMPK together with other protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. The inhibitor compound C and siRNA of PGC1α were used to inhibit the OM2-induced AMPK-PGC1α signaling pathway. And we found that OM2 stimulated AMPK-PGC1α pathway in the 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which were correlated with induced mitochondrial biogenesis, improved mitochondrial function, and reduced lipid accumulation by enhanced fatty acid β-oxidation and augmented ATGL protein expression.Our data indicated that the marine oligosaccharide-derived OM2 might represent a novel class of molecules that could be useful for type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment by up-regulating AMPK-PGC1α signaling pathway.

  19. Mitochondrial structure, function and dynamics are temporally controlled by c-Myc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Anthony Graves

    Full Text Available Although the c-Myc (Myc oncoprotein controls mitochondrial biogenesis and multiple enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, the coordination of these events and the mechanistic underpinnings of their regulation remain largely unexplored. We show here that re-expression of Myc in myc-/- fibroblasts is accompanied by a gradual accumulation of mitochondrial biomass and by increases in membrane polarization and mitochondrial fusion. A correction of OXPHOS deficiency is also seen, although structural abnormalities in electron transport chain complexes (ETC are not entirely normalized. Conversely, the down-regulation of Myc leads to a gradual decrease in mitochondrial mass and a more rapid loss of fusion and membrane potential. Increases in the levels of proteins specifically involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion support the idea that Myc affects mitochondrial mass by influencing both of these processes, albeit favoring the latter. The ETC defects that persist following Myc restoration may represent metabolic adaptations, as mitochondrial function is re-directed away from producing ATP to providing a source of metabolic precursors demanded by the transformed cell.

  20. The helicase senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew S.; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P.; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A. T.; Feagins, Alicia R.; Basler, Christopher; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J.; Lavin, Martin F.; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) is implicated in the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here, we reveal a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells depleted for SETX and AOA2 patient-derived SETX-deficient cells exhibit increased expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) activity at genes stimulated upon viral sensing, thus controlling the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of numerous RNA viruses (e. g. Influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link between SETX inborn errors, susceptibility to infection and development of neurologic disorders. PMID:25822250

  1. Posttranslational modification of mitochondrial transcription factor A in impaired mitochondria biogenesis: implications in diabetic retinopathy and metabolic memory phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Julia M; Mishra, Manish; Kowluru, Renu A

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is one of the key regulators of the transcription of mtDNA. In diabetes, despite increase in gene transcripts of TFAM, its protein levels in the mitochondria are decreased and mitochondria copy numbers become subnormal. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism(s) responsible for decreased mitochondrial TFAM in diabetes. Using retinal endothelial cells, we have investigated the effect of overexpression of cytosolic chaperone, Hsp70, and TFAM on glucose-induced decrease in mitochondrial TFAM levels, and the transcription of mtDNA-encoded genes, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and cytochrome b (Cytb). To investigate the role of posttranslational modifications in subnormal mitochondrial TFAM, ubiquitination of TFAM was assessed, and the results were confirmed in the retina from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. While overexpression of Hsp70 failed to prevent glucose-induced decrease in mitochondrial TFAM and transcripts of ND6 and Cytb, overexpression of TFAM ameliorated decrease in its mitochondrial protein levels and transcriptional activity. TFAM was ubiquitinated by high glucose, and PYR-41, an inhibitor of ubiquitination, prevented TFAM ubiquitination and restored the transcriptional activity. Similarly, TFAM was ubiquitinated in the retina from diabetic rats, and it continued to be modified after reinstitution of normal glycemia. Our results clearly imply that the ubiquitination of TFAM impedes its transport to the mitochondria resulting in subnormal mtDNA transcription and mitochondria dysfunction, and inhibition of ubiquitination restores mitochondrial homeostasis. Reversal of hyperglycemia does not provide any benefit to TFAM ubiquitination. Thus, strategies targeting posttranslational modification could provide an avenue to preserve mitochondrial homeostasis, and inhibit the development/progression of diabetic retinopathy.

  2. Impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, defective axonal transport of mitochondria, abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and synaptic degeneration in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Marcus J; Manczak, Maria; Mao, Peizhong; Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2011-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in synapses and synaptic mitochondria causes synaptic mitochondrial failure and synaptic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this study was to better understand the effects of Aβ in mitochondrial activity and synaptic alterations in neurons from a mouse model of AD. Using primary neurons from a well-characterized Aβ precursor protein transgenic (AβPP) mouse model (Tg2576 mouse line), for the first time, we studied mitochondrial activity, including axonal transport of mitochondria, mitochondrial dynamics, morphology and function. Further, we also studied the nature of Aβ-induced synaptic alterations, and cell death in primary neurons from Tg2576 mice, and we sought to determine whether the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SS31 could mitigate the effects of oligomeric Aβ. We found significantly decreased anterograde mitochondrial movement, increased mitochondrial fission and decreased fusion, abnormal mitochondrial and synaptic proteins and defective mitochondrial function in primary neurons from AβPP mice compared with wild-type (WT) neurons. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a large number of small mitochondria and structurally damaged mitochondria, with broken cristae in AβPP primary neurons. We also found an increased accumulation of oligomeric Aβ and increased apoptotic neuronal death in the primary neurons from the AβPP mice relative to the WT neurons. Our results revealed an accumulation of intraneuronal oligomeric Aβ, leading to mitochondrial and synaptic deficiencies, and ultimately causing neurodegeneration in AβPP cultures. However, we found that the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SS31 restored mitochondrial transport and synaptic viability, and decreased the percentage of defective mitochondria, indicating that SS31 protects mitochondria and synapses from Aβ toxicity.

  3. Control mechanisms in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jana Hroudová; Zdeněk Fi(s)ar

    2013-01-01

    Distribution and activity of mitochondria are key factors in neuronal development, synaptic plasticity and axogenesis. The majority of energy sources, necessary for cellular functions, originate from oxidative phosphorylation located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The adenosine-5'- triphosphate production is regulated by many control mechanism–firstly by oxygen, substrate level, adenosine-5'-diphosphate level, mitochondrial membrane potential, and rate of coupling and proton leak. Recently, these mechanisms have been implemented by "second control mechanisms," such as reversible phosphorylation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and electron transport chain complexes, allosteric inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase, thyroid hormones, effects of fatty acids and uncoupling proteins. Impaired function of mitochondria is implicated in many diseases ranging from mitochondrial myopathies to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Mitochondrial dysfunctions are usually related to the ability of mitochondria to generate adenosine-5'-triphosphate in response to energy demands. Large amounts of reactive oxygen species are released by defective mitochondria, similarly, decline of antioxidative enzyme activities (e.g. in the elderly) enhances reactive oxygen species production. We reviewed data concerning neuroplasticity, physiology, and control of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species production.

  4. OM2, a Novel Oligomannuronate-Chromium(III) Complex, Promotes Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Lipid Metabolism in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes via the AMPK-PGC1α Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Jiejie Hao; Cui Hao; Lijuan Zhang; Xin Liu; Xiaolin Zhou; Yunlou Dun; Haihua Li; Guangsheng Li; Xiaoliang Zhao; Yuanyuan An; Jiankang Liu; Guangli Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background In our previous studies, we prepared novel oligomannuronate-chromium(III) complexes (OM2, OM4) from marine alginate, and found that these compounds sensitize insulin action better than oligomannuronate(OM), chromium, and metformin in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. In the present study, we studied their effects on mitochondrial biogenesis, lipid metabolism, and the underlying molecular mechanisms in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings We firstly used the p...

  5. The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1 Inhibits Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Liver and Fatty Acid Oxidation in Adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D Sisler

    Full Text Available The transcription factor STAT1 plays a central role in orchestrating responses to various pathogens by activating the transcription of nuclear-encoded genes that mediate the antiviral, the antigrowth, and immune surveillance effects of interferons and other cytokines. In addition to regulating gene expression, we report that STAT1-/- mice display increased energy expenditure and paradoxically decreased release of triglycerides from white adipose tissue (WAT. Liver mitochondria from STAT1-/- mice show both defects in coupling of the electron transport chain (ETC and increased numbers of mitochondria. Consistent with elevated numbers of mitochondria, STAT1-/- mice expressed increased amounts of PGC1α, a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. STAT1 binds to the PGC1α promoter in fed mice but not in fasted animals, suggesting that STAT1 inhibited transcription of PGC1α. Since STAT1-/- mice utilized more lipids we examined white adipose tissue (WAT stores. Contrary to expectations, fasted STAT1-/- mice did not lose lipid from WAT. β-adrenergic stimulation of glycerol release from isolated STAT1-/- WAT was decreased, while activation of hormone sensitive lipase was not changed. These findings suggest that STAT1-/- adipose tissue does not release glycerol and that free fatty acids (FFA re-esterify back to triglycerides, thus maintaining fat mass in fasted STAT1-/- mice.

  6. The evolution of ERMIONE in mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid homeostasis: An evolutionary view from comparative cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, Jeremy G; Muñoz-Gómez, Sergio A

    2016-08-01

    The ER-mitochondria organizing network (ERMIONE) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in maintaining mitochondrial morphology and lipid homeostasis. ERMES and MICOS are two scaffolding complexes of ERMIONE that contribute to these processes. ERMES is ancient but has been lost in several lineages including animals, plants, and SAR (stramenopiles, alveolates and rhizaria). On the other hand, MICOS is ancient and has remained present in all organisms bearing mitochondrial cristae. The ERMIONE precursor evolved in the α-proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria which had the central subunit of MICOS, Mic60. The subsequent evolution of ERMIONE and its interactors in eukaryotes reflects the integrative co-evolution of mitochondria and their hosts and the adaptive paths that some lineages have followed in their specialization to certain environments. By approaching the ERMIONE from a perspective of comparative evolutionary cell biology, we hope to shed light on not only its evolutionary history, but also how ERMIONE components may function in organisms other than S. cerevisiae. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  7. Control of lipid oxidation at the mitochondrial level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlin, Kent

    2009-01-01

    , but the mechanisms regulating fuel preferences remain unclear. During intense exercise, oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) decreases, and the major control is likely to be at the mitochondrial level. Potential mitochondrial sites for control of lipid oxidation include transport of LCFAs into mitochondrial...

  8. Upregulation of Mitochondrial Content in Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficient Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogot-Levin, Aviram; Saada, Ann; Leibowitz, Gil; Soiferman, Devorah; Douiev, Liza; Raz, Itamar; Weksler-Zangen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome-c-oxidase (COX) deficiency is a frequent cause of mitochondrial disease and is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. We studied mitochondrial function and biogenesis in fibroblasts derived from the Cohen (CDs) rat, an animal model of COX deficiency. COX activity in CDs-fibroblasts was 50% reduced compared to control rat fibroblasts (P<0.01). ROS-production in CDs fibroblasts increased, along with marked mitochondrial fragmentation and decreased mitochondrial membrane-potential, indicating mitochondrial dysfunction. Surprisingly, cellular ATP content, oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and the extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) were unchanged. To clarify the discrepancy between mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP production, we studied mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover. The content of mitochondria was higher in CDs-fibroblasts. Consistently, AMPK activity and the expression of NRF1-target genes, NRF2 and PGC1-α that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis were increased (P<0.01 vs control fibroblast). In CDs-fibrobalsts, the number of autophagosomes (LC3+ puncta) containing mitochondria in CDs fibroblasts was similar to that in control fibroblasts, suggesting that mitophagy was intact. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are associated with an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis, resulting in preservation of ATP generation.

  9. Accessory NUMM (NDUFS6) subunit harbors a Zn-binding site and is essential for biogenesis of mitochondrial complex I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmita, Katarzyna; Wirth, Christophe; Warnau, Judith; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Hunte, Carola; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R. I.; Zwicker, Klaus; Brandt, Ulrich; Zickermann, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (respiratory complex I) comprises more than 40 polypeptides and contains eight canonical FeS clusters. The integration of subunits and insertion of cofactors into the nascent complex is a complicated multistep process that is aided by assembly factors. We show that the accessory NUMM subunit of complex I (human NDUFS6) harbors a Zn-binding site and resolve its position by X-ray crystallography. Chromosomal deletion of the NUMM gene or mutation of Zn-binding residues blocked a late step of complex I assembly. An accumulating assembly intermediate lacked accessory subunit N7BM (NDUFA12), whereas a paralog of this subunit, the assembly factor N7BML (NDUFAF2), was found firmly bound instead. EPR spectroscopic analysis and metal content determination after chromatographic purification of the assembly intermediate showed that NUMM is required for insertion or stabilization of FeS cluster N4. PMID:25902503

  10. The co-chaperone and reductase ERdj5 facilitates rod opsin biogenesis and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Aguila, Monica; McCulley, Caroline; Kanuga, Naheed; Iwawaki, Takao; Chapple, J Paul; Cheetham, Michael E

    2014-12-15

    Mutations in rhodopsin, the light-sensitive protein of rod cells, are the most common cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Many rod opsin mutations, such as P23H, lead to misfolding of rod opsin with detrimental effects on photoreceptor function and viability. Misfolded P23H rod opsin and other mutations in the intradiscal domain are characterized by the formation of an incorrect disulphide bond between C185 and C187, as opposed to the correct and highly conserved C110-C187 disulphide bond. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that incorrect disulphide bond formation might be a factor that affects the biogenesis of rod opsin by studying wild-type (WT) or P23H rod opsin in combination with amino acid substitutions that prevent the formation of incorrect disulphide bonds involving C185. These mutants had altered traffic dynamics, suggesting a requirement for regulation of disulphide bond formation/reduction during rod opsin biogenesis. Here, we show that the BiP co-chaperone and reductase protein ERdj5 (DNAJC10) regulates this process. ERdj5 overexpression promoted the degradation, improved the endoplasmic reticulum mobility and prevented the aggregation of P23H rod opsin. ERdj5 reduction by shRNA delayed rod opsin degradation and promoted aggregation. The reductase and co-chaperone activity of ERdj5 were both required for these effects on P23H rod opsin. Furthermore, mutations in these functional domains acted as dominant negatives that affected WT rod opsin biogenesis. Collectively, these data identify ERdj5 as a member of the proteostasis network that regulates rod opsin biogenesis and supports a role for disulphide bond formation/reduction in rod opsin biogenesis and disease.

  11. Exercise mitigates mitochondrial permeability transition pore and quality control mechanisms alterations in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Inês O; Passos, Emanuel; Diogo, Cátia V; Rocha-Rodrigues, Sílvia; Santos-Alves, Estela; Oliveira, Paulo J; Ascensão, António; Magalhães, José

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial quality control and apoptosis have been described as key components in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH); exercise is recognized as a nonpharmacological strategy to counteract NASH-associated consequences. We aimed to analyze the effect of voluntary physical activity (VPA) and endurance training (ET) against NASH-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening and mitochondrial and cellular quality control deleterious alterations. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into standard-diet sedentary (SS, n = 16), standard-diet VPA (n = 8), high-fat diet sedentary (HS, n = 16), and high-fat diet VPA (n = 8). After 9 weeks of diet treatment, half of the SS and HS groups were engaged in an ET program for 8 weeks, 5 days/week, 1 h/day. Liver mPTP susceptibility through osmotic swelling, mPTP-related proteins (cyclophilin D, Sirtuin3, Cofilin-1), markers of mitochondrial biogenesis ((mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator protein (PGC-1α)), dynamics (Mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), Dynamin related protein 1, and Optic atrophy 1)), auto/mitophagy (Beclin-1, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, p62, PINK1, and Parkin), and apoptotic signaling (Bax, Bcl-2) and caspases-like activities were assessed. HS animals showed an increased susceptibility to mPTP, compromised expression of Tfam, Mfn1, PINK1, and Parkin and an increase in Bax content (HS vs. SS). ET and VPA improved biogenesis-related proteins (PGC-1α) and autophagy signaling (Beclin-1 and Beclin-1/Bcl-2 ratio) and decreased apoptotic signaling (caspases 8 activity, Bax content, and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio). However, only ET decreased mPTP susceptibility and positively modulated Bcl-2, Tfam, Mfn1, Mfn2, PINK1, and Parkin content. In conclusion, exercise reduces the increased susceptibility to mPTP induced by NASH and promotes the increase of auto/mitophagy and mitochondrial

  12. Microprocessor Activity Controls Differential miRNA Biogenesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Conrad

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In miRNA biogenesis, pri-miRNA transcripts are converted into pre-miRNA hairpins. The in vivo properties of this process remain enigmatic. Here, we determine in vivo transcriptome-wide pri-miRNA processing using next-generation sequencing of chromatin-associated pri-miRNAs. We identify a distinctive Microprocessor signature in the transcriptome profile from which efficiency of the endogenous processing event can be accurately quantified. This analysis reveals differential susceptibility to Microprocessor cleavage as a key regulatory step in miRNA biogenesis. Processing is highly variable among pri-miRNAs and a better predictor of miRNA abundance than primary transcription itself. Processing is also largely stable across three cell lines, suggesting a major contribution of sequence determinants. On the basis of differential processing efficiencies, we define functionality for short sequence features adjacent to the pre-miRNA hairpin. In conclusion, we identify Microprocessor as the main hub for diversified miRNA output and suggest a role for uncoupling miRNA biogenesis from host gene expression.

  13. The transcriptional coregulator PGC-1β controls mitochondrial function and anti-oxidant defence in skeletal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali Ramamoorthy, Thanuja; Laverny, Gilles; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Zoll, Joffrey; Messaddeq, Nadia; Bornert, Jean-Marc; Panza, Salvatore; Ferry, Arnaud; Geny, Bernard; Metzger, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional coregulators PGC-1α and PGC-1β modulate the expression of numerous partially overlapping genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and energetic metabolism. The physiological role of PGC-1β is poorly understood in skeletal muscle, a tissue of high mitochondrial content to produce ATP levels required for sustained contractions. Here we determine the physiological role of PGC-1β in skeletal muscle using mice, in which PGC-1β is selectively ablated in skeletal myofibres at adulthood (PGC-1β(i)skm−/− mice). We show that myofibre myosin heavy chain composition and mitochondrial number, muscle strength and glucose homeostasis are unaffected in PGC-1β(i)skm−/− mice. However, decreased expression of genes controlling mitochondrial protein import, translational machinery and energy metabolism in PGC-1β(i)skm−/− muscles leads to mitochondrial structural and functional abnormalities, impaired muscle oxidative capacity and reduced exercise performance. Moreover, enhanced free-radical leak and reduced expression of the mitochondrial anti-oxidant enzyme Sod2 increase muscle oxidative stress. PGC-1β is therefore instrumental for skeletal muscles to cope with high energetic demands. PMID:26674215

  14. Auxin Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Peter J.; Brown, Hugh M.; Purves, William K.

    1976-01-01

    Subcellular fractionation of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings was achieved, and two of the enzymes in the auxin biosynthetic pathway were localized. NADH-specific indoleacetaldehyde reductase activity was observed only in the cytosol fractions obtained from separated hypocotyl and cotyledon tissue. In contrast, a portion of the NADPH-specific indoleacetaldehyde reductase activity was associated with a microsomal fraction derived from these tissues. The NADPH-specific indoleacetaldehyde reductase was consistently found to be more firmly associated with the microsomal fraction derived from hypocotyls than with that from the cotyledons. These results indicate a division of the terminal steps of auxin biogenesis into at least two subcellular compartments. PMID:16659584

  15. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-03

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans.

  16. Chloroplast biogenesis-associated nuclear genes: Control by plastid signals evolved prior to their regulation as part of photomorphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison C HIlls

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The assembly of photosynthetically-competent chloroplasts occurs in angiosperm seedlings when first exposed to light, and is due to the control by light of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs, also dependent upon plastid-to-nucleus biogenic communication signals. The relationship between light- and plastid signal-regulation of PhANGs is close but poorly understood. In contrast, many conifers green in the dark and the promoter of a pine PhANG, Lhcb, is active in the dark in tobacco. Here we show that the activity of this promoter in tobacco is sensitive to plastid photobleaching, or to the inhibition of plastid translation in the light or the dark, and the same interventions reduce expression of the native gene in pine seedlings, demonstrating classic plastid biogenic signalling in gymnosperms. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutations causing defective plastid biogenesis suppress the effect in darkness of mutations in COP1 and DET1, repressors of photomorphogenesis, for the expression of several PhANGs but not a photosynthesis-unrelated, light-regulated gene. GLK transcriptional regulators mediate the response of LHCB but not of other tested PhANGs. We propose gain of the ability by repressors of photomorphogenesis to suppress the response of PhANG promoters to positive plastid biogenic signals in the dark to have contributed to the evolution of light control of chloroplast biogenesis.

  17. Control of gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis in the muscular adaption to endurance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joseph, A. M.; Pilegaard, H.; Leick, L.

    2006-01-01

    Every time a bout of exercise is performed, a change in gene expression occurs within the contracting muscle. Over the course of many repeated bouts of exercise (i.e. training), the cumulative effects of these alterations lead to a change in muscle phenotype. One of the most prominent of these ad......Every time a bout of exercise is performed, a change in gene expression occurs within the contracting muscle. Over the course of many repeated bouts of exercise (i.e. training), the cumulative effects of these alterations lead to a change in muscle phenotype. One of the most prominent...

  18. Control of gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis in the muscular adaption to endurance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joseph, A. M.; Pilegaard, H.; Leick, L.;

    2006-01-01

    Every time a bout of exercise is performed, a change in gene expression occurs within the contracting muscle. Over the course of many repeated bouts of exercise (i.e. training), the cumulative effects of these alterations lead to a change in muscle phenotype. One of the most prominent of these ad...

  19. Transcriptional control of yeast ribosome biogenesis: A multifaceted role for general regulatory factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosio, Maria Cristina; Fermi, Beatrice; Dieci, Giorgio

    2017-08-08

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a group of more than 200 co-regulated genes (Ribi genes) is involved in ribosome biogenesis. This regulon has recently been shown to rely on a small set of transcriptional regulators (mainly Abf1, but also Reb1, Tbf1 and Rap1) previously referred to as general regulatory factors (GRFs) because of their widespread binding and action at many promoters and other specialized genomic regions. Intriguingly, Abf1 binding to Ribi genes is differentially modulated in response to distinct nutrition signaling pathways. Such a dynamic promoter association has the potential to orchestrate both activation and repression of Ribi genes in synergy with neighboring regulatory sites and through the functional interplay of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases.

  20. Optic atrophy 1-dependent mitochondrial remodeling controls steroidogenesis in trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Michał; Semenzato, Martina; Rafelski, Susanne M; Robbins, Jennifer; Bakardjiev, Anna I; Scorrano, Luca

    2012-07-10

    During human pregnancy, placental trophoblasts differentiate and syncytialize into syncytiotrophoblasts that sustain progesterone production [1]. This process is accompanied by mitochondrial fragmentation and cristae remodeling [2], two facets of mitochondrial apoptosis, whose molecular mechanisms and functional consequences on steroidogenesis are unclear. Here we show that the mitochondria-shaping protein Optic atrophy 1 (Opa1) controls efficiency of steroidogenesis. During syncytialization of trophoblast BeWo cells, levels of the profission mitochondria-shaping protein Drp1 increase, and those of Opa1 and mitofusin (Mfn) decrease, leading to mitochondrial fragmentation and cristae remodeling. Manipulation of the levels of Opa1 reveal an inverse relationship with the efficiency of steroidogenesis in trophoblasts and in mouse embryonic fibroblasts where the mitochondrial steroidogenetic pathway has been engineered. In an in vitro assay, accumulation of cholesterol is facilitated in the inner membrane of isolated mitochondria lacking Opa1. Thus, Opa1-dependent inner membrane remodeling controls efficiency of steroidogenesis.

  1. Evidence for mitochondrial genetic control of autosomal gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam, Irfahan; Qi, Tuan; Lloyd-Jones, Luke; Holloway, Alexander; Jan Bonder, Marc; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Powell, Joseph E; Franke, Lude; Montgomery, Grant W; Visscher, Peter M; McRae, Allan F

    2016-10-18

    The mitochondrial and nuclear genomes coordinate and co-evolve in eukaryotes in order to adapt to environmental changes. Variation in the mitochondrial genome is capable of affecting expression of genes on the nuclear genome. Sex-specific mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression has been demonstrated in Drosophila melanogaster, where males were found to drive most of the total variation in gene expression. This has potential implications for male-related health and disease resulting from variation in mtDNA solely inherited from the mother. We used a family-based study comprised of 47,323 gene expression probes and 78 mitochondrial SNPs (mtSNPs) from n = 846 individuals to examine the extent of mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in humans. This identified 15 significant probe-mtSNP associations (P[Formula: see text]) corresponding to 5 unique genes on the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, with three of these genes corresponding to mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in the nuclear genome. The associated mtSNPs for three genes (one cis and two trans associations) were replicated (P expression in any of these five probes. Sex-specific effects were examined by applying our analysis to males and females separately and testing for differences in effect size. The MEST gene was identified as having the most significantly different effect sizes across the sexes (P [Formula: see text]). MEST was similarly expressed in males and females with the G allele; however, males with the C allele are highly expressed for MEST, while females show no expression of the gene. This study provides evidence for the mitochondrial genetic control of expression of several genes in humans, with little evidence found for sex-specific effects.

  2. Type II PI4-kinases control Weibel-Palade body biogenesis and von Willebrand factor structure in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; O'Connor, Marie N; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; White, Ian J; Al-Shawi, Raya; Simons, J Paul; Mössinger, Julia; Haucke, Volker; Cutler, Daniel F

    2016-05-15

    Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) are endothelial storage organelles that mediate the release of molecules involved in thrombosis, inflammation and angiogenesis, including the pro-thrombotic glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Although many protein components required for WPB formation and function have been identified, the role of lipids is almost unknown. We examined two key phosphatidylinositol kinases that control phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate levels at the trans-Golgi network, the site of WPB biogenesis. RNA interference of the type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases PI4KIIα and PI4KIIβ in primary human endothelial cells leads to formation of an increased proportion of short WPB with perturbed packing of VWF, as exemplified by increased exposure of antibody-binding sites. When stimulated with histamine, these cells release normal levels of VWF yet, under flow, form very few platelet-catching VWF strings. In PI4KIIα-deficient mice, immuno-microscopy revealed that VWF packaging is also perturbed and these mice exhibit increased blood loss after tail cut compared to controls. This is the first demonstration that lipid kinases can control the biosynthesis of VWF and the formation of WPBs that are capable of full haemostatic function.

  3. Exercise- and training-induced upregulation of skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation are not solely dependent on mitochondrial machinery and biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yuko; Jain, Swati S; McFarlan, Jay T; Snook, Laelie A; Chabowski, Adrian; Bonen, Arend

    2013-09-15

      Regulation of skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and adaptation to exercise training have long been thought to depend on delivery of fatty acids (FAs) to muscle, their diffusion into muscle, and muscle mitochondrial content and biochemical machinery. However, FA entry into muscle occurs via a regulatable, protein-mediated mechanism, involving several transport proteins. Among these CD36 is key. Muscle contraction and pharmacological agents induce CD36 to translocate to the cell surface, a response that regulates FA transport, and hence FAO. In exercising CD36 KO mice, exercise duration (-44%), and FA transport (-41%) and oxidation (-37%) are comparably impaired, while carbohydrate metabolism is augmented. In trained CD36 KO mice, training-induced upregulation of FAO is not observed, despite normal training-induced increases in mitochondrial density and enzymes. Transfecting CD36 into sedentary WT muscle (+41%), comparable to training-induced CD36 increases (+44%) in WT muscle, markedly upregulates FAO to rates observed in trained WT mice, but without any changes in mitochondrial density and enzymes. Evidently, in vivo CD36-mediated FA transport is key for muscle fuel selection and training-induced FAO upregulation, independent of mitochondrial adaptations. This CD36 molecular mechanism challenges the view that skeletal muscle FAO is solely regulated by muscle mitochondrial content and machinery.

  4. The Mitochondrial Rhomboid Protease PARL Is Regulated by PDK2 to Integrate Mitochondrial Quality Control and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial quality control (MQC systems are essential for mitochondrial health and normal cellular function. Dysfunction of MQC is emerging as a central mechanism for the pathogenesis of various diseases, including Parkinson’s disease. The mammalian mitochondrial rhomboid protease, PARL, has been proposed as a regulator of PINK1/PARKIN-mediated mitophagy, which is an essential component of MQC. PARL undergoes an N-terminal autocatalytic cleavage (β cleavage, which is required for efficient mitophagy. We demonstrate that β cleavage responds to mitochondrial stress, triggered by the depletion of mitochondrial ATP. Furthermore, we show that PDK2, a key regulator in metabolic plasticity, phosphorylates PARL and regulates β cleavage. Through regulating β cleavage and the production of a less active enzyme, PACT, PDK2 negatively regulates PINK1/PARKIN-mediated mitophagy. Taken together, we propose that PDK2/PARL senses defects in mitochondrial bioenergetics, integrating mitochondrial metabolism to mitophagy and MQC in human health and disease.

  5. Evidence of a bigenomic regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by thyroid hormone during rat brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Pathak, Amrita; Mohan, Vishwa; Babu, Satish; Pal, Amit; Khare, Drirh [Department of Endocrinology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India); Godbole, Madan M., E-mail: madangodbole@yahoo.co.in [Department of Endocrinology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India)

    2010-07-02

    Hypothyroidism during early mammalian brain development is associated with decreased expression of various mitochondrial encoded genes along with evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, in-spite of the similarities between neurological disorders caused by perinatal hypothyroidism and those caused by various genetic mitochondrial defects we still do not know as to how thyroid hormone (TH) regulates mitochondrial transcription during development and whether this regulation by TH is nuclear mediated or through mitochondrial TH receptors? We here in rat cerebellum show that hypothyroidism causes reduction in expression of nuclear encoded genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1{alpha}, NRF-1{alpha} and Tfam. Also, we for the first time demonstrate a mitochondrial localization of thyroid hormone receptor (mTR) isoform in developing brain capable of binding a TH response element (DR2) present in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA. These results thus indicate an integrated nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk in regulation of mitochondrial transcription by TH during brain development.

  6. Subcomplex Ilambda specifically controls integrated mitochondrial functions in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marni J Falk

    Full Text Available Complex I dysfunction is a common, heterogeneous cause of human mitochondrial disease having poorly understood pathogenesis. The extensive conservation of complex I composition between humans and Caenorhabditis elegans permits analysis of individual subunit contribution to mitochondrial functions at both the whole animal and mitochondrial levels. We provide the first experimentally-verified compilation of complex I composition in C. elegans, demonstrating 84% conservation with human complex I. Individual subunit contribution to mitochondrial respiratory capacity, holocomplex I assembly, and animal anesthetic behavior was studied in C. elegans by RNA interference-generated knockdown of nuclear genes encoding 28 complex I structural subunits and 2 assembly factors. Not all complex I subunits directly impact respiratory capacity. Subcomplex Ilambda subunits along the electron transfer pathway specifically control whole animal anesthetic sensitivity and complex II upregulation, proportionate to their relative impairment of complex I-dependent oxidative capacity. Translational analysis of complex I dysfunction facilitates mechanistic understanding of individual gene contribution to mitochondrial disease. We demonstrate that functional consequences of complex I deficiency vary with the particular subunit that is defective.

  7. Control of microRNA biogenesis and transcription by cell signaling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    A limited set of cell-cell signaling pathways presides over the vast majority of animal developmental events. The typical raison d'etre for signal transduction is to control the transcription of protein-coding genes. However, with the recent appreciation of microRNAs, growing attention has been paid towards understanding how signaling pathways intertwine with microRNA-mediated regulation. This review highlights recent studies that uncover unexpected modes of microRNA regulation by cell signal...

  8. Cellulose biogenesis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Organisms that synthesize cellulose can be found amongst the bacteria, protistans, fungi, and animals, but it is in plants that the importance of cellulose in function (as the major structural constituent of plant cell walls) and economic use (as wood and fiber) can be best appreciated. The structure of cellulose and its biosynthesis have been the subjects of intense investigation. One of the most important insights gained from these studies is that the synthesis of cellulose by living organisms involves much more than simply the polymerization of glucose into a (1{r_arrow}4)-{beta}-linked polymer. The number of glucoses in a polymer (the degree of polymerization), the crystalline form assumed by the glucan chains when they crystallize to form a microfibril, and the dimensions and orientation of the microfibrils are all subject to cellular control. Instead of cellulose biosynthesis, a more appropriate term might be cellulose biogenesis, to emphasize the involvement of cellular structures and mechanisms in controlling polymerization and directing crystallization and deposition. Dictyostelium discoideum is uniquely suitable for the study of cellulose biogenesis because of its amenability to experimental study and manipulation and the extent of our knowledge of its basic cellular mechanisms (as will be evident from the rest of this volume). In this chapter, I will summarize what is known about cellulose biogenesis in D. discoideum, emphasizing its potential to illuminate our understanding both of D. discoideum development and plant cellulose biogenesis.

  9. NIPBL Controls RNA Biogenesis to Prevent Activation of the Stress Kinase PKR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobe C. Yuen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available NIPBL, a cohesin loader, has been implicated in transcriptional control and genome organization. Mutations in NIPBL, cohesin, and its deacetylase HDAC8 result in Cornelia de Lange syndrome. We report activation of the RNA-sensing kinase PKR in human lymphoblastoid cell lines carrying NIPBL or HDAC8 mutations, but not SMC1A or SMC3 mutations. PKR activation can be triggered by unmodified RNAs. Gene expression profiles in NIPBL-deficient lymphoblastoid cells and mouse embryonic stem cells reveal lower expression of genes involved in RNA processing and modification. NIPBL mutant lymphoblastoid cells show reduced proliferation and protein synthesis with increased apoptosis, all of which are partially reversed by a PKR inhibitor. Non-coding RNAs from an NIPBL mutant line had less m6A modification and activated PKR activity in vitro. This study provides insight into the molecular pathology of Cornelia de Lange syndrome by establishing a relationship between NIPBL and HDAC8 mutations and PKR activation.

  10. Large sequence divergence of mitochondrial DNA genotypes of the control region within populations of the African antelope, kob (Kobus kob)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birungi, J.; Arctander, Peter

    2000-01-01

    conservation genetics, control region, Kobus kob, mitochondrial DNA, population expansion, population structure......conservation genetics, control region, Kobus kob, mitochondrial DNA, population expansion, population structure...

  11. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  12. Mitochondrial aging and age-related dysfunction of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Sobenin, Igor A; Revin, Victor V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2014-01-01

    Age-related changes in mitochondria are associated with decline in mitochondrial function. With advanced age, mitochondrial DNA volume, integrity and functionality decrease due to accumulation of mutations and oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In aged subjects, mitochondria are characterized by impaired function such as lowered oxidative capacity, reduced oxidative phosphorylation, decreased ATP production, significant increase in ROS generation, and diminished antioxidant defense. Mitochondrial biogenesis declines with age due to alterations in mitochondrial dynamics and inhibition of mitophagy, an autophagy process that removes dysfunctional mitochondria. Age-dependent abnormalities in mitochondrial quality control further weaken and impair mitochondrial function. In aged tissues, enhanced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis contributes to an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. However, implementation of strategies such as caloric restriction and regular physical training may delay mitochondrial aging and attenuate the age-related phenotype in humans.

  13. The pink-eyed dilution locus controls the biogenesis of melanosomes and levels of melanosomal proteins in the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlow, S J; Brilliant, M H

    1999-02-01

    The pink-eyed dilution (p) locus is known to control the quantity of melanin pigment made within melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the eye. We have examined the effects of several mutant allele combinations at the murine p locus on the number and morphology of melanosomes in choroidal melanocytes and RPE cells as well as on the levels of four proteins known to be present within melanosomes: tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related proteins 1 and 2 (TRP-1 and TRP-2) and lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1). By electron microscopy, we observed a modest diminution in the size and number of choroidal melanosomes in pbs/pJ mice but a more dramatic decrease in the RPE in comparison with wild-type P/P mice. By contrast, a drastic reduction in melanosome size and number was present in the choroid and RPE of pun/pun and p6H/pcp mice, and in the RPE of p6H/pcp mice, melanosomes were essentially undetectable. In wild-type mice, levels of tyrosinase, TRP-1 and TRP-2 were high at birth and showed a second peak of expression at 10-14 days of age, declining to undetectable levels by 42 days. All three mutant allele combinations reduced the levels of these melanosomal proteins with the relative severity of effects being p6H/pcp>pun/pun>pbs/pJ. In the null p6H/pcp mice, levels of these proteins were extremely low at birth, no postnatal peak was observed, and levels declined to undetectable by 14 days. Levels of LAMP-1 in wild-type mice rose initially and then declined whereas in the mutant mice, levels decreased gradually from birth. Higher levels of LAMP-1 were observed in each of the mutants than in the wild-type mice at 21 days of age. Our results demonstrate that mutations at the p locus affect the size, number, shape and contents of melanosomes, implicating the p gene product in the normal biogenesis of this organelle.

  14. A Genetic System Controlling Mitochondrial Fusion in the Slime Mould, Physarum Polycephalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, S.; Takano, H.; Imai, J.; Mori, K.; Kuroiwa, T.

    1993-01-01

    We have identified two distinct mitochondrial phenotypes, namely, Mif(+) (mitochondrial fusion) and Mif(-) (mitochondrial fusion-deficient), and have studied the genetic system that controls mitochondrial fusion in the slime mould, Physarum polycephalum. A mitochondrial plasmid of approximately 16 kbp was identified in all Mif(+) plasmodial strains. This plasmid is apparently responsible for promoting mitochondrial fusion, and it is inserted into the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in successive sexual crossing with Mif(-) strains. This recombinant mtDNA and the unchanged free plasmid spread through the mitochondrial population via the promotion of mitochondrial fusion. The Mif(+) strains with the plasmid were further classified as being two types: high frequency and low frequency mitochondrial fusion. Restriction analysis of the mtDNA suggested that the high frequency mitochondrial fusion type was more often heteroplasmic; within each plasmodium, mtDNAs of both parental types were usually present, in addition to the presence of the plasmid. Genetic analysis with the progeny obtained from crossing myxamoebae derived from three different isolates suggested that these progeny carried different alleles at a nuclear locus that controlled the frequency of mitochondrial fusion. These alleles (mitochondrial mating-type alleles, mitA1, 2 and 3) appear to function like the mating type of the myxamoebae; mitochondrial fusion occurs at high frequency with the combination of unlike alleles, but at low frequency with the combination of like alleles. PMID:8436271

  15. Mitochondrial alteration in type 2 diabetes and obesity: an epigenetic link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhiyong; Almeida, Fabio A

    2014-01-01

    The growing epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity is largely attributed to the current lifestyle of over-consumption and physical inactivity. As the primary platform controlling metabolic and energy homeostasis, mitochondria show aberrant changes in T2DM and obese subjects. While the underlying mechanism is under extensive investigation, epigenetic regulation is now emerging to play an important role in mitochondrial biogenesis, function, and dynamics. In line with lifestyle modifications preventing mitochondrial alterations and metabolic disorders, exercise has been shown to change DNA methylation of the promoter of PGC1α to favor gene expression responsible for mitochondrial biogenesis and function. In this article we discuss the epigenetic mechanism of mitochondrial alteration in T2DM and obesity, and the effects of lifestyle on epigenetic regulation. Future studies designed to further explore and integrate the epigenetic mechanisms with lifestyle modification may lead to interdisciplinary interventions and novel preventive options for mitochondrial alteration and metabolic disorders.

  16. Deceleration of fusion-fission cycles improves mitochondrial quality control during aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Thilo Figge

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy play a key role in ensuring mitochondrial quality control. Impairment thereof was proposed to be causative to neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction was further linked to aging. Here we applied a probabilistic modeling approach integrating our current knowledge on mitochondrial biology allowing us to simulate mitochondrial function and quality control during aging in silico. We demonstrate that cycles of fusion and fission and mitophagy indeed are essential for ensuring a high average quality of mitochondria, even under conditions in which random molecular damage is present. Prompted by earlier observations that mitochondrial fission itself can cause a partial drop in mitochondrial membrane potential, we tested the consequences of mitochondrial dynamics being harmful on its own. Next to directly impairing mitochondrial function, pre-existing molecular damage may be propagated and enhanced across the mitochondrial population by content mixing. In this situation, such an infection-like phenomenon impairs mitochondrial quality control progressively. However, when imposing an age-dependent deceleration of cycles of fusion and fission, we observe a delay in the loss of average quality of mitochondria. This provides a rational why fusion and fission rates are reduced during aging and why loss of a mitochondrial fission factor can extend life span in fungi. We propose the 'mitochondrial infectious damage adaptation' (MIDA model according to which a deceleration of fusion-fission cycles reflects a systemic adaptation increasing life span.

  17. The tumor suppressor p53 connects ribosome biogenesis to cell cycle control: a double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzel, Michael; Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Orban, Mathias; Kellner, Markus; Eick, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Since its first description more than 30 years ago p53 has become a paradigm for a protein with versatile functions. P53 sensitizes a large variety of genetic alterations and has been entitled the guardian of the genome. Stabilization of p53 upon DNA damage is accompanied by a complex pattern of modifications, which ascertain the cellular response either in the direction of a reversible or irreversible cell cycle arrest or programmed cell death. More recently it became evident that p53 also responds to non-genotoxic cell stress, in particular if ribosome biogenesis is affected.

  18. Drosophila Erect wing (Ewg) controls mitochondrial fusion during muscle growth and maintenance by regulation of the Opa1-like gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mamta; Katti, Prasanna; Nongthomba, Upendra

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis and morphological changes are associated with tissue-specific functional demand, but the factors and pathways that regulate these processes have not been completely identified. A lack of mitochondrial fusion has been implicated in various developmental and pathological defects. The spatiotemporal regulation of mitochondrial fusion in a tissue such as muscle is not well understood. Here, we show in Drosophila indirect flight muscles (IFMs) that the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial inner membrane fusion gene, Opa1-like, is regulated in a spatiotemporal fashion by the transcription factor/co-activator Erect wing (Ewg). In IFMs null for Ewg, mitochondria undergo mitophagy and/or autophagy accompanied by reduced mitochondrial functioning and muscle degeneration. By following the dynamics of mitochondrial growth and shape in IFMs, we found that mitochondria grow extensively and fuse during late pupal development to form the large tubular mitochondria. Our evidence shows that Ewg expression during early IFM development is sufficient to upregulate Opa1-like, which itself is a requisite for both late pupal mitochondrial fusion and muscle maintenance. Concomitantly, by knocking down Opa1-like during early muscle development, we show that it is important for mitochondrial fusion, muscle differentiation and muscle organization. However, knocking down Opa1-like, after the expression window of Ewg did not cause mitochondrial or muscle defects. This study identifies a mechanism by which mitochondrial fusion is regulated spatiotemporally by Ewg through Opa1-like during IFM differentiation and growth.

  19. Mitochondrial Machineries for Protein Import and Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Nils; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2017-03-15

    Mitochondria are essential organelles with numerous functions in cellular metabolism and homeostasis. Most of the >1,000 different mitochondrial proteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and are imported into mitochondria by five transport pathways. The protein import machineries of the mitochondrial membranes and aqueous compartments reveal a remarkable variability of mechanisms for protein recognition, translocation, and sorting. The protein translocases do not operate as separate entities but are connected to each other and to machineries with functions in energetics, membrane organization, and quality control. Here, we discuss the versatility and dynamic organization of the mitochondrial protein import machineries. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial protein translocation is crucial for understanding the integration of protein translocases into a large network that controls organelle biogenesis, function, and dynamics. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biochemistry Volume 86 is June 20, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  20. CONTROL OF GLUTAMATE OXIDATION IN BRAIN AND LIVER MITOCHONDRIAL SYSTEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BALAZS, R

    1965-05-01

    1. Glutamate oxidation in brain and liver mitochondrial systems proceeds mainly through transamination with oxaloacetate followed by oxidation of the alpha-oxoglutarate formed. Both in the presence and absence of dinitrophenol in liver mitochondria this pathway accounted for almost 80% of the uptake of glutamate. In brain preparations the transamination pathway accounted for about 90% of the glutamate uptake. 2. The oxidation of [1-(14)C]- and [5-(14)C]-glutamate in brain preparations is compatible with utilization through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, either after the formation of alpha-oxoglutarate or after decarboxylation to form gamma-aminobutyrate. There is no indication of gamma-decarboxylation of glutamate. 3. The high respiratory control ratio obtained with glutamate as substrate in brain mitochondrial preparations is due to the low respiration rate in the absence of ADP: this results from the low rate of formation of oxaloacetate under these conditions. When oxaloacetate is made available by the addition of malate or of NAD(+), the respiration rate is increased to the level obtained with other substrates. 4. When the transamination pathway of glutamate oxidation was blocked with malonate, the uptake of glutamate was inhibited in the presence of ADP or ADP plus dinitrophenol by about 70 and 80% respectively in brain mitochondrial systems, whereas the inhibition was only about 50% in dinitrophenol-stimulated liver preparations. In unstimulated liver mitochondria in the presence of malonate there was a sixfold increase in the oxidation of glutamate by the glutamate-dehydrogenase pathway. Thus the operating activity of glutamate dehydrogenase is much less than the ;free' (non-latent) activity. 5. The following explanation is put forward for the control of glutamate metabolism in liver and brain mitochondrial preparations. The oxidation of glutamate by either pathway yields alpha-oxoglutarate, which is further metabolized. Since aspartate aminotransferase is

  1. Physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics and alters apoptotic, dynamic and auto(mito)phagy markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Aleixo, I; Santos-Alves, E; Balça, M M; Rizo-Roca, D; Moreira, P I; Oliveira, P J; Magalhães, J; Ascensão, A

    2015-08-20

    We here investigate the effects of two exercise modalities (endurance treadmill training-TM and voluntary free-wheel activity-FW) on the brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics, permeability transition pore (mPTP), oxidative stress, as well as on proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, apoptosis, and quality control. Eighteen male rats were assigned to sedentary-SED, TM and FW groups. Behavioral alterations and ex vivo brain mitochondrial function endpoints were assessed. Proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, including the adenine nucleotide translocator), oxidative stress markers and regulatory proteins (SIRT3, p66shc, UCP2, carbonyls, MDA, -SH, aconitase, Mn-SOD), as well as proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC1α, TFAM) were evaluated. Apoptotic signaling was measured through quantifying caspase 3, 8 and 9-like activities, Bax, Bcl2, CypD, and cofilin expression. Mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1/2, OPA1 and DRP1) and auto(mito)phagy (LC3II, Beclin1, Pink1, Parkin, p62)-related proteins were also measured by Western blotting. Only the TM exercise group showed increased spontaneous alternation and exploratory activity. Both exercise regimens improved mitochondrial respiratory activity, increased OXPHOS complexes I, III and V subunits in both brain subareas and decreased oxidative stress markers. Increased resistance to mPTP and decreased apoptotic signaling were observed in the brain cortex from TM and in the cerebellum from TM and FW groups. Also, exercise increased the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and fusion, simultaneous with decreased expression of mitochondrial fission-related protein DRP1. In conclusion, physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial function, decreasing oxidative stress and apoptotic related markers. It is also possible that favorable alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy signaling induced by exercise

  2. 大强度耐力运动抑制骨骼肌线粒体的生物合成%High-intensity endurance exercise inhibits mitochondrial biogenesis in the skeletal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国华; 陈淑妆; 李素萍

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:There are many reports on the effects of low-to-moderate intensity endurance exercise on mitochondrial biogenesis in the skeletal muscle, but there is no understanding about the high-intensity endurance exercise. It has not been reported whether the high-intensity endurance exercise influence the mitochondrial biogenesis in the skeletal muscle through 5′-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/silent information regulator factor 2 related enzyme 1 (SIRT1) signal molecules. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of AMPK/SIRT1 signaling cascade on the mitochondrial biogenesis in the skeletal muscle during different intensities of endurance exercises. METHODS:Forty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sedentary group, moderate-intensity exercise group and high-intensity exercise group. Moderate-intensity exercise load was 28 m/min, 60 min/d;high-intensity exercise load was 38 m/min, 60 min/d. In both exercise groups, the rats had 5 days of exercise and 2 days of rest within 1 week, and the exercise lasted for totaly 7 weeks. The animals of exercise groups were kiled immediately, 6 hours and 24 hours after exercise. Quantitative PCR was used to detect peroxisome proliferators γ activated receptor coativator-1α (PGC-1α) and SIRT1 gene expression, and western blot to detect phosphorylated-AMPK (P-AMPK) and SIRT1 protein expression. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:(1) Immediately, 6 hours, 24 hours after moderate-intensity exercise, PGC-1α mRNA expression in the skeletal muscle was 362% (P < 0.01), 675% (P < 0.01) and 116% of that in the sedentary group, P-AMPK protein expression was 112%, 165% (P < 0.05), 129% (P < 0.05) of that in the sedentary group, the expressions of SIRT1 protein and mRNA were 55% (P < 0.05), 86%, 103% and 109% (P < 0.05), 155%, 132% (P < 0.05) of those in the the sedentary group, respectively. (2) Immediately, 6 hours, 24 hours after high-intensity exercise, PGC-1α mRNA expression in the skeletal muscle was

  3. Mitochondrial control of cell death induced by hyperosmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Alfredo; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, M Chiara; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Lavandero, Sergio; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-01-01

    HeLa and HCT116 cells respond differentially to sorbitol, an osmolyte able to induce hypertonic stress. In these models, sorbitol promoted the phenotypic manifestations of early apoptosis followed by complete loss of viability in a time-, dose-, and cell type-specific fashion, by eliciting distinct yet partially overlapping molecular pathways. In HCT116 but not in HeLa cells, sorbitol caused the mitochondrial release of the caspase-independent death effector AIF, whereas in both cell lines cytochrome c was retained in mitochondria. Despite cytochrome c retention, HeLa cells exhibited the progressive activation of caspase-3, presumably due to the prior activation of caspase-8. Accordingly, caspase inhibition prevented sorbitol-induced killing in HeLa, but only partially in HCT116 cells. Both the knock-out of Bax in HCT116 cells and the knock-down of Bax in A549 cells by RNA interference reduced the AIF release and/or the mitochondrial alterations. While the knock-down of Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) sensitized to sorbitol-induced killing, overexpression of a Bcl-2 variant that specifically localizes to mitochondria (but not of the wild-type nor of a endoplasmic reticulum-targeted form) strongly inhibited sorbitol effects. Thus, hyperosmotic stress kills cells by triggering different molecular pathways, which converge at mitochondria where pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family exert their control.

  4. Endocannabinoids in neuroendopsychology: multiphasic control of mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Alistair; Guy, Geoffrey; Bell, Jimmy D

    2012-12-05

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a construct based on the discovery of receptors that are modulated by the plant compound tetrahydrocannabinol and the subsequent identification of a family of nascent ligands, the 'endocannabinoids'. The function of the ECS is thus defined by modulation of these receptors-in particular, by two of the best-described ligands (2-arachidonyl glycerol and anandamide), and by their metabolic pathways. Endocannabinoids are released by cell stress, and promote both cell survival and death according to concentration. The ECS appears to shift the immune system towards a type 2 response, while maintaining a positive energy balance and reducing anxiety. It may therefore be important in resolution of injury and inflammation. Data suggest that the ECS could potentially modulate mitochondrial function by several different pathways; this may help explain its actions in the central nervous system. Dose-related control of mitochondrial function could therefore provide an insight into its role in health and disease, and why it might have its own pathology, and possibly, new therapeutic directions.

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction in myofibrillar myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Amy E; Grady, John P; Rocha, Mariana C; Alston, Charlotte L; Rygiel, Karolina A; Barresi, Rita; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M

    2016-10-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) are characterised by focal myofibrillar destruction and accumulation of myofibrillar elements as protein aggregates. They are caused by mutations in the DES, MYOT, CRYAB, FLNC, BAG3, DNAJB6 and ZASP genes as well as other as yet unidentified genes. Previous studies have reported changes in mitochondrial morphology and cellular positioning, as well as clonally-expanded, large-scale mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions and focal respiratory chain deficiency in muscle of MFM patients. Here we examine skeletal muscle from patients with desmin (n = 6), ZASP (n = 1) and myotilin (n = 2) mutations and MFM protein aggregates, to understand how mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to the underlying mechanisms causing disease pathology. We have used a validated quantitative immunofluorescent assay to study respiratory chain protein levels, together with oxidative enzyme histochemistry and single cell mitochondrial DNA analysis, to examine mitochondrial changes. Results demonstrate a small number of clonally-expanded mitochondrial DNA deletions, which we conclude are due to both ageing and disease pathology. Further to this we report higher levels of respiratory chain complex I and IV deficiency compared to age matched controls, although overall levels of respiratory deficient muscle fibres in patient biopsies are low. More strikingly, a significantly higher percentage of myofibrillar myopathy patient muscle fibres have a low mitochondrial mass compared to controls. We concluded this is mechanistically unrelated to desmin and myotilin protein aggregates; however, correlation between mitochondrial mass and muscle fibre area is found. We suggest this may be due to reduced mitochondrial biogenesis in combination with muscle fibre hypertrophy.

  6. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Mitochondrial Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Suárez-Rivero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are very versatile organelles in continuous fusion and fission processes in response to various cellular signals. Mitochondrial dynamics, including mitochondrial fission/fusion, movements and turnover, are essential for the mitochondrial network quality control. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics can cause neuropathies such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in which mitochondrial fusion and transport are impaired, or dominant optic atrophy which is caused by a reduced mitochondrial fusion. On the other hand, mitochondrial dysfunction in primary mitochondrial diseases promotes reactive oxygen species production that impairs its own function and dynamics, causing a continuous vicious cycle that aggravates the pathological phenotype. Mitochondrial dynamics provides a new way to understand the pathophysiology of mitochondrial disorders and other diseases related to mitochondria dysfunction such as diabetes, heart failure, or Hungtinton’s disease. The knowledge about mitochondrial dynamics also offers new therapeutics targets in mitochondrial diseases.

  7. crRNA biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charpentier, E.; Oost, van der J.; White, M.

    2013-01-01

    Mature crRNAs are key elements in CRISPR-Cas defense against genome invaders. These short RNAs are composed of unique repeat/spacer sequences that guide the Cas protein(s) to the cognate invading nucleic acids for their destruction. The biogenesis of mature crRNAs involves highly precise processing

  8. crRNA biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charpentier, E.; Oost, van der J.; White, M.

    2013-01-01

    Mature crRNAs are key elements in CRISPR-Cas defense against genome invaders. These short RNAs are composed of unique repeat/spacer sequences that guide the Cas protein(s) to the cognate invading nucleic acids for their destruction. The biogenesis of mature crRNAs involves highly precise processing

  9. Mitochondrial control region diversity in Sindhi ethnic group of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Memona; Rakha, Allah; Noreen, Saadia; Salahuddin, Zeenat

    2017-05-01

    The entire mitochondrial DNA control region (nt 16024-576) of 88 unrelated individuals of Sindhi ethnic group residing in different parts of Sindh province of Pakistan was sequenced. Out of 66 different observed haplotypes 50 were unique and 16 were shared by more than one individual. Results showed admixture of mtDNA pool constituting the haplogroups derived mainly from South Asia (47.6%) and West Eurasian (35.7%) whereas the contribution of the African haplogroup was very small (2.4%). High values of genetic diversity (0.992), power of discrimination (0.981) and low value of random match probability (0.018) indicates that mtDNA analysis for this population can effectively be used for forensic casework. The results are valuable contribution towards building mtDNA population variation database for this particular ethnic group from Pakistan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. S-nitrosylation regulates mitochondrial quality control via activation of parkin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Kentaro; Komatsubara, Akira T.; Nishimura, Yuhei; Sawada, Tomoyo; Kawafune, Hiroto; Tsumoto, Hiroki; Tsuji, Yuichi; Zhao, Jing; Kyotani, Yoji; Tanaka, Toshio; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Yoshizumi, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Parkin, a ubiquitin E3 ligase of the ring between ring fingers family, has been implicated in mitochondrial quality control. A series of recent reports have suggested that the recruitment of parkin is regulated by phosphorylation. However, the molecular mechanism that activates parkin to induce mitochondrial degradation is not well understood. Here, and in contrast to previous reports that S-nitrosylation of parkin is exclusively inhibitory, we identify a previously unrecognized site of S-nitrosylation in parkin (Cys323) that induces mitochondrial degradation. We demonstrate that endogenous S-nitrosylation of parkin is in fact responsible for activation of its E3 ligase activity to induce aggregation and degradation. We further demonstrate that mitochondrial uncoupling agents result in denitrosylation of parkin, and that prevention of denitrosylation restores mitochondrial degradation. Our data indicates that NO both positive effects on mitochondrial quality control, and suggest that targeted S-nitrosylation could provide a novel therapeutic strategy against Parkinson's disease. PMID:23857542

  11. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  12. Mitochondrial dynamics in type 2 diabetes: Pathophysiological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Rovira-Llopis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a key role in maintaining cellular metabolic homeostasis. These organelles have a high plasticity and are involved in dynamic processes such as mitochondrial fusion and fission, mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis. Type 2 diabetes is characterised by mitochondrial dysfunction, high production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and low levels of ATP. Mitochondrial fusion is modulated by different proteins, including mitofusin-1 (MFN1, mitofusin-2 (MFN2 and optic atrophy (OPA-1, while fission is controlled by mitochondrial fission 1 (FIS1, dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1 and mitochondrial fission factor (MFF. PARKIN and (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1 participate in the process of mitophagy, for which mitochondrial fission is necessary. In this review, we discuss the molecular pathways of mitochondrial dynamics, their impairment under type 2 diabetes, and pharmaceutical approaches for targeting mitochondrial dynamics, such as mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (mdivi-1, dynasore, P110 and 15-oxospiramilactone. Furthermore, we discuss the pathophysiological implications of impaired mitochondrial dynamics, especially in type 2 diabetes.

  13. Sortase activity is controlled by a flexible lid in the pilus biogenesis mechanism of gram-positive pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Clothilde; Izoré, Thierry; Job, Viviana; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Dessen, Andréa

    2009-11-10

    Pili are surface-linked virulence factors that play key roles in infection establishment in a variety of pathogenic species. In Gram-positive pathogens, pilus formation requires the action of sortases, dedicated transpeptidases that covalently associate pilus building blocks. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, all genes required for pilus formation are harbored in a single pathogenicity islet which encodes three structural proteins (RrgA, RrgB, RrgC) and three sortases (SrtC-1, SrtC-2, SrtC-3). RrgB forms the backbone of the streptococcal pilus, to which minor pilins RrgA and RrgC are covalently associated. SrtC-1 is the main sortase involved in polymerization of the RrgB fiber and displays a lid which encapsulates the active site, a feature present in all pilus-related sortases. In this work, we show that catalysis by SrtC-1 proceeds through a catalytic triad constituted of His, Arg, and Cys and that lid instability affects protein fold and catalysis. In addition, we show by thermal shift analysis that lid flexibility can be stabilized by the addition of substrate-like peptides, a feature shared by other periplasmic transpeptidases. We also report the characterization of a trapped acyl-enzyme intermediate formed between SrtC-1 and RrgB. The presence of lid-encapsulated sortases in the pilus biogenesis systems in many Gram-positive pathogens points to a common mechanism of substrate recognition and catalysis that should be taken into consideration in the development of sortase inhibitors.

  14. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.; Eberhard, Jessica R.; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Sanchez, Juan J.; Hernandez, Alexis; Müeller, Heinrich; Graves, Gary R.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Wright, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified with increasing frequency, particularly in birds (Class Aves). In this study, we investigate the evolutionary history of mitochondrial control region states within the avian order Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos). To this aim, we reconstructed a comprehensive multi-locus phylogeny of parrots, used PCR of three diagnostic fragments to classify the mitochondrial control region state as single or duplicated, and mapped these states onto the phylogeny. We further sequenced 44 selected species to validate these inferences of control region state. Ancestral state reconstruction using a range of weighting schemes identified six independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications within Psittaciformes. Analysis of sequence data showed that varying levels of mitochondrial gene and tRNA homology and degradation were present within a given clade exhibiting duplications. Levels of divergence between control regions within an individual varied from 0–10.9% with the differences occurring mainly between 51 and 225 nucleotides 3′ of the goose hairpin in domain I. Further investigations into the fates of duplicated mitochondrial genes, the potential costs and benefits of having a second control region, and the complex relationship between evolutionary rates, selection, and time since duplication are needed to fully explain these patterns in the mitochondrial genome. PMID:22543055

  15. Mitochondrial metabolism and the control of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eChiong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation and dedifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are essential processes of vascular development. VSMCs have biosynthetic, proliferative and contractile roles in the vessel wall. Alterations in the differentiated state of the VSMCs play a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension and vascular stenosis. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of molecular mechanisms involved in the control of VSMC proliferation, with particular focus on mitochondrial metabolism. Mitochondrial activity can be controlled by regulating mitochondrial dynamics, i.e. mitochondrial fusion and fission, and by regulating mitochondrial calcium handling through the interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Alterations in both VSMC proliferation and mitochondrial function can be triggered by dysregulation of mitofusin-2, a small GTPase associated with mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial-ER interaction. Several lines of evidence highlight the relevance of mitochondrial metabolism in the control of VSMC proliferation, indicating a new area to be explored in the treatment of vascular diseases.

  16. TRAP1 controls mitochondrial fusion/fission balance through Drp1 and Mff expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Takamura

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that change in response to extracellular stimuli. These changes are essential for normal mitochondrial/cellular function and are controlled by a tight balance between two antagonistic pathways that promote fusion and fission. Although some molecules have been identified to mediate the mitochondrial fusion and fission process, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1 is a mitochondrial molecule that regulates a variety of mitochondrial functions. Here, we examined the role of TRAP1 in the regulation of morphology. Stable TRAP1 knockdown cells showed abnormal mitochondrial morphology, and we observed significant decreases in dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1 and mitochondrial fission factor (Mff, mitochondrial fission proteins. Similar results were obtained by transient knockdown of TRAP1 in two different cell lines, SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and KNS-42 glioma cells. However, TRAP1 knockdown did not affect expression levels of fusion proteins. The reduction in Drp1 and Mff protein levels was rescued following treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. These results suggest that TRAP1 regulates the expression of fission proteins and controls mitochondrial fusion/fission, which affects mitochondrial/cellular function.

  17. Possible existence of lysosome-like organella within mitochondria and its role in mitochondrial quality control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Miyamoto

    Full Text Available The accumulation of unhealthy mitochondria results in mitochondrial dysfunction, which has been implicated in aging, cancer, and a variety of degenerative diseases. However, the mechanism by which mitochondrial quality is regulated remains unclear. Here, we show that Mieap, a novel p53-inducible protein, induces intramitochondrial lysosome-like organella that plays a critical role in mitochondrial quality control. Mieap expression is directly regulated by p53 and is frequently lost in human cancer as result of DNA methylation. Mieap dramatically induces the accumulation of lysosomal proteins within mitochondria and mitochondrial acidic condition without destroying the mitochondrial structure (designated MALM, for Mieap-induced accumulation of lysosome-like organelles within mitochondria in response to mitochondrial damage. MALM was not related to canonical autophagy. MALM is involved in the degradation of oxidized mitochondrial proteins, leading to increased ATP synthesis and decreased reactive oxygen species generation. These results suggest that Mieap induces intramitochondrial lysosome-like organella that plays a critical role in mitochondrial quality control by eliminating oxidized mitochondrial proteins. Cancer cells might accumulate unhealthy mitochondria due to p53 mutations and/or Mieap methylation, representing a potential cause of the Warburg effect.

  18. Biogenesis of inner membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luirink, Joen; Yu, Zhong; Wagner, Samuel; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2012-06-01

    The inner membrane proteome of the model organism Escherichia coli is composed of inner membrane proteins, lipoproteins and peripherally attached soluble proteins. Our knowledge of the biogenesis of inner membrane proteins is rapidly increasing. This is in particular true for the early steps of biogenesis - protein targeting to and insertion into the membrane. However, our knowledge of inner membrane protein folding and quality control is still fragmentary. Furthering our knowledge in these areas will bring us closer to understand the biogenesis of individual inner membrane proteins in the context of the biogenesis of the inner membrane proteome of Escherichia coli as a whole. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes.

  19. Mitochondrial unfolded protein response controls matrix pre-RNA processing and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Christian; Harper, J Wade

    2016-06-30

    The mitochondrial matrix is unique in that it must integrate the folding and assembly of proteins derived from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) senses matrix protein misfolding and induces a program of nuclear gene expression, including mitochondrial chaperonins, to promote mitochondrial proteostasis. While misfolded mitochondrial-matrix-localized ornithine transcarbamylase induces chaperonin expression, our understanding of mammalian UPRmt is rudimentary, reflecting a lack of acute triggers for UPRmt activation. This limitation has prevented analysis of the cellular responses to matrix protein misfolding and the effects of UPRmt on mitochondrial translation to control protein folding loads. Here we combine pharmacological inhibitors of matrix-localized HSP90/TRAP1 (ref. 8) or LON protease, which promote chaperonin expression, with global transcriptional and proteomic analysis to reveal an extensive and acute response of human cells to UPRmt. This response encompasses widespread induction of nuclear genes, including matrix-localized proteins involved in folding, pre-RNA processing and translation. Functional studies revealed rapid but reversible translation inhibition in mitochondria occurring concurrently with defects in pre-RNA processing caused by transcriptional repression and LON-dependent turnover of the mitochondrial pre-RNA processing nuclease MRPP3 (ref. 10). This study reveals that acute mitochondrial protein folding stress activates both increased chaperone availability within the matrix and reduced matrix-localized protein synthesis through translational inhibition, and provides a framework for further dissection of mammalian UPRmt.

  20. Mitochondrial Function and Mitophagy in the Elderly: Effects of Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo C. Moreira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a natural, multifactorial and multiorganic phenomenon wherein there are gradual physiological and pathological changes over time. Aging has been associated with a decrease of autophagy capacity and mitochondrial functions, such as biogenesis, dynamics, and mitophagy. These processes are essential for the maintenance of mitochondrial structural integrity and, therefore, for cell life, since mitochondrial dysfunction leads to an impairment of energy metabolism and increased production of reactive oxygen species, which consequently trigger mechanisms of cellular senescence and apoptotic cell death. Moreover, reduced mitochondrial function can contribute to age-associated disease phenotypes in model organisms and humans. Literature data show beneficial effects of exercise on the impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics and on the decrease in the mitophagic capacity associated to aging. Thus, exercise could have effects on the major cell signaling pathways that are involved in the mitochondria quality and quantity control in the elderly. Although it is known that several exercise protocols are able to modify the activity and turnover of mitochondria, further studies are necessary in order to better identify the mechanisms of interaction between mitochondrial functions, aging, and physical activity, as well as to analyze possible factors influencing these processes.

  1. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders (RCDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases because of the fact that protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis, structure, and function of mitochondria, including DNA…

  2. Patients with sepsis exhibit increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity in peripheral blood immune cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Morota, Saori; Persson, Johan Mikael;

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In sepsis, mitochondria have been associated with both initial dysfunction and subsequent upregulation (biogenesis). However, the evolvement of mitochondrial function in sepsis over time is largely unknown, and we therefore investigated mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood...... immune cells (PBICs) in sepsis patients during the first week after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: PBICs from 20 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock were analyzed with high-resolution respirometry 3 times after admission to the ICU (within 48 hours, days 3 to 4 and days 6...... indicators were found at days 6 to 7; P sepsis displayed higher mitochondrial respiratory capacities compared with controls, due...

  3. Cholesterol and myelin biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, Gesine; Simons, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Myelin consists of several layers of tightly compacted membranes wrapped around axons in the nervous system. The main function of myelin is to provide electrical insulation around the axon to ensure the rapid propagation of nerve conduction. As the myelinating glia terminally differentiates, they begin to produce myelin membranes on a remarkable scale. This membrane is unique in its composition being highly enriched in lipids, in particular galactosylceramide and cholesterol. In this review we will summarize the role of cholesterol in myelin biogenesis in the central and peripheral nervous system.

  4. Mitochondrial fusion, fission, and mitochondrial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Joel N; Leuthner, Tess C; Luz, Anthony L

    2017-08-05

    Mitochondrial dynamics are regulated by two sets of opposed processes: mitochondrial fusion and fission, and mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation (including mitophagy), as well as processes such as intracellular transport. These processes maintain mitochondrial homeostasis, regulate mitochondrial form, volume and function, and are increasingly understood to be critical components of the cellular stress response. Mitochondrial dynamics vary based on developmental stage and age, cell type, environmental factors, and genetic background. Indeed, many mitochondrial homeostasis genes are human disease genes. Emerging evidence indicates that deficiencies in these genes often sensitize to environmental exposures, yet can also be protective under certain circumstances. Inhibition of mitochondrial dynamics also affects elimination of irreparable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and transmission of mtDNA mutations. We briefly review the basic biology of mitodynamic processes with a focus on mitochondrial fusion and fission, discuss what is known and unknown regarding how these processes respond to chemical and other stressors, and review the literature on interactions between mitochondrial toxicity and genetic variation in mitochondrial fusion and fission genes. Finally, we suggest areas for future research, including elucidating the full range of mitodynamic responses from low to high-level exposures, and from acute to chronic exposures; detailed examination of the physiological consequences of mitodynamic alterations in different cell types; mechanism-based testing of mitotoxicant interactions with interindividual variability in mitodynamics processes; and incorporating other environmental variables that affect mitochondria, such as diet and exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Biogenesis and dynamics of mitochondria during the cell cycle: significance of 3'UTRs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Martínez-Diez

    Full Text Available Nowadays, we are facing a renaissance of mitochondria in cancer biology. However, our knowledge of the basic cell biology and on the timing and mechanisms that control the biosynthesis of mitochondrial constituents during progression through the cell cycle of mammalian cells remain largely unknown. Herein, we document the in vivo changes on mitochondrial morphology and dynamics that accompany cellular mitosis, and illustrate the following key points of the biogenesis of mitochondria during progression of liver cells through the cycle: (i the replication of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes is synchronized during cellular proliferation, (ii the accretion of OXPHOS proteins is asynchronously regulated during proliferation being the synthesis of beta-F1-ATPase and Hsp60 carried out also at G2/M and, (iii the biosynthesis of cardiolipin is achieved during the S phase, although full development of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim is attained at G2/M. Furthermore, we demonstrate using reporter constructs that the mechanism regulating the accretion of beta-F1-ATPase during cellular proliferation is controlled at the level of mRNA translation by the 3'UTR of the transcript. The 3'UTR-driven synthesis of the protein at G2/M is essential for conferring to the daughter cells the original phenotype of the parental cell. Our findings suggest that alterations on this process may promote deregulated beta-F1-ATPase expression in human cancer.

  6. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuejin; Rasmussen, Tyler P; Koval, Olha M; Joiner, Mei-Ling A; Hall, Duane D; Chen, Biyi; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Wang, Qiongling; Rokita, Adam G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2015-01-20

    Heart rate increases are a fundamental adaptation to physiological stress, while inappropriate heart rate increases are resistant to current therapies. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving heart rate acceleration in cardiac pacemaker cells remain incompletely understood. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) facilitates calcium entry into the mitochondrial matrix to stimulate metabolism. We developed mice with myocardial MCU inhibition by transgenic expression of a dominant-negative (DN) MCU. Here, we show that DN-MCU mice had normal resting heart rates but were incapable of physiological fight or flight heart rate acceleration. We found that MCU function was essential for rapidly increasing mitochondrial calcium in pacemaker cells and that MCU-enhanced oxidative phoshorylation was required to accelerate reloading of an intracellular calcium compartment before each heartbeat. Our findings show that MCU is necessary for complete physiological heart rate acceleration and suggest that MCU inhibition could reduce inappropriate heart rate increases without affecting resting heart rate.

  7. Dynamic organization of the mitochondrial protein import machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Sebastian P; Stiller, Sebastian B; Wiedemann, Nils; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondria contain elaborate machineries for the import of precursor proteins from the cytosol. The translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) performs the initial import of precursor proteins and transfers the precursors to downstream translocases, including the presequence translocase and the carrier translocase of the inner membrane, the mitochondrial import and assembly machinery of the intermembrane space, and the sorting and assembly machinery of the outer membrane. Although the protein translocases can function as separate entities in vitro, recent studies revealed a close and dynamic cooperation of the protein import machineries to facilitate efficient transfer of precursor proteins in vivo. In addition, protein translocases were found to transiently interact with distinct machineries that function in the respiratory chain or in the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane architecture. Mitochondrial protein import is embedded in a regulatory network that ensures protein biogenesis, membrane dynamics, bioenergetic activity and quality control.

  8. Assessment of mitochondrial function and control in normal and diseased states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radda, G K; Odoom, J; Kemp, G; Taylor, D J; Thompson, C; Styles, P

    1995-05-24

    Mitochondrial function in muscle in vivo can be quantitatively evaluated using 31-phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance. In resting muscle, the concentrations of ions (e.g. H+, Na+) and two of the major bioenergetic components (inorganic phosphate and creatine) are determined by regulated transcellular transport processes. During recovery after exercise the kinetics and control of mitochondrial ATP synthesis can be established. During exercise the relative contributions to ATP synthesis of phosphocreatine (using creatine kinase), anaerobic glycogenolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are dissected and have been shown to change with time. The consequences of mitochondrial lesions and dysfunctions on these processes have been summarised.

  9. Analyzing Population Genetics Using the Mitochondrial Control Region and Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takumi; Phillips, Bonnie; Latourelle, Sandra M.; Elwess, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    The 14-base pair hypervariable region in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Asian populations, specifically Japanese and Chinese students at Plattsburgh State University, was examined. Previous research on this 14-base pair region showed it to be susceptible to mutations and as a result indicated direct correlation with specific ethnic populations.…

  10. The circadian clock coordinates ribosome biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Jouffe

    Full Text Available Biological rhythms play a fundamental role in the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. Rhythmic circadian expression of clock-controlled genes is orchestrated by a molecular clock that relies on interconnected negative feedback loops of transcription regulators. Here we show that the circadian clock exerts its function also through the regulation of mRNA translation. Namely, the circadian clock influences the temporal translation of a subset of mRNAs involved in ribosome biogenesis by controlling the transcription of translation initiation factors as well as the clock-dependent rhythmic activation of signaling pathways involved in their regulation. Moreover, the circadian oscillator directly regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs. Thus the circadian clock exerts a major role in coordinating transcription and translation steps underlying ribosome biogenesis.

  11. MITOCHONDRIAL DNA POLYMORPHISM IN CONTROL REGION FROM CHINESE YUGU POPULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘新社; 李生斌

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mitochondrial DNA sequence polymorphism sites in Chinese YUGU ethnic group and to provide basic data used in forensic purpose. Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from the hole blood of 100 unrelated individuals of Chinese YUGU ethnic group by standard chelex-100 method. The sequence polymorphism sites was determined by PCR amplification and direct sequencing. Results 54 polymorphic sites were noted in mtDNA np16091-16418 region, and 46 haplotypes were identified. The genetic diversity was calculated to be 0.9691, and the genetic identity was calculated to be 0.0406. Conclusion There are some particular polymorphism sites in Chinese YUGU ethnic group. The results suggest that sequence polymorphism from np16091-16418 in human mitochondrial DNA can be used as a biological marker for forensic identity.

  12. Inventory control: cytochrome c oxidase assembly regulates mitochondrial translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, David U; Fox, Thomas D; Rehling, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria maintain genome and translation machinery to synthesize a small subset of subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system. To build up functional enzymes, these organellar gene products must assemble with imported subunits that are encoded in the nucleus. New findings on the early steps of cytochrome c oxidase assembly reveal how the mitochondrial translation of its core component, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (Cox1), is directly coupled to the assembly of this respiratory complex.

  13. Inventory control: cytochrome oxidase assembly regulates mitochondrial translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, David U.; Fox, Thomas D.; Rehling, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria maintain a genome and translation-machinery to synthesize a small subset of subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These organellar gene products must assemble with imported subunits that are encoded in the nucleus to build up functional enzymes. New findings on the early steps in cytochrome oxidase assembly reveal how the mitochondrial translation of its core component Cox1 is directly coupled to the assembly of this respiratory complex. PMID:21179059

  14. Mitochondrial haplogroups and control region polymorphisms in age-related macular degeneration: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith E Mueller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Onset and development of the multifactorial disease age-related macular degeneration (AMD are highly interrelated with mitochondrial functions such as energy production and free radical turnover. Mitochondrial dysfunction and overproduction of reactive oxygen species may contribute to destruction of the retinal pigment epithelium, retinal atrophy and choroidal neovascularization, leading to AMD. Consequently, polymorphisms of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA are postulated to be susceptibility factors for this disease. Previous studies from Australia and the United States detected associations of mitochondrial haplogroups with AMD. The aim of the present study was to test these associations in Middle European Caucasians. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mitochondrial haplogroups (combinations of mtDNA polymorphisms and mitochondrial CR polymorphisms were analyzed in 200 patients with wet AMD (choroidal neovascularization, CNV, in 66 patients with dry AMD, and in 385 controls from Austria by means of multiplex primer extension analysis and sequencing, respectively. In patients with CNV, haplogroup H was found to be significantly less frequent compared to controls, and haplogroup J showed a trend toward a higher frequency compared to controls. Five CR polymorphisms were found to differ significantly in the two study populations compared to controls, and all, except one (T152C, are linked to those haplogroups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It can be concluded that haplogroup J is a risk factor for AMD, whereas haplogroup H seems to be protective for AMD.

  15. Exploiting synteny in Cucumis for mapping of Psm: a unique locus controlling paternal mitochondrial sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Faifi, Sulieman; Meyer, Jenelle D F; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Monforte, Antonio J; Havey, Michael J

    2008-08-01

    The three genomes of cucumber show different modes of transmission, nuclear DNA bi-parentally, plastid DNA maternally, and mitochondrial DNA paternally. The mosaic (MSC) phenotype of cucumber is associated with mitochondrial DNA rearrangements and is a valuable tool for studying mitochondrial transmission. A nuclear locus (Psm) has been identified in cucumber that controls sorting of paternally transmitted mitochondrial DNA. Comparative sequencing and mapping of cucumber and melon revealed extensive synteny on the recombinational and sequence levels near Psm and placed this locus on linkage group R of cucumber and G10 of melon. However, the cucumber genomic region near Psm was surprisingly monomorphic with an average of one SNP every 25 kb, requiring that a family from a more diverse cross is produced for fine mapping and eventual cloning of Psm. The cucumber ortholog of Arabidopsis mismatch repair (MSH1) was cloned and it segregated independently of Psm, revealing that this candidate gene is not Psm.

  16. Sequence variation in the guillemot (Alcidae: Cepphus) mitochondrial control region and its nuclear homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, M G; Friesen, V L

    1998-01-01

    We describe sequence variation in the mitochondrial control region and its nuclear homolog in three species and seven subspecies of guillemots (Cepphus spp.). Nuclear homologs of the 5' end of the control region were found in all individuals. Nuclear sequences were approximately 50% divergent from their mitochondrial counterparts and formed a distinct phylogenetic clade; the mitochondrial-nuclear introgression event must have predated the radiation of Cepphus. As in other vertebrates, the guillemot control region has a relatively conserved central block flanked by hypervariable 5' and 3' ends. Mean pairwise interspecific divergence values among control regions were lower than those in other birds. All individuals were heteroplasmic for the number of simple tandem nucleotide repeats (A(n)C) at the 3' end of the control region. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that black guillemots are basal to pigeon and spectacled guillemots, but evolutionary relationships among subspecies remain unresolved, possibly due to incomplete lineage sorting. Describing molecular variation in nuclear homologs of mitochondrial genes is of general interest in phylogenetics because, if undetected, the homologs may confound interpretations of mitochondrial phylogenies.

  17. Transcutaneous application of carbon dioxide (CO2 induces mitochondrial apoptosis in human malignant fibrous histiocytoma in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Onishi

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play an essential role in cellular energy metabolism and apoptosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that decreased mitochondrial biogenesis is associated with cancer progression. In mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α regulates the activities of multiple nuclear receptors and transcription factors involved in mitochondrial proliferation. Previously, we showed that overexpression of PGC-1α leads to mitochondrial proliferation and induces apoptosis in human malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH cells in vitro. We also demonstrated that transcutaneous application of carbon dioxide (CO(2 to rat skeletal muscle induces PGC-1α expression and causes an increase in mitochondrial proliferation. In this study, we utilized a murine model of human MFH to determine the effect of transcutaneous CO(2 exposure on PGC-1α expression, mitochondrial proliferation and cellular apoptosis. PGC-1α expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, while mitochondrial proliferation was assessed by immunofluorescence staining and the relative copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA was assessed by real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence staining and DNA fragmentation assays were used to examine mitochondrial apoptosis. We also evaluated the expression of mitochondrial apoptosis related proteins, such as caspases, cytochorome c and Bax, by immunoblot analysis. We show that transcutaneous application of CO(2 induces PGC-1α expression, and increases mitochondrial proliferation and apoptosis of tumor cells, significantly reducing tumor volume. Proteins involved in the mitochondrial apoptotic cascade, including caspase 3 and caspase 9, were elevated in CO(2 treated tumors compared to control. We also observed an enrichment of cytochrome c in the cytoplasmic fraction and Bax protein in the mitochondrial fraction of CO(2 treated tumors, highlighting the involvement of mitochondria in apoptosis

  18. Nuclear genomic control of naturally occurring variation in mitochondrial function in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Bu, Su; Harbison, Susan T; Slaughter, Juanita C; Mackay, Trudy F C; Moellering, Douglas R; De Luca, Maria

    2012-11-22

    Mitochondria are organelles found in nearly all eukaryotic cells that play a crucial role in cellular survival and function. Mitochondrial function is under the control of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. While the latter has been the focus of most genetic research, we remain largely ignorant about the nuclear-encoded genomic control of inter-individual variability in mitochondrial function. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster as our model organism to address this question. We quantified mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiration rates and P:O ratio in mitochondria isolated from the thoraces of 40 sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel. We found significant within-population genetic variability for all mitochondrial traits. Hence, we performed genome-wide association mapping and identified 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differences in mitochondrial respiration and efficiency (P ≤1 × 10-5). Gene-centered regression models showed that 2-3 SNPs can explain 31, 13, and 18% of the phenotypic variation in state 3, state 4, and P:O ratio, respectively. Most of the genes tagged by the SNPs are involved in organ development, second messenger-mediated signaling pathways, and cytoskeleton remodeling. One of these genes, sallimus (sls), encodes a component of the muscle sarcomere. We confirmed the direct effect of sls on mitochondrial respiration using two viable mutants and their coisogenic wild-type strain. Furthermore, correlation network analysis revealed that sls functions as a transcriptional hub in a co-regulated module associated with mitochondrial respiration and is connected to CG7834, which is predicted to encode a protein with mitochondrial electron transfer flavoprotein activity. This latter finding was also verified in the sls mutants. Our results provide novel insights into the genetic factors regulating natural variation in mitochondrial function in D. melanogaster. The integrative genomic

  19. Intraspecific rearrangement of duplicated mitochondrial control regions in the Luzon Tarictic Hornbill Penelopides manillae (Aves: Bucerotidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammler, Svenja; Ketmaier, Valerio; Havenstein, Katja; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2013-12-01

    Philippine hornbills of the genera Aceros and Penelopides (Bucerotidae) are known to possess a large tandemly duplicated fragment in their mitochondrial genome, whose paralogous parts largely evolve in concert. In the present study, we surveyed the two distinguishable duplicated control regions in several individuals of the Luzon Tarictic Hornbill Penelopides manillae, compare their characteristics within and across individuals, and report on an intraspecific mitochondrial gene rearrangement found in one single specimen, i.e., an interchange between the two control regions. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of two distinct mitochondrial genome rearrangements within a bird species. We briefly discuss a possible evolutionary mechanism responsible for this pattern, and highlight potential implications for the application of control region sequences as a marker in population genetics and phylogeography.

  20. The Psm locus controls paternal sorting of the cucumber mitochondrial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havey, M J; Park, Y H; Bartoszewski, G

    2004-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome of cucumber shows paternal transmission and there are no reports of variation for mitochondrial transmission in cucumber. We used a mitochondrially encoded mosaic (MSC) phenotype to reveal phenotypic variation for mitochondrial-genome transmission in cucumber. At least 10 random plants from each of 71 cucumber plant introductions (PIs) were crossed as the female with an inbred line (MSC16) possessing the MSC phenotype. Nonmosaic F1 progenies were observed at high frequencies (greater than 50%) in F1 families from 10 PIs, with the greatest proportions being from PI 401734. Polymorphisms near the mitochondrial cox1 gene and JLV5 region revealed that nonmosaic hybrid progenies from crosses of PI 401734 with MSC16 as the male possessed the nonmosaic-inducing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from the paternal parent. F2) F3, and backcross progenies from nonmosaic F1 plants from PI 401734 x MSC16 were testcrossed with MSC16 as the male parent to reveal segregation of a nuclear locus (Psm for Paternal sorting of mitochondria) controlling sorting of mtDNA from the paternal parent. Psm is a unique locus at which the maternal genotype affects sorting of paternally transmitted mtDNA.

  1. AMPK controls exercise endurance, mitochondrial oxidative capacity, and skeletal muscle integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantier, Louise; Fentz, Joachim; Mounier, Rémi; Leclerc, Jocelyne; Treebak, Jonas T; Pehmøller, Christian; Sanz, Nieves; Sakakibara, Iori; Saint-Amand, Emmanuelle; Rimbaud, Stéphanie; Maire, Pascal; Marette, André; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Ferry, Arnaud; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit

    2014-07-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status that plays a central role in skeletal muscle metabolism. We used skeletal muscle-specific AMPKα1α2 double-knockout (mdKO) mice to provide direct genetic evidence of the physiological importance of AMPK in regulating muscle exercise capacity, mitochondrial function, and contraction-stimulated glucose uptake. Exercise performance was significantly reduced in the mdKO mice, with a reduction in maximal force production and fatigue resistance. An increase in the proportion of myofibers with centralized nuclei was noted, as well as an elevated expression of interleukin 6 (IL-6) mRNA, possibly consistent with mild skeletal muscle injury. Notably, we found that AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 isoforms are dispensable for contraction-induced skeletal muscle glucose transport, except for male soleus muscle. However, the lack of skeletal muscle AMPK diminished maximal ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration, showing an impairment at complex I. This effect was not accompanied by changes in mitochondrial number, indicating that AMPK regulates muscle metabolic adaptation through the regulation of muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity and mitochondrial substrate utilization but not baseline mitochondrial muscle content. Together, these results demonstrate that skeletal muscle AMPK has an unexpected role in the regulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation that contributes to the energy demands of the exercising muscle.-Lantier, L., Fentz, J., Mounier, R., Leclerc, J., Treebak, J. T., Pehmøller, C., Sanz, N., Sakakibara, I., Saint-Amand, E., Rimbaud, S., Maire, P., Marette, A., Ventura-Clapier, R., Ferry, A., Wojtaszewski, J. F. P., Foretz, M., Viollet, B. AMPK controls exercise endurance, mitochondrial oxidative capacity, and skeletal muscle integrity. © FASEB.

  2. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial and proteostasis malfunction in adrenoleukodystrophy: A paradigm for axonal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourcade, Stéphane; Ferrer, Isidre; Pujol, Aurora

    2015-11-01

    Peroxisomal and mitochondrial malfunction, which are highly intertwined through redox regulation, in combination with defective proteostasis, are hallmarks of the most prevalent multifactorial neurodegenerative diseases-including Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD)-and of the aging process, and are also found in inherited conditions. Here we review the interplay between oxidative stress and axonal degeneration, taking as groundwork recent findings on pathomechanisms of the peroxisomal neurometabolic disease adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). We explore the impact of chronic redox imbalance caused by the excess of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) on mitochondrial respiration and biogenesis, and discuss how this impairs protein quality control mechanisms essential for neural cell survival, such as the proteasome and autophagy systems. As consequence, prime molecular targets in the pathogenetic cascade emerge, such as the SIRT1/PGC-1α axis of mitochondrial biogenesis, and the inhibitor of autophagy mTOR. Thus, we propose that mitochondria-targeted antioxidants; mitochondrial biogenesis boosters such as the antidiabetic pioglitazone and the SIRT1 ligand resveratrol; and the autophagy activator temsirolimus, a derivative of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, hold promise as disease-modifying therapies for X-ALD.

  3. Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase: a control enzyme in ketogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegardt, F G

    1999-03-15

    Cytosolic and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthases were first recognized as different chemical entities in 1975, when they were purified and characterized by Lane's group. Since then, the two enzymes have been studied extensively, one as a control site of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway and the other as an important control site of ketogenesis. This review describes some key developments over the last 25 years that have led to our current understanding of the physiology of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase in the HMG-CoA pathway and in ketogenesis in the liver and small intestine of suckling animals. The enzyme is regulated by two systems: succinylation and desuccinylation in the short term, and transcriptional regulation in the long term. Both control mechanisms are influenced by nutritional and hormonal factors, which explains the incidence of ketogenesis in diabetes and starvation, during intense lipolysis, and in the foetal-neonatal and suckling-weaning transitions. The DNA-binding properties of the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor and other transcription factors on the nuclear-receptor-responsive element of the mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase promoter have revealed how ketogenesis can be regulated by fatty acids. Finally, the expression of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase in the gonads and the correction of auxotrophy for mevalonate in cells deficient in cytosolic HMG-CoA synthase suggest that the mitochondrial enzyme may play a role in cholesterogenesis in gonadal and other tissues.

  4. Laser controlled singlet oxygen generation in mitochondria to promote mitochondrial DNA replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Wang, Yupei; Si, Jing; Zhou, Rong; Gan, Lu; Di, Cuixia; Xie, Yi; Zhang, Hong

    2015-11-18

    Reports have shown that a certain level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. However, it is unclear whether it is the mitochondrial ROS that stimulate mtDNA replication and this requires further investigation. Here we employed a photodynamic system to achieve controlled mitochondrial singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generation. HeLa cells incubated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) were exposed to laser irradiation to induce (1)O2 generation within mitochondria. Increased mtDNA copy number was detected after low doses of 630 nm laser light in ALA-treated cells. The stimulated mtDNA replication was directly linked to mitochondrial (1)O2 generation, as verified using specific ROS scavengers. The stimulated mtDNA replication was regulated by mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mtDNA polymerase γ. MtDNA control region modifications were induced by (1)O2 generation in mitochondria. A marked increase in 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) level was detected in ALA-treated cells after irradiation. HeLa cell growth stimulation and G1-S cell cycle transition were also observed after laser irradiation in ALA-treated cells. These cellular responses could be due to a second wave of ROS generation detected in mitochondria. In summary, we describe a controllable method of inducing mtDNA replication in vitro.

  5. Mitofilin regulates cytochrome c release during apoptosis by controlling mitochondrial cristae remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui-feng; Zhao, Guo-wei; Liang, Shu-ting; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Li-hong [National Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), 5 Dong Dan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China); Chen, Hou-zao, E-mail: houzao@gmail.com [National Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), 5 Dong Dan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China); Liu, De-pei, E-mail: liudp@pumc.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), 5 Dong Dan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitofilin deficiency caused disruption of the cristae structures in HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitofilin deficiency reduced cell proliferation and increased cell sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitofilin deficiency accelerated the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitofilin deficiency accelerated STS-induced intrinsic apoptotic pathway without interfering with the activation of Bax. -- Abstract: Mitochondria amplify caspase-dependent apoptosis by releasing proapoptotic proteins, especially cytochrome c. This process is accompanied by mitochondrial cristae remodeling. Our studies demonstrated that mitofilin, a mitochondrial inner membrane protein, acted as a cristae controller to regulate cytochrome c release during apoptosis. Knockdown of mitofilin in HeLa cells with RNAi led to fragmentation of the mitochondrial network and disorganization of the cristae. Mitofilin-deficient cells showed cytochrome c redistribution between mitochondrial cristae and the intermembrane space (IMS) upon intrinsic apoptotic stimuli. In vitro cytochrome c release experiments further confirmed that, compared with the control group, tBid treatment led to an increase in cytochrome c release from mitofilin-deficient mitochondria. Furthermore, the cells with mitofilin knockdown were more prone to apoptosis by accelerating cytochrome c release upon the intrinsic apoptotic stimuli than controls. Moreover, mitofilin deficiency did not interfere with the activation of proapoptotic member Bax upon intrinsic apoptotic stimuli. Thus, mitofilin distinctly functions in cristae remodeling and controls cytochrome c release during apoptosis.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase in the control of ketogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegardt, F G

    1998-10-01

    Mitochondrial and cytosolic HMG-CoA synthases are encoded by two different genes. Control of ketogenesis is exerted by transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase. Fasting, cAMP, and fatty acids increase its transcriptional rate, while refeeding and insulin repress it. Fatty acids increase transcription through peroxisomal proliferator regulatory element (PPRE), to which peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) can bind. Other transcription factors such as chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) compete for the PPRE site, modulating the response of PPAR.

  7. Extracellular regulated kinase phosphorylates mitofusin 1 to control mitochondrial morphology and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakurel, Aswin; Savoia, Claudia; Hess, Daniel; Scorrano, Luca

    2015-04-16

    Controlled changes in mitochondrial morphology participate in cellular signaling cascades. However, the molecular mechanisms modifying mitochondrial shape are largely unknown. Here we show that the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade member extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylates the pro-fusion protein mitofusin (MFN) 1, modulating its participation in apoptosis and mitochondrial fusion. Phosphoproteomic and biochemical analyses revealed that MFN1 is phosphorylated at an atypical ERK site in its heptad repeat (HR) 1 domain. This site proved essential to mediate MFN1-dependent mitochondrial elongation and apoptosis regulation by the MEK/ERK cascade. A mutant mimicking constitutive MFN1 phosphorylation was less efficient in oligomerizing and mitochondria tethering but bound more avidly to the proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BAK, facilitating its activation and cell death. Moreover, neuronal apoptosis following oxygen glucose deprivation and MEK/ERK activation required an intact MFN1(T562). Our data identify MFN1 as an ERK target to modulate mitochondrial shape and apoptosis.

  8. Extracellular Regulated Kinase Phosphorylates Mitofusin 1 to Control Mitochondrial Morphology and Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakurel, Aswin; Savoia, Claudia; Hess, Daniel; Scorrano, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Summary Controlled changes in mitochondrial morphology participate in cellular signaling cascades. However, the molecular mechanisms modifying mitochondrial shape are largely unknown. Here we show that the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade member extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylates the pro-fusion protein mitofusin (MFN) 1, modulating its participation in apoptosis and mitochondrial fusion. Phosphoproteomic and biochemical analyses revealed that MFN1 is phosphorylated at an atypical ERK site in its heptad repeat (HR) 1 domain. This site proved essential to mediate MFN1-dependent mitochondrial elongation and apoptosis regulation by the MEK/ERK cascade. A mutant mimicking constitutive MFN1 phosphorylation was less efficient in oligomerizing and mitochondria tethering but bound more avidly to the proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BAK, facilitating its activation and cell death. Moreover, neuronal apoptosis following oxygen glucose deprivation and MEK/ERK activation required an intact MFN1T562. Our data identify MFN1 as an ERK target to modulate mitochondrial shape and apoptosis. PMID:25801171

  9. Mitochondrial DNA inheritance after SCNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiendleder, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis and function is under dual genetic control and requires extensive interaction between biparentally inherited nuclear genes and maternally inherited mitochondrial genes. Standard SCNT procedures deprive an oocytes' mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the corresponding maternal nuclear DNA and require it to interact with an entirely foreign nucleus that is again interacting with foreign somatic mitochondria. As a result, most SCNT embryos, -fetuses, and -offspring carry somatic cell mtDNA in addition to recipient oocyte mtDNA, a condition termed heteroplasmy. It is thus evident that somatic cell mtDNA can escape the selective mechanism that targets and eliminates intraspecific sperm mitochondria in the fertilized oocyte to maintain homoplasmy. However, the factors responsible for the large intra- and interindividual differences in heteroplasmy level remain elusive. Furthermore, heteroplasmy is probably confounded with mtDNA recombination. Considering the essential roles of mitochondria in cellular metabolism, cell signalling, and programmed cell death, future experiments will need to assess the true extent and impact of unorthodox mtDNA transmission on various aspects of SCNT success.

  10. Biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters in mammalian cells: new insights and relevance to human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey A. Rouault

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron-sulfur (Fe-S clusters are ubiquitous cofactors composed of iron and inorganic sulfur. They are required for the function of proteins involved in a wide range of activities, including electron transport in respiratory chain complexes, regulatory sensing, photosynthesis and DNA repair. The proteins involved in the biogenesis of Fe-S clusters are evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to humans, and many insights into the process of Fe-S cluster biogenesis have come from studies of model organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants. It is now clear that several rare and seemingly dissimilar human diseases are attributable to defects in the basic process of Fe-S cluster biogenesis. Although these diseases –which include Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA, ISCU myopathy, a rare form of sideroblastic anemia, an encephalomyopathy caused by dysfunction of respiratory chain complex I and multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome – affect different tissues, a feature common to many of them is that mitochondrial iron overload develops as a secondary consequence of a defect in Fe-S cluster biogenesis. This Commentary outlines the basic steps of Fe-S cluster biogenesis as they have been defined in model organisms. In addition, it draws attention to refinements of the process that might be specific to the subcellular compartmentalization of Fe-S cluster biogenesis proteins in some eukaryotes, including mammals. Finally, it outlines several important unresolved questions in the field that, once addressed, should offer important clues into how mitochondrial iron homeostasis is regulated, and how dysfunction in Fe-S cluster biogenesis can contribute to disease.

  11. Self-clearance mechanism of mitochondrial E3 ligase MARCH5 contributes to mitochondria quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Song-Hee; Park, Yong-Yea; Yoo, Young-Suk; Cho, Hyeseong

    2016-01-01

    MARCH5, a mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase, controls mitochondrial dynamics proteins and misfolded proteins, and has been proposed to play a role in mitochondria quality control. However, it remains unclear how mutant MARCH5 found in cancer tissues is removed from cells. Here, we show that mutation in the MARCH5 ligase domain increased its half-life fourfold, resulting in a drastic increase in its protein level. Abnormal accumulation of the E3 ligase-defective MARCH5 mutants MARCH5(H43W) and MARCH5(C65/68S) was diminished by overexpression of active MARCH5(WT) ; the mutant proteins were degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed that MARCH5 forms homodimers, and that substitution of Gly to Leu at the first putative GxxxG dimerization motif, but not the second, resulted in a loss of dimeric interaction. Moreover, overexpression of the dimerization-defective mutant MARCH5(4GL) could not decrease the level of accumulated MARCH5(H43W) , suggesting that dimerization of MARCH5 is necessary for self-clearance. Abnormal accumulation of MARCH5(H43W) and mitochondrial hyperfusion led to NF-ĸB activation, which was suppressed by overexpression of MARCH5(WT) . Together, the data reveal a self-protective mechanism involving MARCH5, which can target its own dysfunctional mutant for degradation in order to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis.

  12. Irisin Controls Growth, Intracellular Ca2+ Signals, and Mitochondrial Thermogenesis in Cardiomyoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Xie

    Full Text Available Exercise offers short-term and long-term health benefits, including an increased metabolic rate and energy expenditure in myocardium. The newly-discovered exercise-induced myokine, irisin, stimulates conversion of white into brown adipocytes as well as increased mitochondrial biogenesis and energy expenditure. Remarkably, irisin is highly expressed in myocardium, but its physiological effects in the heart are unknown. The objective of this work is to investigate irisin's potential multifaceted effects on cardiomyoblasts and myocardium. For this purpose, H9C2 cells were treated with recombinant irisin produced in yeast cells (r-irisin and in HEK293 cells (hr-irisin for examining its effects on cell proliferation by MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and on gene transcription profiles by qRT-PCR. R-irisin and hr-irisin both inhibited cell proliferation and activated genes related to cardiomyocyte metabolic function and differentiation, including myocardin, follistatin, smooth muscle actin, and nuclear respiratory factor-1. Signal transduction pathways affected by r-irisin in H9C2 cells and C57BL/6 mice were examined by detecting phosphorylation of PI3K-AKT, p38, ERK or STAT3. We also measured intracellular Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial thermogenesis and energy expenditure in r-irisin-treated H9C2 cells. The results showed that r-irisin, in a certain concentration rage, could activate PI3K-AKT and intracellular Ca2+ signaling and increase cellular oxygen consumption in H9C2 cells. Our study also suggests the existence of irisin-specific receptor on the membrane of H9C2 cells. In conclusion, irisin in a certain concentration rage increased myocardial cell metabolism, inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell differentiation. These effects might be mediated through PI3K-AKT and Ca2+ signaling, which are known to activate expression of exercise-related genes such as follistatin and myocardin. This work

  13. Mitochondrial Profiles and the Anticonvulsant Effect of the Ketogenic Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A study of the anticonvulsant effect of the ketogenic diet (KD in adolescent rats, at Emory University and other centers, found that the hippocampus responds by inducing mitochondrial biogenesis, enhancing metabolic gene expression, and increasing energy reserves.

  14. mCSF1, a nucleus-encoded CRM protein required for the processing of many mitochondrial introns, is involved in the biogenesis of respiratory complexes I and IV in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmudjak, Michal; Colas des Francs-Small, Catherine; Keren, Ido; Shaya, Felix; Belausov, Eduard; Small, Ian; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2013-07-01

    The coding regions of many mitochondrial genes in plants are interrupted by intervening sequences that are classified as group II introns. Their splicing is essential for the expression of the genes they interrupt and hence for respiratory function, and is facilitated by various protein cofactors. Despite the importance of these cofactors, only a few of them have been characterized. CRS1-YhbY domain (CRM) is a recently recognized RNA-binding domain that is present in several characterized splicing factors in plant chloroplasts. The Arabidopsis genome encodes 16 CRM proteins, but these are largely uncharacterized. Here, we analyzed the intracellular location of one of these hypothetical proteins in Arabidopsis, mitochondrial CAF-like splicing factor 1 (mCSF1; At4 g31010), and analyzed the growth phenotypes and organellar activities associated with mcsf1 mutants in plants. Our data indicated that mCSF1 resides within mitochondria and its functions are essential during embryogenesis. Mutant plants with reduced mCSF1 displayed inhibited germination and retarded growth phenotypes that were tightly associated with reduced complex I and IV activities. Analogously to the functions of plastid-localized CRM proteins, analysis of the RNA profiles in wildtype and mcsf1 plants showed that mCSF1 acts in the splicing of many of the group II intron RNAs in Arabidopsis mitochondria.

  15. Overexpression of the mitochondrial T3 receptor p43 induces a shift in skeletal muscle fiber types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Casas

    Full Text Available In previous studies, we have characterized a new hormonal pathway involving a mitochondrial T3 receptor (p43 acting as a mitochondrial transcription factor and consequently stimulating mitochondrial activity and mitochondrial biogenesis. We have established the involvement of this T3 pathway in the regulation of in vitro myoblast differentiation. We have generated mice overexpressing p43 under control of the human alpha-skeletal actin promoter. In agreement with the previous characterization of this promoter, northern-blot and western-blot experiments confirmed that after birth p43 was specifically overexpressed in skeletal muscle. As expected from in vitro studies, in 2-month old mice, p43 overexpression increased mitochondrial genes expression and mitochondrial biogenesis as attested by the increase of mitochondrial mass and mt-DNA copy number. In addition, transgenic mice had a body temperature 0.8 degrees C higher than control ones and displayed lower plasma triiodothyronine levels. Skeletal muscles of transgenic mice were redder than wild-type animals suggesting an increased oxidative metabolism. In line with this observation, in gastrocnemius, we recorded a strong increase in cytochrome oxidase activity and in mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, we observed that p43 drives the formation of oxidative fibers: in soleus muscle, where MyHC IIa fibers were partly replaced by type I fibers; in gastrocnemius muscle, we found an increase in MyHC IIa and IIx expression associated with a reduction in the number of glycolytic fibers type IIb. In addition, we found that PGC-1alpha and PPARdelta, two major regulators of muscle phenotype were up regulated in p43 transgenic mice suggesting that these proteins could be downstream targets of mitochondrial activity. These data indicate that the direct mitochondrial T3 pathway is deeply involved in the acquisition of contractile and metabolic features of muscle fibers in particular by regulating PGC-1alpha

  16. Control of mitochondrial integrity in ageing and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szklarczyk, R.J.; Nooteboom, M.; Osiewacz, H.D.

    2014-01-01

    Various molecular and cellular pathways are active in eukaryotes to control the quality and integrity of mitochondria. These pathways are involved in keeping a 'healthy' population of this essential organelle during the lifetime of the organism. Quality control (QC) systems counteract processes that

  17. Mitochondrial gene therapy augments mitochondrial physiology in a Parkinson's disease cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, Paula M; Quigley, Caitlin K; Dunham, Lisa D; Papageorge, Christina M; Iyer, Shilpa; Thomas, Ravindar R; Schwarz, Kathleen M; Trimmer, Patricia A; Khan, Shaharyar M; Portell, Francisco R; Bergquist, Kristen E; Bennett, James P

    2009-08-01

    Neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) affects mainly dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, where age-related, increasing percentages of cells lose detectable respiratory activity associated with depletion of intact mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Replenishment of mtDNA might improve neuronal bioenergetic function and prevent further cell death. We developed a technology ("ProtoFection") that uses recombinant human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) engineered with an N-terminal protein transduction domain (PTD) followed by the SOD2 mitochondrial localization signal (MLS) to deliver mtDNA cargo to the mitochondria of living cells. MTD-TFAM (MTD = PTD + MLS = "mitochondrial transduction domain") binds mtDNA and rapidly transports it across plasma membranes to mitochondria. For therapeutic proof-of-principle we tested ProtoFection technology in Parkinson's disease cybrid cells, using mtDNA generated from commercially available human genomic DNA (gDNA; Roche). Nine to 11 weeks after single exposures to MTD-TFAM + mtDNA complex, PD cybrid cells with impaired respiration and reduced mtDNA genes increased their mtDNA gene copy numbers up to 24-fold, mtDNA-derived RNAs up to 35-fold, TFAM and ETC proteins, cell respiration, and mitochondrial movement velocities. Cybrid cells with no or minimal basal mitochondrial impairments showed reduced or no responses to treatment, suggesting the possibility of therapeutic selectivity. Exposure of PD but not control cybrid cells to MTD-TFAM protein alone or MTD-TFAM + mtDNA complex increased expression of PGC-1alpha, suggesting activation of mitochondrial biogenesis. ProtoFection technology for mitochondrial gene therapy holds promise for improving bioenergetic function in impaired PD neurons and needs additional development to define its pharmacodynamics and delineate its molecular mechanisms. It also is unclear whether single-donor gDNA for generating mtDNA would be a preferred therapeutic compared with the pooled

  18. Ground control to major TOM: mitochondria-nucleus communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg-Bord, Michal; Schuldiner, Maya

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria have crucial functions in the cell, including ATP generation, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, nucleotide biosynthesis, and amino acid metabolism. All of these functions require tight regulation on mitochondrial activity and homeostasis. As mitochondria biogenesis is controlled by the nucleus and almost all mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear genes, a tight communication network between mitochondria and the nucleus has evolved, which includes signaling cascades, proteins which are dual-localized to the two compartments, and sensing of mitochondrial products by nuclear proteins. All of these enable a crosstalk between mitochondria and the nucleus that allows the 'ground control' to get information on mitochondria's status. Such information facilitates the creation of a cellular balance of mitochondrial status with energetic needs. This communication also allows a transcriptional response in case mitochondrial function is impaired aimed to restore mitochondrial homeostasis. As mitochondrial dysfunction is related to a growing number of genetic diseases as well as neurodegenerative conditions and aging, elucidating the mechanisms governing the mitochondrial/nuclear communication should progress a better understanding of mitochondrial dysfunctions. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. Mieap, a p53-Inducible Protein, Controls Mitochondrial Quality by Repairing or Eliminating Unhealthy Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Noriaki; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Miyamoto, Yuji; Miyamoto, Takafumi; Kabu, Koki; Yoshida, Masaki; Futamura, Manabu; Ichinose, Shizuko; Arakawa, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance of healthy mitochondria prevents aging, cancer, and a variety of degenerative diseases that are due to the result of defective mitochondrial quality control (MQC). Recently, we discovered a novel mechanism for MQC, in which Mieap induces intramitochondrial lysosome-like organella that plays a critical role in the elimination of oxidized mitochondrial proteins (designated MALM for Mieap-induced accumulation of lysosome-like organelles within mitochondria). However, a large part of the mechanisms for MQC remains unknown. Here, we report additional mechanisms for Mieap-regulated MQC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers completely inhibited MALM. A mitochondrial outer membrane protein NIX interacted with Mieap in a ROS-dependent manner via the BH3 domain of NIX and the coiled-coil domain of Mieap. Deficiency of NIX also completely impaired MALM. When MALM was inhibited, Mieap induced vacuole-like structures (designated as MIV for Mieap-induced vacuole), which engulfed and degraded the unhealthy mitochondria by accumulating lysosomes. The inactivation of p53 severely impaired both MALM and MIV generation, leading to accumulation of unhealthy mitochondria. These results suggest that (1) mitochondrial ROS and NIX are essential factors for MALM, (2) MIV is a novel mechanism for lysosomal degradation of mitochondria, and (3) the p53-Mieap pathway plays a pivotal role in MQC by repairing or eliminating unhealthy mitochondria via MALM or MIV generation, respectively. PMID:21264228

  20. Mitochondrial Quality Control: Decommissioning Power Plants in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukmini Mukherjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell has an intricate quality control system to protect its mitochondria from oxidative stress. This surveillance system is multi-tiered and comprises molecules that are present inside the mitochondria, in the cytosol, and in other organelles like the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum. These molecules cross talk with each other and protect the mitochondria from oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a fundamental part of early disease pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. These disorders also damage the cellular quality control machinery that protects the cell against oxidative stress. This exacerbates the oxidative damage and causes extensive neuronal cell death that is characteristic of neurodegeneration.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA control region variation in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshamali, Farida; Brandstätter, Anita; Zimmermann, Bettina; Parson, Walther

    2008-01-01

    249 entire mtDNA control region sequences were generated and analyzed in a population sample from Dubai, one of the seven United Arab Emirates. The control region was amplified in one piece and sequenced with different sequencing primers. Sequence evaluation was performed twice and validated by a third senior mtDNA scientist. Phylogenetic analyses were used for quality assurance purposes and for the determination of the haplogroup affiliation of the samples. Upon publication, the population data are going to be available in the EMPOP database (www.empop.org).

  2. Novel duplication pattern of the mitochondrial control region in Cantor's Giant softshell turtle Pelochelys cantorii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Cheng; Li, Wei; Zhao, Jian; Chen, Hai-Gang; Zhu, Xin-Ping

    2016-11-15

    Cantor's Giant Softshell Turtle, Pelochelys cantorii has become one of the most critically endangered species in the world. When comparative analyses of the P. cantorii complete mitochondrial genome sequences were conducted, we discovered a duplication of a segment of the control region in the mitochondrial genome of P. cantorii. The duplication is characterized by two copies of conserved sequence box 2 (CSB2) and CSB3 in a single control region. In contrast to previous reports of duplications involving the control regions of other animals, this particular pattern of duplications appears to be unique to P. cantorii. Copies of the CSB2 and CSB3 show many of the conserved sequence features typically found in mitochondrial control regions, and rare differences were found between the paralogous copies. Using the primer design principle of simple sequence repeats (SSR) and the reference sequence of the duplicated CSBs, specific primers were designed to amplify the duplicated CSBs. These primers were validated among different individuals and populations of P. cantorii. This unique duplication structure suggests the two copies of the CSB2 and CSB3 may have arisen through occasional tandem duplication and subsequent concerted evolution.

  3. PGC-1α and PGC-1β Regulate Mitochondrial Density in Neurons*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareski, Przemyslaw; Vaarmann, Annika; Choubey, Vinay; Safiulina, Dzhamilja; Liiv, Joanna; Kuum, Malle; Kaasik, Allen

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that regulation of cellular oxidative capacity through enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis may be beneficial for neuronal recovery and survival in human neurodegenerative disorders. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) has been shown to be a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and cellular energy metabolism in muscle and liver. The aim of our study was to establish whether PGC-1α and PGC-1β control mitochondrial density also in neurons and if these coactivators could be up-regulated by deacetylation. The results demonstrate that PGC-1α and PGC-1β control mitochondrial capacity in an additive and independent manner. This effect was observed in all studied subtypes of neurons, in cortical, midbrain, and cerebellar granule neurons. We also observed that endogenous neuronal PGC-1α but not PGC-1β could be activated through its repressor domain by suppressing it. Results demonstrate also that overexpression of SIRT1 deacetylase or suppression of GCN5 acetyltransferase activates transcriptional activity of PGC-1α in neurons and increases mitochondrial density. These effects were mediated exclusively via PGC-1α, since overexpression of SIRT1 or suppression of GCN5 was ineffective where PGC-1α was suppressed by short hairpin RNA. Moreover, the results demonstrate that overexpression of PGC-1β or PGC-1α or activation of the latter by SIRT1 protected neurons from mutant α-synuclein- or mutant huntingtin-induced mitochondrial loss. These evidences demonstrate that activation or overexpression of the PGC-1 family of coactivators could be used to compensate for neuronal mitochondrial loss and suggest that therapeutic agents activating PGC-1 would be valuable for treating neurodegenerative diseases in which mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage play an important pathogenic role. PMID:19542216

  4. One-way sequencing of multiple amplicons from tandem repetitive mitochondrial DNA control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiawu; Fonseca, Dina M

    2011-10-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences not only exist abundantly in eukaryotic nuclear genomes, but also occur as tandem repeats in many animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control regions. Due to concerted evolution, these repetitive sequences are highly similar or even identical within a genome. When long repetitive regions are the targets of amplification for the purpose of sequencing, multiple amplicons may result if one primer has to be located inside the repeats. Here, we show that, without separating these amplicons by gel purification or cloning, directly sequencing the mitochondrial repeats with the primer outside repetitive region is feasible and efficient. We exemplify it by sequencing the mtDNA control region of the mosquito Aedes albopictus, which harbors typical large tandem DNA repeats. This one-way sequencing strategy is optimal for population surveys.

  5. Intrauterine growth retardation increases the susceptibility of pigs to high-fat diet-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Liu

    Full Text Available It has been recognized that there is a relationship between prenatal growth restriction and the development of metabolic-related diseases in later life, a process involved in mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR increases the susceptibility of offspring to high-fat (HF diet-induced metabolic syndrome. Recent findings suggested that HF feeding decreased mitochondrial oxidative capacity and impaired mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. Therefore, we hypothesized that the long-term consequences of IUGR on mitochondrial biogenesis and function make the offspring more susceptible to HF diet-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Normal birth weight (NBW, and IUGR pigs were allotted to control or HF diet in a completely randomized design, individually. After 4 weeks of feeding, growth performance and molecular pathways related to mitochondrial function were determined. The results showed that IUGR decreased growth performance and plasma insulin concentrations. In offspring fed a HF diet, IUGR was associated with enhanced plasma leptin levels, increased concentrations of triglyceride and malondialdehyde (MDA, and reduced glycogen and ATP contents in skeletal muscle. High fat diet-fed IUGR offspring exhibited decreased activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD. These alterations in metabolic traits of IUGR pigs were accompanied by impaired mitochondrial respiration function, reduced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA contents, and down-regulated mRNA expression levels of genes responsible for mitochondrial biogenesis and function. In conclusion, our results suggest that IUGR make the offspring more susceptible to HF diet-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

  6. Translation and Assembly of Radiolabeled Mitochondrial DNA-Encoded Protein Subunits from Cultured Cells and Isolated Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosa, Luke E; Hofer, Annette; Tischner, Christin; Wenz, Tina; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial electron transport chain consists of five multi-subunit membrane complexes responsible for the generation of cellular ATP. Of these, four complexes are under dual genetic control as they contain subunits encoded by both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, thereby adding another layer of complexity to the puzzle of respiratory complex biogenesis. These subunits must be synthesized and assembled in a coordinated manner in order to ensure correct biogenesis of different respiratory complexes. Here, we describe techniques to (1) specifically radiolabel proteins encoded by mtDNA to monitor the rate of synthesis using pulse labeling methods, and (2) analyze the stability, assembly, and turnover of subunits using pulse-chase methods in cultured cells and isolated mitochondria.

  7. Dietary restriction, mitochondrial function and aging: from yeast to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruetenik, Andrea; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-11-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) attenuates many detrimental effects of aging and consequently promotes health and increases longevity across organisms. While over the last 15 years extensive research has been devoted towards understanding the biology of aging, the precise mechanistic aspects of DR are yet to be settled. Abundant experimental evidence indicates that the DR effect on stimulating health impinges several metabolic and stress-resistance pathways. Downstream effects of these pathways include a reduction in cellular damage induced by oxidative stress, enhanced efficiency of mitochondrial functions and maintenance of mitochondrial dynamics and quality control, thereby attenuating age-related declines in mitochondrial function. However, the literature also accumulates conflicting evidence regarding how DR ameliorates mitochondrial performance and whether that is enough to slow age-dependent cellular and organismal deterioration. Here, we will summarize the current knowledge about how and to which extent the influence of different DR regimes on mitochondrial biogenesis and function contribute to postpone the detrimental effects of aging on health-span and lifespan. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Aging.

  8. Mitochondrial control region structure and single site heteroplasmy in the razorbill (Alca torda; Aves).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moum, T; Bakke, I

    2001-05-01

    The primary structure of the Alca torda mitochondrial control region was determined and conserved structural features were identified based on sequence comparisons to other bird species. In a population survey using control region analysis, five individuals were found to possess heteroplasmic point mutations at the variable 5' end of the control region. The pattern of variable nucleotide positions among individuals was compared to the distribution of heteroplasmic sites and the heteroplasmic condition was further characterised by a cloning procedure applied to two individuals which harboured one and two heteroplasmic point mutations, respectively. These results are in support of recent evidence that single site heteroplasmy may be more common than previously thought.

  9. The mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger plays a key role in the control of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-San Miguel, Esther; Vay, Laura; Santo Domingo, Jaime; Domínguez Lobatón, María Carmen; Moreno, Alfredo; Montero, Mayte; Álvarez, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Producción Científica There is increasing evidence that mitochondria play an important role in the control of cytosolic Ca2+ signaling. We show here that the main mitochondrial Ca2+-exit pathway, the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, controls the pattern of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations in nonexcitable cells. In HeLa cells, the inhibitor of the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger CGP37157 changed the pattern of the oscillations induced by histamine from a high-frequency irregular one t...

  10. A systems biological analysis links ROS metabolism to mitochondrial protein quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowald, Axel; Hamann, Andrea; Zintel, Sandra; Ullrich, Sebastian; Klipp, Edda; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2012-05-01

    The analyses of previously generated Podospora anserina strains in which the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, PaSOD3, is increased in abundance, revealed unexpected results, which, at first glance, are contradictory to the 'free radical theory of aging' (FRTA). To re-analyze these results, we performed additional experiments and developed a mathematical model consisting of a set of differential equations describing the time course of various ROS (reactive oxygen species), components of the cellular antioxidant system (PaSOD3 and mitochondrial peroxiredoxin, PaPRX1), and PaCLPP, a mitochondrial matrix protease involved in protein quality control. Incorporating these components we could identify a positive feed-back loop and demonstrate that the role of superoxide as the primary ROS responsible for age-related molecular damage is more complicated than originally stated by the FRTA. Our study is a first step towards the integration of the various pathways known to be involved in the control of biological aging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A controlled-release mitochondrial protonophore reverses hypertriglyceridemia, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and diabetes in lipodystrophic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulizi, Abudukadier; Perry, Rachel J; Camporez, João Paulo G; Jurczak, Michael J; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Aspichueta, Patricia; Shulman, Gerald I

    2017-07-01

    Lipodystrophy is a rare disorder characterized by complete or partial loss of adipose tissue. Patients with lipodystrophy exhibit hypertriglyceridemia, severe insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Efforts to ameliorate NASH in lipodystrophies with pharmacologic agents have met with limited success. We examined whether a controlled-release mitochondrial protonophore (CRMP) that produces mild liver-targeted mitochondrial uncoupling could decrease hypertriglyceridemia and reverse NASH and diabetes in a mouse model (fatless AZIP/F-1 mice) of severe lipodystrophy and diabetes. After 4 wk of oral CRMP (2 mg/kg body weight per day) or vehicle treatment, mice underwent hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps combined with radiolabeled glucose to assess liver and muscle insulin responsiveness and tissue lipid measurements. CRMP treatment reversed hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance in liver and skeletal muscle. Reversal of insulin resistance could be attributed to reductions in diacylglycerol content and reduced PKC-ε and PKC-θ activity in liver and muscle respectively. CRMP treatment also reversed NASH as reflected by reductions in plasma aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase concentrations; hepatic steatosis; and hepatic expression of IL-1α, -β, -2, -4, -6, -10, -12, CD69, and caspase 3 and attenuated activation of the IRE-1α branch of the unfolded protein response. Taken together, these results provide proof of concept for the development of liver-targeted mitochondrial uncoupling agents as a potential novel therapy for lipodystrophy-associated hypertriglyceridemia, NASH and diabetes.-Abulizi, A., Perry, R. J., Camporez, J. P. G., Jurczak, M. J., Petersen, K. F., Aspichueta, P., Shulman, G. I. A controlled-release mitochondrial protonophore reverses hypertriglyceridemia, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and diabetes in lipodystrophic mice. © FASEB.

  12. PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitochondrial Surveillance: From Pleiotropy to Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Corti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is one of the most frequent neurodegenerative disease caused by the preferential, progressive degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA neurons of the substantia nigra (SN pars compacta. PD is characterized by a multifaceted pathological process involving protein misfolding, mitochondrial dysfunction, neuroinflammation and metabolism deregulation. The molecular mechanisms governing the complex interplay between the different facets of this process are still unknown. PARK2/Parkin and PARK6/PINK1, two genes responsible for familial forms of PD, act as a ubiquitous core signaling pathway, coupling mitochondrial stress to mitochondrial surveillance, by regulating mitochondrial dynamics, the removal of damaged mitochondrial components by mitochondria-derived vesicles, mitophagy, and mitochondrial biogenesis. Over the last decade, PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control emerged as a pleiotropic regulatory pathway. Loss of its function impinges on a number of physiological processes suspected to contribute to PD pathogenesis. Its role in the regulation of innate immunity and inflammatory processes stands out, providing compelling support to the contribution of non-cell-autonomous immune mechanisms in PD. In this review, we illustrate the central role of this multifunctional pathway at the crossroads between mitochondrial stress, neuroinflammation and metabolism. We discuss how its dysfunction may contribute to PD pathogenesis and pinpoint major unresolved questions in the field.

  13. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: A ceRNA Analysis Pointed to a Crosstalk between SOX2, TP53, and microRNA Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Arancio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that cancer stem cells (CSC may play a central role in oncogenesis, especially in undifferentiated tumours. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC has characteristics suggestive of a tumour enriched in CSC. Previous studies suggested that the stem cell factor SOX2 has a preeminent hierarchical role in determining the characteristics of stem cells in SW1736 ATC cell line. In detail, silencing SOX2 in SW1736 is able to suppress the expression of the stem markers analysed, strongly sensitizing the line to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, in order to further investigate the role of SOX2 in ATC, a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA analysis was conducted in order to isolate new functional partners of SOX2. Among the interactors, of particular interest are genes involved in the biogenesis of miRNAs (DICER1, RNASEN, and EIF2C2, in the control cell cycle (TP53, CCND1, and in mitochondrial activity (COX8A. The data suggest that stemness, microRNA biogenesis and functions, p53 regulatory network, cyclin D1, and cell cycle control, together with mitochondrial activity, might be coregulated.

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome of the mudskipper Boleophthalmus pectinirostris (Perciformes, Gobiidae): repetitive sequences in the control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi Zhi; Wang, Cong Tao; Ma, Ling Bo; He, An Yuan; Yang, Jin Quan; Tang, Wen Qiao

    2012-02-01

    The mudskipper, Boleophthalmus pectinirostris (Perciformes, Gobiidae), is an amphibious gobioid fish. In this paper, the complete mitochondrial genome of B. pectinirostris was firstly determined. The mitogenome (17,111 bp) comprises 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 1 putative control region. 130-bp tandem repeat was identified in the control region, which was almost identical among the 10 individuals examined, and three different frequencies of the repeat unit (five, six or seven) were found among these individuals.

  15. Polymorphisms in the control region of mitochondrial DNA associated with elite Japanese athlete status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, E; Fuku, N; Takahashi, H; Ohiwa, N; Pitsiladis, Y P; Higuchi, M; Kawahara, T; Tanaka, M

    2013-10-01

    The control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contains the main regulatory elements for mtDNA replication and transcription. Certain polymorphisms in this region would, therefore, contribute to elite athletic performance, because mitochondrial function is one of determinants of physical performance. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of polymorphisms in this region on elite athlete status by sequencing the mtDNA control region. Subjects comprised 185 elite Japanese athletes who had represented Japan at international competitions (i.e., 100 endurance/middle-power athletes: EMA; 85 sprint/power athletes: SPA), and 672 Japanese controls (CON). The mtDNA control region was analyzed by direct sequencing. Frequency differences of polymorphisms (minor allele frequency ≥ 0.05) in the mtDNA control region between EMA, SPA, and CON were examined. EMA displayed excess of three polymorphisms [m.152T>C, m.514(CA)n repeat (n ≥ 5), and poly-C stretch at m.568-573 (C ≥ 7)] compared with CON. On the other hand, SPA showed greater frequency of the m.204T>C polymorphism compared with CON. In addition, none of the SPA had m.16278C>T polymorphism, whereas the frequencies of this polymorphism in CON and EMA were 8.3% and 10.0%, respectively. These findings imply that several polymorphisms detected in the control region of mtDNA may influence physical performance probably in a functional manner.

  16. Effect of Hyperglycemia on Mitochondrial Respiration in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Højberg, Patricia M V; Almdal, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Skeletal muscle mitochondrial content is reduced in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Whether hyperglycemia inhibits mitochondrial biogenesis and/or function is unknown. This study examined the effect of different levels of glycemia on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in patients with T2......DM. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eleven patients with T2DM [9 males, 2 females; age, 52.8 +/- 2.5 yr (mean +/- se); body mass index, 30.2 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2)] in poor glycemic control were treated with insulin aspart and NPH insulin for a median period of 46 d (range, 31-59). Mitochondrial respiration...... and citrate synthase activity (a marker of mitochondrial content) were measured before and after treatment. Eleven healthy subjects (age, 53.3 +/- 2.7 yr; body mass index, 30.6 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2)) were included as controls. RESULTS: Hemoglobin A1c (9.1 +/- 0.5 to 7.5 +/- 0.3%; P

  17. Effect or nitric oxide on expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in cardiomyocyte%一氧化氮对心肌细胞线粒体生物合成相关基因表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖娟; 肖颖彬; 陈林; 钟前进; 王学锋; 陈柏成

    2008-01-01

    目的:探讨一氧化氮(NO)对体外培养心肌细胞线粒体生物合成相关基因表达的影响.方法:体外培养乳鼠心肌细胞,分为4组进行干预:G1:对照组;G2:NO供体S-亚硝基-N-乙酰青霉胺(SNAP);G3:SNAP和一氧化氮清除荆氧舍血红蛋白(OxyHb);G4:SNAP和可溶性鸟苷酸环化酶(soluble guanylylcyclase,sGC)特异性抑制剂1H-[1,2,4]噁二唑[4,3-a]喹喔啉-1-酮(1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]qumoxalin-1.one,ODQ).运用实时荧光RT.PCR技术检测心肌细胞中线粒体生物合成相关基因过氧化物酶体增生物激活受体γ辅激活因子-1 α(peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α,PGC-1α)、核呼吸因子1(nuclear respiratory factor 1,NRF1)、线粒体转录因子A(mitochondrial transcription factor A,Tfam)和线粒体DNA编码的细胞色素C氧化酶亚单位Ⅰ(cytochrome c oxidase subunit Ⅰ,COX I)的mRNA表达水平.结果:NO供体SNAP单独作用能引起心肌细胞PGC-1α、NRF1、Tfam和COX I基因mRNA水平显著增高(P<0.05),OxyHb和ODQ能抑制SNAP的这一作用.结论:NO对培养乳鼠心肌细胞的线粒体生物合成有促进作用,这一作用可能是通过sGC-cGMP途径实现的.

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF, several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cyclic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  19. Dynamic nucleotide mutation gradients and control region usage in squamate reptile mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoe, T A; Gu, W; de Koning, A P J; Daza, J M; Jiang, Z J; Parkinson, C L; Pollock, D D

    2009-01-01

    Gradients of nucleotide bias and substitution rates occur in vertebrate mitochondrial genomes due to the asymmetric nature of the replication process. The evolution of these gradients has previously been studied in detail in primates, but not in other vertebrate groups. From the primate study, the strengths of these gradients are known to evolve in ways that can substantially alter the substitution process, but it is unclear how rapidly they evolve over evolutionary time or how different they may be in different lineages or groups of vertebrates. Given the importance of mitochondrial genomes in phylogenetics and molecular evolutionary research, a better understanding of how asymmetric mitochondrial substitution gradients evolve would contribute key insights into how this gradient evolution may mislead evolutionary inferences, and how it may also be incorporated into new evolutionary models. Most snake mitochondrial genomes have an additional interesting feature, 2 nearly identical control regions, which vary among different species in the extent that they are used as origins of replication. Given the expanded sampling of complete snake genomes currently available, together with 2 additional snakes sequenced in this study, we reexamined gradient strength and CR usage in alethinophidian snakes as well as several lizards that possess dual CRs. Our results suggest that nucleotide substitution gradients (and corresponding nucleotide bias) and CR usage is highly labile over the approximately 200 m.y. of squamate evolution, and demonstrates greater overall variability than previously shown in primates. The evidence for the existence of such gradients, and their ability to evolve rapidly and converge among unrelated species suggests that gradient dynamics could easily mislead phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary inferences, and argues strongly that these dynamics should be incorporated into phylogenetic models.

  20. Mitochondrial genome of Pogona vitticepes (Reptilia; Agamidae): control region duplication and the origin of Australasian agamids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Sayed A M; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2005-02-14

    The complete mitochondrial DNA sequence for an Australian agamid Pogona vitticepes was determined. Twenty-two tRNA genes, two rRNA genes, thirteen protein-coding genes, and two control regions were identified in this mitochondrial genome. The second control region was inserted between NADH dehydrogenase subunits 5 and 6 genes. The duplication of the control region was found in all Australasian agamids examined and was not found in other Asian or African taxa. The two control regions had nearly identical sequences within species but they were divergent among species, suggesting their concerted sequence evolution. Phylogenetic analyses including divergence time estimation without assuming the molecular clock suggested that the duplication of the control region occurred on a lineage leading to the Australasian agamids 25-45 million years ago after their divergence from a Southeast Asian Physignathus cocincinus. Our finding thus supports the recent dispersal origin of Australasian agamids in connection with plate tectonic movement of Australia to the proximity of Southeast Asia.

  1. Overexpression of PGC-1α increases peroxisomal activity and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in human primary myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tai-Yu; Zheng, Donghai; Houmard, Joseph A; Brault, Jeffrey J; Hickner, Robert C; Cortright, Ronald N

    2017-04-01

    Peroxisomes are indispensable organelles for lipid metabolism in humans, and their biogenesis has been assumed to be under regulation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). However, recent studies in hepatocytes suggest that the mitochondrial proliferator PGC-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α) also acts as an upstream transcriptional regulator for enhancing peroxisomal abundance and associated activity. It is unknown whether the regulatory mechanism(s) for enhancing peroxisomal function is through the same node as mitochondrial biogenesis in human skeletal muscle (HSkM) and whether fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is affected. Primary myotubes from vastus lateralis biopsies from lean donors (BMI = 24.0 ± 0.6 kg/m(2); n = 6) were exposed to adenovirus encoding human PGC-1α or GFP control. Peroxisomal biogenesis proteins (peroxins) and genes (PEXs) responsible for proliferation and functions were assessed by Western blotting and real-time qRT-PCR, respectively. [1-(14)C]palmitic acid and [1-(14)C]lignoceric acid (exclusive peroxisomal-specific substrate) were used to assess mitochondrial oxidation of peroxisomal-derived metabolites. After overexpression of PGC-1α, 1) peroxisomal membrane protein 70 kDa (PMP70), PEX19, and mitochondrial citrate synthetase protein content were significantly elevated (P oxidation mRNA expression levels were significantly upregulated (P oxidation by both peroxisomal and mitochondrial activity was observed (P oxidation by a peroxisomal-mitochondrial functional cooperation, as observed in HSkM cells. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. How do human cells react to the absence of mitochondrial DNA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Mineri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial biogenesis is under the control of two different genetic systems: the nuclear genome (nDNA and the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA. The mtDNA is a circular genome of 16.6 kb encoding 13 of the approximately 90 subunits that form the respiratory chain, the remaining ones being encoded by the nDNA. Eukaryotic cells are able to monitor and respond to changes in mitochondrial function through alterations in nuclear gene expression, a phenomenon first defined in yeast and known as retrograde regulation. To investigate how the cellular transcriptome is modified in response to the absence of mtDNA, we used Affymetrix HG-U133A GeneChip arrays to study the gene expression profile of two human cell lines, 143BTK(- and A549, which had been entirely depleted of mtDNA (rho(o cells, and compared it with that of corresponding undepleted parental cells (rho(+ cells. RESULTS: Our data indicate that absence of mtDNA is associated with: i a down-regulation of cell cycle control genes and a reduction of cell replication rate, ii a down-regulation of nuclear-encoded subunits of complex III of the respiratory chain and iii a down-regulation of a gene described as the human homolog of ELAC2 of E. coli, which encodes a protein that we show to also target to the mitochondrial compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate a strong correlation between mitochondrial biogenesis and cell cycle control and suggest that some proteins could have a double role: for instance in controlling both cell cycle progression and mitochondrial functions. In addition, the finding that ELAC2 and maybe other transcripts that are located into mitochondria, are down-regulated in rho(o cells, make them good candidates for human disorders associated with defective replication and expression of mtDNA.

  3. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Huang, Cher X; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D; Stokes, Matthew P; Silva, Jeffrey C; Bell, George W; MacArthur, Daniel G; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-10-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and type 2 diabetes: a study of 897 cases and 1010 controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnery, P F; Mowbray, C; Patel, S K; Elson, J L; Sampson, M; Hitman, G A; McCarthy, M I; Hattersley, A T; Walker, M

    2007-06-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in the secretion of insulin by pancreatic beta-cells, and pathogenic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause diabetes. The aetiology of type 2 diabetes has a strong genetic component, raising the possibility that genetic variants of mtDNA alter the risk of developing the disorder. Recent studies have produced conflicting results. By studying 897 UK cases of type 2 diabetes and 1010 population-matched controls, it is shown that European mtDNA haplogroups are unlikely to play a major role in the risk of developing the disorder.

  5. Receptor-interacting protein 140 overexpression impairs cardiac mitochondrial function and accelerates the transition to heart failure in chronically infarcted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, YanFang; Chen, ShaoRui; Yue, ZhongBao; Zhang, YiQiang; Zhou, ChangHua; Cao, WeiWei; Chen, Xi; Zhang, LuanKun; Liu, PeiQing

    2017-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with myocardial energy metabolic abnormality. Receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) is an important transcriptional cofactor for maintaining energy balance in high-oxygen consumption tissues. However, the role of RIP140 in the pathologic processes of HF remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of RIP140 in mitochondrial and cardiac functions in rodent hearts under myocardial infarction (MI) stress. MI was created by a permanent ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery and exogenous expression of RIP140 by adenovirus (Ad) vector delivery. Four weeks after MI or Ad-RIP140 treatment, cardiac function was assessed by echocardiographic and hemodynamics analyses, and the mitochondrial function was determined by mitochondrial genes expression, biogenesis, and respiration rates. In Ad-RIP140 or MI group, a subset of metabolic genes changed, accompanied with slight reductions in mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration rates but no change in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content. Cardiac malfunction was compensated. However, under MI stress, rats overexpressing RIP140 exhibited greater repressions in mitochondrial genes, state 3 respiration rates, respiration control ratio, and ATP content and had further deteriorated cardiac malfunction. In conclusion, RIP140 overexpression leads to comparable cardiac function as resulted from MI, but RIP140 aggravates metabolic repression, mitochondrial malfunction, and further accelerates the transition to HF in response to MI stress.

  6. The Biogenesis of Nascent Circular RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state circular RNAs (circRNAs have been mapped to thousands of genomic loci in mammals. We studied circRNA processing using metabolic tagging of nascent RNAs with 4-thiouridine (4sU. Strikingly, the efficiency of circRNA processing from pre-mRNA is extremely low endogenously. Additional studies revealed that back-splicing outcomes correlate with fast RNA Polymerase II elongation rate and are tightly controlled by cis-elements in vivo. Additionally, prolonged 4sU labeling in cells shows that circRNAs are largely processed post-transcriptionally and that circRNAs are stable. Circular RNAs that are abundant at a steady-state level tend to accumulate. This is particularly true in cells, such as neurons, that have slow division rates. This study uncovers features of circRNA biogenesis by investigating the link between nascent circRNA processing and transcription.

  7. Abnormal Mitochondrial Function and Impaired Granulosa Cell Differentiation in Androgen Receptor Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Sheng Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the ovary, the paracrine interactions between the oocyte and surrounded granulosa cells are critical for optimal oocyte quality and embryonic development. Mice lacking the androgen receptor (AR−/− were noted to have reduced fertility with abnormal ovarian function that might involve the promotion of preantral follicle growth and prevention of follicular atresia. However, the detailed mechanism of how AR in granulosa cells exerts its effects on oocyte quality is poorly understood. Comparing in vitro maturation rate of oocytes, we found oocytes collected from AR−/− mice have a significantly poor maturating rate with 60% reached metaphase II and 30% remained in germinal vesicle breakdown stage, whereas 95% of wild-type AR (AR+/+ oocytes had reached metaphase II. Interestingly, we found these AR−/− female mice also had an increased frequency of morphological alterations in the mitochondria of granulosa cells with reduced ATP generation (0.18 ± 0.02 vs. 0.29 ± 0.02 µM/mg protein; p < 0.05 and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis. Mechanism dissection found loss of AR led to a significant decrease in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ co-activator 1-β (PGC1-β and its sequential downstream genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM, in controlling mitochondrial biogenesis. These results indicate that AR may contribute to maintain oocyte quality and fertility via controlling the signals of PGC1-β-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis in granulosa cells.

  8. Mitochondrial quality-control dysregulation in conditional HO-1–/– mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Hagir B.; Keenan, Jeffrey E.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2017-01-01

    The heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox1; HO-1) pathway was tested for defense of mitochondrial quality control in cardiomyocyte-specific Hmox1 KO mice (HO-1[CM]–/–) exposed to oxidative stress (100% O2). After 48 hours of exposure, these mice showed persistent cardiac inflammation and oxidative tissue damage that caused sarcomeric disruption, cardiomyocyte death, left ventricular dysfunction, and cardiomyopathy, while control hearts showed minimal damage. After hyperoxia, HO-1(CM)–/– hearts showed suppression of the Pgc-1α/nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) axis, swelling, low electron density mitochondria by electron microscopy (EM), increased cell death, and extensive collagen deposition. The damage mechanism involves structurally deficient autophagy/mitophagy, impaired LC3II processing, and failure to upregulate Pink1- and Park2-mediated mitophagy. The mitophagy pathway was suppressed through loss of NRF-1 binding to proximal promoter sites on both genes. These results indicate that cardiac Hmox1 induction not only prevents heme toxicity, but also regulates the timing and registration of genetic programs for mitochondrial quality control that limit cell death, pathological remodeling, and cardiac fibrosis.

  9. Mitochondrial plasticity with exercise training and extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boushel, Robert; Lundby, Carsten; Qvortrup, Klaus; Sahlin, Kent

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria form a reticulum in skeletal muscle. Exercise training stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, yet an emerging hypothesis is that training also induces qualitative regulatory changes. Substrate oxidation, oxygen affinity, and biochemical coupling efficiency may be regulated differentially with training and exposure to extreme environments. Threshold training doses inducing mitochondrial upregulation remain to be elucidated considering fitness level.

  10. Structure of mitochondrial DNA control region of Fenneropenaeus chinensis and phylogenetic relationship among different populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Pengfei; Gao, Tianxiang; Zhuang, Zhimeng; Jin, Xianshi

    2012-06-01

    This paper deals with the structure of mitochondrial DNA control region of Fenneropenaeus chinensis. The termination-associated sequence (TAS), cTAS, CSB-D-CSB-F, and CSB-1 are detected in the species. The results indicate that the structures of these parts are similar to those of most marine organisms. Two conserved regions and many stable conserved boxes are found in the extended TAS area, central sequences blocks, and conserved sequences blocks (CSBs). This is the special character of F. chinensis. All the mtDNA control region sequences do not have CSB2 and CSB3 blocks, which is quite different from most vertebrates. In addition, the complete mtDNA control region sequences are used to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of F. chinensis. The phylogenetic trees show a lack of genetic structure among populations, which is similar to many previous studies.

  11. Temporal increase of platelet mitochondrial respiration is negatively associated with clinical outcome in patients with sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Morota, Saori; Hansson, Magnus J;

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested as a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of sepsis-induced multiple organ failure. Also, restoration of mitochondrial function, known as mitochondrial biogenesis, has been implicated as a key factor for the recovery of organ function in patients wi...

  12. Oestrogens ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Carla; Montopoli, Monica; Perli, Elena; Orlandi, Maurizia; Fantin, Marianna; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Caparrotta, Laura; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ghelli, Anna; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, the most frequent mitochondrial disease due to mitochondrial DNA point mutations in complex I, is characterized by the selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells, leading to optic atrophy and loss of central vision prevalently in young males. The current study investigated the reasons for the higher prevalence of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in males, exploring the potential compensatory effects of oestrogens on mutant cell metabolism. Control and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy osteosarcoma-derived cybrids (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6) were grown in glucose or glucose-free, galactose-supplemented medium. After having shown the nuclear and mitochondrial localization of oestrogen receptors in cybrids, experiments were carried out by adding 100 nM of 17β-oestradiol. In a set of experiments, cells were pre-incubated with the oestrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy cybrids in galactose medium presented overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which led to decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increased apoptotic rate, loss of cell viability and hyper-fragmented mitochondrial morphology compared with control cybrids. Treatment with 17β-oestradiol significantly rescued these pathological features and led to the activation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2. In addition, 17β-oestradiol induced a general activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and a small although significant improvement in energetic competence. All these effects were oestrogen receptor mediated. Finally, we showed that the oestrogen receptor β localizes to the mitochondrial network of human retinal ganglion cells. Our results strongly support a metabolic basis for the unexplained male prevalence in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hold promises for a therapeutic use for oestrogen-like molecules.

  13. Exploiting Synteny in Cucumis for Mapping of Psm, A Unique Locus Controlling Paternal Mitochondrial Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    The three genomes of cucumber show different modes of transmission, nuclear DNA bi-parentally, plastid DNA maternally, and mitochondrial DNA paternally. The mosaic (MSC) phenotype of cucumber is associated with mitochondrial DNA rearrangements and is a valuable tool for studying mitochondrial trans...

  14. Overexpression of the mitochondrial T3 receptor induces skeletal muscle atrophy during aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Casas

    Full Text Available In previous studies, we characterized a new hormonal pathway involving a mitochondrial T3 receptor (p43 acting as a mitochondrial transcription factor. In in vitro and in vivo studies, we have shown that p43 increases mitochondrial transcription and mitochondrial biogenesis. In addition, p43 overexpression in skeletal muscle stimulates mitochondrial respiration and induces a shift in metabolic and contractile features of muscle fibers which became more oxidative.Here we have studied the influence of p43 overexpression in skeletal muscle of mice during aging. We report that p43 overexpression initially increased mitochondrial mass. However, after the early rise in mitochondrial DNA occurring at 2 months of age in transgenic mice, we observed a progressive decrease of mitochondrial DNA content which became 2-fold lower at 23 months of age relatively to control animals. Moreover, p43 overexpression induced an oxidative stress characterized by a strong increase of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in quadriceps muscle, although antioxidant enzyme activities (catalase and superoxide dismutase were stimulated. In addition, muscle atrophy became detectable at 6 months of age, probably through a stimulation of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway via two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases E3, Atrogin-1/MAFbx and MuRF1.Taken together, these results demonstrate that a prolonged stimulation of mitochondrial activity induces muscle atrophy. In addition, these data underline the importance of a tight control of p43 expression and suggest that a deregulation of the direct T3 mitochondrial pathway could be one of the parameters involved in the occurrence of sarcopenia.

  15. Reductive stress impairs myoblasts mitochondrial function and triggers mitochondrial hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, François; Charles, Anne-Laure; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Bouitbir, Jamal; Bonifacio, Annalisa; Piquard, François; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Geny, Bernard; Zoll, Joffrey

    2015-07-01

    Even though oxidative stress damage from excessive production of ROS is a well known phenomenon, the impact of reductive stress remains poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that cellular reductive stress could lead to mitochondrial malfunction, triggering a mitochondrial hormesis (mitohormesis) phenomenon able to protect mitochondria from the deleterious effects of statins. We performed several in vitro experiments on L6 myoblasts and studied the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at different exposure times. Direct NAC exposure (1mM) led to reductive stress, impairing mitochondrial function by decreasing maximal mitochondrial respiration and increasing H₂O₂production. After 24h of incubation, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was increased. The resulting mitochondrial oxidation activated mitochondrial biogenesis pathways at the mRNA level. After one week of exposure, mitochondria were well-adapted as shown by the decrease of cellular ROS, the increase of mitochondrial content, as well as of the antioxidant capacities. Atorvastatin (ATO) exposure (100μM) for 24h increased ROS levels, reduced the percentage of live cells, and increased the total percentage of apoptotic cells. NAC exposure during 3days failed to protect cells from the deleterious effects of statins. On the other hand, NAC pretreatment during one week triggered mitochondrial hormesis and reduced the deleterious effect of statins. These results contribute to a better understanding of the redox-dependant pathways linked to mitochondria, showing that reductive stress could trigger mitochondrial hormesis phenomenon.

  16. Comparative analysis of complete mitochondrial DNA control region of four species of Strigiformes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bing; Ma, Fei; Sun, Yi; Li, Qing-Wei

    2006-11-01

    The sequence of the whole mitochondrial (mt) DNA control region (CR) of four species of Strigiformes was obtained. Length of the CR was 3,290 bp, 2,848 bp, 2,444 bp, and 1,771 bp for Asio flammeus, Asio otus, Athene noctua, and Strix aluco, respectively. Interestingly, the length of the control region was maximum in Asio flammeus among all the avian mtDNA control regions sequenced thus far. In addition, the base composition and organization of mtDNA CR of Asio flammeus were identical to those reported for other birds. On the basis of the differential frequencies of base substitutions, the CR may be divided two variable domains, I and III, and a central conserved domain, II. The 3' end of the CR contained many tandem repeats of varying lengths and repeat numbers. In Asio flammeus, the repeated sequences consisted of a 126 bp sequence that was repeated seven times and a 78 bp sequence that was repeated 14 times. In Asio otus, there were also two repeated sequences, namely a 127 bp sequence that was repeated eight times and a 78 bp sequence that was repeated six times. The control region of Athene noctua contained three sets of repeats: a 89 bp sequence that was repeated three times, a 77 bp sequence that was repeated four times, and a 71 bp sequence that was repeated six times. Strix aluco, however, had only one repeated sequence, a 78 bp sequence that was repeated five times. The results of this study seem to indicate that these tandem repeats may have resulted from slipped-strand mispairing during mtDNA replication. Moreover, there are many conserved motifs within the repeated units. These sequences could form stable stem-loop secondary structures, which suggests that these repeated sequences play an important role in regulating transcription and replication of the mitochondrial genome.

  17. Sequence polymorphism of human mitochondrial DNA control region in Chinese Dongxiang unrelated individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xin-she; CHEN Teng; LI Sheng-bin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mitochondrial DNA sequence polymorphism in Chinese Dongxiang ethnic group and to provide basic data used in ethnic origin investigation and forensic purpose. Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted from the whole blood of 100 unrelated individuals of Chinese Dongxiang ethnic group by standard Chelex-100 method.The sequence polymorphism was determined by PCR amplification and direct sequencing. Results: Eighty-two polymorphic sites were identified in mtDNA D-loop region 16 091 - 16 418 np, and 88 haplotypes were found. The genetic diversity was calculated to be 0.996 9, and the genetic identity was 0.013 2. Conclusion: There are some particular polymorphic sites in Chinese Dongxiang ethnic group, and these sites provide an important basis to investigate the origin of Dongxiang and the relationship between Dongxiang and other ethnic groups. The result also suggested that sequence polymorphism from 16 091 -16 418 np in human mitochondrial DNA control region can be an useful tool for forensic identity.

  18. Characterization of human mitochondrial ferritin promoter: identification of transcription factors and evidences of epigenetic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldo, Michela; Santambrogio, Paolo; Rovelli, Elisabetta; di Savino, Augusta; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cittaro, Davide; Roetto, Antonella; Levi, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is an iron storage protein belonging to the ferritin family but, unlike the cytosolic ferritin, it has an iron-unrelated restricted tissue expression. FtMt appears to be preferentially expressed in cell types characterized by high metabolic activity and oxygen consumption, suggesting a role in protecting mitochondria from iron-dependent oxidative damage. The human gene (FTMT) is intronless and its promoter region has not been described yet. To analyze the regulatory mechanisms controlling FTMT expression, we characterized the 5‧ flanking region upstream the transcriptional starting site of FTMT by in silico enquiry of sequences conservation, DNA deletion analysis, and ChIP assay. The data revealed a minimal promoter region and identified the presence of SP1, CREB and YY1 as positive regulators, and GATA2, FoxA1 and C/EBPβ as inhibitors of the transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, the FTMT transcription is increased by acetylating and de-methylating agent treatments in K562 and HeLa cells. These treatments up-regulate FtMt expression even in fibroblasts derived from a Friedreich ataxia patient, where it might exert a beneficial effect against mitochondrial oxidative damage. The expression of FTMT appears regulated by a complex mechanism involving epigenetic events and interplay between transcription factors.

  19. The Protective Effects of Salidroside from Exhaustive Exercise-Induced Heart Injury by Enhancing the PGC-1 α -NRF1/NRF2 Pathway and Mitochondrial Respiratory Function in Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ping, Zheng; Zhang, Long-fei; Cui, Yu-juan; Chang, Yu-mei; Jiang, Cai-wu; Meng, Zhen-zhi; Xu, Peng; Liu, Hai-yan; Wang, Dong-ying; Cao, Xue-bin

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that salidroside (SAL) can protect heart from exhaustive exercise-induced injury by enhancing mitochondrial respiratory function and mitochondrial biogenesis key signaling pathway PGC-1α-NRF1/NRF2 in rats...

  20. Mitochondrial function in neuronal cells depends on p97/VCP/Cdc48-mediated quality control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eFang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining mitochondrial function is essential for neuronal survival and offers protection against neurodegeneration. Ubiquitin-mediated, proteasome-dependent protein degradation in the form of outer mitochondrial membrane associated degradation (OMMAD was shown to play roles in maintenance of mitochondria on the level of proteostasis, but also mitophagy and cell death. Recently, the AAA-ATPase p97/VCP/Cdc48 was recognized as part of OMMAD acting as retrotranslocase of ubiquitinated mitochondrial proteins for proteasomal degradation. Thus, p97 likely plays a major role in mitochondrial maintenance. Support for this notion comes from mitochondrial dysfunction associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD caused by p97 mutation. Using SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing p97 or dominant-negative p97QQ treated with mitochondrial toxins rotenone, 6-OHDA, or Aβ-peptide as model for neuronal cells suffering from mitochondrial dysfunction, we found mitochondrial fragmentation under normal and stress conditions was significantly increased upon inactivation of p97. Furthermore, inactivation of p97 resulted in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Under additional stress conditions, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased ROS production was even more pronounced. Loss of mitochondrial fidelity upon inactivation of p97 was likely due to disturbed maintenance of mitochondrial proteostasis as the employed treatments neither induced mitophagy nor cell death. This was supported by the accumulation of oxidatively-damaged proteins on mitochondria in response to p97 inactivation. Dysfunction of p97 under normal and stress conditions in neuron-like cells severely impacts mitochondrial function, thus supporting for the first time a role for p97 as a major component of mitochondrial

  1. Etiology and pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease: role of mitochondrial pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottolini D

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Denis Ottolini, Tito Calì, Marisa BriniDepartment of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, University of Padova, Padova, ItalyAbstract: Neurons critically rely on mitochondrial activity: they are characterized by high energy demand and they are totally dependent on the process of oxidative phosphorylation to produce adenosine triphosphate. Thus, any impairment in mitochondrial function results in neuronal damage and degeneration. Some particular neuronal populations are more susceptible to mitochondrial damage, as it has been recently proposed for the ventral midbrain dopaminergic neurons, the degeneration of which represents a clinical sign of Parkinson’s disease. Different cellular pathways are involved in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disease, but intriguingly both sporadic and familial forms share common features that essentially recapitulate mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial biogenesis, bioenergetics, mitochondria dynamics, and quality-control process are the main affected pathways. General consensus agrees on the possibility that deficiency in these processes may represent the cause rather than the consequence of neurodegeneration. In this review, we will discuss these aspects and the substantial achievements that have been reached in recent years in identifying specific defects in precise biological processes, eg, mitochondrial quality control. The development of cell and animal genetic models has been an important tool to dissect numerous molecular details; for this reason, we will mainly refer to experiments performed on them.Keywords: mitochondria, Parkinson’s disease, α-synuclein, PINK1/parkin, DJ-1, LRRK2

  2. Mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis in skeletal muscle of the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Ninna; Krustrup, Peter; Rasmussen, Hans N

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypotheses that 1) skeletal muscles of elderly subjects can adapt to a single endurance exercise bout and 2) endurance trained elderly subjects have higher expression/activity of oxidative and angiogenic proteins in skeletal muscle than untrained elderly people...... in UT PGC-1a mRNA 11-fold and VEGF mRNA 4-fold at 2h of recovery, and AMPK phosphorylation ~5-fold immediately after exercise, relative to Pre, indicating an ability to adapt metabolically and angiogenically to endurance exercise. However, in ET PGC-1a mRNA only increased 5 fold and AMPK phosphorylation...

  3. The Neurogenic Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor NeuroD6 Concomitantly Increases Mitochondrial mass and Regulates Cytoskeletal Organization in the Early Stages of Neuronal Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Kathleen Baxter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a central role during neurogenesis by providing energy in the form of ATP for cytoskeletal remodelling, outgrowth of neuronal processes, growth cone activity and synaptic activity. However, the fundamental question of how differentiating neurons control mitochondrial biogenesis remains vastly unexplored. Since our previous studies have shown that the neurogenic bHLH (basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor NeuroD6 is sufficient to induce differentiation of the neuronal progenitor-like PC12 cells and that it triggers expression of mitochondrial-related genes, we investigated whether NeuroD6 could modulate the mitochondrial biomass using our PC12-ND6 cellular paradigm. Using a combination of flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and mitochondrial fractionation, we demonstrate that NeuroD6 stimulates maximal mitochondrial mass at the lamellipodia stage, thus preceding axonal growth. NeuroD6 triggers remodelling of the actin and microtubule networks in conjunction with increased expression of the motor protein KIF5B, thus promoting mitochondrial movement in developing neurites with accumulation in growth cones. Maintenance of the NeuroD6-induced mitochondrial mass requires an intact cytoskeletal network, as its disruption severely reduces mitochondrial mass. The present study provides the first evidence that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in co-ordinating increase in mitochondrial mass with cytoskeletal remodelling, suggestive of a role of this transcription factor as a co-regulator of neuronal differentiation and energy metabolism.

  4. The neurogenic basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor NeuroD6 concomitantly increases mitochondrial mass and regulates cytoskeletal organization in the early stages of neuronal differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Kathleen Baxter

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a central role during neurogenesis by providing energy in the form of ATP for cytoskeletal remodelling, outgrowth of neuronal processes, growth cone activity and synaptic activity. However, the fundamental question of how differentiating neurons control mitochondrial biogenesis remains vastly unexplored. Since our previous studies have shown that the neurogenic bHLH (basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor NeuroD6 is sufficient to induce differentiation of the neuronal progenitor-like PC12 cells and that it triggers expression of mitochondrial-related genes, we investigated whether NeuroD6 could modulate the mitochondrial biomass using our PC12-ND6 cellular paradigm. Using a combination of flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and mitochondrial fractionation, we demonstrate that NeuroD6 stimulates maximal mitochondrial mass at the lamellipodia stage, thus preceding axonal growth. NeuroD6 triggers remodelling of the actin and microtubule networks in conjunction with increased expression of the motor protein KIF5B, thus promoting mitochondrial movement in developing neurites with accumulation in growth cones. Maintenance of the NeuroD6-induced mitochondrial mass requires an intact cytoskeletal network, as its disruption severely reduces mitochondrial mass. The present study provides the first evidence that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in co-ordinating increase in mitochondrial mass with cytoskeletal remodelling, suggestive of a role of this transcription factor as a co-regulator of neuronal differentiation and energy metabolism.

  5. Mitochondrial Plasticity With Exercise Training and Extreme Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert; Lundby, Carsten; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria form a reticulum in skeletal muscle. Exercise training stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, yet an emerging hypothesis is that training also induces qualitative regulatory changes. Substrate oxidation, oxygen affinity and biochemical coupling efficiency may be differentially regulated...... with training and exposure to extreme environments. Threshold training doses inducing mitochondrial up-regulation remain to be elucidated considering fitness level. SUMMARY: Muscle mitochondrial are responsive to training and environment, yet thresholds for volume vs. regulatory changes and their physiological...

  6. The Mitochondrial Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetases: Genes and Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases. This is because protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis and maintenance of mitochondria, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, transcription, and translation, require nuclear-encoded genes. In the past decade, a growing number of syndromes associated with dysfunction of...

  7. Genetic diversity analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region in artificially propagated Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yuan; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Ouyang, Shan; Huang, Xiao-Chen; Zhan, Yang; Zhou, Ping; Rong, Jun; Wu, Xiao-Ping

    2015-08-01

    The genetic diversity of the three major artificially propagated populations of Chinese sucker, an endangered freshwater fish species, was investigated using the sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control regions. Among the 89 individuals tested, 66 variable sites (7.26%) and 10 haplotypes were detected (Haplotype diversity Hd = 0.805, Nucleotide diversity π = 0.0287). In general, genetic diversity was lower in artificially propagated populations than in wild populations. This reduction in genetic diversity may be due to population bottlenecks, genetic drift and human selection. A stepping-stone pattern of gene flow was detected in the populations studied, showing much higher gene flow between neighbouring populations. To increase the genetic diversity, wild lineages should be introduced, and more lineages should be shared among artificially propagated populations.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA control region analysis of three ethnic groups in the Republic of Macedonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankova-Ajanovska, Renata; Zimmermann, Bettina; Huber, Gabriela; Röck, Alexander W.; Bodner, Martin; Jakovski, Zlatko; Janeska, Biljana; Duma, Aleksej; Parson, Walther

    2014-01-01

    A total of 444 individuals representing three ethnic groups (Albanians, Turks and Romanies) in the Republic of Macedonia were sequenced in the mitochondrial control region. The mtDNA haplogroup composition differed between the three groups. Our results showed relatively high frequencies of haplogroup H12 in Albanians (8.8%) and less in Turks (3.3%), while haplogroups M5a1 and H7a1a were dominant in Romanies (13.7% and 10.3%, respectively) but rare in the former two. This highlights the importance of regional sampling for forensic mtDNA databasing purposes. These population data will be available on EMPOP under accession numbers EMP00644 (Albanians), EMP00645 (Romanies) and EMP00646 (Turks). PMID:25051224

  9. Mitochondrial DNA control region analysis of three ethnic groups in the Republic of Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankova-Ajanovska, Renata; Zimmermann, Bettina; Huber, Gabriela; Röck, Alexander W; Bodner, Martin; Jakovski, Zlatko; Janeska, Biljana; Duma, Aleksej; Parson, Walther

    2014-11-01

    A total of 444 individuals representing three ethnic groups (Albanians, Turks and Romanies) in the Republic of Macedonia were sequenced in the mitochondrial control region. The mtDNA haplogroup composition differed between the three groups. Our results showed relatively high frequencies of haplogroup H12 in Albanians (8.8%) and less in Turks (3.3%), while haplogroups M5a1 and H7a1a were dominant in Romanies (13.7% and 10.3%, respectively) but rare in the former two. This highlights the importance of regional sampling for forensic mtDNA databasing purposes. These population data will be available on EMPOP under accession numbers EMP00644 (Albanians), EMP00645 (Romanies) and EMP00646 (Turks).

  10. Myopathy caused by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inactivation is not reversed by restoring mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanino, Klaas; Mazelin, Laetitia; Albert, Verena; Conjard-Duplany, Agnès; Lin, Shuo; Bentzinger, C Florian; Handschin, Christoph; Puigserver, Pere; Zorzato, Francesco; Schaeffer, Laurent; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Rüegg, Markus A

    2011-12-20

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is central to the control of cell, organ, and body size. Skeletal muscle-specific inactivation of mTORC1 in mice results in smaller muscle fibers, fewer mitochondria, increased glycogen stores, and a progressive myopathy that causes premature death. In mTORC1-deficient muscles, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α), which regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and glucose homeostasis, is strongly down-regulated. Here we tested whether induction of mitochondrial biogenesis pharmacologically or by the overexpression of PGC-1α is sufficient to reverse the phenotype of mice deficient for mTORC1. We show that both approaches normalize mitochondrial function, such as oxidative capacity and expression of mitochondrial genes. However, they do not prevent or delay the progressive myopathy. In addition, we find that mTORC1 has a much stronger effect than PGC-1α on the glycogen content in muscle. This effect is based on the strong activation of PKB/Akt in mTORC1-deficient mice. We also show that activation of PKB/Akt not only affects glycogen synthesis but also diminishes glycogen degradation. Thus, our work provides strong functional evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction in mice with inactivated mTORC1 signaling is caused by the down-regulation of PGC-1α. However, our data also show that the impairment of mitochondria does not lead directly to the lethal myopathy.

  11. Mitochondrial cholesterol: mechanisms of import and effects on mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laura A; Kennedy, Barry E; Karten, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria require cholesterol for biogenesis and membrane maintenance, and for the synthesis of steroids, oxysterols and hepatic bile acids. Multiple pathways mediate the transport of cholesterol from different subcellular pools to mitochondria. In steroidogenic cells, the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) interacts with a mitochondrial protein complex to mediate cholesterol delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane for conversion to pregnenolone. In non-steroidogenic cells, several members of a protein family defined by the presence of a StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain play key roles in the delivery of cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes. Subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), form membrane contact sites with mitochondria and may contribute to the transport of ER cholesterol to mitochondria, either independently or in conjunction with lipid-transfer proteins. Model systems of mitochondria enriched with cholesterol in vitro and mitochondria isolated from cells with (patho)physiological mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial cholesterol levels affect mitochondrial function. Increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels have been observed in several diseases, including cancer, ischemia, steatohepatitis and neurodegenerative diseases, and influence disease pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms maintaining mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis may reveal additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we give a brief overview of mitochondrial cholesterol import in steroidogenic cells, and then focus on cholesterol trafficking pathways that deliver cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes in non-steroidogenic cells. We also briefly discuss the consequences of increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels on mitochondrial function and their potential role in disease pathology.

  12. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter Mcu controls excitotoxicity and is transcriptionally repressed by neuroprotective nuclear calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jing; Tan, Yan-Wei; Hagenston, Anna M; Martel, Marc-Andre; Kneisel, Niclas; Skehel, Paul A; Wyllie, David J A; Bading, Hilmar; Hardingham, Giles E

    2013-01-01

    The recent identification of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter gene (Mcu/Ccdc109a) has enabled us to address its role, and that of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, in neuronal excitotoxicity. Here we show that exogenously expressed Mcu is mitochondrially localized and increases mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels following NMDA receptor activation, leading to increased mitochondrial membrane depolarization and excitotoxic cell death. Knockdown of endogenous Mcu expression reduces NMDA-induced increases in mitochondrial Ca(2+), resulting in lower levels of mitochondrial depolarization and resistance to excitotoxicity. Mcu is subject to dynamic regulation as part of an activity-dependent adaptive mechanism that limits mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload when cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels are high. Specifically, synaptic activity transcriptionally represses Mcu, via a mechanism involving the nuclear Ca(2+) and CaM kinase-mediated induction of Npas4, resulting in the inhibition of NMDA receptor-induced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and preventing excitotoxic death. This establishes Mcu and the pathways regulating its expression as important determinants of excitotoxicity, which may represent therapeutic targets for excitotoxic disorders.

  13. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodermel, Steven

    2015-11-16

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.

  14. Mitochondrial disorders and the eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Neill EC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicole J Van Bergen, Rahul Chakrabarti, Evelyn C O'Neill, Jonathan G Crowston, Ian A TrounceCentre for Eye Research Australia, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: The clinical significance of disturbed mitochondrial function in the eye has emerged since mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutation was described in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. The spectrum of mitochondrial dysfunction has become apparent through increased understanding of the contribution of nuclear and somatic mtDNA mutations to mitochondrial dynamics and function. Common ophthalmic manifestations of mitochondrial dysfunction include optic atrophy, pigmentary retinopathy, and ophthalmoplegia. The majority of patients with ocular manifestations of mitochondrial disease also have variable central and peripheral nervous system involvement. Mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been associated with age-related retinal disease including macular degeneration and glaucoma. Therefore, therapeutic targets directed at promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function offer a potential to both preserve retinal function and attenuate neurodegenerative processes.Keywords: mitochondria, disease, retina, eye, aging, neuroprotection

  15. Identifications of captive and wild tilapia species existing in Hawaii by mitochondrial DNA control region sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tilapia family of the Cichlidae includes many fish species, which live in freshwater and saltwater environments. Several species, such as O. niloticus, O. aureus, and O. mossambicus, are excellent for aquaculture because these fish are easily reproduced and readily adapt to diverse environments. Historically, tilapia species, including O. mossambicus, S. melanotheron, and O. aureus, were introduced to Hawaii many decades ago, and the state of Hawaii uses the import permit policy to prevent O. niloticus from coming into the islands. However, hybrids produced from O. niloticus may already be present in the freshwater and marine environments of the islands. The purpose of this study was to identify tilapia species that exist in Hawaii using mitochondrial DNA analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we analyzed 382 samples collected from 13 farm (captive and wild tilapia populations in Oahu and the Hawaii Islands. Comparison of intraspecies variation between the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene from five populations indicated that mtDNA CR had higher nucleotide diversity than COI. A phylogenetic tree of all sampled tilapia was generated using mtDNA CR sequences. The neighbor-joining tree analysis identified seven distinctive tilapia species: O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. niloticus, S. melanotheron, O. urolepies, T. redalli, and a hybrid of O. massambicus and O. niloticus. Of all the populations examined, 10 populations consisting of O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. urolepis, and O. niloticus from the farmed sites were relatively pure, whereas three wild populations showed some degree of introgression and hybridization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This DNA-based tilapia species identification is the first report that confirmed tilapia species identities in the wild and captive populations in Hawaii. The DNA sequence comparisons of mtDNA CR appear to be a valid method for

  16. PINK1, Parkin, and Mitochondrial Quality Control: What can we Learn about Parkinson’s Disease Pathobiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truban, Dominika; Hou, Xu; Caulfield, Thomas R.; Fiesel, Fabienne C.; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical description of Parkinson’s disease (PD) will embrace its two century anniversary in 2017. For the past 30 years, mitochondrial dysfunction has been hypothesized to play a central role in the pathobiology of this devastating neurodegenerative disease. The identifications of mutations in genes encoding PINK1 (PTEN-induced kinase 1) and Parkin (E3 ubiquitin ligase) in familial PD and their functional association with mitochondrial quality control provided further support to this hypothesis. Recent research focused mainly on their key involvement in the clearance of damaged mitochondria, a process known as mitophagy. It has become evident that there are many other aspects of this complex regulated, multifaceted pathway that provides neuroprotection. As such, numerous additional factors that impact PINK1/Parkin have already been identified including genes involved in other forms of PD. A great pathogenic overlap amongst different forms of familial, environmental and even sporadic disease is emerging that potentially converges at the level of mitochondrial quality control. Tremendous efforts now seek to further detail the roles and exploit PINK1 and Parkin, their upstream regulators and downstream signaling pathways for future translation. This review summarizes the latest findings on PINK1/Parkin-directed mitochondrial quality control, its integration and cross-talk with other disease factors and pathways as well as the implications for idiopathic PD. In addition, we highlight novel avenues for the development of biomarkers and disease-modifying therapies that are based on a detailed understanding of the PINK1/Parkin pathway. PMID:27911343

  17. Disruption of skeletal muscle mitochondrial network genes and miRNAs in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Aaron P; Wada, Shogo; Vergani, Lodovica; Hock, M Benjamin; Lamon, Séverine; Léger, Bertrand; Ushida, Takashi; Cartoni, Romain; Wadley, Glenn D; Hespel, Peter; Kralli, Anastasia; Soraru, Gianni; Angelini, Corrado; Akimoto, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to play a role in the progression and severity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The regulation of transcriptional co-activators involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function in ALS is not well known. When compared with healthy control subjects, patients with ALS, but not neurogenic disease (ND), had lower levels of skeletal muscle peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA and protein and estrogen-related receptor-α (ERRα) and mitofusin-2 (Mfn2) mRNA. PGC-1β, nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) and Mfn1 mRNA as well as cytochrome C oxidase subunit IV (COXIV) mRNA and protein were lower in patients with ALS and ND. Both patient groups had reductions in citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activity. Similar observations were made in skeletal muscle from transgenic ALS G93A transgenic mice. In vitro, PGC-1α and PGC-1β regulated Mfn1 and Mfn2 in an ERRα-dependent manner. Compared to healthy controls, miRNA 23a, 29b, 206 and 455 were increased in skeletal muscle of ALS patients. miR-23a repressed PGC-1α translation in a 3' UTR dependent manner. Transgenic mice over expressing miR-23a had a reduction in PGC-1α, cytochome-b and COXIV protein levels. These results show that skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction in ALS patients is associated with a reduction in PGC-1α signalling networks involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function, as well as increases in several miRNAs potentially implicated in skeletal muscle and neuromuscular junction regeneration. As miR-23a negatively regulates PGC-1α signalling, therapeutic inhibition of miR-23a may be a strategy to rescue PGC-1α activity and ameliorate skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in ALS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased androgen levels in rats impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongdong; Wang, Xiaping; Zhu, Yunxia; Chen, Fang; Sun, Yujie; Han, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Although insulin resistance is recognized to contribute to the reproductive and metabolic phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), pancreatic beta cell dysfunction plays an essential role in the progression from PCOS to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the role of insulin secretory abnormalities in PCOS has received little attention. In addition, the precise changes in beta cells and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we therefore attempted to elucidate potential mechanisms involved in beta cell alterations in a rat model of PCOS. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was measured in islets isolated from DHT-treated and control rats. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR), ATP production, and mitochondrial copy number were assayed to evaluate mitochondrial function. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is significantly decreased in islets from DHT-treated rats. On the other hand, significant reductions are observed in the expression levels of several key genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and in mitochondrial OCR and ATP production in DHT-treated rat islets. Meanwhile, we found that androgens can directly impair beta cell function by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro in an androgen receptor dependent manner. For the first time, our study demonstrates that increased androgens in female rats can impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion partly through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function. This work has significance for hyperandrogenic women with PCOS: excess activation of the androgen receptor by androgens may provoke beta cell dysfunction via mitochondrial dysfunction.

  19. Disruption of mitochondrial DNA replication in Drosophila increases mitochondrial fast axonal transport in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehan M Baqri

    Full Text Available Mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase (pol gamma cause several progressive human diseases including Parkinson's disease, Alper's syndrome, and progressive external ophthalmoplegia. At the cellular level, disruption of pol gamma leads to depletion of mtDNA, disrupts the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and increases susceptibility to oxidative stress. Although recent studies have intensified focus on the role of mtDNA in neuronal diseases, the changes that take place in mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial axonal transport when mtDNA replication is disrupted are unknown. Using high-speed confocal microscopy, electron microscopy and biochemical approaches, we report that mutations in pol gamma deplete mtDNA levels and lead to an increase in mitochondrial density in Drosophila proximal nerves and muscles, without a noticeable increase in mitochondrial fragmentation. Furthermore, there is a rise in flux of bidirectional mitochondrial axonal transport, albeit with slower kinesin-based anterograde transport. In contrast, flux of synaptic vesicle precursors was modestly decreased in pol gamma-alpha mutants. Our data indicate that disruption of mtDNA replication does not hinder mitochondrial biogenesis, increases mitochondrial axonal transport, and raises the question of whether high levels of circulating mtDNA-deficient mitochondria are beneficial or deleterious in mtDNA diseases.

  20. Protective and biogenesis effects of sodium hydrosulfide on brain mitochondria after cardiac arrest and resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hao; Xie, Xuemeng; Chen, Di; Zhang, Jincheng; Zhou, Yaguang; Yang, Guangtian

    2014-10-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in brain injury after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor compounds preserve mitochondrial morphology and function during ischemia-reperfusion injury. In this study, we sought to explore the effects of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) on brain mitochondria 24h after cardiac arrest and resuscitation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6min cardiac arrest and then resuscitated successfully. Rats received NaHS (0.5mg/kg) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl, 1.67ml/kg) 1min before the start of CPR intravenously, followed by a continuous infusion of NaHS (1.5mg/kg/h) or vehicle (5ml/kg/h) for 3h. Neurological deficit was evaluated 24h after resuscitation and then cortex was collected for assessments. As a result, we found that rats treated with NaHS revealed an improved neurological outcome and cortex mitochondrial morphology 24h after resuscitation. We also observed that NaHS therapy reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and calcium overload, inhibited mitochondrial permeability transition pores, preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, elevated ATP level and ameliorated the cytochrome c abnormal distribution. Further studies indicated that NaHS administration increased mitochondrial biogenesis in cortex at the same time. Our findings suggested that administration of NaHS 1min prior CPR and followed by a continuous infusion ameliorated neurological dysfunction 24h after resuscitation, possibly through mitochondria preservation as well as by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis.

  1. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.;

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified ...

  2. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified ...

  3. Desmin common mutation is associated with multi-systemic disease manifestations and depletion of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eMcCormick

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Desmin (DES is a major muscle scaffolding protein that also functions to anchor mitochondria. Pathogenic DES mutations, however, have not previously been recognized as a cause of multi-systemic mitochondrial disease. Here, we describe a 45-year-old man who presented to The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Mitochondrial-Genetics Diagnostic Clinic for evaluation of progressive cardiac, neuromuscular, gastrointestinal, and mood disorders. Muscle biopsy at age 45 was remarkable for cytoplasmic bodies, as well as ragged red fibers and SDH positive/COX negative fibers that were suggestive of a mitochondrial myopathy. Muscle also showed significant reductions in mitochondrial content (16% of control mean for citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA (35% of control mean. His family history was significant for cardiac conduction defects and myopathy in multiple maternal relatives. Multiple single gene and panel-based sequencing studies were unrevealing. Whole exome sequencing identified a known pathogenic p.S13F mutation in DES that had previously been associated with desmin-related myopathy. Desmin-related myopathy is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by right ventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myopathy, and arrhythmias. However, neuropathy, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and depletion of both mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA have not previously been widely recognized in this disorder. Recognition that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in desmin-related myopathy clarifies the basis for the multi-systemic manifestations, as are typical of primary mitochondrial disorders. Understanding the mitochondrial pathophysiology of desmin-related myopathy highlights the possibility of new therapies for the otherwise untreatable and often fatal class of disease. We postulate that drug treatments aimed at improving mitochondrial biogenesis or reducing oxidative stress may be effective therapies to ameliorate the effects of desmin

  4. Desmin common mutation is associated with multi-systemic disease manifestations and depletion of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Elizabeth M; Kenyon, Lawrence; Falk, Marni J

    2015-01-01

    Desmin (DES) is a major muscle scaffolding protein that also functions to anchor mitochondria. Pathogenic DES mutations, however, have not previously been recognized as a cause of multi-systemic mitochondrial disease. Here, we describe a 45-year-old man who presented to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Mitochondrial-Genetics Diagnostic Clinic for evaluation of progressive cardiac, neuromuscular, gastrointestinal, and mood disorders. Muscle biopsy at age 45 was remarkable for cytoplasmic bodies, as well as ragged red fibers and SDH positive/COX negative fibers that were suggestive of a mitochondrial myopathy. Muscle also showed significant reductions in mitochondrial content (16% of control mean for citrate synthase activity) and mitochondrial DNA (35% of control mean). His family history was significant for cardiac conduction defects and myopathy in multiple maternal relatives. Multiple single gene and panel-based sequencing studies were unrevealing. Whole exome sequencing identified a known pathogenic p.S13F mutation in DES that had previously been associated with desmin-related myopathy. Desmin-related myopathy is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by right ventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myopathy, and arrhythmias. However, neuropathy, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and depletion of both mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA have not previously been widely recognized in this disorder. Recognition that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in desmin-related myopathy clarifies the basis for the multi-systemic manifestations, as are typical of primary mitochondrial disorders. Understanding the mitochondrial pathophysiology of desmin-related myopathy highlights the possibility of new therapies for this otherwise untreatable and often fatal class of disease. We postulate that drug treatments aimed at improving mitochondrial biogenesis or reducing oxidative stress may be effective therapies to ameliorate the effects of desmin-related disease.

  5. Mitochondrial Glutamate Carrier GC1 as a Newly Identified Player in the Control of Glucose-stimulated Insulin Secretion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimir, Marina; Lasorsa, Francesco M.; Rubi, Blanca; Caille, Dorothée; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Meda, Paolo; Maechler, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The SLC25 carrier family mediates solute transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane, a process that is still poorly characterized regarding both the mechanisms and proteins implicated. This study investigated mitochondrial glutamate carrier GC1 in insulin-secreting β-cells. GC1 was cloned from insulin-secreting cells, and sequence analysis revealed hydropathy profile of a six-transmembrane protein, characteristic of mitochondrial solute carriers. GC1 was found to be expressed at the mRNA and protein levels in INS-1E β-cells and pancreatic rat islets. Immunohistochemistry showed that GC1 was present in mitochondria, and ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopy revealed inner mitochondrial membrane localization of the transporter. Silencing of GC1 in INS-1E β-cells, mediated by adenoviral delivery of short hairpin RNA, reduced mitochondrial glutamate transport by 48% (p < 0.001). Insulin secretion at basal 2.5 mm glucose and stimulated either by intermediate 7.5 mm glucose or non-nutrient 30 mm KCl was not modified by GC1 silencing. Conversely, insulin secretion stimulated with optimal 15 mm glucose was reduced by 23% (p < 0.005) in GC1 knocked down cells compared with controls. Adjunct of cell-permeant glutamate (5 mm dimethyl glutamate) fully restored the secretory response at 15 mm glucose (p < 0.005). Kinetics of insulin secretion were investigated in perifused isolated rat islets. GC1 silencing in islets inhibited the secretory response induced by 16.7 mm glucose, both during first (−25%, p < 0.05) and second (−33%, p < 0.05) phases. This study demonstrates that insulin-secreting cells depend on GC1 for maximal glucose response, thereby assigning a physiological function to this newly identified mitochondrial glutamate carrier. PMID:19584051

  6. Peptide-mediated delivery of donor mitochondria improves mitochondrial function and cell viability in human cybrid cells with the MELAS A3243G mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Hoel, Fredrik; Liu, Ko-Hung; Wei, Yau-Huei; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Liu, Chin-San

    2017-09-06

    The cell penetrating peptide, Pep-1, has been shown to facilitate cellular uptake of foreign mitochondria but further research is required to evaluate the use of Pep-1-mediated mitochondrial delivery (PMD) in treating mitochondrial defects. Presently, we sought to determine whether mitochondrial transplantation rescue mitochondrial function in a cybrid cell model of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) disease. Following PMD, recipient cells had internalized donor mitochondria after 1 h, and expressed higher levels of normal mitochondrial DNA, particularly at the end of the treatment and 11 days later. After 4 days, mitochondrial respiratory function had recovered and biogenesis was evident in the Pep-1 and PMD groups, compared to the untreated MELAS group. However, only PMD was able to reverse the fusion-to-fission ratio of mitochondrial morphology, and mitochondria shaping proteins resembled the normal pattern seen in the control group. Cell survival following hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress was also improved in the PMD group. Finally, we observed that PMD partially normalized cytokine expression, including that of interleukin (IL)-7, granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in the MELAS cells. Presently, our data further confirm the protective effects of PMD as well in MELAS disease.

  7. IL-6 Is Not Necessary for the Regulation of Adipose Tissue Mitochondrial Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhongxiao; Perry, Christopher G. R.; Macdonald, Tara; Chan, Catherine B.; Holloway, Graham P.; Wright, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue mitochondria have been implicated as key mediators of systemic metabolism. We have shown that IL-6 activates AMPK, a mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis, in adipose tissue; however, IL-6−/− mice fed a high fat diet have been reported to develop insulin resistance. These findings suggest that IL-6 may control adipose tissue mitochondrial content in vivo, and that reductions in adipose tissue mitochondria may be causally linked to the development of insulin resistance in IL-6−/− mice fed a high fat diet. On the other hand, IL-6 has been implicated as a negative regulator of insulin action. Given these discrepancies the purpose of the present investigation was to further evaluate the relationship between IL-6, adipose tissue mitochondrial content and whole body insulin action. Methodology and Principal Findings In cultured epididymal mouse adipose tissue IL-6 (75 ng/ml) induced the expression of the transcriptional co-activators PGC-1α and PRC, reputed mediators of mitochondrial biogenesis. Similarly, IL-6 increased the expression of COXIV and CPT-1. These effects were absent in cultured subcutaneous adipose tissue and were associated with lower levels of GP130 and IL-6 receptor alpha protein content. Markers of mitochondrial content were intact in adipose tissue from chow fed IL-6−/− mice. When fed a high fat diet IL-6−/− mice were more glucose and insulin intolerant than controls fed the same diet; however this was not explained by decreases in adipose tissue mitochondrial content or respiration. Conclusions and Significance Our findings demonstrate depot-specific differences in the ability of IL-6 to induce PGC-1α and mitochondrial enzymes and demonstrate that IL-6 is not necessary for the maintenance of adipose tissue mitochondrial content in vivo. Moreover, reductions in adipose tissue mitochondria do not explain the greater insulin resistance in IL-6−/− mice fed a high fat diet. These results question the role of

  8. Mitochondrial DNA copy number in whole blood and glioma risk: A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Song, Renduo; Lu, Zhimin; Zhao, Hua

    2016-12-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number are observed in human gliomas. However, whether variations in mtDNA copy number in whole blood play any role in glioma carcinogenesis is still largely unknown. In current study with 395 glioma patients and 425 healthy controls, we intended to investigate the association between mtDNA copy number in whole blood and glioma risk. Overall, we found that levels of mtDNA copy number were significantly higher in glioma cases than healthy controls (mean: 1.48 vs. 1.32, P copy number were inversely correlated with age (P copy number than their counterparts (P = 0.02, P copy number levels were associated with a 1.63-fold increased risk of glioma (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.23-2.14). In further quartile analysis, study subjects who had highest levels of mtNDA copy number had 1.75-fold increased risk of gliomas (adjOR = 1.75, 95%CI = 1.18-2.61). In brief, our findings support the role of mtDNA copy number in the glioma carcinogenesis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Disrupted Renal Mitochondrial Homeostasis after Liver Transplantation in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinlong Liu

    Full Text Available Suppressed mitochondrial biogenesis (MB contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI after many insults. AKI occurs frequently after liver transplantation (LT and increases mortality. This study investigated whether disrupted mitochondrial homeostasis plays a role in AKI after LT.Livers were explanted from Lewis rats and implanted after 18 h cold storage. Kidney and blood were collected 18 h after LT.In the kidney, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS proteins ATP synthase-β and NADH dehydrogenase-3 decreased 44% and 81%, respectively, with marked reduction in associated mRNAs. Renal PGC-1α, the major regulator of MB, decreased 57% with lower mRNA and increased acetylation, indicating inhibited synthesis and suppressed activation. Mitochondrial transcription factor-A, which controls mtDNA replication and transcription, protein and mRNA decreased 66% and 68%, respectively, which was associated with 64% decreases in mtDNA. Mitochondrial fission proteins Drp-1 and Fis-1 and mitochondrial fusion protein mitofusin-1 all decreased markedly. In contrast, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 and microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 increased markedly after LT, indicating enhanced mitophagy. Concurrently, 18- and 13-fold increases in neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cleaved caspase-3 occurred in renal tissue. Both serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen increased >2 fold. Mild to moderate histological changes were observed in the kidney, including loss of brush border, vacuolization of tubular cells in the cortex, cast formation and necrosis in some proximal tubular cells. Finally, myeloperoxidase and ED-1 also increased, indicating inflammation.Suppression of MB, inhibition of mitochondrial fission/fusion and enhancement of mitophagy occur in the kidneys of recipients of liver grafts after long cold storage, which may contribute to the occurrence of AKI and increased mortality after LT.

  10. Melatonin: A Mitochondrial Targeting Molecule Involving Mitochondrial Protection and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dun-Xian Tan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin has been speculated to be mainly synthesized by mitochondria. This speculation is supported by the recent discovery that aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase/serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT/SNAT is localized in mitochondria of oocytes and the isolated mitochondria generate melatonin. We have also speculated that melatonin is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. It accumulates in mitochondria with high concentration against a concentration gradient. This is probably achieved by an active transportation via mitochondrial melatonin transporter(s. Melatonin protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS, inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP, and activating uncoupling proteins (UCPs. Thus, melatonin maintains the optimal mitochondrial membrane potential and preserves mitochondrial functions. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is also regulated by melatonin. In most cases, melatonin reduces mitochondrial fission and elevates their fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics exhibit an oscillatory pattern which matches the melatonin circadian secretory rhythm in pinealeocytes and probably in other cells. Recently, melatonin has been found to promote mitophagy and improve homeostasis of mitochondria.

  11. Association of genetic variations in the mitochondrial DNA control region with presbycusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falah M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Masoumeh Falah,1 Mohammad Farhadi,1 Seyed Kamran Kamrava,1 Saeid Mahmoudian,1 Ahmad Daneshi,1 Maryam Balali,1 Alimohamad Asghari,2 Massoud Houshmand1,3 1ENT and Head & Neck Research Center and Department, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Skull Base Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Medical Genetics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran, Iran Background: The prominent role of mitochondria in the generation of reactive oxygen species, cell death, and energy production contributes to the importance of this organelle in the intracellular mechanism underlying the progression of the common sensory disorder of the elderly, presbycusis. Reduced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA gene expression and coding region variation have frequently been reported as being associated with the development of presbycusis. The mtDNA control region regulates gene expression and replication of the genome of this organelle. To comprehensively understand of the role of mitochondria in the progression of presbycusis, we compared variations in the mtDNA control region between subjects with presbycusis and controls.Methods: A total of 58 presbycusis patients and 220 control subjects were enrolled in the study after examination by the otolaryngologist and audiology tests. Variations in the mtDNA control region were investigated by polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing.Results: A total of 113 sequence variants were observed in mtDNA, and variants were detected in 100% of patients, with 84% located in hypervariable regions. The frequencies of the variants, 16,223 C>T, 16,311 T>C, 16,249 T>C, and 15,954 A>C, were significantly different between presbycusis and control subjects.Conclusion: The statistically significant difference in the frequencies of four nucleotide variants in the mtDNA control region of presbycusis patients and controls is in agreement with previous experimental

  12. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Boland

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability and other more conventional aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the sigificance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis and spatial dynamics and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knockon effects for cell proliferation and growth. Scientifically, there is also scope for defining what mitochondria dysfunction is and here we address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  13. A chemical screen probing the relationship between mitochondrial content and cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshimori Kitami

    Full Text Available The cellular content of mitochondria changes dynamically during development and in response to external stimuli, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. To systematically identify molecular probes and pathways that control mitochondrial abundance, we developed a high-throughput imaging assay that tracks both the per cell mitochondrial content and the cell size in confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We screened 28,786 small molecules and observed that hundreds of small molecules are capable of increasing or decreasing the cellular content of mitochondria in a manner proportionate to cell size, revealing stereotyped control of these parameters. However, only a handful of compounds dissociate this relationship. We focus on one such compound, BRD6897, and demonstrate through secondary assays that it increases the cellular content of mitochondria as evidenced by fluorescence microscopy, mitochondrial protein content, and respiration, even after rigorous correction for cell size, cell volume, or total protein content. BRD6897 increases uncoupled respiration 1.6-fold in two different, non-dividing cell types. Based on electron microscopy, BRD6897 does not alter the percent of cytoplasmic area occupied by mitochondria, but instead, induces a striking increase in the electron density of existing mitochondria. The mechanism is independent of known transcriptional programs and is likely to be related to a blockade in the turnover of mitochondrial proteins. At present the molecular target of BRD6897 remains to be elucidated, but if identified, could reveal an important additional mechanism that governs mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover.

  14. Mitochondrial activity and dynamics changes regarding metabolism in ageing and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Lluch, Guillermo

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondria play an essential role in ageing and longevity. During ageing, a general deregulation of metabolism occurs, affecting molecular, cellular and physiological activities in the organism. Dysfunction of mitochondria has been associated with ageing and age-related diseases indicating their importance in the maintenance of cell homeostasis. Three major nutritional sensors, mTOR, AMPK and Sirtuins are involved in the control of mitochondrial physiology. These nutritional sensors control mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics by regulating fusion and fission processes, and turnover through mito- and autophagy. Apart of the known factors involved in fusion, OPA1 and mitofusins, and fission, DRP1 and FIS1, emerging factors such as prohibitins and sestrins can play important functions in mitochondrial dynamics regulation. Mitochondria is also affected by sexual hormones that suffer drastic changes during ageing. The recent literature demonstrates the complex interaction between nutritional sensors and mitochondrial homeostasis in the physiology of adipose tissue and in the accumulation of fat in other organs such as muscle and liver. In this article, the role of mitochondrial homeostasis in ageing and age-dependent fat accumulation is revised. This review highlights the importance of mitochondria in the accumulation of fat during ageing and related diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of mitochondrial function and endoplasmic reticulum stress by nitric oxide in pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballano-Infantes, Estefania; Terron-Bautista, José; Beltrán-Povea, Amparo; Cahuana, Gladys M; Soria, Bernat; Nabil, Hajji; Bedoya, Francisco J; Tejedo, Juan R

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) are global processes that are interrelated and regulated by several stress factors. Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional biomolecule with many varieties of physiological and pathological functions, such as the regulation of cytochrome c inhibition and activation of the immune response, ERS and DNA damage; these actions are dose-dependent. It has been reported that in embryonic stem cells, NO has a dual role, controlling differentiation, survival and pluripotency, but the molecular mechanisms by which it modulates these functions are not yet known. Low levels of NO maintain pluripotency and induce mitochondrial biogenesis. It is well established that NO disrupts the mitochondrial respiratory chain and causes changes in mitochondrial Ca2+ flux that induce ERS. Thus, at high concentrations, NO becomes a potential differentiation agent due to the relationship between ERS and the unfolded protein response in many differentiated cell lines. Nevertheless, many studies have demonstrated the need for physiological levels of NO for a proper ERS response. In this review, we stress the importance of the relationships between NO levels, ERS and mitochondrial dysfunction that control stem cell fate as a new approach to possible cell therapy strategies. PMID:28289506

  16. Mechanism of mitochondrial respiratory control in caspase-3 induced positive feed back loop in apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Caspase-3 plays a central role in the execution of apoptosis. Besides many substrates of caspase-3, mitochondria seem to be one of the candidate targets in the apoptotic process. We evaluated the effects of caspase-3 on the isolated mitochondria in detail, and especially focused on the mechanism involved in mitochondrial functions, which were not fully assessed till now. Our results showed that recombinant caspase-3 induced the increase of superoxide production, the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and rate increasing of mitochondrial state 4 respiration. Caspases inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk can inhibit these effects of caspase-3 on mitochondria. Bcl-xL and cyclosporin A were also shown to be able to inhibit these changes. These results suggested a possible mechanism in caspase-3 induced disruption of mitochondrial membrane barrier which formed a positive feedback loop in apoptosis.

  17. The Opa1-Dependent Mitochondrial Cristae Remodeling Pathway Controls Atrophic, Apoptotic, and Ischemic Tissue Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanita, Tatiana; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Romanello, Vanina; Zaglia, Tania; Quintana-Cabrera, Rubén; Semenzato, Martina; Menabò, Roberta; Costa, Veronica; Civiletto, Gabriele; Pesce, Paola; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Di Lisa, Fabio; Mongillo, Marco; Sandri, Marco; Scorrano, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial morphological and ultrastructural changes occur during apoptosis and autophagy, but whether they are relevant in vivo for tissue response to damage is unclear. Here we investigate the role of the optic atrophy 1 (OPA1)-dependent cristae remodeling pathway in vivo and provide evidence that it regulates the response of multiple tissues to apoptotic, necrotic, and atrophic stimuli. Genetic inhibition of the cristae remodeling pathway in vivo does not affect development, but protects mice from denervation-induced muscular atrophy, ischemic heart and brain damage, as well as hepatocellular apoptosis. Mechanistically, OPA1-dependent mitochondrial cristae stabilization increases mitochondrial respiratory efficiency and blunts mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, and reactive oxygen species production. Our results indicate that the OPA1-dependent cristae remodeling pathway is a fundamental, targetable determinant of tissue damage in vivo. PMID:26039448

  18. Structure of mitochondrial DNA control region of Pholis fangi and its phylogenetic implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Dianrong; Gao, Tianxiang

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) of Pholis fangi was amplified via polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing. The length of the mtDNA CR consensus sequence of P. fangi was 853 bp in length. In accordance with the recognition sites as were previously reported in fish species, the mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi can be divided into 3 domains, i.e., the extended terminal associated sequence (ETAS), the central conserved sequence block (CSB), and the CSB domain. In addition, the following structures were identified in the mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi: 2 ETASs in the ETAS domain (TAS and cTAS), 6 CSBs in the central CSB domain (CSB-F to CSB-A), and 3 CSBs in the CSB domain (CSB-1 to CSB-3). These demonstrated that the structure of the mtDNA CR of P. fangi was substantially different from those of most other fish species. The mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi contained one conserved region from 656 bp to 815 bp. Similar to most other fish species, P. fangi has no tandem repeat sequences in its mtDNA CR sequence. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete mtDNA CR sequences showed that there were no genetic differences within P. fangi populations of the same geographical origin and between P. fangi populations of different geographical origins.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA control region diversity in a population from Espirito Santo state, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Naiara M; Paneto, Greiciane G; Figueiredo, Raquel F; de Mello, Aline O; Cicarelli, Regina M B

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis has proved to be useful for forensic identification, especially in cases which nuclear DNA markers fail, as in degraded samples or in cases where the biological material has few traces or no nuclear DNA. Moreover, it can be applied in population genetics, inferring the origin of a population. In this work, the entire mtDNA control region of 97 individuals from the state of Espirito Santo, Brazil, was analyzed. We have found 94 different haplotypes yielding a high haplotype diversity of 0.9994 ± 0.0016. The probability of a random match calculated was 1.09. Haplogroup distribution analysis confirmed a highly admixed Latin American population: African lineages (43.3 %), European lineages (32.0 %), Native American lineages (23.7 %) and Asian lineages (1.0 %). We have concluded that this type of tool can be used both in forensic genetics to the study of different human populations, such as highly admixed populations, and in the study of migration's history and colonization of different states and countries of the world.

  20. Forensic utility of the feline mitochondrial control region - A Dutch perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselink, Monique; Bergwerff, Leonie; Hoogmoed, Daniëlle; Kloosterman, Ate D; Kuiper, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Different portions of the feline mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) were evaluated for their informative value in forensic investigations. The 402bp region located between RS2 and RS3 described most extensively in the past is not efficient for distinguishing between the majority of Dutch cats, illustrated by a random match probability (RMP) of 41%. Typing of the whole region between RS2 and RS3, and additional typing of the 5'portion of the feline CR decreases the RMP to 29%, increasing the applicability of such analyses for forensic investigations. The haplotype distribution in Dutch random bred cats (N=113) differs greatly from the distributions reported for other countries, with a single haplotype NL-A1 present in 54% of the population. The three investigated breeds showed haplotype distributions differing from each other and the random bred cats with haplotype NL-A1 accounting for 4%, 29% and 32% of Maine Coon, Norwegian forest cats and Siamese & Oriental cats. These results indicate the necessity of validating haplotype frequencies within continents and regions prior to reporting the value a mtDNA match. In cases where known purebred cats are involved, further investigation of the breed may be valuable.

  1. Genetic structure of Florida green turtle rookeries as indicated by mitochondrial DNA control region sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamblin, Brian M.; Bagley, Dean A.; Ehrhart, Llewellyn M.; Desjardin, Nicole A.; Martin, R. Erik; Hart, Kristen M.; Naro-Maciel, Eugenia; Rusenko, Kirt; Stiner, John C.; Sobel, Debra; Johnson, Chris; Wilmers, Thomas; Wright, Laura J.; Nairn, Campbell J.

    2014-01-01

    Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) nesting has increased dramatically in Florida over the past two decades, ranking the Florida nesting aggregation among the largest in the Greater Caribbean region. Individual beaches that comprise several hundred kilometers of Florida’s east coast and Keys support tens to thousands of nests annually. These beaches encompass natural to highly developed habitats, and the degree of demographic partitioning among rookeries was previously unresolved. We characterized the genetic structure of ten Florida rookeries from Cape Canaveral to the Dry Tortugas through analysis of 817 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 485 nesting turtles. Two common haplotypes, CM-A1.1 and CM-A3.1, accounted for 87 % of samples, and the haplotype frequencies were strongly partitioned by latitude along Florida’s Atlantic coast. Most genetic structure occurred between rookeries on either side of an apparent genetic break in the vicinity of the St. Lucie Inlet that separates Hutchinson Island and Jupiter Island, representing the finest scale at which mtDNA structure has been documented in marine turtle rookeries. Florida and Caribbean scale analyses of population structure support recognition of at least two management units: central eastern Florida and southern Florida. More thorough sampling and deeper sequencing are necessary to better characterize connectivity among Florida green turtle rookeries as well as between the Florida nesting aggregation and others in the Greater Caribbean region.

  2. Repetitive sequences in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx L.) mitochondrial DNA control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindičić, Magda; Gomerčić, Tomislav; Galov, Ana; Polanc, Primož; Huber, Duro; Slavica, Alen

    2012-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) of numerous species is known to include up to five different repetitive sequences (RS1-RS5) that are found at various locations, involving motifs of different length and extensive length heteroplasmy. Two repetitive sequences (RS2 and RS3) on opposite sides of mtDNA central conserved region have been described in domestic cat (Felis catus) and some other felid species. However, the presence of repetitive sequence RS3 has not been detected in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) yet. We analyzed mtDNA CR of 35 Eurasian lynx (L. lynx L.) samples to characterize repetitive sequences and to compare them with those found in other felid species. We confirmed the presence of 80 base pairs (bp) repetitive sequence (RS2) at the 5' end of the Eurasian lynx mtDNA CR L strand and for the first time we described RS3 repetitive sequence at its 3' end, consisting of an array of tandem repeats five to ten bp long. We found that felid species share similar RS3 repetitive pattern and fundamental repeat motif TACAC.

  3. Unusually long palindromes are abundant in mitochondrial control regions of insects and nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K P Arunkumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Palindromes are known to be involved in a variety of biological processes. In the present investigation we carried out a comprehensive analysis of palindromes in the mitochondrial control regions (CRs of several animal groups to study their frequency, distribution and architecture to gain insights into the origin of replication of mtDNA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Many species of Arthropoda, Nematoda, Mollusca and Annelida harbor palindromes and inverted repeats (IRs in their CRs. Lower animals like cnidarians and higher animal groups like chordates are almost devoid of palindromes and IRs. The study revealed that palindrome occurrence is positively correlated with the AT content of CRs, and that IRs are likely to give rise to longer palindromes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study attempts to explain possible reasons and gives in silico evidence for absence of palindromes and IRs from CR of vertebrate mtDNA and acquisition and retention of the same in insects. Study of CRs of different animal phyla uncovered unique architecture of this locus, be it high abundance of long palindromes and IRs in CRs of Insecta and Nematoda, or short IRs of 10-20 nucleotides with a spacer region of 12-14 bases in subphylum Chelicerata, or nearly complete of absence of any long palindromes and IRs in Vertebrata, Cnidaria and Echinodermata.

  4. Unusually long palindromes are abundant in mitochondrial control regions of insects and nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunkumar, K P; Nagaraju, Javaregowda

    2006-12-20

    Palindromes are known to be involved in a variety of biological processes. In the present investigation we carried out a comprehensive analysis of palindromes in the mitochondrial control regions (CRs) of several animal groups to study their frequency, distribution and architecture to gain insights into the origin of replication of mtDNA. Many species of Arthropoda, Nematoda, Mollusca and Annelida harbor palindromes and inverted repeats (IRs) in their CRs. Lower animals like cnidarians and higher animal groups like chordates are almost devoid of palindromes and IRs. The study revealed that palindrome occurrence is positively correlated with the AT content of CRs, and that IRs are likely to give rise to longer palindromes. The present study attempts to explain possible reasons and gives in silico evidence for absence of palindromes and IRs from CR of vertebrate mtDNA and acquisition and retention of the same in insects. Study of CRs of different animal phyla uncovered unique architecture of this locus, be it high abundance of long palindromes and IRs in CRs of Insecta and Nematoda, or short IRs of 10-20 nucleotides with a spacer region of 12-14 bases in subphylum Chelicerata, or nearly complete of absence of any long palindromes and IRs in Vertebrata, Cnidaria and Echinodermata.

  5. Mitochondrial control region haplotypes of the South American sea lion Otaria flavescens (Shaw, 1800

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.O. Artico

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The South American sea lion, Otaria flavescens, is widely distributed along the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of South America. However, along the Brazilian coast, there are only two nonbreeding sites for the species (Refúgio de Vida Silvestre da Ilha dos Lobos and Refúgio de Vida Silvestre do Molhe Leste da Barra do Rio Grande, both in Southern Brazil. In this region, the species is continuously under the effect of anthropic activities, mainly those related to environmental contamination with organic and inorganic chemicals and fishery interactions. This paper reports, for the first time, the genetic diversity of O. flavescens found along the Southern Brazilian coast. A 287-bp fragment of the mitochondrial DNA control region (D-loop was analyzed. Seven novel haplotypes were found in 56 individuals (OFA1-OFA7, with OFA1 being the most frequent (47.54%. Nucleotide diversity was moderate (π = 0.62% and haplotype diversity was relatively low (67%. Furthermore, the median joining network analysis indicated that Brazilian haplotypes formed a reciprocal monophyletic clade when compared to the haplotypes from the Peruvian population on the Pacific coast. These two populations do not share haplotypes and may have become isolated some time back. Further genetic studies covering the entire species distribution are necessary to better understand the biological implications of the results reported here for the management and conservation of South American sea lions.

  6. Mitochondrial control region haplotypes of the South American sea lion Otaria flavescens (Shaw, 1800).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, L O; Bianchini, A; Grubel, K S; Monteiro, D S; Estima, S C; Oliveira, L R de; Bonatto, S L; Marins, L F

    2010-09-01

    The South American sea lion, Otaria flavescens, is widely distributed along the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of South America. However, along the Brazilian coast, there are only two nonbreeding sites for the species (Refúgio de Vida Silvestre da Ilha dos Lobos and Refúgio de Vida Silvestre do Molhe Leste da Barra do Rio Grande), both in Southern Brazil. In this region, the species is continuously under the effect of anthropic activities, mainly those related to environmental contamination with organic and inorganic chemicals and fishery interactions. This paper reports, for the first time, the genetic diversity of O. flavescens found along the Southern Brazilian coast. A 287-bp fragment of the mitochondrial DNA control region (D-loop) was analyzed. Seven novel haplotypes were found in 56 individuals (OFA1-OFA7), with OFA1 being the most frequent (47.54%). Nucleotide diversity was moderate (π = 0.62%) and haplotype diversity was relatively low (67%). Furthermore, the median joining network analysis indicated that Brazilian haplotypes formed a reciprocal monophyletic clade when compared to the haplotypes from the Peruvian population on the Pacific coast. These two populations do not share haplotypes and may have become isolated some time back. Further genetic studies covering the entire species distribution are necessary to better understand the biological implications of the results reported here for the management and conservation of South American sea lions.

  7. Proteomic profiling of the mitochondrial ribosome identifies Atp25 as a composite mitochondrial precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woellhaf, Michael W; Sommer, Frederik; Schroda, Michael; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-10-15

    Whereas the structure and function of cytosolic ribosomes are well characterized, we only have a limited understanding of the mitochondrial translation apparatus. Using SILAC-based proteomic profiling, we identified 13 proteins that cofractionated with the mitochondrial ribosome, most of which play a role in translation or ribosomal biogenesis. One of these proteins is a homologue of the bacterial ribosome-silencing factor (Rsf). This protein is generated from the composite precursor protein Atp25 upon internal cleavage by the matrix processing peptidase MPP, and in this respect, it differs from all other characterized mitochondrial proteins of baker's yeast. We observed that cytosolic expression of Rsf, but not of noncleaved Atp25 protein, is toxic. Our results suggest that eukaryotic cells face the challenge of avoiding negative interference from the biogenesis of their two distinct translation machineries.

  8. Advanced glycation end products receptor RAGE controls myocardial dysfunction and oxidative stress in high-fat fed mice by sustaining mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy-lysosome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yichi; Wang, Lei; Delguste, Florian; Durand, Arthur; Guilbaud, Axel; Rousselin, Clementine; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Tessier, Frédéric; Boulanger, Eric; Neviere, Remi

    2017-08-19

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are recognized as major contributors of cardiovascular damage in diabetes and high fat diet (HFD) fed mice. Blockade of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) attenuates vascular oxidative stress and development of atherosclerosis. We tested whether HFD-induced myocardial dysfunction would be reversed in RAGE deficiency mice, in association with changes in oxidative stress damage, mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial fission and autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Cardiac antioxidant capacity was upregulated in RAGE(-)/(-) mice under normal diet as evidenced by increased superoxide dismutase and sirtuin mRNA expressions. Mitochondrial fragmentation and mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and Fis1 expressions were increased in RAGE(-)/(-) mice. Autophagy-related protein expressions and cathepsin-L activity were increased in RAGE(-)/(-) mice suggesting sustained autophagy-lysosomal flux. HFD induced mitochondrial respiration defects, cardiac contractile dysfunction, disrupted mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy inhibition, which were partially prevented in RAGE(-)/(-) mice. Our results suggest that cardioprotection against HFD in RAGE(-)/(-) mice include reactivation of autophagy, as inhibition of autophagic flux by chloroquine fully abrogated beneficial myocardial effects and its stimulation by rapamycin improved myocardial function in HFD wild type mice. As mitochondrial fission is necessary to mitophagy, increased fragmentation of mitochondrial network in HFD RAGE(-)/(-) mice may have facilitated removal of damaged mitochondria leading to better mitochondrial quality control. In conclusion, modulation of RAGE pathway may improve mitochondrial damage and myocardial dysfunction in HFD mice. Attenuation of cardiac oxidative stress and maintenance of healthy mitochondria population ensuring adequate energy supply may be involved in myocardial protection against HFD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. The Mitochondrial Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetases: Genes and Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diodato, Daria; Ghezzi, Daniele; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases. This is because protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis and maintenance of mitochondria, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, transcription, and translation, require nuclear-encoded genes. In the past decade, a growing number of syndromes associated with dysfunction of mtDNA translation have been reported. This paper reviews the current knowledge of mutations affecting mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNAs synthetases and their role in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the different clinical presentations.

  10. The Mitochondrial Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetases: Genes and Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Diodato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC disorders are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases. This is because protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis and maintenance of mitochondria, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication, transcription, and translation, require nuclear-encoded genes. In the past decade, a growing number of syndromes associated with dysfunction of mtDNA translation have been reported. This paper reviews the current knowledge of mutations affecting mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNAs synthetases and their role in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the different clinical presentations.

  11. Congenital sideroblastic anemia due to mutations in the mitochondrial HSP70 homologue HSPA9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Ciesielski, Szymon J; Schmidt, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    The congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are relatively uncommon diseases, characterized by defects in mitochondrial heme synthesis, iron-sulfur cluster (Fe-S) biogenesis, or protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that mutations in HSPA9, a mitochondrial HSP70 homologue located in the 5q...

  12. Nrf2 impacts cellular bioenergetics by controlling substrate availability for mitochondrial respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira M. Holmström

    2013-06-01

    Transcription factor Nrf2 and its repressor Keap1 regulate a network of cytoprotective genes involving more than 1% of the genome, their best known targets being drug-metabolizing and antioxidant genes. Here we demonstrate a novel role for this pathway in directly regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics in murine neurons and embryonic fibroblasts. Loss of Nrf2 leads to mitochondrial depolarisation, decreased ATP levels and impaired respiration, whereas genetic activation of Nrf2 increases the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels, the rate of respiration and the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation. We further show that Nrf2-deficient cells have increased production of ATP in glycolysis, which is then used by the F1Fo-ATPase for maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential. While the levels and in vitro activities of the respiratory complexes are unaffected by Nrf2 deletion, their activities in isolated mitochondria and intact live cells are substantially impaired. In addition, the rate of regeneration of NADH after inhibition of respiration is much slower in Nrf2-knockout cells than in their wild-type counterparts. Taken together, these results show that Nrf2 directly regulates cellular energy metabolism through modulating the availability of substrates for mitochondrial respiration. Our findings highlight the importance of efficient energy metabolism in Nrf2-mediated cytoprotection.

  13. Repression of mitochondrial translation, respiration and a metabolic cycle-regulated gene, SLF1, by the yeast Pumilio-family protein Puf3p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Chatenay-Lapointe

    Full Text Available Synthesis and assembly of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS system requires genes located both in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but how gene expression is coordinated between these two compartments is not fully understood. One level of control is through regulated expression mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and other factors required for mitochondrial translation and OXPHOS assembly, which are all products of nuclear genes that are subsequently imported into mitochondria. Interestingly, this cadre of genes in budding yeast has in common a 3'-UTR element that is bound by the Pumilio family protein, Puf3p, and is coordinately regulated under many conditions, including during the yeast metabolic cycle. Multiple functions have been assigned to Puf3p, including promoting mRNA degradation, localizing nucleus-encoded mitochondrial transcripts to the outer mitochondrial membrane, and facilitating mitochondria-cytoskeletal interactions and motility. Here we show that Puf3p has a general repressive effect on mitochondrial OXPHOS abundance, translation, and respiration that does not involve changes in overall mitochondrial biogenesis and largely independent of TORC1-mitochondrial signaling. We also identified the cytoplasmic translation factor Slf1p as yeast metabolic cycle-regulated gene that is repressed by Puf3p at the post-transcriptional level and promotes respiration and extension of yeast chronological life span when over-expressed. Altogether, these results should facilitate future studies on which of the many functions of Puf3p is most relevant for regulating mitochondrial gene expression and the role of nuclear-mitochondrial communication in aging and longevity.

  14. Proteolytic cleavage by the IMP complex or Oct1 peptidase controls the localization of the yeast peroxiredoxin Prx1 to distinct mitochondrial compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Fernando; Palma, Flavio Romero; Barros, Mario H; Tsuchida, Eduardo T; Turano, Helena G; Alegria, Thiago G P; Demasi, Marilene; Netto, Luis E S

    2017-08-18

    Yeast Prx1 is a mitochondrial 1-Cys peroxiredoxin that catalyzes the reduction of endogenously generated H2O2 Prx1 is synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes as a preprotein with a cleavable N-terminal presequence that is the mitochondrial targeting signal, but the mechanisms underlying Prx1 distribution to distinct mitochondrial subcompartments are unknown. Here, we provide direct evidence of the following dual mitochondrial localization of Prx1: a soluble form in the intermembrane space and a form in the matrix weakly associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. We show that Prx1 sorting into the intermembrane space likely involves the release of the protein precursor within the lipid bilayer of the inner membrane, followed by cleavage by the inner membrane peptidase (IMP). We also found that during its import into the matrix compartment, Prx1 is sequentially cleaved by mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP) and then by octapeptidyl aminopeptidase 1 (Oct1). Oct1 cleaved eight amino acid residues from the N-terminal region of Prx1 inside the matrix, without interfering with its peroxidase activity in vitro Remarkably, the processing of Prx proteins by Oct1 appears to be an evolutionarily conserved process since yeast Oct1 could cleave the human mitochondrial peroxiredoxin Prx3 when expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Altogether, the processing of peroxiredoxins by Imp2 or Oct1 likely represents systems that control the localization of Prxs into distinct compartments and thereby contribute to various mitochondrial redox processes.. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Short-term increase of plasma free fatty acids does not interfere with intrinsic mitochondrial function in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Myrte; Hoeks, Joris; Sauerwein, Hans P; Ackermans, Mariette T; Ouwens, Margriet; Lammers, Nicolette M; van der Plas, Mart N; Schrauwen, Patrick; Groen, Albert K; Serlie, Mireille J

    2011-10-01

    Free fatty acid (FFA)- and obesity-induced insulin resistance has been associated with disturbed mitochondrial function. Elevated plasma FFA can impair insulin-induced increase of adenosine triphosphate synthesis and downregulate the expression of genes important in the biogenesis of mitochondria in human skeletal muscle. Whether FAs have a direct effect on intrinsic mitochondrial capacity remains to be established. Therefore, we measured ex vivo mitochondrial respiratory capacity in human skeletal muscle after exposure to hyperinsulinemia and high levels of plasma FFA. Nine healthy lean men were studied during a 6-hour hyperinsulinemic (600 pmol/L) euglycemic clamp with concomitant infusion of Intralipid (Fresensius Kabi Nederland, Den Bosch, the Netherlands) (FFA clamped at 0.5 mmol/L) or saline. Mitochondrial respiratory capacity was measured by high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized muscle fibers using an Oxygraph (OROBOROS Instruments, Innsbruck, Austria). Each participant served as his own control. Peripheral glucose uptake (rate of disappearance) was significantly lower during infusion of the lipid emulsion compared with the control saline infusion (68 μmol/kg·min [saline] vs 40 μmol/kg·min [lipid], P = .008). However, adenosine diphosphate-stimulated and maximal carbonylcyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)-phenylhydrazone-stimulated uncoupled respiration rates were not different in permeabilized skeletal muscle fibers after exposure to high levels of FFA compared with the control condition. We conclude that short-term elevation of FFA within the physiological range induces insulin resistance but does not affect intrinsic mitochondrial capacity in skeletal muscle in humans.

  16. Phylogeography and population structure of the red stingray, Dasyatis akajei inferred by mitochondrial control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Chen, Xiao; Sun, Dianrong; Song, Na; Lin, Qin; Gao, Tianxiang

    2015-08-01

    The red stingray Dasyatis akajei is distributed in both marine and freshwater, but little is known about its phylogeography and population structure. We sampled 107 individuals from one freshwater region and 6 coastal localities within the distribution range of D. akajei. Analyses of the first hypervariable region of mitochondrial DNA control region of 474 bp revealed only 17 polymorphism sites that defined 28 haplotypes, with no unique haplotype for the freshwater population. A high level of haplotype diversity and low nucleotide diversity were observed in both marine (h = 0.9393 ± 0.0104, π = 0.0069 ± 0.0040) and freshwater populations (h = 0.8333 ± 0.2224, π = 0.0084 ± 0.0063). Significant level of genetic structure was detected between four marine populations (TZ, WZ, ND and ZZ) via both hierarchical molecular variance analysis (AMOVA) and pairwise FST (with two exceptions), which is unusual for elasmobranchs detected previously over such short geographical distance. However, limited sampling suggested that the freshwater population was not particularly distinct (p > 0.05), but additional samples would be needed to confirm it. Demersal and slow-moving characters likely have contributed to the genetically heterogeneous population structure. The demographic history of D. akajei examined by mismatch distribution analyses, neutrality tests and Bayesian skyline analyses suggested a sudden population expansion dating to upper Pleistocene. The information on genetic diversity and genetic structure will have implications for the management of fisheries and conservation efforts.

  17. Genetic diversity analysis of Arius manillensis (Siluriformes: Ariidae) using the mitochondrial control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Brian S; Quilang, Jonas P

    2012-04-01

    Arius manillensis is a Philippine endemic species and is an economically important fishery resource in Laguna de Bay, the largest lake in the country. Drastic reduction in population sizes of A. manillensis has been recorded in the past, which may have resulted in genetic bottleneck. In this study, the genetic diversity and population structure of A. manillensis in Laguna de Bay were assessed using the mitochondrial DNA control region. Specimens were obtained from three localities along Laguna de Bay, namely Binangonan (n = 27), Tanay (n = 29), and Calamba (n = 30). Of the 86 DNA sequences generated, 22 distinct haplotypes were observed. There were four unique haplotypes for Binangonan, six for Calamba, and five for Tanay. There were two haplotypes common to the three sites. The maximum likelihood tree and median-joining network showed little geographic separation among the haplotypes. Chi-square test showed no significant differentiation in A. manillensis from the three sites. The overall computed F(ST) was 0.0144, indicating small genetic differentiation in A. manillensis from the three localities sampled. Likewise, analysis of molecular variance showed a greater percentage of variation within population (98.62%) than variation among populations (1.38%; P = 0.21). Total haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity among the specimens from the three sites were 0.775 and 0.013, respectively. The high haplotype diversity coupled with low nucleotide diversity observed in this study confirms that genetic bottleneck occurred in A. manillensis which was followed by population expansion. This is also supported by the non-significant values for both Tajima's D and Fu's F. Furthermore, multimodal mismatch distribution plots were generated, which is consistent with the model of spatial range expansion followed by demographic expansion.

  18. A quantitative map of the liver mitochondrial phosphoproteome reveals posttranslational control of ketogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsrud, Paul A; Carson, Joshua J; Hebert, Alex S; Hubler, Shane L; Niemi, Natalie M; Bailey, Derek J; Jochem, Adam; Stapleton, Donald S; Keller, Mark P; Westphall, Michael S; Yandell, Brian S; Attie, Alan D; Coon, Joshua J; Pagliarini, David J

    2012-11-07

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that play a central role in a diverse array of metabolic processes. Elucidating mitochondrial adaptations to changing metabolic demands and the pathogenic alterations that underlie metabolic disorders represent principal challenges in cell biology. Here, we performed multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to chart the remodeling of the mouse liver mitochondrial proteome and phosphoproteome during both acute and chronic physiological transformations in more than 50 mice. Our analyses reveal that reversible phosphorylation is widespread in mitochondria, and is a key mechanism for regulating ketogenesis during the onset of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Specifically, we have demonstrated that phosphorylation of a conserved serine on Hmgcs2 (S456) significantly enhances its catalytic activity in response to increased ketogenic demand. Collectively, our work describes the plasticity of this organelle at high resolution and provides a framework for investigating the roles of proteome restructuring and reversible phosphorylation in mitochondrial adaptation.

  19. Early Exercise Affects Mitochondrial Transcription Factors Expression after Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongshan Hu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence shows that exercise training is neuroprotective after stroke, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. To clarify this critical issue, the current study investigated the effects of early treadmill exercise on the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors. Adult rats were subjected to ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Expression of two genes critical for transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1 (PGC-1 and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1, were examined by RT-PCR after five days of exercise starting at 24 h after ischemia. Mitochondrial protein cytochrome C oxidase subunit IV (COX IV was detected by Western blot. Neurological status and cerebral infarct volume were evaluated as indices of brain damage. Treadmill training increased levels of PGC-1 and NRF-1 mRNA, indicating that exercise promotes rehabilitation after ischemia via regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis.

  20. Adenine nucleotide-dependent and redox-independent control of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keisuke; Hisabori, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is important for sustaining cellular growth and maintenance; however, the regulatory mechanisms underlying individual processes in plant mitochondria remain largely uncharacterized. Previous redox-proteomics studies have suggested that mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH), a key enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and redox shuttling, is under thiol-based redox regulation as a target candidate of thioredoxin (Trx). In addition, the adenine nucleotide status may be another factor controlling mitochondrial metabolism, as respiratory ATP production in mitochondria is believed to be influenced by several environmental stimuli. Using biochemical and reverse-genetic approaches, we addressed the redox- and adenine nucleotide-dependent regulation of mMDH in Arabidopsis thaliana. Recombinant mMDH protein formed intramolecular disulfide bonds under oxidative conditions, but these bonds did not have a considerable effect on mMDH activity. Mitochondria-localized o-type Trx (Trx-o) did not facilitate re-reduction of oxidized mMDH. Determination of the in vivo redox state revealed that mMDH was stably present in the reduced form even in Trx-o-deficient plants. Accordingly, we concluded that mMDH is not in the class of redox-regulated enzymes. By contrast, mMDH activity was lowered by adenine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, and ATP). Each adenine nucleotide suppressed mMDH activity with different potencies and ATP exerted the largest inhibitory effect with a significantly lower K(I). Correspondingly, mMDH activity was inhibited by the increase in ATP/ADP ratio within the physiological range. These results suggest that mMDH activity is finely controlled in response to variations in mitochondrial adenine nucleotide balance.

  1. Mitophagy or how to control the Jekyll and Hyde embedded in mitochondrial metabolism: implications for melanoma progression and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soengas, María S

    2012-11-01

    Proteins and pathways that control cell fate are placed under intense scrutiny. The same tight regulation applies to essential organelles that can both sustain cell survival or promote self-degradation programs. Mitochondria are perhaps the prime example of cellular machineries with split functions (personalities). As a main source of ATP, mitochondria represent the main powerhouse of eukaryotic cells. However, mitochondrial respiration has the hidden complication of the production of potentially harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, mitochondria holds an armamentarium of stress-response factors, which depending on the context, may lead to pro-inflammatory signals, and to various forms of cell death, ranging from apoptosis to necrosis. A main clearance mechanism to eliminate superfluous, damaged or hyperactive mitochondria is selective mitophagy. Mitophagy, in fact, is emerging as a key quality-control mechanism in cancer cells. Specifically, malignant transformation has been found to induce marked changes in mitochondrial dynamics and structure. Moreover, a key hallmark of tumor progression is metabolic reprogramming, which further deregulates ROS content and renders cells more susceptible to mitochondrial perturbations. Despite its increasing relevance in cancer biology, the field of mitophagy remains virtually unexplored in melanoma. However, given unique antioxidant mechanisms in melanocytic cells (e.g., linked to melanin) and the idiosyncratic interplay between ROS and hypoxia (both mitophagy inducers) in melanoma, this tumor type represents an ideal scenario for physiological studies of mitochondrial turnover. This perspective summarizes proof of concept for in-depth basic and translational studies of mitophagy in melanoma. Particular emphasis is dedicated to new opportunities for gene discovery and drug design in this still aggressive disease. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Polymorphisms in the mitochondrial DNA control region and frailty in older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Z Moore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondria contribute to the dynamics of cellular metabolism, the production of reactive oxygen species, and apoptotic pathways. Consequently, mitochondrial function has been hypothesized to influence functional decline and vulnerability to disease in later life. Mitochondrial genetic variation may contribute to altered susceptibility to the frailty syndrome in older adults. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess potential mitochondrial genetic contributions to the likelihood of frailty, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA variation was compared in frail and non-frail older adults. Associations of selected SNPs with a muscle strength phenotype were also explored. Participants were selected from the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS, a population-based observational study (1989-1990, 1992-1993. At baseline, frailty was identified as the presence of three or more of five indicators (weakness, slowness, shrinking, low physical activity, and exhaustion. mtDNA variation was assessed in a pilot study, including 315 individuals selected as extremes of the frailty phenotype, using an oligonucleotide sequencing microarray based on the Revised Cambridge Reference Sequence. Three mtDNA SNPs were statistically significantly associated with frailty across all pilot participants or in sex-stratified comparisons: mt146, mt204, and mt228. In addition to pilot participants, 4,459 additional men and women with frailty classifications, and an overlapping subset of 4,453 individuals with grip strength measurements, were included in the study population genotyped at mt204 and mt228. In the study population, the mt204 C allele was associated with greater likelihood of frailty (adjusted odds ratio = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.07-3.60, p = 0.020 and lower grip strength (adjusted coefficient = -2.04, 95% CI = -3.33- -0.74, p = 0.002. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports a role for mitochondrial genetic variation in the frailty syndrome and later life muscle strength

  3. Visualization of mitochondrial DNA replication in individual cells by EdU signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Kristine M; Feldman, Eva L; Lentz, Stephen I

    2010-11-15

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular energy and mitochondrial biogenesis is an essential component of regulating mitochondria numbers in healthy cells. One approach for monitoring mitochondrial biogenesis is to measure the rate of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. We developed a sensitive technique to label newly synthesized mtDNA in individual cells in order to study mtDNA biogenesis. The technique combines the incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) with a tyramide signal amplification (TSA) protocol to visualize mtDNA replication within subcellular compartments of neurons. EdU is superior to other thymidine analogs, such as 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU), because the initial click reaction to label EdU does not require the harsh acid treatments or enzyme digests that are required for exposing the BrdU epitope. The milder labeling of EdU allows for direct comparison of its incorporation with other cellular markers. The ability to visualize and quantify mtDNA biogenesis provides an essential tool for investigating the mechanisms used to regulate mitochondrial biogenesis and would provide insight into the pathogenesis associated with drug toxicity, aging, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Our technique is applicable to sensory neurons as well as other cell types. The use of this technique to measure mtDNA biogenesis has significant implications in furthering the understanding of both normal cellular physiology as well as impaired disease states.

  4. Effects of Fcj1-Mos1 and mitochondrial division on aggregation of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids and organelle morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kie; Tamura, Yasushi; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2013-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is packaged into DNA-protein complexes called nucleoids, which are distributed as many small foci in mitochondria. Nucleoids are crucial for the biogenesis and function of mtDNA. Here, using a yeast genetic screen for components that control nucleoid distribution and size, we identify Fcj1 and Mos1, two evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial proteins that maintain the connection between the cristae and boundary membranes. These two proteins are also important for establishing tubular morphology of mitochondria, as mitochondria lacking Fcj1 and Mos1 form lamellar sheets. We find that nucleoids aggregate, increase in size, and decrease in number in fcj1 and mos1 cells. In addition, Fcj1 form punctate structures and localized adjacent to nucleoids. Moreover, connecting mitochondria by deleting the DNM1 gene required for organelle division enhances aggregation of mtDNA nucleoids in fcj1 and mos1 cells, whereas single deletion of DNM1 does not affect nucleoids. Conversely, deleting F1Fo-ATP synthase dimerization factors generates concentric ring-like cristae, restores tubular mitochondrial morphology, and suppresses nucleoid aggregation in these mutants. Our findings suggest an unexpected role of Fcj1-Mos1 and organelle division in maintaining the distribution and size of mtDNA nucleoids.

  5. Regulation of MicroRNA Biogenesis: A miRiad of mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Brandi N

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract microRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that influence diverse biological functions through the repression of target genes during normal development and pathological responses. Widespread use of microRNA arrays to profile microRNA expression has indicated that the levels of many microRNAs are altered during development and disease. These findings have prompted a great deal of investigation into the mechanism and function of microRNA-mediated repression. However, the mechanisms which govern the regulation of microRNA biogenesis and activity are just beginning to be uncovered. Following transcription, mature microRNA are generated through a series of coordinated processing events mediated by large protein complexes. It is increasingly clear that microRNA biogenesis does not proceed in a 'one-size-fits-all' manner. Rather, individual classes of microRNAs are differentially regulated through the association of regulatory factors with the core microRNA biogenesis machinery. Here, we review the regulation of microRNA biogenesis and activity, with particular focus on mechanisms of post-transcriptional control. Further understanding of the regulation of microRNA biogenesis and activity will undoubtedly provide important insights into normal development as well as pathological conditions such as cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  6. Hierarchical RNA Processing Is Required for Mitochondrial Ribosome Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Rackham

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of mitochondrial RNA processing and its importance for ribosome biogenesis and energy metabolism are not clear. We generated conditional knockout mice of the endoribonuclease component of the RNase P complex, MRPP3, and report that it is essential for life and that heart and skeletal-muscle-specific knockout leads to severe cardiomyopathy, indicating that its activity is non-redundant. Transcriptome-wide parallel analyses of RNA ends (PARE and RNA-seq enabled us to identify that in vivo 5′ tRNA cleavage precedes 3′ tRNA processing, and this is required for the correct biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosomal subunits. We identify that mitoribosomal biogenesis proceeds co-transcriptionally because large mitoribosomal proteins can form a subcomplex on an unprocessed RNA containing the 16S rRNA. Taken together, our data show that RNA processing links transcription to translation via assembly of the mitoribosome.

  7. Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Different Routes to Alzheimer’s Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Picone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are dynamic ATP-generating organelle which contribute to many cellular functions including bioenergetics processes, intracellular calcium regulation, alteration of reduction-oxidation potential of cells, free radical scavenging, and activation of caspase mediated cell death. Mitochondrial functions can be negatively affected by amyloid β peptide (Aβ, an important component in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis, and Aβ can interact with mitochondria and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. One of the most accepted hypotheses for AD onset implicates that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are one of the primary events in the insurgence of the pathology. Here, we examine structural and functional mitochondrial changes in presence of Aβ. In particular we review data concerning Aβ import into mitochondrion and its involvement in mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetics, biogenesis, trafficking, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP formation, and mitochondrial protein interaction. Moreover, the development of AD therapy targeting mitochondria is also discussed.

  8. From Endosymbiont to Host-Controlled Organelle: The Hijacking of Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis and Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabaldon, T.; Huynen, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria are eukaryotic organelles that originated from the endosymbiosis of an alpha-proteobacterium. To gain insight into the evolution of the mitochondrial proteome as it proceeded through the transition from a free-living cell to a specialized organelle, we compared a reconstructed ancestral

  9. From endosymbiont to host-controlled organelle: the hijacking of mitochondrial protein synthesis and metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabaldon, T.; Huynen, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria are eukaryotic organelles that originated from the endosymbiosis of an alpha-proteobacterium. To gain insight into the evolution of the mitochondrial proteome as it proceeded through the transition from a free-living cell to a specialized organelle, we compared a reconstructed ancestral

  10. From Endosymbiont to Host-Controlled Organelle: The Hijacking of Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis and Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabaldon, T.; Huynen, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria are eukaryotic organelles that originated from the endosymbiosis of an alpha-proteobacterium. To gain insight into the evolution of the mitochondrial proteome as it proceeded through the transition from a free-living cell to a specialized organelle, we compared a reconstructed ancestral

  11. From endosymbiont to host-controlled organelle: the hijacking of mitochondrial protein synthesis and metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabaldon, T.; Huynen, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria are eukaryotic organelles that originated from the endosymbiosis of an alpha-proteobacterium. To gain insight into the evolution of the mitochondrial proteome as it proceeded through the transition from a free-living cell to a specialized organelle, we compared a reconstructed ancestral

  12. Variation in molybdenum content across broadly distributed populations of Arabidopsis thaliana is controlled by a mitochondrial molybdenum transporter (MOT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Baxter

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum (Mo is an essential micronutrient for plants, serving as a cofactor for enzymes involved in nitrate assimilation, sulfite detoxification, abscisic acid biosynthesis, and purine degradation. Here we show that natural variation in shoot Mo content across 92 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions is controlled by variation in a mitochondrially localized transporter (Molybdenum Transporter 1 - MOT1 that belongs to the sulfate transporter superfamily. A deletion in the MOT1 promoter is strongly associated with low shoot Mo, occurring in seven of the accessions with the lowest shoot content of Mo. Consistent with the low Mo phenotype, MOT1 expression in low Mo accessions is reduced. Reciprocal grafting experiments demonstrate that the roots of Ler-0 are responsible for the low Mo accumulation in shoot, and GUS localization demonstrates that MOT1 is expressed strongly in the roots. MOT1 contains an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence and expression of MOT1 tagged with GFP in protoplasts and transgenic plants, establishing the mitochondrial localization of this protein. Furthermore, expression of MOT1 specifically enhances Mo accumulation in yeast by 5-fold, consistent with MOT1 functioning as a molybdate transporter. This work provides the first molecular insight into the processes that regulate Mo accumulation in plants and shows that novel loci can be detected by association mapping.

  13. GPA protects the nigrostriatal dopamine system by enhancing mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Tamas L; Erion, Derek M; Elsworth, John D; Roth, Robert H; Shulman, Gerald I; Andrews, Zane B

    2011-07-01

    Guanidinopropionic acid (GPA) increases AMPK activity, mitochondrial function and biogenesis in muscle and improves physiological function, for example during aging. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Here we tested whether GPA prevents neurodegeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system in MPTP-treated mice. Mice were fed a diet of 1% GPA or normal chow for 4 weeks and then treated with either MPTP or saline. Indices of nigrostriatal function were examined by HPLC, immunohistochemistry, stereology, electron microscopy and mitochondrial respiration. MPTP intoxication decreased TH neurons in the SNpc of normal chow-fed mice; however GPA-fed mice remarkably exhibited no loss of TH neurons in the SNpc. MPTP caused a decrease in striatal dopamine of both normal chow- and GPA-fed mice, although this effect was significantly attenuated in GPA-fed mice. GPA-fed mice showed increased AMPK activity, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial number in nigrostriatal TH neurons, suggesting that the neuroprotective effects of GPA involved AMPK-dependent increases in mitochondrial function and biogenesis. MPTP treatment produced a decrease in mitochondrial number and volume in normal chow-fed mice but not GPA-fed mice. Our results show the neuroprotective properties of GPA in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease are partially mediated by AMPK and mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common problem in neurodegeneration and thus GPA may slow disease progression in other models of neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress impairs metabolic adaptations to exercise in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D Crane

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a complex phenomenon that is inherently tied to energy provision and is implicated in many metabolic disorders. Exercise training increases mitochondrial oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle yet it remains unclear if oxidative stress plays a role in regulating these adaptations. We demonstrate that the chronic elevation in mitochondrial oxidative stress present in Sod2 (+/- mice impairs the functional and biochemical mitochondrial adaptations to exercise. Following exercise training Sod2 (+/- mice fail to increase maximal work capacity, mitochondrial enzyme activity and mtDNA copy number, despite a normal augmentation of mitochondrial proteins. Additionally, exercised Sod2 (+/- mice cannot compensate for their higher amount of basal mitochondrial oxidative damage and exhibit poor electron transport chain complex assembly that accounts for their compromised adaptation. Overall, these results demonstrate that chronic skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative stress does not impact exercise induced mitochondrial biogenesis, but impairs the resulting mitochondrial protein function and can limit metabolic plasticity.

  15. Cholesterol in myelin biogenesis and hypomyelinating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, Gesine; Stumpf, Sina Kristin

    2015-08-01

    The largest pool of free cholesterol in mammals resides in myelin membranes. Myelin facilitates rapid saltatory impulse propagation by electrical insulation of axons. This function is achieved by ensheathing axons with a tightly compacted stack of membranes. Cholesterol influences myelination at many steps, from the differentiation of myelinating glial cells, over the process of myelin membrane biogenesis, to the functionality of mature myelin. Cholesterol emerged as the only integral myelin component that is essential and rate-limiting for the development of myelin in the central and peripheral nervous system. Moreover, disorders that interfere with sterol synthesis or intracellular trafficking of cholesterol and other lipids cause hypomyelination and neurodegeneration. This review summarizes recent results on the roles of cholesterol in CNS myelin biogenesis in normal development and under different pathological conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids.

  16. Oil Body Biogenesis during Brassica napus Embryogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Qing He; Yan Wu

    2009-01-01

    Although the oil body is known to be an important membrane enclosed compartment for oil storage in seeds, we have little understanding about its biogenesis during embryogenesis. In the present study we investigated the oil body emergence and variations in Brassica napus cv. Topas. The results demonstrate that the oil bodies could be detected already at the heart stage, at the same time as the embryos began to tum green, and the starch grains accumulated in the chloroplast stroma. In comparison, we have studied the development of oil bodies between Arabidopsis thaliana wild type (Col) and the low-seed-oil mutant wrinkled1-3. We observed that the oil body development in the embryos of Col is similar to that of B. napus cv. Topas, and that the size of the oil bodies was obviously smaller in the embryos of wrinkled1-3. Our results suggest that the oil body biogenesis might be coupled with the embryo chloroplast.

  17. Quantitative analysis of mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in living cells using high-content imaging, machine learning, and morphological binning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Anthony P; Cameron, Robert B; Speiser, Jaime L; Wolf, Bethany J; Peterson, Yuri K; Schnellmann, Rick G; Beeson, Craig C; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the processes of mitochondrial dynamics (fission, fusion, biogenesis, and mitophagy) has been hampered by the lack of automated, deterministic methods to measure mitochondrial morphology from microscopic images. A method to quantify mitochondrial morphology and function is presented here using a commercially available automated high-content wide-field fluorescent microscopy platform and R programming-language-based semi-automated data analysis to achieve high throughput morphological categorization (puncta, rod, network, and large & round) and quantification of mitochondrial membrane potential. In conjunction with cellular respirometry to measure mitochondrial respiratory capacity, this method detected that increasing concentrations of toxicants known to directly or indirectly affect mitochondria (t-butyl hydroperoxide [TBHP], rotenone, antimycin A, oligomycin, ouabain, and carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone [FCCP]), decreased mitochondrial networked areas in cultured 661w cells to 0.60-0.80 at concentrations that inhibited respiratory capacity to 0.20-0.70 (fold change compared to vehicle). Concomitantly, mitochondrial swelling was increased from 1.4- to 2.3-fold of vehicle as indicated by changes in large & round areas in response to TBHP, oligomycin, or ouabain. Finally, the automated identification of mitochondrial location enabled accurate quantification of mitochondrial membrane potential by measuring intramitochondrial tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) fluorescence intensity. Administration of FCCP depolarized and administration of oligomycin hyperpolarized mitochondria, as evidenced by changes in intramitochondrial TMRM fluorescence intensities to 0.33- or 5.25-fold of vehicle control values, respectively. In summary, this high-content imaging method accurately quantified mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in hundreds of thousands of cells on a per-cell basis, with sufficient throughput for pharmacological

  18. Adenosine prevents TNFα-induced decrease in endothelial mitochondrial mass via activation of eNOS-PGC-1α regulatory axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore J Kalogeris

    Full Text Available We tested whether adenosine, a cytoprotective mediator and trigger of preconditioning, could protect endothelial cells from inflammation-induced deficits in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. We examined this question using human microvascular endothelial cells exposed to TNFα. TNFα produced time and dose-dependent decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential, cellular ATP levels, and mitochondrial mass, preceding an increase in apoptosis. These effects were prevented by co-incubation with adenosine, a nitric oxide (NO donor, a guanylate cyclase (GC activator, or a cell-permeant cyclic GMP (cGMP analog. The effects of adenosine were blocked by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, a morpholino antisense oligonucleotide to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, or siRNA knockdown of the transcriptional coactivator, PGC-1α. Incubation with exogenous NO, a GC activator, or a cGMP analog reversed the effect of eNOS knockdown, while the effect of NO was blocked by inhibition of GC. The protective effects of NO and cGMP analog were prevented by siRNA to PGC-1α. TNFα also decreased expression of eNOS, cellular NO levels, and PGC-1α expression, which were reversed by adenosine. Exogenous NO, but not adenosine, rescued expression of PGC-1α in cells in which eNOS expression was knocked down by eNOS antisense treatment. Thus, TNFα elicits decreases in endothelial mitochondrial function and mass, and an increase in apoptosis. These effects were reversed by adenosine, an effect mediated by eNOS-synthesized NO, acting via soluble guanylate cyclase/cGMP to activate a mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory program under the control of PGC-1α. These results support the existence of an adenosine-triggered, mito-and cytoprotective mechanism dependent upon an eNOS-PGC-1α regulatory pathway, which acts to preserve endothelial mitochondrial function and mass during inflammatory challenge.

  19. Pharmacologic Effects on Mitochondrial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bruce H.

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of energy necessary for cellular function is produced in mitochondria. Free-radical production and apoptosis are other critical mitochondrial functions. The complex structure, electrochemical properties of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM), and genetic control from both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) are…

  20. Improved glycaemic control decreases inner mitochondrial membrane leak in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, R; Højberg, P M V; Almdal, T;

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Several mechanisms have been targeted as culprits of weight gain during antihyperglycaemic treatment in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). These include reductions in glucosuria, increased food intake from fear of hypoglycaemia, the anabolic effect of insulin, decreased metabolic rate and increased...... efficiency in fuel usage. The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that mitochondrial efficiency increases as a result of insulin treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We included ten patients with T2DM (eight males) on oral antidiabetic treatment, median age: 51.5 years (range: 39......-67) and body mass index (BMI): 30.1 +/- 1.2 kg/m2 (mean +/- s.e.). Muscle biopsies from m. vastus lateralis and m. deltoideus were obtained before and after seven weeks of intensive insulin treatment, and mitochondrial respiration was measured using high-resolution respirometry. State 3 respiration...

  1. Mitochondrial dynamics controlled by mitofusins regulate Agrp neuronal activity and diet-induced obesity

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are key organelles in the maintenance of cellular energy metabolism and integrity. Here we show that mitochondria number decrease but their size increase in orexigenic Agrp neurons during the transition from fasted to fed to over-fed state. These fusion-like dynamic changes were cell-type specific, as they occurred in the opposite direction in anorexigenic POMC neurons. Interfering with mitochondrial fusion mechanisms in Agrp neurons by cell-selectively knocking down mitofusin-1 ...

  2. c-Myc and AMPK Control Cellular Energy Levels by Cooperatively Regulating Mitochondrial Structure and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia R Edmunds

    Full Text Available The c-Myc (Myc oncoprotein and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK regulate glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (Oxphos although often for different purposes. Because Myc over-expression depletes ATP with the resultant activation of AMPK, we explored the potential co-dependency of and cross-talk between these proteins by comparing the consequences of acute Myc induction in ampk+/+ (WT and ampk-/- (KO murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs. KO MEFs showed a higher basal rate of glycolysis than WT MEFs and an appropriate increase in response to activation of a Myc-estrogen receptor (MycER fusion protein. However, KO MEFs had a diminished ability to increase Oxphos, mitochondrial mass and reactive oxygen species in response to MycER activation. Other differences between WT and KO MEFs, either in the basal state or following MycER induction, included abnormalities in electron transport chain function, levels of TCA cycle-related oxidoreductases and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox states. Transcriptional profiling of pathways pertinent to glycolysis, Oxphos and mitochondrial structure and function also uncovered significant differences between WT and KO MEFs and their response to MycER activation. Finally, an unbiased mass-spectrometry (MS-based survey capable of quantifying ~40% of all mitochondrial proteins, showed about 15% of them to be AMPK- and/or Myc-dependent in their steady state. Significant differences in the activities of the rate-limiting enzymes pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase, which dictate pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A abundance, were also differentially responsive to Myc and AMPK and could account for some of the differences in basal metabolite levels that were also detected by MS. Thus, Myc and AMPK are highly co-dependent and appear to engage in significant cross-talk across numerous pathways which support metabolic and ATP-generating functions.

  3. Hepatic mTORC1 Opposes Impaired Insulin Action to Control Mitochondrial Metabolism in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanka Kucejova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulated mitochondrial metabolism during hepatic insulin resistance may contribute to pathophysiologies ranging from elevated glucose production to hepatocellular oxidative stress and inflammation. Given that obesity impairs insulin action but paradoxically activates mTORC1, we tested whether insulin action and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 contribute to altered in vivo hepatic mitochondrial metabolism. Loss of hepatic insulin action for 2 weeks caused increased gluconeogenesis, mitochondrial anaplerosis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle oxidation, and ketogenesis. However, activation of mTORC1, induced by the loss of hepatic Tsc1, suppressed these fluxes. Only glycogen synthesis was impaired by both loss of insulin receptor and mTORC1 activation. Mice with a double knockout of the insulin receptor and Tsc1 had larger livers, hyperglycemia, severely impaired glycogen storage, and suppressed ketogenesis, as compared to those with loss of the liver insulin receptor alone. Thus, activation of hepatic mTORC1 opposes the catabolic effects of impaired insulin action under some nutritional states.

  4. Dysregulation of microRNA biogenesis machinery in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Akiko; Kashima, Risa

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are integral to the gene regulatory network. A single miRNA is capable of controlling the expression of hundreds of protein coding genes and modulate a wide spectrum of biological functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, stress responses, DNA repair, cell adhesion, motility, inflammation, cell survival, senescence and apoptosis, all of which are fundamental to tumorigenesis. Overexpression, genetic amplification, and gain-of-function mutation of oncogenic miRNAs ("onco-miRs") as well as genetic deletion and loss-of-function mutation of tumor suppressor miRNAs ("suppressor-miRs") are linked to human cancer. In addition to the dysregulation of a specific onco-miR or suppressor-miRs, changes in global miRNA levels resulting from a defective miRNA biogenesis pathway play a role in tumorigenesis. The function of individual onco-miRs and suppressor-miRs and their target genes in cancer has been described in many different articles elsewhere. In this review, we primarily focus on the recent development regarding the dysregulation of the miRNA biogenesis pathway and its contribution to cancer.

  5. Erythropoietin Activates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Couples Red Cell Mass to Mitochondrial Mass in the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: Erythropoietin (EPO) is often administered to cardiac patients with anemia, particularly from chronic kidney disease, and stimulation of erythropoiesis may stabilize left ventricular and renal function by recruiting protective effects beyond the correction of anemia. O...

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of bighead croaker, Collichthys niveatus (Perciformes, Sciaenidae): structure of control region and phylogenetic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Jun; Cheng, Yuan-Zhi; Sun, Yue-Na; Shi, Ge; Wang, Ri-Xin

    2011-10-01

    Sciaenidae is a diverse, commercially important family. To understand the phylogenetic position of Collichthys niveatus in this family, we present its complete mitochondrial genome sequence. The genome is 16469 bp in length and contains 37 mitochondrial genes (13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 22 transfer RNA genes) and a control region (CR) as in other bony fishes. Further sequencing for the complete control region was performed on Collichthys lucida. Although the conserved sequence domains such as extend termination associated sequence (ETAS) and conserved sequence block domains (CSB-1, CSB-2 and CSB-3) are recognized in the control region of the two congeneric species, the typical central conserved blocks (CSB-F, CSB-E and CSB-D) could not be detected, while they are found in Miichthys miiuy and Cynoscion acoupa of Sciaenidae and other Percoidei fishes. Phylogenetic analyses do not support the monophyly of Pseudosciaeniae, which is against with the morphological results. C. niveatus is most closely related to Larimichthys polyactis, and Collichthys and Larimichthys may be merged into one genus, based on the current datasets.

  7. Tissue Specific Impacts of a Ketogenic Diet on Mitochondrial Dynamics in the BTBRT+tf/j Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Christopher; Shutt, Timothy E.; Ahn, Younghee; Hittel, Dustin. S.; Khan, Aneal; Rho, Jong M.; Shearer, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) has been utilized as a dietary therapeutic for nearly a century. One experimental model particularly responsive to the KD is the BTBRT+tf/j (BTBR) mouse, which displays phenotypic characteristics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and insulin resistance. Recently, the study of impaired mitochondrial function has become a focal point of research investigating the pathophysiology of ASD. As highly dynamic organelles, mitochondria undergo constant fluctuations in morphology, biogenesis, and quality control in order to maintain cellular homeostasis. An important modifier of mitochondrial dynamics is energy availability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the impact of a KD on mitochondrial dynamics in the liver and brain (prefrontal cortex) of the BTBR mouse model of ASD. Juvenile male C57Bl/6 (B6) and BTBR mice were age-matched to 5 weeks of age before being fed standard chow (CD, 13% kcal fat) or a KD (75% kcal fat) for 10–14 days. Analysis of brain tissue identified differences in mitochondrial gene expression but no correlation with protein levels. Unlike in the brain, KD led to decreased levels of mitochondrial proteins in the liver, despite increased gene expression. Consistent with decreased mitochondrial proteins, we also observed decreased mtDNA for all mice on the KD, demonstrating that the KD reduces the total amount of mitochondria in the liver. In order to explain the discrepancy between protein levels and gene expression, we investigated whether mitochondrial turnover via mitophagy was increased. To this end, we examined expression levels of the mitophagy regulator BNIP3 (BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kd-interacting protein 3). BNIP3 gene and protein expression were significantly elevated in liver of KD animals (p < 0.05), indicating the potential activation of mitophagy. Therefore, consumption of a KD exerts highly tissue-specific effects, ultimately increasing mitochondrial turnover in the liver, while gene and protein

  8. Study of mitochondrial respiratory defects on reprogramming to human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Sandy S.C.; Van Bergen, Nicole J.; Jackson, Stacey; Liang, Helena; Mackey, David A.; Hernández, Damián; Lim, Shiang Y.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Trounce, Ian; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C.B.

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into a pluripotent state is known to be accompanied by extensive restructuring of mitochondria and switch in metabolic requirements. Here we utilized Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) as a mitochondrial disease model to study the effects of homoplasmic mtDNA mutations and subsequent oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects in reprogramming. We obtained fibroblasts from a total of 6 LHON patients and control subjects, and showed a significant defect in complex I respiration in LHON fibroblasts by high-resolution respiratory analysis. Using episomal vector reprogramming, our results indicated that human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) generation is feasible in LHON fibroblasts. In particular, LHON-specific OXPHOS defects in fibroblasts only caused a mild reduction and did not significantly affect reprogramming efficiency, suggesting that hiPSC reprogramming can tolerate a certain degree of OXPHOS defects. Our results highlighted the induction of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1), mitochondrial fusion (MFN1, MFN2) and glycine production (GCAT) during reprogramming. However, LHON-associated OXPHOS defects did not alter the kinetics or expression levels of these genes during reprogramming. Together, our study provides new insights into the effects of mtDNA mutation and OXPHOS defects in reprogramming and genes associated with various aspects of mitochondrial biology. PMID:27127184

  9. Sustained activation of Akt elicits mitochondrial dysfunction to block Plasmodium falciparum infection in the mosquito host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Luckhart

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The overexpression of activated, myristoylated Akt in the midgut of female transgenic Anopheles stephensi results in resistance to infection with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum but also decreased lifespan. In the present study, the understanding of mitochondria-dependent midgut homeostasis has been expanded to explain this apparent paradox in an insect of major medical importance. Given that Akt signaling is essential for cell growth and survival, we hypothesized that sustained Akt activation in the mosquito midgut would alter the balance of critical pathways that control mitochondrial dynamics to enhance parasite killing at some cost to survivorship. Toxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RNOS rise to high levels in the midgut after blood feeding, due to a combination of high NO production and a decline in FOXO-dependent antioxidants. Despite an apparent increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in young females (3 d, energy deficiencies were apparent as decreased oxidative phosphorylation and increased [AMP]/[ATP] ratios. In addition, mitochondrial mass was lower and accompanied by the presence of stalled autophagosomes in the posterior midgut, a critical site for blood digestion and stem cell-mediated epithelial maintenance and repair, and by functional degradation of the epithelial barrier. By 18 d, the age at which An. stephensi would transmit P. falciparum to human hosts, mitochondrial dysfunction coupled to Akt-mediated repression of autophagy/mitophagy was more evident and midgut epithelial structure was markedly compromised. Inhibition of RNOS by co-feeding of the nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME at infection abrogated Akt-dependent killing of P. falciparum that begins within 18 h of infection in 3-5 d old mosquitoes. Hence, Akt-induced changes in mitochondrial dynamics perturb midgut homeostasis to enhance parasite resistance and decrease mosquito infective lifespan. Further, quality control of mitochondrial

  10. Sustained activation of Akt elicits mitochondrial dysfunction to block Plasmodium falciparum infection in the mosquito host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckhart, Shirley; Giulivi, Cecilia; Drexler, Anna L; Antonova-Koch, Yevgeniya; Sakaguchi, Danielle; Napoli, Eleonora; Wong, Sarah; Price, Mark S; Eigenheer, Richard; Phinney, Brett S; Pakpour, Nazzy; Pietri, Jose E; Cheung, Kong; Georgis, Martha; Riehle, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The overexpression of activated, myristoylated Akt in the midgut of female transgenic Anopheles stephensi results in resistance to infection with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum but also decreased lifespan. In the present study, the understanding of mitochondria-dependent midgut homeostasis has been expanded to explain this apparent paradox in an insect of major medical importance. Given that Akt signaling is essential for cell growth and survival, we hypothesized that sustained Akt activation in the mosquito midgut would alter the balance of critical pathways that control mitochondrial dynamics to enhance parasite killing at some cost to survivorship. Toxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RNOS) rise to high levels in the midgut after blood feeding, due to a combination of high NO production and a decline in FOXO-dependent antioxidants. Despite an apparent increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in young females (3 d), energy deficiencies were apparent as decreased oxidative phosphorylation and increased [AMP]/[ATP] ratios. In addition, mitochondrial mass was lower and accompanied by the presence of stalled autophagosomes in the posterior midgut, a critical site for blood digestion and stem cell-mediated epithelial maintenance and repair, and by functional degradation of the epithelial barrier. By 18 d, the age at which An. stephensi would transmit P. falciparum to human hosts, mitochondrial dysfunction coupled to Akt-mediated repression of autophagy/mitophagy was more evident and midgut epithelial structure was markedly compromised. Inhibition of RNOS by co-feeding of the nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME at infection abrogated Akt-dependent killing of P. falciparum that begins within 18 h of infection in 3-5 d old mosquitoes. Hence, Akt-induced changes in mitochondrial dynamics perturb midgut homeostasis to enhance parasite resistance and decrease mosquito infective lifespan. Further, quality control of mitochondrial function in the

  11. Polymorphic genes of detoxification and mitochondrial enzymes and risk for progressive supranuclear palsy: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potts Lisa F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no known causes for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP. The microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT H1 haplotype is the major genetic factor associated with risk of PSP, with both oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction also implicated. We investigated whether specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes encoding enzymes of xenobiotic detoxification, mitochondrial functioning, or oxidative stress response, including debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase, paraoxonase 1 and 2, N-acetyltransferase 1 and 2 (NAT2, superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, and PTEN-induced putative kinase are associated with PSP. Methods DNA from 553 autopsy-confirmed Caucasian PSP cases (266 females, 279 males; age at onset 68 ± 8 years; age at death 75 ± 8 from the Society for PSP Brain Bank and 425 clinical control samples (197 females, 226 males; age at draw 72 ± 11 years from healthy volunteers were genotyped using Taqman PCR and the SequenomiPLEX Gold assay. Results The proportion of NAT2 rapid acetylators compared to intermediate and slow acetylators was larger in cases than in controls (OR = 1.82, p MAPT (p Conclusions Our results show that NAT2 rapid acetylator phenotype is associated with PSP, suggesting that NAT2 may be responsible for activation of a xenobiotic whose metabolite is neurotoxic. Although our results need to be further confirmed in an independent sample, NAT2 acetylation status should be considered in future genetic and epidemiological studies of PSP.

  12. Extreme variation in patterns of tandem repeats in mitochondrial control region of yellow-browed tits (Sylviparus modestus, Paridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Nian; Zhang, Hongli; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Huang, Yuan; Lei, Fumin

    2015-08-19

    To investigate the evolutionary pattern and origins of tandem repeats in the mitochondrial control region of the yellow-browed tit (Sylviparus modestus), the control region and another four mitochondrial loci from fifteen individuals were analyzed. A 117-bp tandem repeat unit that repeated once, twice or three times in different individuals was found, and a rarely reported arrangement for this tandem repeats region that a 5' imperfect copy at its downstream and a 3' imperfect copy at its upstream was observed. The haplotype network, phylogenetic trees, and ancestral state reconstruction of the combined dataset of five loci suggested multiple origins of the same repeat number. The turnover model via slipped-strand mispairing was introduced to interpret the results, because mispairing occurred so frequently that multiple origins of certain repeat number were observed. Insertion via recombination should be a better explanation for the origin of this tandem repeat unit, considering characteristics of the combined sequence of the 3' and 5' imperfect copy, including identification of its homolog in other passerines and its predicted secondary structure.

  13. Mitochondrial Myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which stimulates normal beating of the heart. Cardiac muscle damage also may occur. People with mitochondrial disorders may need to have regular examina- tions by a cardiologist. Other potential health issues Some people with mitochondrial disease experience ...

  14. Mitochondrial haplogroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Schwartz, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2008-01-01

    Rare mutations in the mitochondrial genome may cause disease. Mitochondrial haplogroups defined by common polymorphisms have been associated with risk of disease and longevity. We tested the hypothesis that common haplogroups predict risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease, morbidity from other...

  15. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and markers of dynamics in hepatocytes from aged, calorie restricted mice fed with different dietary fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khraiwesh, Husam; López-Domínguez, José A.; del Río, Lucía Fernández; Gutierrez-Casado, Elena; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; de Cabo, Rafael; Ramsey, Jon J.; Burón, María I.; Villalba, José M.; González-Reyes, José A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyzed changes in hepatocyte mitochondrial mass and ultrastructure as well as in mitochondrial markers of fission/fusion and biogenesis in mice subjected to 40% calorie restriction (CR) for 18 months versus ad libitum-fed controls. Animals subjected to CR were separated into three groups with different dietary fats: soybean oil (also in controls),fish oil and lard. Therefore, the effect of the dietary fat under CR was studied as well. Our results show that CR induced changes in hepatocyte and mitochondrial size, in the volume fraction occupied by mitochondria, and in the number of mitochondria per hepatocyte. Also, mean number of mitochondrial cristae and lengths were significantly higher in all CR groups compared with controls. Finally, CR had no remarkable effects on the expression levels of fission and fusion protein markers. However, considerable differences in many of these parameters were found when comparing the CR groups, supporting the idea that dietary fat plays a relevant role in the modulation of CR effects in aged mice. PMID:24704714

  16. VARIATION IN MITOCHONDRIAL-DNA LEVELS IN MUSCLE FROM NORMAL CONTROLS - IS DEPLETION OF MTDNA IN PATIENTS WITH MITOCHONDRIAL MYOPATHY A DISTINCT CLINICAL SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POULTON, J; SEWRY, C; POTTER, CG; BOUGERON, T; CHRETIEN, D; WIJBURG, FA; MORTEN, KJ; BROWN, G

    1995-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a group of patients with cytochrome oxidase (COX) deficiency presenting in infancy associated with a deficiency of mtDNA in muscle or other affected tissue (Moraes et al 1991). We used a navel approach to compare the level of mitochondrial (mtDNA) compared to nuclear D

  17. Mitochondrial genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Chinnery, Patrick Francis; Hudson, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last 10 years the field of mitochondrial genetics has widened, shifting the focus from rare sporadic, metabolic disease to the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in a growing spectrum of human disease. The aim of this review is to guide the reader through some key concepts regarding mitochondria before introducing both classic and emerging mitochondrial disorders. Sources of data In this article, a review of the current mitochondrial genetics literature was con...

  18. α-MHC MitoTimer mouse: In vivo mitochondrial turnover model reveals remarkable mitochondrial heterogeneity in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotland, Aleksandr; Gottlieb, Roberta A

    2016-01-01

    In order to maintain an efficient, energy-producing network in the heart, dysfunctional mitochondria are cleared through the mechanism of autophagy, which is closely linked with mitochondrial biogenesis; these, together with fusion and fission comprise a crucial process known as mitochondrial turnover. Until recently, the lack of molecular tools and methods available to researchers has impeded in vivo investigations of turnover. To investigate the process at the level of a single mitochondrion, our laboratory has developed the MitoTimer protein. Timer is a mutant of DsRed fluorescent protein characterized by transition from green fluorescence to a more stable red conformation over 48 h, and its rate of maturation is stable under physiological conditions. We fused the Timer cDNA with the inner mitochondrial membrane signal sequence and placed it under the control of a cardiac-restricted promoter. This construct was used to create the alpha-MHC-MitoTimer mice. Surprisingly, initial analysis of the hearts from these mice demonstrated a high degree of heterogeneity in the ratio of red-to-green fluorescence of MitoTimer in cardiac tissue. Further, scattered solitary mitochondria within cardiomyocytes display a much higher red-to-green fluorescence (red-shifted) relative to other mitochondria in the cell, implying a block in import of newly synthesized MitoTimer likely due to lower membrane potential. These red-shifted mitochondria may represent older, senescent mitochondria. Concurrently, the cardiomyocytes also contain a subpopulation of mitochondria that display a lower red-to-green fluorescence (green-shifted) relative to other mitochondria, indicative of germinal mitochondria that are actively engaged in import of newly-synthesized mito-targeted proteins. These mitochondria can be isolated and sorted from the heart by flow cytometry for further analysis. Initial studies suggest that these mice represent an elegant tool for the investigation of mitochondrial turnover

  19. Species determination of Brazilian mammals implicated in the epidemiology of rabies based on the control region of mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Carnieli Junior

    Full Text Available Identification of animals that are decomposing or have been run over or burnt and cannot be visually identified is a problem in the surveillance and control of infectious diseases. Many of these animals are wild and represent a valuable source of information for epidemiologic research as they may be carriers of an infectious agent. This article discusses the results obtained using a method for identifying mammals genetically by sequencing their mitochondrial DNA control region. Fourteen species were analyzed and identified. These included the main reservoirs and transmitters of rabies virus, namely, canids, chiroptera and primates. The results prove that this method of genetic identification is both efficient and simple and that it can be used in the surveillance of infectious diseases which includes mammals in their epidemiologic cycle, such as rabies.

  20. Species determination of Brazilian mammals implicated in the epidemiology of rabies based on the control region of mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Carnieli Junior

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification of animals that are decomposing or have been run over or burnt and cannot be visually identified is a problem in the surveillance and control of infectious diseases. Many of these animals are wild and represent a valuable source of information for epidemiologic research as they may be carriers of an infectious agent. This article discusses the results obtained using a method for identifying mammals genetically by sequencing their mitochondrial DNA control region. Fourteen species were analyzed and identified. These included the main reservoirs and transmitters of rabies virus, namely, canids, chiroptera and primates. The results prove that this method of genetic identification is both efficient and simple and that it can be used in the surveillance of infectious diseases which includes mammals in their epidemiologic cycle, such as rabies.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups confer differences in risk for age-related macular degeneration: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenney M Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of vision loss in elderly, Caucasian populations. There is strong evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress play a role in the cell death found in AMD retinas. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of the Caucasian mitochondrial JTU haplogroup cluster with AMD. We also assessed for gender bias and additive risk with known high risk nuclear gene SNPs, ARMS2/LOC387715 (G > T; Ala69Ser, rs10490924 and CFH (T > C; Try402His, rs1061170. Methods Total DNA was isolated from 162 AMD subjects and 164 age-matched control subjects located in Los Angeles, California, USA. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR and restriction enzyme digestion were used to identify the J, U, T, and H mitochondrial haplogroups and the ARMS2-rs10490924 and CFH-rs1061170 SNPs. PCR amplified products were sequenced to verify the nucleotide substitutions for the haplogroups and ARMS2 gene. Results The JTU haplogroup cluster occurred in 34% (55/162 of AMD subjects versus 15% (24/164 of normal (OR = 2.99; p = 0.0001. This association was slightly greater in males (OR = 3.98, p = 0.005 than the female population (OR = 3.02, p = 0.001. Assuming a dominant effect, the risk alleles for the ARMS2 (rs10490924; p = 0.00001 and CFH (rs1061170; p = 0.027 SNPs were significantly associated with total AMD populations. We found there was no additive risk for the ARMS2 (rs10490924 or CFH (rs1061170 SNPs on the JTU haplogroup background. Conclusions There is a strong association of the JTU haplogroup cluster with AMD. In our Southern California population, the ARMS2 (rs10490924 and CFH (rs1061170 genes were significantly but independently associated with AMD. SNPs defining the JTU mitochondrial haplogroup cluster may change the retinal bioenergetics and play a significant role in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  2. Profiling the mitochondrial proteome of Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON in Thailand: down-regulation of bioenergetics and mitochondrial protein quality control pathways in fibroblasts with the 11778G>A mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung Win Tun

    Full Text Available Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON is one of the commonest mitochondrial diseases. It causes total blindness, and predominantly affects young males. For the disease to develop, it is necessary for an individual to carry one of the primary mtDNA mutations 11778G>A, 14484T>C or 3460G>A. However these mutations are not sufficient to cause disease, and they do not explain the characteristic features of LHON such as the higher prevalence in males, incomplete penetrance, and relatively later age of onset. In order to explore the roles of nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in development of LHON, we applied a proteomic approach to samples from affected and unaffected individuals from 3 pedigrees and from 5 unrelated controls. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by MS/MS analysis in the mitochondrial lysate identified 17 proteins which were differentially expressed between LHON cases and unrelated controls, and 24 proteins which were differentially expressed between unaffected relatives and unrelated controls. The proteomic data were successfully validated by western blot analysis of 3 selected proteins. All of the proteins identified in the study were mitochondrial proteins and most of them were down regulated in 11778G>A mutant fibroblasts. These proteins included: subunits of OXPHOS enzyme complexes, proteins involved in intermediary metabolic processes, nucleoid related proteins, chaperones, cristae remodelling proteins and an anti-oxidant enzyme. The protein profiles of both the affected and unaffected 11778G>A carriers shared many features which differed from those of unrelated control group, revealing similar proteomic responses to 11778G>A mutation in both affected and unaffected individuals. Differentially expressed proteins revealed two broad groups: a cluster of bioenergetic pathway proteins and a cluster involved in protein quality control system. Defects in these systems are likely to impede the function of retinal ganglion

  3. Profiling the mitochondrial proteome of Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) in Thailand: down-regulation of bioenergetics and mitochondrial protein quality control pathways in fibroblasts with the 11778G>A mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tun, Aung Win; Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Kaewsutthi, Supannee; Katanyoo, Wanphen; Chuenkongkaew, Wanicha; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Peerapittayamongkol, Chayanon; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Lertrit, Patcharee

    2014-01-01

    Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) is one of the commonest mitochondrial diseases. It causes total blindness, and predominantly affects young males. For the disease to develop, it is necessary for an individual to carry one of the primary mtDNA mutations 11778G>A, 14484T>C or 3460G>A. However these mutations are not sufficient to cause disease, and they do not explain the characteristic features of LHON such as the higher prevalence in males, incomplete penetrance, and relatively later age of onset. In order to explore the roles of nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in development of LHON, we applied a proteomic approach to samples from affected and unaffected individuals from 3 pedigrees and from 5 unrelated controls. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by MS/MS analysis in the mitochondrial lysate identified 17 proteins which were differentially expressed between LHON cases and unrelated controls, and 24 proteins which were differentially expressed between unaffected relatives and unrelated controls. The proteomic data were successfully validated by western blot analysis of 3 selected proteins. All of the proteins identified in the study were mitochondrial proteins and most of them were down regulated in 11778G>A mutant fibroblasts. These proteins included: subunits of OXPHOS enzyme complexes, proteins involved in intermediary metabolic processes, nucleoid related proteins, chaperones, cristae remodelling proteins and an anti-oxidant enzyme. The protein profiles of both the affected and unaffected 11778G>A carriers shared many features which differed from those of unrelated control group, revealing similar proteomic responses to 11778G>A mutation in both affected and unaffected individuals. Differentially expressed proteins revealed two broad groups: a cluster of bioenergetic pathway proteins and a cluster involved in protein quality control system. Defects in these systems are likely to impede the function of retinal ganglion cells, and may lead

  4. Biogenesis, delivery, and function of extracellular RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. Patton

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium was launched by the National Institutes of Health to focus on the extent to which RNA might function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. With the availability of increasingly sensitive tools, small amounts of RNA can be detected in serum, plasma, and other bodily fluids. The exact mechanism(s by which RNA can be secreted from cells and the mechanisms for the delivery and uptake by recipient cells remain to be determined. This review will summarize current knowledge about the biogenesis and delivery of exRNA and outline projects seeking to understand the functional impact of exRNA.

  5. Human telomerase: biogenesis, trafficking, recruitment, and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jens C; Cech, Thomas R

    2015-06-01

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the extension of telomeric DNA in eukaryotes. Recent work has begun to reveal key aspects of the assembly of the human telomerase complex, its intracellular trafficking involving Cajal bodies, and its recruitment to telomeres. Once telomerase has been recruited to the telomere, it appears to undergo a separate activation step, which may include an increase in its repeat addition processivity. This review covers human telomerase biogenesis, trafficking, and activation, comparing key aspects with the analogous events in other species.

  6. Overexpression of S100A7 protects LPS-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and stimulates IL-6 and IL-8 in HaCaT cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Sun

    Full Text Available S100A7 (or psoriasin is distributed in the cytoplasm of keratinocytes of normal human epidermis, and it is overexpressed in many epidermal inflammatory diseases. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces mitochondrial function changes, which play important roles in multiple cellular mechanisms including inflammation. Although S100A7 expression is regulated by various factors in the human epidermis during inflammation, whether S100A7 interacts with mitochondria in keratinocytes is not clear.Our study was designed to investigate whether S100A7 could prohibit mitochondrial dysfunction and stimulate cytokines in cultured normal HaCaT cells treated with LPS.We generated HaCaT cells that constitutively express enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP-S100A7 (S100A7-EGFP or EGFP alone, as a control. Here, we show that S100A7-EGFP HaCaT cells exhibit an increase in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP. qRT-PCR revealed that expression of three main mitochondrial biogenesis-associated genes was significantly increased: PPAR-coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α, the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1. S100A7 overexpression increased mtDNA content and effectively increased intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP production, while decreasing reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. S100A7 overexpression also significantly decreased the expression of Mfn2 and increased DRP1 expression compared with control EGFP cells. S100A7 down-regulated the expression of the autophagy-related proteins Beclin-1 and LC3B. S100A7 also increased expression of IL-6 and IL-8 cytokines. Knockdown of S100A7 decreased MMP and disrupted mitochondrial homeostasis.These findings demonstrate that S100A7 stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis and increases mitochondrial function in HaCaT cells treated with LPS; and S100A7 also promotes secretion of IL-6 and IL-8.

  7. Role of Mitochondrial Metabolism in the Control of Early Lineage Progression and Aging Phenotypes in Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckervordersandforth, Ruth; Ebert, Birgit; Schäffner, Iris; Moss, Jonathan; Fiebig, Christian; Shin, Jaehoon; Moore, Darcie L; Ghosh, Laboni; Trinchero, Mariela F; Stockburger, Carola; Friedland, Kristina; Steib, Kathrin; von Wittgenstein, Julia; Keiner, Silke; Redecker, Christoph; Hölter, Sabine M; Xiang, Wei; Wurst, Wolfgang; Jagasia, Ravi; Schinder, Alejandro F; Ming, Guo-Li; Toni, Nicolas; Jessberger, Sebastian; Song, Hongjun; Lie, D Chichung

    2017-02-08

    Precise regulation of cellular metabolism is hypothesized to constitute a vital component of the developmental sequence underlying the life-long generation of hippocampal neurons from quiescent neural stem cells (NSCs). The identity of stage-specific metabolic programs and their impact on adult neurogenesis are largely unknown. We show that the adult hippocampal neurogenic lineage is critically dependent on the mitochondrial electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation machinery at the stage of the fast proliferating intermediate progenitor cell. Perturbation of mitochondrial complex function by ablation of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) reproduces multiple hallmarks of aging in hippocampal neurogenesis, whereas pharmacological enhancement of mitochondrial function ameliorates age-associated neurogenesis defects. Together with the finding of age-associated alterations in mitochondrial function and morphology in NSCs, these data link mitochondrial complex function to efficient lineage progression of adult NSCs and identify mitochondrial function as a potential target to ameliorate neurogenesis-defects in the aging hippocampus.

  8. AMPK dysregulation promotes diabetes-related reduction of superoxide and mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Laura L; You, Young-Hyun; Ali, Sameh S; Diamond-Stanic, Maggie; Miyamoto, Satoshi; DeCleves, Anne-Emilie; Andreyev, Aleksander; Quach, Tammy; Ly, San; Shekhtman, Grigory; Nguyen, William; Chepetan, Andre; Le, Thuy P; Wang, Lin; Xu, Ming; Paik, Kacie P; Fogo, Agnes; Viollet, Benoit; Murphy, Anne; Brosius, Frank; Naviaux, Robert K; Sharma, Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic microvascular complications have been considered to be mediated by a glucose-driven increase in mitochondrial superoxide anion production. Here, we report that superoxide production was reduced in the kidneys of a steptozotocin-induced mouse model of type 1 diabetes, as assessed by in vivo real-time transcutaneous fluorescence, confocal microscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance analysis. Reduction of mitochondrial biogenesis and phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were observed in kidneys from diabetic mice. These observations were consistent with an overall reduction of mitochondrial glucose oxidation. Activity of AMPK, the major energy-sensing enzyme, was reduced in kidneys from both diabetic mice and humans. Mitochondrial biogenesis, PDH activity, and mitochondrial complex activity were rescued by treatment with the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR). AICAR treatment induced superoxide production and was linked with glomerular matrix and albuminuria reduction in the diabetic kidney. Furthermore, diabetic heterozygous superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2(+/-)) mice had no evidence of increased renal disease, and Ampka2(-/-) mice had increased albuminuria that was not reduced with AICAR treatment. Reduction of mitochondrial superoxide production with rotenone was sufficient to reduce AMPK phosphorylation in mouse kidneys. Taken together, these results demonstrate that diabetic kidneys have reduced superoxide and mitochondrial biogenesis and activation of AMPK enhances superoxide production and mitochondrial function while reducing disease activity.

  9. Biogenesis and regulation of the let-7 miRNAs and their functional implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosuk Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The let-7 miRNA was one of the first miRNAs discovered in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and its biological functions show a high level of evolutionary conservation from the nematode to the human. Unlike in C. elegans, higher animals have multiple isoforms of let-7 miRNAs; these isoforms share a consensus sequence called the ‘seed sequence’ and these isoforms are categorized into let-7 miRNA family. The expression of let-7 family is required for developmental timing and tumor suppressor function, but must be suppressed for the self-renewal of stem cells. Therefore, let-7 miRNA biogenesis must be carefully controlled. To generate a let-7 miRNA, a primary transcript is produced by RNA polymerase II and then subsequently processed by Drosha/DGCR8, TUTase, and Dicer. Because dysregulation of let-7 processing is deleterious, biogenesis of let-7 is tightly regulated by cellular factors, such as the RNA binding proteins, LIN28A/B and DIS3L2. In this review, we discuss the biological functions and biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs, focusing on the molecular mechanisms of regulation of let-7 biogenesis in vertebrates, such as the mouse and the human.

  10. Biogenesis and regulation of the let-7 miRNAs and their functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hosuk; Han, Sungwook; Kwon, Chang Seob; Lee, Daeyoup

    2016-02-01

    The let-7 miRNA was one of the first miRNAs discovered in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and its biological functions show a high level of evolutionary conservation from the nematode to the human. Unlike in C. elegans, higher animals have multiple isoforms of let-7 miRNAs; these isoforms share a consensus sequence called the 'seed sequence' and these isoforms are categorized into let-7 miRNA family. The expression of let-7 family is required for developmental timing and tumor suppressor function, but must be suppressed for the self-renewal of stem cells. Therefore, let-7 miRNA biogenesis must be carefully controlled. To generate a let-7 miRNA, a primary transcript is produced by RNA polymerase II and then subsequently processed by Drosha/DGCR8, TUTase, and Dicer. Because dysregulation of let-7 processing is deleterious, biogenesis of let-7 is tightly regulated by cellular factors, such as the RNA binding proteins, LIN28A/B and DIS3L2. In this review, we discuss the biological functions and biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs, focusing on the molecular mechanisms of regulation of let-7 biogenesis in vertebrates, such as the mouse and the human.

  11. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive tissues, increased hepatic glucose production, increased lipolysis in adipose tissue, and altered insulin secretion. Studies of individuals with insulin resistance, both with established T2D and high-risk individuals, have consistently demonstrated a diverse array of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D.

  12. Impaired mitochondrial function in human placenta with increased maternal adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, James; Muralimanoharan, Sribalasubashini; Maloyan, Alina; Myatt, Leslie

    2014-09-01

    The placenta plays a key role in regulation of fetal growth and development and in mediating in utero developmental programming. Obesity, which is associated with chronic inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction in many tissues, exerts a programming effect in pregnancy. We determined the effect of increasing maternal adiposity and of fetal sex on placental ATP generation, mitochondrial biogenesis, expression of electron transport chain subunits, and mitochondrial function in isolated trophoblasts. Placental tissue was collected from women with prepregnancy BMI ranging from 18.5 to 45 following C-section at term with no labor. Increasing maternal adiposity was associated with excessive production of reactive oxygen species and a significant reduction in placental ATP levels in placentae with male and female fetuses. To explore the potential mechanism of placental mitochondrial dysfunction, levels of transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in electron transport and mitochondrial biogenesis were measured. Our in vitro studies showed significant reduction in mitochondrial respiration in cultured primary trophoblasts with increasing maternal obesity along with an abnormal metabolic flexibility of these cells. This reduction in placental mitochondrial respiration in pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity could compromise placental function and potentially underlie the increased susceptibility of these pregnancies to fetal demise in late gestation and to developmental programming.

  13. Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Tu, Ya-Ting; Amunts, Alexey; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally and functionally conserved macromolecular machine universally responsible for catalyzing protein synthesis. Within eukaryotic cells, mitochondria contain their own ribosomes (mitoribosomes), which synthesize a handful of proteins, all essential for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of the yeast, porcine and human mitoribosomal subunits and of the entire human mitoribosome have uncovered a wealth of new information to illustrate their evolutionary divergence from their bacterial ancestors and their adaptation to synthesis of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. With such structural data becoming available, one of the most important remaining questions is that of the mitoribosome assembly pathway and factors involved. The regulation of mitoribosome biogenesis is paramount to mitochondrial respiration, and thus to cell viability, growth and differentiation. Moreover, mutations affecting the rRNA and protein components produce severe human mitochondrial disorders. Despite its biological and biomedical significance, knowledge on mitoribosome biogenesis and its deviations from the much-studied bacterial ribosome assembly processes is scarce, especially the order of rRNA processing and assembly events and the regulatory factors required to achieve fully functional particles. This article focuses on summarizing the current available information on mitoribosome assembly pathway, factors that form the mitoribosome assembly machinery, and the effect of defective mitoribosome assembly on human health.

  14. Control of mitochondrial pH by uncoupling protein 4 in astrocytes promotes neuronal survival

    KAUST Repository

    Lambert, Hélène Perreten

    2014-09-18

    Brain activity is energetically costly and requires a steady and highly regulated flow of energy equivalents between neural cells. It is believed that a substantial share of cerebral glucose, the major source of energy of the brain, will preferentially be metabolized in astrocytes via aerobic glycolysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether uncoupling proteins (UCPs), located in the inner membrane of mitochondria, play a role in setting up the metabolic response pattern of astrocytes. UCPs are believed to mediate the transmembrane transfer of protons, resulting in the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation from ATP production. UCPs are therefore potentially important regulators of energy fluxes. The main UCP isoforms expressed in the brain are UCP2, UCP4, and UCP5. We examined in particular the role of UCP4 in neuron-astrocyte metabolic coupling and measured a range of functional metabolic parameters including mitochondrial electrical potential and pH, reactive oxygen species production, NAD/NADH ratio, ATP/ADP ratio, CO2 and lactate production, and oxygen consumption rate. In brief, we found that UCP4 regulates the intramitochondrial pH of astrocytes, which acidifies as a consequence of glutamate uptake, with the main consequence of reducing efficiency of mitochondrial ATP production. The diminished ATP production is effectively compensated by enhancement of glycolysis. This nonoxidative production of energy is not associated with deleterious H2O2 production. We show that astrocytes expressing more UCP4 produced more lactate, which is used as an energy source by neurons, and had the ability to enhance neuronal survival.

  15. Control of mitochondrial pH by uncoupling protein 4 in astrocytes promotes neuronal survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreten Lambert, Hélène; Zenger, Manuel; Azarias, Guillaume; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Magistretti, Pierre J; Lengacher, Sylvain

    2014-11-07

    Brain activity is energetically costly and requires a steady and highly regulated flow of energy equivalents between neural cells. It is believed that a substantial share of cerebral glucose, the major source of energy of the brain, will preferentially be metabolized in astrocytes via aerobic glycolysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether uncoupling proteins (UCPs), located in the inner membrane of mitochondria, play a role in setting up the metabolic response pattern of astrocytes. UCPs are believed to mediate the transmembrane transfer of protons, resulting in the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation from ATP production. UCPs are therefore potentially important regulators of energy fluxes. The main UCP isoforms expressed in the brain are UCP2, UCP4, and UCP5. We examined in particular the role of UCP4 in neuron-astrocyte metabolic coupling and measured a range of functional metabolic parameters including mitochondrial electrical potential and pH, reactive oxygen species production, NAD/NADH ratio, ATP/ADP ratio, CO2 and lactate production, and oxygen consumption rate. In brief, we found that UCP4 regulates the intramitochondrial pH of astrocytes, which acidifies as a consequence of glutamate uptake, with the main consequence of reducing efficiency of mitochondrial ATP production. The diminished ATP production is effectively compensated by enhancement of glycolysis. This nonoxidative production of energy is not associated with deleterious H2O2 production. We show that astrocytes expressing more UCP4 produced more lactate, which is used as an energy source by neurons, and had the ability to enhance neuronal survival.

  16. Control of Mitochondrial pH by Uncoupling Protein 4 in Astrocytes Promotes Neuronal Survival*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreten Lambert, Hélène; Zenger, Manuel; Azarias, Guillaume; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Lengacher, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Brain activity is energetically costly and requires a steady and highly regulated flow of energy equivalents between neural cells. It is believed that a substantial share of cerebral glucose, the major source of energy of the brain, will preferentially be metabolized in astrocytes via aerobic glycolysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether uncoupling proteins (UCPs), located in the inner membrane of mitochondria, play a role in setting up the metabolic response pattern of astrocytes. UCPs are believed to mediate the transmembrane transfer of protons, resulting in the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation from ATP production. UCPs are therefore potentially important regulators of energy fluxes. The main UCP isoforms expressed in the brain are UCP2, UCP4, and UCP5. We examined in particular the role of UCP4 in neuron-astrocyte metabolic coupling and measured a range of functional metabolic parameters including mitochondrial electrical potential and pH, reactive oxygen species production, NAD/NADH ratio, ATP/ADP ratio, CO2 and lactate production, and oxygen consumption rate. In brief, we found that UCP4 regulates the intramitochondrial pH of astrocytes, which acidifies as a consequence of glutamate uptake, with the main consequence of reducing efficiency of mitochondrial ATP production. The diminished ATP production is effectively compensated by enhancement of glycolysis. This nonoxidative production of energy is not associated with deleterious H2O2 production. We show that astrocytes expressing more UCP4 produced more lactate, which is used as an energy source by neurons, and had the ability to enhance neuronal survival. PMID:25237189

  17. Population structure of the African savannah elephant inferred from mitochondrial control region sequences and nuclear microsatellite loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyakaana, S; Arctander, P; Siegismund, H R

    2002-01-01

    Two hundred and thirty-six mitochondrial DNA nucleotide sequences were used in combination with polymorphism at four nuclear microsatellite loci to assess the amount and distribution of genetic variation within and between African savannah elephants. They were sampled from 11 localities in eastern...... populations and 44 alleles in the total sample were found. The gene diversity ranged from 0.51 to 0.72 in the localities studied. An analysis of molecular variance showed significant genetic differentiation between populations within regions and also between regions. The extent of subdivision between...... populations at the mtDNA control region was approximately twice as high as shown by the microsatellite loci (mtDNA F(ST) = 0.59; microsatellite R(ST) = 0.31). We discuss our results in the light of Pleistocene refugia and attribute the observed pattern to population divergence in allopatry accompanied...

  18. Genetic identification of istiophorid larvae from the Gulf of Mexico based on the analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, J L; Alvarado Bremer, J R

    2017-03-01

    Assigning relative importance of spawning and nursery habitats for threatened and endangered teleosts, such as those seen in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM), relies on the proper identification of the early life-history stages of the species of concern. Here, sequencing a portion of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) I as barcodes is recommended to identify istiophorid (billfish) larvae in the Atlantic Ocean because of its high resolution and the intrinsic value of the levels of genetic variation that can be extracted from these data. The universality of the primers employed here demonstrates their utility for not only the positive identification of istiophorids in the GoM, but for any larval teleost occurring in areas recognized as larval hotspots worldwide.

  19. Pro-oxidant effect of ALA is implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction of HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laafi, Jihane; Homedan, Chadi; Jacques, Caroline; Gueguen, Naig; Schmitt, Caroline; Puy, Hervé; Reynier, Pascal; Carmen Martinez, Maria; Malthièry, Yves

    2014-11-01

    Heme biosynthesis begins in the mitochondrion with the formation of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). In acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary tyrosinemia type I and lead poisoning patients, ALA is accumulated in plasma and in organs, especially the liver. These diseases are also associated with neuromuscular dysfunction and increased incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies suggest that this damage may originate from ALA-induced oxidative stress following its accumulation. Using the MnSOD as an oxidative stress marker, we showed here that ALA treatment of cultured cells induced ROS production, increasing with ALA concentration. The mitochondrial energetic function of ALA-treated HepG2 cells was further explored. Mitochondrial respiration and ATP content were reduced compared to control cells. For the 300 μM treatment, ALA induced a mitochondrial mass decrease and a mitochondrial network imbalance although neither necrosis nor apoptosis were observed. The up regulation of PGC-1, Tfam and ND5 genes was also found; these genes encode mitochondrial proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis activation and OXPHOS function. We propose that ALA may constitute an internal bioenergetic signal, which initiates a coordinated upregulation of respiratory genes, which ultimately drives mitochondrial metabolic adaptation within cells. The addition of an antioxidant, Manganese(III) tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (MnTMPyP), resulted in improvement of maximal respiratory chain capacity with 300 μM ALA. Our results suggest that mitochondria, an ALA-production site, are more sensitive to pro-oxidant effect of ALA, and may be directly involved in pathophysiology of patients with inherited or acquired porphyria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  20. Phylogenetic relationships of Australian and New Zealand feral pigs assessed by mitochondrial control region sequence and nuclear GPIP genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Jaime; Fleming, Peter; Spencer, Peter B S; Mason, Richard; Garkavenko, Olga; Meyer, Johann-Nikolaus; Droegemueller, Cord; Lee, Jun Heon; Moran, Chris

    2004-11-01

    Pigs were introduced into Australia and New Zealand in the 18th and 19th centuries, with some establishing feral populations. With few records of pig introductions into these two countries, molecular phylogenetic analysis was used to assess their origins. Mitochondrial (mt) control region sequence and nuclear glucosephosphate isomerase pseudogene (GPIP) restriction fragments were used, as distinct European and Asian domestic pig and Wild Boar control region clades and GPIP genotypes can be recognised. Feral pig control region sequences clustered with either European or Asian domestic pig sequences and both Asian and European GPIP alleles were segregating. It was not possible to distinguish direct importation of Asian domestic animals into Australia and New Zealand from indirect introgression of Asian domestic sequences via Europe. However, the clustering of three feral control region sequences of pigs from northern Australia with Asian Wild Boar implies unrecorded introduction of Wild Boar or crossbred animals into Australia. However, two of these feral pigs had European GPIP alleles. In combination, analyses of control region and GPIP markers suggest that both European and Asian pigs have contributed in similar frequencies to the origins of Australian feral pigs.

  1. Mitochondrial vasculopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Josef Finsterer; Sinda Zarrouk-Mahjoub

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders(MIDs)are usually multisystem disorders(mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome)either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course.Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system,the muscle,endocrine glands,or the myocardium.Recently,it has been shown that rarely alsothe arteries may be affected(mitochondrial arteriopathy).This review focuses on the type,diagnosis,and treat-ment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients.A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out.Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy.Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy,migraine-like headache,stroke-like episodes,or peripheral retinopathy.Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis,ectasia of arteries,aneurysm formation,dissection,or spontan-eous rupture of arteries.The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes.Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes.Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro-or macroangiopathy.Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications.

  2. Analysis of mitochondrial control region nucleotide sequences from Baffin Bay beluga, (Delphinapterus leucas: detecting pods or sub-populations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Jakob Palsbøll

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of an analysis of the variation in the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial control region obtained in 218 samples collected from belugas, Delphinapterus leucas, around the Baffin Bay. We detected multiple instances of significant heterogeneity in the distribution of genetic variation among the analyzed mitochondrial control region sequences on a spatial as well as temporal scale indicating a high degree of maternal population structure. The detection of significant levels of heterogeneity between samples collected in different years but within the same area and season was unexpected. Re-examination of earlier results presented by Brown Gladden and coworkers also revealed temporal genetic heterogeneity within the one area where sufficient (n>15 samples were collected in multiple years. These findings suggest that non-random breeding and maternally directed site-fidelity are not the sole causes of genetic heterogeneity among belugas but that a matrilineal pod structure might cause significant levels of genetic heterogeneity as well, even within the same area. We propose that a maternal pod structure, which has been shown to be the cause of significant genetic heterogeneity in other odontocetes, may add to the overall level of heterogeneity in the maternally inherited DNA and hence that much of the spatial heterogeneity observed in this and previous studies might be attributed to pod rather than population structure. Our findings suggest that it is important to estimate the contribution of pod structure to overall heterogeneity before defining populations or management units in order to avoid interpreting heterogeneity due to sampling of different pods as different populations/management units.

  3. Functional Recovery of Human Cells Harbouring the Mitochondrial DNA Mutation MERRF A8344G via Peptide-Mediated Mitochondrial Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Chih Chang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We explored the feasibility of mitochondrial therapy using the cell-penetrating peptide Pep-1 to transfer mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA between cells and rescue a cybrid cell model of the mitochondrial disease myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibres (MERRF syndrome. Pep-1-conjugated wild-type mitochondria isolated from parent cybrid cells incorporating a mitochondria-specific tag were used as donors for mitochondrial delivery into MERRF cybrid cells (MitoB2 and mtDNA-depleted Rho-zero cells (Mitoρ°. Forty-eight hours later, translocation of Pep-1-labelled mitochondria into the mitochondrial regions of MitoB2 and Mitoρ° host cells was observed (delivery efficiencies of 77.48 and 82.96%, respectively. These internalized mitochondria were maintained for at least 15 days in both cell types and were accompanied by mitochondrial function recovery and cell survival by preventing mitochondria-dependent cell death. Mitochondrial homeostasis analyses showed that peptide-mediated mitochondrial delivery (PMD also increased mitochondrial biogenesis in both cell types, but through distinct regulatory pathways involving mitochondrial dynamics. Dramatic decreases in mitofusin-2 (MFN2 and dynamin-related protein 1/fission 1 were observed in MitoB2 cells, while Mitoρ° cells showed a significant increase in optic atrophy 1 and MFN2. These findings suggest that PMD can be used as a potential therapeutic intervention for mitochondrial disorders.

  4. Loss of mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG affects mitochondrial respiration and induces ROS-mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigchelaar, Wardit; Yu, Hongjuan; de Jong, Anne Margreet; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; Westenbrink, B Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A; Silljé, Herman H W

    2015-01-15

    Recently, a locus at the mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG gene, which has been implicated in mitochondrial DNA repair, was associated with cardiac function. The function of EXOG in cardiomyocytes is still elusive. Here we investigated the role of EXOG in mitochondrial function and hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes. Depletion of EXOG in primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCs) induced a marked increase in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Depletion of EXOG, however, did not result in loss of mitochondrial DNA integrity. Although EXOG depletion did not induce fetal gene expression and common hypertrophy pathways were not activated, a clear increase in ribosomal S6 phosphorylation was observed, which readily explains increased protein synthesis. With the use of a Seahorse flux analyzer, it was shown that the mitochondrial oxidative consumption rate (OCR) was increased 2.4-fold in EXOG-depleted NRVCs. Moreover, ATP-linked OCR was 5.2-fold higher. This increase was not explained by mitochondrial biogenesis or alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential. Western blotting confirmed normal levels of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. The increased OCR was accompanied by a 5.4-fold increase in mitochondrial ROS levels. These increased ROS levels could be normalized with specific mitochondrial ROS scavengers (MitoTEMPO, mnSOD). Remarkably, scavenging of excess ROS strongly attenuated the hypertrophic response. In conclusion, loss of EXOG affects normal mitochondrial function resulting in increased mitochondrial respiration, excess ROS production, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. MITOCHONDRIAL MYOPATHY: A NEW THERAPEUTIC APPROACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiu, B A; Mungiu, C

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of deoxyribonucleic acid in mitochondrial myopathies may occur after a mechanical or chemical injury of striated muscle or by endurance training. Therapies with enzymes, gene therapies, or treatments with substances that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis are used at the moment. Genesis of mitochondria may also come from myonuclei by releasing the nuclear respiratory factor-1/2 during muscle contractions. Multiplying of myonuclei depends on muscle satellite cell activation. Since the electromyostimulation increase the number of circulating stem cells that may participate in the genesis of new muscle fibers (adding to the deposit of specific stem cells of the muscle), and intermittent hypoxia stimulates the proliferation of muscle satellite cells, we propose to combine the two processes for the treatment of mitochondrial myopathies. Respective combined therapy may be useful for restoring damaged mitochondria by drug side effects.

  6. Expanding antitumor therapeutic windows by targeting cancer-specific nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-biogenesis pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakrabarti G

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gaurab Chakrabarti,1,2,4 David E Gerber,3,4 David A Boothman1,2,4 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, 3Division of Hematology and Oncology, 4Harold C Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Abstract: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH biogenesis is an essential mechanism by which both normal and cancer cells maintain redox balance. While antitumor approaches to treat cancers through elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS are not new ideas, depleting specific NADPH-biogenesis pathways that control recovery and repair pathways are novel, viable approaches to enhance cancer therapy. However, to elicit efficacious therapies exploiting NADPH-biogenic pathways, it is crucial to understand and specifically define the roles of NADPH-biogenesis pathways used by cancer cells for survival or recovery from cell stress. It is equally important to select NADPH-biogenic pathways that are expendable or not utilized in normal tissue to avoid unwanted toxicity. Here, we address recent literature that demonstrates specific tumor-selective NADPH-biogenesis pathways that can be exploited using agents that target specific cancer cell pathways normally not utilized in normal cells. Defining NADPH-biogenesis profiles of specific cancer-types should enable novel strategies to exploit these therapeutic windows for increased efficacy against recalcitrant neoplastic disease, such as pancreatic cancers. Accomplishing the goal of using ROS as a weapon against cancer cells will also require agents, such as NQO1 bioactivatable drugs, that selectively induce elevated ROS levels in cancer cells, while normal cells are protected. Keywords: reactive oxygen species (ROS, NQO1-bioactivatable drugs, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH, glutathione (GSH, biogenic pathways, antioxidant

  7. Arabidopsis Seed Mitochondria Are Bioenergetically Active Immediately upon Imbibition and Specialize via Biogenesis in Preparation for Autotrophic Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszkiewicz, Gaël; Gualberto, José M; Benamar, Abdelilah; Macherel, David; Logan, David C

    2017-01-01

    Seed germination is a vital developmental transition for production of progeny by sexual reproduction in spermatophytes. Quiescent cells in nondormant dry embryos are reawakened first by imbibition and then by perception of germination triggers. Reanimated tissues enter into a germination program requiring energy for expansion growth. However, germination requires that embryonic tissues develop to support the more energy-demanding processes of cell division and organogenesis of the new seedling. Reactivation of mitochondria to supply the required energy is thus a key process underpinning germination and seedling survival. Using live imaging, we investigated reactivation of mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model. Bioenergetic reactivation, visualized by presence of a membrane potential, is immediate upon rehydration. However, reactivation of mitochondrial dynamics only occurs after transfer to germination conditions. Reactivation of mitochondrial bioenergetics is followed by dramatic reorganization of the chondriome (all mitochondrial in a cell, collectively) involving massive fusion and membrane biogenesis to form a perinuclear tubuloreticular structure enabling mixing of previously discrete mitochondrial DNA nucleoids. The end of germination coincides with fragmentation of the chondriome, doubling of mitochondrial number, and heterogeneous redistribution of nucleoids among the mitochondria, generating a population of mitochondria tailored to seedling growth.

  8. Overexpression of microRNA biogenesis machinery: Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Naser; Shaghaghi, Hassan; Mahmoodi, Davood; Shirzad, Zohreh; Alibeiki, Fatemeh; Bohlooli, Shahab; Dogaheh, Hadi Peeri

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the expression of the major components of microRNA biogenesis machinery including Drosha, Dicer and DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8 (DGCR8) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The expression levels of these components in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients were significantly up-regulated in comparison to healthy controls. DGCR8 was up-regulated 4.9 times in RRMS patients versus healthy controls, and Drosha was up-regulated 3.58 times. Additionally, the expression level of Dicer was 2.11 times higher in RRMS patients than the healthy controls. In conclusion, our results suggest that overexpression of Drosha, Dicer and DGCR8 may contribute to the pathogenesis of MS. Further investigation may introduce microRNA biogenesis machinery as MS markers and therapeutic targets.

  9. MITOCHONDRIA QUALITY CONTROL AND MUSCLE MASS MAINTENANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina eRomanello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of muscle mass and force occurs in many diseases such as disuse/inactivity, diabetes, cancer, renal and cardiac failure and in aging-sarcopenia. In these catabolic conditions the mitochondrial content, morphology and function are greatly affected. The changes of mitochondrial network influence the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS that play an important role in muscle function. Moreover, dysfunctional mitochondria trigger catabolic signaling pathways which feed-forward to the nucleus to promote the activation of muscle atrophy. Exercise, on the other hand, improves mitochondrial function by activating mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy, possibly playing an important part in the beneficial effects of physical activity in several diseases. Optimised mitochondrial function is strictly maintained by the coordinated activation of different mitochondrial quality control pathways. In this review we outline the current knowledge linking mitochondria-dependent signaling pathways to muscle homeostasis in aging and disease and the resulting implications for the development of novel therapeutic approaches to prevent muscle loss.

  10. MicroRNA-210 Controls Mitochondrial Metabolism during Hypoxia by Repressing the Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Proteins ISCU1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stephen Y.; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Hemann, Craig; Mahoney, Christopher E.; Zweier, Jay L.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Summary Repression of mitochondrial respiration represents an evolutionarily ancient cellular adaptation to hypoxia and profoundly influences cell survival and function; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Primarily utilizing pulmonary arterial endothelial cells as a representative hypoxic cell type, we identify the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins (ISCU1/2) as direct targets for repression by the hypoxia-induced microRNA-210 (miR-210). ISCU1/2 facilitate the assembly of iron-sulfur clusters, prosthetic groups that are critical for electron transport and mitochondrial oxidation-reduction reactions. Under in vivo conditions of up-regulating miR-210 and repressing ISCU1/2, the integrity of iron-sulfur clusters is disrupted. In turn, by repressing ISCU1/2 during hypoxia, miR-210 decreases the activity of prototypical iron-sulfur proteins controlling mitochondrial metabolism, including Complex I and aconitase. Consequently, miR-210 represses mitochondrial respiration and associated downstream functions. These results identify important mechanistic connections among microRNA, iron-sulfur cluster biology, hypoxia, and mitochondrial function, with broad implications for cellular metabolism and adaptation to cellular stress. PMID:19808020

  11. Structure and organization of the mitochondrial DNA control region with tandemly repeated sequence in the Amazon ornamental fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terencio, Maria Leandra; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia; Feldberg, Eliana; Porto, Jorge Ivan Rebelo

    2013-02-01

    Tandemly repeated sequences are a common feature of vertebrate mitochondrial DNA control regions. However, questions still remain about their mode of evolution and function. To better understand patterns of variation in length and to explore the existence of previously described domain, we have characterized the control region structure of the Amazonian ornamental fish Nannostomus eques and Nannostomus unifasciatus. The control region ranged from 1121 to 1142 bp in length and could be separated into three domains: the domain associated with the extended terminal associated sequences, the central conserved domain, and the conserved sequence blocks domain. In the first domain, we encountered a sequence repeated 10 times in tandem (variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)) that could adopt an "inverted repetitions" type structural conformation. The results suggest that the VNTR pattern encountered in both N. eques and N. unifasciatus is consistent with the prerequisites of the illegitimate elongation model in which the unequal pairing of the chains near the 5'-end of the control region favors the formation of repetitions.

  12. Trends in Mitochondrial Therapeutics for Neurological Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão-Rocha, Ana; Guedes-Dias, Pedro; Pinho, Brígida R; Oliveira, Jorge M A

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal homeostasis is critically dependent on healthy mitochondria. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), in nuclear-encoded mitochondrial components, and age-dependent mitochondrial damage, have all been connected with neurological disorders. These include not only typical mitochondrial syndromes with neurological features such as encephalomyopathy, myoclonic epilepsy, neuropathy and ataxia; but also secondary mitochondrial involvement in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Unravelling the molecular aetiology of mitochondrial dysfunction opens new therapeutic prospects for diseases thus far lacking effective treatments. In this review we address recent advances on preventive strategies, such as pronuclear, spindle-chromosome complex, or polar body genome transfer to replace mtDNA and avoid disease transmission to newborns; we also address experimental mitochondrial therapeutics aiming to benefit symptomatic patients and prevent disease manifestation in those at risk. Specifically, we focus on: (1) gene therapy to reduce mutant mtDNA, such as anti-replicative therapies and mitochondriatargeted nucleases allowing favourable heteroplasmic shifts; (2) allotopic expression of recoded wild-type mitochondrial genes, including targeted tRNAs and xenotopic expression of cognate genes to compensate for pathogenic mutations; (3) mitochondria targeted-peptides and lipophilic cations for in vivo delivery of antioxidants or other putative therapeutics; and (4) modulation of mitochondrial dynamics at the level of biogenesis, fission, fusion, movement and mitophagy. Further advances in therapeutic development are hindered by scarce in vivo models for mitochondrial disease, with the bulk of available data coming from cellular models. Nevertheless, wherever available, we also address data from in vivo experiments and clinical trials, focusing on neurological disease models.

  13. RECQL4 localizes to mitochondria and preserves mitochondrial DNA integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Croteau, Deborah L; Rossi, Marie L; Canugovi, Chandrika

    2012-01-01

    RECQL4 is associated with Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome (RTS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by premature aging, genomic instability, and cancer predisposition. RECQL4 is a member of the RecQ helicase family, and has many similarities to WRN protein, which is also implicated...... in premature aging. There is no information about whether any of the RecQ helicases play roles in mitochondrial biogenesis, which is strongly implicated in the aging process. Here, we used microscopy to visualize RECQL4 in mitochondria. Fractionation of human and mouse cells also showed that RECQL4 was present...... in mitochondria. Q-PCR amplification of mitochondrial DNA demonstrated that mtDNA damage accumulated in RECQL4-deficient cells. Microarray analysis suggested that mitochondrial bioenergetic pathways might be affected in RTS. Measurements of mitochondrial bioenergetics showed a reduction in the mitochondrial...

  14. Erythropoietin treatment enhances muscle mitochondrial capacity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Ulla; Belhage, Bo; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia;

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) treatment has been shown to induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac muscle along with enhanced mitochondrial capacity in mice. We hypothesized that recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) treatment enhances skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity...... in humans. In six healthy volunteers rhEpo was administered by sub-cutaneous injection over 8 weeks with oral iron (100 mg) supplementation taken daily. Mitochondrial OXPHOS was quantified by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized muscle fibers obtained from biopsies of the vastus lateralis...... before and after rhEpo treatment. OXPHOS was determined with the mitochondrial complex I substrates malate, glutamate, pyruvate, and complex II substrate succinate in the presence of saturating ADP concentrations, while maximal electron transport capacity (ETS) was assessed by addition of an uncoupler...

  15. Evolution of the holozoan ribosome biogenesis regulon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Seth J; Cole, Michael D; Erives, Albert J

    2008-01-01

    Background The ribosome biogenesis (RiBi) genes encode a highly-conserved eukaryotic set of nucleolar proteins involved in rRNA transcription, assembly, processing, and export from the nucleus. While the mode of regulation of this suite of genes has been studied in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, how this gene set is coordinately regulated in the larger and more complex metazoan genomes is not understood. Results Here we present genome-wide analyses indicating that a distinct mode of RiBi regulation co-evolved with the E(CG)-binding, Myc:Max bHLH heterodimer complex in a stem-holozoan, the ancestor of both Metazoa and Choanoflagellata, the protozoan group most closely related to animals. These results show that this mode of regulation, characterized by an E(CG)-bearing core-promoter, is specific to almost all of the known genes involved in ribosome biogenesis in these genomes. Interestingly, this holozoan RiBi promoter signature is absent in nematode genomes, which have not only secondarily lost Myc but are marked by invariant cell lineages typically producing small body plans of 1000 somatic cells. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of 10 fungal genomes shows that this holozoan signature in RiBi genes is not found in hemiascomycete fungi, which evolved their own unique regulatory signature for the RiBi regulon. Conclusion These results indicate that a Myc regulon, which is activated in proliferating cells during normal development as well as during tumor progression, has primordial roots in the evolution of an inducible growth regime in a protozoan ancestor of animals. Furthermore, by comparing divergent bHLH repertoires, we conclude that regulation by Myc but not by other bHLH genes is responsible for the evolutionary maintenance of E(CG) sites across the RiBi suite of genes. PMID:18816399

  16. Evolution of the holozoan ribosome biogenesis regulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Michael D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ribosome biogenesis (RiBi genes encode a highly-conserved eukaryotic set of nucleolar proteins involved in rRNA transcription, assembly, processing, and export from the nucleus. While the mode of regulation of this suite of genes has been studied in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, how this gene set is coordinately regulated in the larger and more complex metazoan genomes is not understood. Results Here we present genome-wide analyses indicating that a distinct mode of RiBi regulation co-evolved with the E(CG-binding, Myc:Max bHLH heterodimer complex in a stem-holozoan, the ancestor of both Metazoa and Choanoflagellata, the protozoan group most closely related to animals. These results show that this mode of regulation, characterized by an E(CG-bearing core-promoter, is specific to almost all of the known genes involved in ribosome biogenesis in these genomes. Interestingly, this holozoan RiBi promoter signature is absent in nematode genomes, which have not only secondarily lost Myc but are marked by invariant cell lineages typically producing small body plans of 1000 somatic cells. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of 10 fungal genomes shows that this holozoan signature in RiBi genes is not found in hemiascomycete fungi, which evolved their own unique regulatory signature for the RiBi regulon. Conclusion These results indicate that a Myc regulon, which is activated in proliferating cells during normal development as well as during tumor progression, has primordial roots in the evolution of an inducible growth regime in a protozoan ancestor of animals. Furthermore, by comparing divergent bHLH repertoires, we conclude that regulation by Myc but not by other bHLH genes is responsible for the evolutionary maintenance of E(CG sites across the RiBi suite of genes.

  17. Seven complete mitochondrial genome sequences of bushtits (Passeriformes, Aegithalidae, Aegithalos): the evolution pattern in duplicated control regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Huang, Yuan; Liu, Nian; Yang, Jing; Lei, Fumin

    2015-06-01

    The control region (CR) of the mitochondrial DNA exhibits important functions in replication and transcription, and duplications of the CR have been reported in a wide range of animal groups. In most cases, concerted evolution is expected to explain the high similarity of duplicated CRs. In this paper, we present seven complete mitochondrial genome sequences from the bushtits (genus Aegithalos), in which we discovered two duplicated CRs, and try to survey the evolution pattern of these duplicated CRs. We also found that the duplicated CRs within one individual were almost identical, and variations were concentrated in two sections, one located between a poly-C site and a potential TAS (termination associated sequence) element, the other one located at the 3' end of the duplicated CRs. The phylogenetic analyses of paralogous CRs showed that the tree topology were depending on whether the two high variable regions at the upstream of TAS element and the 3'end of duplicated CRs: when they were concluded, the orthologous copies were closely related; when they were excluded, the paralogous copies in the same lineages were closely related. This may suggest the role of recombination in the evolution of duplicated CRs. Consequently, the recombination was detected, and the breakpoints were found at ∼120 bp (the upstream of the potential TAS element) and ∼1150 bp of the alignment of duplicated CRs. According to these results, we supposed that homologous recombination occurred between paralogous CRs from different mtDNA molecule was proposed as the most suitable mechanism for concerted evolution of the duplicated CRs, and the recombination took place in every replication cycle, so that most part of the duplicated regions remain identical within an individual, while the 5' and 3'end of the duplicated CRs were not involved in recombination, and evolved independently.

  18. Research on biogenesis of mitochondria in astrocytes in sepsis-associated encephalopathy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y-Z; Gao, Z-Y; Ma, L-Q; Zhuang, Y-Y; Guan, F-L

    2017-10-01

    To study the structural and functional changes in mitochondria in astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats in the simulated sepsis environment in vitro and the relationship between these changes and the biogenesis of mitochondria in astrocytes by establishing models of sepsis astrocytes. The structural and functional changes in mitochondria in astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats were evaluated. The ultra structural changes in the mitochondria, astrocytes, and ultrathin sections, were observed with a transmission electron microscope. The expression of the regulatory factors related to biogenesis of mitochondria in astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats was evaluated in various experimental groups. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to evaluate the expression of the regulatory factors related to biogenesis of mitochondria in astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats. The "point grid method" was used to evaluate the volume density of the mitochondria in the astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats in various experimental groups. The Western blotting was used to evaluate the role of fusion and fission of mitochondria in the astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats in various experimental groups in regulating the expression of the protein-OPAI and DRPI. In the sepsis astrocyte models established by co-incubation of LPS and IFN-γ and astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats, the mitochondria with a minor injury in the 6 h group (2.97± 0.92) increased significantly when compared with those in the 0 h group (1.08±0.95), 12 h group (1.70±1.01), and 24 h group (1.59±0.55) (p<0.05); the concentration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the astrocytes of the cerebral cortex of the rats in the 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h groups increased significantly when compared with that in the 0 h group (p<0.05). PGC-1α mRNA, NRF-1 mRNA, NRF-2α mRNA, NRF-2β mRNA, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) mRNA in the astrocytes of the cerebral

  19. Structure and function of Zucchini endoribonuclease in piRNA biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Ishizu, Hirotsugu; Saito, Kuniaki; Fukuhara, Satoshi; Kamatani, Miharu K; Bonnefond, Luc; Matsumoto, Naoki; Nishizawa, Tomohiro; Nakanaga, Keita; Aoki, Junken; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Siomi, Haruhiko; Siomi, Mikiko C; Nureki, Osamu

    2012-11-08

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) silence transposons to maintain genome integrity in animal germ lines. piRNAs are classified as primary and secondary piRNAs, depending on their biogenesis machinery. Primary piRNAs are processed from long non-coding RNA precursors transcribed from piRNA clusters in the genome through the primary processing pathway. Although the existence of a ribonuclease participating in this pathway has been predicted, its molecular identity remained unknown. Here we show that Zucchini (Zuc), a mitochondrial phospholipase D (PLD) superfamily member, is an endoribonuclease essential for primary piRNA biogenesis. We solved the crystal structure of Drosophila melanogaster Zuc (DmZuc) at 1.75 Å resolution. The structure revealed that DmZuc has a positively charged, narrow catalytic groove at the dimer interface, which could accommodate a single-stranded, but not a double-stranded, RNA. DmZuc and the mouse homologue MmZuc (also known as Pld6 and MitoPLD) showed endoribonuclease activity for single-stranded RNAs in vitro. The RNA cleavage products bear a 5'-monophosphate group, a hallmark of mature piRNAs. Mutational analyses revealed that the conserved active-site residues of DmZuc are critical for the ribonuclease activity in vitro, and for piRNA maturation and transposon silencing in vivo. We propose a model for piRNA biogenesis in animal germ lines, in which the Zuc endoribonuclease has a key role in primary piRNA maturation.

  20. Characterization of mitochondrial control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNAs of Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Norma Machado; de Souza Dias, Aline; da Silva Valente, Vera Lúcia; Valiati, Victor Hugo

    2009-12-01

    The control region in insects is the major noncoding region in animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and is responsible for a large part of the variation in the DNA sequence and size of the genome of this organelle. In this study, the mtDNA control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNA genes of a Zaprionus indianus strain were cloned, sequenced and compared with other Drosophila species. The overall A+T content in the Z. indianus control region is 94.3%, and a comparison with other Drosophila species demonstrated that the most conserved region appears to be the 420 base pairs nearest to the tRNA(ile), similar to the findings of other authors. We also describe conserved sequence blocks, including a poly-T involved in the replication process of Drosophila mtDNA; a putative secondary structure also involved in the replication process and repeated sequences. tRNA(ile) sequence demonstrated the greatest variability when the tRNA sequences of species were compared.

  1. Molecular mechanisms for mitochondrial adaptation to exercise training in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Joshua C; Wilson, Rebecca J; Yan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training enhances physical performance and confers health benefits, largely through adaptations in skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial adaptation, encompassing coordinated improvements in quantity (content) and quality (structure and function), is increasingly recognized as a key factor in the beneficial outcomes of exercise training. Exercise training has long been known to promote mitochondrial biogenesis, but recent work has demonstrated that it has a profound impact on mitochondrial dynamics (fusion and fission) and clearance (mitophagy), as well. In this review, we discuss the various mechanisms through which exercise training promotes mitochondrial quantity and quality in skeletal muscle.

  2. Inhibiting myosin-ATPase reveals a dynamic range of mitochondrial respiratory control in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Christopher G R; Kane, Daniel A; Lin, Chien-Te; Kozy, Rachel; Cathey, Brook L; Lark, Daniel S; Kane, Constance L; Brophy, Patricia M; Gavin, Timothy P; Anderson, Ethan J; Neufer, P Darrell

    2011-07-15

    Assessment of mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics in PmFBs (permeabilized fibre bundles) is increasingly used in clinical diagnostic and basic research settings. However, estimates of the Km for ADP vary considerably (~20-300 μM) and tend to overestimate respiration at rest. Noting that PmFBs spontaneously contract during respiration experiments, we systematically determined the impact of contraction, temperature and oxygenation on ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics. BLEB (blebbistatin), a myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blocked contraction under all conditions and yielded high Km values for ADP of >~250 and ~80 μM in red and white rat PmFBs respectively. In the absence of BLEB, PmFBs contracted and the Km for ADP decreased ~2-10-fold in a temperature-dependent manner. PmFBs were sensitive to hyperoxia (increased Km) in the absence of BLEB (contracted) at 30 °C but not 37 °C. In PmFBs from humans, contraction elicited high sensitivity to ADP (Km<100 μM), whereas blocking contraction (+BLEB) and including a phosphocreatine/creatine ratio of 2:1 to mimic the resting energetic state yielded a Km for ADP of ~1560 μM, consistent with estimates of in vivo resting respiratory rates of <1% maximum. These results demonstrate that the sensitivity of muscle to ADP varies over a wide range in relation to contractile state and cellular energy charge, providing evidence that enzymatic coupling of energy transfer within skeletal muscle becomes more efficient in the working state.

  3. Inhibiting Myosin-ATPase Reveals Dynamic Range of Mitochondrial Respiratory Control in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Christopher G.R.; Kane, Daniel A.; Lin, Chien-Te; Kozy, Rachel; Cathey, Brook L.; Lark, Daniel S.; Kane, Constance L.; Brophy, Patricia M.; Gavin, Timothy P; Anderson, Ethan J.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics in permeabilized skeletal myofibres (PmFB) is increasingly used in clinical diagnostic and basic research settings. However, estimates of the Km for ADP vary considerably (∼20-300 μM) and tend to overestimate respiration at rest. Noting PmFBs spontaneously contract during respiration experiments, we systematically determined the impact of contraction, temperature and oxygenation on ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics. Blebbistatin (BLEB), a myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blocked contraction under all conditions and yielded high Km values for ADP of >∼250 and ∼80 μM in red and white rat PmFB, respectively. In the absence of BLEB, PmFB contracted and the Km for ADP decreased by ∼2 to 10-fold in a temperature-dependent manner. PmFB were sensitive to hyperoxia (increased Km) in the absence of BLEB (contracted) at 30°C but not 37°C. In PmFB from humans, contraction elicited high sensitivity to ADP (m <100 μM) whereas blocking contraction (+BLEB) and including PCr:Cr = 2 to mimic the resting energetic state yielded a Km for ADP = ∼1560 μM, consistent with estimates of in vivo resting respiratory rates of <1% maximum. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of muscle to ADP varies over a wide range in relation to contractile state and cellular energy charge, providing evidence that enzymatic coupling of energy transfer within skeletal muscle becomes more efficient in the working state. PMID:21554250

  4. Control of oxidative phosphorylation by vitamin A illuminates a fundamental role in mitochondrial energy homoeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acin-Perez, Rebeca; Hoyos, Beatrice; Zhao, Feng; Vinogradov, Valerie; Fischman, Donald A; Harris, Robert A; Leitges, Michael; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn; Blaner, William S; Manfredi, Giovanni; Hammerling, Ulrich

    2010-02-01

    The physiology of two metabolites of vitamin A is understood in substantial detail: retinaldehyde functions as the universal chromophore in the vertebrate and invertebrate eye; retinoic acid regulates a set of vertebrate transcription factors, the retinoic acid receptor superfamily. The third member of this retinoid triumvirate is retinol. While functioning as the precursor of retinaldehyde and retinoic acid, a growing body of evidence suggests a far more fundamental role for retinol in signal transduction. Here we show that retinol is essential for the metabolic fitness of mitochondria. When cells were deprived of retinol, respiration and ATP synthesis defaulted to basal levels. They recovered to significantly higher energy output as soon as retinol was restored to physiological concentration, without the need for metabolic conversion to other retinoids. Retinol emerged as an essential cofactor of protein kinase Cdelta (PKCdelta), without which this enzyme failed to be activated in mitochondria. Furthermore, retinol needed to physically bind PKCdelta, because mutation of the retinol binding site rendered PKCdelta unresponsive to Rol, while retaining responsiveness to phorbol ester. The PKCdelta/retinol complex signaled the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex for enhanced flux of pyruvate into the Krebs cycle. The baseline response was reduced in vitamin A-deficient lecithin:retinol acyl transferase-knockout mice, but this was corrected within 3 h by intraperitoneal injection of vitamin A; this suggests that vitamin A is physiologically important. These results illuminate a hitherto unsuspected role of vitamin A in mitochondrial bioenergetics of mammals, acting as a nutritional sensor. As such, retinol is of fundamental importance for energy homeostasis. The data provide a mechanistic explanation to the nearly 100-yr-old question of why vitamin A deficiency causes so many pathologies that are independent of retinoic acid action.

  5. A novel mitochondrial genome architecture in thrips (Insecta: Thysanoptera): extreme size asymmetry among chromosomes and possible recent control region duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-partite mitochondrial genomes are very rare in animals but have been found previously in two insect orders with highly rearranged genomes, the Phthiraptera (parasitic lice), and the Psocoptera (booklice/barklice). We provide the first report of a multi-partite mitochondrial genome architecture...

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of the common sea slater, Ligia oceanica (Crustacea, Isopoda bears a novel gene order and unusual control region features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podsiadlowski Lars

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence data and other characters from mitochondrial genomes (gene translocations, secondary structure of RNA molecules are useful in phylogenetic studies among metazoan animals from population to phylum level. Moreover, the comparison of complete mitochondrial sequences gives valuable information about the evolution of small genomes, e.g. about different mechanisms of gene translocation, gene duplication and gene loss, or concerning nucleotide frequency biases. The Peracarida (gammarids, isopods, etc. comprise about 21,000 species of crustaceans, living in many environments from deep sea floor to arid terrestrial habitats. Ligia oceanica is a terrestrial isopod living at rocky seashores of the european North Sea and Atlantic coastlines. Results The study reveals the first complete mitochondrial DNA sequence from a peracarid crustacean. The mitochondrial genome of Ligia oceanica is a circular double-stranded DNA molecule, with a size of 15,289 bp. It shows several changes in mitochondrial gene order compared to other crustacean species. An overview about mitochondrial gene order of all crustacean taxa yet sequenced is also presented. The largest non-coding part (the putative mitochondrial control region of the mitochondrial genome of Ligia oceanica is unexpectedly not AT-rich compared to the remainder of the genome. It bears two repeat regions (4× 10 bp and 3× 64 bp, and a GC-rich hairpin-like secondary structure. Some of the transfer RNAs show secondary structures which derive from the usual cloverleaf pattern. While some tRNA genes are putative targets for RNA editing, trnR could not be localized at all. Conclusion Gene order is not conserved among Peracarida, not even among isopods. The two isopod species Ligia oceanica and Idotea baltica show a similarly derived gene order, compared to the arthropod ground pattern and to the amphipod Parhyale hawaiiensis, suggesting that most of the translocation events were already

  7. Impaired p32 Regulation Caused by the Lymphoma-Prone RECQ4 Mutation Drives Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiin-Tarng Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA encodes proteins that are important for ATP biogenesis. Therefore, changes in mtDNA copy number will have profound consequences on cell survival and proliferation. RECQ4 DNA helicase participates in both nuclear DNA and mtDNA synthesis. However, the mechanism that balances the distribution of RECQ4 in the nucleus and mitochondria is unknown. Here, we show that RECQ4 forms protein complexes with Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A, nucleophosmin (NPM, and mitochondrial p32 in different cellular compartments. Critically, the interaction with p32 negatively controls the transport of both RECQ4 and its chromatin-associated replication factor, MCM10, from the nucleus to mitochondria. Amino acids that are deleted in the most common cancer-associated RECQ4 mutation are required for the interaction with p32. Hence, this RECQ4 mutant, which is no longer regulated by p32 and is enriched in the mitochondria, interacts with the mitochondrial replication helicase PEO1 and induces abnormally high levels of mtDNA synthesis.

  8. Simultaneous DNA and RNA Mapping of Somatic Mitochondrial Mutations across Diverse Human Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Stewart

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria are required in tumor cells, and also observe a strong mutational strand bias, compatible with endogenous replication-coupled errors as the major source of mutations. Interestingly, while allelic ratios in general were consistent in RNA compared to DNA, some mutations in tRNAs displayed strong allelic imbalances caused by accumulation of unprocessed tRNA precursors. The effect was explained by altered secondary structure, demonstrating that correct tRNA folding is a major determinant for processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts. Additionally, the data suggest that tRNA clusters are preferably processed in the 3' to 5' direction. Our study gives insights into mtDNA function in cancer and answers questions regarding mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis that are difficult to address in controlled experimental systems.

  9. Simultaneous DNA and RNA Mapping of Somatic Mitochondrial Mutations across Diverse Human Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James B.; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Samuelsson, Tore; Gorodkin, Jan; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Larsson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria ar