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Sample records for controls iron homeostasis

  1. A multi-scale model of hepcidin promoter regulation reveals factors controlling systemic iron homeostasis.

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    Guillem Casanovas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic iron homeostasis involves a negative feedback circuit in which the expression level of the peptide hormone hepcidin depends on and controls the iron blood levels. Hepcidin expression is regulated by the BMP6/SMAD and IL6/STAT signaling cascades. Deregulation of either pathway causes iron-related diseases such as hemochromatosis or anemia of inflammation. We quantitatively analyzed how BMP6 and IL6 control hepcidin expression. Transcription factor (TF phosphorylation and reporter gene expression were measured under co-stimulation conditions, and the promoter was perturbed by mutagenesis. Using mathematical modeling, we systematically analyzed potential mechanisms of cooperative and competitive promoter regulation by the transcription factors, and experimentally validated the model predictions. Our results reveal that hepcidin cross-regulation primarily occurs by combinatorial transcription factor binding to the promoter, whereas signaling crosstalk is insignificant. We find that the presence of two BMP-responsive elements enhances the steepness of the promoter response towards the iron-sensing BMP signaling axis, which promotes iron homeostasis in vivo. IL6 co-stimulation reduces the promoter sensitivity towards the BMP signal, because the SMAD and STAT transcription factors compete for recruiting RNA polymerase to the transcription start site. This may explain why inflammatory signals disturb iron homeostasis in anemia of inflammation. Taken together, our results reveal why the iron homeostasis circuit is sensitive to perturbations implicated in disease.

  2. Iron homeostasis during pregnancy.

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    Fisher, Allison L; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2017-12-01

    During pregnancy, iron needs to increase substantially to support fetoplacental development and maternal adaptation to pregnancy. To meet these iron requirements, both dietary iron absorption and the mobilization of iron from stores increase, a mechanism that is in large part dependent on the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. In healthy human pregnancies, maternal hepcidin concentrations are suppressed in the second and third trimesters, thereby facilitating an increased supply of iron into the circulation. The mechanism of maternal hepcidin suppression in pregnancy is unknown, but hepcidin regulation by the known stimuli (i.e., iron, erythropoietic activity, and inflammation) appears to be preserved during pregnancy. Inappropriately increased maternal hepcidin during pregnancy can compromise the iron availability for placental transfer and impair the efficacy of iron supplementation. The role of fetal hepcidin in the regulation of placental iron transfer still remains to be characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding and addresses the gaps in knowledge about gestational changes in hematologic and iron variables and regulatory aspects of maternal, fetal, and placental iron homeostasis. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Mitochondrial Iron Transport and Homeostasis in Plants

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    Anshika eJain

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is an essential nutrient for plants and although the mechanisms controlling iron uptake from the soil are relatively well understood, comparatively little is known about subcellular trafficking of iron in plant cells. Mitochondria represent a significant iron sink within cells, as iron is required for the proper functioning of respiratory chain protein complexes. Mitochondria are a site of Fe-S cluster synthesis, and possibly heme synthesis as well. Here we review recent insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling mitochondrial iron transport and homeostasis. We focus on the recent identification of a mitochondrial iron uptake transporter in rice and a possible role for metalloreductases in iron uptake by mitochondria. In addition, we highlight recent advances in mitochondrial iron homeostasis with an emphasis on the roles of frataxin and ferritin in iron trafficking and storage within mitochondria.

  4. Nitric oxide–mediated regulation of ferroportin-1 controls macrophage iron homeostasis and immune function in Salmonella infection

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    Nairz, Manfred; Schleicher, Ulrike; Schroll, Andrea; Sonnweber, Thomas; Theurl, Igor; Ludwiczek, Susanne; Talasz, Heribert; Brandacher, Gerald; Moser, Patrizia L.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Fang, Ferric C.; Bogdan, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by inducible NO synthase 2 (NOS2) affects cellular iron homeostasis, but the underlying molecular mechanisms and implications for NOS2-dependent pathogen control are incompletely understood. In this study, we found that NO up-regulated the expression of ferroportin-1 (Fpn1), the major cellular iron exporter, in mouse and human cells. Nos2−/− macrophages displayed increased iron content due to reduced Fpn1 expression and allowed for an enhanced iron acquisition by the intracellular bacterium Salmonella typhimurium. Nos2 gene disruption or inhibition of NOS2 activity led to an accumulation of iron in the spleen and splenic macrophages. Lack of NO formation resulted in impaired nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) expression, resulting in reduced Fpn1 transcription and diminished cellular iron egress. After infection of Nos2−/− macrophages or mice with S. typhimurium, the increased iron accumulation was paralleled by a reduced cytokine (TNF, IL-12, and IFN-γ) expression and impaired pathogen control, all of which were restored upon administration of the iron chelator deferasirox or hyperexpression of Fpn1 or Nrf2. Thus, the accumulation of iron in Nos2−/− macrophages counteracts a proinflammatory host immune response, and the protective effect of NO appears to partially result from its ability to prevent iron overload in macrophages PMID:23630227

  5. Influence of the Hfq and Crc global regulators on the control of iron homeostasis in Pseudomonas putida.

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    Sánchez-Hevia, Dione L; Yuste, Luis; Moreno, Renata; Rojo, Fernando

    2018-04-30

    Metabolically versatile bacteria use catabolite repression control to select their preferred carbon sources, thus optimizing carbon metabolism. In pseudomonads, this occurs through the combined action of the proteins Hfq and Crc, which form stable tripartite complexes at target mRNAs, inhibiting their translation. The activity of Hfq/Crc is antagonised by small RNAs of the CrcZ family, the amounts of which vary according to carbon availability. The present work examines the role of Pseudomonas putida Hfq protein under conditions of low-level catabolite repression, in which Crc protein would have a minor role since it is sequestered by CrcZ/CrcY. The results suggest that, under these conditions, Hfq remains operative and plays an important role in iron homeostasis. In this scenario, Crc appears to participate indirectly by helping CrcZ/CrcY to control the amount of free Hfq in the cell. Iron homeostasis in pseudomonads relies on regulatory elements such as the Fur protein, the PrrF1-F2 sRNAs, and several extracytoplasmic sigma factors. Our results show that the absence of Hfq is paralleled by a reduction in PrrF1-F2 small RNAs. Hfq thus provides a regulatory link between iron and carbon metabolism, coordinating the iron supply to meet the needs of the enzymes operational under particular nutritional regimes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Air pollution particles and iron homeostasis

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    Background: The mechanism underlying biological effects of particles deposited in the lung has not been defined. Major Conclusions: A disruption in iron homeostasis follows exposure of cells to all particulate matter including air pollution particles. Following endocytosis, fun...

  7. Current understanding of iron homeostasis.

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    Anderson, Gregory J; Frazer, David M

    2017-12-01

    Iron is an essential trace element, but it is also toxic in excess, and thus mammals have developed elegant mechanisms for keeping both cellular and whole-body iron concentrations within the optimal physiologic range. In the diet, iron is either sequestered within heme or in various nonheme forms. Although the absorption of heme iron is poorly understood, nonheme iron is transported across the apical membrane of the intestinal enterocyte by divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) and is exported into the circulation via ferroportin 1 (FPN1). Newly absorbed iron binds to plasma transferrin and is distributed around the body to sites of utilization with the erythroid marrow having particularly high iron requirements. Iron-loaded transferrin binds to transferrin receptor 1 on the surface of most body cells, and after endocytosis of the complex, iron enters the cytoplasm via DMT1 in the endosomal membrane. This iron can be used for metabolic functions, stored within cytosolic ferritin, or exported from the cell via FPN1. Cellular iron concentrations are modulated by the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) IRP1 and IRP2. At the whole-body level, dietary iron absorption and iron export from the tissues into the plasma are regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin. When tissue iron demands are high, hepcidin concentrations are low and vice versa. Too little or too much iron can have important clinical consequences. Most iron deficiency reflects an inadequate supply of iron in the diet, whereas iron excess is usually associated with hereditary disorders. These disorders include various forms of hemochromatosis, which are characterized by inadequate hepcidin production and, thus, increased dietary iron intake, and iron-loading anemias whereby both increased iron absorption and transfusion therapy contribute to the iron overload. Despite major recent advances, much remains to be learned about iron physiology and pathophysiology. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. The liver in regulation of iron homeostasis.

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    Rishi, Gautam; Subramaniam, V Nathan

    2017-09-01

    The liver is one of the largest and most functionally diverse organs in the human body. In addition to roles in detoxification of xenobiotics, digestion, synthesis of important plasma proteins, gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, and storage, the liver also plays a significant role in iron homeostasis. Apart from being the storage site for excess body iron, it also plays a vital role in regulating the amount of iron released into the blood by enterocytes and macrophages. Since iron is essential for many important physiological and molecular processes, it increases the importance of liver in the proper functioning of the body's metabolism. This hepatic iron-regulatory function can be attributed to the expression of many liver-specific or liver-enriched proteins, all of which play an important role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. This review focuses on these proteins and their known roles in the regulation of body iron metabolism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss and Polymorphisms in Iron Homeostasis Genes: New Insights from a Case-Control Study

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    Alessandro Castiglione

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Even if various pathophysiological events have been proposed as explanations, the putative cause of sudden hearing loss remains unclear. Objectives. To investigate and to reveal associations (if any between the main iron-related gene variants and idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Study Design. Case-control study. Materials and Methods. A total of 200 sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients (median age 63.65 years; range 10–92 were compared with 400 healthy control subjects. The following genetic variants were investigated: the polymorphism c.−8CG in the promoter of the ferroportin gene (FPN1; SLC40A1, the two isoforms C1 and C2 (p.P570S of the transferrin protein (TF, the amino acidic substitutions p.H63D and p.C282Y in the hereditary hemochromatosis protein (HFE, and the polymorphism c.–582AG in the promoter of the HEPC gene, which encodes the protein hepcidin (HAMP. Results. The homozygous genotype c.−8GG of the SLC40A1 gene revealed an OR for ISSNHL risk of 4.27 (CI 95%, 2.65–6.89; P=0.001, being overrepresented among cases. Conclusions. Our study indicates that the homozygous genotype FPN1 −8GG was significantly associated with increased risk of developing sudden hearing loss. These findings suggest new research should be conducted in the field of iron homeostasis in the inner ear.

  10. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

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    Yatrik M. Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC.

  11. Air pollution particles and iron homeostasis | Science ...

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    Background: The mechanism underlying biological effects of particles deposited in the lung has not been defined. Major Conclusions: A disruption in iron homeostasis follows exposure of cells to all particulate matter including air pollution particles. Following endocytosis, functional groups at the surface of retained particle complex iron available in the cell. In response to a reduction in concentrations of requisite iron, a functional deficiency can result intracellularly. Superoxide production by the cell exposed to a particle increases ferrireduction which facilitates import of iron with the objective being the reversal of the metal deficiency. Failure to resolve the functional iron deficiency following cell exposure to particles activates kinases and transcription factors resulting in a release of inflammatory mediators and inflammation. Tissue injury is the end product of this disruption in iron homeostasis initiated by the particle exposure. Elevation of available iron to the cell precludes deficiency of the metal and either diminishes or eliminates biological effects.General Significance: Recognition of the pathway for biological effects after particle exposure to involve a functional deficiency of iron suggests novel therapies such as metal supplementation (e.g. inhaled and oral). In addition, the demonstration of a shared mechanism of biological effects allows understanding the common clinical, physiological, and pathological presentation fol

  12. Prion protein modulates glucose homeostasis by altering intracellular iron.

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    Ashok, Ajay; Singh, Neena

    2018-04-26

    The prion protein (PrP C ), a mainly neuronal protein, is known to modulate glucose homeostasis in mouse models. We explored the underlying mechanism in mouse models and the human pancreatic β-cell line 1.1B4. We report expression of PrP C on mouse pancreatic β-cells, where it promoted uptake of iron through divalent-metal-transporters. Accordingly, pancreatic iron stores in PrP knockout mice (PrP -/- ) were significantly lower than wild type (PrP +/+ ) controls. Silencing of PrP C in 1.1B4 cells resulted in significant depletion of intracellular (IC) iron, and remarkably, upregulation of glucose transporter GLUT2 and insulin. Iron overloading, on the other hand, resulted in downregulation of GLUT2 and insulin in a PrP C -dependent manner. Similar observations were noted in the brain, liver, and neuroretina of iron overloaded PrP +/+ but not PrP -/- mice, indicating PrP C -mediated modulation of insulin and glucose homeostasis through iron. Peripheral challenge with glucose and insulin revealed blunting of the response in iron-overloaded PrP +/+ relative to PrP -/- mice, suggesting that PrP C -mediated modulation of IC iron influences both secretion and sensitivity of peripheral organs to insulin. These observations have implications for Alzheimer's disease and diabetic retinopathy, known complications of type-2-diabetes associated with brain and ocular iron-dyshomeostasis.

  13. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

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    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Local iron homeostasis in the breast ductal carcinoma microenvironment

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    Marques, Oriana; Porto, Graça; Rêma, Alexandra; Faria, Fátima; Cruz Paula, Arnaud; Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Silva, Paula; Martins da Silva, Berta; Lopes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    While the deregulation of iron homeostasis in breast epithelial cells is acknowledged, iron-related alterations in stromal inflammatory cells from the tumor microenvironment have not been explored. Immunohistochemistry for hepcidin, ferroportin 1 (FPN1), transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1) and ferritin (FT) was performed in primary breast tissues and axillary lymph nodes in order to dissect the iron-profiles of epithelial cells, lymphocytes and macrophages. Furthermore, breast carcinoma core biopsies frozen in optimum cutting temperature (OCT) compound were subjected to imaging flow cytometry to confirm FPN1 expression in the cell types previously evaluated and determine its cellular localization. We confirm previous results by showing that breast cancer epithelial cells present an ‘iron-utilization phenotype’ with an increased expression of hepcidin and TFR1, and decreased expression of FT. On the other hand, lymphocytes and macrophages infiltrating primary tumors and from metastized lymph nodes display an ‘iron-donor’ phenotype, with increased expression of FPN1 and FT, concomitant with an activation profile reflected by a higher expression of TFR1 and hepcidin. A higher percentage of breast carcinomas, compared to control mastectomy samples, present iron accumulation in stromal inflammatory cells, suggesting that these cells may constitute an effective tissue iron reservoir. Additionally, not only the deregulated expression of iron-related proteins in epithelial cells, but also on lymphocytes and macrophages, are associated with clinicopathological markers of breast cancer poor prognosis, such as negative hormone receptor status and tumor size. The present results reinforce the importance of analyzing the tumor microenvironment in breast cancer, extending the contribution of immune cells to local iron homeostasis in the tumor microenvironment context

  15. Role of glutaredoxin 3 in iron homeostasis

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    Iron is an essential mineral nutrient that is tightly regulated through mechanisms involving iron regulatory genes, intracellular storage, and iron recycling. Dysregulation of these mechanisms often results in either excess tissue iron accumulation (overload) or iron deficiency (anemia). Many bioche...

  16. Development of iron homeostasis in infants and young children.

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    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2017-12-01

    Healthy, term, breastfed infants usually have adequate iron stores that, together with the small amount of iron that is contributed by breast milk, make them iron sufficient until ≥6 mo of age. The appropriate concentration of iron in infant formula to achieve iron sufficiency is more controversial. Infants who are fed formula with varying concentrations of iron generally achieve sufficiency with iron concentrations of 2 mg/L (i.e., with iron status that is similar to that of breastfed infants at 6 mo of age). Regardless of the feeding choice, infants' capacity to regulate iron homeostasis is important but less well understood than the regulation of iron absorption in adults, which is inverse to iron status and strongly upregulated or downregulated. Infants who were given daily iron drops compared with a placebo from 4 to 6 mo of age had similar increases in hemoglobin concentrations. In addition, isotope studies have shown no difference in iron absorption between infants with high or low hemoglobin concentrations at 6 mo of age. Together, these findings suggest a lack of homeostatic regulation of iron homeostasis in young infants. However, at 9 mo of age, homeostatic regulatory capacity has developed although, to our knowledge, its extent is not known. Studies in suckling rat pups showed similar results with no capacity to regulate iron homeostasis at 10 d of age when fully nursing, but such capacity occurred at 20 d of age when pups were partially weaned. The major iron transporters in the small intestine divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin were not affected by pup iron status at 10 d of age but were strongly affected by iron status at 20 d of age. Thus, mechanisms that regulate iron homeostasis are developed at the time of weaning. Overall, studies in human infants and experimental animals suggest that iron homeostasis is absent or limited early in infancy largely because of a lack of regulation of the iron transporters DMT1 and ferroportin

  17. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

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    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Iron Homeostasis in Peripheral Nervous System, Still a Black Box?

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    Taveggia, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Iron is the most abundant transition metal in biology and an essential cofactor for many cellular enzymes. Iron homeostasis impairment is also a component of peripheral neuropathies. Recent Advances: During the past years, much effort has been paid to understand the molecular mechanism involved in maintaining systemic iron homeostasis in mammals. This has been stimulated by the evidence that iron dyshomeostasis is an initial cause of several disorders, including genetic and sporadic neurodegenerative disorders. Critical Issues: However, very little has been done to investigate the physiological role of iron in peripheral nervous system (PNS), despite the development of suitable cellular and animal models. Future Directions: To stimulate research on iron metabolism and peripheral neuropathy, we provide a summary of the knowledge on iron homeostasis in the PNS, on its transport across the blood–nerve barrier, its involvement in myelination, and we identify unresolved questions. Furthermore, we comment on the role of iron in iron-related disorder with peripheral component, in demyelinating and metabolic peripheral neuropathies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 634–648. PMID:24409826

  19. Modulation of intestinal sulfur assimilation metabolism regulates iron homeostasis

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    Hudson, Benjamin H.; Hale, Andrew T.; Irving, Ryan P.; Li, Shenglan; York, John D.

    2018-01-01

    Sulfur assimilation is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that plays an essential role in cellular and metabolic processes, including sulfation, amino acid biosynthesis, and organismal development. We report that loss of a key enzymatic component of the pathway, bisphosphate 3′-nucleotidase (Bpnt1), in mice, both whole animal and intestine-specific, leads to iron-deficiency anemia. Analysis of mutant enterocytes demonstrates that modulation of their substrate 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphate (PAP) influences levels of key iron homeostasis factors involved in dietary iron reduction, import and transport, that in part mimic those reported for the loss of hypoxic-induced transcription factor, HIF-2α. Our studies define a genetic basis for iron-deficiency anemia, a molecular approach for rescuing loss of nucleotidase function, and an unanticipated link between nucleotide hydrolysis in the sulfur assimilation pathway and iron homeostasis. PMID:29507250

  20. Ironing Out the Wrinkles in Host Defense: Interactions between Iron Homeostasis and Innate Immunity

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    Wang, Lijian; Cherayil, Bobby J.

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for both microbial pathogens and their mammalian hosts. Changes in iron availability and distribution have significant effects on pathogen virulence and on the immune response to infection. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of iron metabolism have shed new light on how alterations in iron homeostasis both contribute to and influence innate immunity. In this article, we review what is currently known about the role of iron in the response to infection. PMID:20375603

  1. NCOA4 Deficiency Impairs Systemic Iron Homeostasis

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    Roberto Bellelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cargo receptor NCOA4 mediates autophagic ferritin degradation. Here we show that NCOA4 deficiency in a knockout mouse model causes iron accumulation in the liver and spleen, increased levels of transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, and liver hepcidin, and decreased levels of duodenal ferroportin. Despite signs of iron overload, NCOA4-null mice had mild microcytic hypochromic anemia. Under an iron-deprived diet (2–3 mg/kg, mice failed to release iron from ferritin storage and developed severe microcytic hypochromic anemia and ineffective erythropoiesis associated with increased erythropoietin levels. When fed an iron-enriched diet (2 g/kg, mice died prematurely and showed signs of liver damage. Ferritin accumulated in primary embryonic fibroblasts from NCOA4-null mice consequent to impaired autophagic targeting. Adoptive expression of the NCOA4 COOH terminus (aa 239–614 restored this function. In conclusion, NCOA4 prevents iron accumulation and ensures efficient erythropoiesis, playing a central role in balancing iron levels in vivo.

  2. Three-component homeostasis control

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    Xu, Jin; Hong, Hyunsuk; Jo, Junghyo

    2014-03-01

    Two reciprocal components seem to be sufficient to maintain a control variable constant. However, pancreatic islets adapt three components to control glucose homeostasis. They are α (secreting glucagon), β (insulin), and δ (somatostatin) cells. Glucagon and insulin are the reciprocal hormones for increasing and decreasing blood glucose levels, while the role of somatostatin is unknown. However, it has been known how each hormone affects other cell types. Based on the pulsatile hormone secretion and the cellular interactions, this system can be described as coupled oscillators. In particular, we used the Landau-Stuart model to consider both amplitudes and phases of hormone oscillations. We found that the presence of the third component, δ cell, was effective to resist under glucose perturbations, and to quickly return to the normal glucose level once perturbed. Our analysis suggested that three components are necessary for advanced homeostasis control.

  3. Deficiency of a alpha-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

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    Abstract Background: There is evidence that proteases and anti-proteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this anti-protease in humans are asso...

  4. Heme metabolism as an integral part of iron homeostasis

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    Paweł Lipiński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme, a ferrous iron protoporphyrin IX complex, is employed as a prosthetic group in a number of diverse heme proteins that participate in important cellular and systemic physiological processes. Provision of an adequate amount of iron for heme biosynthesis is one of the elemental hallmarks of intracellular iron homeostasis. In the cell the bioavailability of iron for the two main iron biological pathways – heme synthesis and the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters ([Fe-S] – is mainly regulated by the IRP/IRE posttranscriptional system. The biogenesis of [Fe-S] centers is crucial for heme synthesis because these co-factors determine the activity of IRP1 and that of ferrochelatase, an enzyme responsible for the insertion of an iron into protoporphyrin IX to produce heme. On the other hand, delivery of iron for heme and hemoglobin synthesis in erythroblasts, precursors of erythrocytes in bone marrow, is an indispensable element of body iron homeostasis. This process relies on the recovery of iron from senescent red blood cells through the enzymatic degradation of heme molecules and recycling of iron to the circulation. Molecular coordination of these processes involves the activity of heme oxygenase 1, IRP1 and IRP2 as well as the functioning of the hepcidin-ferroportin regulatory axis. Recent studies show in mammals the existence of an expanded system of proteins involved in the transport of intact heme molecules at the cellular and systemic levels. The biological role of this system is of particular importance when the concentration of free heme reaches a toxic level in the body (intravascular hemolysis as well as locally in cells having intensive heme metabolism such as erythroblasts and macrophages.

  5. [Heme metabolism as an integral part of iron homeostasis].

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    Lipiński, Paweł; Starzyński, Rafał R; Styś, Agnieszka; Gajowiak, Anna; Staroń, Robert

    2014-01-02

    Heme, a ferrous iron protoporphyrin IX complex, is employed as a prosthetic group in a number of diverse heme proteins that participate in important cellular and systemic physiological processes. Provision of an adequate amount of iron for heme biosynthesis is one of the elemental hallmarks of intracellular iron homeostasis. In the cell the bioavailability of iron for the two main iron biological pathways--heme synthesis and the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters ([Fe-S])--is mainly regulated by the IRP/IRE posttranscriptional system. The biogenesis of [Fe-S] centers is crucial for heme synthesis because these co-factors determine the activity of IRP1 and that of ferrochelatase, an enzyme responsible for the insertion of an iron into protoporphyrin IX to produce heme. On the other hand, delivery of iron for heme and hemoglobin synthesis in erythroblasts, precursors of erythrocytes in bone marrow, is an indispensable element of body iron homeostasis. This process relies on the recovery of iron from senescent red blood cells through the enzymatic degradation of heme molecules and recycling of iron to the circulation. Molecular coordination of these processes involves the activity of heme oxygenase 1, IRP1 and IRP2 as well as the functioning of the hepcidin-ferroportin regulatory axis. Recent studies show in mammals the existence of an expanded system of proteins involved in the transport of intact heme molecules at the cellular and systemic levels. The biological role of this system is of particular importance when the concentration of free heme reaches a toxic level in the body (intravascular hemolysis) as well as locally in cells having intensive heme metabolism such as erythroblasts and macrophages.

  6. Iron Homeostasis in Yellowstone National Park Hot Spring Microbial Communities

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    Brown, I.; Tringe, S. G.; Franklin, H.; Bryant, D. A.; Klatt, C. G.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Guevara, M.

    2010-01-01

    It has been postulated that life may have originated on Earth, and possibly on Mars, in association with hydrothermal activity and high concentrations of ferrous iron. However, it is not clear how an iron-rich thermal hydrosphere could be hospitable to microbes, since reduced iron appears to stimulate oxidative stress in all domains of life and particularly in oxygenic phototrophs. Therefore, the study of microbial diversity in iron-depositing hot springs (IDHS) and the mechanisms of iron homeostasis and suppression of oxidative stress may help elucidate how Precambrian organisms could withstand the extremely high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by interaction between environmental Fe(2+) and O2. Proteins and clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) involved in the maintenance of Fe homeostasis found in cyanobacteria (CB) inhabiting environments with high and low [Fe] were main target of this analysis. Preliminary results of the analysis suggest that the Chocolate Pots (CP) microbial community is heavily dominated by phototrophs from the cyanobacteria (CB), Chloroflexi and Chlorobi phyla, while the Mushroom Spring (MS) effluent channel harbors a more diverse community in which Chloroflexi are the dominant phototrophs. It is speculated that CB inhabiting IDHS have an increased tolerance to both high concentrations of Fe(2+) and ROS produced in the Fenton reaction. This hypothesis was explored via a comparative analysis of the diversity of proteins and COGs involved in Fe and redox homeostasis in the CP and MS microbiomes.

  7. Asthma as a disruption in iron homeostasis | Science ...

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    Over several decades, asthma has evolved from being recognized as a single disease to include a diverse group of phenotypes with dissimilar natural histories, pathophysiologies, responses to treatment, and distinctive molecular pathways. With the application of Occam’s razor to asthma, it is proposed that there is one cause underlying the numerous phenotypes of this disease and that the responsible molecular pathway is a deficiency of iron in the lung tissues. This deficiency can be either absolute (e.g. asthma in the neonate and during both pregnancy and menstruation) or functional (e.g. asthma associated with infections, smoking, and obesity). Comparable associations between asthma co-morbidity (e.g. eczema, urticaria, restless leg syndrome, and pulmonary hypertension) with iron deficiency support such a shared mechanistic pathway. Therapies directed at asthma demonstrate a capacity to impact iron homeostasis, further strengthening the relationship. Finally, pathophysiologic events producing asthma, including inflammation, increases in Th2 cells, and muscle contraction, can correlate with iron availability. Recognition of a potential association between asthma and an absolute and/or functional iron deficiency suggests specific therapeutic interventions including inhaled iron. Asthma is a public health issue that has environmental triggers. Iron homeostasis is an essential mechanism whereby the body manages the impact of environmental agents on overall

  8. The actin-binding protein profilin 2 is a novel regulator of iron homeostasis.

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    Luscieti, Sara; Galy, Bruno; Gutierrez, Lucia; Reinke, Michael; Couso, Jorge; Shvartsman, Maya; Di Pascale, Antonio; Witke, Walter; Hentze, Matthias W; Pilo Boyl, Pietro; Sanchez, Mayka

    2017-10-26

    Cellular iron homeostasis is controlled by the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) 1 and 2 that bind cis -regulatory iron-responsive elements (IRE) on target messenger RNAs (mRNA). We identified profilin 2 ( Pfn2 ) mRNA, which encodes an actin-binding protein involved in endocytosis and neurotransmitter release, as a novel IRP-interacting transcript, and studied its role in iron metabolism. A combination of electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments and bioinformatic analyses led to the identification of an atypical and conserved IRE in the 3' untranslated region of Pfn2 mRNA. Pfn2 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in duodenal samples from mice with intestinal IRP ablation, suggesting that IRPs exert a positive effect on Pfn2 mRNA expression in vivo. Overexpression of Pfn2 in HeLa and Hepa1-6 cells reduced their metabolically active iron pool. Importantly, Pfn2-deficient mice showed iron accumulation in discrete areas of the brain (olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and midbrain) and reduction of the hepatic iron store without anemia. Despite low liver iron levels, hepatic hepcidin expression remained high, likely because of compensatory activation of hepcidin by mild inflammation. Splenic ferroportin was increased probably to sustain hematopoiesis. Overall, our results indicate that Pfn2 expression is controlled by the IRPs in vivo and that Pfn2 contributes to maintaining iron homeostasis in cell lines and mice. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. Deficiency of α-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghio AJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrew J Ghio,1 Joleen M Soukup,1 Judy H Richards,1 Bernard M Fischer,2 Judith A Voynow,2 Donald E Schmechel31US Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2Division of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics,3Joseph and Kathleen Bryan Alzheimer Disease Research Center, Department of Medicine (Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: There is evidence that proteases and antiproteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that α-1 antitrypsin (A1AT polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this antiprotease in humans are associated with a systemic disruption in iron homeostasis. Archived plasma samples from Alpha-1 Foundation (30 MM, 30 MZ, and 30 ZZ individuals were analyzed for A1AT, ferritin, transferrin, and C-reactive protein (CRP. Plasma samples were also assayed for metals using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES. Plasma levels of A1AT in MZ and ZZ individuals were approximately 60% and 20% of those for MM individuals respectively. Plasma ferritin concentrations in those with the ZZ genotype were greater relative to those individuals with either MM or MZ genotype. Plasma transferrin for MM, MZ, and ZZ genotypes showed no significant differences. Linear regression analysis revealed a significant (negative relationship between plasma concentrations of A1AT and ferritin while that between A1AT and transferrin levels was not significant. Plasma CRP concentrations were not significantly different between MM, MZ, and ZZ individuals. ICPAES measurement of metals confirmed elevated plasma concentrations of nonheme iron among ZZ individuals. Nonheme iron concentrations correlated (negatively with levels of A1AT. A1AT deficiency is associated with evidence of a disruption in iron homeostasis with plasma ferritin and nonheme iron concentrations being elevated among those with the ZZ genotype.Keywords: α-1

  10. Misregulation of iron homeostasis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

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    Anna Gajowiak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for all mammalian cells, but it is toxic in excess. Our understanding of molecular mechanisms ensuring iron homeostasis at both cellular and systemic levels has dramatically increased over the past 15 years. However, despite major advances in this field, homeostatic regulation of iron in the central nervous system (CNS requires elucidation. It is unclear how iron moves in the CNS and how its transfer to the CNS across the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers, which separate the CNS from the systemic circulation, is regulated. Increasing evidence indicates the role of iron dysregulation in neuronal cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective cortical czynand spinal motor neuron dysfunction that results from a complex interplay among various pathogenic factors including oxidative stress. The latter is known to strongly affect cellular iron balance, creating a vicious circle to exacerbate oxidative injury. The role of iron in the pathogenesis of ALS is confirmed by therapeutic effects of iron chelation in ALS mouse models. These models are of great importance for deciphering molecular mechanisms of iron accumulation in neurons. Most of them consist of transgenic rodents overexpressing the mutated human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 gene. Mutations in the SOD1 gene constituteone of the most common genetic causes of the inherited form of ALS. However, it should beconsidered that overexpression of the SOD1 gene usually leads to increased SOD1 enzymaticactivity, a condition which does not occur in human pathology and which may itself changethe expression of iron metabolism genes.

  11. Nicotianamine synthase overexpression positively modulates iron homeostasis-related genes in high iron rice

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    Meng eWang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nearly one-third of the world population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anemia or impaired mental development. Biofortification of rice, which is a staple crop for nearly half of the world’s population, can significantly contribute in alleviating iron deficiency. NFP rice (transgenic rice expressing nicotianamine synthase, ferritin and phytase genes has a more than six-fold increase in iron content in polished rice grains, resulting from the synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase (NAS and ferritin transgenes. We investigated iron homeostasis in NFP plants by analyzing the expression of 28 endogenous rice genes known to be involved in the homeostasis of iron and other metals, in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. RNA was collected from different tissues (roots, flag leaves, grains and at three developmental stages during grain filling. NFP plants showed increased sensitivity to iron-deficiency conditions and changes in the expression of endogenous genes involved in nicotianamine (NA metabolism, in comparison to their non-transgenic siblings. Elevated transcript levels were detected in NFP plants for several iron transporters. In contrast, expression of OsYSL2, which encodes a member of Yellow Stripe-like protein family, and a transporter of the NA-Fe(II complex was reduced in NFP plants under low iron conditions, indicating that expression of OsYSL2 is regulated by the endogenous iron status. Expression of the transgenes did not significantly affect overall iron homeostasis in NFP plants, which establishes the engineered push-pull mechanism as a suitable strategy to increase rice endosperm iron content.

  12. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Indicates a Disturbed Brain Iron Homeostasis in Neuromyelitis Optica ? A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Doring, Thomas Martin; Granado, Vanessa; Rueda, Fernanda; Deistung, Andreas; Reichenbach, Juergen R.; Tukamoto, Gustavo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Schweser, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and can be associated with oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate brain iron in patients with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), a quantitative iron-sensitive MRI technique. 12 clinically confirmed NMO patients (6 female and 6 male; age 35.4y±14.2y) and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (7 female and 5 male; age 33.9±11.3y) underwen...

  13. Iron Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Mechanistic Insights into Siderophore-Mediated Iron Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires iron for normal growth but faces a limitation of the metal ion due to its low solubility at biological pH and the withholding of iron by the mammalian host. The pathogen expresses the Fe3+-specific siderophores mycobactin and carboxymycobactin to chelate the metal ion from insoluble iron and the host proteins transferrin, lactoferrin, and ferritin. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake is essential for the survival of M. tuberculosis, as knockout mutants, which were defective in siderophore synthesis or uptake, failed to survive in low-iron medium and inside macrophages. But as excess iron is toxic due to its catalytic role in the generation of free radicals, regulation of iron uptake is necessary to maintain optimal levels of intracellular iron. The focus of this review is to present a comprehensive overview of iron homeostasis in M. tuberculosis that is discussed in the context of mycobactin biosynthesis, transport of iron across the mycobacterial cell envelope, and storage of excess iron. The clinical significance of the serum iron status and the expression of the iron-regulated protein HupB in tuberculosis (TB) patients is presented here, highlighting the potential of HupB as a marker, notably in extrapulmonary TB cases. PMID:27402628

  14. The interplay between mitochondrial protein and iron homeostasis and its possible role in ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallikarjun, Venkatesh; Sriram, Ashwin; Scialo, Filippo; Sanz, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Free (labile or chelatable) iron is extremely redox-active and only represents a small fraction of the total mitochondrial iron population. Several studies have shown that the proportion of free iron increases with age, leading to increased Fenton chemistry in later life. It is not clear why free iron accumulates in mitochondria, but it does so in parallel with an inability to degrade and recycle damaged proteins that causes loss of mitochondrial protein homeostasis (proteostasis). The increase in oxidative damage that has been shown to occur with age might be explained by these two processes. While this accumulation of oxidative damage has often been cited as causative to ageing there are examples of model organisms that possess high levels of oxidative damage throughout their lives with no effect on lifespan. Interestingly, these same animals are characterised by an outstanding ability to maintain correct proteostasis during their entire life. ROS can damage critical components of the iron homeostasis machinery, while the efficacy of mitochondrial quality control mechanisms will determine how detrimental that damage is. Here we review the interplay between iron and organellar quality control in mitochondrial dysfunction and we suggest that a decline in mitochondrial proteostasis with age leaves iron homeostasis (where several key stages are thought to be dependent on proteostasis machinery) vulnerable to oxidative damage and other age-related stress factors. This will have severe consequences for the electron transport chain and TCA cycle (among other processes) where several components are acutely dependent on correct assembly, insertion and maintenance of iron-sulphur clusters, leading to energetic crisis and death. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dissecting plant iron homeostasis under short and long-term iron fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz Darbani; Briat, Jean-Francois; Holm, Preben Bach

    2013-01-01

    A wealth of information on the different aspects of iron homeostasis in plants has been obtained during the last decade. However, there is no clear road-map integrating the relationships between the various components. The principal aim of the current review is to fill this gap. In this context we...

  16. The physiological functions of iron regulatory proteins in iron homeostasis - an update

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    De-Liang eZhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs regulate the expression of genes involved in iron metabolism by binding to RNA stem-loop structures known as iron responsive elements (IREs in target mRNAs. IRP binding inhibits the translation of mRNAs that contain an IRE in the 5’untranslated region of the transcripts, and increases the stability of mRNAs that contain IREs in the 3'untranslated region of transcripts. By these mechanisms, IRPs increase cellular iron absorption and decrease storage and export of iron to maintain an optimal intracellular iron balance. There are two members of the mammalian IRP protein family, IRP1 and IRP2, and they have redundant functions as evidenced by the embryonic lethality of the mice that completely lack IRP expression (Irp1-/-/Irp2-/- mice, which contrasts with the fact that Irp1-/- and Irp2-/- mice are viable. In addition, Irp2-/- mice also display neurodegenerative symptoms and microcytic hypochromic anemia, suggesting that IRP2 function predominates in the nervous system and erythropoietic homeostasis. Though the physiological significance of IRP1 had been unclear since Irp1-/- animals were first assessed in the early 1990’s, recent studies indicate that IRP1 plays an essential function in orchestrating the balance between erythropoiesis and bodily iron homeostasis. Additionally, Irp1-/- mice develop pulmonary hypertension, and they experience sudden death when maintained on an iron-deficient diet, indicating that IRP1 has a critical role in the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems. This review summarizes recent progress that has been made in understanding the physiological roles of IRP1 and IRP2, and further discusses the implications for clinical research on patients with idiopathic polycythemia, pulmonary hypertension and neurodegeneration.

  17. Copper and ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis transport protein COPT1 alter iron homeostasis in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Bordería, Amparo; Andrés, Fernando; Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Perea-García, Ana; Domingo, Concha; Puig, Sergi; Peñarrubia, Lola

    2017-09-01

    Copper deficiency and excess differentially affect iron homeostasis in rice and overexpression of the Arabidopsis high-affinity copper transporter COPT1 slightly increases endogenous iron concentration in rice grains. Higher plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to efficiently acquire and use micronutrients such as copper and iron. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between both metals remain poorly understood. In the present work, we study the effects produced on iron homeostasis by a wide range of copper concentrations in the growth media and by altered copper transport in Oryza sativa plants. Gene expression profiles in rice seedlings grown under copper excess show an altered expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis compared to standard control conditions. Thus, ferritin OsFER2 and ferredoxin OsFd1 mRNAs are down-regulated whereas the transcriptional iron regulator OsIRO2 and the nicotianamine synthase OsNAS2 mRNAs rise under copper excess. As expected, the expression of OsCOPT1, which encodes a high-affinity copper transport protein, as well as other copper-deficiency markers are down-regulated by copper. Furthermore, we show that Arabidopsis COPT1 overexpression (C1 OE ) in rice causes root shortening in high copper conditions and under iron deficiency. C1 OE rice plants modify the expression of the putative iron-sensing factors OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 and enhance the expression of OsIRO2 under copper excess, which suggests a role of copper transport in iron signaling. Importantly, the C1 OE rice plants grown on soil contain higher endogenous iron concentration than wild-type plants in both brown and white grains. Collectively, these results highlight the effects of rice copper status on iron homeostasis, which should be considered to obtain crops with optimized nutrient concentrations in edible parts.

  18. Metagenomic Study of Iron Homeostasis in Iron Depositing Hot Spring Cyanobacterial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I.; Franklin H.; Tringe, S. G.; Klatt, C. G.; Bryant, D. A.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Guevara, M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: It is not clear how an iron-rich thermal hydrosphere could be hospitable to cyanobacteria, since reduced iron appears to stimulate oxidative stress in all domains of life and particularly in oxygenic phototrophs. Therefore, metagenomic study of cyanobacterial community in iron-depositing hot springs may help elucidate how oxygenic prokaryotes can withstand the extremely high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by interaction between environmental Fe2+ and O2. Method: Anchor proteins from various species of cyanobacteria and some anoxygenic phototrophs were selected on the basis of their hypothetical role in Fe homeostasis and the suppression of oxidative stress and were BLASTed against the metagenomes of iron-depositing Chocolate Pots and freshwater Mushroom hot springs. Results: BLASTing proteins hypothesized to be involved in Fe homeostasis against the microbiomes from the two springs revealed that iron-depositing hot spring has a greater abundance of defensive proteins such as bacterioferritin comigratory protein (Bcp) and DNA-binding Ferritin like protein (Dps) than a fresh-water hot spring. One may speculate that the abundance of Bcp and Dps in an iron-depositing hot spring is connected to the need to suppress oxidative stress in bacteria inhabiting environments with high Fe2+ concnetration. In both springs, Bcp and Dps are concentrated within the cyanobacterial fractions of the microbial community (regardless of abundance). Fe3+ siderophore transport (from the transport system permease protein query) may be less essential to the microbial community of CP because of the high [Fe]. Conclusion: Further research is needed to confirm that these proteins are unique to photoautotrophs such as those living in iron-depositing hot spring.

  19. Iron homeostasis and its disruption in mouse lung in iron deficiency and overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Gisela; D'Anna, María Cecilia; Roque, Marta Elena

    2015-10-01

    What is the central question of this study? The aim was to explore the role and hitherto unclear mechanisms of action of iron proteins in protecting the lung against the harmful effects of iron accumulation and the ability of pulmonary cells to mobilize iron in iron deficiency. What is the main finding and its importance? We show that pulmonary hepcidin appears not to modify cellular iron mobilization in the lung. We propose pathways for supplying iron to the lung in iron deficiency and for protecting the lung against iron excess in iron overload, mediated by the co-ordinated action of iron proteins, such as divalent metal transporter 1, ZRT-IRE-like-protein 14, transferrin receptor, ferritin, haemochromatosis-associated protein and ferroportin. Iron dyshomeostasis is associated with several forms of chronic lung disease, but its mechanisms of action remain to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of the lung in whole-animal models with iron deficiency and iron overload, studying the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), ZRT-IRE-like protein 14 (ZIP14), transferrin receptor (TfR), haemochromatosis-associated protein (HFE), hepcidin, ferritin and ferroportin (FPN) expression. In each model, adult CF1 mice were divided into the following groups (six mice per group): (i) iron-overload model, iron saccharate i.p. and control group (iron adequate), 0.9% NaCl i.p.; and (ii) iron-deficiency model, induced by repeated bleeding, and control group (sham operated). Proteins were assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. In control mice, DMT1 was localized in the cytoplasm of airway cells, and in iron deficiency and overload it was in the apical membrane. Divalent metal transporter 1 and TfR increased in iron deficiency, without changes in iron overload. ZRT-IRE-like protein 14 decreased in airway cells in iron deficiency and increased in iron overload. In iron deficiency, HFE and FPN were immunolocalized close to the apical membrane

  20. Protein synthesis controls phosphate homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Mauricio H; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2018-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element assimilated largely as orthophosphate (Pi). Cells respond to Pi starvation by importing Pi from their surroundings. We now report that impaired protein synthesis alone triggers a Pi starvation response even when Pi is plentiful in the extracellular milieu. In the bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium , this response entails phosphorylation of the regulatory protein PhoB and transcription of PhoB-dependent Pi transporter genes and is eliminated upon stimulation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. When protein synthesis is impaired due to low cytoplasmic magnesium (Mg 2+ ), Salmonella triggers the Pi starvation response because ribosomes are destabilized, which reduces ATP consumption and thus free cytoplasmic Pi. This response is transient because low cytoplasmic Mg 2+ promotes an uptake in Mg 2+ and a decrease in ATP levels, which stabilizes ribosomes, resulting in ATP consumption and Pi increase, thus ending the response. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of protein synthesis also elicited a Pi starvation response in the bacterium Escherichia coli and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Our findings identify a regulatory connection between protein synthesis and Pi homeostasis that is widespread in nature. © 2018 Pontes and Groisman; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. The pupylation machinery is involved in iron homeostasis by targeting the iron storage protein ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küberl, Andreas; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2016-04-26

    The balance of sufficient iron supply and avoidance of iron toxicity by iron homeostasis is a prerequisite for cellular metabolism and growth. Here we provide evidence that, in Actinobacteria, pupylation plays a crucial role in this process. Pupylation is a posttranslational modification in which the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup is covalently attached to a lysine residue in target proteins, thus resembling ubiquitination in eukaryotes. Pupylated proteins are recognized and unfolded by a dedicated AAA+ ATPase (Mycobacterium proteasomal AAA+ ATPase; ATPase forming ring-shaped complexes). In Mycobacteria, degradation of pupylated proteins by the proteasome serves as a protection mechanism against several stress conditions. Other bacterial genera capable of pupylation such as Corynebacterium lack a proteasome, and the fate of pupylated proteins is unknown. We discovered that Corynebacterium glutamicum mutants lacking components of the pupylation machinery show a strong growth defect under iron limitation, which was caused by the absence of pupylation and unfolding of the iron storage protein ferritin. Genetic and biochemical data support a model in which the pupylation machinery is responsible for iron release from ferritin independent of degradation.

  2. Assessment of urinary concentrations of hepcidin provides novel insight into disturbances in iron homeostasis during malarial infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mast, de Q.; Nadjm, B.; Reyburn, H.; Kemna, E.H.J.M.; Amos, B.; Laarakkers, C.M.M.; Silalye, S.; Verhoef, H.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Swinkels, D.W.; Ven, van der A.J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Disturbances in iron homeostasis are frequently observed in individuals with malaria. To study the effect of malaria and its treatment on iron homeostasis and to provide a mechanistic explanation for observed alterations in iron distribution, we studied the course of the iron regulatory hormone

  3. Calcineurin signaling and membrane lipid homeostasis regulates iron mediated multidrug resistance mechanisms in Candida albicans.

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    Saif Hameed

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that iron deprivation enhances drug susceptibility of Candida albicans by increasing membrane fluidity which correlated with the lower expression of ERG11 transcript and ergosterol levels. The iron restriction dependent membrane perturbations led to an increase in passive diffusion and drug susceptibility. The mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis and multidrug resistance (MDR, however, are not yet resolved. To evaluate the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS based lipidome analyses of iron deprived Candida cells to examine the new cellular circuitry of the MDR of this pathogen. Our transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and iron homeostasis. Among the several categories of iron deprivation responsive genes, the down regulation of calcineurin signaling genes including HSP90, CMP1 and CRZ1 was noteworthy. Interestingly, iron deprived Candida cells as well as iron acquisition defective mutants phenocopied molecular chaperone HSP90 and calcineurin mutants and thus were sensitive to alkaline pH, salinity and membrane perturbations. In contrast, sensitivity to above stresses did not change in iron deprived DSY2146 strain with a hyperactive allele of calcineurin. Although, iron deprivation phenocopied compromised HSP90 and calcineurin, it was independent of protein kinase C signaling cascade. Notably, the phenotypes associated with iron deprivation in genetically impaired calcineurin and HSP90 could be reversed with iron supplementation. The observed down regulation of ergosterol (ERG1, ERG2, ERG11 and ERG25 and sphingolipid biosynthesis (AUR1 and SCS7 genes followed by lipidome analysis confirmed that iron deprivation not only disrupted ergosterol biosynthesis, but it also affected sphingolipid homeostasis in Candida cells. These lipid compositional changes suggested extensive remodeling of the membranes in iron

  4. Central role for ferritin in the day/night regulation of iron homeostasis in marine phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botebol, Hugo; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Šuták, Robert; Six, Christophe; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Schatt, Philippe; Vergé, Valérie; Kirilovsky, Amos; Morrissey, Joe; Léger, Thibaut; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Gueneugues, Audrey; Bowler, Chris; Blain, Stéphane; Bouget, François-Yves

    2015-01-01

    In large regions of the open ocean, iron is a limiting resource for phytoplankton. The reduction of iron quota and the recycling of internal iron pools are among the diverse strategies that phytoplankton have evolved to allow them to grow under chronically low ambient iron levels. Phytoplankton species also have evolved strategies to cope with sporadic iron supply such as long-term storage of iron in ferritin. In the picophytoplanktonic species Ostreococcus we report evidence from observations both in the field and in laboratory cultures that ferritin and the main iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrate assimilation pathways show opposite diurnal expression patterns, with ferritin being maximally expressed during the night. Biochemical and physiological experiments using a ferritin knock-out line subsequently revealed that this protein plays a central role in the diel regulation of iron uptake and recycling and that this regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for cell survival under iron limitation. PMID:26553998

  5. Metabolomic profiling identifies potential pathways involved in the interaction of iron homeostasis with glucose metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Stechemesser

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Elevated serum ferritin has been linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D and adverse health outcomes in subjects with the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS. As the mechanisms underlying the negative impact of excess iron have so far remained elusive, we aimed to identify potential links between iron homeostasis and metabolic pathways. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, data were obtained from 163 patients, allocated to one of three groups: (1 lean, healthy controls (n = 53, (2 MetS without hyperferritinemia (n = 54 and (3 MetS with hyperferritinemia (n = 56. An additional phlebotomy study included 29 patients with biopsy-proven iron overload before and after iron removal. A detailed clinical and biochemical characterization was obtained and metabolomic profiling was performed via a targeted metabolomics approach. Results: Subjects with MetS and elevated ferritin had higher fasting glucose (p < 0.001, HbA1c (p = 0.035 and 1 h glucose in oral glucose tolerance test (p = 0.002 compared to MetS subjects without iron overload, whereas other clinical and biochemical features of the MetS were not different. The metabolomic study revealed significant differences between MetS with high and low ferritin in the serum concentrations of sarcosine, citrulline and particularly long-chain phosphatidylcholines. Methionine, glutamate, and long-chain phosphatidylcholines were significantly different before and after phlebotomy (p < 0.05 for all metabolites. Conclusions: Our data suggest that high serum ferritin concentrations are linked to impaired glucose homeostasis in subjects with the MetS. Iron excess is associated to distinct changes in the serum concentrations of phosphatidylcholine subsets. A pathway involving sarcosine and citrulline also may be involved in iron-induced impairment of glucose metabolism. Author Video: Author Video Watch what authors say about their articles Keywords: Metabolomics, Hyperferritinemia, Iron overload, Metabolic

  6. Brain Iron Homeostasis: From Molecular Mechanisms To Clinical Significance and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Swati; Tripathi, Ajai K.; Horback, Katharine; Wong, Joseph; Sharma, Deepak; Beserra, Amber; Suda, Srinivas; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Dev, Som; Mukhopadhyay, Chinmay K.; Singh, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Iron has emerged as a significant cause of neurotoxicity in several neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), and others. In some cases, the underlying cause of iron mis-metabolism is known, while in others, our understanding is, at best, incomplete. Recent evidence implicating key proteins involved in the pathogenesis of AD, PD, and sCJD in cellular iron metabolism suggests that imbalance of brain iron homeostasis associated with these disorders is a direct consequence of disease pathogenesis. A complete understanding of the molecular events leading to this phenotype is lacking partly because of the complex regulation of iron homeostasis within the brain. Since systemic organs and the brain share several iron regulatory mechanisms and iron-modulating proteins, dysfunction of a specific pathway or selective absence of iron-modulating protein(s) in systemic organs has provided important insights into the maintenance of iron homeostasis within the brain. Here, we review recent information on the regulation of iron uptake and utilization in systemic organs and within the complex environment of the brain, with particular emphasis on the underlying mechanisms leading to brain iron mis-metabolism in specific neurodegenerative conditions. Mouse models that have been instrumental in understanding systemic and brain disorders associated with iron mis-metabolism are also described, followed by current therapeutic strategies which are aimed at restoring brain iron homeostasis in different neurodegenerative conditions. We conclude by highlighting important gaps in our understanding of brain iron metabolism and mis-metabolism, particularly in the context of neurodegenerative disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1324–1363. PMID:23815406

  7. PfsR is a key regulator of iron homeostasis in Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Cheng

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential cofactor in numerous cellular processes. The iron deficiency in the oceans affects the primary productivity of phytoplankton including cyanobacteria. In this study, we examined the function of PfsR, a TetR family transcriptional regulator, in iron homeostasis of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Compared with the wild type, the pfsR deletion mutant displayed stronger tolerance to iron limitation and accumulated significantly more chlorophyll a, carotenoid, and phycocyanin under iron-limiting conditions. The mutant also maintained more photosystem I and photosystem II complexes than the wild type after iron deprivation. In addition, the activities of photosystem I and photosystem II were much higher in pfsR deletion mutant than in wild-type cells under iron-limiting conditions. The transcripts of pfsR were enhanced by iron limitation and inactivation of the gene affected pronouncedly expression of fut genes (encoding a ferric iron transporter, feoB (encoding a ferrous iron transporter, bfr genes (encoding bacterioferritins, ho genes (encoding heme oxygenases, isiA (encoding a chlorophyll-binding protein, and furA (encoding a ferric uptake regulator. The iron quota in pfsR deletion mutant cells was higher than in wild-type cells both before and after exposure to iron limitation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that PfsR bound to its own promoter and thereby auto-regulated its own expression. These data suggest that PfsR is a critical regulator of iron homeostasis.

  8. The biological effect of asbestos exposure is dependent on changes in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Functional groups on the surface of fibrous silicates can complex iron. We tested the postulate that 1) asbestos complexes and sequesters host cell iron resulting in a disruption of metal homeostasis and 2) this loss of essential metal results in an oxidative stress and...

  9. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Indicates a Disturbed Brain Iron Homeostasis in Neuromyelitis Optica - A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Martin Doring

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and can be associated with oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate brain iron in patients with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM, a quantitative iron-sensitive MRI technique. 12 clinically confirmed NMO patients (6 female and 6 male; age 35.4y±14.2y and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (7 female and 5 male; age 33.9±11.3y underwent MRI of the brain at 3 Tesla. Quantitative maps of the effective transverse relaxation rate (R2* and magnetic susceptibility were calculated and a blinded ROI-based group comparison analysis was performed. Normality of the data and differences between patients and controls were tested by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and t-test, respectively. Correlation with age was studied using Spearman's rank correlation and an ANCOVA-like analysis. Magnetic susceptibility values were decreased in the red nucleus (p0.95; between -15 and -22 ppb depending on reference region with a trend toward increasing differences with age. R2* revealed significantly decreased relaxation in the optic radiations of five of the 12 patients (p<0.0001; -3.136±0.567 s-1. Decreased relaxation in the optic radiation is indicative for demyelination, which is in line with previous findings. Decreased magnetic susceptibility in the red nucleus is indicative for a lower brain iron concentration, a chemical redistribution of iron into less magnetic forms, or both. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the pathological cause or consequence of this finding.

  10. Iron deficiency regulated OsOPT7 is essential for iron homeostasis in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Khurram; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Senoura, Takeshi; Takahashi, Michiko; An, Gynheung; Oikawa, Takaya; Ueda, Minoru; Sato, Aiko; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2015-05-01

    The molecular mechanism of iron (Fe) uptake and transport in plants are well-characterized; however, many components of Fe homeostasis remain unclear. We cloned iron-deficiency-regulated oligopeptide transporter 7 (OsOPT7) from rice. OsOPT7 localized to the plasma membrane and did not transport Fe(III)-DMA or Fe(II)-NA and GSH in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Furthermore OsOPT7 did not complement the growth of yeast fet3fet4 mutant. OsOPT7 was specifically upregulated in response to Fe-deficiency. Promoter GUS analysis revealed that OsOPT7 expresses in root tips, root vascular tissue and shoots as well as during seed development. Microarray analysis of OsOPT7 knockout 1 (opt7-1) revealed the upregulation of Fe-deficiency-responsive genes in plants grown under Fe-sufficient conditions, despite the high Fe and ferritin concentrations in shoot tissue indicating that Fe may not be available for physiological functions. Plants overexpressing OsOPT7 do not exhibit any phenotype and do not accumulate more Fe compared to wild type plants. These results indicate that OsOPT7 may be involved in Fe transport in rice.

  11. Mammalian iron metabolism and its control by iron regulatory proteins☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cole P.; Shen, Lacy; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2). IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) located in the untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding protein involved in iron uptake, storage, utilization and export. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding how IRPs are regulated by iron-dependent and iron-independent mechanisms and the pathological consequences of IRP2 deficiency in mice. The identification of novel IREs involved in diverse cellular pathways has revealed that the IRP–IRE network extends to processes other than iron homeostasis. A mechanistic understanding of IRP regulation will likely yield important insights into the basis of disorders of iron metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22610083

  12. The extrahepatic role of TFR2 in iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eSilvestri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2, a protein homologous to the cell iron importer transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1, is expressed in the liver and erythroid cells and is reported to bind diferric transferrin, although at lower affinity than TFR1. TFR2 gene is mutated in type 3 hemochromatosis, a disorder characterized by iron overload and inability to upregulate hepcidin in response to iron. Liver TFR2 is considered a sensor of diferric transferrin, possibly in a complex with HFE. In erythroid cells TFR2 is a partner of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR and stabilizes the receptor on the cell surface. However, Tfr2 null mice as well as TFR2 hemochromatosis patients do not show defective erythropoiesis and tolerate repeated phlebotomy. The iron deficient Tfr2-Tmprss6 double knock out mice have higher red cells count and more severe microcytosis than the liver specific Tfr2 and Tmprss6 double knock out mice. TFR2 in the bone marrow might be a sensor of iron deficiency that protects against excessive microcytosis in a way that involves EPOR, although the mechanisms remain to be worked out.

  13. Effect of malnutrition on iron homeostasis in black-necked swans (Cygnus melanocoryphus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norambuena, M Cecilia; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2009-12-01

    The Cayumapu River black-necked swan (Cygnus melanocoryphus) population in southern Chile suffered a syndrome of malnutrition and hyperferremia in 2005. The iron metabolic imbalance could not be explained on the basis of the quality of their diet. Hence, the primary objective of this study was to determine the relationship between malnutrition and iron homeostasis in black-necked swans. It was proposed that catabolic processes could increase serum iron levels due to the release of endogenous iron from tissues. A free-living swan population undergoing natural nutritional imbalance due to molting was studied. In addition, swans captured were subjected to a diet restriction until they became emaciated. The results revealed that neither lipolytic activity nor emaciation affected serum iron concentrations. The increment of total iron binding capacity observed was in agreement with the reduction of endogenous iron stored, with the increase of erythropoeitic demand, or with both. Future studies are needed to determine the effect of incremental erythropoietic activity on iron homeostasis in anemic, malnourished birds.

  14. Longitudinal Analysis of the Interaction Between Obesity and Pregnancy on Iron Homeostasis: Role of Hepcidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Quijano, María Eugenia; Montalvo-Velarde, Irene; Vital-Reyes, Victor Saul; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique; López-Alarcón, Mardia

    2016-10-01

    When pregnancy occurs in obese women, two opposite mechanisms for iron homeostasis concur: increased need for available iron to support erythropoiesis and decreased iron mobilization from diets and stores due to obesity-related inflammation linked to overexpressed hepcidin. Few studies have examined the role of hepcidin on maternal iron homeostasis in the context of obese pregnancy. The aim of the study was to evaluate the combined effect of maternal obesity and pregnancy on hepcidin and maternal iron status while accounting for inflammation and iron supplementation. We conducted a secondary analysis of a cohort of pregnant women recruited from a referral obstetric hospital in Mexico City. Circulating biomarkers of iron status (hepcidin, ferritin [SF], transferrin receptor [sTfR], erythropoietin [EPO]), and inflammation (C-reactive protein [CRP], tumor necrosis factor-[TNF]α, and interleukin-[IL]6) were determined monthly throughout pregnancy. Repeated measures ANOVA and logistic regression models were used for statistics. Twenty-three obese (Ob) and 25 lean (Lc) women were studied. SF and hepcidin declined, and EPO and sTfR increased throughout pregnancy in both groups. sTfR increased more in Ob than in Lc (p = 0.024). The smallest hepcidin decline occurred in iron-supplemented Ob women compared to non-supplemented Lc women (p = 0.022). The risk for iron deficiency at the end of pregnancy was higher for Ob than for Lc (OR = 4.45, 95% CI = 2.07-9.58) after adjusting for iron supplementation and hepcidin concentration. Pre-gestational obesity increases the risk of maternal iron deficiency despite iron supplementation. Overexpressed hepcidin appears to be a potential mechanism. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitric oxide-mediated modulation of iron regulatory proteins: implication for cellular iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwon; Ponka, Prem

    2002-01-01

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) control the synthesis of transferrin receptors (TfR) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) that are located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) and the 5' UTR of their respective mRNAs. Cellular iron levels affect binding of IRPs to IREs and consequently expression of TfR and ferritin. Moreover, NO(.), a redox species of nitric oxide that interacts primarily with iron, can activate IRP1 RNA-binding activity resulting in an increase in TfR mRNA levels and a decrease in ferritin synthesis. We have shown that treatment of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) with NO(+) (nitrosonium ion, which causes S-nitrosylation of thiol groups) resulted in a rapid decrease in RNA-binding of IRP2, followed by IRP2 degradation, and these changes were associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels and a dramatic increase in ferritin synthesis. Moreover, we demonstrated that stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increased IRP1 binding activity, whereas RNA-binding of IRP2 decreased and was followed by a degradation of this protein. Furthermore, the decrease of IRP2 binding/protein levels was associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels and an increase in ferritin synthesis in LPS/IFN-gamma-treated cells, and these changes were prevented by inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that NO(+)-mediated degradation of IRP2 plays a major role in iron metabolism during inflammation.

  16. The Porphyromonas gingivalis ferric uptake regulator orthologue does not regulate iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Butler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that has an absolute requirement for iron which it transports from the host as heme and/or Fe2+. Iron transport must be regulated to prevent toxic effects from excess metal in the cell. P. gingivalis has one ferric uptake regulator (Fur orthologue encoded in its genome called Har, which would be expected to regulate the transport and usage of iron within this bacterium. As a gene regulator, inactivation of Har should result in changes in gene expression of several genes compared to the wild-type. This dataset (GEO accession number GSE37099 provides information on expression levels of genes in P. gingivalis in the absence of Har. Surprisingly, these genes do not relate to iron homeostasis.

  17. Isolation and characterization of Lotus japonicus genes involved in iron and zinc homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Jensen, Winnie; Sandal, Niels Nørgaard

    . Legumes are frequently grown in soil with limited nutrient availability. Plants use finely tuned mechanisms to keep appropriated levels of iron and zinc in each of their organs. Several genes involved in iron and zinc homeostasis have been described in yeast, and a few orthologs have been studied...... in plants. We have used these sequences to search for L. japonicus ESTs and genomic loci that are likely to be involved in iron and zinc metabolism. We have identified sequences corresponding to ferritins, ferric reductases, metal transport proteins of the ZIP family, and cation transporters of the NRAMP......The goal of this project is to find ways to improve the nutritional value of legumes by identifying genes and proteins important for iron and zinc regulation in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Legumes are important staples in the developing world and are a major source of nutrients in many areas...

  18. The PICALM protein plays a key role in iron homeostasis and cell proliferation.

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    Paula B Scotland

    Full Text Available The ubiquitously expressed phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly (PICALM protein associates with the plasma membrane, binds clathrin, and plays a role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Alterations of the human PICALM gene are present in aggressive hematopoietic malignancies, and genome-wide association studies have recently linked the PICALM locus to late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Inactivating and hypomorphic Picalm mutations in mice cause different degrees of severity of anemia, abnormal iron metabolism, growth retardation and shortened lifespan. To understand PICALM's function, we studied the consequences of PICALM overexpression and characterized PICALM-deficient cells derived from mutant fit1 mice. Our results identify a role for PICALM in transferrin receptor (TfR internalization and demonstrate that the C-terminal PICALM residues are critical for its association with clathrin and for the inhibitory effect of PICALM overexpression on TfR internalization. Murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs that are deficient in PICALM display several characteristics of iron deficiency (increased surface TfR expression, decreased intracellular iron levels, and reduced cellular proliferation, all of which are rescued by retroviral PICALM expression. The proliferation defect of cells that lack PICALM results, at least in part, from insufficient iron uptake, since it can be corrected by iron supplementation. Moreover, PICALM-deficient cells are particularly sensitive to iron chelation. Taken together, these data reveal that PICALM plays a critical role in iron homeostasis, and offer new perspectives into the pathogenesis of PICALM-associated diseases.

  19. Acute loss of the hepatic endo-lysosomal system in vivo causes compensatory changes in iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzendorf, Christoph; Zeigerer, Anja; Seifert, Sarah; Sparla, Richard; Najafi, Bahar; Canonne-Hergaux, François; Zerial, Marino; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2017-06-22

    Liver cells communicate with the extracellular environment to take up nutrients via endocytosis. Iron uptake is essential for metabolic activities and cell homeostasis. Here, we investigated the role of the endocytic system for maintaining iron homeostasis. We specifically depleted the small GTPase Rab5 in the mouse liver, causing a transient loss of the entire endo-lysosomal system. Strikingly, endosome depletion led to a fast reduction of hepatic iron levels, which was preceded by an increased abundance of the iron exporter ferroportin. Compensatory changes in livers of Rab5-depleted mice include increased expression of transferrin receptor 1 as well as reduced expression of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Serum iron indices (serum iron, free iron binding capacity and total iron binding capacity) in Rab5-KD mice were increased, consistent with an elevated splenic and hepatic iron export. Our data emphasize the critical importance of the endosomal compartments in hepatocytes to maintain hepatic and systemic iron homeostasis in vivo. The short time period (between day four and five) upon which these changes occur underscore the fast dynamics of the liver iron pool.

  20. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

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    Petra Procházková

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP. The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant.

  1. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5′- or 3′-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5′-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant. PMID:25279857

  2. HapX-Mediated Iron Homeostasis Is Essential for Rhizosphere Competence and Virulence of the Soilborne Pathogen Fusarium oxysporum[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Berges, Manuel S.; Capilla, Javier; Turrà, David; Schafferer, Lukas; Matthijs, Sandra; Jöchl, Christoph; Cornelis, Pierre; Guarro, Josep; Haas, Hubertus; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Soilborne fungal pathogens cause devastating yield losses and are highly persistent and difficult to control. During the infection process, these organisms must cope with limited availability of iron. Here we show that the bZIP protein HapX functions as a key regulator of iron homeostasis and virulence in the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Deletion of hapX does not affect iron uptake but causes derepression of genes involved in iron-consuming pathways, leading to impaired growth under iron-depleted conditions. F. oxysporum strains lacking HapX are reduced in their capacity to invade and kill tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants and immunodepressed mice. The virulence defect of ΔhapX on tomato plants is exacerbated by coinoculation of roots with a biocontrol strain of Pseudomonas putida, but not with a siderophore-deficient mutant, indicating that HapX contributes to iron competition of F. oxysporum in the tomato rhizosphere. These results establish a conserved role for HapX-mediated iron homeostasis in fungal infection of plants and mammals. PMID:22968717

  3. Regnase-1 Maintains Iron Homeostasis via the Degradation of Transferrin Receptor 1 and Prolyl-Hydroxylase-Domain-Containing Protein 3 mRNAs

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    Masanori Yoshinaga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron metabolism is regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. The mRNA of the iron-controlling gene, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, has long been believed to be negatively regulated by a yet-unidentified endonuclease. Here, we show that the endonuclease Regnase-1 is critical for the degradation of mRNAs involved in iron metabolism in vivo. First, we demonstrate that Regnase-1 promotes TfR1 mRNA decay. Next, we show that Regnase-1−/− mice suffer from severe iron deficiency anemia, although hepcidin expression is downregulated. The iron deficiency anemia is induced by a defect in duodenal iron uptake. We reveal that duodenal Regnase-1 controls the expression of PHD3, which impairs duodenal iron uptake via HIF2α suppression. Finally, we show that Regnase-1 is a HIF2α-inducible gene and thus provides a positive feedback loop for HIF2α activation via PHD3. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Regnase-1-mediated regulation of iron-related transcripts is essential for the maintenance of iron homeostasis.

  4. Regnase-1 Maintains Iron Homeostasis via the Degradation of Transferrin Receptor 1 and Prolyl-Hydroxylase-Domain-Containing Protein 3 mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Masanori; Nakatsuka, Yoshinari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Ori, Daisuke; Uehata, Takuya; Tsujimura, Tohru; Suzuki, Yutaka; Mino, Takashi; Takeuchi, Osamu

    2017-05-23

    Iron metabolism is regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. The mRNA of the iron-controlling gene, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), has long been believed to be negatively regulated by a yet-unidentified endonuclease. Here, we show that the endonuclease Regnase-1 is critical for the degradation of mRNAs involved in iron metabolism in vivo. First, we demonstrate that Regnase-1 promotes TfR1 mRNA decay. Next, we show that Regnase-1 -/- mice suffer from severe iron deficiency anemia, although hepcidin expression is downregulated. The iron deficiency anemia is induced by a defect in duodenal iron uptake. We reveal that duodenal Regnase-1 controls the expression of PHD3, which impairs duodenal iron uptake via HIF2α suppression. Finally, we show that Regnase-1 is a HIF2α-inducible gene and thus provides a positive feedback loop for HIF2α activation via PHD3. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Regnase-1-mediated regulation of iron-related transcripts is essential for the maintenance of iron homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neural Control Mechanisms and Body Fluid Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alan Kim

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to study the nature of afferent signals to the brain that reflect the status of body fluid balance and to investigate the central neural mechanisms that process this information for the activation of response systems which restore body fluid homeostasis. That is, in the face of loss of fluids from intracellular or extracellular fluid compartments, animals seek and ingest water and ionic solutions (particularly Na(+) solutions) to restore the intracellular and extracellular spaces. Over recent years, our laboratory has generated a substantial body of information indicating that: (1) a fall in systemic arterial pressure facilitates the ingestion of rehydrating solutions and (2) that the actions of brain amine systems (e.g., norepinephrine; serotonin) are critical for precise correction of fluid losses. Because both acute and chronic dehydration are associated with physiological stresses, such as exercise and sustained exposure to microgravity, the present research will aid in achieving a better understanding of how vital information is handled by the nervous system for maintenance of the body's fluid matrix which is critical for health and well-being.

  6. Fungal Morphology, Iron Homeostasis, and Lipid Metabolism Regulated by a GATA Transcription Factor in Blastomyces dermatitidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber J Marty

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In response to temperature, Blastomyces dermatitidis converts between yeast and mold forms. Knowledge of the mechanism(s underlying this response to temperature remains limited. In B. dermatitidis, we identified a GATA transcription factor, SREB, important for the transition to mold. Null mutants (SREBΔ fail to fully complete the conversion to mold and cannot properly regulate siderophore biosynthesis. To capture the transcriptional response regulated by SREB early in the phase transition (0-48 hours, gene expression microarrays were used to compare SREB∆ to an isogenic wild type isolate. Analysis of the time course microarray data demonstrated SREB functioned as a transcriptional regulator at 37°C and 22°C. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses indicated SREB was involved in diverse biological processes including iron homeostasis, biosynthesis of triacylglycerol and ergosterol, and lipid droplet formation. Integration of microarray data, bioinformatics, and chromatin immunoprecipitation identified a subset of genes directly bound and regulated by SREB in vivo in yeast (37°C and during the phase transition to mold (22°C. This included genes involved with siderophore biosynthesis and uptake, iron homeostasis, and genes unrelated to iron assimilation. Functional analysis suggested that lipid droplets were actively metabolized during the phase transition and lipid metabolism may contribute to filamentous growth at 22°C. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, RNA interference, and overexpression analyses suggested that SREB was in a negative regulatory circuit with the bZIP transcription factor encoded by HAPX. Both SREB and HAPX affected morphogenesis at 22°C; however, large changes in transcript abundance by gene deletion for SREB or strong overexpression for HAPX were required to alter the phase transition.

  7. Comparative analysis of iron homeostasis in sub-Saharan African children with sickle cell disease and their unaffected siblings

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    Selma eGomez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential trace element subject to tight regulation to ensure adequate running of biological processes. In sub-Saharan Africa where hemoglobinopathies are common, iron homeostasis is likely to be impaired by these conditions. Here we assessed and compared key serum proteins associated with iron metabolism between sub-Saharan African children with sickle cell disease (SCD and their unaffected siblings. Complete blood counts and serum concentrations of four key proteins involved in iron regulation (ferritin, transferrin, sTfR and hepcidin were measured for 73 children with SCD and 68 healthy siblings in Benin, West Africa. We found significant differences in concentration of transferrin, sTfR and ferritin between the two groups. Hepcidin concentrations were found at unusually high concentrations but did not differ among the two groups. We found a significant negative correlation between hepcidin levels and both MCH and MCV in the SCD group and report that sTfR concentrations show a correlation with MCV and MHC in opposite directions in the two groups. These results highlight the unusually high levels of hepcidin in the Beninese population and the patterns of differential iron homeostasis taking place under sickle cell disease status. These results lay the foundation for a systematic evaluation of the underlying mechanisms deregulating iron homeostasis in populations with SCD or high prevalence of iron deficiency.

  8. Acquisition and Homeostasis of Iron in Higher Plants and Their Probable Role in Abiotic Stress Tolerance

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    Durgesh K. Tripathi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is a micronutrient that plays an important role in agriculture worldwide because plants require a small amount of iron for its growth and development. All major functions in a plant's life from chlorophyll biosynthesis to energy transfer are performed by Fe (Brumbarova et al., 2008; Gill and Tuteja, 2011. Iron also acts as a major constituent of many plant proteins and enzymes. The acquisition of Fe in plants occurs through two strategies, i.e., strategy I and strategy II (Marschner and Römheld, 1994. Under various stress conditions, Nramp and the YSL gene families help in translocation of Fe, which further acts as a mineral regulatory element and defends plants against stresses. Iron plays an irreplaceable role in alleviating stress imposed by salinity, drought, and heavy metal stress. This is because it activates plant enzymatic antioxidants like catalase (CAT, peroxidase, and an isoform of superoxide dismutase (SOD that act as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS (Hellin et al., 1995. In addition to this, their deficiency as well as their excess amount can disturb the homeostasis of a plant's cell and result in declining of photosynthetic rate, respiration, and increased accumulation of Na+ and Ca− ions which culminate in an excessive formation of ROS. The short-range order hydrated Fe oxides and organic functional groups show affinities for metal ions. Iron plaque biofilm matrices could sequester a large amount of metals at the soil–root interface. Hence, it has attracted the attention of plant physiologists and agricultural scientists who are discovering more exciting and hidden applications of Fe and its potential in the development of bio-factories. This review looks into the recent progress made in putting forward the role of Fe in plant growth, development, and acclimation under major abiotic stresses, i.e., salinity, drought, and heavy metals.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa disrupts Caenorhabditis elegans iron homeostasis, causing a hypoxic response and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirienko, Natalia V; Kirienko, Daniel R; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Wählby, Carolina; Ruvkun, Gary; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2013-04-17

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes serious human infections, but effective treatments and the mechanisms mediating pathogenesis remain elusive. Caenorhabditis elegans shares innate immune pathways with humans, making it invaluable to investigate infection. To determine how P. aeruginosa disrupts host biology, we studied how P. aeruginosa kills C. elegans in a liquid-based pathogenesis model. We found that P. aeruginosa-mediated killing does not require quorum-sensing pathways or host colonization. A chemical genetic screen revealed that iron chelators alleviate P. aeruginosa-mediated killing. Consistent with a role for iron in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis, the bacterial siderophore pyoverdin was required for virulence and was sufficient to induce a hypoxic response and death in the absence of bacteria. Loss of the C. elegans hypoxia-inducing factor HIF-1, which regulates iron homeostasis, exacerbated P. aeruginosa pathogenesis, further linking hypoxia and killing. As pyoverdin is indispensable for virulence in mice, pyoverdin-mediated hypoxia is likely to be relevant in human pathogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Roles of Fe-S proteins: from cofactor synthesis to iron homeostasis to protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Debkumar; Dancis, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Fe-S cluster assembly is an essential process for all cells. Impairment of Fe-S cluster assembly creates diseases in diverse and surprising ways. In one scenario, the loss of function of lipoic acid synthase, an enzyme with Fe-S cluster cofactor in mitochondria, impairs activity of various lipoamide-dependent enzymes with drastic consequences for metabolism. In a second scenario, the heme biosynthetic pathway in red cell precursors is specifically targeted, and iron homeostasis is perturbed, but lipoic acid synthesis is unaffected. In a third scenario, tRNA modifications arising from action of the cysteine desulfurase and/or Fe-S cluster proteins are lost, which may lead to impaired protein synthesis. These defects can then result in cancer, neurologic dysfunction or type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Perchlorate exposure and association with iron homeostasis and other biological functions among NHANES 2005-2008 subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchlorate exposure and association with iron homeostasis and other biological functions among NHANES 2005-2008 subjects Schreinemachers DM, Ghio AJ, Cascio WE, Sobus JR. U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA Perchlorate (ClO4-), an environmental pollutant, is a known thyroid toxicant and...

  12. CNS-targets in control of energy and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinridders, André; Könner, A Christine; Brüning, Jens C

    2009-12-01

    The exceeding efforts in understanding the signals initiated by nutrients and hormones in the central nervous system (CNS) to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis have largely revolutionized our understanding of the neurocircuitry in control of peripheral metabolism. The ability of neurons to sense nutrients and hormones and to adopt a coordinated response to these signals is of crucial importance in controlling food intake, energy expenditure, glucose and lipid metabolism. Anatomical lesion experiments, pharmacological inhibition of signaling pathways, and, more recently, the analysis of conditional mouse mutants with modifications of hormone and nutrient signaling in defined neuronal populations have broadened our understanding of these complex neurocircuits. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the role of the CNS in sensing and transmitting nutritional and hormonal signals to control energy and glucose homeostasis and aims to define them as potential novel drug targets for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  13. Lactoferrin Efficiently Counteracts the Inflammation-Induced Changes of the Iron Homeostasis System in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutone, Antimo; Rosa, Luigi; Lepanto, Maria Stefania; Scotti, Mellani Jinnett; Berlutti, Francesca; Bonaccorsi di Patti, Maria Carmela; Musci, Giovanni; Valenti, Piera

    2017-01-01

    Human lactoferrin (hLf), an 80-kDa multifunctional iron-binding cationic glycoprotein, is constitutively secreted by exocrine glands and by neutrophils during inflammation. hLf is recognized as a key element in the host immune defense system. The in vitro and in vivo experiments are carried out with bovine Lf (bLf), which shares high sequence homology and identical functions with hLf, including anti-inflammatory activity. Here, in "pure" M1 human macrophages, obtained by stimulation with a mixture of 10 pg/ml LPS and 20 ng/ml IFN-γ, as well as in a more heterogeneous macrophage population, challenged with high-dose of LPS (1 µg/ml), the effect of bLf on the expression of the main proteins involved in iron and inflammatory homeostasis, namely ferroportin (Fpn), membrane-bound ceruloplasmin (Cp), cytosolic ferritin (Ftn), transferrin receptor 1, and cytokines has been investigated. The increase of IL-6 and IL-1β cytokines, following the inflammatory treatments, is associated with both upregulation of cytosolic Ftn and downregulation of Fpn, membrane-bound Cp, and transferrin receptor 1. All these changes take part into intracellular iron overload, a very unsafe condition leading in vivo to higher host susceptibility to infections as well as iron deficiency in the blood and anemia of inflammation. It is, therefore, of utmost importance to counteract the persistence of the inflammatory status to rebalance iron levels between tissues/secretions and blood. Moreover, levels of the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 were increased in cells treated with high doses of LPS. Conversely, IL-10 decreased when the LPS/IFN-γ mix was used, suggesting that only the inflammation triggered by LPS high doses can switch on an anti-inflammatory response in our macrophagic model. Here, we demonstrate that bLf, when included in the culture medium, significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-1β production and efficiently prevented the changes of Fpn, membrane-bound Cp, cytosolic Ftn, and

  14. Lactoferrin Efficiently Counteracts the Inflammation-Induced Changes of the Iron Homeostasis System in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antimo Cutone

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human lactoferrin (hLf, an 80-kDa multifunctional iron-binding cationic glycoprotein, is constitutively secreted by exocrine glands and by neutrophils during inflammation. hLf is recognized as a key element in the host immune defense system. The in vitro and in vivo experiments are carried out with bovine Lf (bLf, which shares high sequence homology and identical functions with hLf, including anti-inflammatory activity. Here, in “pure” M1 human macrophages, obtained by stimulation with a mixture of 10 pg/ml LPS and 20 ng/ml IFN-γ, as well as in a more heterogeneous macrophage population, challenged with high-dose of LPS (1 µg/ml, the effect of bLf on the expression of the main proteins involved in iron and inflammatory homeostasis, namely ferroportin (Fpn, membrane-bound ceruloplasmin (Cp, cytosolic ferritin (Ftn, transferrin receptor 1, and cytokines has been investigated. The increase of IL-6 and IL-1β cytokines, following the inflammatory treatments, is associated with both upregulation of cytosolic Ftn and downregulation of Fpn, membrane-bound Cp, and transferrin receptor 1. All these changes take part into intracellular iron overload, a very unsafe condition leading in vivo to higher host susceptibility to infections as well as iron deficiency in the blood and anemia of inflammation. It is, therefore, of utmost importance to counteract the persistence of the inflammatory status to rebalance iron levels between tissues/secretions and blood. Moreover, levels of the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 were increased in cells treated with high doses of LPS. Conversely, IL-10 decreased when the LPS/IFN-γ mix was used, suggesting that only the inflammation triggered by LPS high doses can switch on an anti-inflammatory response in our macrophagic model. Here, we demonstrate that bLf, when included in the culture medium, significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-1β production and efficiently prevented the changes of Fpn, membrane-bound Cp

  15. c-Myc over-expression in Ramos Burkitt's lymphoma cell line predisposes to iron homeostasis disruption in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habel, Marie-Eve; Jung, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is an aggressive B-cell neoplasm resulting from deregulated c-myc expression. We have previously shown that proliferation of Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines such as Ramos is markedly reduced by iron treatment. It has been shown that iron induces expression of c-myc which, owing to its transcriptional regulatory functions, regulates genes involved in iron metabolism. Transient enhancement of c-myc expression by iron could increase the expression of genes involved in iron incorporation, which could lead to an accumulation of intracellular free iron. Here, we have investigated whether cells with a high basal level of c-Myc were more likely to accumulate free iron. Our results suggest that the basal level of c-Myc in Ramos cells is twofold higher than what is seen in HL-60 cells. Moreover, in Ramos cells, where c-Myc is expressed at a high level, H-ferritin expression is down-regulated, transferrin receptor (CD71) expression is increased, and ferritin translation is inhibited. These modifications in iron metabolism, resulting from the strong basal expression of c-Myc, and amplified by iron addition, could lead to a disruption in homeostasis and consequently to growth arrest

  16. Ets transcription factor GABP controls T cell homeostasis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chong T; Osmanbeyoglu, Hatice U; Do, Mytrang H; Bivona, Michael R; Toure, Ahmed; Kang, Davina; Xie, Yuchen; Leslie, Christina S; Li, Ming O

    2017-10-20

    Peripheral T cells are maintained in the absence of vigorous stimuli, and respond to antigenic stimulation by initiating cell cycle progression and functional differentiation. Here we show that depletion of the Ets family transcription factor GA-binding protein (GABP) in T cells impairs T-cell homeostasis. In addition, GABP is critically required for antigen-stimulated T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Transcriptome and genome-wide GABP-binding site analyses identify GABP direct targets encoding proteins involved in cellular redox balance and DNA replication, including the Mcm replicative helicases. These findings show that GABP has a nonredundant role in the control of T-cell homeostasis and immunity.

  17. Thyroid hormone and the central control of homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Amy; Mittag, Jens

    2012-08-01

    It has long been known that thyroid hormone has profound direct effects on metabolism and cardiovascular function. More recently, it was shown that the hormone also modulates these systems by actions on the central autonomic control. Recent studies that either manipulated thyroid hormone signalling in anatomical areas of the brain or analysed seasonal models with an endogenous fluctuation in hypothalamic thyroid hormone levels revealed that the hormone controls energy turnover. However, most of these studies did not progress beyond the level of anatomical nuclei; thus, the neuronal substrates as well as the molecular mechanisms remain largely enigmatic. This review summarises the evidence for a role of thyroid hormone in the central autonomic control of peripheral homeostasis and advocates novel strategies to address thyroid hormone action in the brain on a cellular level.

  18. Electrochemically controlled iron isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jay R.; Young, Edward D.; Kavner, Abby

    2010-02-01

    Variations in the stable isotope abundances of transition metals have been observed in the geologic record and trying to understand and reconstruct the physical/environmental conditions that produced these signatures is an area of active research. It is clear that changes in oxidation state lead to large fractionations of the stable isotopes of many transition metals such as iron, suggesting that transition metal stable isotope signatures could be used as a paleo-redox proxy. However, the factors contributing to these observed stable isotope variations are poorly understood. Here we investigate how the kinetics of iron redox electrochemistry generates isotope fractionation. Through a combination of electrodeposition experiments and modeling of electrochemical processes including mass-transport, we show that electron transfer reactions are the cause of a large isotope separation, while mass transport-limited supply of reactant to the electrode attenuates the observed isotopic fractionation. Furthermore, the stable isotope composition of electroplated transition metals can be tuned in the laboratory by controlling parameters such as solution chemistry, reaction overpotential, and solution convection. These methods are potentially useful for generating isotopically-marked metal surfaces for tracking and forensic purposes. In addition, our studies will help interpret stable isotope data in terms of identifying underlying electron transfer processes in laboratory and natural samples.

  19. Exercise, Obesity and CNS Control of Metabolic Homeostasis: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John K.

    2018-01-01

    This review details the manner in which the central nervous system regulates metabolic homeostasis in normal weight and obese rodents and humans. It includes a review of the homeostatic contributions of neurons located in the hypothalamus, the midbrain and limbic structures, the pons and the medullary area postrema, nucleus tractus solitarius, and vagus nucleus, and details how these brain regions respond to circulating levels of orexigenic hormones, such as ghrelin, and anorexigenic hormones, such as glucagon-like peptide 1 and leptin. It provides an insight as to how high intensity exercise may improve homeostatic control in overweight and obese subjects. Finally, it provides suggestions as to how further progress can be made in controlling the current pandemic of obesity and diabetes.

  20. Zinc transporter ZIP14 functions in hepatic zinc, iron and glucose homeostasis during the innate immune response (endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolunay Beker Aydemir

    Full Text Available ZIP14 (slc39A14 is a zinc transporter induced in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli. ZIP14 induction accompanies the reduction in serum zinc (hypozincemia of acute inflammation. ZIP14 can transport Zn(2+ and non-transferrin-bound Fe(2+ in vitro. Using a Zip14(-/- mouse model we demonstrated that ZIP14 was essential for control of phosphatase PTP1B activity and phosphorylation of c-Met during liver regeneration. In the current studies, a global screening of ZIP transporter gene expression in response to LPS-induced endotoxemia was conducted. Following LPS, Zip14 was the most highly up-regulated Zip transcript in liver, but also in white adipose tissue and muscle. Using ZIP14(-/- mice we show that ZIP14 contributes to zinc absorption from the gastrointestinal tract directly or indirectly as zinc absorption was decreased in the KOs. In contrast, Zip14(-/- mice absorbed more iron. The Zip14 KO mice did not exhibit hypozincemia following LPS, but do have hypoferremia. Livers of Zip14-/- mice had increased transcript abundance for hepcidin, divalent metal transporter-1, ferritin and transferrin receptor-1 and greater accumulation of iron. The Zip14(-/- phenotype included greater body fat, hypoglycemia and higher insulin levels, as well as increased liver glucose and greater phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and increased GLUT2, SREBP-1c and FASN expression. The Zip14 KO mice exhibited decreased circulating IL-6 with increased hepatic SOCS-3 following LPS, suggesting SOCS-3 inhibited insulin signaling which produced the hypoglycemia in this genotype. The results are consistent with ZIP14 ablation yielding abnormal labile zinc pools which lead to increased SOCS-3 production through G-coupled receptor activation and increased cAMP production as well as signaled by increased pSTAT3 via the IL-6 receptor, which inhibits IRS 1/2 phosphorylation. Our data show the role of ZIP14 in the hepatocyte is multi-functional since zinc and iron trafficking are

  1. Anaemia and Iron Homeostasis in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Obirikorang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We determined the prevalence of anaemia and evaluated markers of iron homeostasis in a cohort of HIV patients. Methods. A comparative cross-sectional study on 319 participants was carried out at the Tamale Teaching Hospital from July 2013 to December 2013, 219 patients on HAART (designated On-HAART and 100 HAART-naive patients. Data gathered include sociodemography, clinical history, and selected laboratory assays. Results. Prevalence of anaemia was 23.8%. On-HAART participants had higher CD4/CD3 lymphocyte counts, Hb, HCT/PCV, MCV, MCH, iron, ferritin, and TSAT (P<0.05. Hb, iron, ferritin, and TSAT decreased from grade 1 to grade 3 anaemia and CD4/CD3 lymphocyte count was lowest in grade 3 anaemia (P<0.05. Iron (P=0.0072 decreased with disease severity whilst transferrin (P=0.0143 and TIBC (P=0.0143 increased with disease severity. Seventy-six (23.8% participants fulfilled the criteria for anaemia, 86 (26.9% for iron deficiency, 41 (12.8% for iron deficiency anaemia, and 17 (5.3% for iron overload. The frequency of anaemia was higher amongst participants not on HAART (OR 2.6 for grade 1 anaemia; OR 3.0 for grade 3 anaemia. Conclusion. In this study population, HIV-associated anaemia is common and is related to HAART status and disease progression. HIV itself is the most important cause of anaemia and treatment of HIV should be a priority compared to iron supplementation.

  2. Homeostasis control of building environment using sensor agent robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Eri; Mita, Akira

    2012-04-01

    A human centered system for building is demanded to meet variety of needs due to the diversification and maturation of society. Smart buildings and smart houses have been studied to satisfy this demand. However, it is difficult for such systems to respond flexibly to unexpected events and needs that are caused by aging and complicate emotion changes. With this regards, we suggest "Biofied Buildings". The goal for this research is to realize buildings that are safer, more comfortable and more energy-efficient by embedding adaptive functions of life into buildings. In this paper, we propose a new control system for building environments, focused on physiological adaptation, particularly homeostasis, endocrine system and immune system. Residents are used as living sensors and controllers in the control loop. A sensor agent robot is used to acquire resident's discomfort feeling, and to output hormone-like signals to activate devices to control the environments. The proposed system could control many devices without establishing complicated scenarios. Results obtained from some simulations and the demonstration experiments using an LED lighting system showed that the proposed system were able to achieve robust and stable control of environments without complicated scenarios.

  3. Metal homeostasis in Hypogymnia physodes is controlled by lichen substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Markus

    2008-05-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the lichen substances produced by the epiphytic lichen Hypogymnia physodes control the intracellular uptake of divalent transition metals. Incubating lichen thalli with and without their natural content of lichen substances with metal solutions showed that the lichen substances of H. physodes selectively inhibit the uptake of Cu(2+) and Mn(2+), but not of Fe(2+) and Zn(2+). Such behavior is ecologically beneficial, as ambient concentrations of Cu(2+) and Mn(2+) in precipitation and bark are known to limit the abundance of H. physodes, whereas limiting effects of Fe(2+) or Zn(2+) have never been found. This suggests that increasing the Cu(2+) and Mn(2+) tolerance stimulated the evolution of lichen substances in H. physodes. The depsidone physodalic acid is apparently most effective at reducing Cu(2+) and Mn(2+) uptake among the seven lichen substances produced by H. physodes. Probably lichen substances play a general role in the metal homeostasis of lichens.

  4. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  5. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  6. Lipocalin 2 deficiency dysregulates iron homeostasis and exacerbates endotoxin-induced sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srinivasan, Gayathri; Aitken, Jesse D; Zhang, Benyue

    2012-01-01

    Various states of inflammation, including sepsis, are associated with hypoferremia, which limits iron availability to pathogens and reduces iron-mediated oxidative stress. Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2; siderocalin, 24p3) plays a central role in iron transport. Accordingly, Lcn2-deficient (Lcn2KO) mice exhib...

  7. High dose intravenous iron, mineral homeostasis and intact FGF23 in normal and uremic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Eva; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Mace, Maria L.

    2013-01-01

    High iron load might have a number of toxic effects in the organism. Recently intravenous (iv) iron has been proposed to induce elevation of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia in iron deficient subjects. High levels of FGF23 are associated with increased...

  8. Metabolic sensing neurons and the control of energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barry E

    2006-11-30

    The brain and periphery carry on a constant conversation; the periphery informs the brain about its metabolic needs and the brain provides for these needs through its control of somatomotor, autonomic and neurohumoral pathways involved in energy intake, expenditure and storage. Metabolic sensing neurons are the integrators of a variety of metabolic, humoral and neural inputs from the periphery. Such neurons, originally called "glucosensing", also respond to fatty acids, hormones and metabolites from the periphery. They are integrated within neural pathways involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Unlike most neurons, they utilize glucose and other metabolites as signaling molecules to regulate their membrane potential and firing rate. For glucosensing neurons, glucokinase acts as the rate-limiting step in glucosensing while the pathways that mediate responses to metabolites like lactate, ketone bodies and fatty acids are less well characterized. Many metabolic sensing neurons also respond to insulin and leptin and other peripheral hormones and receive neural inputs from peripheral organs. Each set of afferent signals arrives with different temporal profiles and by different routes and these inputs are summated at the level of the membrane potential to produce a given neural firing pattern. In some obese individuals, the relative sensitivity of metabolic sensing neurons to various peripheral inputs is genetically reduced. This may provide one mechanism underlying their propensity to become obese when exposed to diets high in fat and caloric density. Thus, metabolic sensing neurons may provide a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity.

  9. Metal homeostasis in Hypogymnia physodes is controlled by lichen substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauck, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the lichen substances produced by the epiphytic lichen Hypogymnia physodes control the intracellular uptake of divalent transition metals. Incubating lichen thalli with and without their natural content of lichen substances with metal solutions showed that the lichen substances of H. physodes selectively inhibit the uptake of Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ , but not of Fe 2+ and Zn 2+ . Such behavior is ecologically beneficial, as ambient concentrations of Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ in precipitation and bark are known to limit the abundance of H. physodes, whereas limiting effects of Fe 2+ or Zn 2+ have never been found. This suggests that increasing the Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ tolerance stimulated the evolution of lichen substances in H. physodes. The depsidone physodalic acid is apparently most effective at reducing Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ uptake among the seven lichen substances produced by H. physodes. Probably lichen substances play a general role in the metal homeostasis of lichens. - Lichen substances in Hypogymnia physodes specifically reduce the uptake of Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ , but not Fe 2+ or Zn 2+

  10. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus Treated With Punicalagin, a Natural Antibiotic From Pomegranate That Disrupts Iron Homeostasis and Induces SOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bret; Islam, Nazrul; Xu, Yunfeng; Beard, Hunter S; Garrett, Wesley M; Gu, Ganyu; Nou, Xiangwu

    2018-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterial, food-borne pathogen of humans, can contaminate raw fruits and vegetables. While physical and chemical methods are available to control S. aureus, scientists are searching for inhibitory phytochemicals from plants. One promising compound from pomegranate is punicalagin, a natural antibiotic. To get a broader understanding of the inhibitory effect of punicalagin on S. aureus growth, high-throughput mass spectrometry and quantitative isobaric labeling was used to investigate the proteome of S. aureus after exposure to a sublethal dose of punicalagin. Nearly half of the proteins encoded by the small genome were interrogated, and nearly half of those exhibited significant changes in accumulation. Punicalagin treatment altered the accumulation of proteins and enzymes needed for iron acquisition, and it altered amounts of enzymes for glycolysis, citric acid cycling, protein biosynthesis, and purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis. Punicalagin treatment also induced an SOS cellular response to damaged DNA. Transcriptional comparison of marker genes shows that the punicalagin-induced iron starvation and SOS responses resembles those produced by EDTA and ciprofloxacin. These results show that punicalagin adversely alters bacterial growth by disrupting iron homeostasis and that it induces SOS, possibly through DNA biosynthesis inhibition. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Absorption of controlled-release iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.D.; Lipschitz, D.A.; Skikne, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple-dose double radioiron technic was used to compare absorption of iron administered as a controlled release (CR) capsule and as an elixir; both formulations contained 50 mg elemental iron as ferrous sulfate. When taken by normal subjects in the fasting state, mean absorption from the elixir and CR capsule averaged 4.92% and 4.38%, which gave a CR capsule:elixir ratio of 0.89. This difference was not significant, but when taken with meals that inhibit absorption of dietary iron by different degrees, absorption of the CR formulation was superior. CR capsule:elixir absorption ratios averaged 1.70 from a meal that is mildly inhibitory and 3.13 from a meal that causes more marked inhibition. It is concluded that CR iron formulations may offer a therapeutic advantage to patients who take oral iron with meals to avoid gastrointestinal side effects

  12. The role of hepatic transferrin receptor 2 in the regulation of iron homeostasis in the body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christal A Worthen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fine tuning of body iron is required to prevent diseases such as iron-overload and anemia. The putative iron-sensor, transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2, is expressed in the liver and mutations in this protein result in the iron-overload disease Type III hereditary hemochromatosis (HH. With the loss of functional TfR2, the liver produces about two-fold less of the peptide hormone hepcidin, which is responsible for negatively regulating iron uptake from the diet. This reduction in hepcidin expression leads to the slow accumulation of iron in the liver, heart, joints, and pancreas and subsequent cirrhosis, heart disease, arthritis, and diabetes. TfR2 can bind iron-loaded transferrin in the bloodstream, and hepatocytes treated with transferrin respond with a two-fold increase in hepcidin expression through stimulation of the BMP-signaling pathway. Loss of functional TfR2 or its binding partner, the original HH protein (HFE, results in a loss of this transferrin-sensitivity. While much is known about the trafficking and regulation of TfR2, the mechanism of its transferrin-sensitivity through the BMP-signaling pathway is still not known.

  13. Anemia and iron homeostasis in a cohort of HIV-infected patients in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jusuf Hadi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anemia is a common clinical finding in HIV-infected patients and iron deficiency or redistribution may contribute to the development of low hemoglobin levels. Iron overload is associated with a poor prognosis in HIV and Hepatitis C virus infections. Iron redistribution may be caused by inflammation but possibly also by hepatitis C co-infection. We examined the prevalence of anemia and its relation to mortality in a cohort of HIV patients in a setting where injecting drug use (IDU is a main mode of HIV transmission, and measured serum ferritin and sTfR, in relation to anemia, inflammation, stage of HIV disease, ART and HCV infection. Methods Patient characteristics, ART history and iron parameters were recorded from adult HIV patients presenting between September 2007 and August 2009 in the referral hospital for West Java, Indonesia. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox's regression were used to assess factors affecting survival. Logistic regression was used to identity parameters associated with high ferritin concentrations. Results Anemia was found in 49.6% of 611 ART-naïve patients, with mild (Hb 10.5 - 12.99 g/dL for men; and 10.5 - 11.99 g/dL for women anemia in 62.0%, and moderate to severe anemia (Hb Conclusion HIV-associated anemia is common among HIV-infected patients in Indonesia and strongly related to mortality. High ferritin with low sTfR levels suggest that iron redistribution and low erythropoietic activity, rather than iron deficiency, contribute to anemia. Serum ferritin and sTfR should be used cautiously to assess iron status in patients with advanced HIV infection.

  14. Multilevel control of glucose homeostasis by adenylyl cyclase 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raoux, Matthieu; Vacher, Pierre; Papin, Julien; Picard, Alexandre; Kostrzewa, Elzbieta; Devin, Anne; Gaitan, Julien; Limon, Isabelle; Kas, Martien J.; Magnan, Christophe; Lang, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Nutrient homeostasis requires integration of signals generated by glucose metabolism and hormones. Expression of the calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase ADCY8 is regulated by glucose and the enzyme is capable of integrating signals from multiple pathways. It may thus have an

  15. The role of melatonin on brain iron homeostasis and its relation to Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Hien Tet

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is the second most common neurological disorder after Alzheimer’s Disease. The disease will manifest with the loss of up to 70% of the dopaminergic neurons in the Substantia Nigra (SN) region and it mainly affects the elderly. One of the common pathological hallmarks for PD is the excessive iron accumulation within the SN region of the brain. However, the pathogenesis for of the excessive iron levels accumulation in the SN is unclear. The increase in intracellular oxi...

  16. Exercise, Obesity and CNS Control of Metabolic Homeostasis: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    John K. Smith

    2018-01-01

    This review details the manner in which the central nervous system regulates metabolic homeostasis in normal weight and obese rodents and humans. It includes a review of the homeostatic contributions of neurons located in the hypothalamus, the midbrain and limbic structures, the pons and the medullary area postrema, nucleus tractus solitarius, and vagus nucleus, and details how these brain regions respond to circulating levels of orexigenic hormones, such as ghrelin, and anorexigenic hormones...

  17. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Leon J.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we

  18. Chloroquine Interference with Hemoglobin Endocytic Trafficking Suppresses Adaptive Heme and Iron Homeostasis in Macrophages: The Paradox of an Antimalarial Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A. Schaer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The CD163 scavenger receptor pathway for Hb:Hp complexes is an essential mechanism of protection against the toxicity of extracellular hemoglobin (Hb, which can accumulate in the vasculature and within tissues during hemolysis. Chloroquine is a lysosomotropic agent, which has been extensively used as an antimalarial drug in the past, before parasite resistance started to limit its efficacy in most parts of the world. More recent use of chloroquine is related to its immunomodulatory activity in patients with autoimmune diseases, which may also involve hemolytic disease components. In this study we examined the effects of chloroquine on the human Hb clearance pathway. For this purpose we developed a new mass-spectrometry-based method to specifically quantify intracellular Hb peptides within the endosomal-lysosomal compartment by single reaction monitoring (SRM. We found that chloroquine exposure impairs trafficking of Hb:Hp complexes through the endosomal-lysosomal compartment after internalization by CD163. Relative quantification of intracellular Hb peptides by SRM confirmed that chloroquine blocked cellular Hb:Hp catabolism. This effect suppressed the cellular heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1 response and shifted macrophage iron homeostasis towards inappropriately high expression of the transferrin receptor with concurrent inhibition of ferroportin expression. A functional deficiency of Hb detoxification and heme-iron recycling may therefore be an adverse consequence of chloroquine treatment during hemolysis.

  19. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunder, Leon J; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D

    2017-07-05

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we highlight recent advances with regard to the molecular mechanisms of cell polarity-controlled epithelial homeostasis and immunity in the human intestine. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. Effects of metal compounds with distinct physicochemical properties on iron homeostasis and antibacterial activity in the lungs: chromium and vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mitchell D; Sisco, Maureen; Prophete, Colette; Yoshida, Kotaro; Chen, Lung-chi; Zelikoff, Judith T; Smee, Jason; Holder, Alvin A; Stonehuerner, Jacqueline; Crans, Debbie C; Ghio, Andrew J

    2010-02-01

    In situ reactions of metal ions or their compounds are important mechanisms by which particles alter lung immune responses. The authors hypothesized that major determinants of the immunomodulatory effect of any metal include its redox behavior/properties, oxidation state, and/or solubility, and that the toxicities arising from differences in physicochemical parameters are manifest, in part, via differential shifts in lung iron (Fe) homeostasis. To test the hypotheses, immunomodulatory potentials for both pentavalent vanadium (VV; as soluble metavanadate or insoluble vanadium pentoxide) and hexavalent chromium (CrVI; as soluble sodium chromate or insoluble calcium chromate) were quantified in rats after inhalation (5h/day for 5 days) of each at 100 microg metal/m3. Differences in effects on local bacterial resistance between the two VV, and between each CrVI, agents suggested that solubility might be a determinant of in situ immunotoxicity. For the soluble forms, VV had a greater impact on resistance than CrVI, indicating that redox behavior/properties was likely also a determinant. The soluble VV agent was the strongest immunomodulant. Regarding Fe homeostasis, both VV agents had dramatic effects on airway Fe levels. Both also impacted local immune/airway epithelial cell Fe levels in that there were significant increases in production of select cytokines/chemokines whose genes are subject to regulation by HIF-1 (whose intracellular longevity is related to cell Fe status). Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the role that metal compound properties play in respiratory disease pathogenesis and provide a rationale for differing pulmonary immunotoxicities of commonly encountered ambient metal pollutants.

  1. Renal Control of Calcium, Phosphate, and Magnesium Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonchol, Michel; Levi, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are multivalent cations that are important for many biologic and cellular functions. The kidneys play a central role in the homeostasis of these ions. Gastrointestinal absorption is balanced by renal excretion. When body stores of these ions decline significantly, gastrointestinal absorption, bone resorption, and renal tubular reabsorption increase to normalize their levels. Renal regulation of these ions occurs through glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption and/or secretion and is therefore an important determinant of plasma ion concentration. Under physiologic conditions, the whole body balance of calcium, phosphate, and magnesium is maintained by fine adjustments of urinary excretion to equal the net intake. This review discusses how calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are handled by the kidneys. PMID:25287933

  2. Glutaredoxins in plant development, abiotic stress response, and iron homeostasis: From model organisms to crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant growth, development, and response to environmental stress require the judicious balance of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are a group of oxidoreductases that participate in the control of ROS and are traditionally defined as redox regulators. New studies suggest the member...

  3. Control of Immune Cell Homeostasis and Function by lncRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowel, Walter K; Kotzin, Jonathan J; McCright, Sam J; Neal, Vanessa D; Henao-Mejia, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    The immune system is composed of diverse cell types that coordinate responses to infection and maintain tissue homeostasis. In each of these cells, extracellular cues determine highly specific epigenetic landscapes and transcriptional profiles to promote immunity while maintaining homeostasis. New evidence indicates that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play crucial roles in epigenetic and transcriptional regulation in mammals. Thus, lncRNAs have emerged as key regulatory molecules of immune cell gene expression programs in response to microbial and tissue-derived cues. We review here how lncRNAs control the function and homeostasis of cell populations during immune responses, emphasizing the diverse molecular mechanisms by which lncRNAs tune highly contextualized transcriptional programs. In addition, we discuss the new challenges faced in interrogating lncRNA mechanisms and function in the immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Highly controlled nest homeostasis of honey bees helps deactivate phenolics in nectar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fanglin; He, Jianzhong; Fu, Wenjun

    2005-06-01

    Honey bees have a highly developed nest homeostasis, for example, maintaining low CO2 levels and stable nest temperatures at 35°C.We investigate the role of nest homeostasis in deactivating phenolic compounds present in the nectar of Aloe littoralis. We show that the phenolic content in nectar was reduced (from 0.65% to 0.49%) after nectar was incubated in a nest of Apis cerana, and that it was reduced still more (from 0.65% to 0.37%) if nectar was mixed with hypopharyngeal gland proteins (HGP) of worker bees before being placed inside a nest. HGP had little effect on samples outside a nest, indicating that nest conditions are necessary for HGP to deactivate phenolics in nectar. Consequently, the highly controlled nest homeostasis of honey bees facilitates direct deactivation of phenolics in nectar, and plays a role in the action of HGP as well.

  5. The hypothalamic clock and its control of glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Yi, Chun-Xia; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Fliers, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The everyday life of mammals, including humans, exhibits many behavioral, physiological and endocrine oscillations. The major timekeeping mechanism for these rhythms is contained in the central nervous system (CNS). The output of the CNS clock not only controls daily rhythms in sleep/wake (or

  6. Phosphate homeostasis in Bartter syndrome: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinelli, Alberto; Viganò, Cristina; Provero, Maria Cristina; Barretta, Francesco; Albisetti, Alessandra; Tedeschi, Silvana; Scicchitano, Barbara; Bianchetti, Mario G

    2014-11-01

    Bartter patients may be hypercalciuric. Additional abnormalities in the metabolism of calcium, phosphate, and calciotropic hormones have occasionally been reported. The metabolism of calcium, phosphate, and calciotropic hormones was investigated in 15 patients with Bartter syndrome and 15 healthy subjects. Compared to the controls, Bartter patients had significantly reduced plasma phosphate {mean [interquartile range]:1.29 [1.16-1.46] vs. 1.61 [1.54-1.67] mmol/L} and maximal tubular phosphate reabsorption (1.16 [1.00-1.35] vs. 1.41 [1.37-1.47] mmol/L) and significantly increased parathyroid hormone (PTH) level (6.1 [4.5-7.7] vs. 2.8 [2.2-4.4] pmol/L). However, patients and controls did not differ in blood calcium, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin levels. In patients, an inverse correlation (P Bartter patients.

  7. CART neurons in the arcuate nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area exert differential controls on energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie Lau

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART codes for a pivotal neuropeptide important in the control of appetite and energy homeostasis. However, limited understanding exists for the defined effector sites underlying CART function, as discrepant effects of central CART administration have been reported. Methods: By combining Cart-cre knock-in mice with a Cart adeno-associated viral vector designed using the flip-excision switch (AAV-FLEX technology, specific reintroduction or overexpression of CART selectively in CART neurons in the arcuate nucleus (Arc and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA, respectively, was achieved. The effects on energy homeostasis control were investigated. Results: Here we show that CART neuron-specific reintroduction of CART into the Arc and LHA leads to distinct effects on energy homeostasis control. Specifically, CART reintroduction into the Arc of otherwise CART-deficient Cartcre/cre mice markedly decreased fat mass and body weight, whereas CART reintroduction into the LHA caused significant fat mass gain and lean mass loss, but overall unaltered body weight. The reduced adiposity in ArcCART;Cartcre/cre mice was associated with an increase in both energy expenditure and physical activity, along with significantly decreased Npy mRNA levels in the Arc but with no change in food consumption. Distinctively, the elevated fat mass in LHACART;Cartcre/cre mice was accompanied by diminished insulin responsiveness and glucose tolerance, greater spontaneous food intake, and reduced energy expenditure, which is consistent with the observed decrease of brown adipose tissue temperature. This is also in line with significantly reduced tyrosine hydroxylase (Th and notably increased corticotropin-releasing hormone (Crh mRNA expressions in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN. Conclusions: Taken together, these results identify catabolic and anabolic effects of CART in the Arc and LHA, respectively, demonstrating for

  8. CHIP regulates aquaporin-2 quality control and body water homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qi; Moeller, Hanne B.; Stevens, Donté A.

    2018-01-01

    The importance of the kidney distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and cortical collecting duct (CCD) is highlighted by various water and electrolyte disorders that arise when the unique transport properties of these segments are disturbed. Despite this critical role, little is known about which proteins...... by vasopressin; interacts with aquaporin-2 (AQP2), Hsp70, and Hsc70; and can directly ubiquitylate the water channel AQP2 in vitro. shRNA knockdown of CHIP in CCD cells increased AQP2 protein t1/2 and reduced AQP2 ubiquitylation, resulting in greater levels of AQP2 andphosphorylatedAQP2.CHIP knockdown increased...... the plasma membrane abundance of AQP2 in these cells. Compared with wild-type controls, CHIP knockout mice or novel CRISPR/Cas9 mice without CHIPE3 ligase activity had greater AQP2 abundance and altered renal water handling, with decreased water intake and urine volume, alongside higher urine osmolality. We...

  9. TCR down-regulation controls T cell homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Nielsen, Bodil L

    2009-01-01

    TCR and cytokine receptor signaling play key roles in the complex homeostatic mechanisms that maintain a relative stable number of T cells throughout life. Despite the homeostatic mechanisms, a slow decline in naive T cells is typically observed with age. The CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif...... controls TCR down-regulation and plays a central role in fine-tuning TCR expression and signaling in T cells. In this study, we show that the age-associated decline of naive T cells is strongly accelerated in CD3gammaLLAA knock-in mice homozygous for a double leucine to alanine mutation in the CD3gamma di......-leucine-based motif, whereas the number of memory T cells is unaffected by the mutation. This results in premature T cell population senescence with a severe dominance of memory T cells and very few naive T cells in middle-aged to old CD3gamma mutant mice. The reduced number of naive T cells in CD3gamma mutant mice...

  10. Homeostasis lighting control based on relationship between lighting environment and human behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Risa; Mita, Akira

    2015-03-01

    Although each person has own preferences, living spaces which can respond to various preferences and needs have not become reality. Focusing on the lighting environments which influence on the impression of living spaces, this research aims to offer comfortable lighting environments for each resident by a flexible control. This research examines the relationship between lighting environments and human behaviors considering colored lights. In accord with the relationship, this research proposes an illuminance-color control system which flexibly changes spatial environments responding to human conditions. Firstly, the psychological evaluation was conducted in order to build human models for various environments. As a result, preferred lighting environments for each examinee were determined for particular behaviors. Moreover, satisfaction levels of lighting environments were calculated by using seven types of impression of the environments as parameters. The results were summarized as human models. Secondly, this research proposed "Homeostasis Lighting Control System", which employs the human models. Homeostasis lighting control system embodies the algorithm of homeostasis, which is one of the functions of the physiological adaptation. Human discomfort feelings are obtained automatically by the sensor agent robot. The system can offer comfortable lighting environments without controlling environments by residents autonomously based on the information from the robot. This research takes into accounts both illuminance and color. The robot communicates with the server which contains human models, then the system corresponds to individuals. Combining these three systems, the proposed system can effectively control the lighting environment. At last, the feasibility of the proposed system was verified by simulation experiments.

  11. Proteomic analysis of human bladder epithelial cells by 2D blue native SDS-PAGE reveals TCDD-induced alterations of calcium and iron homeostasis possibly mediated by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Nisha; Pink, Mario; Petrat, Frank; Rettenmeier, Albert W; Schmitz-Spanke, Simone

    2015-01-02

    A proteomic analysis of the interaction among multiprotein complexes involved in 2,3,7,8-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-mediated toxicity in urinary bladder epithelial RT4 cells was performed using two-dimensional blue native SDS-PAGE (2D BN/SDS-PAGE). To enrich the protein complexes, unexposed and TCDD-exposed cells were fractionated. BN/SDS-PAGE of the resulting fractions led to an effective separation of proteins and protein complexes of various origins, including cell membrane, mitochondria, and other intracellular compartments. Major differences between the proteome of control and exposed cells involved the alteration of many calcium-regulated proteins (calmodulin, protein S100-A2, annexin A5, annexin A10, gelsolin isoform b) and iron-regulated proteins (ferritin, heme-binding protein 2, transferrin). On the basis of these findings, the intracellular calcium concentration was determined, revealing a significant increase after 24 h of exposure to TCDD. Moreover, the concentration of the labile iron pool (LIP) was also significantly elevated in TCDD-exposed cells. This increase was strongly inhibited by the calmodulin (CaM) antagonist W-7, which pointed toward a possible interaction between iron and calcium signaling. Because nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly enhanced in TCDD-exposed cells and was also inhibited by W-7, we hypothesize that alterations in calcium and iron homeostasis upon exposure to TCDD may be linked through NO generated by CaM-activated nitric oxide synthase. In our model, we propose that NO produced upon TCDD exposure interacts with the iron centers of iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs) that modulate the alteration of ferritin and transferrin, resulting in an augmented cellular LIP and, hence, increased toxicity.

  12. Practical homeostasis lighting control system using sensor agent robots for office space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Momoko; Mita, Akira

    2014-03-01

    The comfortable space can be changed by season, age, physical condition and the like. However, the current systems are not able to resolve them absolutely. This research proposes the Homeostasis lighting control system based on the mechanism of biotic homeostasis for making the algorithms of apparatus control. Homeostasis are kept by the interaction of the three systems, endocrine system, immune system, and nervous system[1]. By the gradual reaction in the endocrine system, body's protective response in the immune system, and the electrical reaction in the nerve system, we can keep the environments against variable changes. The new lighting control system utilizes this mechanism. Firstly, we focused on legibility and comfort in the office space to construct the control model learning from the endocrine and immune systems. The mechanism of the endocrine system is used for ambient lights in the space is used considering circadian rhythm for comfort. For the legibility, the immune system is used to control considering devices near the human depending on the distance between the human. Simulations and the demonstration were conducted to show the feasibility. Finally, the nerve system was intruded to enhance the system.

  13. Dietary iron controls circadian hepatic glucose metabolism through heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcox, Judith A; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-Hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu; McClain, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  14. Two-Component Signaling System VgrRS Directly Senses Extracytoplasmic and Intracellular Iron to Control Bacterial Adaptation under Iron Depleted Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Both iron starvation and excess are detrimental to cellular life, especially for animal and plant pathogens since they always live in iron-limited environments produced by host immune responses. However, how organisms sense and respond to iron is incompletely understood. Herein, we reveal that in the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, VgrS (also named ColS is a membrane-bound receptor histidine kinase that senses extracytoplasmic iron limitation in the periplasm, while its cognate response regulator, VgrR (ColR, detects intracellular iron excess. Under iron-depleted conditions, dissociation of Fe3+ from the periplasmic sensor region of VgrS activates the VgrS autophosphorylation and subsequent phosphotransfer to VgrR, an OmpR-family transcription factor that regulates bacterial responses to take up iron. VgrR-VgrS regulon and the consensus DNA binding motif of the transcription factor VgrR were dissected by comparative proteomic and ChIP-seq analyses, which revealed that in reacting to iron-depleted environments, VgrR directly or indirectly controls the expressions of hundreds of genes that are involved in various physiological cascades, especially those associated with iron-uptake. Among them, we demonstrated that the phosphorylated VgrR tightly represses the transcription of a special TonB-dependent receptor gene, tdvA. This regulation is a critical prerequisite for efficient iron uptake and bacterial virulence since activation of tdvA transcription is detrimental to these processes. When the intracellular iron accumulates, the VgrR-Fe2+ interaction dissociates not only the binding between VgrR and the tdvA promoter, but also the interaction between VgrR and VgrS. This relieves the repression in tdvA transcription to impede continuous iron uptake and avoids possible toxic effects of excessive iron accumulation. Our results revealed a signaling system that directly senses both extracytoplasmic and intracellular

  15. Control of cast iron and casts manufacturing by Inmold method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the usability of cast iron spheroidizing process in mould control by ATD method as well as by ultrasonic method were presented. Structure of instrumentation needed for control form performance of cast iron spheroidizing by Inmold method was illustrated. Author, pointed out that amount of magnesium master alloy should obtain 0,8 ÷ 1,0% of mass in form at all. Such quantity of preliminary alloy assure of obtain of nodular graphite in cast iron. In consequence of this, is reduce the cast iron liquidus temperature and decrease of recalescence temperature of graphite-eutectic crystallization in compare with initial cast iron. Control of casts can be carried out by ultrasonic method. In plain cast iron, ferritic-pearlitic microstructure is obtaining. Additives of 1,5% Cu ensure pearlitic structure.

  16. Iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana: transcriptomic analyses reveal novel FIT-regulated genes, iron deficiency marker genes and functional gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Hans-Jörg; Pateyron, Stéphanie; Bauer, Petra

    2016-10-03

    FIT (FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR) is the central regulator of iron uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. We performed transcriptome analyses of six day-old seedlings and roots of six week-old plants using wild type, a fit knock-out mutant and a FIT over-expression line grown under iron-sufficient or iron-deficient conditions. We compared genes regulated in a FIT-dependent manner depending on the developmental stage of the plants. We assembled a high likelihood dataset which we used to perform co-expression and functional analysis of the most stably iron deficiency-induced genes. 448 genes were found FIT-regulated. Out of these, 34 genes were robustly FIT-regulated in root and seedling samples and included 13 novel FIT-dependent genes. Three hundred thirty-one genes showed differential regulation in response to the presence and absence of FIT only in the root samples, while this was the case for 83 genes in the seedling samples. We assembled a virtual dataset of iron-regulated genes based on a total of 14 transcriptomic analyses of iron-deficient and iron-sufficient wild-type plants to pinpoint the best marker genes for iron deficiency and analyzed this dataset in depth. Co-expression analysis of this dataset revealed 13 distinct regulons part of which predominantly contained functionally related genes. We could enlarge the list of FIT-dependent genes and discriminate between genes that are robustly FIT-regulated in roots and seedlings or only in one of those. FIT-regulated genes were mostly induced, few of them were repressed by FIT. With the analysis of a virtual dataset we could filter out and pinpoint new candidates among the most reliable marker genes for iron deficiency. Moreover, co-expression and functional analysis of this virtual dataset revealed iron deficiency-induced and functionally distinct regulons.

  17. Atmospheric and marine controls on aerosol iron solubility in seawater

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, A.R.; Croot, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The fraction of atmospherically deposited iron which dissolves in seawater, or becomes available to phytoplankton for growth, is a key determinant of primary productivity in many open ocean regions. As such this parameter plays an important part in the global oceanic cycles of iron and carbon, and yet the factors that control iron dissolution from aerosol are very poorly understood. In this manuscript we seek to synthesise the available knowledge of these factors, which operate in the atmos...

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway required for immune homeostasis is neurally controlled by arrestin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Varsha; Aballay, Alejandro

    2012-09-28

    In response to pathogen infection, the host innate immune system activates microbial killing pathways and cellular stress pathways that need to be balanced because insufficient or excessive immune responses have deleterious consequences. Recent studies demonstrate that two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans control immune homeostasis. To investigate further how GPCR signaling controls immune homeostasis at the organismal level, we studied arrestin-1 (ARR-1), which is the only GPCR adaptor protein in C. elegans. The results indicate that ARR-1 is required for GPCR signaling in ASH, ASI, AQR, PQR, and URX neurons, which control the unfolded protein response and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway required for innate immunity. ARR-1 activity also controlled immunity through ADF chemosensory and AFD thermosensory neurons that regulate longevity. Furthermore, we found that although ARR-1 played a key role in the control of immunity by AFD thermosensory neurons, it did not control longevity through these cells. However, ARR-1 partially controlled longevity through ADF neurons.

  19. Parenteral Iron Therapy in the Treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Pregnancy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, N.; Ayub, R.; Khan, W. U.; Ijaz, S.; Alam, A. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To compare the efficacy and safety profile of total dose infusion of low molecular weight iron dextran with divided doses of intravenous iron sucrose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, over a period of two years from January 2008 to December 2009. Methodology: Pregnant women at gestational age more than 12 weeks with the confirmed diagnosis of Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA) were divided into two groups. In the group-A, intravenous iron sucrose was given in divided doses while in the group-B, total daily intake of Low Molecular Weight (LMW) of iron dextran was given. Post-infusion Hemoglobin (Hb) was checked at 4 weeks and at the time of delivery for both groups. Paired sample t-test is applied and comparison (in terms of rise in hemoglobin from pre to post) of both groups was not found to be significant. Results: In the group-A (iron sucrose group), mean pre-infusion Hb levels was 9.09 ± 0.83 gm/dl. Mean increase in Hemoglobin (Hb) was 10.75 ± 1.097 gm/dl after 4 weeks of infusion and 11.06 ± 0.866 gm/dl at delivery (p < 0.001). In group-B (iron dextran group) pre-infusion haemoglobin was 8.735 ± 0.956 gm/dl and the mean increase in hemoglobin was 10.613 ± 1.22 gm/dl at 4-week while mean increase of 10.859 ± 1.11 gm/dl at the time of delivery (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Both LMW iron dextran, as well as iron sucrose are equally effective in treatment of IDA during pregnancy, however, LMW iron dextran has the advantage of single visit treatment. (author)

  20. Pulmonary Toxicity and Modifications in Iron Homeostasis Following Libby Amphibole Asbestos Exposure in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Individuals suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD) develop iron dysregulation which may influence pulmonary toxicity and injury upon exposure to asbestos. We hypothesized spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats woul...

  1. The nuclear IκB family of proteins controls gene regulation and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MaruYama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The inhibitory IκB family of proteins is subdivided into two groups based on protein localization in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. These proteins interact with NF-κB, a major transcription factor regulating the expression of many inflammatory cytokines, by modulating its transcriptional activity. However, nuclear IκB family proteins not only interact with NF-κB to change its transcriptional activity, but they also bind to chromatin and control gene expression. This review provides an overview of nuclear IκB family proteins and their role in immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Rethinking Iron Regulation and Assessment in Iron Deficiency, Anemia of Chronic Disease, and Obesity: Introducing Hepcidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa; Pustacioglu, Cenk; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Braunschweig, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Adequate iron availability is essential to human development and overall health. Iron is a key component of oxygen-carrying proteins, has a pivotal role in cellular metabolism, and is essential to cell growth and differentiation. Inadequate dietary iron intake, chronic and acute inflammatory conditions, and obesity are each associated with alterations in iron homeostasis. Tight regulation of iron is necessary because iron is highly toxic and human beings can only excrete small amounts through sweat, skin and enterocyte sloughing, and fecal and menstrual blood loss. Hepcidin, a small peptide hormone produced mainly by the liver, acts as the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin controls movement of iron into plasma by regulating the activity of the sole known iron exporter ferroportin-1. Downregulation of the ferroportin-1 exporter results in sequestration of iron within intestinal enterocytes, hepatocytes, and iron-storing macrophages reducing iron bioavailability. Hepcidin expression is increased by higher body iron levels and inflammation and decreased by anemia and hypoxia. Importantly, existing data illustrate that hepcidin may play a significant role in the development of several iron-related disorders, including the anemia of chronic disease and the iron dysregulation observed in obesity. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to discuss iron regulation, with specific emphasis on systemic regulation by hepcidin, and examine the role of hepcidin within several disease states, including iron deficiency, anemia of chronic disease, and obesity. The relationship between obesity and iron depletion and the clinical assessment of iron status will also be reviewed. PMID:22717199

  3. Iron Profile and Glycaemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Misra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron overload is increasingly being connected to insulin resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM patients. Free iron causes the assembly of reactive oxygen species that invariably steer the body’s homeostasis towards oxidative stress-mediated diabetic complications. This study aims to assess the serum iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC, and percentage transferrin saturation (Tsat of 150 subjects divided into three groups (I,II,III of 50. Healthy individuals (controls constituted Group I. Group II consisted of T2DM patients with optimal glycaemic control. T2DM patients with suboptimal glycaemic control formed group III. Mean serum free iron concentration was 105.34 ± 3.5, 107.33 ± 3.45, and 125.58 ± 3.45 μg/dL in Group I, Group II, and Group III, respectively. Mean serum TIBC concentration in Group I, Group II, and Group III was 311.39 ± 5.47, 309.63 ± 6.1, and 284.2 ± 3.18 μg/dL, respectively. Mean serum transferrin saturation (% in Group I, Group II, and Group III was 34.17 ± 1.21, 35.02 ± 1.2, and 44.39 ± 1.07, respectively. The difference between TIBC, mean serum free iron concentration, and transferrin saturation between Group I and Group III (for all, p values <0.001, as well as between Group II and Group III (p values 0.0012, 0.0015, and <0.0001, respectively was statistically significant. The fasting plasma glucose values of Groups II and III were significantly higher than those of Group I, (p < 0.0001. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c values were also shown to increase from Group I to II and then III, and the increase was highly significant (all p values <0.0001. Thus, decreased glycaemic control and an increase in the glycation of haemoglobin was the key to elevation in serum iron values and alterations in other parameters. However, a significant correlation was absent between serum iron and HbA1c (r = 0.05 and transferrin saturation (r = 0.0496 in Group III.

  4. Casein kinase 1 regulates sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) to control sterol homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookheart, Rita T; Lee, Chih-Yung S; Espenshade, Peter J

    2014-01-31

    Sterol homeostasis is tightly controlled by the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factor that is highly conserved from fungi to mammals. In fission yeast, SREBP functions in an oxygen-sensing pathway to promote adaptation to decreased oxygen supply that limits oxygen-dependent sterol synthesis. Low oxygen stimulates proteolytic cleavage of the SREBP homolog Sre1, generating the active transcription factor Sre1N that drives expression of sterol biosynthetic enzymes. In addition, low oxygen increases the stability and DNA binding activity of Sre1N. To identify additional signals controlling Sre1 activity, we conducted a genetic overexpression screen. Here, we describe our isolation and characterization of the casein kinase 1 family member Hhp2 as a novel regulator of Sre1N. Deletion of Hhp2 increases Sre1N protein stability and ergosterol levels in the presence of oxygen. Hhp2-dependent Sre1N degradation by the proteasome requires Hhp2 kinase activity, and Hhp2 binds and phosphorylates Sre1N at specific residues. Our results describe a role for casein kinase 1 as a direct regulator of sterol homeostasis. Given the role of mammalian Hhp2 homologs, casein kinase 1δ and 1ε, in regulation of the circadian clock, these findings may provide a mechanism for coordinating circadian rhythm and lipid metabolism.

  5. Exercise and Glycemic Control: Focus on Redox Homeostasis and Redox-Sensitive Protein Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lewan; Shaw, Christopher S.; Stepto, Nigel K.; Levinger, Itamar

    2017-01-01

    Physical inactivity, excess energy consumption, and obesity are associated with elevated systemic oxidative stress and the sustained activation of redox-sensitive stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Sustained SAPK activation leads to aberrant insulin signaling, impaired glycemic control, and the development and progression of cardiometabolic disease. Paradoxically, acute exercise transiently increases oxidative stress and SAPK signaling, yet postexercise glycemic control and skeletal muscle function are enhanced. Furthermore, regular exercise leads to the upregulation of antioxidant defense, which likely assists in the mitigation of chronic oxidative stress-associated disease. In this review, we explore the complex spatiotemporal interplay between exercise, oxidative stress, and glycemic control, and highlight exercise-induced reactive oxygen species and redox-sensitive protein signaling as important regulators of glucose homeostasis. PMID:28529499

  6. Central control of glucose homeostasis: the brain--endocrine pancreas axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorens, B

    2010-10-01

    A large body of data gathered over the last decades has delineated the neuronal pathways that link the central nervous system with the autonomic innervation of the endocrine pancreas, which controls alpha- and beta-cell secretion activity and mass. These are important regulatory functions that are certainly keys for preserving the capacity of the endocrine pancreas to control glucose homeostasis over a lifetime. Identifying the cells involved in controlling the autonomic innervation of the endocrine pancreas, in response to nutrient, hormonal and environmental cues and how these cues are detected to activate neuronal activity are important goals of current research. Elucidation of these questions may possibly lead to new means for preserving or restoring defects in insulin and glucagon secretion associated with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Modular design of artificial tissue homeostasis: robust control through synthetic cellular heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles Miller

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology efforts have largely focused on small engineered gene networks, yet understanding how to integrate multiple synthetic modules and interface them with endogenous pathways remains a challenge. Here we present the design, system integration, and analysis of several large scale synthetic gene circuits for artificial tissue homeostasis. Diabetes therapy represents a possible application for engineered homeostasis, where genetically programmed stem cells maintain a steady population of β-cells despite continuous turnover. We develop a new iterative process that incorporates modular design principles with hierarchical performance optimization targeted for environments with uncertainty and incomplete information. We employ theoretical analysis and computational simulations of multicellular reaction/diffusion models to design and understand system behavior, and find that certain features often associated with robustness (e.g., multicellular synchronization and noise attenuation are actually detrimental for tissue homeostasis. We overcome these problems by engineering a new class of genetic modules for 'synthetic cellular heterogeneity' that function to generate beneficial population diversity. We design two such modules (an asynchronous genetic oscillator and a signaling throttle mechanism, demonstrate their capacity for enhancing robust control, and provide guidance for experimental implementation with various computational techniques. We found that designing modules for synthetic heterogeneity can be complex, and in general requires a framework for non-linear and multifactorial analysis. Consequently, we adapt a 'phenotypic sensitivity analysis' method to determine how functional module behaviors combine to achieve optimal system performance. We ultimately combine this analysis with Bayesian network inference to extract critical, causal relationships between a module's biochemical rate-constants, its high level functional behavior in

  8. Modular design of artificial tissue homeostasis: robust control through synthetic cellular heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Miles; Hafner, Marc; Sontag, Eduardo; Davidsohn, Noah; Subramanian, Sairam; Purnick, Priscilla E M; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Weiss, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology efforts have largely focused on small engineered gene networks, yet understanding how to integrate multiple synthetic modules and interface them with endogenous pathways remains a challenge. Here we present the design, system integration, and analysis of several large scale synthetic gene circuits for artificial tissue homeostasis. Diabetes therapy represents a possible application for engineered homeostasis, where genetically programmed stem cells maintain a steady population of β-cells despite continuous turnover. We develop a new iterative process that incorporates modular design principles with hierarchical performance optimization targeted for environments with uncertainty and incomplete information. We employ theoretical analysis and computational simulations of multicellular reaction/diffusion models to design and understand system behavior, and find that certain features often associated with robustness (e.g., multicellular synchronization and noise attenuation) are actually detrimental for tissue homeostasis. We overcome these problems by engineering a new class of genetic modules for 'synthetic cellular heterogeneity' that function to generate beneficial population diversity. We design two such modules (an asynchronous genetic oscillator and a signaling throttle mechanism), demonstrate their capacity for enhancing robust control, and provide guidance for experimental implementation with various computational techniques. We found that designing modules for synthetic heterogeneity can be complex, and in general requires a framework for non-linear and multifactorial analysis. Consequently, we adapt a 'phenotypic sensitivity analysis' method to determine how functional module behaviors combine to achieve optimal system performance. We ultimately combine this analysis with Bayesian network inference to extract critical, causal relationships between a module's biochemical rate-constants, its high level functional behavior in isolation, and

  9. Iron saturation control in RHIC dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.A.; Gupta, R.C.; Kahn, S.A.; Hahn, H.; Morgan, G.H.; Wanderer, P.J.; Willen, E.

    1991-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will require 360 dipoles of 80 mm bore. This paper discusses the field perturbations produced by the saturation of the yoke iron. Changes have been made to the yoke to reduce these perturbations, in particular, decapole -4 . Measurements and calculations for 6 series of dipole magnets are presented. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  11. Effects of acute creatine supplementation on iron homeostasis and uric acid-based antioxidant capacity of plasma after wingate test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros Marcelo P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary creatine has been largely used as an ergogenic aid to improve strength and athletic performance, especially in short-term and high energy-demanding anaerobic exercise. Recent findings have also suggested a possible antioxidant role for creatine in muscle tissues during exercise. Here we evaluate the effects of a 1-week regimen of 20 g/day creatine supplementation on the plasma antioxidant capacity, free and heme iron content, and uric acid and lipid peroxidation levels of young subjects (23.1 ± 5.8 years old immediately before and 5 and 60 min after the exhaustive Wingate test. Results Maximum anaerobic power was improved by acute creatine supplementation (10.5 %, but it was accompanied by a 2.4-fold increase in pro-oxidant free iron ions in the plasma. However, potential iron-driven oxidative insult was adequately counterbalanced by proportional increases in antioxidant ferric-reducing activity in plasma (FRAP, leading to unaltered lipid peroxidation levels. Interestingly, the FRAP index, found to be highly dependent on uric acid levels in the placebo group, also had an additional contribution from other circulating metabolites in creatine-fed subjects. Conclusions Our data suggest that acute creatine supplementation improved the anaerobic performance of athletes and limited short-term oxidative insults, since creatine-induced iron overload was efficiently circumvented by acquired FRAP capacity attributed to: overproduction of uric acid in energy-depleted muscles (as an end-product of purine metabolism and a powerful iron chelating agent and inherent antioxidant activity of creatine.

  12. Association Studies of HFE C282Y and H63D Variants with Oral Cancer Risk and Iron Homeostasis Among Whites and Blacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan R. Jones

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis (HFE gene are associated with excessive iron absorption from the diet, and pro-oxidant effects of iron accumulation are thought to be a risk factor for several types of cancer. Methods: The C282Y (rs1800562 and H63D (rs1799945 polymorphisms were genotyped in 301 oral cancer cases and 437 controls and analyzed in relation to oral cancer risk, and serum iron biomarker levels from a subset of 130 subjects. Results: Individuals with the C282Y allele had lower total iron binding capacity (TIBC (321.2 ± 37.2 µg/dL vs. 397.7 ± 89.0 µg/dL, p = 0.007 and higher percent transferrin saturation (22.0 ± 8.7 vs. 35.6 ± 22.9, p = 0.023 than wild type individuals. Iron and ferritin levels approached significantly higher levels for the C282Y allele (p = 0.0632 and p = 0.0588, respectively. Conclusions: Iron biomarker levels were elevated by the C282Y allele, but neither (rs1800562 nor (rs1799945 was associated with oral cancer risk in blacks and whites.

  13. Amino acids and autophagy: cross-talk and co-operation to control cellular homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Bernadette; Korolchuk, Viktor I; Sarkar, Sovan

    2015-10-01

    Maintenance of amino acid homeostasis is important for healthy cellular function, metabolism and growth. Intracellular amino acid concentrations are dynamic; the high demand for protein synthesis must be met with constant dietary intake, followed by cellular influx, utilization and recycling of nutrients. Autophagy is a catabolic process via which superfluous or damaged proteins and organelles are delivered to the lysosome and degraded to release free amino acids into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, autophagy is specifically activated in response to amino acid starvation via two key signaling cascades: the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) and the general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) pathways. These pathways are key regulators of the integration between anabolic (amino acid depleting) and catabolic (such as autophagy which is amino acid replenishing) processes to ensure intracellular amino acid homeostasis. Here, we discuss the key roles that amino acids, along with energy (ATP, glucose) and oxygen, are playing in cellular growth and proliferation. We further explore how sophisticated methods are employed by cells to sense intracellular amino acid concentrations, how amino acids can act as a switch to dictate the temporal and spatial activation of anabolic and catabolic processes and how autophagy contributes to the replenishment of free amino acids, all to ensure cell survival. Relevance of these molecular processes to cellular and organismal physiology and pathology is also discussed.

  14. Hepatic CREB3L3 controls whole-body energy homeostasis and improves obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Satoh, Aoi; Yabe, Sachiko; Furusawa, Mika; Tokushige, Naoko; Tezuka, Hitomi; Mikami, Motoki; Iwata, Wakiko; Shingyouchi, Akiko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kiwata, Shiori; Fujimoto, Yuri; Shimizu, Hidehisa; Danno, Hirosuke; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ishii, Kiyoaki; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Shimada, Masako; Kawakami, Yasushi; Urayama, Osamu; Sone, Hirohito; Takekoshi, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes in the liver is the key to maintaining systemic energy homeostasis during starvation. The membrane-bound transcription factor cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 3 (CREB3L3) has been reported to be activated during fasting and to regulate triglyceride metabolism. Here, we show that CREB3L3 confers a wide spectrum of metabolic responses to starvation in vivo. Adenoviral and transgenic overexpression of nuclear CREB3L3 induced systemic lipolysis, hepatic ketogenesis, and insulin sensitivity with increased energy expenditure, leading to marked reduction in body weight, plasma lipid levels, and glucose levels. CREB3L3 overexpression activated gene expression levels and plasma levels of antidiabetic hormones, including fibroblast growth factor 21 and IGF-binding protein 2. Amelioration of diabetes by hepatic activation of CREB3L3 was also observed in several types of diabetic obese mice. Nuclear CREB3L3 mutually activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α promoter in an autoloop fashion and is crucial for the ligand transactivation of PPARα by interacting with its transcriptional regulator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α. CREB3L3 directly and indirectly controls fibroblast growth factor 21 expression and its plasma level, which contributes at least partially to the catabolic effects of CREB3L3 on systemic energy homeostasis in the entire body. Therefore, CREB3L3 is a therapeutic target for obesity and diabetes.

  15. Homeostasis 5: nurses as external agents of control in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, John; McVicar, Andrew

    Breast cancer is caused by a homeostatic imbalance of cell division. Healthcare practitioners need to understand cellular activities to appreciate the physiological basis of health (homeostasis), the pathophysiological basis of illness and the physiological rationale of healthcare. Cells are the 'basic unit of life' (Clancy and McVicar, 2011a). This article describes normal cell division and the anatomy and physiology of the breast and, using a case study, will show how breast cancer is a homeostatic imbalance of cell division. There are analogies between the components of homeostasis and the components of the nursing (healthcare) process (Clancy and McVicar, 2011b) in the condition of breast cancer. After reading this article, nurses should be able to: understand that breast cancer is a cellular hence chemical imbalance that causes uncontrollable mitotic division of breast cells; understand how the cell cycle of cancer cells differs from that of normal cells; identify nature-nurture interactions involved in the aetiology of breast cancer; understand that when caring for people with breast cancer, health professionals including oncology nurses are acting as external agents of homeostatic control as the patient 'recovers' from breast cancer, and also to some extent when reducing signs and symptoms, hence quality of life, by providing palliative care.

  16. Computer-aided control of high-quality cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses the possibility of control of the high-quality grey cast iron and ductile iron using the author’s genuine computer programs. The programs have been developed with the help of algorithms based on statistical relationships that are said to exist between the characteristic parameters of DTA curves and properties, like Rp0,2, Rm, A5 and HB. It has been proved that the spheroidisation and inoculation treatment of cast iron changes in an important way the characteristic parameters of DTA curves, thus enabling a control of these operations as regards their correctness and effectiveness, along with the related changes in microstructure and mechanical properties of cast iron. Moreover, some examples of statistical relationships existing between the typical properties of ductile iron and its control process were given for cases of the melts consistent and inconsistent with the adopted technology.A test stand for control of the high-quality cast iron and respective melts has been schematically depicted.

  17. The Hog1p kinase regulates Aft1p transcription factor to control iron accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Telma S; Pereira, Clara; Canadell, David; Vilaça, Rita; Teixeira, Vítor; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Posas, Francesc; Costa, Vítor

    2018-01-01

    Iron acquisition systems have to be tightly regulated to assure a continuous supply of iron, since it is essential for survival, but simultaneously to prevent iron overload that is toxic to the cells. In budding yeast, the low‑iron sensing transcription factor Aft1p is a master regulator of the iron regulon. Our previous work revealed that bioactive sphingolipids modulate iron homeostasis as yeast cells lacking the sphingomyelinase Isc1p exhibit an upregulation of the iron regulon. In this study, we show that Isc1p impacts on iron accumulation and localization. Notably, Aft1p is activated in isc1Δ cells due to a decrease in its phosphorylation and an increase in its nuclear levels. Consistently, the expression of a phosphomimetic version of Aft1p-S210/S224 that favours its nuclear export abolished iron accumulation in isc1Δ cells. Notably, the Hog1p kinase, homologue of mammalian p38, interacts with and directly phosphorylates Aft1p at residues S210 and S224. However, Hog1p-Aft1p interaction decreases in isc1Δ cells, which likely contributes to Aft1p dephosphorylation and consequently to Aft1p activation and iron overload in isc1Δ cells. These results suggest that alterations in sphingolipid composition in isc1Δ cells may impact on iron homeostasis by disturbing the regulation of Aft1p by Hog1p. To our knowledge, Hog1p is the first kinase reported to directly regulate Aft1p, impacting on iron homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F

    2015-12-22

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system.

  19. Importance of the gut-brain axis in the control of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migrenne, Stéphanie; Marsollier, Nicolas; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, Céline; Magnan, Christophe

    2006-12-01

    Adult mammals finely match glucose production to glucose utilization, thus allowing glycaemia to be maintained in a physiological range of 0.8-1.2mg/dl whatever the energetic status of the mammal (i.e. fed or fasted, rested or exercised). To accomplish this, peripheral signals originating from the gut 'inform' the central nervous system, which in turn is able to monitor the status of both peripheral glucose stores and ongoing fuel availability. Indeed, both secretion and action of hormones regulating endogenous glucose production and utilization are regulated by the autonomic nervous system. These gut signals are either hormonal (e.g. glucagon-like peptide-1, ghrelin and cholecystokinine) or neuronal (e.g. afferent vagus nerve fibres). Recent data, combined with the development of incretin analogues for treatment of diabetes, highlight the importance of the gut-brain axis, especially glucagon-like peptide-1 and ghrelin, in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  20. Iron fortification of food: a strategy for control of iron deficiency anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, T.; BILAL, R.

    2001-01-01

    Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA) is prevalent in the low socio-economic strata of population of developing countries. Most of the developed countries have well established programs of food fortification with iron. Many developing countries are initiating such programs and Pakistan is one of them. In the ninth 5 year plan of Pakistan, fortification of wheat flour with appropriate level and form of iron will be done to combat the IDA problem. The current paper summarizes the information regarding various fortificants that are being used for the control of IDA world over, along with some information on their effectiveness and bioavailability, where nuclear techniques have proven to be very useful. This will help in the initial planning of the National Program of wheat flour fortification trial in Pakistan. (author)

  1. Rotor Field Oriented Control with adaptive Iron Loss Compensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known from the literature that iron loses in an induction motor implies field angle estimation errors and hence detuning problems. In this paper a new method for estimating the iron loss resistor in an induction motor is presented. The method is based on a traditional dynamic model...... controlled in a Field Oriented Control scheme. This deviation is used to force a MIT-rule based adaptive estimator. An adaptive compensator containing the developed estimator is introduced and verified by simulations and tested by real time experiments....

  2. Environmental control measures in sponge iron industry with particular reference to Tata Sponge Iron Limited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarangi, B.M.; Kesav, B.; Sheshadri, M.K.

    2002-07-01

    Direct reduced iron or sponge iron technology was developed as an alternate route for steel making and is considered as a clean technology. The waste generation and gas emissions from this route of steel making are far less when compared to the conventional blast furnace route. The paper details the efforts of Tata Sponge Iron Limited to make the process a clean technology without affecting its surroundings and natural resources. The paper describes the system of bag filters made from filter glass fabric for collecting hot waste gases and for dedusting of product and raw material handling circuits. Design of the plant for waste gas cleaning by scrubbers and by electrostatic precipitators is described. Major pollution control equipment installed at Tata Sponge Iron Ltd., described in the article are: a wet gas cleaning plant (in 1986), a second gas cleaning plant with electrostatic precipitator (in 1998) and dust extraction and dust suppression systems. Water is sprayed around the plant to control fugitive dust and trees have been grown around it. 13 figs.

  3. The importance of being subtle: small changes in calcium homeostasis control cognitive decline in normal aging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Toescu, E.C.; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 6, - (2007), s. 267-273 ISSN 1474-9718 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Aging * Ca homeostasis * Cognitive decline Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.854, year: 2007

  4. Modelling Systemic Iron Regulation during Dietary Iron Overload and Acute Inflammation: Role of Hepcidin-Independent Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enculescu, Mihaela; Metzendorf, Christoph; Sparla, Richard; Hahnel, Maximilian; Bode, Johannes; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Legewie, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Systemic iron levels must be maintained in physiological concentrations to prevent diseases associated with iron deficiency or iron overload. A key role in this process plays ferroportin, the only known mammalian transmembrane iron exporter, which releases iron from duodenal enterocytes, hepatocytes, or iron-recycling macrophages into the blood stream. Ferroportin expression is tightly controlled by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms in response to hypoxia, iron deficiency, heme iron and inflammatory cues by cell-autonomous and systemic mechanisms. At the systemic level, the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin is released from the liver in response to these cues, binds to ferroportin and triggers its degradation. The relative importance of individual ferroportin control mechanisms and their interplay at the systemic level is incompletely understood. Here, we built a mathematical model of systemic iron regulation. It incorporates the dynamics of organ iron pools as well as regulation by the hepcidin/ferroportin system. We calibrated and validated the model with time-resolved measurements of iron responses in mice challenged with dietary iron overload and/or inflammation. The model demonstrates that inflammation mainly reduces the amount of iron in the blood stream by reducing intracellular ferroportin transcription, and not by hepcidin-dependent ferroportin protein destabilization. In contrast, ferroportin regulation by hepcidin is the predominant mechanism of iron homeostasis in response to changing iron diets for a big range of dietary iron contents. The model further reveals that additional homeostasis mechanisms must be taken into account at very high dietary iron levels, including the saturation of intestinal uptake of nutritional iron and the uptake of circulating, non-transferrin-bound iron, into liver. Taken together, our model quantitatively describes systemic iron metabolism and generated experimentally testable predictions for additional

  5. Polyamines control of cation transport across plant membranes: implications for ion homeostasis and abiotic stress signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Polyamines are unique polycationic metabolites, controlling a variety of vital functions in plants, including growth and stress responses. Over the last two decades a bulk of data was accumulated providing explicit evidence that polyamines play an essential role in regulating plant membrane transport. The most straightforward example is a blockage of the two major vacuolar cation channels, namely slow (SV) and fast (FV) activating ones, by the micromolar concentrations of polyamines. This effect is direct and fully reversible, with a potency descending in a sequence Spm(4+) > Spd(3+) > Put(2+). On the contrary, effects of polyamines on the plasma membrane (PM) cation and K(+)-selective channels are hardly dependent on polyamine species, display a relatively low affinity, and are likely to be indirect. Polyamines also affect vacuolar and PM H(+) pumps and Ca(2+) pump of the PM. On the other hand, catabolization of polyamines generates H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydroxyl radicals. Export of polyamines to the apoplast and their oxidation there by available amine oxidases results in the induction of a novel ion conductance and confers Ca(2+) influx across the PM. This mechanism, initially established for plant responses to pathogen attack (including a hypersensitive response), has been recently shown to mediate plant responses to a variety of abiotic stresses. In this review we summarize the effects of polyamines and their catabolites on cation transport in plants and discuss the implications of these effects for ion homeostasis, signaling, and plant adaptive responses to environment.

  6. Pancreatic polypeptide controls energy homeostasis via Npy6r signaling in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Loh, Kim; Lin, Shu; Lau, Jackie; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Yanchuan; Berning, Britt A; Enriquez, Ronaldo; Driessler, Frank; Macia, Laurence; Khor, Ee Cheng; Qi, Yue; Baldock, Paul; Sainsbury, Amanda; Herzog, Herbert

    2014-01-07

    Y-receptors control energy homeostasis, but the role of Npy6 receptors (Npy6r) is largely unknown. Young Npy6r-deficient (Npy6r(-/-)) mice have reduced body weight, lean mass, and adiposity, while older and high-fat-fed Npy6r(-/-) mice have low lean mass with increased adiposity. Npy6r(-/-) mice showed reduced hypothalamic growth hormone releasing hormone (Ghrh) expression and serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels relative to WT. This is likely due to impaired vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) signaling in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where we found Npy6r coexpressed in VIP neurons. Peripheral administration of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) increased Fos expression in the SCN, increased energy expenditure, and reduced food intake in WT, but not Npy6r(-/-), mice. Moreover, intraperitoneal (i.p.) PP injection increased hypothalamic Ghrh mRNA expression and serum IGF-1 levels in WT, but not Npy6r(-/-), mice, an effect blocked by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VPAC) receptors antagonism. Thus, PP-initiated signaling through Npy6r in VIP neurons regulates the growth hormone axis and body composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular control of steady-state dendritic cell maturation and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Gianna Elena; Ma, Averil

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized sentinels responsible for coordinating adaptive immunity. This function is dependent upon coupled sensitivity to environmental signs of inflammation and infection to cellular maturation-the programmed alteration of DC phenotype and function to enhance immune cell activation. Although DCs are thus well equipped to respond to pathogens, maturation triggers are not unique to infection. Given that immune cells are exquisitely sensitive to the biological functions of DCs, we now appreciate that multiple layers of suppression are required to restrict the environmental sensitivity, cellular maturation, and even life span of DCs to prevent aberrant immune activation during the steady state. At the same time, steady-state DCs are not quiescent but rather perform key functions that support homeostasis of numerous cell types. Here we review these functions and molecular mechanisms of suppression that control steady-state DC maturation. Corruption of these steady-state operatives has diverse immunological consequences and pinpoints DCs as potent drivers of autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

  8. Control of chilling tendency in grey cast iron reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliu Ojo Seidu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In grey cast iron remelt and recycling, white iron can result in the cast product if careful control of the chilling tendency is not ensured. Many jobbing foundries are constrained in furnace types and available foundry additives that the operation always results in white irons. This study is towards ensuring grey iron is reproduced from cast iron scrap auto engine blocks, when using a diesel fired rotary furnace and a FeSi alloy for structural modification (inoculation. With varying addition rate of the FeSi alloy to the tapped molten metal, chill wedge tests were performed on two different wedge samples of type W (according to ASTM A367- wedge test with cooling modulus of 0.45 cm (W3½ and 0.54 cm (W4. The carbon equivalents for the test casts were within hypoeutectic range (3.85 wt. (% to 4.11 wt. (%. In the W4 wedge sample, at 2.0 wt. (% addition rate of the FeSi alloy, the relative clear chill was totally reduced to zero from 19.76%, while the relative mottled chill was brought down to 9.59% from 33.71%. The microstructure from the cast at this level of addition was free of carbidic phases; it shows randomly oriented graphite flakes evenly distributed in the iron matrix. Hardness assessment shows that increasing rate of FeSi addition results in decreasing hardness, with maximum effect at 2.0 wt. (% addition. With equivalent aspect ratio (cooling modulus in a target cast product, this addition rate for this FeSi alloy under this furnace condition will attain graphitized microstructure in the cast product.

  9. Control of chilling tendency in grey cast iron reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliu Ojo Seidu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In grey cast iron remelt and recycling, white iron can result in the cast product if careful control of the chilling tendency is not ensured. Many jobbing foundries are constrained in furnace types and available foundry additives that the operation always results in white irons. This study is towards ensuring grey iron is reproduced from cast iron scrap auto engine blocks, when using a diesel fired rotary furnace and a FeSi alloy for structural modification (inoculation. With varying addition rate of the FeSi alloy to the tapped molten metal, chill wedge tests were performed on two different wedge samples of type W (according to ASTM A367- wedge test with cooling modulus of 0.45 cm (W3½ and 0.54 cm (W4. The carbon equivalents for the test casts were within hypoeutectic range (3.85 wt. (% to 4.11 wt. (%. In the W4 wedge sample, at 2.0 wt. (% addition rate of the FeSi alloy, the relative clear chill was totally reduced to zero from 19.76%, while the relative mottled chill was brought down to 9.59% from 33.71%. The microstructure from the cast at this level of addition was free of carbidic phases; it shows randomly oriented graphite flakes evenly distributed in the iron matrix. Hardness assessment shows that increasing rate of FeSi addition results in decreasing hardness, with maximum effect at 2.0 wt. (% addition. With equivalent aspect ratio (cooling modulus in a target cast product, this addition rate for this FeSi alloy under this furnace condition will attain graphitized microstructure in the cast product.

  10. Control of mitochondrial metabolism and systemic energy homeostasis by microRNAs 378 and 378*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrer, Michele; Liu, Ning; Grueter, Chad E; Williams, Andrew H; Frisard, Madlyn I; Hulver, Matthew W; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2012-09-18

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and deranged regulation of metabolic genes. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1β (PGC-1β) is a transcriptional coactivator that regulates metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis through stimulation of nuclear hormone receptors and other transcription factors. We report that the PGC-1β gene encodes two microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-378 and miR-378*, which counterbalance the metabolic actions of PGC-1β. Mice genetically lacking miR-378 and miR-378* are resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity and exhibit enhanced mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism and elevated oxidative capacity of insulin-target tissues. Among the many targets of these miRNAs, carnitine O-acetyltransferase, a mitochondrial enzyme involved in fatty acid metabolism, and MED13, a component of the Mediator complex that controls nuclear hormone receptor activity, are repressed by miR-378 and miR-378*, respectively, and are elevated in the livers of miR-378/378* KO mice. Consistent with these targets as contributors to the metabolic actions of miR-378 and miR-378*, previous studies have implicated carnitine O-acetyltransferase and MED13 in metabolic syndrome and obesity. Our findings identify miR-378 and miR-378* as integral components of a regulatory circuit that functions under conditions of metabolic stress to control systemic energy homeostasis and the overall oxidative capacity of insulin target tissues. Thus, these miRNAs provide potential targets for pharmacologic intervention in obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  11. The CNS glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The gut-brain axis plays a key role in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. In response to luminal stimulation of macronutrients and microbiota-derived metabolites (secondary bile acids and short chain fatty acids), glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1 and -2) are cosecreted from endocrine L cells in the gut and coreleased from preproglucagonergic neurons in the brain stem. Glucagon-like peptides are proposed as key mediators for bariatric surgery-improved glycemic control and energy balance. Little is known about the GLP-2 receptor (Glp2r)-mediated physiological roles in the control of food intake and glucose homeostasis, yet Glp1r has been studied extensively. This review will highlight the physiological relevance of the central nervous system (CNS) Glp2r in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis and focuses on cellular mechanisms underlying the CNS Glp2r-mediated neural circuitry and intracellular PI3K signaling pathway. New evidence (obtained from Glp2r tissue-specific KO mice) indicates that the Glp2r in POMC neurons is essential for suppressing feeding behavior, gastrointestinal motility, and hepatic glucose production. Mice with Glp2r deletion selectively in POMC neurons exhibit hyperphagic behavior, accelerated gastric emptying, glucose intolerance, and hepatic insulin resistance. GLP-2 differentially modulates postsynaptic membrane excitability of hypothalamic POMC neurons in Glp2r- and PI3K-dependent manners. GLP-2 activates the PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling pathway in POMC neurons by Glp2r-p85α interaction. Intracerebroventricular GLP-2 augments glucose tolerance, suppresses glucose production, and enhances insulin sensitivity, which require PI3K (p110α) activation in POMC neurons. Thus, the CNS Glp2r plays a physiological role in the control of food intake and glucose homeostasis. This review will also discuss key questions for future studies. PMID:24990862

  12. Thermosensitive liposomes entrapping iron oxide nanoparticles for controllable drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, L-A; Wang, Y-C; Wang, Y-J; Yang, C-S; Tsai, P-J; Lo, L-W

    2009-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles can serve as a heating source upon alternative magnetic field (AMF) exposure. Iron oxide nanoparticles can be mixed with thermosensitive nanovehicles for hyperthermia-induced drug release, yet such a design and mechanism may not be suitable for controllable drug release applications in which the tissues are susceptible to environmental temperature change such as brain tissue. In the present study, iron oxide nanoparticles were entrapped inside of thermosensitive liposomes for AMF-induced drug release while the environmental temperature was maintained at a constant level. Carboxyfluorescein was co-entrapped with the iron oxide nanoparticles in the liposomes as a model compound for monitoring drug release and environmental temperature was maintained with a water circulator jacket. These experiments have been successfully performed in solution, in phantom and in anesthetized animals. Furthermore, the thermosensitive liposomes were administered into rat forearm skeletal muscle, and the release of carboxylfluorescein triggered by the external alternative magnetic field was monitored by an implanted microdialysis perfusion probe with an on-line laser-induced fluorescence detector. In the future such a device could be applied to simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging and non-invasive drug release in temperature-sensitive applications.

  13. Control of Homeostasis and Dendritic Cell Survival by the GTPase RhoA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuai; Dislich, Bastian; Brakebusch, Cord H

    2015-01-01

    11b(-)CD8(+) and CD11b(+)Esam(hi) DC subsets, whereas CD11b(+)Esam(lo) DCs were not affected in conditional RhoA-deficient mice. Proteome analyses revealed a defective prosurvival pathway via PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt1)/Bcl-2-associated death promoter in the absence of RhoA. Taken together, our...... findings identify RhoA as a central regulator of DC homeostasis, and its deletion decreases DC numbers below critical thresholds for immune protection and homeostasis, causing aberrant compensatory DC proliferation....

  14. Bach2 Controls Homeostasis of Eosinophils by Restricting the Type-2 Helper Function of T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuki; Kato, Hiroki; Ebina-Shibuya, Risa; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-03-01

    Bach2 is a transcription factor which represses its target genes and plays important roles in the differentiation of B and T lymphoid cells. Bach2-deficient (KO) mice develop severe pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, which is associated with increased numbers of granulocytes and T cells. Bach2 is essential for the regulation of T cells, but its role in the regulation of granulocytes is not clear. Here, we observed increased numbers of eosinophils but not neutrophils in the bone marrow, spleen, peripheral blood, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of Bach2 KO mice compared with those of wild-type (WT) mice. Upon co-transplantation of the bone marrow cells from CD45.2 Bach2 KO and CD45.1/CD45.2 double-positive WT mice to irradiated WT CD45.1/CD45.2 mice, the reconstituted numbers of eosinophils were similar between Bach2 KO and WT cells. These results showed that the deficiency of Bach2 in eosinophils did not directly drive the differentiation of eosinophils. To investigate the effect of Bach2 KO CD4 + T cells upon eosinophils, we analyzed Rag2/Bach2-double deficient (dKO) mice which lack lymphocytes including CD4 + T cells. Rag2/Bach2 dKO mice did not show any increase in the numbers of eosinophils. Importantly, Bach2 KO mice showed an increase of interleukin-5 (Il-5) in the sera compared with WT mice. These results suggest that up-regulated functions of CD4 + T cells including secretion of Il-5 resulted in proliferation and/or migration to peripheral tissues of eosinophils in Bach2 KO mice. We propose that Bach2 controls homeostasis of eosinophils via restricting the production of Il-5 in CD4 + T cells.

  15. GM-CSF Controls Nonlymphoid Tissue Dendritic Cell Homeostasis but Is Dispensable for the Differentiation of Inflammatory Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greter, Melanie; Helft, Julie; Chow, Andrew; Hashimoto, Daigo; Mortha, Arthur; Agudo-Cantero, Judith; Bogunovic, Milena; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Miller, Jennifer; Leboeuf, Marylene; Lu, Geming; Aloman, Costica; Brown, Brian D.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Xiong, Huabao; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Frenette, Paul S.; Merad, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY GM-CSF (Csf-2) is a critical cytokine for the in vitro generation of dendritic cells (DCs) and is thought to control the development of inflammatory DCs and resident CD103+ DCs in some tissues. Here we showed that in contrast to the current understanding, Csf-2 receptor acts in the steady state to promote the survival and homeostasis of nonlymphoid tissue-resident CD103+ and CD11b+ DCs. Absence of Csf-2 receptor on lung DCs abrogated the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity after immunization with particulate antigens. In contrast, Csf-2 receptor was dispensable for the differentiation and innate function of inflammatory DCs during acute injuries. Instead, inflammatory DCs required Csf-1 receptor for their development. Thus, Csf-2 is important in vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell immunity through the regulation of nonlymphoid tissue DC homeostasis rather than control of inflammatory DCs in vivo. PMID:22749353

  16. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...... of transcription factors, activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery or of other cell death mechanisms. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β facilitates divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1)-induced β-cell iron uptake and consequently ROS formation and apoptosis, and we propose that this mechanism provides...

  17. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Search the ODS website Submit Search NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Consumer Datos en español Health ... eating a variety of foods, including the following: Lean meat, seafood, and poultry. Iron-fortified breakfast cereals ...

  18. MicroRNA-orchestrated pathophysiologic control in gut homeostasis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juneyoung; Park, Eun Jeong; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    The intestine represents the largest and most elaborate immune system organ, in which dynamic and reciprocal interplay among numerous immune and epithelial cells, commensal microbiota, and external antigens contributes to establishing both homeostatic and pathologic conditions. The mechanisms that sustain gut homeostasis are pivotal in maintaining gut health in the harsh environment of the gut lumen. Intestinal epithelial cells are critical players in creating the mucosal platform for interplay between host immune cells and luminal stress inducers. Thus, knowledge of the epithelial interface between immune cells and the luminal environment is a prerequisite for a better understanding of gut homeostasis and pathophysiologies such as inflammation. In this review, we explore the importance of the epithelium in limiting or promoting gut inflammation (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease). We also introduce recent findings on how small RNAs such as microRNAs orchestrate pathophysiologic gene regulation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 263-269].

  19. Central insulin and leptin-mediated autonomic control of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Joseph S; Xu, Yong; Hill, Jennifer W

    2011-07-01

    Largely as a result of rising obesity rates, the incidence of type 2 diabetes is escalating rapidly. Type 2 diabetes results from multi-organ dysfunctional glucose metabolism. Recent publications have highlighted hypothalamic insulin- and adipokine-sensing as a major determinant of peripheral glucose and insulin responsiveness. The preponderance of evidence indicates that the brain is the master regulator of glucose homeostasis, and that hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling in particular play a crucial role in the development of insulin resistance. This review discusses the neuronal crosstalk between the hypothalamus, autonomic nervous system, and tissues associated with the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, and how hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling are integral to maintaining normal glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Carbonate-sensitive phytotransferrin controls high-affinity iron uptake in diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Jeffrey B.; Kustka, Adam B.; Oborník, Miroslav; Horák, Aleš; McCrow, John P.; Karas, Bogumil J.; Zheng, Hong; Kindeberg, Theodor; Andersson, Andreas J.; Barbeau, Katherine A.; Allen, Andrew E.

    2018-03-01

    In vast areas of the ocean, the scarcity of iron controls the growth and productivity of phytoplankton. Although most dissolved iron in the marine environment is complexed with organic molecules, picomolar amounts of labile inorganic iron species (labile iron) are maintained within the euphotic zone and serve as an important source of iron for eukaryotic phytoplankton and particularly for diatoms. Genome-enabled studies of labile iron utilization by diatoms have previously revealed novel iron-responsive transcripts, including the ferric iron-concentrating protein ISIP2A, but the mechanism behind the acquisition of picomolar labile iron remains unknown. Here we show that ISIP2A is a phytotransferrin that independently and convergently evolved carbonate ion-coordinated ferric iron binding. Deletion of ISIP2A disrupts high-affinity iron uptake in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and uptake is restored by complementation with human transferrin. ISIP2A is internalized by endocytosis, and manipulation of the seawater carbonic acid system reveals a second-order dependence on the concentrations of labile iron and carbonate ions. In P. tricornutum, the synergistic interaction of labile iron and carbonate ions occurs at environmentally relevant concentrations, revealing that carbonate availability co-limits iron uptake. Phytotransferrin sequences have a broad taxonomic distribution and are abundant in marine environmental genomic datasets, suggesting that acidification-driven declines in the concentration of seawater carbonate ions will have a negative effect on this globally important eukaryotic iron acquisition mechanism.

  1. Central insulin and leptin-mediated autonomic control of glucose homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Marino, Joseph S.; Xu, Yong; Hill, Jennifer W.

    2011-01-01

    Largely as a result of rising obesity rates, the incidence of type 2 diabetes is escalating rapidly. Type 2 diabetes results from multi-organ dysfunctional glucose metabolism. Recent publications have highlighted hypothalamic insulin- and adipokine-sensing as a major determinant of peripheral glucose and insulin responsiveness. The preponderance of evidence indicates that the brain is the master regulator of glucose homeostasis, and that hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling in particular...

  2. Redox control of iron biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie Rhianon

    Magnetotactic bacteria have evolved complex subcellular machinery to construct linear chains of magnetite nanocrystals that allow the host cell to sense direction. Each mixed-valent iron nanoparticle is mineralized from soluble iron within a membrane-encapsulated vesicle termed the magnetosome, which serves as a specialized compartment that regulates the iron, redox, and pH environment of the growing mineral. In order to dissect the biological components that control this process, we have carried out genetic and biochemical studies of proteins proposed to function in iron mineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. As iron biomineralization by magnetotactic bacteria represents a particularly interesting case for understanding how the production of nanomaterials can be programmed at the genetic level, we also apply synthetic biology techniques towards the production of new cellular materials and new cellular functions. As the production of magnetite requires both the formation of Fe(II) and Fe(III), the redox components of the magnetosome play an essential role in this process. Using genetic complementation studies, we show that the redox cofactors or heme sites of the two putative redox partners, MamP and MamT, are required for magnetite biomineralization in vivo and that removal of one or both sites leads to defects in mineralization. We develop and optimize a heterologous expression method in the E. coli periplasm to cleanly isolate fully heme-loaded MamP for biochemical studies. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the reduction potential of MamP lies in a different range than other c-type cytochrome involved in either Fe(III) reduction or Fe(II) oxidation. Nonetheless, in vitro mineralization studies with MamP and Fe(II) show that it is able to catalyze the formation of mixed-valent Fe(II)/Fe(III) oxides such as green rust. Biomineralization also requires lattice-templating proteins that guide the growth of the functional crystalline material. We

  3. Evidence for a role for interleukin-17, Th17 cells and iron homeostasis in protective immunity against tuberculosis in cynomolgus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareham, Alice S; Tree, Julia A; Marsh, Philip D; Butcher, Philip D; Dennis, Mike; Sharpe, Sally A

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health problem. The only vaccine, BCG, gives variable protection, especially in adults, so several new vaccines are in clinical trials. There are no correlates of protective immunity to TB; therefore vaccines progress through lengthy and expensive pre-clinical assessments and human trials. Correlates of protection could act as early end-points during clinical trials, accelerating vaccine development and reducing costs. A genome-wide microarray was utilised to identify potential correlates of protection and biomarkers of disease induced post-BCG vaccination and post-Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge in PPD-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cynomolgus macaques where the outcome of infection was known. Gene expression post BCG-vaccination and post challenge was compared with gene expression when the animals were naïve. Differentially expressed genes were identified using a moderated T test with Benjamini Hochberg multiple testing correction. After BCG vaccination and six weeks post-M. tuberculosis challenge, up-regulation of genes related to a Th1 and Th17 response was observed in disease controllers. At post-mortem, RT-PCR revealed an up-regulation of iron regulatory genes in animals that developed TB and down-regulation of these genes in disease controllers, indicating the ability to successfully withhold iron may be important in the control of TB disease. The induction of a balanced Th1 and Th17 response, together with expression of effector cytokines, such as IFNG, IL2, IL17, IL21 and IL22, could be used as correlates of a protective host response.

  4. Evidence for a role for interleukin-17, Th17 cells and iron homeostasis in protective immunity against tuberculosis in cynomolgus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice S Wareham

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a major global public health problem. The only vaccine, BCG, gives variable protection, especially in adults, so several new vaccines are in clinical trials. There are no correlates of protective immunity to TB; therefore vaccines progress through lengthy and expensive pre-clinical assessments and human trials. Correlates of protection could act as early end-points during clinical trials, accelerating vaccine development and reducing costs. A genome-wide microarray was utilised to identify potential correlates of protection and biomarkers of disease induced post-BCG vaccination and post-Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge in PPD-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cynomolgus macaques where the outcome of infection was known. Gene expression post BCG-vaccination and post challenge was compared with gene expression when the animals were naïve. Differentially expressed genes were identified using a moderated T test with Benjamini Hochberg multiple testing correction. After BCG vaccination and six weeks post-M. tuberculosis challenge, up-regulation of genes related to a Th1 and Th17 response was observed in disease controllers. At post-mortem, RT-PCR revealed an up-regulation of iron regulatory genes in animals that developed TB and down-regulation of these genes in disease controllers, indicating the ability to successfully withhold iron may be important in the control of TB disease. The induction of a balanced Th1 and Th17 response, together with expression of effector cytokines, such as IFNG, IL2, IL17, IL21 and IL22, could be used as correlates of a protective host response.

  5. Nitrogen controlled iron catalyst phase during carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Bernhard C., E-mail: bernhard.bayer@univie.ac.at [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Baehtz, Carsten [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Kidambi, Piran R.; Weatherup, Robert S.; Caneva, Sabina; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Hofmann, Stephan [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Mangler, Clemens; Kotakoski, Jani; Meyer, Jannik C. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Goddard, Caroline J. L. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-06

    Close control over the active catalyst phase and hence carbon nanotube structure remains challenging in catalytic chemical vapor deposition since multiple competing active catalyst phases typically co-exist under realistic synthesis conditions. Here, using in-situ X-ray diffractometry, we show that the phase of supported iron catalyst particles can be reliably controlled via the addition of NH{sub 3} during nanotube synthesis. Unlike polydisperse catalyst phase mixtures during H{sub 2} diluted nanotube growth, nitrogen addition controllably leads to phase-pure γ-Fe during pre-treatment and to phase-pure Fe{sub 3}C during growth. We rationalize these findings in the context of ternary Fe-C-N phase diagram calculations and, thus, highlight the use of pre-treatment- and add-gases as a key parameter towards controlled carbon nanotube growth.

  6. Automatic control system for uniformly paving iron ore pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bowen; Qian, Xiaolong

    2014-05-01

    In iron and steelmaking industry, iron ore pellet qualities are crucial to end-product properties, manufacturing costs and waste emissions. Uniform pellet pavements on the grate machine are a fundamental prerequisite to ensure even heat-transfer and pellet induration successively influences performance of the following metallurgical processes. This article presents an automatic control system for uniformly paving green pellets on the grate, via a mechanism mainly constituted of a mechanical linkage, a swinging belt, a conveyance belt and a grate. Mechanism analysis illustrates that uniform pellet pavements demand the frontend of the swinging belt oscillate at a constant angular velocity. Subsequently, kinetic models are formulated to relate oscillatory movements of the swinging belt's frontend to rotations of a crank link driven by a motor. On basis of kinetic analysis of the pellet feeding mechanism, a cubic B-spline model is built for numerically computing discrete frequencies to be modulated during a motor rotation. Subsequently, the pellet feeding control system is presented in terms of compositional hardware and software components, and their functional relationships. Finally, pellet feeding experiments are carried out to demonstrate that the control system is effective, reliable and superior to conventional methods.

  7. Epigenetic Control of Stem Cell Potential During Homeostasis, Aging, and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerman, Isabel; Rossi, Derrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell decline is an important cellular driver of aging-associated pathophysiology in multiple tissues. Epigenetic regulation is central to establishing and maintaining stem cell function, and emerging evidence indicates that epigenetic dysregulation contributes to the altered potential of stem cells during aging. Unlike terminally differentiated cells, the impact of epigenetic dysregulation in stem cells is propagated beyond self; alterations can be heritably transmitted to differentiated progeny, in addition to being perpetuated and amplified within the stem cell pool through self-renewal divisions. This review focuses on recent studies examining epigenetic regulation of tissue-specific stem cells in homeostasis, aging, and aging-related disease. PMID:26046761

  8. Sensing the fuels: glucose and lipid signaling in the CNS controlling energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Sabine D; Könner, A Christine; Brüning, Jens C

    2010-10-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is capable of gathering information on the body's nutritional state and it implements appropriate behavioral and metabolic responses to changes in fuel availability. This feedback signaling of peripheral tissues ensures the maintenance of energy homeostasis. The hypothalamus is a primary site of convergence and integration for these nutrient-related feedback signals, which include central and peripheral neuronal inputs as well as hormonal signals. Increasing evidence indicates that glucose and lipids are detected by specialized fuel-sensing neurons that are integrated in these hypothalamic neuronal circuits. The purpose of this review is to outline the current understanding of fuel-sensing mechanisms in the hypothalamus, to integrate the recent findings in this field, and to address the potential role of dysregulation in these pathways in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  9. Iron concentration in breast milk normalised within one week of a single high-dose infusion of iron isomaltoside in randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Charlotte; Thomsen, Lars Lykke; Nørgaard, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    AIM: We compared the iron concentration in breast milk after a single high-dose of intravenous iron isomaltoside or daily oral iron for postpartum haemorrhage. METHODS: In this randomised controlled trial, the women were allocated a single dose of intravenous 1,200mg iron isomaltoside or oral iron...... deviation) iron concentration in breast milk in the intravenous and oral groups were 0.72 ± 0.27 mg/L and 0.40 ± 0.18 mg/L at three days (p birth. CONCLUSION: A single high...

  10. Multi-domain CGFS-type glutaredoxin Grx4 regulates iron homeostasis via direct interaction with a repressor Fep1 in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Chang [Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Roe, Jung-Hye, E-mail: jhroe@snu.ac.kr [Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4 allows Fep1-mediated de-repression of iron uptake genes at low iron. {yields} Grx4 directly interacts with Fep1 in vivo and in vitro. {yields} The Cys172 in the CGFS motif of Grx4 is necessary for cell proliferation and iron regulation. {yields} The Cys172 of Grx4 is required for normal interaction with Fep1. -- Abstract: The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains two CGFS-type monothiol glutaredoxins, Grx4 and Grx5, which are localized primarily in the nucleus and mitochondria, respectively. We observed involvement of Grx4 in regulating iron-responsive gene expression, which is modulated by a repressor Fep1. Lack of Grx4 caused defects not only in growth but also in the expression of both iron-uptake and iron-utilizing genes regardless of iron availability. In order to unravel how Grx4 is involved in Fep1-mediated regulation, interaction between them was investigated. Co-immunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) revealed that Grx4 physically interacts with Fep1 in vivo. BiFC revealed localized nuclear dots produced by interaction of Grx4 with Fep1. Mutation of cysteine-172 in the CGFS motif to serine (C172S) produced effects similarly observed under Grx4 depletion, such as the loss of iron-dependent gene regulation and the absence of nuclear dots in BiFC analysis. These results suggest that the ability of Grx4 to bind iron, most likely Fe-S cofactor, could be critical in interacting with and modulating the activity of Fep1.

  11. Iron in Alzheimer's and Control Hippocampi - Moessbauer, Atomic Absorption and ELISA Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galazka-Friedman, J.; Szlachta, K.; Bauminger, E.R.; Koziorowski, D.; Friedman, A.; Tomasiuk, R.; Jaklewicz, A.; Wszolek, Z.K.; Dickson, D.; Kaplinska, K.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a neurodegenerative process of unknown mechanism taking place in a part of the brain - hippocampus. Oxidative stress and the role of iron in it is one of the suggested mechanisms of cells death. In this study several methods were used to assess iron and iron binding compounds in human hippocampus tissues. Moessbauer spectroscopy was used for identification of the iron binding compound and determination of total iron concentration in 12 control and one Alzheimer disease sample of hippocampus. Moessbauer parameters obtained for all samples suggest that most of the iron is ferritin-like iron. The average concentration of iron determined by Moessbauer spectroscopy in control hippocampus was 45 ± 10 ng/mg wet tissue. The average concentration of iron in 10 Alzheimer disease samples determined by atomic absorption was 66 ± 13 ng/mg wet tissue. The concentration of H and L chains of ferritin in 20 control and 10 AD hippocampi was assessed with enzyme-linked immuno-absorbent assay. The concentration of H and L ferritin was higher in Alzheimer disease compared to control (19.36 ± 1.51 vs. 5.84 ± 0.55 ng/μg protein for H, and 1.39 ± 0.25 vs. 0.55 ± 0.10 for L). This 3-fold increase of the concentration of ferritin is accompanied by a small increase of the total iron concentration. (authors)

  12. Genetic models rule out a major role of beta cell glycogen in the control of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Coll, Joan; Duran, Jordi; Slebe, Felipe; García-Rocha, Mar; Gomis, Ramon; Gasa, Rosa; Guinovart, Joan J

    2016-05-01

    Glycogen accumulation occurs in beta cells of diabetic patients and has been proposed to partly mediate glucotoxicity-induced beta cell dysfunction. However, the role of glycogen metabolism in beta cell function and its contribution to diabetes pathophysiology remain poorly understood. We investigated the function of beta cell glycogen by studying glucose homeostasis in mice with (1) defective glycogen synthesis in the pancreas; and (2) excessive glycogen accumulation in beta cells. Conditional deletion of the Gys1 gene and overexpression of protein targeting to glycogen (PTG) was accomplished by Cre-lox recombination using pancreas-specific Cre lines. Glucose homeostasis was assessed by determining fasting glycaemia, insulinaemia and glucose tolerance. Beta cell mass was determined by morphometry. Glycogen was detected histologically by periodic acid-Schiff's reagent staining. Isolated islets were used for the determination of glycogen and insulin content, insulin secretion, immunoblots and gene expression assays. Gys1 knockout (Gys1 (KO)) mice did not exhibit differences in glucose tolerance or basal glycaemia and insulinaemia relative to controls. Insulin secretion and gene expression in isolated islets was also indistinguishable between Gys1 (KO) and controls. Conversely, despite effective glycogen overaccumulation in islets, mice with PTG overexpression (PTG(OE)) presented similar glucose tolerance to controls. However, under fasting conditions they exhibited lower glycaemia and higher insulinaemia. Importantly, neither young nor aged PTG(OE) mice showed differences in beta cell mass relative to age-matched controls. Finally, a high-fat diet did not reveal a beta cell-autonomous phenotype in either model. Glycogen metabolism is not required for the maintenance of beta cell function. Glycogen accumulation in beta cells alone is not sufficient to trigger the dysfunction or loss of these cells, or progression to diabetes.

  13. Duodenal Cytochrome b (DCYTB in Iron Metabolism: An Update on Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius J. R. Lane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron and ascorbate are vital cellular constituents in mammalian systems. The bulk-requirement for iron is during erythropoiesis leading to the generation of hemoglobin-containing erythrocytes. Additionally; both iron and ascorbate are required as co-factors in numerous metabolic reactions. Iron homeostasis is controlled at the level of uptake; rather than excretion. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that in addition to the known ability of dietary ascorbate to enhance non-heme iron absorption in the gut; ascorbate regulates iron homeostasis. The involvement of ascorbate in dietary iron absorption extends beyond the direct chemical reduction of non-heme iron by dietary ascorbate. Among other activities; intra-enterocyte ascorbate appears to be involved in the provision of electrons to a family of trans-membrane redox enzymes; namely those of the cytochrome b561 class. These hemoproteins oxidize a pool of ascorbate on one side of the membrane in order to reduce an electron acceptor (e.g., non-heme iron on the opposite side of the membrane. One member of this family; duodenal cytochrome b (DCYTB; may play an important role in ascorbate-dependent reduction of non-heme iron in the gut prior to uptake by ferrous-iron transporters. This review discusses the emerging relationship between cellular iron homeostasis; the emergent “IRP1-HIF2α axis”; DCYTB and ascorbate in relation to iron metabolism.

  14. Control of plant phosphate homeostasis by inositol pyrophosphates and the SPX domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji-Yul; Ried, Martina K; Hothorn, Michael; Poirier, Yves

    2018-02-01

    Proteins containing a SPX domain are involved in phosphate (Pi) homeostasis, including Pi transport and adaptation to Pi deficiency. The SPX domain harbors a basic surface binding Pi at low affinity and inositol pyrophosphates (PP-InsPs) at high affinity. Genetic and biochemical studies revealed that PP-InsPs serve as ligands for the SPX domain. Residues in the PHO1 SPX domain involved in PP-InsPs binding are critical for its Pi export activity, and the interaction between SPX proteins and the PHR1 transcription factor, which results in PHR1 inactivation, is promoted by PP-InsPs. Changes in PP-InsPs levels in response to Pi deficiency may thus contribute to the adaptation of plants to stress via the modulation of the activity of SPX-containing proteins and their interactors. Modulating PP-InsP levels or the affinity/specificity of the SPX domain for PP-InsP could potentially be used to engineer crops to maintain high yield under reduced Pi fertilizer input. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Calcium Homeostasis and ER Stress in Control of Autophagy in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Kania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a basic catabolic process, serving as an internal engine during responses to various cellular stresses. As regards cancer, autophagy may play a tumor suppressive role by preserving cellular integrity during tumor development and by possible contribution to cell death. However, autophagy may also exert oncogenic effects by promoting tumor cell survival and preventing cell death, for example, upon anticancer treatment. The major factors influencing autophagy are Ca2+ homeostasis perturbation and starvation. Several Ca2+ channels like voltage-gated T- and L-type channels, IP3 receptors, or CRAC are involved in autophagy regulation. Glucose transporters, mainly from GLUT family, which are often upregulated in cancer, are also prominent targets for autophagy induction. Signals from both Ca2+ perturbations and glucose transport blockage might be integrated at UPR and ER stress activation. Molecular pathways such as IRE 1-JNK-Bcl-2, PERK-eIF2α-ATF4, or ATF6-XBP 1-ATG are related to autophagy induced through ER stress. Moreover ER molecular chaperones such as GRP78/BiP and transcription factors like CHOP participate in regulation of ER stress-mediated autophagy. Autophagy modulation might be promising in anticancer therapies; however, it is a context-dependent matter whether inhibition or activation of autophagy leads to tumor cell death.

  16. Consuming Iron Biofortified Beans Increases Iron Status in Rwandan Women after 128 Days in a Randomized Controlled Feeding Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jere D; Luna, Sarah V; Lung'aho, Mercy G; Wenger, Michael J; Murray-Kolb, Laura E; Beebe, Stephen; Gahutu, Jean-Bosco; Egli, Ines M

    2016-08-01

    Food-based strategies to reduce nutritional iron deficiency have not been universally successful. Biofortification has the potential to become a sustainable, inexpensive, and effective solution. This randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of iron-biofortified beans (Fe-Beans) to improve iron status in Rwandan women. A total of 195 women (aged 18-27 y) with serum ferritin Beans, with 86 mg Fe/kg, or standard unfortified beans (Control-Beans), with 50 mg Fe/kg, 2 times/d for 128 d in Huye, Rwanda. Iron status was assessed by hemoglobin, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and body iron (BI); inflammation was assessed by serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). Anthropometric measurements were performed at baseline and at end line. Random weekly serial sampling was used to collect blood during the middle 8 wk of the feeding trial. Mixed-effects regression analysis with repeated measurements was used to evaluate the effect of Fe-Beans compared with Control-Beans on iron biomarkers throughout the course of the study. At baseline, 86% of subjects were iron-deficient (serum ferritin beans/d. The Fe-Beans group consumed 14.5 ± 1.6 mg Fe/d from biofortified beans, whereas the Control-Beans group consumed 8.6 ± 0.8 mg Fe/d from standard beans (P Beans group had significantly greater increases in hemoglobin (3.8 g/L), log serum ferritin (0.1 log μg/L), and BI (0.5 mg/kg) than did controls after 128 d. For every 1 g Fe consumed from beans over the 128 study days, there was a significant 4.2-g/L increase in hemoglobin (P beans significantly improved iron status in Rwandan women. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01594359. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles: chelator-controlled nanoparticle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Lauren F.; Rentz, Nikki S.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we characterize iron nanoparticles synthesized in water in the presence of a phosphonate chelator, amino tris(methylene phosphonic acid) (ATMP) for a range of molar ratios of ATMP to iron. An increase in the molar ratio from 0.05 to 0.8 decreases nanoparticle size from approximately 150 nm to less than 10 nm. Zeta potential measurements were used to evaluate colloidal stability. Zeta potential values varied as a function of pH, and zeta potential values decreased with increasing pH. At lower molar ratios of ATMP to iron, the zeta potential varied between 15 and -40 mV, passing through an isoelectric point at pH 7.5. At higher ratios, the zeta potential was negative across the measured pH range of 2-12 and varied from -2 to -55 mV. Diffraction analysis indicates that ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles may have a nano-crystalline structure, potentially with regions of amorphous iron. Characterization results of ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles are compared to results obtained for carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-stabilized iron nanoparticles. CMC stabilization caused similar peak broadening in diffraction spectra as for ATMP, suggesting similar nano-crystalline/amorphous structure; however, an increase in the molar ratio of CMC to iron did not cause the same reduction in nanoparticle size as was observed for ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles.

  18. Effects of probiotics and antibiotics on the intestinal homeostasis in a computer controlled model of the large intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Ateequr

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infection are frequent complications of broad spectrum antibiotic therapy. Probiotic bacteria are used as therapeutic and preventive agents in these disorders, but the exact functional mechanisms and the mode of action are poorly understood. The effects of clindamycin and the probiotic mixture VSL#3 (containing the 8 bacterial strains Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus consecutively or in combination were investigated and compared to controls without therapy using a standardized human fecal microbiota in a computer-controlled in vitro model of large intestine. Microbial metabolites (short chain fatty acids, lactate, branched chain fatty acids, and ammonia and the intestinal microbiota were analyzed. Results Compared to controls and combination therapy, short chain fatty acids and lactate, but also ammonia and branched chain fatty acids, were increased under probiotic therapy. The metabolic pattern under combined therapy with antibiotics and probiotics had the most beneficial and consistent effect on intestinal metabolic profiles. The intestinal microbiota showed a decrease in several indigenous bacterial groups under antibiotic therapy, there was no significant recovery of these groups when the antibiotic therapy was followed by administration of probiotics. Simultaneous application of anti- and probiotics had a stabilizing effect on the intestinal microbiota with increased bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Conclusions Administration of VSL#3 parallel with the clindamycin therapy had a beneficial and stabilizing effect on the intestinal metabolic homeostasis by decreasing toxic metabolites and protecting the endogenic microbiota from destruction. Probiotics could be a reasonable

  19. Controls on radium transport by adsorption to iron minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Wang, T.; Kocar, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Radium is a naturally occurring radioactive metal found in many subsurface environments. Radium isotopes are generated by uranium and thorium decay, and are particularly abundant within groundwaters where minimal porewater flux leads to accumulation. These isotopes are used as natural tracers for estimating submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) [1], allowing for large scale estimation of GW fluxes into and out of the ocean [2]. They also represent a substantial hazard in wastewater produced after hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction [3], resulting in a significant risk of environmental release to surface and near-surface waters, and increased cost for water treatment or disposal. Adsorption to mineral surfaces represents a dominant pathway of radium retention in subsurface environments. For SGD studies, adsorption processes impact estimates of GW fluxes, while in hydraulic fracturing, radium adsorption to aquifer solids mediates wastewater radium activities. Analysis of past sorption studies revealed large variability in partition coefficients [4], while examination of radium adsorption kinetics and surface complexation have only recently started [5]. Accordingly, we present the results of sorption and column experiments of radium with a suite of iron minerals representative of those found within deep saline and near-surface (freshwater) aquifers, and evaluate impacts of varying salinity solutions through artificial waters. Further, we explore the impacts of pyrite oxidation and ferrihydrite transformation to other iron-bearing secondary minerals on the transport and retention of radium. These results will provide critical information on the mineralogical controls on radium retention in subsurface environments, and will therefore improve predictions of radium groundwater transport in natural and contaminated systems. [1] Charette, M.A., Buesseler, K.O. & Andrews, J.E., Limnol. Oceanogr. (2001). [2] Moore, W.S., Ann. Rev. Mar. Sci. (2010). [3] Vengosh, A

  20. Neuronal SH2B1 is essential for controlling energy and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Decheng; Zhou, Yingjiang; Morris, David; Li, Minghua; Li, Zhiqin; Rui, Liangyou

    2007-02-01

    SH2B1 (previously named SH2-B), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein, binds via its Src homology 2 (SH2) domain to a variety of protein tyrosine kinases, including JAK2 and the insulin receptor. SH2B1-deficient mice are obese and diabetic. Here we demonstrated that multiple isoforms of SH2B1 (alpha, beta, gamma, and/or delta) were expressed in numerous tissues, including the brain, hypothalamus, liver, muscle, adipose tissue, heart, and pancreas. Rat SH2B1beta was specifically expressed in neural tissue in SH2B1-transgenic (SH2B1(Tg)) mice. SH2B1(Tg) mice were crossed with SH2B1-knockout (SH2B1(KO)) mice to generate SH2B1(TgKO) mice expressing SH2B1 only in neural tissue but not in other tissues. Systemic deletion of the SH2B1 gene resulted in metabolic disorders in SH2B1(KO) mice, including hyperlipidemia, leptin resistance, hyperphagia, obesity, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance. Neuron-specific restoration of SH2B1beta not only corrected the metabolic disorders in SH2B1(TgKO) mice, but also improved JAK2-mediated leptin signaling and leptin regulation of orexigenic neuropeptide expression in the hypothalamus. Moreover, neuron-specific overexpression of SH2B1 dose-dependently protected against high-fat diet-induced leptin resistance and obesity. These observations suggest that neuronal SH2B1 regulates energy balance, body weight, peripheral insulin sensitivity, and glucose homeostasis at least in part by enhancing hypothalamic leptin sensitivity.

  1. Iron metabolism in critically ill patients developing anemia of inflammation: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshuizen, Margit; Binnekade, Jan M; Nota, Benjamin; van de Groep, Kirsten; Cremer, Olaf L; Tuinman, Pieter R; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J; van Bruggen, Robin; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2018-05-02

    Anemia occurring as a result of inflammatory processes (anemia of inflammation, AI) has a high prevalence in critically ill patients. Knowledge on changes in iron metabolism during the course of AI is limited, hampering the development of strategies to counteract AI. This case control study aimed to investigate iron metabolism during the development of AI in critically ill patients. Iron metabolism in 30 patients who developed AI during ICU stay was compared with 30 septic patients with a high Hb and 30 non-septic patients with a high Hb. Patients were matched on age and sex. Longitudinally collected plasma samples were analyzed for levels of parameters of iron metabolism. A linear mixed model was used to assess the predictive values of the parameters. In patients with AI, levels of iron, transferrin and transferrin saturation showed an early decrease compared to controls with a high Hb, already prior to the development of anemia. Ferritin, hepcidin and IL-6 levels were increased in AI compared to controls. During AI development, erythroferrone decreased. Differences in iron metabolism between groups were not influenced by APACHE IV score. The results show that in critically ill patients with AI, iron metabolism is already altered prior to the development of anemia. Levels of iron regulators in AI differ from septic controls with a high Hb, irrespective of disease severity. AI is characterized by high levels of hepcidin, ferritin and IL-6 and low levels of iron, transferrin and erythroferrone.

  2. Food Fortification to Prevent and Control Iron Deficiency | Chen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is essential to prevent the fortification iron from reacting with the absorption inhibitors. To ensure adequate absorption therefore, various factors must be considered before initiating a fortification programme. These include cost effectiveness of fortification in increasing absorbable iron, palatability of the fortified food and the ...

  3. Transcriptome analysis by GeneTrail revealed regulation of functional categories in response to alterations of iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenhof Hans-Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput technologies have opened new avenues to study biological processes and pathways. The interpretation of the immense amount of data sets generated nowadays needs to be facilitated in order to enable biologists to identify complex gene networks and functional pathways. To cope with this task multiple computer-based programs have been developed. GeneTrail is a freely available online tool that screens comparative transcriptomic data for differentially regulated functional categories and biological pathways extracted from common data bases like KEGG, Gene Ontology (GO, TRANSPATH and TRANSFAC. Additionally, GeneTrail offers a feature that allows screening of individually defined biological categories that are relevant for the respective research topic. Results We have set up GeneTrail for the use of Arabidopsis thaliana. To test the functionality of this tool for plant analysis, we generated transcriptome data of root and leaf responses to Fe deficiency and the Arabidopsis metal homeostasis mutant nas4x-1. We performed Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA with eight meaningful pairwise comparisons of transcriptome data sets. We were able to uncover several functional pathways including metal homeostasis that were affected in our experimental situations. Representation of the differentially regulated functional categories in Venn diagrams uncovered regulatory networks at the level of whole functional pathways. Over-Representation Analysis (ORA of differentially regulated genes identified in pairwise comparisons revealed specific functional plant physiological categories as major targets upon Fe deficiency and in nas4x-1. Conclusion Here, we obtained supporting evidence, that the nas4x-1 mutant was defective in metal homeostasis. It was confirmed that nas4x-1 showed Fe deficiency in roots and signs of Fe deficiency and Fe sufficiency in leaves. Besides metal homeostasis, biotic stress, root carbohydrate, leaf

  4. Acceptability and use of iron and iron-alloy cooking pots: implications for anaemia control programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Katherine; Mackeith, Nancy; Woodruff, Bradley A; Talley, Leisel; Mselle, Laurent; Mirghani, Zahra; Abdalla, Fathia; Bhatia, Rita; Seal, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the acceptability of iron and iron-alloy cooking pots prior to an intervention trial and to investigate factors affecting retention and use. Pre-trial research was conducted on five types of iron and iron-alloy pots using focus group discussions and a laboratory evaluation of Fe transfer during cooking was undertaken. Usage and retention during the subsequent intervention trial were investigated using focus group discussions and market monitoring. Three refugee camps in western Tanzania. Refugee health workers were selected for pre-trial research. Mothers of children aged 6-59 months participated in the investigation of retention and use. Pre-trial research indicated that the stainless steel pot would be the only acceptable type for use in this population due to excessive rusting and/or the high weight of other types. Cooking three typical refugee dishes in stainless steel pots led to an increase in Fe content of 3.2 to 17.1 mg/100 g food (P basic acceptability criteria. The relatively low usage reported during the trial highlights the limitations of using high-value iron-alloy cooking pots as an intervention in populations where poverty and the availability of other pots may lead to selling.

  5. Efficacy of iron-fortified whole maize flour on iron status of schoolchildren in Kenya: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andang'o, P.E.A.; Osendarp, S.J.M.; Ayah, R.; West, C.E.; Mwaniki, D.; Wolf, de C.A.; Kraaijenhagen, R.; Kok, F.J.; Verhoef, H.

    2007-01-01

    Background Sodium iron edetic acid (NaFeEDTA) might be a more bioavailable source of iron than electrolytic iron, when added to maize flour. We aimed to assess the effect, on children's iron status, of consumption of whole maize flour fortified with iron as NaFeEDTA or electrolytic iron. Methods 516

  6. Urinary hepcidin level as an early predictor of iron deficiency in children: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharib Amal F

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ideal screening test would be capable of identifying iron deficiency in the absence of anemia. We tried to detect role of urinary hepcidin-25 level in early prediction of iron deficiency in children. Methods This is a case control study performed on 100 children in Hematology Unit of Pediatric Department, Zagazig University Hospital, Egypt. Our study included 25 cases of iron deficiency (ID stage-1 (iron depletion, 25 cases ID stage-2 (iron-deficient erythropoiesis, 25 cases ID stage-3 (iron deficiency anemia and 25 healthy children as a control group. Estimation of iron status parameters was done. Urinary hepcidin-25 level was detected. Results Urinary hepcidin-25 level was significantly lower in all stages of iron deficiency than in control group, more significant reduction in its level was observed with the progress in severity of iron deficiency. Urinary hepcidin showed significant positive correlation with hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, hematocrit value, serum iron and ferritin and transferrin saturation. In contrary, it showed significant negative correlation with serum transferrin and total iron binding capacity. Urinary hepcidin at cutoff point ≤0.94 nmol/mmol Cr could Predict ID stage-1 with sensitivity 88% and specificity 88%. Cutoff point ≤0.42 nmol/mmol Cr could predict ID stage-2 with sensitivity 96% and specificity 92%. Cutoff point ≤0.08 nmol/mmol Cr could Predict ID stage-3 with Sensitivity 96% and specificity 100%. Conclusions We can conclude that detection of urinary hepcidin-25 level was a simple and non invasive test and could predict iron deficiency very early, before appearance of hematological affections.

  7. Vector Control Using Series Iron Loss Model of Induction, Motors and Power Loss Minimization

    OpenAIRE

    Kheldoun Aissa; Khodja Djalal Eddine

    2009-01-01

    The iron loss is a source of detuning in vector controlled induction motor drives if the classical rotor vector controller is used for decoupling. In fact, the field orientation will not be satisfied and the output torque will not truck the reference torque mostly used by Loss Model Controllers (LMCs). In addition, this component of loss, among others, may be excessive if the vector controlled induction motor is driving light loads. In this paper, the series iron loss model ...

  8. Dynamic optimal control of homeostasis: an integrative system approach for modeling of the central nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, N A; Giuseppin, M L; Verrips, C T

    2000-01-01

    The theory of dynamic optimal metabolic control (DOMC), as developed by Giuseppin and Van Riel (Metab. Eng., 2000), is applied to model the central nitrogen metabolism (CNM) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The CNM represents a typical system encountered in advanced metabolic engineering. The CNM is the source of the cellular amino acids and proteins, including flavors and potentially valuable biomolecules; therefore, it is also of industrial interest. In the DOMC approach the cell is regarded as an optimally controlled system. Given the metabolic genotype, the cell faces a control problem to maintain an optimal flux distribution in a changing environment. The regulation is based on strategies and balances feedback control of homeostasis and feedforward regulation for adaptation. The DOMC approach is an integrative, holistic approach, not based on mechanistic descriptions and (therefore) not biased by the variation present in biochemical and molecular biological data. It is an effective tool to structure the rapidly increasing amount of data on the function of genes and pathways. The DOMC model is used successfully to predict the responses of pulses of ammonia and glutamine to nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of a wild-type strain and a glutamine synthetase-negative mutant. The simulation results are validated with experimental data.

  9. Gibberellin homeostasis and plant height control by EUI and a role for gibberellin in root gravity responses in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhu, Yongyou; Peng, Yu; Yan, Dawei; Li, Qun; Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Linyou; He, Zuhua

    2008-03-01

    The rice Eui (ELONGATED UPPERMOST INTERNODE) gene encodes a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase that deactivates bioactive gibberellins (GAs). In this study, we investigated controlled expression of the Eui gene and its role in plant development. We found that Eui was differentially induced by exogenous GAs and that the Eui promoter had the highest activity in the vascular bundles. The eui mutant was defective in starch granule development in root caps and Eui overexpression enhanced starch granule generation and gravity responses, revealing a role for GA in root starch granule development and gravity responses. Experiments using embryoless half-seeds revealed that RAmy1A and GAmyb were highly upregulated in eui aleurone cells in the absence of exogenous GA. In addition, the GA biosynthesis genes GA3ox1 and GA20ox2 were downregulated and GA2ox1 was upregulated in eui seedlings. These results indicate that EUI is involved in GA homeostasis, not only in the internodes at the heading stage, but also in the seedling stage, roots and seeds. Disturbing GA homeostasis affected the expression of the GA signaling genes GID1 (GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF 1), GID2 and SLR1. Transgenic RNA interference of the Eui gene effectively increased plant height and improved heading performance. By contrast, the ectopic expression of Eui under the promoters of the rice GA biosynthesis genes GA3ox2 and GA20ox2 significantly reduced plant height. These results demonstrate that a slight increase in Eui expression could dramatically change rice morphology, indicating the practical application of the Eui gene in rice molecular breeding for a high yield potential.

  10. IP3 3-kinase B controls hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and prevents lethal hematopoietic failure in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegemund, Sabine; Rigaud, Stephanie; Conche, Claire; Broaten, Blake; Schaffer, Lana; Westernberg, Luise; Head, Steven Robert

    2015-01-01

    Tight regulation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homeostasis ensures lifelong hematopoiesis and prevents blood cancers. The mechanisms balancing HSC quiescence with expansion and differentiation into hematopoietic progenitors are incompletely understood. Here, we identify Inositol-trisphosphate 3-kinase B (Itpkb) as an essential regulator of HSC homeostasis. Young Itpkb−/− mice accumulated phenotypic HSC, which were less quiescent and proliferated more than wild-type (WT) controls. Itpkb−/− HSC downregulated quiescence and stemness associated, but upregulated activation, oxidative metabolism, protein synthesis, and lineage associated messenger RNAs. Although they had normal-to-elevated viability and no significant homing defects, Itpkb−/− HSC had a severely reduced competitive long-term repopulating potential. Aging Itpkb−/− mice lost hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and died with severe anemia. WT HSC normally repopulated Itpkb−/− hosts, indicating an HSC-intrinsic Itpkb requirement. Itpkb−/− HSC showed reduced colony-forming activity and increased stem-cell-factor activation of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) effectors Akt/mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). This was reversed by treatment with the Itpkb product and PI3K/Akt antagonist IP4. Transcriptome changes and biochemistry support mTOR hyperactivity in Itpkb−/− HSC. Treatment with the mTOR-inhibitor rapamycin reversed the excessive mTOR signaling and hyperproliferation of Itpkb−/− HSC without rescuing colony forming activity. Thus, we propose that Itpkb ensures HSC quiescence and function through limiting cytokine-induced PI3K/mTOR signaling and other mechanisms. PMID:25788703

  11. Growth of airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface changes both the response to particle exposure and iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    We tested the hypothesis that 1) relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface and allowed to differentiate would have an altered response to particle exposure and 2) that these differences would be associated with indices of iron homeostas...

  12. Rotor Field Oriented Control with adaptive Iron Loss Compensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    1999-01-01

    of the motor referenced to the rotor magnetizing current, and with the extension of an iron loss resistor added in parallel to the magnetizing inductance. The resistor estimator is based on the observation that the actual applied stator voltages deviates from the voltage estimated, when a motor is current......It is well known from the literature that iron loses in an induction motor implies field angle estimation errors and hence detuning problems. In this paper a new method for estimating the iron loss resistor in an induction motor is presented. The method is based on a traditional dynamic model...

  13. Iron deficiency anemia in Helicobacter pylori infection: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenzhen; Li Yumin; Yang Kehu; Ma Bin; Guan Quanlin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Lijuan

    2010-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and iron deficiency anemia are prevalent in disadvantaged populations worldwide. The benefit of H. pylori eradiation for iron deficiency anemia has been extensively studied, but data are still equivocal. A search in The Cochrane Library, PUBMED, EMBASE, EBM Review databases, Science Citation Index Expanded, and CMB (Chinese Biomedical Literature Database) was performed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing anti-H. pylori plus oral iron to oral iron alone for the iron deficiency patients in whom H. pylori was positive were selected for meta-analysis. Reviev Manager 5.0 software was used for the performance of meta-analysis. Sixteen randomized controlled trials totaling 956 patients were included. The meta-analysis showed that the difference from baseline to endpoint of hemoglobin (Hb), serum iron (SI), and serum ferritin (SF) was statistically significantly different between anti-H. pylori treatment plus oral iron and oral iron alone (SMD, Hb 1.48; 95% CI, 0.96, 2.00; p infection could be effective in improving anemia and iron statue in IDA patients infected by H. pylori, particularly in patients with moderate or severe anemia.

  14. One-pot size and shape controlled synthesis of DMSO capped iron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Size and shape of the capped iron oxide nanoparticles are well controlled by simply ... quently used to synthesize magnetic ferrites from different iron precursors ... added to the mixture resulting in a dark brown precipitate. Figure 2. (a–c). TG–DTA .... Doyle P S, Bibette J, Bancaud A and Viovy J L 2002 Science. 295 2237.

  15. High speed turning of compacted graphite iron using controlled modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalbaum, Tyler Paul

    Compacted graphite iron (CGI) is a material which emerged as a candidate material to replace cast iron (CI) in the automotive industry for engine block castings. Its thermal and mechanical properties allow the CGI-based engines to operate at higher cylinder pressures and temperatures than CI-based engines, allowing for lower fuel emissions and increased fuel economy. However, these same properties together with the thermomechanical wear mode in the CGI-CBN system result in poor machinability and inhibit CGI from seeing wide spread use in the automotive industry. In industry, machining of CGI is done only at low speeds, less than V = 200 m/min, to avoid encountering rapid wear of the cutting tools during cutting. Studies have suggested intermittent cutting operations such as milling suffer less severe tool wear than continuous cutting. Furthermore, evidence that a hard sulfide layer which forms over the cutting edge in machining CI at high speeds is absent during machining CGI is a major factor in the difference in machinability of these material systems. The present study addresses both of these issues by modification to the conventional machining process to allow intermittent continuous cutting. The application of controlled modulation superimposed onto the cutting process -- modulation-assisted machining (MAM) -- is shown to be quite effective in reducing the wear of cubic boron nitride (CBN) tools when machining CGI at high machining speeds (> 500 m/min). The tool life is at least 20 times greater than found in conventional machining of CGI. This significant reduction in wear is a consequence of reduction in the severity of the tool-work contact conditions with MAM. The propensity for thermochemical wear of CBN is thus reduced. It is found that higher cutting speed (> 700 m/min) leads to lower tool wear with MAM. The MAM configuration employing feed-direction modulation appears feasible for implementation at high speeds and offers a solution to this challenging

  16. The Study of HFE Genotypes and Its Expression Effect on Iron Status of Iranian Haemochromatosis, Iron Deficiency Anemia Patients, Iron-Taker and Non Iron-Taker Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiranvand, Elham; Abediankenari, Saeid; Rostamian, Mosayeb; Beiranvand, Behnoush; Naazeri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    The role of HFE gene mutations or its expression in regulation of iron metabolism of hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) patients is remained controversial. Therefore here the correlation between two common HFE genotype (p.C282Y, p.H63D) and HFE gene expression with iron status in HH, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and healthy Iranian participants was studied. For this purpose genotype determination was done by polymerase chain reaction--restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Real-Time PCR was applied for evaluation of HFE gene expression. Biochemical parameters and iron consumption were also assessed. Homozygote p.H63D mutation was seen in all HH patients and p.C282Y was not observed in any member of the population. A significant correlation was observed between serum ferritin (SF) level and gender or age of HH patients. p.H63D homozygote was seen to be able to significantly increase SF and transferrin saturation (TS) level without affecting on liver function. Our results also showed that iron consumption affects on TS level increasing. HFE gene expression level of IDA patients was significantly higher than other groups. Also the HFE gene expression was negatively correlated with TS. Finally, the main result of our study showed that loss of HFE function in HH is not derived from its gene expression inhibition and much higher HFE gene expression might lead to IDA. However we propose repeating of the study for more approval of our finding.

  17. Subcellular Iron Localization Mechanisms in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Aksoy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic micro-nutrient element iron (Fe is present as a cofactor in the active sites of many metalloproteins with important roles in the plant. On the other hand, since it is excessively reactive, excess accumulation in the cell triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, leading to cell death. Therefore, iron homeostasis in the cell is very important for plant growth. Once uptake into the roots, iron is distributed to the subcellular compartments. Subcellular iron transport and hence cellular iron homeostasis is carried out through synchronous control of different membrane protein families. It has been discovered that expression levels of these membrane proteins increase under iron deficiency. Examination of the tasks and regulations of these carriers is very important in terms of understanding the iron intake and distribution mechanisms in plants. Therefore, in this review, the transporters responsible for the uptake of iron into the cell and its subcellular distribution between organelles will be discussed with an emphasis on the current developments about these transporters.

  18. Servo-control of water and sodium homeostasis during renal clearance measurements in conscious rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Klaus; Shirley, David G

    2007-01-01

    Servo-controlled fluid and sodium replacement during clearance studies is used in order to prevent loss of body fluid and sodium following diuretic/natriuretic procedures. However, even under control conditions, the use of this technique is sometimes associated with increases in proximal tubular...... fluid output (assessed by lithium clearance) and excretion rates. The present study examined the reason for these increases. The first series of experiments showed that one cause is volume overloading. This can occur if the servo system is activated from the start, i.e., during the establishment...... not seen when blood samples are replaced with the animal's own red blood cells resuspended in isotonic saline. When these pitfalls are avoided, servo-controlled sodium and fluid replacement is a reliable technique that makes it possible to study the effects of natriuretic and/or diuretic stimuli without...

  19. Smartphone-controlled optogenetically engineered cells enable semiautomatic glucose homeostasis in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiawei; Xue, Shuai; Yu, Guiling; Yu, Yuanhuan; Yang, Xueping; Bai, Yu; Zhu, Sucheng; Yang, Linfeng; Yin, Jianli; Wang, Yidan; Liao, Shuyong; Guo, Sanwei; Xie, Mingqi; Fussenegger, Martin; Ye, Haifeng

    2017-04-26

    With the increasingly dominant role of smartphones in our lives, mobile health care systems integrating advanced point-of-care technologies to manage chronic diseases are gaining attention. Using a multidisciplinary design principle coupling electrical engineering, software development, and synthetic biology, we have engineered a technological infrastructure enabling the smartphone-assisted semiautomatic treatment of diabetes in mice. A custom-designed home server SmartController was programmed to process wireless signals, enabling a smartphone to regulate hormone production by optically engineered cells implanted in diabetic mice via a far-red light (FRL)-responsive optogenetic interface. To develop this wireless controller network, we designed and implanted hydrogel capsules carrying both engineered cells and wirelessly powered FRL LEDs (light-emitting diodes). In vivo production of a short variant of human glucagon-like peptide 1 (shGLP-1) or mouse insulin by the engineered cells in the hydrogel could be remotely controlled by smartphone programs or a custom-engineered Bluetooth-active glucometer in a semiautomatic, glucose-dependent manner. By combining electronic device-generated digital signals with optogenetically engineered cells, this study provides a step toward translating cell-based therapies into the clinic. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Servo-control of water and sodium homeostasis during renal clearance measurements in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Klaus; Shirley, David G

    2007-01-01

    Servo-controlled fluid and sodium replacement during clearance studies is used in order to prevent loss of body fluid and sodium following diuretic/natriuretic procedures. However, even under control conditions, the use of this technique is sometimes associated with increases in proximal tubular fluid output (assessed by lithium clearance) and excretion rates. The present study examined the reason for these increases. The first series of experiments showed that one cause is volume overloading. This can occur if the servo system is activated from the start, i.e., during the establishment of a suitably high urine flow rate by constant infusion of hypotonic glucose solution. The second series of experiments showed that replacement of blood samples with donor blood can also lead to increases in fractional lithium excretion and accompanying increases in water and sodium excretion, a problem not seen when blood samples are replaced with the animal's own red blood cells resuspended in isotonic saline. When these pitfalls are avoided, servo-controlled sodium and fluid replacement is a reliable technique that makes it possible to study the effects of natriuretic and/or diuretic stimuli without interference from unwanted changes in extracellular volume. 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Iron-dependent regulation of hepcidin in Hjv-/- mice: evidence that hemojuvelin is dispensable for sensing body iron levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Gkouvatsos

    Full Text Available Hemojuvelin (Hjv is a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP co-receptor involved in the control of systemic iron homeostasis. Functional inactivation of Hjv leads to severe iron overload in humans and mice due to marked suppression of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. To investigate the role of Hjv in body iron sensing, Hjv-/- mice and isogenic wild type controls were placed on a moderately low, a standard or a high iron diet for four weeks. Hjv-/- mice developed systemic iron overload under all regimens. Transferrin (Tf was highly saturated regardless of the dietary iron content, while liver iron deposition was proportional to it. Hepcidin mRNA expression responded to fluctuations in dietary iron intake, despite the absence of Hjv. Nevertheless, iron-dependent upregulation of hepcidin was more than an order of magnitude lower compared to that seen in wild type controls. Likewise, iron signaling via the BMP/Smad pathway was preserved but substantially attenuated. These findings suggest that Hjv is not required for sensing of body iron levels and merely functions as an enhancer for iron signaling to hepcidin.

  2. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortijo, Cedric; Gouzi, Mathieu; Tissir, Fadel

    2012-01-01

    glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal.......5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased...

  3. Reduction of body iron in HFE-related haemochromatosis and moderate iron overload (Mi-Iron): a multicentre, participant-blinded, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Sim Y; Gurrin, Lyle C; Dolling, Lara; Dixon, Jeanette; Nicoll, Amanda J; Wolthuizen, Michelle; Wood, Erica M; Anderson, Gregory J; Ramm, Grant A; Allen, Katrina J; Olynyk, John K; Crawford, Darrell; Ramm, Louise E; Gow, Paul; Durrant, Simon; Powell, Lawrie W; Delatycki, Martin B

    2017-12-01

    The iron overload disorder hereditary haemochromatosis is most commonly caused by HFE p.Cys282Tyr homozygosity. In the absence of results from any randomised trials, current evidence is insufficient to determine whether individuals with hereditary haemochromatosis and moderately elevated serum ferritin, should undergo iron reduction treatment. This trial aimed to establish whether serum ferritin normalisation in this population improved symptoms and surrogate biomarkers. This study was a multicentre, participant-blinded, randomised controlled trial done at three centres in Australia. We enrolled people who were homozygous for HFE p.Cys282Tyr, aged between 18 and 70 years, with moderately elevated serum ferritin, defined as 300-1000 μg/L, and raised transferrin saturation. Participants were randomly assigned, via a computer-generated random number, to undergo either iron reduction by erythrocytapheresis (treatment group) or sham treatment by plasmapheresis (control group). Randomisation was stratified by baseline serum ferritin (cognitive subcomponent (-3·6, -5·9 to -1·3, p=0·0030), but not in the physical (-1·90 -4·5 to 0·63, p=0·14) and psychosocial (-0·54, -1·2 to 0·11, p=0·10) subcomponents. No serious adverse events occurred in either group. One participant in the control group had a vasovagal event and 17 participants (14 in the treatment group and three in the control group) had transient symptoms assessed as related to hypovolaemia. Mild citrate reactions were more common in the treatment group (32 events [25%] in 129 procedures) compared with the control group (one event [1%] in 93 procedures). To our knowledge, this study is the first to objectively assess the consequences of iron removal in individuals with hereditary haemochromatosis and moderately elevated serum ferritin. Our results suggest that serum ferritin normalisation by iron depletion could be of benefit for all individuals with hereditary haemochromatosis and elevated serum

  4. X-ray fluorescence control of chemical composition of cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prekina, I.M.; Rozova, O.F.; Loran, A.V.; Teplitskaya, G.A.; Smagunova, A.N.

    1995-01-01

    A method of x-ray fluorescence analysis developed for analytical set (KRF-18 diffractometer/DVK-3 computer) is used to control cast iron composition. A quantitative evaluation of errors attributed to the violation of conditions of cast iron sampling from the flow and to the quality of preparing samples for XFA is obtained. It is shown that the main component of the integral experimental error is attributed to nonuniformity of chemical composition of cast iron. Metrological studies show that reproductibility, convergence, accuracy, and sensitivity of the method match the requirements characteristic of the control process. 4 refs.; 2 tabs

  5. [Nutrient sensing by the gastro-intestinal nervous system and control of energy homeostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Mithieux

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal nerves are crucial in the sensing of nutrients and hormones and its translation in terms of control of food intake. Major macronutrients like glucose and proteins are sensed by the extrinsic nerves located around the portal vein walls, which signal to the brain and account for the satiety phenomenon they promote. Glucose is sensed in the portal vein by neurons expressing the glucose receptor SGLT3, which activates the main regions of the brain involved in the control of food intake. Proteins indirectly act on food intake by inducing intestinal gluconeogenesis and its sensing by the portal glucose sensor. The mechanism involves a prior antagonism by peptides of the μ-opioid receptors present in the portal vein nervous system and a reflex arc with the brain inducing intestinal gluconeogenesis. In a comparable manner, short chain fatty acids produced from soluble fibers act via intestinal gluconeogenesis to exert anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects. In the case of propionate, the mechanism involves a prior activation of the free fatty acid receptor FFAR3 present in the portal nerves and a reflex arc initiating intestinal gluconeogenesis. © Société de Biologie, 2016.

  6. Controlling Mast Cell Activation and Homeostasis: Work Influenced by Bill Paul That Continues Today

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    Heather L. Caslin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are tissue resident, innate immune cells with heterogenous phenotypes tuned by cytokines and other microenvironmental stimuli. Playing a protective role in parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections, mast cells are also known for their role in the pathogenesis of allergy, asthma, and autoimmune diseases. Here, we review factors controlling mast cell activation, with a focus on receptor signaling and potential therapies for allergic disease. Specifically, we will discuss our work with FcεRI and FγR signaling, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β1 treatment, and Stat5. We conclude with potential therapeutics for allergic disease. Much of these efforts have been influenced by the work of Bill Paul. With many mechanistic targets for mast cell activation and different classes of therapeutics being studied, there is reason to be hopeful for continued clinical progress in this area.

  7. Controlling Mast Cell Activation and Homeostasis: Work Influenced by Bill Paul That Continues Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caslin, Heather L; Kiwanuka, Kasalina N; Haque, Tamara T; Taruselli, Marcela T; MacKnight, H Patrick; Paranjape, Anuya; Ryan, John J

    2018-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue resident, innate immune cells with heterogenous phenotypes tuned by cytokines and other microenvironmental stimuli. Playing a protective role in parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections, mast cells are also known for their role in the pathogenesis of allergy, asthma, and autoimmune diseases. Here, we review factors controlling mast cell activation, with a focus on receptor signaling and potential therapies for allergic disease. Specifically, we will discuss our work with FcεRI and FγR signaling, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β1 treatment, and Stat5. We conclude with potential therapeutics for allergic disease. Much of these efforts have been influenced by the work of Bill Paul. With many mechanistic targets for mast cell activation and different classes of therapeutics being studied, there is reason to be hopeful for continued clinical progress in this area.

  8. Regrowing the adult brain: NF-κB controls functional circuit formation and tissue homeostasis in the dentate gyrus.

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    Yvonne Imielski

    Full Text Available Cognitive decline during aging is correlated with a continuous loss of cells within the brain and especially within the hippocampus, which could be regenerated by adult neurogenesis. Here we show that genetic ablation of NF-κB resulted in severe defects in the neurogenic region (dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Despite increased stem cell proliferation, axogenesis, synaptogenesis and neuroprotection were hampered, leading to disruption of the mossy fiber pathway and to atrophy of the dentate gyrus during aging. Here, NF-κB controls the transcription of FOXO1 and PKA, regulating axogenesis. Structural defects culminated in behavioral impairments in pattern separation. Re-activation of NF-κB resulted in integration of newborn neurons, finally to regeneration of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by a complete recovery of structural and behavioral defects. These data identify NF-κB as a crucial regulator of dentate gyrus tissue homeostasis suggesting NF-κB to be a therapeutic target for treating cognitive and mood disorders.

  9. Maize source leaf adaptation to nitrogen deficiency affects not only nitrogen and carbon metabolism but also control of phosphate homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Urte; Mascher, Martin; Colmsee, Christian; Scholz, Uwe; Bräutigam, Andrea; Fahnenstich, Holger; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2012-11-01

    Crop plant development is strongly dependent on the availability of nitrogen (N) in the soil and the efficiency of N utilization for biomass production and yield. However, knowledge about molecular responses to N deprivation derives mainly from the study of model species. In this article, the metabolic adaptation of source leaves to low N was analyzed in maize (Zea mays) seedlings by parallel measurements of transcriptome and metabolome profiling. Inbred lines A188 and B73 were cultivated under sufficient (15 mM) or limiting (0.15 mM) nitrate supply for up to 30 d. Limited availability of N caused strong shifts in the metabolite profile of leaves. The transcriptome was less affected by the N stress but showed strong genotype- and age-dependent patterns. N starvation initiated the selective down-regulation of processes involved in nitrate reduction and amino acid assimilation; ammonium assimilation-related transcripts, on the other hand, were not influenced. Carbon assimilation-related transcripts were characterized by high transcriptional coordination and general down-regulation under low-N conditions. N deprivation caused a slight accumulation of starch but also directed increased amounts of carbohydrates into the cell wall and secondary metabolites. The decrease in N availability also resulted in accumulation of phosphate and strong down-regulation of genes usually involved in phosphate starvation response, underlining the great importance of phosphate homeostasis control under stress conditions.

  10. Molecular control of copper homeostasis in filamentous fungi: increased expression of a metallothionein gene during aging of Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbeck, N B; Borghouts, C; Hamann, A; Specke, V; Osiewacz, H D

    2001-01-01

    The lifespan of the ascomycete Podospora anserina was previously demonstrated to be significantly increased in a copper-uptake mutant, suggesting that copper is a potential stressor involved in degenerative processes. In order to determine whether changes in copper stress occur in the cells during normal aging of cultures, we cloned and characterized a gene coding for a component of the molecular machinery involved in the control of copper homeostasis. This gene, PaMt1, is a single-copy gene that encodes a metallothionein of 26 amino acids. The coding sequence of PaMt1 is interrupted by a single intron. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a high degree of sequence identity to metallothioneins of the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa and the basidiomycete Agaricus bisporus, and to the N-terminal portion of mammalian metallothioneins. Levels of PaMt1 transcript increase in response to elevated amounts of copper in the growth medium and during aging of wild-type cultures. In contrast, in the long-lived mutant grisea, transcript levels first increase but then decrease again. The ability of wild-type cultures to respond to exogenous copper stress via the induction of PaMt1 transcription is not affected as they grow older.

  11. Regrowing the Adult Brain: NF-κB Controls Functional Circuit Formation and Tissue Homeostasis in the Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imielski, Yvonne; Schwamborn, Jens C.; Lüningschrör, Patrick; Heimann, Peter; Holzberg, Magdalena; Werner, Hendrikje; Leske, Oliver; Püschel, Andreas W.; Memet, Sylvie; Heumann, Rolf; Israel, Alain; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive decline during aging is correlated with a continuous loss of cells within the brain and especially within the hippocampus, which could be regenerated by adult neurogenesis. Here we show that genetic ablation of NF-κB resulted in severe defects in the neurogenic region (dentate gyrus) of the hippocampus. Despite increased stem cell proliferation, axogenesis, synaptogenesis and neuroprotection were hampered, leading to disruption of the mossy fiber pathway and to atrophy of the dentate gyrus during aging. Here, NF-κB controls the transcription of FOXO1 and PKA, regulating axogenesis. Structural defects culminated in behavioral impairments in pattern separation. Re-activation of NF-κB resulted in integration of newborn neurons, finally to regeneration of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by a complete recovery of structural and behavioral defects. These data identify NF-κB as a crucial regulator of dentate gyrus tissue homeostasis suggesting NF-κB to be a therapeutic target for treating cognitive and mood disorders. PMID:22312433

  12. Siderophore-mediated iron trafficking in humans is regulated by iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuoming; Lanford, Robert; Mueller, Sebastian; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Luscieti, Sara; Sanchez, Mayka; Devireddy, L.

    2013-01-01

    Siderophores are best known as small iron binding molecules that facilitate microbial iron transport. In our previous study we identified a siderophore-like molecule in mammalian cells and found that its biogenesis is evolutionarily conserved. A member of the short chain dehydrogenase family of reductases, 3-OH butyrate dehydrogenase (BDH2) catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the biogenesis of the mammalian siderophore. We have shown that depletion of the mammalian siderophore by inhibiting expression of bdh2 results in abnormal accumulation of cellular iron and mitochondrial iron deficiency. These observations suggest that the mammalian siderophore is a critical regulator of cellular iron homeostasis and facilitates mitochondrial iron import. By utilizing bioinformatics, we identified an iron-responsive element (IRE; a stem-loop structure that regulates genes expression post-transcriptionally upon binding to iron regulatory proteins or IRPs) in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of the human BDH2 (hBDH2) gene. In cultured cells as well as in patient samples we now demonstrate that the IRE confers iron-dependent regulation on hBDH2 and binds IRPs in RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays. In addition, we show that the hBDH2 IRE associates with IRPs in cells and that abrogation of IRPs by RNAi eliminates the iron-dependent regulation of hBDH2 mRNA. The key physiologic implication is that iron-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of hBDH2 controls mitochondrial iron homeostasis in human cells. These observations provide a new and an unanticipated mechanism by which iron regulates its intracellular trafficking. PMID:22527885

  13. Microbial Community Composition Impacts Pathogen Iron Availability during Polymicrobial Infection.

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    Apollo Stacy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient for bacterial pathogenesis, but in the host, iron is tightly sequestered, limiting its availability for bacterial growth. Although this is an important arm of host immunity, most studies examine how bacteria respond to iron restriction in laboratory rather than host settings, where the microbiome can potentially alter pathogen strategies for acquiring iron. One of the most important transcriptional regulators controlling bacterial iron homeostasis is Fur. Here we used a combination of RNA-seq and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq to characterize the iron-restricted and Fur regulons of the biofilm-forming opportunistic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We discovered that iron restriction and Fur regulate 4% and 3.5% of the genome, respectively. While most genes in these regulons were related to iron uptake and metabolism, we found that Fur also directly regulates the biofilm-dispersing enzyme Dispersin B, allowing A. actinomycetemcomitans to escape from iron-scarce environments. We then leveraged these datasets to assess the availability of iron to A. actinomycetemcomitans in its primary infection sites, abscesses and the oral cavity. We found that A. actinomycetemcomitans is not restricted for iron in a murine abscess mono-infection, but becomes restricted for iron upon co-infection with the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Furthermore, in the transition from health to disease in human gum infection, A. actinomycetemcomitans also becomes restricted for iron. These results suggest that host iron availability is heterogeneous and dependent on the infecting bacterial community.

  14. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

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    Cedric Cortijo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity (PCP refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal that tridimensional organization and collective communication of cells are needed in the pancreatic epithelium in order to generate appropriate numbers of endocrine cells.

  15. Basics of control system material in iron foundry

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    J. Sitko

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is taking into account problems of preparing the production of cast-iron casts with reference to correctnesses functioning of processes supplementing, containing elements the system of supply necessary materials and the tool used in order processing production. Methods and chosen models realization elements of production process and their influence on the efficiency process were characterized.

  16. Iron control of the Vibrio fischeri luminescence system in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, P V

    1992-01-01

    Iron influences luminescence in Vibrio fischeri; cultures iron-restricted for growth rate induce luminescence at a lower optical density (OD) than faster growing, iron-replete cultures. An iron restriction effect analogous to that in V. fischeri (slower growth, induction of luminescence at a lower OD) was established using Escherichia coli tonB and tonB+ strains transformed with recombinant plasmids containing the V. fischeri lux genes (luxR luxICDABEG) and grown in the presence and absence of the iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxylphenyl acetic acid) (EDDHA). This permitted the mechanism of iron control of luminescence to be examined. A fur mutant and its parent strain containing the intact lux genes exhibited no difference in the OD at induction of luminescence. Therefore, an iron-binding repressor protein apparently is not involved in iron control of luminescence. Furthermore, in the tonB and in tonB+ strains containing lux plasmids with Mu dI(lacZ) fusions in luxR, levels of beta-galactosidase activity (expression from the luxR promoter) and luciferase activity (expression from the luxICDABEG promoter) both increased by a similar amount (8-9 fold each for tonB, 2-3 fold each for tonB+) in the presence of EDDHA. Similar results were obtained with the luxR gene present on a complementing plasmid. The previously identified regulatory factors that control the lux system (autoinducer-LuxR protein, cyclic AMP-cAMP receptor protein) differentially control expression from the luxR and luxICDABEG promoters, increasing expression from one while decreasing expression from the other. Consequently, these results suggest that the effect of iron on the V. fischeri luminescence system is indirect.

  17. Perfluoroalkyl acids-induced liver steatosis: Effects on genes controlling lipid homeostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Kaberi P.; Wood, Carmen R.; Lin, Mimi T.; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Lau, Christopher; Wallace, Kendall B.; Corton, J. Christopher; Abbott, Barbara D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Structurally diverse PFAAs induced fatty liver and increased TG accumulation in mouse. • Genes of lipid synthesis and degradation were increased after exposure to PFAAs. • PFAAs did not inhibit either mitochondrial fatty acid transport or β-oxidation directly. - Abstract: Persistent presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the environment is due to their extensive use in industrial and consumer products, and their slow decay. Biochemical tests in rodent demonstrated that these chemicals are potent modifiers of lipid metabolism and cause hepatocellular steatosis. However, the molecular mechanism of PFAAs interference with lipid metabolism remains to be elucidated. Currently, two major hypotheses are that PFAAs interfere with mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids and/or they affect the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in liver. To determine the ability of structurally-diverse PFAAs to cause steatosis, as well as to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, wild-type (WT) and PPARα-null mice were treated with perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), or perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), by oral gavage for 7 days, and their effects were compared to that of PPARα agonist WY-14643 (WY), which does not cause steatosis. Increases in liver weight and cell size, and decreases in DNA content per mg of liver, were observed for all compounds in WT mice, and were also seen in PPARα-null mice for PFOA, PFNA, and PFHxS, but not for WY. In Oil Red O stained sections, WT liver showed increased lipid accumulation in all treatment groups, whereas in PPARα-null livers, accumulation was observed after PFNA and PFHxS treatment, adding to the burden of steatosis observed in control (untreated) PPARα-null mice. Liver triglyceride (TG) levels were elevated in WT mice by all PFAAs and in PPARα-null mice only by PFNA. In vitro β-oxidation of palmitoyl carnitine by isolated rat

  18. Glutathione, Glutaredoxins, and Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Carsten; Lillig, Christopher Horst

    2017-11-20

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant cellular low-molecular-weight thiol in the majority of organisms in all kingdoms of life. Therefore, functions of GSH and disturbed regulation of its concentration are associated with numerous physiological and pathological situations. Recent Advances: The function of GSH as redox buffer or antioxidant is increasingly being questioned. New functions, especially functions connected to the cellular iron homeostasis, were elucidated. Via the formation of iron complexes, GSH is an important player in all aspects of iron metabolism: sensing and regulation of iron levels, iron trafficking, and biosynthesis of iron cofactors. The variety of GSH coordinated iron complexes and their functions with a special focus on FeS-glutaredoxins are summarized in this review. Interestingly, GSH analogues that function as major low-molecular-weight thiols in organisms lacking GSH resemble the functions in iron homeostasis. Since these iron-related functions are most likely also connected to thiol redox chemistry, it is difficult to distinguish between mechanisms related to either redox or iron metabolisms. The ability of GSH to coordinate iron in different complexes with or without proteins needs further investigation. The discovery of new Fe-GSH complexes and their physiological functions will significantly advance our understanding of cellular iron homeostasis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1235-1251.

  19. Effects of Vitamin A Supplementation on Iron Status Indices and Iron Deficiency Anaemia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Hesham M. Al-Mekhlafi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world including developed and developing countries. Despite intensive efforts to improve the quality of life of rural and aboriginal communities in Malaysia, anaemia and IDA are still major public health problems in these communities particularly among children. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 250 Orang Asli (aboriginal schoolchildren in Malaysia to investigate the effects of a single high-dose of vitamin A supplementation (200,000 IU on iron status indices, anaemia and IDA status. The effect of the supplement was assessed after 3 months of receiving the supplements; after a complete 3-day deworming course of 400 mg/day of albendazole tablets. The prevalence of anaemia was found to be high: 48.5% (95% CI = 42.3, 54.8. Moreover, 34% (95% CI = 28.3, 40.2 of the children had IDA, which accounted for 70.1% of the anaemic cases. The findings showed that the reduction in serum ferritin level and the increments in haemoglobin, serum iron and transferrin saturation were found to be significant among children allocated to the vitamin A group compared to those allocated to the placebo group (p < 0.01. Moreover, a significant reduction in the prevalence of IDA by almost 22% than prevalence at baseline was reported among children in the vitamin A group compared with only 2.3% reduction among children in the placebo group. In conclusion, vitamin A supplementation showed a significant impact on iron status indices and IDA among Orang Asli children. Hence, providing vitamin A supplementation and imparting the knowledge related to nutritious food should be considered in the efforts to improve the nutritional and health status of these children as a part of efforts to improve the quality of life in rural and aboriginal communities.

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron in the body and lead to ... Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron- ...

  1. The effect of gold kiwifruit consumed with an iron fortified breakfast cereal meal on iron status in women with low iron stores: A 16 week randomised controlled intervention study

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    Coad Jane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary treatment is often recommended as the first line of treatment for women with mild iron deficiency. Although it is well established that ascorbic acid enhances iron absorption, it is less clear whether the consumption of ascorbic acid rich foods (such as kiwifruit with meals fortified with iron improves iron status. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the consumption of ZESPRI® GOLD kiwifruit (a fruit high in ascorbic acid and carotenoids with an iron fortified breakfast cereal meal increases iron status in women with low iron stores. Methods/Design Eighty nine healthy women aged 18-44 years with low iron stores (serum ferritin (SF ≤ 25 μg/L, haemoglobin (Hb ≥ 115 g/L living in Auckland, New Zealand were randomised to receive an iron fortified breakfast cereal (16 mg iron per serve and either two ZESPRI® GOLD kiwifruit or a banana (low ascorbic acid and carotenoid content to eat at breakfast time every day for 16 weeks. Iron status (SF, Hb, C-reactive protein (CRP and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR, ascorbic acid and carotenoid status were measured at baseline and after 16 weeks. Anthropometric measures, dietary intake, physical activity and blood loss were measured before and after the 16 week intervention. Discussion This randomised controlled intervention study will be the first study to investigate the effect of a dietary based intervention of an iron fortified breakfast cereal meal combined with an ascorbic acid and carotenoid rich fruit on improving iron status in women with low iron stores. Trial registration ACTRN12608000360314

  2. Local geology controlled the feasibility of vitrifying Iron Age buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Fabian B; Heap, Michael J; Damby, David E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Najorka, Jens; Vasseur, Jérémie; Fahrner, Dominik; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-01-12

    During European prehistory, hilltop enclosures made from polydisperse particle-and-block stone walling were exposed to temperatures sufficient to partially melt the constituent stonework, leading to the preservation of glassy walls called 'vitrified forts'. During vitrification, the granular wall rocks partially melt, sinter viscously and densify, reducing inter-particle porosity. This process is strongly dependent on the solidus temperature, the particle sizes, the temperature-dependence of the viscosity of the evolving liquid phase, as well as the distribution and longevity of heat. Examination of the sintering behaviour of 45 European examples reveals that it is the raw building material that governs the vitrification efficiency. As Iron Age forts were commonly constructed from local stone, we conclude that local geology directly influenced the degree to which buildings were vitrified in the Iron Age. Additionally, we find that vitrification is accompanied by a bulk material strengthening of the aggregates of small sizes, and a partial weakening of larger blocks. We discuss these findings in the context of the debate surrounding the motive of the wall-builders. We conclude that if wall stability by bulk strengthening was the desired effect, then vitrification represents an Iron Age technology that failed to be effective in regions of refractory local geology.

  3. Carnosine and anserine homeostasis in skeletal muscle and heart is controlled by β‐alanine transamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancquaert, Laura; Baba, Shahid P.; Kwiatkowski, Sebastian; Stautemas, Jan; Stegen, Sanne; Barbaresi, Silvia; Chung, Weiliang; Boakye, Adjoa A.; Hoetker, J. David; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Delanghe, Joris; Vanheel, Bert; Veiga‐da‐Cunha, Maria; Derave, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Key points Using recombinant DNA technology, the present study provides the first strong and direct evidence indicating that β‐alanine is an efficient substrate for the mammalian transaminating enzymes 4‐aminobutyrate‐2‐oxoglutarate transaminase and alanine‐glyoxylate transaminase.The concentration of carnosine and anserine in murine skeletal and heart muscle depends on circulating availability of β‐alanine, which is in turn controlled by degradation of β‐alanine in liver and kidney.Chronic oral β‐alanine supplementation is a popular ergogenic strategy in sports because it can increase the intracellular carnosine concentration and subsequently improve the performance of high‐intensity exercises. The present study can partly explain why the β‐alanine supplementation protocol is so inefficient, by demonstrating that exogenous β‐alanine can be effectively routed toward oxidation. Abstract The metabolic fate of orally ingested β‐alanine is largely unknown. Chronic β‐alanine supplementation is becoming increasingly popular for improving high‐intensity exercise performance because it is the rate‐limiting precursor of the dipeptide carnosine (β‐alanyl‐l‐histidine) in muscle. However, only a small fraction (3–6%) of the ingested β‐alanine is used for carnosine synthesis. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the putative contribution of two β‐alanine transamination enzymes, namely 4‐aminobutyrate‐2‐oxoglutarate transaminase (GABA‐T) and alanine‐glyoxylate transaminase (AGXT2), to the homeostasis of carnosine and its methylated analogue anserine. We found that, when transfected into HEK293T cells, recombinant mouse and human GABA‐T and AGXT2 are able to transaminate β‐alanine efficiently. The reaction catalysed by GABA‐T is inhibited by vigabatrin, whereas both GABA‐T and AGXT2 activity is inhibited by aminooxyacetic acid (AOA). Both GABA‐T and AGXT2 are highly expressed in the mouse liver and

  4. Valorizing waste iron powder in biogas production: Hydrogen sulfide control and process performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriamanohiarisoamanana, Fetra J; Shirai, Tomoya; Yamashiro, Takaki; Yasui, Seiichi; Iwasaki, Masahiro; Ihara, Ikko; Nishida, Takehiro; Tangtaweewipat, Suchon; Umetsu, Kazutaka

    2018-02-15

    Biogas is composed of different gases including hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), which is a hazardous gas that damages pipes and generators in anaerobic digestion system. The objective of this study was to control H 2 S by waste iron powder produced by laser cutting machine in a steel and iron industry. Waste iron powder was mixed with dairy manure at a concentration between 2.0 and 20.0 g/L in batch experiments, while the concentration was varied between 1.0 and 4.0 g/L in bench experiment. In batch experiment, a reduction of up to 93% of H 2 S was observed at waste iron powder of 2.0 g/L (T1), while the reduction was of more than 99% at waste iron powder beyond 8.0 g/L (T4 ∼ T6). The total sulfide concentration (S T ) increased together with waste iron powder concentration and was fitted with a quadratic equation with a maximum S T of 208.0 mg/L at waste iron powder of 20.2 g/L. Waste iron powder did not have significant effect on methane yield in batch and bench experiments. However, hydrolysis rate constant was increased by almost 100%, while the lag-phase period was reduced to half in test digesters compared to that in control digester. In bench experiment, H 2 S concentration was reduced by 89% at 2.0 g/L, while 50% at 1.0 g/L. Therefore, waste iron powder was effectively removed H 2 S and did not affect negatively anaerobic digestion process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Seizure control through genetic and pharmacological manipulation of Pumilio in Drosophila: a key component of neuronal homeostasis

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    Wei-Hsiang Lin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a significant disorder for which approximately one-third of patients do not respond to drug treatments. Next-generation drugs, which interact with novel targets, are required to provide a better clinical outcome for these individuals. To identify potential novel targets for antiepileptic drug (AED design, we used RNA sequencing to identify changes in gene transcription in two seizure models of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The first model compared gene transcription between wild type (WT and bangsenseless1 (parabss, a gain-of-function mutant in the sole fly voltage-gated sodium channel (paralytic. The second model compared WT with WT fed the proconvulsant picrotoxin (PTX. We identified 743 genes (FDR≤1% with significant altered expression levels that are common to both seizure models. Of these, 339 are consistently upregulated and 397 downregulated. We identify pumilio (pum to be downregulated in both seizure models. Pum is a known homeostatic regulator of action potential firing in both flies and mammals, achieving control of neuronal firing through binding to, and regulating translation of, the mRNA transcripts of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav. We show that maintaining expression of pum in the CNS of parabss flies is potently anticonvulsive, whereas its reduction through RNAi-mediated knockdown is proconvulsive. Using a cell-based luciferase reporter screen, we screened a repurposed chemical library and identified 12 compounds sufficient to increase activity of pum. Of these compounds, we focus on avobenzone, which significantly rescues seizure behaviour in parabss flies. The mode of action of avobenzone includes potentiation of pum expression and mirrors the ability of this homeostatic regulator to reduce the persistent voltage-gated Na+ current (INaP in an identified neuron. This study reports a novel approach to suppress seizure and highlights the mechanisms of neuronal homeostasis as potential targets for next

  6. Experimental oral iron administration: Histological investigations and expressions of iron handling proteins in rat retina with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Jha, Kumar Abhiram; Dey, Sanjay Kumar; Kathpalia, Poorti; Maurya, Meenakshi; Gupta, Chandan Lal; Bhatia, Jagriti; Roy, Tara Sankar; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2017-12-01

    Iron is implicated in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The aim of this study was to see if long-term, experimental iron administration with aging modifies retinal and choroidal structures and expressions of iron handling proteins, to understand some aspects of iron homeostasis. Male Wistar rats were fed with ferrous sulphate heptahydrate (500mg/kg body weight/week, oral; elemental iron availability: 20%) from 2 months of age onward until they were 19.5 month-old. At 8, 14 and 20 months of age, they were sacrificed and serum and retinal iron levels were detected by HPLC. Oxidative stress was analyzed by TBARS method. The retinas were examined for cell death (TUNEL), histology (electron microscopy) and the expressions of transferrin, transferrin receptor-1 [TFR-1], H- and L-ferritin. In control animals, at any age, there was no difference in the serum and retinal iron levels, but the latter increased significantly in 14- and 20 month-old iron-fed rats, indicating that retinal iron accumulation proceeds with progression of aging (>14 months). The serum and retinal TBARS levels increased significantly with progression of aging in experimental but not in control rats. There was significant damage to choriocapillaris, accumulation of phagosomes in retinal pigment epithelium and increased incidence of TUNEL+ cells in outer nuclear layer and vacuolation in inner nuclear layer (INL) of 20 month-aged experimental rats, compared to those in age-matched controls. Vacuolations in INL could indicate a long-term effect of iron accumulation in the inner retina. These events paralleled the increased expression of ferritins and transferrin and a decrease in the expression of TFR-1 in iron-fed rats with aging, thereby maintaining iron homeostasis in the retina. As some of these changes mimic with those happening in eyes with AMD, this model can be utilized to understand iron-induced pathophysiological changes in AMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lysosome-related organelles as mediators of metal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2014-10-10

    Metal ion assimilation is essential for all forms of life. However, organisms must properly control the availability of these nutrients within the cell to avoid inactivating proteins by mismetallation. To safeguard against an imbalance between supply and demand in eukaryotes, intracellular compartments contain metal transporters that load and unload metals. Although the vacuoles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana are well established locales for the storage of copper, zinc, iron, and manganese, related compartments are emerging as important mediators of metal homeostasis. Here we describe these compartments and review their metal transporter complement. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Shape control of the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles under different chain length of reducing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngoi, Kuan Hoon; Chia, Chin-Hua; Zakaria, Sarani; Chiu, Wee Siong

    2015-01-01

    We report on the effect of using reducing agents with different chain-length on the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate in 1-octadecene. This modification allows us to control the shape of nanoparticles into spherical and cubic iron oxide nanoparticles. The highly monodisperse 14 nm spherical nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-dodecanediol and average 14 nm edge-length cubic iron oxide nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-tetradecanediol. The structural characterization such as transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows similar properties between two particles with different shapes. The vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) shows no significant difference between spherical and cubic nanoparticles, which are 36 emu/g and 37 emu/g respectively and superparamagnetic in nature

  9. Shape control of the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles under different chain length of reducing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngoi, Kuan Hoon; Chia, Chin-Hua, E-mail: chia@ukm.edu.my; Zakaria, Sarani [School of Applied Physics, Faculty Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Chiu, Wee Siong [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Lembah Pantai, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    We report on the effect of using reducing agents with different chain-length on the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate in 1-octadecene. This modification allows us to control the shape of nanoparticles into spherical and cubic iron oxide nanoparticles. The highly monodisperse 14 nm spherical nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-dodecanediol and average 14 nm edge-length cubic iron oxide nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-tetradecanediol. The structural characterization such as transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows similar properties between two particles with different shapes. The vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) shows no significant difference between spherical and cubic nanoparticles, which are 36 emu/g and 37 emu/g respectively and superparamagnetic in nature.

  10. Electrochemical oxidation of iron and alkalinity generation for efficient sulfide control in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Kustermans, Caroline; Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Prévoteau, Antonin; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan, Zhiguo; Pikaar, Ilje

    2017-07-01

    The addition of iron salts is one of the most commonly used dosing strategies for sulfide control in sewers. However, iron salts decrease the sewage pH which not only reduces the effectiveness of sulfide precipitation but also enhances the release of residual sulfide to the sewer atmosphere. Equally important, concentrated iron salt solutions are corrosive and their frequent transport, handling, and on-site storage often come with Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) concerns. Here, we experimentally demonstrated a novel sulfide control approach using electrochemical systems with parallel placed iron electrodes. This enabled combining anodic dissolved iron species release with cathodic hydroxyl anion production, which alleviates all the aforementioned concerns. A long-term experiment was successfully carried out achieving an average sulfide removal efficiency of 95.4 ± 4.4% at low voltage input of 2.90 ± 0.54 V over the course of 8 weeks. This electrochemical method was demonstrated to successfully achieve efficient sulfide control. In addition, it increases the sewage pH, thereby overcoming the drawbacks associated with the pH decrease in the case of conventional iron salt dosing. Ferrous ions were produced at an overall coulombic efficiency (CE) of 98.2 ± 1.2%, whereas oxygen evolution and direct sulfide oxidation were not observed. Short-term experiments showed that increasing either inter-electrode gap or current density increased the cell voltage associated with the increase in the ohmic drop of the system. Overall, this study highlights the practical potential of in-situ generation of dissolved iron species and simultaneous hydroxyl anion generation for efficient sulfide control in sewers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells control CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation by modulating IL-2 homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Alice; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Sparwasser, Tim; Thomas, Ranjeny; Steptoe, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses. Although many mechanisms of Treg suppression in vitro have been described, the mechanisms by which Treg modulate CD8+ T cell differentiation and effector function in vivo are more poorly defined. It has been proposed, in many instances, that modulation of cytokine homeostasis could be an important mechanism by which Treg regulate adaptive immunity; however, direct experimental evidence is sparse. Here we demonstrate that CD4+CD25+ Treg, by critically regulating IL-2 homeostasis, modulate CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation. Expansion and effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells is promoted by autocrine IL-2 but, by competing for IL-2, Treg limit CD8+ effector differentiation. Furthermore, a regulatory loop exists between Treg and CD8+ effector T cells, where IL-2 produced during CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation promotes Treg expansion. PMID:21502514

  12. Quantitative Proteomic Analyses of Staphylococcus aureus Treated with Punicalagin, a Natural Antibiotic from Pomegranate that Disrupts Iron Homeostasis and Induces SOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterial, food-borne pathogen of humans, can contaminate raw fruits and vegetables. While physical and chemical methods are available to control S. aureus, scientists are searching for inhibitory phytochemicals from plants. One promising compound from pomegranate is punica...

  13. Age-dependent transition from cell-level to population-level control in murine intestinal homeostasis revealed by coalescence analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Hu

    Full Text Available In multi-cellular organisms, tissue homeostasis is maintained by an exquisite balance between stem cell proliferation and differentiation. This equilibrium can be achieved either at the single cell level (a.k.a. cell asymmetry, where stem cells follow strict asymmetric divisions, or the population level (a.k.a. population asymmetry, where gains and losses in individual stem cell lineages are randomly distributed, but the net effect is homeostasis. In the mature mouse intestinal crypt, previous evidence has revealed a pattern of population asymmetry through predominantly symmetric divisions of stem cells. In this work, using population genetic theory together with previously published crypt single-cell data obtained at different mouse life stages, we reveal a strikingly dynamic pattern of stem cell homeostatic control. We find that single-cell asymmetric divisions are gradually replaced by stochastic population-level asymmetry as the mouse matures to adulthood. This lifelong process has important developmental and evolutionary implications in understanding how adult tissues maintain their homeostasis integrating the trade-off between intrinsic and extrinsic regulations.

  14. Fuzzy control of the iron ore pellets thermal treatment on a conveying car

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В’ячеслав Йосипович Лобов

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to solve the problem of fuzzy control of iron ore pellets thermal treatment on a conveyor roasting machine, to build an automated control system of conveyor roasting machine and perform simulation and to present the results of research. According to the structural scheme of the fuzzy control an automated control system is proposed for being modelled. This is done by using the software MATLAB. The use of atomic emission spectroscopy determines the percentage of the major elements in iron ore pellets considering the main process parameters. This article uses an automated system of fuzzy control of iron ore pellets firing on a conveyor roasting machine with the introduction of atomic emission spectroscopy of the pellets. Development and practical implementation of fuzzy control will improve their quality by taking into account the basic parameters of thermal treatment of pellets such as speed of movement of the grate trucks, gas flow rate, the height of the layer of pellets and the venting speed of the pellets layer with gas-air flow, humidity, average diameter, the basicity and the iron composition in the pellets. The expediency of the developed method of using automated fuzzy control system of iron ore pellets firing on a conveyor roasting car has been proved. The system with fuzzy controller provides a reduction on average 2 m3/h, which is 0,3% of natural gas consumption as compared to the existing systems. This provides more uniform gas permeability of the layer of pellets, which leads to filtration rate increase of the gas flow and to heat exchange intensification in the layer of pellets. It makes it possible to introduce the atomic emission spectroscopy of non-burned pellets and to increase the productivity of conveyor roasting machine by 2,5%. At the same time the resistance of technological equipment (pallets increases, due to more uniform distribution of the thermal field

  15. [Research on controlling iron release of desalted water transmitted in existing water distribution system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yi-Mei; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Peng; Shan, Jin-Lin; Yang, Suo-Yin; Liu, Wei

    2012-04-01

    Desalted water, with strong corrosion characteristics, would possibly lead to serious "red water" when transmitted and distributed in existing municipal water distribution network. The main reason for red water phenomenon is iron release in water pipes. In order to study the methods of controlling iron release in existing drinking water distribution pipe, tubercle analysis of steel pipe and cast iron pipe, which have served the distribution system for 30-40 years, was carried out, the main construction materials were Fe3O4 and FeOOH; and immersion experiments were carried in more corrosive pipes. Through changing mixing volume of tap water and desalted water, pH, alkalinity, chloride and sulfate, the influence of different water quality indexes on iron release were mainly analyzed. Meanwhile, based on controlling iron content, water quality conditions were established to meet with the safety distribution of desalted water: volume ratio of potable water and desalted water should be higher than or equal to 2, pH was higher than 7.6, alkalinity was higher than 200 mg x L(-1).

  16. Control of heme synthesis during Friend cell differentiation: role of iron and transferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskey, J.D.; Ponka, P.; Schulman, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    In many types of cells the synthesis of σ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) limits the rate of heme formation. However, results from this laboratory with reticulocytes suggest that the rate of iron uptake from 125 I-transferrin (Tf), rather than ALA synthase activity, limits the rate of heme synthesis in erythroid cells. To determine whether changes occur in iron metabolism and the control of heme synthesis during erythroid cell development Friend erythroleukemia cells induced to erythroid differentiation by dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) were studied. While added ALA stimulated heme synthesis in uninduced Friend cells (suggesting ALA synthase is limiting) it did not do so in induced cells. Therefore the possibility was investigated that, in induced cells, iron uptake from Tf limits and controls heme synthesis. Several aspects of iron metabolism were investigated using the synthetic iron chelator salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH). Both induced and uninduced Friend cells take up and utilize Fe for heme synthesis directly from Fe-SIH without the involvement of transferrin and transferrin receptors and to a much greater extent than from saturating levels or 59 Fe-Tf (20 μM). Furthermore, in induced Friend cells 100 μM Fe-SIH stimulated 2- 14 C-glycine incorporation into heme up to 3.6-fold as compared to the incorporation observed with saturating concentrations of Fe-Tf. These results indicate that some step(s) in the pathway of iron from extracellular Tf to protoporphyrin, rather than the activity of ALA synthase, limits and controls the overall rate of heme and possibly hemoglobin synthesis in differentiating Friend erythroleukemia cells

  17. Controlled electropolymerisation of a carbazole-functionalised iron porphyrin electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Xinming; Salmi, Zakaria; Lillethorup, Mie

    2016-01-01

    Using a one-step electropolymerisation procedure, CO2 absorbing microporous carbazole-functionalised films of iron porphyrins are prepared in a controlled manner. The electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 for these films is investigated to elucidate their efficiency and the origin of their ultimate...

  18. Torque decomposition and control in an iron core linear permanent magnet motor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overboom, T.T.; Smeets, J.P.C.; Stassen, J.M.; Jansen, J.W.; Lomonova, E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract—This paper concerns the decomposition and control of the torque produced by an iron core linear permanent magnet motor. The proposed method is based on the dq0-decomposition of the three-phase currents using Park’s transformation. The torque is decomposed into a reluctance component and two

  19. HFE gene: Structure, function, mutations, and associated iron abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, James C; Edwards, Corwin Q; Acton, Ronald T

    2015-12-15

    The hemochromatosis gene HFE was discovered in 1996, more than a century after clinical and pathologic manifestations of hemochromatosis were reported. Linked to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6p, HFE encodes the MHC class I-like protein HFE that binds beta-2 microglobulin. HFE influences iron absorption by modulating the expression of hepcidin, the main controller of iron metabolism. Common HFE mutations account for ~90% of hemochromatosis phenotypes in whites of western European descent. We review HFE mapping and cloning, structure, promoters and controllers, and coding region mutations, HFE protein structure, cell and tissue expression and function, mouse Hfe knockouts and knockins, and HFE mutations in other mammals with iron overload. We describe the pertinence of HFE and HFE to mechanisms of iron homeostasis, the origin and fixation of HFE polymorphisms in European and other populations, and the genetic and biochemical basis of HFE hemochromatosis and iron overload. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The commercialization of the FENIX iron control system for purifying copper electrowinning electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, D. R.; Dreisinger, D. B.; Lancaster, T.; Richmond, G. D.; Tomlinson, M.

    2004-07-01

    The FENIX Hydromet Iron Control System was installed at Western Metals Copper Ltd.’s Mt. Gordon Operations in Queensland, Australia. The system uses a novel and patented ion-exchange resin to selectively remove iron from copper electrolyte at the solvent extraction/electrowinning plant. At Mt. Gordon, the system delivered significant savings in reagent consumption (acid and cobalt sulfate for electrowinning and lime for neutralization of the raffinate bleed) and has the potential to deliver higher current efficiencies in copper electrowinning, leading to increased copper production.

  1. On-line iron loss resistance identification by a state observer for rotor-flux-oriented control of induction motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, Pablo M. de la; Bossio, Guillermo R.; Solsona, Jorge A.; Garcia, Guillermo O.

    2008-01-01

    A rotor flux state observer considering iron loss, for an Induction Motor (IM), is proposed. The aim of this proposal is to avoid detuning caused by the IM iron loss on a field-oriented control (FOC). An adaptive scheme for the K Fe , a parameter that represents the IM iron loss, is also proposed. The main objective of this scheme is to improve the dynamic response of control by compensating the variations of iron losses due to possible variations in the stator core characteristics. Simulation results demonstrated that the observer and the adaptive scheme showed a good performance fulfilling then the objectives

  2. Multi-Copper Oxidases and Human Iron Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashchenko, Ganna; MacGillivray, Ross T. A.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-copper oxidases (MCOs) are a small group of enzymes that oxidize their substrate with the concomitant reduction of dioxygen to two water molecules. Generally, multi-copper oxidases are promiscuous with regards to their reducing substrates and are capable of performing various functions in different species. To date, three multi-copper oxidases have been detected in humans—ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen. Each of these enzymes has a high specificity towards iron with the resulting ferroxidase activity being associated with ferroportin, the only known iron exporter protein in humans. Ferroportin exports iron as Fe2+, but transferrin, the major iron transporter protein of blood, can bind only Fe3+ effectively. Iron oxidation in enterocytes is mediated mainly by hephaestin thus allowing dietary iron to enter the bloodstream. Zyklopen is involved in iron efflux from placental trophoblasts during iron transfer from mother to fetus. Release of iron from the liver relies on ferroportin and the ferroxidase activity of ceruloplasmin which is found in blood in a soluble form. Ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen show distinctive expression patterns and have unique mechanisms for regulating their expression. These features of human multi-copper ferroxidases can serve as a basis for the precise control of iron efflux in different tissues. In this manuscript, we review the biochemical and biological properties of the three human MCOs and discuss their potential roles in human iron homeostasis. PMID:23807651

  3. Controlling lipid oxidation via a biomimetic iron chelating active packaging material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fang; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2013-12-18

    Previously, a siderophore-mimetic metal chelating active packaging film was developed by grafting poly(hydroxamic acid) (PHA) from the surface of polypropylene (PP) films. The objective of the current work was to demonstrate the potential applicability of this PP-g-PHA film to control iron-promoted lipid oxidation in food emulsions. The iron chelating activity of this film was investigated, and the surface chemistry and color intensity of films were also analyzed after iron chelation. In comparison to the iron chelating activity in the free Fe(3+) solution, the PP-g-PHA film retained approximately 50 and 30% of its activity in nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)/Fe(3+) and citric acid/Fe(3+) solutions, respectively (pH 5.0), indicating a strong chelating strength for iron. The ability of PP-g-PHA films to control lipid oxidation was demonstrated in a model emulsion system (pH 3.0). PP-g-PHA films performed even better than ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in preventing the formation of volatile oxidation products. The particle size and ζ potential results of emulsions indicated that PP-g-PHA films had no adverse effects on the stability of the emulsion system. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analysis suggested a non-migratory nature of the PP-g-PHA film surface. These results suggest that such biomimetic, non-migratory metal chelating active packaging films have commercial potential in protecting foods against iron-promoted lipid oxidation.

  4. Iron concentration controller in feedwater in nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Motohiro; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the present invention is to prevent chlorine ions from flowing into a reactor when sea water leakage accident should occur in a condenser upon control of Fe concentration in feedwater. That is, a sensor is disposed for detecting the leakage of the sea water at the exit of the condenser. The controller receives a detection signal as the input and delivers a control signal as the output. A control system receives the control signal and actuates valves in bypass systems. In view of the above, the electroconductivity or chlorine ion concentration of the condensate, which varies upon occurrence of sea water leakages in the condenser, is detected by the sensor, and then the controller closes a valve dispposed in the bypass systems in a processing device for filtering and desalting the condensates. Accordingly, the chlorine ions mixed into the condensates are removed by a desalting device without flowing into the reactor. In view of the above, an effect capable of keeping integrity of the plant is obtainable. (I.S.)

  5. Asthma as a disruption in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over several decades, asthma has evolved from being recognized as a single disease to include a diverse group of phenotypes with dissimilar natural histories, pathophysiologies, responses to treatment, and distinctive molecular pathways. With the application of Occam’s razor to ...

  6. Iron ore sintering. Part 3: Automatic and control systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Cores

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El proceso de sinterización implica un gran número de parámetros, más de quinientos, cada uno de los cuales ejerce una mayor o menor influencia y necesita ser controlado, dentro de los límites posibles, con el fin de optimizar la productividad, la estabilidad del proceso, y la composición y la calidad de la sinterizado producido. Para cumplir con la legislación ambiental, un sistema de control de la contaminación debe monitorizar la composición de las partículas y los gases generados en la planta de sinterización y emitidos a la atmósfera. Los sistemas de automatización y control son herramientas vitales para ayudar a los operadores de la planta en el seguimiento de cada etapa del proceso de producción de sinterizado.

  7. Iron supplementation in HIV-infected Malawian children with anemia: a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esan, Michael O.; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele; Nkhoma, Ernest; Musicha, Crispin; White, Sarah A.; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Phiri, Kamija S.

    2013-01-01

    It is unknown whether iron supplementation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children living in regions with high infection pressure is safe or beneficial. A 2-arm, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial was conducted to examine the effects of iron supplementation on hemoglobin, HIV

  8. Double-blind randomized controlled trial of rolls fortified with microencapsulated iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Teresa Negreira Navarro; Taddei, José Augusto de Aguiar Carrazedo; Palma, Domingos; Ancona-Lopez, Fábio; Braga, Josefina Aparecida Pellegrini

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of the fortification of rolls with microencapsulated iron sulfate with sodium alginate on the hemoglobin levels in preschoolers as compared to controls. Double-blind randomized controlled trial comprised of children aged 2 to 6 years with initial hemoglobin exceeding 9 g/dL from four not-for-profit daycares randomly selected in the city of São Paulo - Brazil. Children of 2 daycares (n = 88) received rolls with fortified wheat flour as the exposed group (EC) and children of 2 daycares (n = 85) received rolls without fortification as the control group (CG) over a 24-week period. Rolls with 4 mg iron each were offered once a day, five days a week. Hemoglobin concentrations were determined in capillary blood by HemoCue® at three moments of trial: baseline (Ml), after 12 and 24 weeks of intervention (M2, M3). Hemoglobin concentration presented significant increase up to M3 in EG (11.7-12.5-12.6 g/dL) and in CG (11.1-12.4-12.3 g/dL) with higher elevations in children initially with anemia. There was significant reduction in the occurrence of anemia from 22% to 9% in EG and from 47% to 8.2% in CG at M3. Rolls fortified with microencapsulated iron sulfate were well tolerated, increased hemoglobin levels and reduced the occurrence of anemia, but with no difference compared to the control group.

  9. Spin-State-Controlled Photodissociation of Iron(III) Azide to an Iron(V) Nitride Complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andris, E.; Navrátil, R.; Jašík, J.; Sabenya, G.; Costas, M.; Srnec, Martin; Roithová, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 45 (2017), s. 14057-14060 ISSN 1521-3773 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Ion spectroscopy * Iron(V) nitride * Photodissociation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry

  10. Biogeochemical processes controlling density stratification in an iron-meromictic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixdorf, E.; Boehrer, B.

    2015-06-01

    Biogeochemical processes and mixing regime of a lake can control each other mutually. The prominent case of iron meromixis is investigated in Waldsee near Doebern, a small lake that originated from surface mining of lignite. From a four years data set of monthly measured electrical conductivity profiles, we calculated summed conductivity as a quantitative variable reflecting the amount of electro-active substances in the entire lake. Seasonal variations followed changing chemocline height. Coinciding changes of electrical conductivities in the monimolimnion indicated that a considerable share of substances, precipitated by the advancing oxygenated epilimnion, re-dissolved in the remaining anoxic deep waters and contributed considerably to the density stratification. In addition, we constructed a lab experiment, in which aeration of monimolimnetic waters removed iron compounds and organic material. Precipitates could be identified by visual inspection. Introduced air bubbles ascended through the water column and formed a water mass similar to the mixolimnetic Waldsee water. The remaining less dense water remained floating on the nearly unchanged monimolimnetic water. In conclusion, iron meromixis as seen in Waldsee did not require two different sources of incoming waters, but the inflow of iron rich deep groundwater and the aeration through the lake surface were fully sufficient.

  11. The yeast protein kinase Sch9 adjusts V-ATPase assembly/disassembly to control pH homeostasis and longevity in response to glucose availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Wilms

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The conserved protein kinase Sch9 is a central player in the nutrient-induced signaling network in yeast, although only few of its direct substrates are known. We now provide evidence that Sch9 controls the vacuolar proton pump (V-ATPase to maintain cellular pH homeostasis and ageing. A synthetic sick phenotype arises when deletion of SCH9 is combined with a dysfunctional V-ATPase, and the lack of Sch9 has a significant impact on cytosolic pH (pHc homeostasis. Sch9 physically interacts with, and influences glucose-dependent assembly/disassembly of the V-ATPase, thereby integrating input from TORC1. Moreover, we show that the role of Sch9 in regulating ageing is tightly connected with V-ATPase activity and vacuolar acidity. As both Sch9 and the V-ATPase are highly conserved in higher eukaryotes, it will be interesting to further clarify their cooperative action on the cellular processes that influence growth and ageing.

  12. The transcription factor Jdp2 controls bone homeostasis and antibacterial immunity by regulating osteoclast and neutrophil differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Kenta; Fukasaka, Masahiro; Vandenbon, Alexis; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Kawasaki, Takumi; Kondo, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Standley, Daron; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo

    2012-12-14

    Jdp2 is an AP-1 family transcription factor that regulates the epigenetic status of histones. Previous in vitro studies revealed that Jdp2 is involved in osteoclastogenesis. However, the roles of Jdp2 in vivo and its pleiotropic functions are largely unknown. Here we generated Jdp2(-/-) mice and discovered its crucial roles not only in bone metabolism but also in differentiation of neutrophils. Jdp2(-/-) mice exhibited osteopetrosis resulting from impaired osteoclastogenesis. Jdp2(-/-) neutrophils were morphologically normal but had impaired surface expression of Ly6G, bactericidal function, and apoptosis. We also found that ATF3 was an inhibitor of neutrophil differentiation and that Jdp2 directly suppresses its expression via inhibition of histone acetylation. Strikingly, Jdp2(-/-) mice were highly susceptible to Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans infection. Thus, Jdp2 plays pivotal roles in in vivo bone homeostasis and host defense by regulating osteoclast and neutrophil differentiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulation of dendritic cell development by GM-CSF: molecular control and implications for immune homeostasis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Laar, Lianne; Coffer, Paul J; Woltman, Andrea M

    2012-04-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a small and heterogeneous fraction of the hematopoietic system, specialized in antigen capture, processing, and presentation. The different DC subsets act as sentinels throughout the body and perform a key role in the induction of immunogenic as well as tolerogenic immune responses. Because of their limited lifespan, continuous replenishment of DC is required. Whereas the importance of GM-CSF in regulating DC homeostasis has long been underestimated, this cytokine is currently considered a critical factor for DC development under both steady-state and inflammatory conditions. Regulation of cellular actions by GM-CSF depends on the activation of intracellular signaling modules, including JAK/STAT, MAPK, PI3K, and canonical NF-κB. By directing the activity of transcription factors and other cellular effector proteins, these pathways influence differentiation, survival and/or proliferation of uncommitted hematopoietic progenitors, and DC subset-specific precursors, thereby contributing to specific aspects of DC subset development. The specific intracellular events resulting from GM-CSF-induced signaling provide a molecular explanation for GM-CSF-dependent subset distribution as well as clues to the specific characteristics and functions of GM-CSF-differentiated DCs compared with DCs generated by fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand. This knowledge can be used to identify therapeutic targets to improve GM-CSF-dependent DC-based strategies to regulate immunity.

  14. Quantitative analysis of biogeochemically controlled density stratification in an iron-meromictic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixdorf, E.; Boehrer, B.

    2015-11-01

    Lake stratification controls the cycling of dissolved matter within the water body. This is of particular interest in the case of meromictic lakes, where permanent density stratification of the deep water limits vertical transport, and a chemically different (reducing) milieu can be established. As a consequence, the geochemical setting and the mixing regime of a lake can stabilize each other mutually. We attempt a quantitative approach to the contribution of chemical reactions sustaining the density stratification. As an example, we chose the prominent case of iron meromixis in Waldsee near Doebern, a small lake that originated from near-surface underground mining of lignite. From a data set covering 4 years of monthly measured electrical conductivity profiles, we calculated summed conductivity as a quantitative variable reflecting the amount of electro-active substances in the entire lake. Seasonal variations followed the changing of the chemocline height. Coinciding changes of electrical conductivities in the monimolimnion indicated that a considerable share of substances, precipitated by the advancing oxygenated epilimnion, re-dissolved in the remaining anoxic deep waters and contributed considerably to the density stratification. In addition, we designed a lab experiment, in which we removed iron compounds and organic material from monimolimnetic waters by introducing air bubbles. Precipitates could be identified by visual inspection. Eventually, the remaining solutes in the aerated water layer looked similar to mixolimnetic Waldsee water. Due to its reduced concentration of solutes, this water became less dense and remained floating on nearly unchanged monimolimnetic water. In conclusion, iron meromixis as seen in Waldsee did not require two different sources of incoming waters, but the inflow of iron-rich deep groundwater and the aeration through the lake surface were fully sufficient for the formation of iron meromixis.

  15. Controlled formation of iron carbides and their performance in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Wezendonk, Tim A.

    2018-04-19

    Iron carbides are unmistakably associated with the active phase for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The formation of these carbides is highly dependent on the catalyst formulation, the activation method and the operational conditions. Because of this highly dynamic behavior, studies on active phase performance often lack the direct correlation between catalyst performance and iron carbide phase. For the above reasons, an extensive in situ Mössbauer spectroscopy study on highly dispersed Fe on carbon catalysts (Fe@C) produced through pyrolysis of a Metal Organic Framework was coupled to their FTS performance testing. The preparation of Fe@C catalysts via this MOF mediated synthesis allows control over the active phase formation and therefore provides an ideal model system to study the performance of different iron carbides. Reduction of fresh Fe@C followed by low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (LTFT) conditions resulted in the formation of the ε′-Fe2.2C, whereas carburization of the fresh catalysts under high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (HTFT) resulted in the formation of χ-Fe5C2. Furthermore, the different activation methods did not alter other important catalyst properties, as pre- and post-reaction transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization confirmed that the iron nanoparticle dispersion was preserved. The weight normalized activities (FTY) of χ-Fe5C2 and ε′-Fe2.2C are virtually identical, whilst it is found that ε′-Fe2.2C is a better hydrogenation catalyst than χ-Fe5C2. The absence of differences under subsequent HTFT experiments, where χ-Fe5C2 is the dominating phase, is a strong indication that the iron carbide phase is responsible for the differences in selectivity.

  16. Iron status in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankowiak-Kulpa, Hanna; Kargulewicz, Angelika; Styszyński, Arkadiusz; Swora-Cwynar, Ewelina; Grzymisławski, Marian

    2017-12-23

    A decreased concentration of iron, and consecutively haemoglobin, ferritin and decreased level of saturated transferrin, were observed in obese individuals more often than in healthy subjects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation are significantly diminished in obese female patients compared to non-obese counterparts, and whether excess adiposity and inflammation were associated with depleted iron. Female patients (n=48) diagnosed with obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m2), aged 18-40 were accepted for the study. A control group (n=30) encompassed normal weight women, aged 18-30. All obese women obtained an individually adjusted dietary plan with an energy content of 1,500 kcal. Blood glucose, insulin, lipids, ferritin, TIBC and iron concentrations were assayed in serum twice, initially and after 8 weeks of dieting. The obese women at the initial evaluation, in comparison to non-obese control women, were characterized by a significantly lower mean red blood cell volume (MCV; 84.2±12.4 vs. 91.3±9.3 fL; piron level (92.6±42.4 vs. 119.8±44.0 μg/dL; piron homeostasis. Weight loss leads to decrease in the CRP level, but it does not change haematologic parameters in the period of 8 weeks.

  17. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit e controls intracellular calcium homeostasis by regulation of cav1.2 surface expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Buda

    Full Text Available Inappropriate surface expression of voltage-gated Ca(2+channels (CaV in pancreatic ß-cells may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. First, failure to increase intracellular Ca(2+ concentrations at the sites of exocytosis impedes insulin release. Furthermore, excessive Ca(2+ influx may trigger cytotoxic effects. The regulation of surface expression of CaV channels in the pancreatic β-cells remains unknown. Here, we used real-time 3D confocal and TIRFM imaging, immunocytochemistry, cellular fractionation, immunoprecipitation and electrophysiology to study trafficking of L-type CaV1.2 channels upon β-cell stimulation. We found decreased surface expression of CaV1.2 and a corresponding reduction in L-type whole-cell Ca(2+ currents in insulin-secreting INS-1 832/13 cells upon protracted (15-30 min stimulation. This internalization occurs by clathrin-dependent endocytosis and could be prevented by microtubule or dynamin inhibitors. eIF3e (Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit E is part of the protein translation initiation complex, but its effect on translation are modest and effects in ion channel trafficking have been suggested. The factor interacted with CaV1.2 and regulated CaV1.2 traffic bidirectionally. eIF3e silencing impaired CaV1.2 internalization, which resulted in an increased intracellular Ca(2+ load upon stimulation. These findings provide a mechanism for regulation of L-type CaV channel surface expression with consequences for β-cell calcium homeostasis, which will affect pancreatic β-cell function and insulin production.

  18. Shrimp hemocyte homeostasis-associated protein (PmHHAP) interacts with WSSV134 to control apoptosis in white spot syndrome virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apitanyasai, Kantamas; Amparyup, Piti; Charoensapsri, Walaiporn; Sangsuriya, Pakkakul; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2018-05-01

    Hemocyte homeostasis-associated protein (PmHHAP) was first identified as a viral-responsive gene, due to a high upregulation in transcription following white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. Functional studies using RNA interference have suggested that PmHHAP is involved in hemocyte homeostasis by controlling apoptosis during WSSV infection. In this study, the role of PmHHAP in host-viral interactions was further investigated. Yeast two-hybrid assay and co-immunoprecipitation revealed that PmHHAP binds to an anti-apoptosis protein, WSSV134. The viral protein WSSV134 is a late protein of WSSV, expressed 24 h post infection (hpi). Gene silencing of WSSV134 in WSSV-infected shrimp resulted in a reduction of the expression level of the viral replication marker genes VP28, wsv477, and ie-1, which suggests that WSSV134 is likely involved in viral propagation. However, co-silencing of PmHHAP and WSSV134 counteracted the effects on WSSV infection, which implies the importance of the host-pathogen interaction between PmHHAP and WSSV134 in WSSV infection. In addition, caspase 3/7 activity was noticeably induced in the PmHHAP and WSSV134 co-silenced shrimp upon WSSV infection. Moreover, PmHHAP and WSSV134 inhibited caspase-induced activation of PmCasp in vitro in a non-competitive manner. Taken together, these results suggest that PmHHAP and WSSV134 play a role in the host-pathogen interaction and work concordantly to control apoptosis in WSSV infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Iron and iron-related proteins in asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: We tested the postulate that iron homeostasis is altered among patients diagnosed to have asbestosis. Lung tissue from six individuals diagnosed to have had asbestosis at autopsy was stained for iron, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (FP...

  20. Study on electrolytic reduction with controlled oxygen flow for iron from molten oxide slag containing FeO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Y.M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A ZrO2-based solid membrane electrolytic cell with controlled oxygen flow was constructed: graphite rod /[O]Fe+C saturated / ZrO2(MgO/(FeO slag/iron crucible. The feasibility of extraction of iron from molten oxide slag containing FeO at an applied voltage was investigated by means of the electrolytic cell. The effects of some important process factors on the FeO electrolytic reduction with the controlled oxygen flow were discussed. The results show that: solid iron can be extracted from molten oxide slag containing FeO at 1450ºC and an applied potential of 4V. These factors, such as precipitation and growth of solid iron dendrites, change of the cathode active area on the inner wall of the iron crucible and ion diffusion flux in the molten slag may affect the electrochemical reaction rate. The reduction for Fe2+ ions mainly appears on new iron dendrites of the iron crucible cathode, and a very small amount of iron are also formed on the MSZ (2.18% MgO partially stabilized zirconia tube/slag interface due to electronic conductance of MSZ tube. Internal electronic current through MSZ tube may change direction at earlier and later electrolytic reduction stage. It has a role of promoting electrolytic reduction for FeO in the molten slag at the earlier stage, but will lower the current efficiency at the later stage. The final reduction ratio of FeO in the molten slag can achieve 99%. A novel electrolytic method with controlled oxygen flow for iron from the molten oxide slag containing FeO was proposed. The theory of electrolytic reduction with the controlled oxygen flow was developed.

  1. Multivitamin and iron supplementation to prevent periconceptional anemia in rural tanzanian women: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilupa S Gunaratna

    Full Text Available Women's nutritional status during conception and early pregnancy can influence maternal and infant outcomes. This study examined the efficacy of pre-pregnancy supplementation with iron and multivitamins to reduce the prevalence of anemia during the periconceptional period among rural Tanzanian women and adolescent girls.A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in which participants were individually randomized to receive daily oral supplements of folic acid alone, folic acid and iron, or folic acid, iron, and vitamins A, B-complex, C, and E at approximately single recommended dietary allowance (RDA doses for six months.Rural Rufiji District, Tanzania.Non-pregnant women and adolescent girls aged 15-29 years (n = 802.The study arms were comparable in demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, food security, nutritional status, pregnancy history, and compliance with the regimen (p>0.05. In total, 561 participants (70% completed the study and were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Hemoglobin levels were not different across treatments (median: 11.1 g/dL, Q1-Q3: 10.0-12.4 g/dL, p = 0.65. However, compared with the folic acid arm (28%, there was a significant reduction in the risk of hypochromic microcytic anemia in the folic acid and iron arm (17%, RR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.42-0.90, p = 0.01 and the folic acid, iron, and multivitamin arm (19%, RR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.45-0.96, p = 0.03. Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW to adjust for potential selection bias due to loss to follow-up did not materially change these results. The effect of the regimens was not modified by frequency of household meat consumption, baseline underweight status, parity, breastfeeding status, or level of compliance (in all cases, p for interaction>0.2.Daily oral supplementation with iron and folic acid among women and adolescents prior to pregnancy reduces risk of anemia. The potential benefits of supplementation on the risk of

  2. Iron control on global productivity: an efficient inverse model of the ocean's coupled phosphate and iron cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, B.; Holzer, M.; Frants, M.

    2016-02-01

    We construct a data-constrained mechanistic inverse model of the ocean's coupled phosphorus and iron cycles. The nutrient cycling is embedded in a data-assimilated steady global circulation. Biological nutrient uptake is parameterized in terms of nutrient, light, and temperature limitations on growth for two classes of phytoplankton that are not transported explicitly. A matrix formulation of the discretized nutrient tracer equations allows for efficient numerical solutions, which facilitates the objective optimization of the key biogeochemical parameters. The optimization minimizes the misfit between the modelled and observed nutrient fields of the current climate. We systematically assess the nonlinear response of the biological pump to changes in the aeolian iron supply for a variety of scenarios. Specifically, Green-function techniques are employed to quantify in detail the pathways and timescales with which those perturbations are propagated throughout the world oceans, determining the global teleconnections that mediate the response of the global ocean ecosystem. We confirm previous findings from idealized studies that increased iron fertilization decreases biological production in the subtropical gyres and we quantify the counterintuitive and asymmetric response of global productivity to increases and decreases in the aeolian iron supply.

  3. Analysis of serum copper and iron levels in oral submucous fibrosis patients: A case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF is a chronic debilitating disease and a potentially malignant disorder of the oral cavity. The pathogenesis of the disease is not well established. Trace elements such as copper and iron play an important role in the pathogenesis of OSF. Estimation of these elements in serum of the patients may be helpful in understanding the pathologic mechanism. Therefore, a study was carried out to analyze the level of serum copper and iron in the population of Central India. Materials and Methods: A case–control study was carried out on 35 patients with clinically diagnosed of OSF and 35 healthy controls. OSF patients were categorized by clinical staging. Serum copper and iron concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results: Results of the study shows that the mean serum copper concentration was greater in study group (133.3 ± 19.2 compared to control group (113.9 ± 22.1 and the mean serum iron was lower in study group (116.0 ± 24.1 compared to control group (128.2 ± 23.4. The result obtained was statistically significant. The serum copper level increases as the clinical staging of OSF progresses, whereas serum iron level decreases as clinical staging progresses. Conclusion: There was an increase in copper level and decrease in iron level in study group compared to control group; this suggests that there is an increase in copper level with the advancement of clinical staging of OSF.

  4. On-stream analysis of iron ore and its potential for improving export quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    An on-stream iron ore analyser has been developed in collaboration with Hamersley Iron Pty. Limited for determining the iron content of both lump (-30+6 mm particle size) and fines (-6 mm particle size) on conveyor belts. The analyser, which is called IRONSCAN, is based on pair production, and is now commercially available from Mineral Control Instrumentation Limited (MCI) in Adelaide. It can be mounted under existing conveyor belts with minimal modifications to the conveyor structure, and the presence of steel cables in the belt does not interfere once the analyser has been correctly calibrated. The analyser has been extensively tested on both lump and fines on the shiploading conveyor at Dampier, and typically the root mean square (r.m.s.) deviation between single IRONSCAN measurements and conventional chemical analyses is better than 0.5% Fe. It is currently being evaluated on - 150 mm ore from the primary crusher at Mount Tom Price, and initial results are encouraging. The principal advantage of IRONSCAN is that it provides rapid information on ore grades. But perhaps its greatest potential is at the primary crusher where conventional sampling and analysis is very expensive to implement. 11 figs., 1 tab

  5. Thermal analysis control of in-mould and ladle inoculated grey cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Chisamera

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of addition of 0.05wt.% to 0.25 wt.% Ca, Zr, Al-FeSi alloy on in-ladle and in-mould inoculation of grey cast irons was investigated. In the present paper, the conclusions drawn are based on thermal analysis. For the solidification pattern, some specific cooling curves characteristics, such as the degree of undercooling at the beginning of eutectic solidifi cation and at the end of solidifi cation, as well as the recalescence level, are identifi ed to be more infl uenced by the inoculation technique. The degree of eutectic undercooling of the electrically melted base iron having 0.025% S, 0.003% Al and 3.5% Ce is excessively high (39–40℃, generating a relatively high need for inoculation. Under these conditions, the in-mould inoculation has a more signifi cant effect compared to ladle inoculation, especially at lower inoculant usage (less than 0.20 wt.%. Generally, the efficiency of 0.05wt.%–0.15wt.% of alloy for in-mould inoculation is comparable to, or better than, that of 0.15wt.%–0.25wt.% addition in ladle inoculation procedures. In order to secure stable and controlled processes, representative thermal analysis parameters could be used, especially in thin wall grey iron castings production.

  6. Homeostasis in leaf water potentials on leeward and windward sides of desert shrub crowns: water loss control vs. high hydraulic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iogna, Patricia A; Bucci, Sandra J; Scholz, Fabián G; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    Phenotypic plasticity in morphophysiological leaf traits in response to wind was studied in two dominant shrub species of the Patagonian steppe, used as model systems for understanding effects of high wind speed on leaf water relations and hydraulic properties of small woody plants. Morpho-anatomical traits, hydraulic conductance and conductivity and water relations in leaves of wind-exposed and protected crown sides were examined during the summer with nearly continuous high winds. Although exposed sides of the crowns were subjected to higher wind speeds and air saturation deficits than the protected sides, leaves throughout the crown had similar minimum leaf water potential (ΨL). The two species were able to maintain homeostasis in minimum ΨL using different physiological mechanisms. Berberis microphylla avoided a decrease in the minimum ΨL in the exposed side of the crown by reducing water loss by stomatal control, loss of cell turgor and low epidermal conductance. Colliguaja integerrima increased leaf water transport efficiency to maintain transpiration rates without increasing the driving force for water loss in the wind-exposed crown side. Leaf physiological changes within the crown help to prevent the decrease of minimum ΨL and thus contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis, assuring the hydraulic integrity of the plant under unfavorable conditions. The responses of leaf traits that contribute to mechanical resistance (leaf mass per area and thickness) differed from those of large physiological traits by exhibiting low phenotypic plasticity. The results of this study help us to understand the unique properties of shrubs which have different hydraulic architecture compared to trees.

  7. INTRACELLULAR Ca2+ HOMEOSTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahdevi Nandar Kurniawan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+ signaling functions to regulate many cellular processes. Dynamics of Ca2+ signaling or homeostasis is regulated by the interaction between ON and OFF reactions that control Ca2+ flux in both the plasma membrane and internal organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria. External stimuli activate the ON reactions, which include Ca2+ into the cytoplasm either through channels in the plasma membrane or from internal storage like in ER. Most of the cells utilize both channels/sources, butthere area few cells using an external or internal source to control certain processes. Most of the Ca2+ entering the cytoplasm adsorbed to the buffer, while a smaller part activate effect or to stimulate cellular processes. Reaction OFF is pumping of cytoplasmic Ca2+ using a combination mechanism of mitochondrial and others. Changes in Ca2+ signal has been detected in various tissues isolated from animals induced into diabetes as well as patients with diabetes. Ca2+ signal interference is also found in sensory neurons of experimental animals with diabetes. Ca2+ signaling is one of the main signaling systems in the cell.

  8. One-pot size and shape controlled synthesis of DMSO capped iron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/boms/029/06/0617-0621. Keywords. Iron oxide; thermal decomposition; TEM; VSM. Abstract. We report here the capping of iron oxide nanoparticles with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to make chloroform soluble iron oxide nanoparticles. Size and shape of the capped iron oxide nanoparticles ...

  9. Feasibility of sulfide control in sewers by reuse of iron rich drinking water treatment sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Pikaar, Ilje; Sharma, Keshab Raj; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-15

    Dosage of iron salt is the most commonly used method for sulfide control in sewer networks but incurs high chemical costs. In this study, we experimentally investigate the feasibility of using iron rich drinking water treatment sludge for sulfide control in sewers. A lab-scale rising main sewer biofilm reactor was used. The sulfide concentration in the effluent decreased from 15.5 to 19.8 mgS/L (without dosing) to below 0.7-2.3 mgS/L at a sludge dosing rate achieving an iron to total dissolved inorganic sulfur molar ratio (Fe:S) of 1:1, with further removal of sulfide possible by prolonging the reaction time. In fact, batch tests revealed an Fe consumption to sulfide removal ratio of 0.5 ± 0.02 (mole:mole), suggesting the possible occurrence of other reactions involving the removal of sulfide. Modelling revealed that the reaction between iron in sludge and sulfide has reaction orders of 0.65 ± 0.01 and 0.77 ± 0.02 with respect to the Fe and sulfide concentrations, respectively. The addition of sludge slightly increased the total chemical oxidation demand (tCOD) concentration (by approximately 12%) as expected, but decreased the soluble chemical oxidation demand (sCOD) concentration and methane formation by 7% and 20%, respectively. Some phosphate removal (13%) was also observed at the sludge dosing rate of 1:1 (Fe:S), which is beneficial to nutrient removal from the wastewater. Overall, this study suggests that dosing iron-rich drinking water sludge to sewers could be an effective strategy for sulfide removal in sewer systems, which would also reduce the sludge disposal costs for drinking water treatment works. However, its potential side-effects on sewer sedimentation and on the wastewater treatment plant effluent remain to be investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Iron Cage and the Gaze: Interpreting Medical Control in the English Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Exworthy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to determine the value of theoretical ideal-types of medical control. Whilst ideal types (such as the iron cage and gaze need revision in their application to medical settings, they remain useful in describing and explaining patterns of control and autonomy in the medical profession. The apparent transition from the cage to the gaze has often been over-stated since both types are found in many contemporary health reforms. Indeed, forms of neo-bureaucracy have emerged alongside surveillance of the gaze. These types are contextualised and elaborated in terms of two empirical examples: the management of medical performance and financial incentives for senior hospital doctors in England. Findings point towards the reformulation of medical control, an on-going re-stratification of the medical profession, and the internalisation of managerial discourses. The cumulative effect involves the medical profession’s ability to re-cast and enhance its position (vis-à-vis managerial interests.Keywords: medical profession, medical control, iron cage, gaze

  11. Sequence analysis of dolphin ferritin H and L subunits and possible iron-dependent translational control of dolphin ferritin gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Yukako

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-storage protein, ferritin plays a central role in iron metabolism. Ferritin has dual function to store iron and segregate iron for protection of iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species. Tissue ferritin is composed of two kinds of subunits (H: heavy chain or heart-type subunit; L: light chain or liver-type subunit. Ferritin gene expression is controlled at translational level in iron-dependent manner or at transcriptional level in iron-independent manner. However, sequencing analysis of marine mammalian ferritin subunits has not yet been performed fully. The purpose of this study is to reveal cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits, and demonstrate the possibility of expression of these subunits, especially H subunit, by iron. Methods Sequence analyses of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits were performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR fragments from cDNAs generated via reverse transcription-PCR of leukocyte total RNA prepared from blood samples of six different dolphin species (Pseudorca crassidens, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens, Grampus griseus, Globicephala macrorhynchus, Tursiops truncatus, and Delphinapterus leucas. The putative iron-responsive element sequence in the 5'-untranslated region of the six different dolphin species was revealed by direct sequencing of PCR fragments obtained using leukocyte genomic DNA. Results Dolphin H and L subunits consist of 182 and 174 amino acids, respectively, and amino acid sequence identities of ferritin subunits among these dolphins are highly conserved (H: 99–100%, (99→98 ; L: 98–100%. The conserved 28 bp IRE sequence was located -144 bp upstream from the initiation codon in the six different dolphin species. Conclusion These results indicate that six different dolphin species have conserved ferritin sequences, and suggest that these genes are iron-dependently expressed.

  12. MyD88 Adaptor Protein Is Required for Appropriate Hepcidin Induction in Response to Dietary Iron Overload in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Layoun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated to provide virtually all cells in the body, particularly red blood cells, with this essential element while defending against its toxicity. The peptide hormone hepcidin is central to the control of the amount of iron absorbed from the diet and iron recycling from macrophages. Previously, we have shown that hepcidin induction in macrophages following Toll-like receptor (TLR stimulation depends on the presence of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88. In this study, we analyzed the regulation of iron metabolism in MyD88−/− mice to further investigate MyD88 involvement in iron sensing and hepcidin induction. We show that mice lacking MyD88 accumulate significantly more iron in their livers than wild-type counterparts in response to dietary iron loading as they are unable to appropriately control hepcidin levels. The defect was associated with inappropriately low levels of Smad4 protein and Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation in liver samples found in the MyD88−/− mice compared to wild-type mice. In conclusion, our results reveal a previously unknown link between MyD88 and iron homeostasis, and provide new insights into the regulation of hepcidin through the iron-sensing pathway.

  13. The development of fabrication techniques for europia/iron cermet tips for coarse-control arms in DIDO and PLUTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, D.A.; Tarrant, E.A.

    1980-11-01

    The applicability of cermet-fabrication techniques to the production of europia/iron cermets for use as coarse-control arm tips in the materials test reactors DIDO and PLUTO has been investigated. Spheroids of europia were prepared by a dry agglomeration process. These were sintered, dispersed in iron powder and pressed into plates; the plates were then sintered to densify the iron matrix. These stages were optimised to produce a strong cermet with a europia density of >= 2.75 g/cm 3 . The uniformity of distribution of the absorber particles was confirmed by radiography, and adequate neutron-absorption worth by measurements carried out in the GLEEP reactor. An outline flow sheet has been prepared for the manufacture of europia/iron cermet plates suitable for use in the tips of DIDO and PLUTO coarse-control arms. (author)

  14. TMBIM3/GRINA is a novel unfolded protein response (UPR) target gene that controls apoptosis through the modulation of ER calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Rivera, D; Armisén, R; Colombo, A; Martínez, G; Eguiguren, A L; Díaz, A; Kiviluoto, S; Rodríguez, D; Patron, M; Rizzuto, R; Bultynck, G; Concha, M L; Sierralta, J; Stutzin, A; Hetz, C

    2012-06-01

    Transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif-containing (TMBIM)-6, also known as BAX-inhibitor 1 (BI-1), is an anti-apoptotic protein that belongs to a putative family of highly conserved and poorly characterized genes. Here we report the function of TMBIM3/GRINA in the control of cell death by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Tmbim3 mRNA levels are strongly upregulated in cellular and animal models of ER stress, controlled by the PERK signaling branch of the unfolded protein response. TMBIM3/GRINA synergies with TMBIM6/BI-1 in the modulation of ER calcium homeostasis and apoptosis, associated with physical interactions with inositol trisphosphate receptors. Loss-of-function studies in D. melanogaster demonstrated that TMBIM3/GRINA and TMBIM6/BI-1 have synergistic activities against ER stress in vivo. Similarly, manipulation of TMBIM3/GRINA levels in zebrafish embryos revealed an essential role in the control of apoptosis during neuronal development and in experimental models of ER stress. These findings suggest the existence of a conserved group of functionally related cell death regulators across species beyond the BCL-2 family of proteins operating at the ER membrane.

  15. Effects of trans fatty acids on glucose homeostasis: a meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials123

    OpenAIRE

    Aronis, Konstantinos N; Khan, Sami M; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although evidence from cohort studies has suggested that trans fatty acid (TFA) consumption may be associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) have yielded conflicting results.

  16. Report of the World Health Organization Technical Consultation on Prevention and Control of Iron Deficiency in Infants and Young Children in Malaria-Endemic Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives were to review the scientific evidence on scientific evidence on safety and efficacy of iron administration to prevent and control iron deficiency at population levels; to provide guidance on the most feasible, effective, and safe progammatic ways to administer additional iron; and to...

  17. Persistent hepatitis virus infection and immune homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    ZHOU Yun

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis between the host and viruses is naturally maintained. On the one hand, the immune system activates the immune response to kill or eliminate viruses; on the other hand, the immune system controls the immune response to maintain immune homeostasis. The cause of persistent infections with hepatitis viruses such as HBV and HCV is that viral molecules damage the immune system of the host and their variants escape immune clearance. Long-term coexistence of the host and viruses is the pr...

  18. The homeostasis solution – Mechanical homeostasis in architecturally homeostatic buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lin-Shu; Ma, Peizheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Architectural homeostatic buildings (AHBs) make sense because of the laws of physics. • However, high efficiency can be obtained only with AHBs and equipment considered as systems. • Mechanical homeostasis facilitates AHB-equipment system synergy with heat extraction. • Entropically speaking a building needs neither energy nor a fixed amount of heat, but its homeostatic existence. • Homeostatic buildings can reduce building energy consumption from 80% to 90%. - Abstract: We already know, for energy-saving potential, the necessary architectural features in well-designed buildings: high performance building envelope, sufficient interior thermal mass, and hydronic-network activated radiant surfaces for cooling and heating. Buildings with these features may be referred to as architecturally homeostatic buildings (AHBs); such a building-system is thermally semi-autonomous in the sense that its temperature variation stays within a certain range even without conditioning equipment, and, with conditioning equipment in operation, its thermal regulation is handled by its hydronic heat-distribution-network for controlling the temperature level of the building. At the present time conventional HVAC equipment is used for maintaining the heat-distribution-network: this arrangement, however, has resulted in great energy saving only for AHBs with accessible natural water bodies. In operation of general AHBs, a case is made here for a new kind of mechanical equipment having the attribute of mechanical homeostasis (MH). MH is a new energy transformation concept in a triadic framework. Superlative energy efficiency is predicted as a result of combined improvements in higher triadCOPs and lower total (inducted + removed) heat rates—evincing existence of synergy in architectural and mechanical homeostasis, which together will be referred to as the homeostasis solution.

  19. Ameliorated Austenite Carbon Content Control in Austempered Ductile Irons by Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Yun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron has emerged as a notable material in several engineering fields, including marine applications. The initial austenite carbon content after austenization transform but before austempering process for generating bainite matrix proved critical in controlling the resulted microstructure and thus mechanical properties. In this paper, support vector regression is employed in order to establish a relationship between the initial carbon concentration in the austenite with austenization temperature and alloy contents, thereby exercising improved control in the mechanical properties of the austempered ductile irons. Particularly, the paper emphasizes a methodology tailored to deal with a limited amount of available data with intrinsically contracted and skewed distribution. The collected information from a variety of data sources presents another challenge of highly uncertain variance. The authors present a hybrid model consisting of a procedure of a histogram equalizer and a procedure of a support-vector-machine (SVM- based regression to gain a more robust relationship to respond to the challenges. The results show greatly improved accuracy of the proposed model in comparison to two former established methodologies. The sum squared error of the present model is less than one fifth of that of the two previous models.

  20. Tuning dipolar magnetic interactions by controlling individual silica coating of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas Rojas, P. C.; Tancredi, P.; Moscoso Londoño, O.; Knobel, M.; Socolovsky, L. M.

    2018-04-01

    Single and fixed size core, core-shell nanoparticles of iron oxides coated with a silica layer of tunable thickness were prepared by chemical routes, aiming to generate a frame of study of magnetic nanoparticles with controlled dipolar interactions. The batch of iron oxides nanoparticles of 4.5 nm radii, were employed as cores for all the coated samples. The latter was obtained via thermal decomposition of organic precursors, resulting on nanoparticles covered with an organic layer that was subsequently used to promote the ligand exchange in the inverse microemulsion process, employed to coat each nanoparticle with silica. The amount of precursor and times of reaction was varied to obtain different silica shell thicknesses, ranging from 0.5 nm to 19 nm. The formation of the desired structures was corroborated by TEM and SAXS measurements, the core single-phase spinel structure was confirmed by XRD, and superparamagnetic features with gradual change related to dipolar interaction effects were obtained by the study of the applied field and temperature dependence of the magnetization. To illustrate that dipolar interactions are consistently controlled, the main magnetic properties are presented and analyzed as a function of center to center minimum distance between the magnetic cores.

  1. Root plasma membrane transporters controlling K+/Na+ homeostasis in salt-stressed bBarley1[C][W

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhonghua; Pottosin, Igor I.; Cuin, Tracey A.

    2007-01-01

    are well combined to withstand saline conditions. These mechanisms include: (1) better control of membrane voltage so retaining a more negative membrane potential; (2) intrinsically higher H1 pump activity; (3) better ability of root cells to pump Na1 from the cytosol to the external medium; and (4) higher......Plant salinity tolerance is a polygenic trait with contributions from genetic, developmental, and physiological interactions, in addition to interactions between the plant and its environment. In this study, we show that in salt-tolerant genotypes of barley (Hordeum vulgare), multiple mechanisms...... of the cytosolic K1-to-Na1 ratio being a key determinant of plant salinity tolerance, and suggest multiple pathways of controlling that important feature in salt-tolerant plants....

  2. Effects of thermal treatment on mineralogy and heavy metal behavior in iron oxide stabilized air pollution control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard; Bender-Koch, C.; Starckpoole, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    Stabilization of air pollution control residues by coprecipitation with ferrous iron and subsequent thermal treatment (at 600 and 900 °C) has been examined as a means to reduce heavy metal leaching and to improve product stability. Changes in mineralogy and metal binding were analyzed using various...... analytical and environmental techniques. Ferrihydrite was formed initially but transformed upon thermal treatment to more stable and crystalline iron oxides (maghemite and hematite). For some metals leaching studies showed more substantial binding after thermal treatment, while other metals either....... Thermal treatment of the stabilized residues produced structures with an inherently better iron oxide stability. However, the concentration of metals in the leachate generally increased as a consequence of the decreased solubility of metals in the more stable iron oxide structure....

  3. Osteoarthritis: Control of human cartilage hypertrophic differentiation. Research highlight van: Gremlin1, frizzled-related protein, and Dkk-1 are key regulators of human articular cartilage homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckland, J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of articular cartilage homeostasis is important in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis, key to which is activation of articular chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Healthy articular cartilage is resistant to hypertrophic differentiation, whereas growth-plate cartilage is destined to

  4. A randomized, controlled study evaluating effects of amlodipine addition to chelators to reduce iron loading in patients with thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghbali, Aziz; Kazemi, Hamideh; Taherahmadi, Hassan; Ghandi, Yazdan; Rafiei, Mohammad; Bagheri, Bahador

    2017-12-01

    Cardiomyopathy due to iron overload can be fatal in patients with thalassemia major. Calcium channel blockers seem to be effective to reduce iron loading. Our goal was to study effects of amlodipine addition to chelators on iron loading in patients with thalassemia major. This randomized, controlled, and single-center trial was performed on 56 patients with thalassemia major. Patients were randomized 1:1 to combined group (iron chelator plus amlodipine) or control group (iron chelator) for 1 year. Iron content was measured by magnetic resonance imaging; heart T2*, and liver T2*. Serum ferritin was also measured. After 12 months of treatment, myocardial T2* values had significant improvement in combined group (21.9 ± 8.0 ms to 24.5 ± 7.6 ms; P < .05); Difference between two groups was significant (P = .02). Combined treatment had no effect on hepatic T2* value (9.6 ± 2.8 ms to 9.5 ± 3.6 ms); difference between two groups was not significant (P = .2). In addition, a significant reduction was seen in serum ferritin levels in two groups. Mild gastrointestinal upset was the most common untoward effect. Addition of amlodipine to iron chelators has beneficial effects for reduction of iron loading in patients with thalassemia major. This combination therapy seems safe. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. TRP channels in calcium homeostasis: from hormonal control to structure-function relationship of TRPV5 and TRPV6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Goor, Mark K C; Hoenderop, Joost G J; van der Wijst, Jenny

    2017-06-01

    Maintaining plasma calcium levels within a narrow range is of vital importance for many physiological functions. Therefore, calcium transport processes in the intestine, bone and kidney are tightly regulated to fine-tune the rate of absorption, storage and excretion. The TRPV5 and TRPV6 calcium channels are viewed as the gatekeepers of epithelial calcium transport. Several calciotropic hormones control the channels at the level of transcription, membrane expression, and function. Recent technological advances have provided the first near-atomic resolution structural models of several TRPV channels, allowing insight into their architecture. While this field is still in its infancy, it has increased our understanding of molecular channel regulation and holds great promise for future structure-function studies of these ion channels. This review will summarize the mechanisms that control the systemic calcium balance, as well as extrapolate structural views to the molecular functioning of TRPV5/6 channels in epithelial calcium transport. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Neuronal regulation of homeostasis by nutrient sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tony K T

    2010-04-01

    In type 2 diabetes and obesity, the homeostatic control of glucose and energy balance is impaired, leading to hyperglycemia and hyperphagia. Recent studies indicate that nutrient-sensing mechanisms in the body activate negative-feedback systems to regulate energy and glucose homeostasis through a neuronal network. Direct metabolic signaling within the intestine activates gut-brain and gut-brain-liver axes to regulate energy and glucose homeostasis, respectively. In parallel, direct metabolism of nutrients within the hypothalamus regulates food intake and blood glucose levels. These findings highlight the importance of the central nervous system in mediating the ability of nutrient sensing to maintain homeostasis. Futhermore, they provide a physiological and neuronal framework by which enhancing or restoring nutrient sensing in the intestine and the brain could normalize energy and glucose homeostasis in diabetes and obesity.

  7. National Guidelines for Prevention and Control of Iron Deficiency Anemia in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Bellad

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Anaemia is a serious public health challenge in India with more than 50% prevalence across vulnerable groups such as pregnant women, infants, young children and adolescents. It has adverse effects on health, physical and mental productivity affecting quality of life. Guideline is any document containing recommendations about health interventions, whether these are clinical, public health or policy recommendations. The National Anemia Prevention and control guidelines have been developed taking cognizance of the current scientific evidence. The National Iron+ Initiative guidelines have been developed by the Adolescent Division of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW, Government of India.  Prevention and control of anaemia is one of the key strategies of the Health, Nutrition and Population Sector Programmes for reducing maternal, neonatal and childhood mortality and improving maternal, adolescent and childhood health status. It is estimated that anaemia causes 20 per cent of maternal deaths in India.

  8. Change in iron metabolism in rats after renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Liang Xie

    Full Text Available Previous studies have indicated that hepcidin, which can regulate iron efflux by binding to ferroportin-1 (FPN1 and inducing its internalization and degradation, acts as the critical factor in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, it is unknown whether hepcidin is involved in acute renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI. In this study, an IRI rat model was established via right renal excision and blood interruption for 45 min in the left kidney, and iron metabolism indexes were examined to investigate the change in iron metabolism and to analyze the role of hepcidin during IRI. From 1 to 24 h after renal reperfusion, serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were found to be time-dependently increased with different degrees of kidney injury. Regular variations in iron metabolism indexes in the blood and kidneys were observed in renal IRI. Renal iron content, serum iron and serum ferritin increased early after reperfusion and then declined. Hepcidin expression in the liver significantly increased early after reperfusion, and its serum concentration increased beginning at 8 h after reperfusion. The splenic iron content decreased significantly in the early stage after reperfusion and then increased time-dependently with increasing reperfusion time, and the hepatic iron content showed a decrease in the early stage after reperfusion. The early decrease of the splenic iron content and hepatic iron content might indicate their contribution to the increase in serum iron in renal IRI. In addition, the duodenal iron content showed time-dependently decreased since 12 h after reperfusion in the IRI groups compared to the control group. Along with the spleen, the duodenum might contribute to the decrease in serum iron in the later stage after reperfusion. The changes in iron metabolism indexes observed in our study demonstrate an iron metabolism disorder in renal IRI, and hepcidin might be involved in maintaining iron homeostasis in renal IRI. These

  9. Metformin regulates glycemic homeostasis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an NO donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Sergeevich Kuznetsov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the influence of metformin on nitric oxide bioavailability in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM regarding glycemic homeostasis, and to investigate a correlation between metformin dosage and NO levels in vivo. Materials and Methods. Two groups ? primary and control ? were assembled for the clinical section of this study. Patients with newly diagnosed T2DM on metformin therapy were included to the primary group, while drug-naive T2DM patients were enrolled as control subjects. Glycemic parameters and NO bioavailability was tested in both groups prior to and after the follow-up period. Experimental section was dedicated to the elucidation of potential dose-dependent effects of metformin on NO bioavailability. Mice were intraperitoneally infused with metformin at 0.5; 1.1; 5.6 mg per subject. Tissue detection of NO was performed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC iron complexes to form mononitrosyl iron compounds (MIC with paramagnetic properties. Control rodents were intraperitoneally infused with metformin without spin trapping. Results. We found nitrite and methaemoglobin (a marker for NO bioavailability to increase in parallel along with glycemic compensation in the primary but not control group. In vivo rodent models showed linear correlation between accumulation of DETC/MIC and dose of metformin, as well as formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes, known as endogenous NO transporters. Conclusion. Our data suggests that metformin benefits glycemic homeostasis in T2DM as an NO donor via formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes.

  10. Potential for iron oxides to control metal releases in CO2 sequestration scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, P.M.; Roy, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    configuration to match measured geochemical changes due to CO2 injection, we modeled potential changes in groundwater chemistry at the Illinois Basin - Decatur Project (IBDP) site in Decatur, Illinois, USA. At the IBDP, the MGSC will inject 1 million tonnes of CO2 over the course of three years at a depth of about 2 km below the surface into the Mt. Simon Formation. Sections of the Mt. Simon Formation contain up to 10 percent iron oxide, and therefore surface complexes on iron oxides should play a major role in controlling brine chemistry. The batch simulation of this system showed a significant decrease in pH after the injection of CO2 with corresponding changes in brine chemistry resulting from both mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions and changes in the chemistry on iron oxide surfaces. To ensure the safety of shallow drinking water sources, there are several shallow monitoring wells at the IBDP that the MGSC samples regularly to determine baseline chemical concentrations. Knowing what geochemical parameters are most sensitive to CO2 disturbances allows us to focus monitoring efforts. Modeling a major influx of CO2 into the shallow groundwater allowed us to determine that were an introduction of CO2 to occur, the only immediate effect will be dolomite dissolution and calcite precipitation. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Role of α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors in the lateral parabrachial nucleus in the control of body fluid homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, C.A.F.; Andrade-Franzé, G.M.F.; De Paula, P.M.; De Luca, L.A. Jr.; Menani, J.V. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Patologia, Faculdade de Odontologia, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-10

    Central α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors and the pontine lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) are involved in the control of sodium and water intake. Bilateral injections of moxonidine (α{sub 2}-adrenergic/imidazoline receptor agonist) or noradrenaline into the LPBN strongly increases 0.3 M NaCl intake induced by a combined treatment of furosemide plus captopril. Injection of moxonidine into the LPBN also increases hypertonic NaCl and water intake and reduces oxytocin secretion, urinary sodium, and water excreted by cell-dehydrated rats, causing a positive sodium and water balance, which suggests that moxonidine injected into the LPBN deactivates mechanisms that restrain body fluid volume expansion. Pretreatment with specific α{sub 2}-adrenoceptor antagonists injected into the LPBN abolishes the behavioral and renal effects of moxonidine or noradrenaline injected into the same area, suggesting that these effects depend on activation of LPBN α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors. In fluid-depleted rats, the palatability of sodium is reduced by ingestion of hypertonic NaCl, limiting intake. However, in rats treated with moxonidine injected into the LPBN, the NaCl palatability remains high, even after ingestion of significant amounts of 0.3 M NaCl. The changes in behavioral and renal responses produced by activation of α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors in the LPBN are probably a consequence of reduction of oxytocin secretion and blockade of inhibitory signals that affect sodium palatability. In this review, a model is proposed to show how activation of α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors in the LPBN may affect palatability and, consequently, ingestion of sodium as well as renal sodium excretion.

  12. Role of α2-adrenoceptors in the lateral parabrachial nucleus in the control of body fluid homeostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, C.A.F.; Andrade-Franzé, G.M.F.; De Paula, P.M.; De Luca, L.A. Jr.; Menani, J.V.

    2014-01-01

    Central α 2 -adrenoceptors and the pontine lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) are involved in the control of sodium and water intake. Bilateral injections of moxonidine (α 2 -adrenergic/imidazoline receptor agonist) or noradrenaline into the LPBN strongly increases 0.3 M NaCl intake induced by a combined treatment of furosemide plus captopril. Injection of moxonidine into the LPBN also increases hypertonic NaCl and water intake and reduces oxytocin secretion, urinary sodium, and water excreted by cell-dehydrated rats, causing a positive sodium and water balance, which suggests that moxonidine injected into the LPBN deactivates mechanisms that restrain body fluid volume expansion. Pretreatment with specific α 2 -adrenoceptor antagonists injected into the LPBN abolishes the behavioral and renal effects of moxonidine or noradrenaline injected into the same area, suggesting that these effects depend on activation of LPBN α 2 -adrenoceptors. In fluid-depleted rats, the palatability of sodium is reduced by ingestion of hypertonic NaCl, limiting intake. However, in rats treated with moxonidine injected into the LPBN, the NaCl palatability remains high, even after ingestion of significant amounts of 0.3 M NaCl. The changes in behavioral and renal responses produced by activation of α 2 -adrenoceptors in the LPBN are probably a consequence of reduction of oxytocin secretion and blockade of inhibitory signals that affect sodium palatability. In this review, a model is proposed to show how activation of α 2 -adrenoceptors in the LPBN may affect palatability and, consequently, ingestion of sodium as well as renal sodium excretion

  13. Dietary and stored iron as predictors of breast cancer risk: A nested case–control study in Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Amber B.; Shannon, Jackilen; Chen, Chu; Lampe, Johanna W.; Ray, Roberta M.; Lewis, Sharon K.; Lin, Minggang; Stalsberg, Helge; Thomas, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Increases in risk of breast cancer in successive generations of migrants to the United States from China and rapid temporal changes in incidence rates in China following social and economic changes clearly implicate environmental factors in the etiology of this disease. Case–control and cohort studies have provided evidence that at least some of these factors may be dietary. Iron, an essential element necessary for cell function, has also been demonstrated to have potential carcinogenic and co-carcinogenic activities. Iron overload, which was previously uncommon, has become more common in the United States than iron deficiency and may be increasing in China concurrently with dramatic increases in meat consumption. A case–control study nested in a cohort of women in Shanghai, China, was conducted to evaluate possible associations between risk of proliferative and nonproliferative fibrocystic changes as well as breast cancer and dietary iron intake and plasma ferritin levels. Plasma ferritin levels and reported dietary iron intake were compared in 346 women with fibrocystic changes, 248 breast cancer cases and 1,040 controls. Increasing ferritin levels were significantly associated with increasing risk of nonproliferative fibrocystic changes (OR: 2.51, 95% CI: 1.16–5.45, p trend = 0.04). Similar, but weaker, trends were observed for proliferative changes and for breast cancer. Risk of breast cancer relative to the risk of fibrocystic changes was associated with dietary iron intake in women with nonproliferative fibrocystic changes (OR: 2.63, 95% CI: 1.04–6.68, p = 0.02). In conclusion, this study finds significant associations between iron (stored and dietary) and fibrocystic disease and breast cancer. PMID:19444907

  14. Control of Fur synthesis by the non-coding RNA RyhB and iron-responsive decoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecerek, Branislav; Moll, Isabella; Bläsi, Udo

    2007-02-21

    The Fe2+-dependent Fur protein serves as a negative regulator of iron uptake in bacteria. As only metallo-Fur acts as an autogeneous repressor, Fe2+scarcity would direct fur expression when continued supply is not obviously required. We show that in Escherichia coli post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms ensure that Fur synthesis remains steady in iron limitation. Our studies revealed that fur translation is coupled to that of an upstream open reading frame (uof), translation of which is downregulated by the non-coding RNA (ncRNA) RyhB. As RyhB transcription is negatively controlled by metallo-Fur, iron depletion creates a negative feedback loop. RyhB-mediated regulation of uof-fur provides the first example for indirect translational regulation by a trans-encoded ncRNA. In addition, we present evidence for an iron-responsive decoding mechanism of the uof-fur entity. It could serve as a backup mechanism of the RyhB circuitry, and represents the first link between iron availability and synthesis of an iron-containing protein.

  15. Genetic and biochemical investigations of the role of MamP in redox control of iron biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie R; Wilson, Tiffany D; Brown, Margaret E; Rahn-Lee, Lilah; Yu, Yi; Fredriksen, Laura L; Ozyamak, Ertan; Komeili, Arash; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2015-03-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria have evolved complex subcellular machinery to construct linear chains of magnetite nanocrystals that allow the host cell to sense direction. Each mixed-valent iron nanoparticle is mineralized from soluble iron within a membrane-encapsulated vesicle termed the magnetosome, which serves as a specialized compartment that regulates the iron, redox, and pH environment of the growing mineral. To dissect the biological components that control this process, we have carried out a genetic and biochemical study of proteins proposed to function in iron mineralization. In this study, we show that the redox sites of c-type cytochromes of the Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 magnetosome island, MamP and MamT, are essential to their physiological function and that ablation of one or both heme motifs leads to loss of function, suggesting that their ability to carry out redox chemistry in vivo is important. We also develop a method to heterologously express fully heme-loaded MamP from AMB-1 for in vitro biochemical studies, which show that its Fe(III)-Fe(II) redox couple is set at an unusual potential (-89 ± 11 mV) compared with other related cytochromes involved in iron reduction or oxidation. Despite its low reduction potential, it remains competent to oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and mineralize iron to produce mixed-valent iron oxides. Finally, in vitro mineralization experiments suggest that Mms mineral-templating peptides from AMB-1 can modulate the iron redox chemistry of MamP.

  16. The effect of enriched chicory inulin on liver enzymes, calcium homeostasis and hematological parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhangi, Mahdieh Abbasalizad; Javid, Ahmad Zare; Dehghan, Parvin

    2016-08-01

    Type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM) as one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality is associated with immune system disturbances and metabolic abnormalities. In the current study we aimed to evaluate the effects of enriched chicory inulin supplementation on liver enzymes, serum calcium and phosphorous concentrations and hematological parameters in patients with T2DM. Forty-six diabetic females patients were randomly allocated into intervention (n=27) and control (n=22) groups. Subjects in the intervention group received a daily dose of 10g of chicory and subjects in control group received a placebo for two months. Anthropometric variables, glucose homeostasis, hematological parameters and metabolic indices including serum alanine aminotransfersae (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), calcium and phosphorous as well as creatinine concentrations, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and blood pressure were assessed at the beginning and end of the trial. Significant reductions in fasting serum glucose (FSG), Hb A1C, AST and ALP concentrations were observed in chicory-treated group. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were also reduced in chicory-treated group. Serum calcium significantly increased after chicory supplementation but no change in placebo treated group has been occurred (P=0.014). Supplementation with enriched chicory for two months significantly reduced hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) values (Pliver function tests, blood pressure and reduction in hematologic risk factors of diabetes in female patients with T2DM. Further studies in both genders are needed to generalize these findings to total population. Copyright © 2016 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Single Atomic Iron Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Acidic Media: Particle Size Control and Thermal Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hanguang [Department; Hwang, Sooyeon [Center; Wang, Maoyu [School; Feng, Zhenxing [School; Karakalos, Stavros [Department; Luo, Langli [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Qiao, Zhi [Department; Xie, Xiaohong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Wang, Chongmin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Su, Dong [Center; Shao, Yuyan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Wu, Gang [Department

    2017-09-26

    To significantly reduce the cost of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, current Pt must be replaced by platinum-metal-group (PGM)-free catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid. We report here a new class of high-performance atomic iron dispersed carbon catalysts through controlled chemical doping of iron ions into zinc-zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF), a type of metal-organic framework (MOF). The novel synthetic chemistry enables accurate size control of Fe-doped ZIF catalyst particles with a wide range from 20 to 1000 nm without changing chemical properties, which provides a great opportunity to increase the density of active sites that is determined by the particle size. We elucidated the active site formation mechanism by correlating the chemical and structural changes with thermal activation process for the conversion from Fe-N4 complex containing hydrocarbon networks in ZIF to highly active FeNx sites embedded into carbon. A temperature of 800oC was identified as the critical point to start forming pyridinic nitrogen doping at the edge of the graphitized carbon planes. Further increasing heating temperature to 1100oC leads to increase of graphitic nitrogen, generating possible synergistic effect with FeNx sites to promote ORR activity. The best performing catalyst, which has well-defined particle size around 50 nm and abundance of atomic FeNx sites embedded into carbon structures, achieve a new performance milestone for the ORR in acid including a half-wave potential of 0.85 V vs RHE and only 20 mV loss after 10,000 cycles in O2 saturated H2SO4 electrolyte. The new class PGM-free catalyst with approaching activity to Pt holds great promise for future PEM fuel cells.

  18. Homeostasis, inflammation, and disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotas, Maya E; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2015-02-26

    While modernization has dramatically increased lifespan, it has also witnessed the increasing prevalence of diseases such as obesity, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. Such chronic, acquired diseases result when normal physiologic control goes awry and may thus be viewed as failures of homeostasis. However, while nearly every process in human physiology relies on homeostatic mechanisms for stability, only some have demonstrated vulnerability to dysregulation. Additionally, chronic inflammation is a common accomplice of the diseases of homeostasis, yet the basis for this connection is not fully understood. Here we review the design of homeostatic systems and discuss universal features of control circuits that operate at the cellular, tissue, and organismal levels. We suggest a framework for classification of homeostatic signals that is based on different classes of homeostatic variables they report on. Finally, we discuss how adaptability of homeostatic systems with adjustable set points creates vulnerability to dysregulation and disease. This framework highlights the fundamental parallels between homeostatic and inflammatory control mechanisms and provides a new perspective on the physiological origin of inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ...

  20. Brain glucose sensing, counterregulation, and energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Nell; Dallaporta, Michel; Thorens, Bernard

    2007-08-01

    Neuronal circuits in the central nervous system play a critical role in orchestrating the control of glucose and energy homeostasis. Glucose, beside being a nutrient, is also a signal detected by several glucose-sensing units that are located at different anatomical sites and converge to the hypothalamus to cooperate with leptin and insulin in controlling the melanocortin pathway.

  1. Autophagy-related protein Vps34 controls the homeostasis and function of antigen cross-presenting CD8α+ dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Vrajesh V; Pabbisetty, Sudheer K; Wu, Lan; Sebzda, Eric; Martinez, Jennifer; Zhang, Jianhua; Van Kaer, Luc

    2017-08-01

    The class III PI3K Vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34) plays a role in both canonical and noncanonical autophagy, key processes that control the presentation of antigens by dendritic cells (DCs) to naive T lymphocytes. We generated DC-specific Vps34 -deficient mice to assess the contribution of Vps34 to DC functions. We found that DCs from these animals have a partially activated phenotype, spontaneously produce cytokines, and exhibit enhanced activity of the classic MHC class I and class II antigen-presentation pathways. Surprisingly, these animals displayed a defect in the homeostatic maintenance of splenic CD8α + DCs and in the capacity of these cells to cross-present cell corpse-associated antigens to MHC class I-restricted T cells, a property that was associated with defective expression of the T-cell Ig mucin (TIM)-4 receptor. Importantly, mice deficient in the Vps34-associated protein Rubicon, which is critical for a noncanonical form of autophagy called "Light-chain 3 (LC3)-associated phagocytosis" (LAP), lacked such defects. Finally, consistent with their defect in the cross-presentation of apoptotic cells, DC-specific Vps34 -deficient animals developed increased metastases in response to challenge with B16 melanoma cells. Collectively, our studies have revealed a critical role of Vps34 in the regulation of CD8α + DC homeostasis and in the capacity of these cells to process and present antigens associated with apoptotic cells to MHC class I-restricted T cells. Our findings also have important implications for the development of small-molecule inhibitors of Vps34 for therapeutic purposes.

  2. Modulation of iron metabolism in aging and in Alzheimer’s disease: relevance of the choroid plexus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Da Mesquita

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for mammalian cellular homeostasis. However, in excess, it promotes free radical formation and is associated with aging-related progressive deterioration and with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. There are no mechanisms to excrete iron, which makes iron homeostasis a very tightly regulated process at the level of the intestinal absorption. Iron is believed to reach the brain through receptor mediated endocytosis of iron-bound transferrin by the brain barriers, the blood-cerebrospinal (CSF fluid barrier, formed by the choroid plexus (CP epithelial cells and the blood-brain barrier formed by the endothelial cells of the brain capillaries. Importantly, the CP epithelial cells are responsible for producing most of the CSF, the fluid that fills the brain ventricles and the subarachnoid space. Recently, the finding that the CP epithelial cells display all the machinery to locally control iron delivery into the CSF may suggest that the general and progressive senescence of the CP may be at the basis of the impairment of regional iron metabolism, iron-mediated toxicity and the increase in inflammation and oxidative stress that occurs with aging and, particularly, in AD.

  3. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization: Microbial and Mineralogical Controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joel E. Kostka; Lainie Petrie; Nadia North; David L. Balkwill; Joseph W. Stucki; Lee Kerkhof

    2004-01-01

    The overall objective of our project is to understand the microbial and geochemical mechanisms controlling the reduction and immobilization of U(VI) during biostimulation in subsurface sediments of the Field Research Center (FRC) which are cocontaminated with uranium and nitrate. The focus will be on activity of microbial populations (metal- and nitrate-reducing bacteria) and iron minerals which are likely to make strong contributions to the fate of uranium during in situ bioremediation. The project will: (1) quantify the relationships between active members of the microbial communities, iron mineralogy, and nitrogen transformations in the field and in laboratory incubations under a variety of biostimulation conditions, (2) purify and physiologically characterize new model metal-reducing bacteria isolated from moderately acidophilic FRC subsurface sediments, and (3) elucidate the biotic and abiotic mechanisms by which FRC aluminosilicate clay minerals are reduced and dissolved under environmental conditions resembling those during biostimulation. Active microbial communities will be assessed using quantitative molecular techniques along with geochemical measurements to determine the different terminal-electron-accepting pathways. Iron minerals will be characterized using a suite of physical, spectroscopic, and wet chemical methods. Monitoring the activity and composition of the denitrifier community in parallel with denitrification intermediates during nitrate removal will provide a better understanding of the indirect effects of nitrate reduction on uranium speciation. Through quantification of the activity of specific microbial populations and an in-depth characterization of Fe minerals likely to catalyze U sorption/precipitation, we will provide important inputs for reaction-based biogeochemical models which will provide the basis for development of in situ U bioremediation strategies. In collaboration with Jack Istok and Lee Krumholz, we have begun to study the

  4. The effect of psychological stress on iron absorption in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Min

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological stress (PS is recognized as an important pathogenic factor which leads to metabolism disorder in many diseases. Previous studies have shown that systemic iron homeostasis in mammalians was changed under specific stress conditions. Methods In present study, we used communication box to create psychological stress model and investigated the iron apparent absorption, iron accumulation in the apical poles of villous enterocytes and protein expressions of ferroportin 1 (FPN1, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1. Results Our study showed that iron apparent absorption decreased and iron significantly accumulated in the apical poles of villous enterocytes in 3 d and 7 d PS groups. The expression of intestinal FPN1 in 3 d and 7 d PS groups was lower than that of control, while the change of intestinal ferritin was opposite. However, the expression of DMT1 did not change. Conclusion These results demonstrate that PS can decrease iron absorption in rats, which might be related to regulation expression of iron transporters.

  5. Imparting magnetic dipole heterogeneity to internalized iron oxide nanoparticles for microorganism swarm control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Paul Seung Soo, E-mail: psk25@drexel.edu [Drexel University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics (United States); Becker, Aaron, E-mail: aaron.becker@childrens.harvard.edu [Harvard University, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (United States); Ou, Yan, E-mail: ouy2@rpi.edu; Julius, Anak Agung, E-mail: agung@rpi.edu [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering (United States); Kim, Min Jun, E-mail: mkim@coe.drexel.edu [Drexel University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Tetrahymena pyriformis is a single cell eukaryote that can be modified to respond to magnetic fields, a response called magnetotaxis. Naturally, this microorganism cannot respond to magnetic fields, but after modification using iron oxide nanoparticles, cells are magnetized and exhibit a constant magnetic dipole strength. In experiments, a rotating field is applied to cells using a two-dimensional approximate Helmholtz coil system. Using rotating magnetic fields, we characterize discrete cells’ swarm swimming which is affected by several factors. The behavior of the cells under these fields is explained in detail. After the field is removed, relatively straight swimming is observed. We also generate increased heterogeneity within a population of cells to improve controllability of a swarm, which is explored in a cell model. By exploiting this straight swimming behavior, we propose a method to control discrete cells utilizing a single global magnetic input. Successful implementation of this swarm control method would enable teams of microrobots to perform a variety of in vitro microscale tasks impossible for single microrobots, such as pushing objects or simultaneous micromanipulation of discrete entities.

  6. Imparting magnetic dipole heterogeneity to internalized iron oxide nanoparticles for microorganism swarm control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Paul Seung Soo; Becker, Aaron; Ou, Yan; Julius, Anak Agung; Kim, Min Jun

    2015-01-01

    Tetrahymena pyriformis is a single cell eukaryote that can be modified to respond to magnetic fields, a response called magnetotaxis. Naturally, this microorganism cannot respond to magnetic fields, but after modification using iron oxide nanoparticles, cells are magnetized and exhibit a constant magnetic dipole strength. In experiments, a rotating field is applied to cells using a two-dimensional approximate Helmholtz coil system. Using rotating magnetic fields, we characterize discrete cells’ swarm swimming which is affected by several factors. The behavior of the cells under these fields is explained in detail. After the field is removed, relatively straight swimming is observed. We also generate increased heterogeneity within a population of cells to improve controllability of a swarm, which is explored in a cell model. By exploiting this straight swimming behavior, we propose a method to control discrete cells utilizing a single global magnetic input. Successful implementation of this swarm control method would enable teams of microrobots to perform a variety of in vitro microscale tasks impossible for single microrobots, such as pushing objects or simultaneous micromanipulation of discrete entities

  7. Homeostasis of peripheral CD4+ T cells: IL-2R alpha and IL-2 shape a population of regulatory cells that controls CD4+ T cell numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almeida, Afonso R. M.; Legrand, Nicolas; Papiernik, Martine; Freitas, António A.

    2002-01-01

    We show that the lymphoid hyperplasia observed in IL-2Ralpha- and IL-2-deficient mice is due to the lack of a population of regulatory cells essential for CD4 T cell homeostasis. In chimeras reconstituted with bone marrow cells from IL-2Ralpha-deficient donors, restitution of a population of

  8. Functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for controlling the movement of immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ethan E.; Pai, Alex; Weng, Yiming; Suresh, Anil K.; van Haute, Desiree; Pailevanian, Torkom; Alizadeh, Darya; Hajimiri, Ali; Badie, Behnam; Berlin, Jacob M.

    2015-04-01

    Immunotherapy is currently being investigated for the treatment of many diseases, including cancer. The ability to control the location of immune cells during or following activation would represent a powerful new technique for this field. Targeted magnetic delivery is emerging as a technique for controlling cell movement and localization. Here we show that this technique can be extended to microglia, the primary phagocytic immune cells in the central nervous system. The magnetized microglia were generated by loading the cells with iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with CpG oligonucleotides, serving as a proof of principle that nanoparticles can be used to both deliver an immunostimulatory cargo to cells and to control the movement of the cells. The nanoparticle-oligonucleotide conjugates are efficiently internalized, non-toxic, and immunostimulatory. We demonstrate that the in vitro migration of the adherent, loaded microglia can be controlled by an external magnetic field and that magnetically-induced migration is non-cytotoxic. In order to capture video of this magnetically-induced migration of loaded cells, a novel 3D-printed ``cell box'' was designed to facilitate our imaging application. Analysis of cell movement velocities clearly demonstrate increased cell velocities toward the magnet. These studies represent the initial step towards our final goal of using nanoparticles to both activate immune cells and to control their trafficking within the diseased brain.Immunotherapy is currently being investigated for the treatment of many diseases, including cancer. The ability to control the location of immune cells during or following activation would represent a powerful new technique for this field. Targeted magnetic delivery is emerging as a technique for controlling cell movement and localization. Here we show that this technique can be extended to microglia, the primary phagocytic immune cells in the central nervous system. The magnetized microglia were

  9. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our...... the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters....

  10. Control of the interparticle spacing in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle clusters by surface ligand engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Wang; Bingbing, Lin; Taipeng, Shen; Jun, Wu; Fuhua, Hao; Chunchao, Xia; Qiyong, Gong; Huiru, Tang; Bin, Song; Hua, Ai

    2016-07-01

    Polymer-mediated self-assembly of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles allows modulation of the structure of SPIO nanocrystal cluster and their magnetic properties. In this study, dopamine-functionalized polyesters (DA-polyester) were used to directly control the magnetic nanoparticle spacing and its effect on magnetic resonance relaxation properties of these clusters was investigated. Monodisperse SPIO nanocrystals with different surface coating materials (poly(ɛ-caprolactone), poly(lactic acid)) of different molecular weights containing dopamine (DA) structure (DA-PCL2k, DA-PCL1k, DA-PLA1k)) were prepared via ligand exchange reaction, and these nanocrystals were encapsulated inside amphiphilic polymer micelles to modulate the SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was applied to quantify the interparticle spacing of SPIO clusters. The results demonstrated that the tailored magnetic nanoparticle clusters featured controllable interparticle spacing providing directly by the different surface coating of SPIO nanocrystals. Systematic modulation of SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing can regulate the saturation magnetization (M s) and T 2 relaxation of the aggregation, and lead to increased magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation properties with decreased interparticle spacing. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB933903), the National Key Technology R&D Program of China (Grant No. 2012BAI23B08), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 20974065, 51173117, and 50830107).

  11. Aluminum stimulates uptake of non-transferrin bound iron and transferrin bound iron in human glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Bressler, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer's Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer's disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. A transporter was likely involved in the uptake of nontransferrin iron because uptake reached saturation, was temperature-dependent, and attenuated by inhibitors of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the effects of aluminum were not blocked by inhibitors of RNA synthesis. Aluminum also decreased the amount of iron bound to ferritin though it did not affect levels of divalent metal transporter 1. These results suggest that aluminum disrupts iron homeostasis in Brain by several mechanisms including the transferrin receptor, a nontransferrin iron transporter, and ferritin

  12. Ironing Out the Unconventional Mechanisms of Iron Acquisition and Gene Regulation in Chlamydia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick D. Pokorzynski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, along with its close species relatives, is known to be strictly dependent upon the availability of iron. Deprivation of iron in vitro induces an aberrant morphological phenotype termed “persistence.” This persistent phenotype develops in response to various immunological and nutritional insults and may contribute to the development of sub-acute Chlamydia-associated chronic diseases in susceptible populations. Given the importance of iron to Chlamydia, relatively little is understood about its acquisition and its role in gene regulation in comparison to other iron-dependent bacteria. Analysis of the genome sequences of a variety of chlamydial species hinted at the involvement of unconventional mechanisms, being that Chlamydia lack many conventional systems of iron homeostasis that are highly conserved in other bacteria. Herein we detail past and current research regarding chlamydial iron biology in an attempt to provide context to the rapid progress of the field in recent years. We aim to highlight recent discoveries and innovations that illuminate the strategies involved in chlamydial iron homeostasis, including the vesicular mode of acquiring iron from the intracellular environment, and the identification of a putative iron-dependent transcriptional regulator that is synthesized as a fusion with a ABC-type transporter subunit. These recent findings, along with the noted absence of iron-related homologs, indicate that Chlamydia have evolved atypical approaches to the problem of iron homeostasis, reinvigorating research into the iron biology of this pathogen.

  13. NOx Emission in Iron and Steel Production: A Review of Control Measures for Safe and Eco-Friendly Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. A. Mukhtar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron and steel manufacturing involved preparation of raw materials through processes such as sintering, pelletizing and coke making. During these processes, pollutants such as Sulphur (iv oxides (SO2 Carbon II oxides (CO, Nitrogen oxides (NOX, Volatile organic compounds (VOC and Particulate matter (PM etc. are emitted. The present work is aimed at describing some mitigation technologies of controlling emissions in iron and steel production. The processes involved in the production of iron and steel using Blast Furnace (BF and Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF has been described. The mitigation technologies of controlling emissions were analyzed and discussed with environmental impacts based on the economical and technical factors. In this work, the data presented is based on existing reviews. The combination of low NOX burner (LNB and Selective catalytic reduction (SCR is capable of reducing emission for up to 90% and above. Emissions of other pollutants into the atmosphere as a result of ammonia slip, formation of acids and other gases are harmful to the environment and causes damage to the SCR systems. Installation and operation cost are the major impacts of the SCR technology in the process of iron and steel production.

  14. Identification of novel microRNAs in post-transcriptional control of Nrf2 expression and redox homeostasis in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhanan Narasimhan

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2/NFE2L2, a redox-sensitive transcription factor plays a critical role in adaptation to cellular stress and affords cellular defense by initiating transcription of antioxidative and detoxification genes. While a protein can be regulated at multiple levels, control of Nrf2 has been largely studied at post-translational regulation points by Keap1. Importantly, post-transcriptional/translational based regulation of Nrf2 is less understood and to date there are no reports on such mechanisms in neuronal systems. In this context, studies involving the role of microRNAs (miRs which are normally considered as fine tuning regulators of protein production through translation repression and/or post-transcriptional alterations, are in place. In the current study, based on in-silico analysis followed by immunoblotting and real time analysis, we have identified and validated for the first time that human NFE2L2 could be targeted by miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells. Co-transfection studies with individual miR mimics along with either WT 3' UTR of human Nrf2 or mutated miRNA targeting seed sequence within Nrf2 3' UTR, demonstrated that Nrf2 is a direct regulatory target of these miRs. In addition, ectopic expression of miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 affected Nrf2 mRNA abundance and nucleo-cytoplasmic concentration of Nrf2 in a Keap1 independent manner resulting in inefficient transactivating ability of Nrf2. Furthermore, forced expression of miRs diminished GCLC and GSR expression resulting in alteration of Nrf2 dependent redox homeostasis. Finally, bioinformatics based miRNA-disease network analysis (MDN along with extended computational network analysis of Nrf2 associated pathologic processes suggests that if in a particular cellular scenario where any of these miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 either individually or as a group is altered, it could affect Nrf2 thus triggering and

  15. Iron decreases biological effects of ozone exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    CONTEXT: Ozone (0(3)) exposure is associated with a disruption of iron homeostasis and increased availability of this metal which potentially contributes to an oxidative stress and biologicaleffects. OBJECTIVE: We tested the postulate that increased concentrations of iron in c...

  16. Iron and Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbon, E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413534049; Trapet, P.L.; Stringlis, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41185206X; Kruijs, Sophie; Bakker, P.A.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074744623; Pieterse, C.M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113115113

    2017-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most life on Earth because it functions as a crucial redox catalyst in many cellular processes. However, when present in excess iron can lead to the formation of harmful hydroxyl radicals. Hence, the cellular iron balance must be tightly controlled. Perturbation of

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  18. Efficacy of iron-supplement bars to reduce anemia in urban Indian women: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rajvi; Platt, Alyssa C; Sun, Xizi; Desai, Mukesh; Clements, Dennis; Turner, Elizabeth L

    2017-03-01

    Background: India's high prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia has largely been attributed to the local diet consisting of nonheme iron, which has lower absorption than that of heme iron. Objective: We assessed the efficacy of the consumption of iron-supplement bars in raising hemoglobin concentrations and hematocrit percentages in anemic (hemoglobin concentration Indian women of reproductive age. Design: The Let's be Well Red study was a 90-d, pair-matched, cluster-randomized controlled trial. A total of 361 nonpregnant women (age 18-35 y) were recruited from 10 sites within Mumbai and Navi Mumbai, India. All participants received anemia education and a complete blood count (CBC). Random assignment of anemic participants to intervention and control arms occurred within 5 matched site-pairs. Intervention participants received 1 iron-supplement bar (containing 14 mg Fe)/d for 90 d, whereas control subjects received nothing. CBC tests were given at days 15, 45, and 90. Primary outcomes were 90-d changes from baseline in hemoglobin concentrations and hematocrit percentages. Linear mixed models and generalized estimating equations were used to model continuous and binary outcomes, respectively. Results: Of 179 anemic participants, 136 (76.0%) completed all follow-up assessments (65 intervention and 71 control participants). Baseline characteristics were comparable by arm. Mean hemoglobin and hematocrit increases after 90 d were greater for intervention than for control participants [1.4 g/dL (95% CI: 1.3, 1.6 g/dL) and 2.7% (95% CI: 2.2%, 3.2%), respectively]. The anemia prevalence at 90 d was lower for intervention (29.2%) than for control participants (98.6%) (OR: 0.007; 95% CI: 0.001, 0.04). Conclusions: The daily consumption of an iron-supplement bar leads to increased hemoglobin concentrations and hematocrit percentages and to a lower anemia prevalence in the target population with no reported side effects. This intervention is an attractive option to combat anemia

  19. Crystallization behavior and controlling mechanism of iron-containing Si-C-N ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Adel; Ionescu, Emanuel; Fasel, Claudia; Riedel, Ralf

    2009-11-02

    The crystallization behavior and controlling mechanism of the Si-Fe-C-N system based on polymer-derived SiCN ceramic filled with iron metal powder has been studied. The composite preparation conditions allow the formation of a random distribution of metallic particles in the polymer matrix volume for the Si-C-N system. Pyrolysis of the composite material at 1100 degrees C indicates the presence of one crystalline phase Fe(3)Si. While the sample pyrolyzed at 1200 degrees C reveals the formation of both Fe(3)Si and Fe(5)Si(3) phases, a crystallization of beta-SiC is additionally observed by increasing the temperature up to 1300 degrees C. The propensity for the formation of SiC is due to the presence of Fe(5)Si(3), where a solid-liquid-solid (SLS) growth mechanism was suggested to occur. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and thermal gravimetric analysis with mass spectroscopic detection (TGA-MS) were employed to investigate the crystallization behavior of the Si-Fe-C-N system.

  20. Rapid and controlled transformation of nitrate in water and brine by stabilized iron nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Zhong; Zhao Dongye; Pan Gang

    2009-01-01

    Highly reactive zero-valent iron (ZVI) nanoparticles stabilized with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were tested for reduction of nitrate in fresh water and brine. Batch kinetic tests showed that the pseudo first-order rate constant (k obs ) with the stabilized nanoparticles was five times greater than that for non-stabilized counterparts. The stabilizer not only increased the specific surface area of the nanoparticles, but also increased the reactive particle surface. The allocation between the two reduction products, NH 4 + and N 2 , can be manipulated by varying the ZVI-to-nitrate molar ratio and/or applying a Cu-Pd bimetallic catalyst. Greater CMC-to-ZVI ratios lead to faster nitrate reduction. Application of a 0.05 M HEPES buffer increased the k obs value by 15 times compared to that without pH control. Although the presence of 6% NaCl decreased k obs by 30%, 100% nitrate was transformed within 2 h in the saline water. The technology provides a powerful alternative for treating water with concentrated nitrate such as ion exchange brine.

  1. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization: Microbial and Mineralogical Controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joel E. Kostka

    2008-01-01

    This project represented a joint effort between Florida State University (FSU), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Illinois (U of I). FSU served as the lead institution and Dr. J.E. Kostka was responsible for project coordination, integration, and deliverables. This project was designed to elucidate the microbial ecology and geochemistry of metal reduction in subsurface environments at the U.S. DOE-NABIR Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORFRC). Our objectives were to: (1) characterize the dominant iron minerals and related geochemical parameters likely to limit U(VI) speciation, (2) directly quantify reaction rates and pathways of microbial respiration (terminal-electron-accepting) processes which control subsurface sediment chemistry, and (3) identify and enumerate the organisms mediating U(VI) transformation. A total of 31 publications and 47 seminars or meeting presentations were completed under this project. One M.S. thesis (by Nadia North) and a Ph.D. dissertation (by Lainie Petrie-Edwards) were completed at FSU during fall of 2003 and spring of 2005, respectively. Ph.D. students, Denise Akob and Thomas Gihring have continued the student involvement in this research since fall of 2004. All of the above FSU graduate students were heavily involved in the research, as evidenced by their regular attendance at PI meetings and ORFRC workshops

  2. New Insights on Iron Study in Myelodysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha M. El Husseiny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hepcidin plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis. It is predominantly produced by hepatocytes and inhibits iron release from macrophages and iron uptake by intestinal epithelial cells. Competitive ELISA is the current method of choice for the quantification of serum hepcidin because of its lower detection limit, low costs, and high throughput. This study aims to discuss the role of hepcidin in the pathogenesis of iron overload in recently diagnosed myelodysplasia (MDS cases. METHODS: The study included 21 recently diagnosed MDS patients and 13 healthy controls. Ferritin, hepcidin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTFR were measured in all subjects. RESULTS: There were 7 cases of hypocellular MDS, 8 cases of refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, and 6 cases of refractory anemia with excess blasts. No difference was observed among the 3 MDS subtypes in terms of hepcidin, sTFR, and ferritin levels (p>0.05. Mean hepcidin levels in the MDS and control groups were 55.8±21.5 ng/mL and 19.9±2.6 ng/ mL, respectively. Mean sTFR was 45.7±8.8 nmol/L in MDS patients and 31.1±5.6 nmol/L in the controls. Mean ferritin levels were significantly higher in MDS patients than in controls (539.14±83.5 ng/mL vs. 104.6±42.9 ng/mL, p0.05. CONCLUSION: Hepcidin may not be the main cause of iron overload in MDS. Further studies are required to test failure of production or peripheral unresponsiveness to hepcidin in MDS cases.

  3. The FIND-CKD study--a randomized controlled trial of intravenous iron versus oral iron in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients: background and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdougall, Iain C; Bock, Andreas; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gaillard, Carlo; Van Wyck, David; Roubert, Bernard; Cushway, Timothy; Roger, Simon D

    2014-04-01

    Rigorous data are sparse concerning the optimal route of administration and dosing strategy for iron therapy with or without concomitant erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) therapy for the management of iron deficiency anaemia in patients with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD). FIND-CKD was a 56-week, open-label, multicentre, prospective, randomized three-arm study (NCT00994318) of 626 patients with ND-CKD and iron deficiency anaemia randomized to (i) intravenous (IV) ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) at an initial dose of 1000 mg iron with subsequent dosing as necessary to target a serum ferritin level of 400-600 µg/L (ii) IV FCM at an initial dose of 200 mg with subsequent dosing as necessary to target serum ferritin 100-200 µg/L or (iii) oral ferrous sulphate 200 mg iron/day. The primary end point was time to initiation of other anaemia management (ESA therapy, iron therapy other than study drug or blood transfusion) or a haemoglobin (Hb) trigger (two consecutive Hb values FIND-CKD was the longest randomized trial of IV iron therapy to date. Its findings will address several unanswered questions regarding iron therapy to treat iron deficiency anaemia in patients with ND-CKD. It was also the first randomized trial to utilize both a high and low serum ferritin target range to adjust IV iron dosing, and the first not to employ Hb response as its primary end point.

  4. Iron accumulates in the lavage and explanted lungs of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Oxidative stress participates in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF). An underlying disruption in iron homeostasis can frequently be demonstrated in injuries and diseases associated with an oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that iron accumulation and ...

  5. Research needed to strengthen science and programs for the control of iron deficiency and its consequences in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight critical research needs for the effective prevention and control of iron deficiency and its consequences in children living in low-income countries. Four types of research are highlighted: The first involves scaling up interventions that we know are effective, namely iron supplementation of pregnant women, delayed cord clamping at delivery, immediate and exclusive breast-feeding, and continued exclusive breast-feeding for approximately 6 mo. The second entails evaluation research of alternative interventions that are likely to work, to find the most cost-effective strategies for a given social, economic, and epidemiological context. This research is especially needed to expand the implementation of appropriate complementary feeding interventions. In this area, research needs to be designed to provide causal evidence, to measure cost-effectiveness, and to measure potential effect modifiers. The third is efficacy research to discover promising practices where we lack proven interventions. Examples include how to detect infants younger than 6 mo who are at high risk of iron deficiency, efficacious and safe interventions for those young high-risk infants, and best protocols for the treatment of severe anemia. The fourth includes basic research to elucidate physiological processes and mechanisms underlying the risks and benefits of supplemental iron for children exposed to infectious diseases, especially malaria. Strategic research in all 4 areas will ensure that interventions to control pediatric iron deficiency are integrated into national programs and global initiatives to make pregnancy safer, reduce newborn deaths, and promote child development, health, and survival.

  6. Facile crystal-structure-controlled synthesis of iron oxides for adsorbents and anode materials of lithium batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Yao; Liu, Lihu; Qiao, Wencan; Liu, Fan; Zhang, Yashan; Tan, Wenfeng; Qiu, Guohong

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxides exhibit excellent physicochemical properties as functional materials because of the diversity of crystal structure. Nano-sized iron oxides, including akaganite (β-FeOOH), maghemite (γ-Fe_2O_3), ferrihydrite (Fe_5HO_8∙4H_2O) and hematite (α-Fe_2O_3), were prepared by a facile reflux treatment of iron powder in NaClO solution at 50 °C for 12 h. The crystal structures were controlled by adjusting the pH values of reaction systems. Akaganite, maghemite, ferrihydrite, and hematite were formed when pHs were adjusted to 2–4, 6, 8, and 10, respectively. They showed excellent adsorption performance for As(III), and the adsorption capacity was affected by crystal structure as well as specific surface area. The maximum adsorption capacity for akaganite, maghemite, ferrihydrite, and hematite reached 89.8, 79.1, 78.4, and 63.4 mg g"−"1, respectively. Hematite showed lithium storage capacity of 2043 mAh g"−"1 for the first cycle and then kept stable after twenty cycles at a current density of 100 mA g"−"1. The discharge specific capacity stabilized at 639 mAh g"−"1 after 100 cycles. The as-prepared iron oxides might be applied as potential adsorbents and anode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion battery. - Highlights: • Nano-sized ferric oxides were fabricated by refluxing iron powder in NaClO solutions. • Crystal structures were controlled by adjusting pHs from 2.0 to 10.0 in systems. • Akaganite exhibited the largest As(III) adsorption capacity of 89.8 mg g"−"1. • Hematite had lithium storage capacity of 639 mAh g"−"1 after 100 cycles.

  7. Effects of wheat-flour biscuits fortified with iron and EDTA, alone and in combination, on blood lead concentration, iron status, and cognition in children: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhouch, Raschida R; El-Fadeli, Sana; Andersson, Maria; Aboussad, Abdelmounaim; Chabaa, Laila; Zeder, Christophe; Kippler, Maria; Baumgartner, Jeannine; Sedki, Azzedine; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2016-11-01

    Lead is a common neurotoxicant and its absorption may be increased in iron deficiency (ID). Thus, iron fortification to prevent ID in populations is a promising lead mitigation strategy. Two common fortificants are ferrous sulfate (FeSO 4 ) and ferric sodium EDTA (NaFeEDTA). EDTA can chelate iron and lead. Our study objective was to determine the effects of iron and EDTA, alone and in combination, on blood lead (BPb) concentration, iron status, and cognition. In this 2 × 2 factorial, double-blind placebo-controlled trial, 457 lead-exposed Moroccan children were stratified by school and grade and randomly assigned to consume biscuits (6 d/wk at school) containing 1) ∼8 mg Fe as FeSO 4 , 2) ∼8 mg Fe as NaFeEDTA that contained ∼41 mg EDTA, 3) ∼41 mg EDTA as sodium EDTA (Na 2 EDTA), or 4) placebo for 28 wk. The primary outcome was BPb concentration; secondary outcomes were iron status and cognitive outcomes from subtests of the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children and the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test. These outcomes were measured at baseline and endpoint. All data were analyzed by intention-to-treat. The adjusted geometric mean BPb concentration at baseline was 4.3 μg/dL (95% CI: 4.2, 4.3 μg/dL), and at endpoint these values were 3.3 μg/dL (95% CI: 3.1, 3.5 μg/dL) for FeSO 4 , 2.9 μg/dL (95% CI: 2.7, 3.0 μg/dL) for NaFeEDTA, 3.3 μg/dL (95% CI: 3.1, 3.5 μg/dL) for EDTA, and 3.7 μg/dL (95% CI: 3.5, 3.9 μg/dL) for placebo. We found an effect of iron (P = 0.009) and EDTA (P = 0.012) for reduced BPb concentrations at endpoint, but no iron × EDTA interaction. Iron fortification improved iron status, but there were no positive effects of iron or EDTA on cognitive test scores. Food fortification with iron and EDTA additively reduces BPb concentrations. Our findings suggest that NaFeEDTA should be the iron fortificant of choice in lead-exposed populations. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01573013. © 2016 American Society for

  8. Integrated technology selection for energy conservation and PAHs control in iron and steel industry: Methodology and case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Li; Lu, Yonglong; Shi, Yajuan; Wang, Tieyu; Luo, Wei; Gosens, Jorrit; Chen, Peng; Li, Haiqian

    2013-01-01

    Energy conservation and PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) control are two challenges for the iron and steel industry, especially where the industry has developed at high speed. How to select appropriate technologies to improve energy efficiency and control pollution from PAHs simultaneously is encountered by both the researchers and the decision makers. This study sets up a framework on technology selection and combination which integrates technology assessment, multiple objective programming and scenario analysis. It can predict proper technology combination for different emission controls, energy conservation targets and desired levels of production. An iron and steel factory in Southwestern China is cited as a case. It is shown that stricter PAHs control will drive the transformation from process control technology to alternative smelting technology. In low PAHs limit, 25% energy reduction is a threshold. Before inclusion of a restraint on energy consumption at 25% reduction, PAHs emission is the key limiting factor for the technology selection; while after inclusion of this restraint, energy consumption becomes the key limiting factor. The desired level of production will also influence the technology selection. This study can help decision makers to select appropriate technologies to meet the PAHs control objectives and energy conservation strategies in energy-intensive industries. - Highlights: ► We predict technical strategy for energy and PAHs reduction in iron and steel mill. ► With low PAHs control objectives, process control technologies are preferable. ► With medium and high PAHs control goals, alternative smelting technology is dominate. ► In low PAHs control objective, 25% energy reduction is a threshold

  9. Amyloid and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2018-03-01

    Extracellular amyloid deposition defines a range of amyloidosis and amyloid-related disease. Addition to primary and secondary amyloidosis, amyloid-related disease can be observed in different tissue/organ that sharing the common pathogenesis based on the formation of amyloid deposition. Currently, both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with certainly only based on the autopsy results, by which amyloidosis of the associative tissue/organ is observed. Intriguingly, since it demonstrated that amyloid deposits trigger inflammatory reaction through the activation of cascaded immune response, wherein several lines of evidence implies a protective role of amyloid in preventing autoimmunity. Furthermore, attempts for preventing amyloid formation and/or removing amyloid deposits from the brain have caused meningoencephalitis and consequent deaths among the subjects. Hence, it is important to note that amyloid positively participates in maintaining immune homeostasis and contributes to irreversible inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the interactive relationship between amyloid and the immune system, discussing the potential functional roles of amyloid in immune tolerance and homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Ageing and water homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, David; Jordan, Jens; Jacob, Giris; Ketch, Terry; Shannon, John R.; Biaggioni, Italo

    2002-01-01

    This review outlines current knowledge concerning fluid intake and volume homeostasis in ageing. The physiology of vasopressin is summarized. Studies have been carried out to determine orthostatic changes in plasma volume and to assess the effect of water ingestion in normal subjects, elderly subjects, and patients with dysautonomias. About 14% of plasma volume shifts out of the vasculature within 30 minutes of upright posture. Oral ingestion of water raises blood pressure in individuals with impaired autonomic reflexes and is an important source of noise in blood pressure trials in the elderly. On the average, oral ingestion of 16 ounces (473ml) of water raises blood pressure 11 mmHg in elderly normal subjects. In patients with autonomic impairment, such as multiple system atrophy, strikingly exaggerated pressor effects of water have been seen with blood pressure elevations greater than 75 mmHg not at all uncommon. Ingestion of water is a major determinant of blood pressure in the elderly population. Volume homeostasis is importantly affected by posture and large changes in plasma volume may occur within 30 minutes when upright posture is assumed.

  11. Microbial iron management mechanisms in extremely acidic environments: comparative genomics evidence for diversity and versatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieto Pamela A

    2008-11-01

    uptake systems could reflect their obligatory occupation of extremely low pH environments where high concentrations of soluble iron may always be available and were oxidized sulfur species might not compromise iron speciation dynamics. Presence of bacterioferritin in the Acidithiobacilli, polyphosphate accumulation functions and variants of FieF-like diffusion facilitators in both Acidithiobacilli and Leptospirilla, indicate that they may remove or store iron under conditions of variable availability. In addition, the Fe(II-oxidizing capacity of both A. ferrooxidans and Leptospirilla could itself be a way to evade iron stress imposed by readily available Fe(II ions at low pH. Fur regulatory sites have been predicted for a number of gene clusters including iron related and non-iron related functions in both the Acidithiobacilli and Leptospirilla, laying the foundation for the future discovery of iron regulated and iron-phosphate coordinated regulatory control circuits. Conclusion In silico analyses of the genomes of acidophilic bacteria are beginning to tease apart the mechanisms that mediate iron uptake and homeostasis in low pH environments. Initial models pinpoint significant differences in abundance and diversity of iron management mechanisms between Leptospirilla and Acidithiobacilli, and begin to reveal how these two groups respond to iron cycling and iron fluctuations in naturally acidic environments and in industrial operations. Niche partitions and ecological successions between acidophilic microorganisms may be partially explained by these observed differences. Models derived from these analyses pave the way for improved hypothesis testing and well directed experimental investigation. In addition, aspects of these models should challenge investigators to evaluate alternative iron management strategies in non-acidophilic model organisms.

  12. Randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of a reusable fish-shaped iron ingot to increase hemoglobin concentration in anemic, rural Cambodian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Aviva I; Whitfield, Kyly C; Chapman, Gwen E; Yada, Rickey Y; Kheang, Khin Meng; Louise, Jennie; Summerlee, Alastair J; Armstrong, Gavin R; Green, Timothy J

    2017-08-01

    Background: Anemia affects 45% of women of childbearing age in Cambodia. Iron supplementation is recommended in populations in which anemia prevalence is high. However, there are issues of cost, distribution, and adherence. A potential alternative is a reusable fish-shaped iron ingot, which, when added to the cooking pot, leaches iron into the fluid in which it is prepared. Objective: We sought to determine whether there was a difference in hemoglobin concentrations in rural Cambodian anemic women (aged 18-49 y) who cooked with the iron ingot or consumed a daily iron supplement compared with a control after 1 y. Design: In Preah Vihear, 340 women with mild or moderate anemia were randomly assigned to 1 ) an iron-ingot group, 2 ) an iron-supplement (18 mg/d) group, or 3 ) a nonplacebo control group. A venous blood sample was taken at baseline and at 6 and 12 mo. Blood was analyzed for hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and serum transferrin receptor. Hemoglobin electrophoresis was used to detect structural hemoglobin variants. Results: Anemia prevalence was 44% with the use of a portable hemoglobinometer during screening. At baseline, prevalence of iron deficiency was 9% on the basis of a low serum ferritin concentration. There was no significant difference in mean hemoglobin concentrations between the iron-ingot group (115 g/L; 95% CI: 113, 118 g/L; P = 0.850) or iron-supplement group (115 g/L; 95% CI: 113, 117 g/L; P = 0.998) compared with the control group (115 g/L; 95% CI: 113, 117 g/L) at 12 mo. Serum ferritin was significantly higher in the iron-supplement group (73 μg/L; 95% CI: 64, 82 μg/L; P = 0.002) than in the control group at 6 mo; however, this significance was not maintained at 12 mo (73 μg/L; 95% CI: 58, 91 μg/L; P = 0.176). Conclusions: Neither the iron ingot nor iron supplements increased hemoglobin concentrations in this population at 6 or 12 mo. We do not recommend the use of the fish-shaped iron ingot in Cambodia or in countries where the prevalence

  13. Iron Sulfur and Molybdenum Cofactor Enzymes Regulate the Drosophila Life Cycle by Controlling Cell Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelja, Zvonimir; Leimkühler, Silke; Missirlis, Fanis

    2018-01-01

    Iron sulfur (Fe-S) clusters and the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) are present at enzyme sites, where the active metal facilitates electron transfer. Such enzyme systems are soluble in the mitochondrial matrix, cytosol and nucleus, or embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane, but virtually absent from the cell secretory pathway. They are of ancient evolutionary origin supporting respiration, DNA replication, transcription, translation, the biosynthesis of steroids, heme, catabolism of purines, hydroxylation of xenobiotics, and cellular sulfur metabolism. Here, Fe-S cluster and Moco biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster is reviewed and the multiple biochemical and physiological functions of known Fe-S and Moco enzymes are described. We show that RNA interference of Mocs3 disrupts Moco biosynthesis and the circadian clock. Fe-S-dependent mitochondrial respiration is discussed in the context of germ line and somatic development, stem cell differentiation and aging. The subcellular compartmentalization of the Fe-S and Moco assembly machinery components and their connections to iron sensing mechanisms and intermediary metabolism are emphasized. A biochemically active Fe-S core complex of heterologously expressed fly Nfs1, Isd11, IscU, and human frataxin is presented. Based on the recent demonstration that copper displaces the Fe-S cluster of yeast and human ferredoxin, an explanation for why high dietary copper leads to cytoplasmic iron deficiency in flies is proposed. Another proposal that exosomes contribute to the transport of xanthine dehydrogenase from peripheral tissues to the eye pigment cells is put forward, where the Vps16a subunit of the HOPS complex may have a specialized role in concentrating this enzyme within pigment granules. Finally, we formulate a hypothesis that (i) mitochondrial superoxide mobilizes iron from the Fe-S clusters in aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase; (ii) increased iron transiently displaces manganese on superoxide dismutase, which

  14. Iron Sulfur and Molybdenum Cofactor Enzymes Regulate the Drosophila Life Cycle by Controlling Cell Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonimir Marelja

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron sulfur (Fe-S clusters and the molybdenum cofactor (Moco are present at enzyme sites, where the active metal facilitates electron transfer. Such enzyme systems are soluble in the mitochondrial matrix, cytosol and nucleus, or embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane, but virtually absent from the cell secretory pathway. They are of ancient evolutionary origin supporting respiration, DNA replication, transcription, translation, the biosynthesis of steroids, heme, catabolism of purines, hydroxylation of xenobiotics, and cellular sulfur metabolism. Here, Fe-S cluster and Moco biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster is reviewed and the multiple biochemical and physiological functions of known Fe-S and Moco enzymes are described. We show that RNA interference of Mocs3 disrupts Moco biosynthesis and the circadian clock. Fe-S-dependent mitochondrial respiration is discussed in the context of germ line and somatic development, stem cell differentiation and aging. The subcellular compartmentalization of the Fe-S and Moco assembly machinery components and their connections to iron sensing mechanisms and intermediary metabolism are emphasized. A biochemically active Fe-S core complex of heterologously expressed fly Nfs1, Isd11, IscU, and human frataxin is presented. Based on the recent demonstration that copper displaces the Fe-S cluster of yeast and human ferredoxin, an explanation for why high dietary copper leads to cytoplasmic iron deficiency in flies is proposed. Another proposal that exosomes contribute to the transport of xanthine dehydrogenase from peripheral tissues to the eye pigment cells is put forward, where the Vps16a subunit of the HOPS complex may have a specialized role in concentrating this enzyme within pigment granules. Finally, we formulate a hypothesis that (i mitochondrial superoxide mobilizes iron from the Fe-S clusters in aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase; (ii increased iron transiently displaces manganese on superoxide

  15. Control of arsenic mobilization in paddy soils by manganese and iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaowei; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Peng; Kretzschmar, Ruben; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2017-12-01

    Reductive mobilization of arsenic (As) in paddy soils under flooded conditions is an important reason for the relatively high accumulation of As in rice, posing a risk to food safety and human health. The extent of As mobilization varies widely among paddy soils, but the reasons are not well understood. In this study, we investigated As mobilization in six As-contaminated paddy soils (total As ranging from 73 to 122 mg kg -1 ) in flooded incubation and pot experiments. Arsenic speciation in the solution and solid phases were determined. The magnitude of As mobilization into the porewater varied by > 100 times among the six soils. Porewater As concentration correlated closely with the concentration of oxalate-extractable As, suggesting that As associated with amorphous iron (oxyhydr)oxides represents the potentially mobilizable pool of As under flooded conditions. Soil containing a high level of manganese oxides showed the lowest As mobilization, likely because Mn oxides retard As mobilization by slowing down the drop of redox potential upon soil flooding and maintaining a higher arsenate to arsenite ratio in the solid and solution phases. Additions of a synthetic Mn oxide (hausmannite) to two paddy soils increased arsenite oxidation, decreased As mobilization into the porewater and decreased As concentrations in rice grain and straw. Consistent with previous studies using simplified model systems or pure mineral phases, the present study shows that Mn oxides and amorphous Fe (oxyhydr)oxides are important factors controlling reductive As mobilization in As-contaminated paddy soils. In addition, this study also suggests a potential mitigation strategy using exogenous Mn oxides to decrease As uptake by rice in paddy soils containing low levels of indigenous Mn oxides, although further work is needed to verify its efficacy and possible secondary effects under field conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pain emotion and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, Alberto E

    2011-05-01

    Pain has always been considered as part of a defensive strategy, whose specific role is to signal an immediate, active danger. This definition partially fits acute pain, but certainly not chronic pain, that is maintained also in the absence of an active noxa or danger and that nowadays is considered a disease by itself. Moreover, acute pain is not only an automatic alerting system, but its severity and characteristics can change depending on the surrounding environment. The affective, emotional components of pain have been and are the object of extensive attention and research by psychologists, philosophers, physiologists and also pharmacologists. Pain itself can be considered to share the same genesis as emotions and as a specific emotion in contributing to the maintenance of the homeostasis of each unique subject. Interestingly, this role of pain reaches its maximal development in the human; some even argue that it is specific for the human primate.

  17. Enzymatic- and temperature-sensitive controlled release of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shann S; Scherer, Randy L; Ortega, Ryan A; Bell, Charleson S; O'Neil, Conlin P; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Giorgio, Todd D

    2011-02-27

    Drug and contrast agent delivery systems that achieve controlled release in the presence of enzymatic activity are becoming increasingly important, as enzymatic activity is a hallmark of a wide array of diseases, including cancer and atherosclerosis. Here, we have synthesized clusters of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs) that sense enzymatic activity for applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To achieve this goal, we utilize amphiphilic poly(propylene sulfide)-bl-poly(ethylene glycol) (PPS-b-PEG) copolymers, which are known to have excellent properties for smart delivery of drug and siRNA. Monodisperse PPS polymers were synthesized by anionic ring opening polymerization of propylene sulfide, and were sequentially reacted with commercially available heterobifunctional PEG reagents and then ssDNA sequences to fashion biofunctional PPS-bl-PEG copolymers. They were then combined with hydrophobic 12 nm USPIO cores in the thin-film hydration method to produce ssDNA-displaying USPIO micelles. Micelle populations displaying complementary ssDNA sequences were mixed to induce crosslinking of the USPIO micelles. By design, these crosslinking sequences contained an EcoRV cleavage site. Treatment of the clusters with EcoRV results in a loss of R2 negative contrast in the system. Further, the USPIO clusters demonstrate temperature sensitivity as evidenced by their reversible dispersion at ~75°C and re-clustering following return to room temperature. This work demonstrates proof of concept of an enzymatically-actuatable and thermoresponsive system for dynamic biosensing applications. The platform exhibits controlled release of nanoparticles leading to changes in magnetic relaxation, enabling detection of enzymatic activity. Further, the presented functionalization scheme extends the scope of potential applications for PPS-b-PEG. Combined with previous findings using this polymer platform that demonstrate controlled drug release in oxidative

  18. Enzymatic- and temperature-sensitive controlled release of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega Ryan A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug and contrast agent delivery systems that achieve controlled release in the presence of enzymatic activity are becoming increasingly important, as enzymatic activity is a hallmark of a wide array of diseases, including cancer and atherosclerosis. Here, we have synthesized clusters of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs that sense enzymatic activity for applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. To achieve this goal, we utilize amphiphilic poly(propylene sulfide-bl-poly(ethylene glycol (PPS-b-PEG copolymers, which are known to have excellent properties for smart delivery of drug and siRNA. Results Monodisperse PPS polymers were synthesized by anionic ring opening polymerization of propylene sulfide, and were sequentially reacted with commercially available heterobifunctional PEG reagents and then ssDNA sequences to fashion biofunctional PPS-bl-PEG copolymers. They were then combined with hydrophobic 12 nm USPIO cores in the thin-film hydration method to produce ssDNA-displaying USPIO micelles. Micelle populations displaying complementary ssDNA sequences were mixed to induce crosslinking of the USPIO micelles. By design, these crosslinking sequences contained an EcoRV cleavage site. Treatment of the clusters with EcoRV results in a loss of R2 negative contrast in the system. Further, the USPIO clusters demonstrate temperature sensitivity as evidenced by their reversible dispersion at ~75°C and re-clustering following return to room temperature. Conclusions This work demonstrates proof of concept of an enzymatically-actuatable and thermoresponsive system for dynamic biosensing applications. The platform exhibits controlled release of nanoparticles leading to changes in magnetic relaxation, enabling detection of enzymatic activity. Further, the presented functionalization scheme extends the scope of potential applications for PPS-b-PEG. Combined with previous findings using this polymer platform that

  19. HFE gene variants and iron-induced oxygen radical generation in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiuolo, Federica; Puxeddu, Ermanno; Pezzuto, Gabriella; Cavalli, Francesco; Longo, Giuliana; Comandini, Alessia; Di Pierro, Donato; Pallante, Marco; Sergiacomi, Gianluigi; Simonetti, Giovanni; Zompatori, Maurizio; Orlandi, Augusto; Magrini, Andrea; Amicosante, Massimo; Mariani, Francesca; Losi, Monica; Fraboni, Daniela; Bisetti, Alberto; Saltini, Cesare

    2015-02-01

    In idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), lung accumulation of excessive extracellular iron and macrophage haemosiderin may suggest disordered iron homeostasis leading to recurring microscopic injury and fibrosing damage. The current study population comprised 89 consistent IPF patients and 107 controls. 54 patients and 11 controls underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Haemosiderin was assessed by Perls' stain, BAL fluid malondialdehyde (MDA) by high-performance liquid chromatography, BAL cell iron-dependent oxygen radical generation by fluorimetry and the frequency of hereditary haemochromatosis HFE gene variants by reverse dot blot hybridisation. Macrophage haemosiderin, BAL fluid MDA and BAL cell unstimulated iron-dependent oxygen radical generation were all significantly increased above controls (pHFE allelic variants was markedly higher in IPF compared with controls (40.4% versus 22.4%, OR 2.35, p=0.008) and was associated with higher iron-dependent oxygen radical generation (HFE variant 107.4±56.0, HFE wild type (wt) 59.4±36.4 and controls 16.7±11.8 fluorescence units per 10(5) BAL cells; p=0.028 HFE variant versus HFE wt, p=0.006 HFE wt versus controls). The data suggest iron dysregulation associated with HFE allelic variants may play an important role in increasing susceptibility to environmental exposures, leading to recurring injury and fibrosis in IPF. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  20. Mild iron overload in patients carrying the HFE S65C gene mutation: a retrospective study in patients with suspected iron overload and healthy controls

    OpenAIRE

    Holmström, P; Marmur, J; Eggertsen, G; Gåfvels, M; Stål, P

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: The role of the HFE S65C mutation in the development of hepatic iron overload is unknown. The aim of the present study was: (A) to determine the HFE S65C frequency in a Northern European population; and (B) to evaluate whether the presence of the HFE S65C mutation would result in a significant hepatic iron overload.

  1. Cp/Heph mutant mice have iron-induced neurodegeneration diminished by deferiprone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liangliang; Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Wang, Chenguang; Xu, Xueying; Song, Ying; Jinnah, H.A.; Wodzinska, Jolanta; Iacovelli, Jared; Wolkow, Natalie; Krajacic, Predrag; Weissberger, Alyssa Cwanger; Connelly, John; Spino, Michael; Lee, Michael K.; Connor, James; Giasson, Benoit; Harris, Z. Leah; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2016-01-01

    Brain iron accumulates in several neurodegenerative diseases and can cause oxidative damage, but mechanisms of brain iron homeostasis are incompletely understood. Patients with mutations in the cellular iron-exporting ferroxidase ceruloplasmin (Cp) have brain iron accumulation causing neurodegeneration. Here, we assessed the brains of mice with combined mutation of Cp and its homolog hephaestin. Compared to single mutants, brain iron accumulation was accelerated in double mutants in the cerebellum, substantia nigra, and hippocampus. Iron accumulated within glia, while neurons were iron deficient. There was loss of both neurons and glia. Mice developed ataxia and tremor, and most died by 9 months. Treatment with the oral iron chelator deferiprone diminished brain iron levels, protected against neuron loss, and extended lifespan. Ferroxidases play important, partially overlapping roles in brain iron homeostasis by facilitating iron export from glia, making iron available to neurons. PMID:26303407

  2. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to a...

  3. Integrated pyrolucite fluidized bed-membrane hybrid process for improved iron and manganese control in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtban Kenari, Seyedeh Laleh; Barbeau, Benoit

    2017-04-15

    Newly developed ceramic membrane technologies offer numerous advantages over the conventional polymeric membranes. This work proposes a new configuration, an integrated pyrolucite fluidized bed (PFB)-ceramic MF/UF hybrid process, for improved iron and manganese control in drinking water. A pilot-scale study was undertaken to evaluate the performance of this process with respect to iron and manganese control as well as membrane fouling. In addition, the fouling of commercially available ceramic membranes in conventional preoxidation-MF/UF process was compared with the hybrid process configuration. In this regard, a series of experiments were conducted under different influent water quality and operating conditions. Fouling mechanisms and reversibility were analyzed using blocking law and resistance-in-series models. The results evidenced that the flux rate and the concentration of calcium and humic acids in the feed water have a substantial impact on the filtration behavior of both membranes. The model for constant flux compressible cake formation well described the rise in transmembrane pressure. The compressibility of the filter cake substantially increased in the presence of 2 mg/L humic acids. The presence of calcium ions caused significant aggregation of manganese dioxide and humic acid which severely impacted the extent of membrane fouling. The PFB pretreatment properly alleviated membrane fouling by removing more than 75% and 95% of iron and manganese, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Long-term aerobic exercise increases redox-active iron through nitric oxide in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Xiao, De-Sheng

    2014-01-30

    Adult hippocampus is highly vulnerable to iron-induced oxidative stress. Aerobic exercise has been proposed to reduce oxidative stress but the findings in the hippocampus are conflicting. This study aimed to observe the changes of redox-active iron and concomitant regulation of cellular iron homeostasis in the hippocampus by aerobic exercise, and possible regulatory effect of nitric oxide (NO). A randomized controlled study was designed in the rats with swimming exercise treatment (for 3 months) and/or an unselective inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS) (L-NAME) treatment. The results from the bleomycin-detectable iron assay showed additional redox-active iron in the hippocampus by exercise treatment. The results from nonheme iron content assay, combined with the redox-active iron content, showed increased storage iron content by exercise treatment. NOx (nitrate plus nitrite) assay showed increased NOx content by exercise treatment. The results from the Western blot assay showed decreased ferroportin expression, no changes of TfR1 and DMT1 expressions, increased IRP1 and IRP2 expression, increased expressions of eNOS and nNOS rather than iNOS. In these effects of exercise treatment, the increased redox-active iron content, storage iron content, IRP1 and IRP2 expressions were completely reversed by L-NAME treatment, and decreased ferroportin expression was in part reversed by L-NAME. L-NAME treatment completely inhibited increased NOx and both eNOS and nNOS expression in the hippocampus. Our findings suggest that aerobic exercise could increase the redox-active iron in the hippocampus, indicating an increase in the capacity to generate hydroxyl radicals through the Fenton reactions, and aerobic exercise-induced iron accumulation in the hippocampus might mainly result from the role of the endogenous NO. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Physiologist's View of Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Harold; Cliff, William; Michael, Joel; McFarland, Jenny; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Wright, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis is a core concept necessary for understanding the many regulatory mechanisms in physiology. Claude Bernard originally proposed the concept of the constancy of the "milieu interieur," but his discussion was rather abstract. Walter Cannon introduced the term "homeostasis" and expanded Bernard's notion of…

  6. Siderophore-mediated iron dissolution from nontronites is controlled by mineral cristallochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien eParrello

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria living in oxic environments experience iron deficiency due to limited solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of iron-bearing minerals. To cope with iron deprivation, aerobic bacteria have evolved various strategies, including release of siderophores or other organic acids that scavenge external Fe(III and deliver it to the cells. This research investigated the role of siderophores produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the acquisition of Fe(III from two iron-bearing colloidal nontronites (NAu-1 and NAu-2, comparing differences in bioavailability related with site occupancy and distribution of Fe(III in the two lattices. To avoid both the direct contact of the mineral colloids with the bacterial cells and the uncontrolled particle aggregation, nontronite suspensions were homogenously dispersed in a porous silica gel before the dissolution experiments. A multiparametric approach coupling UV-vis spectroscopy and spectral decomposition algorithm was implemented to monitor simultaneously the solubilisation of Fe and the production of pyoverdine in microplate-based batch experiments. Both nontronites released Fe in a particle concentration-dependent manner when incubated with the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain, however iron released from NAu-2 was substantially greater than from NAu-1. The profile of organic acids produced in both cases was similar and may not account for the difference in the iron dissolution efficiency. In contrast, a pyoverdine-deficient mutant was unable to mobilise Fe(III from either nontronite, whereas iron dissolution occurred in abiotic experiments conducted with purified pyoverdine. Overall, our data provide evidence that P. aeruginosa indirectly mobilise Fe from nontronites primarily through the production of pyoverdine. The structural Fe present on the edges of Nau-2 rather than Nau-1 particles appears to be more bio-accessible, indicating that the distribution of Fe, in the tetrahedron and/or in the octahedron

  7. Data-Driven Nonlinear Subspace Modeling for Prediction and Control of Molten Iron Quality Indices in Blast Furnace Ironmaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ping; Song, Heda; Wang, Hong; Chai, Tianyou

    2017-09-01

    Blast furnace (BF) in ironmaking is a nonlinear dynamic process with complicated physical-chemical reactions, where multi-phase and multi-field coupling and large time delay occur during its operation. In BF operation, the molten iron temperature (MIT) as well as Si, P and S contents of molten iron are the most essential molten iron quality (MIQ) indices, whose measurement, modeling and control have always been important issues in metallurgic engineering and automation field. This paper develops a novel data-driven nonlinear state space modeling for the prediction and control of multivariate MIQ indices by integrating hybrid modeling and control techniques. First, to improve modeling efficiency, a data-driven hybrid method combining canonical correlation analysis and correlation analysis is proposed to identify the most influential controllable variables as the modeling inputs from multitudinous factors would affect the MIQ indices. Then, a Hammerstein model for the prediction of MIQ indices is established using the LS-SVM based nonlinear subspace identification method. Such a model is further simplified by using piecewise cubic Hermite interpolating polynomial method to fit the complex nonlinear kernel function. Compared to the original Hammerstein model, this simplified model can not only significantly reduce the computational complexity, but also has almost the same reliability and accuracy for a stable prediction of MIQ indices. Last, in order to verify the practicability of the developed model, it is applied in designing a genetic algorithm based nonlinear predictive controller for multivariate MIQ indices by directly taking the established model as a predictor. Industrial experiments show the advantages and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  8. Serum Albumin Alters the Expression of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Iron Controlled Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effect serum on global transcription within P. aeruginosa at different phases of growth and the role of iron in this regulation. Results presented in this study suggest a novel mechanism through which serum regulates the expression of different P. ae...

  9. Wood smoke particle sequesters cell iron to impact a biological effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biological effect of an inorganic particle (i.e., silica) can be associated with a disruption in cell iron homeostasis. Organic compounds included in particles originating from combustion processes can also complex sources of host cell iron to disrupt metal homeostasis. We te...

  10. Efficacy of a microencapsulated iron pyrophosphate-fortified fruit juice: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in Spanish iron-deficient women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Rojo, Ruth; Pérez-Granados, Ana M; Toxqui, Laura; González-Vizcayno, Carmen; Delgado, Marco A; Vaquero, M Pilar

    2011-06-01

    Fe-deficiency anaemia is a worldwide health problem. We studied the influence of consuming an Fe-fortified fruit juice on Fe status in menstruating women. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 16 weeks of duration was performed. Subjects were randomised into two groups: the P group (n 58) or the F group (n 64), and consumed, as a supplement to their usual diet, 500 ml/d of a placebo fruit juice or an Fe-fortified fruit juice, respectively. The Fe-fortified fruit juice, containing microencapsulated iron pyrophosphate, provided 18 mg Fe/d (100 % of the RDA). At baseline and monthly, dietary intake, body weight and Fe parameters were determined: total erythrocytes, haematocrit, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), red blood cell distribution width (RDW), Hb, serum Fe, serum ferritin, serum transferrin, transferrin saturation, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP). The fruit juice consumption involved increased intake of carbohydrates and vitamin C, and increased BMI within normal limits. Ferritin was higher in the F group after week 4 (P juice improves Fe status and may be used to prevent Fe-deficiency anaemia.

  11. Prion Protein Promotes Kidney Iron Uptake via Its Ferrireductase Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Swati; Tripathi, Ajai; Qian, Juan; Beserra, Amber; Suda, Srinivas; McElwee, Matthew; Turner, Jerrold; Hopfer, Ulrich; Singh, Neena

    2015-01-01

    Brain iron-dyshomeostasis is an important cause of neurotoxicity in prion disorders, a group of neurodegenerative conditions associated with the conversion of prion protein (PrPC) from its normal conformation to an aggregated, PrP-scrapie (PrPSc) isoform. Alteration of iron homeostasis is believed to result from impaired function of PrPC in neuronal iron uptake via its ferrireductase activity. However, unequivocal evidence supporting the ferrireductase activity of PrPC is lacking. Kidney provides a relevant model for this evaluation because PrPC is expressed in the kidney, and ∼370 μg of iron are reabsorbed daily from the glomerular filtrate by kidney proximal tubule cells (PT), requiring ferrireductase activity. Here, we report that PrPC promotes the uptake of transferrin (Tf) and non-Tf-bound iron (NTBI) by the kidney in vivo and mainly NTBI by PT cells in vitro. Thus, uptake of 59Fe administered by gastric gavage, intravenously, or intraperitoneally was significantly lower in PrP-knock-out (PrP−/−) mouse kidney relative to PrP+/+ controls. Selective in vivo radiolabeling of plasma NTBI with 59Fe revealed similar results. Expression of exogenous PrPC in immortalized PT cells showed localization on the plasma membrane and intracellular vesicles and increased transepithelial transport of 59Fe-NTBI and to a smaller extent 59Fe-Tf from the apical to the basolateral domain. Notably, the ferrireductase-deficient mutant of PrP (PrPΔ51–89) lacked this activity. Furthermore, excess NTBI and hemin caused aggregation of PrPC to a detergent-insoluble form, limiting iron uptake. Together, these observations suggest that PrPC promotes retrieval of iron from the glomerular filtrate via its ferrireductase activity and modulates kidney iron metabolism. PMID:25572394

  12. Alkylating Agent-Induced NRF2 Blocks Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Apoptosis via Control of Glutathione Pools and Protein Thiol Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Masamsetti, V Pragathi; Loranc, Eva; Tonapi, Sonal S; Gorthi, Aparna; Bernard, Xavier; Gonçalves, Rosângela Mayer; Moreira, José C F; Chen, Yidong; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2016-12-01

    Alkylating agents are a commonly used cytotoxic class of anticancer drugs. Understanding the mechanisms whereby cells respond to these drugs is key to identify means to improve therapy while reducing toxicity. By integrating genome-wide gene expression profiling, protein analysis, and functional cell validation, we herein demonstrated a direct relationship between NRF2 and Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress pathways in response to alkylating agents, which is coordinated by the availability of glutathione (GSH) pools. GSH is essential for both drug detoxification and protein thiol homeostasis within the ER, thus inhibiting ER stress induction and promoting survival, an effect independent of its antioxidant role. NRF2 accumulation induced by alkylating agents resulted in increased GSH synthesis via GCLC/GCLM enzyme, and interfering with this NRF2 response by either NRF2 knockdown or GCLC/GCLM inhibition with buthionine sulfoximine caused accumulation of damaged proteins within the ER, leading to PERK-dependent apoptosis. Conversely, upregulation of NRF2, through KEAP1 depletion or NRF2-myc overexpression, or increasing GSH levels with N-acetylcysteine or glutathione-ethyl-ester, decreased ER stress and abrogated alkylating agents-induced cell death. Based on these results, we identified a subset of lung and head-and-neck carcinomas with mutations in either KEAP1 or NRF2/NFE2L2 genes that correlate with NRF2 target overexpression and poor survival. In KEAP1-mutant cancer cells, NRF2 knockdown and GSH depletion increased cell sensitivity via ER stress induction in a mechanism specific to alkylating drugs. Overall, we show that the NRF2-GSH influence on ER homeostasis implicates defects in NRF2-GSH or ER stress machineries as affecting alkylating therapy toxicity. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 3000-14. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Alkylating agent induced NRF2 blocks endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis via control of glutathione pools and protein thiol homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Masamsetti, V. Pragathi; Loranc, Eva; Tonapi, Sonal S.; Gorthi, Aparna; Bernard, Xavier; Gonçalves, Rosângela Mayer; Moreira, José C. F.; Chen, Yidong; Bishop, Alexander J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a commonly used cytotoxic class of anticancer drugs. Understanding the mechanisms whereby cells respond to these drugs is key to identify means to improve therapy while reducing toxicity. By integrating genome-wide gene expression profiling, protein analysis and functional cell validation, we herein demonstrated a direct relationship between NRF2 and Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress pathways in response to alkylating agents, which is coordinated by the availability of glutathione (GSH) pools. GSH is essential for both drug detoxification and protein thiol homeostasis within the ER, thus inhibiting ER stress induction and promoting survival; an effect independent of its antioxidant role. NRF2 accumulation induced by alkylating agents resulted in increased GSH synthesis via GCLC/GCLM enzyme, and interfering with this NRF2 response by either NRF2 knockdown or GCLC/GCLM inhibition with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) caused accumulation of damaged proteins within the ER, leading to PERK-dependent apoptosis. Conversely, upregulation of NRF2, through KEAP1 depletion or NRF2-myc overexpression, or increasing GSH levels with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or glutathione-ethyl-ester (GSH-E), decreased ER stress and abrogated alkylating agents-induced cell death. Based on these results, we identified a subset of lung and head-and-neck carcinomas with mutations in either KEAP1 or NRF2/NFE2L2 genes that correlate with NRF2 targets overexpression and poor survival. In KEAP1 mutant cancer cells, NRF2 knockdown and GSH depletion increased cell sensitivity via ER stress induction in a mechanism specific to alkylating drugs. Overall, we show that the NRF2-GSH influence on ER homeostasis implicates defects in NRF2-GSH or ER stress machineries as affecting alkylating therapy toxicity. PMID:27638861

  14. Identification of iron-regulated genes of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 as a basis for controlled gene expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cronin, M.; Zomer, A.L.; Fitzgerald, G.F.; Sinderen, D. van

    2012-01-01

    Iron is an essential growth factor for virtually all organisms. However, iron is not readily available in most environments and microorganisms have evolved specialized mechanisms, such as the use of siderophores and high-affinity transport systems, to acquire iron when confronted with iron-limiting

  15. Controlled hydrodynamic conditions on the formation of iron oxide nanostructures synthesized by electrochemical anodization: Effect of the electrode rotation speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas-Granados, Bianca; Sánchez-Tovar, Rita; Fernández-Domene, Ramón M.; García-Antón, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel iron anodization process under controlled dynamic conditions was evaluated. • Iron oxide nanostructures composed mainly by hematite were synthesized. • Different morphologies were obtained depending on the electrode rotation speed. • A suitable photocatalyst was obtained by stirring the electrode at 1000 rpm.. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanostructures are of particular interest because they can be used as photocatalysts in water splitting due to their advantageous properties. Electrochemical anodization is one of the best techniques to synthesize nanostructures directly on the metal substrate (direct back contact). In the present study, a novel methodology consisting of the anodization of iron under hydrodynamic conditions is carried out in order to obtain mainly hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) nanostructures to be used as photocatalysts for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. Different rotation speeds were studied with the aim of evaluating the obtained nanostructures and determining the most attractive operational conditions. The synthesized nanostructures were characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, photoelectrochemical water splitting, stability against photocorrosion tests, Mott-Schottky analysis, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and band gap measurements. The results showed that the highest photocurrent densities for photoelectrochemical water splitting were achieved for the nanostructure synthesized at 1000 rpm which corresponds to a nanotubular structure reaching ∼0.130 mA cm −2 at 0.54 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). This is in agreement with the EIS measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis which showed the lowest resistances and the corresponding donor density values, respectively, for the nanostructure anodized at 1000 rpm.

  16. Controlled hydrodynamic conditions on the formation of iron oxide nanostructures synthesized by electrochemical anodization: Effect of the electrode rotation speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas-Granados, Bianca; Sánchez-Tovar, Rita; Fernández-Domene, Ramón M.; García-Antón, Jose, E-mail: jgarciaa@iqn.upv.es

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Novel iron anodization process under controlled dynamic conditions was evaluated. • Iron oxide nanostructures composed mainly by hematite were synthesized. • Different morphologies were obtained depending on the electrode rotation speed. • A suitable photocatalyst was obtained by stirring the electrode at 1000 rpm.. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanostructures are of particular interest because they can be used as photocatalysts in water splitting due to their advantageous properties. Electrochemical anodization is one of the best techniques to synthesize nanostructures directly on the metal substrate (direct back contact). In the present study, a novel methodology consisting of the anodization of iron under hydrodynamic conditions is carried out in order to obtain mainly hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanostructures to be used as photocatalysts for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. Different rotation speeds were studied with the aim of evaluating the obtained nanostructures and determining the most attractive operational conditions. The synthesized nanostructures were characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, photoelectrochemical water splitting, stability against photocorrosion tests, Mott-Schottky analysis, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and band gap measurements. The results showed that the highest photocurrent densities for photoelectrochemical water splitting were achieved for the nanostructure synthesized at 1000 rpm which corresponds to a nanotubular structure reaching ∼0.130 mA cm{sup −2} at 0.54 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). This is in agreement with the EIS measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis which showed the lowest resistances and the corresponding donor density values, respectively, for the nanostructure anodized at 1000 rpm.

  17. Iron diminishes the in vitro biological effect of vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanistic pathways underlying inflammatory injury following exposures to vanadium-containing compounds are not defined. We tested the postulate that the in vitro biological effect of vanadium results from its impact on iron homeostasis. Human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells ex...

  18. Facile crystal-structure-controlled synthesis of iron oxides for adsorbents and anode materials of lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yao; Liu, Lihu; Qiao, Wencan; Liu, Fan [College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Zhang, Yashan [Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States); Tan, Wenfeng [College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Qiu, Guohong, E-mail: qiugh@mail.hzau.edu.cn [College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Iron oxides exhibit excellent physicochemical properties as functional materials because of the diversity of crystal structure. Nano-sized iron oxides, including akaganite (β-FeOOH), maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), ferrihydrite (Fe{sub 5}HO{sub 8}∙4H{sub 2}O) and hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), were prepared by a facile reflux treatment of iron powder in NaClO solution at 50 °C for 12 h. The crystal structures were controlled by adjusting the pH values of reaction systems. Akaganite, maghemite, ferrihydrite, and hematite were formed when pHs were adjusted to 2–4, 6, 8, and 10, respectively. They showed excellent adsorption performance for As(III), and the adsorption capacity was affected by crystal structure as well as specific surface area. The maximum adsorption capacity for akaganite, maghemite, ferrihydrite, and hematite reached 89.8, 79.1, 78.4, and 63.4 mg g{sup −1}, respectively. Hematite showed lithium storage capacity of 2043 mAh g{sup −1} for the first cycle and then kept stable after twenty cycles at a current density of 100 mA g{sup −1}. The discharge specific capacity stabilized at 639 mAh g{sup −1} after 100 cycles. The as-prepared iron oxides might be applied as potential adsorbents and anode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion battery. - Highlights: • Nano-sized ferric oxides were fabricated by refluxing iron powder in NaClO solutions. • Crystal structures were controlled by adjusting pHs from 2.0 to 10.0 in systems. • Akaganite exhibited the largest As(III) adsorption capacity of 89.8 mg g{sup −1}. • Hematite had lithium storage capacity of 639 mAh g{sup −1} after 100 cycles.

  19. The control of H2S in biogas using iron ores as in situ desulfurizers during anaerobic digestion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiying; Jiang, Xia; Li, Xi; Jiang, Wenju

    2016-09-01

    In this study, five kinds of iron ores, limonite, hematite, manganese ore, magnetite and lava rock, were used as the in situ desulfurizers in the anaerobic digestion reactors to investigate their effects on controlling H2S in biogas. The results show that the addition of the five iron ores could significantly control the content of H2S in biogas, with the best performance for limonite. As limonite dosages increase (10-60 g/L), the contents of H2S in biogas were evidently decreased in the digesters with different initial sulfate concentrations (0-1000 mg/L). After the anaerobic digestion, the removed sulfur was mostly deposited on the surface of limonite. A possible mechanism of H2S control in biogas by limonite was proposed preliminarily, including adsorption, FeS precipitation, and Fe (III) oxidation. The results demonstrated that limonite was a promising in situ desulfurizer for controlling H2S in biogas with low cost and high efficiency.

  20. A 1-h time interval between a meal containing iron and consumption of tea attenuates the inhibitory effects on iron absorption: a controlled trial in a cohort of healthy UK women using a stable iron isotope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Fuzi, Salma F; Koller, Dagmar; Bruggraber, Sylvaine; Pereira, Dora Ia; Dainty, Jack R; Mushtaq, Sohail

    2017-12-01

    Background: Tea has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of nonheme iron absorption, but it remains unclear whether the timing of tea consumption relative to a meal influences iron bioavailability. Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of a 1-h time interval of tea consumption on nonheme iron absorption in an iron-containing meal in a cohort of iron-replete, nonanemic female subjects with the use of a stable isotope ( 57 Fe). Design: Twelve women (mean ± SD age: 24.8 ± 6.9 y) were administered a standardized porridge meal extrinsically labeled with 4 mg 57 Fe as FeSO 4 on 3 separate occasions, with a 14-d time interval between each test meal (TM). The TM was administered with water (TM-1), with tea administered simultaneously (TM-2), and with tea administered 1 h postmeal (TM-3). Fasted venous blood samples were collected for iron isotopic analysis and measurement of iron status biomarkers. Fractional iron absorption was estimated by the erythrocyte iron incorporation method. Results: Iron absorption was 5.7% ± 8.5% (TM-1), 3.6% ± 4.2% (TM-2), and 5.7% ± 5.4% (TM-3). Mean fractional iron absorption was found to be significantly higher (2.2%) when tea was administered 1 h postmeal (TM-3) than when tea was administered simultaneously with the meal (TM-2) ( P = 0.046). An ∼50% reduction in the inhibitory effect of tea (relative to water) was observed, from 37.2% (TM-2) to 18.1% (TM-3). Conclusions: This study shows that tea consumed simultaneously with an iron-containing porridge meal leads to decreased nonheme iron absorption and that a 1-h time interval between a meal and tea consumption attenuates the inhibitory effect, resulting in increased nonheme iron absorption. These findings are not only important in relation to the management of iron deficiency but should also inform dietary advice, especially that given to those at risk of deficiency. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02365103. © 2017 American Society for

  1. Weekly iron folic acid supplementation plays differential role in maintaining iron markers level in non-anaemic and anaemic primigravida: A randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Shankar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Anaemia during pregnancy is most commonly observed and highly prevalent in South-East Asia. Various effective programmes have been laid down for its management, mainly daily supplementation of iron folic acid (IFA tablets. Following the same, standard obstetrical practice has included the IFA supplementation without requiring the determination of iron deficiency. In this study, a total of 120 primigravida (N = 60; non-anaemic (Hb > 11 g/dl and N = 60 anaemic (Hb = 8–11 g/dl were selected among those attending the Antenatal Clinic in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi, India. They were supplemented with daily and weekly IFA tablets till 6 weeks postpartum. Corresponding changes in haemoglobin level on advance of pregnancy, side effects and compliance associated with daily and weekly IFA supplementation and its associations with iron status markers were studied. The inflammatory markers were also estimated. The statistical significance level (p < 0.05 between the groups were assessed by applying unpaired t-test using SPSS (version 16.0. The obtained results publicized the salutary role of daily IFA supplementation in improving the haemoglobin level and iron status markers in anaemic pregnant women though the levels could not reach up to the non-anaemic haemoglobin levels. However, weekly IFA supplementation seems to be a better approach in non-anaemic pregnant women where almost comparable results were obtained in terms of haematological parameters, gestation length and birth weight. Conclusion: Weekly IFA supplementation found to be as effective as daily supplementation in iron sufficient non-anaemic pregnant women whereas anaemic pregnant women should be prescribed daily IFA supplementation irrespective of iron replete/deplete state. Keywords: Anaemia, Iron folic acid supplementation, Iron status markers, Pregnancy

  2. Adaptive mechanisms of homeostasis disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Dobosiewicz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability to preserve a permanent level of internal environment in a human organism, against internal and external factors, which could breach the consistency, can be define as homeostasis. Scientific proven influence on the homeostasis has the periodicity of biological processes, which is also called circadian rhythm. The effect of circadian rhythm is also to see in the functioning of autonomic nervous system and cardiovascular system. Sleep deprivation is an example of how the disorders in circadian rhythm could have the influence on the homeostasis.

  3. Effects of long-term weekly iron and folic acid supplementation on lower genital tract infection - a double blind, randomised controlled trial in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabin, Loretta; Roberts, Stephen A; Gies, Sabine; Nelson, Andrew; Diallo, Salou; Stewart, Christopher J; Kazienga, Adama; Birtles, Julia; Ouedraogo, Sayouba; Claeys, Yves; Tinto, Halidou; d'Alessandro, Umberto; Faragher, E Brian; Brabin, Bernard

    2017-11-23

    Provision of routine iron supplements to prevent anaemia could increase the risk for lower genital tract infections as virulence of some pathogens depends on iron availability. This trial in Burkina Faso assessed whether weekly periconceptional iron supplementation increased the risk of lower genital tract infection in young non-pregnant and pregnant women. Genital tract infections were assessed within a double blind, controlled, non-inferiority trial of malaria risk among nulliparous women, randomised to receive either iron and folic acid or folic acid alone, weekly, under direct observation for 18 months. Women conceiving during this period entered the pregnancy cohort. End assessment (FIN) for women remaining non-pregnant was at 18 months. For the pregnancy cohort, end assessment was at the first scheduled antenatal visit (ANC1). Infection markers included Nugent scores for abnormal flora and bacterial vaginosis (BV), T. vaginalis PCR, vaginal microbiota, reported signs and symptoms, and antibiotic and anti-fungal prescriptions. Iron biomarkers were assessed at baseline, FIN and ANC1. Analysis compared outcomes by intention to treat and in iron replete/deficient categories. A total of 1954 women (mean 16.8 years) were followed and 478 (24.5%) became pregnant. Median supplement adherence was 79% (IQR 59-90%). Baseline BV prevalence was 12.3%. At FIN and ANC1 prevalence was 12.8% and 7.0%, respectively (P Iron-supplemented non-pregnant women received more antibiotic treatments for non-genital infections (P = 0.014; mainly gastrointestinal infections (P = 0.005), anti-fungal treatments for genital infections (P = 0.014) and analgesics (P = 0.008). Weekly iron did not significantly reduce iron deficiency prevalence. At baseline, iron-deficient women were more likely to have normal vaginal flora (P = 0.016). Periconceptional weekly iron supplementation of young women did not increase the risk of lower genital tract infections but did increase

  4. Guest editor's introduction: Energy homeostasis in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jill E

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". Energy homeostasis is achieved through neuroendocrine and metabolic control of energy intake, storage, and expenditure. Traditionally, these controls have been studied in an unrealistic and narrow context. The appetite for food, for example, is most often assumed to be independent of other motivations, such as sexual desire, fearfulness, and competition. Furthermore, our understanding of all aspects of energy homeostasis is based on studying males of only a few species. The baseline control subjects are most often housed in enclosed spaces, with continuous, unlimited access to food. In the last century, this approach has generated useful information, but all the while, the global prevalence of obesity has increased and remains at unprecedented levels (Ogden et al., 2013, 2014). It is likely, however, that the mechanisms that control ingestive behavior were molded by evolutionary forces, and that few, if any vertebrate species evolved in the presence of a limitless food supply, in an enclosed 0.5 × 1 ft space, and exposed to a constant ambient temperature of 22+2 °C. This special issue of Hormones and Behavior therefore contains 9 review articles and 7 data articles that consider energy homeostasis within the context of other motivations and physiological processes, such as early development, sexual differentiation, sexual motivation, reproduction, seasonality, hibernation, and migration. Each article is focused on a different species or on a set of species, and most vertebrate classes are represented. Energy homeostasis is viewed in the context of the selection pressures that simultaneously molded multiple aspects of energy intake, storage, and expenditure. This approach yields surprising conclusions regarding the function of those traits and their underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. A community-based case–control study to investigate the role of iron deficiency in the persistence of goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambha Pathak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To find out the magnitude of iron deficiency anemia in the age group of 6–12 years and investigate the role of iron deficiency as a possible contributor to endemic goiter in school children in Ambala. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted as a subset of a cross-sectional study among 2700 children from 6 to 12 years of age to find out the prevalence of goiter. All the subjects who were found to be suffering from goiter in the cross-sectional study were enrolled in the case–control study as cases and were compared with age- and sex-matched controls (children without goiter from the same cohort. The study was conducted from February 2011 to January 2012. Results: Out of total, goiter was observed in 12.6% of the subjects. Urinary iodine excretion was found to be <100 μg/L in 57 (10.5% children. Mean hemoglobin (Hb level of the study population was 11.9 g/dL. It was noted that 71% of the goitrous children had anemia (Hb <12 g/dL as compared to 63.7% of the control group. Serum ferritin (SF was <15 ng/mL in 70% of the children. The mean ± standard deviation of SF in the goitrous and nongoitrous children was 19.65 ± 32.51 μg/L and 27.55 ± 21.07 μg/L, respectively (P = 0.012. Conclusion: The findings in the study suggest that iron deficiency anemia in children is contributing toward the persistence of goiter in the postiodization phase.

  6. IX - MR Control Chart as a Tool in Assessment of the Cast Iron Properties Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Binczyk

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The study offers a statistical assessment of the stability of a technological process of melting and pouring low-carbon grey iron assigned for casting of brake discs. Some specific characteristics were presented that should be taken into consideration when statistical methods are used for technology improvement. The stability of the cast iron melting process was evaluated using data read out from the thermal analysis curve and true data, i.e. the results of spectrometric analysis of the chemical composition and measured values of the mechanical properties. The method for assessment of process stability was discussed on the example of carbon content and Brinell hardness. The examined parameters of the technological process of grey iron melting and casting are independent of each other (the results of carbon content determination in successive melts, the results of hardness measurements, etc.. Therefore, for analysis, the IX - MR type charts were chosen, where single measurements of the selected property (n = 1 serve as a measure of location, while a measure of variability are the, so called, Moving Ranges (MR, which are an absolute value of the difference between the two successive measurements.

  7. Legal considerations involving chemical control of iron and other deficiencies in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, A; Samman, Y. S.

    1981-01-01

    Four cases of lawsuits involving use of chelating agents in plant nutrition are discussed. Three of them involved use of iron. One concerned addition of FeDTPA to nursery trees in containers. One case involved foliar application of FeHEDTA to potatoes in July by airplane. Another case not involving iron chelate was with ZnEDTA and MnEDTA with Fe as FeSO/sub 4/ later as a foliar spray. The Zn and MnEDTA were applied as a band 8 inches (20 cm) on both sides of nursery tree rows just as the buds that had been placed in the fall began growing in the spring. In the fourth case, many tomato transplants died when the transplanting was done with about 120 ml per plant of transplant solution containing besides N, P and K, about 19 mg Zn as ZnEDTA, 14 mg Mn as MnEDTA and 7 mg Fe as FeHEDTA. Cases such as these will probably discourage use of chelating agents in plant nutrition even if the chelating agents were not the damaging agent. Not enough developmental work was done on the potential toxicities from metal chelates. This trend to lawsuits makes it even more important to solve iron chlorosis problems via plant breeding.

  8. Effect of superconducting solenoid model cores on spanwise iron magnet roll control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with conventional ferromagnetic fuselage cores, superconducting solenoid cores appear to offer significant reductions in the projected cost of a large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system. The provision of sufficient magnetic roll torque capability has been a long-standing problem with all magnetic suspension and balance systems; and the spanwise iron magnet scheme appears to be the most powerful system available. This scheme utilizes iron cores which are installed in the wings of the model. It was anticipated that the magnetization of these cores, and hence the roll torque generated, would be affected by the powerful external magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. A preliminary study has been made of the effect of the superconducting solenoid fuselage model core concept on the spanwise iron magnet roll torque generation schemes. Computed data for one representative configuration indicate that reductions in available roll torque occur over a range of applied magnetic field levels. These results indicate that a 30-percent increase in roll electromagnet capacity over that previously determined will be required for a representative 8-foot wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system design.

  9. A mathematical model of brain glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Hidenori

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological fact that a stable level of brain glucose is more important than that of blood glucose suggests that the ultimate goal of the glucose-insulin-glucagon (GIG regulatory system may be homeostasis of glucose concentration in the brain rather than in the circulation. Methods In order to demonstrate the relationship between brain glucose homeostasis and blood hyperglycemia in diabetes, a brain-oriented mathematical model was developed by considering the brain as the controlled object while the remaining body as the actuator. After approximating the body compartmentally, the concentration dynamics of glucose, as well as those of insulin and glucagon, are described in each compartment. The brain-endocrine crosstalk, which regulates blood glucose level for brain glucose homeostasis together with the peripheral interactions among glucose, insulin and glucagon, is modeled as a proportional feedback control of brain glucose. Correlated to the brain, long-term effects of psychological stress and effects of blood-brain-barrier (BBB adaptation to dysglycemia on the generation of hyperglycemia are also taken into account in the model. Results It is shown that simulation profiles obtained from the model are qualitatively or partially quantitatively consistent with clinical data, concerning the GIG regulatory system responses to bolus glucose, stepwise and continuous glucose infusion. Simulations also revealed that both stress and BBB adaptation contribute to the generation of hyperglycemia. Conclusion Simulations of the model of a healthy person under long-term severe stress demonstrated that feedback control of brain glucose concentration results in elevation of blood glucose level. In this paper, we try to suggest that hyperglycemia in diabetes may be a normal outcome of brain glucose homeostasis.

  10. Metal ion transporters and homeostasis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, N

    1999-01-01

    Transition metals are essential for many metabolic processes and their homeostasis is crucial for life. Aberrations in the cellular metal ion concentrations may lead to cell death and severe diseases. Metal ion transporters play a major role in maintaining the correct concentrations of the various metal ions in the different cellular compartments. Recent studies of yeast mutants revealed key elements in metal ion homeostasis, including novel transport systems. Several of the proteins discover...

  11. Assessing the Roles of Iron, Macronutrients and Wet deposition in Controlling Phytoplankton Growth in Seasonally Oligotrophic Waters of the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedwick, P.; Mulholland, M. R.; Najjar, R.; Bernhardt, P. W.; Price, L. M.; Sohst, B. M.; Sookhdeo, C.; Widner, B.

    2016-02-01

    The role of iron supply in regulating phytoplankton production in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll ocean regions has been well established. Less clear, however, is the importance of iron for phytoplankton processes in other oceanic settings, such as coastal and oligotrophic waters, where differential changes in the supply and removal of dissolved iron (dFe) can result in limitation or co-limitation of growth due to iron deficiency. One such region of interest is the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB), where previous field experiments have provided some evidence of co-limitation of algal growth by nitrogen and iron. In summer 2014 we conducted field sampling and shipboard experiments to assess the role of iron and macronutrient availability in controlling primary production in seasonally oligotrophic waters over the MAB continental slope, with a focus on the the impacts of wet deposition. Our results indicate that nitrogen was the proximate limiting nutrient, with a secondary limitation imposed by availability of phosphorus; we found no evidence for a deficiency in dFe, which was present at concentrations in the range 0.3-0.9 nM. Phytoplankton growth was clearly stimulated by the addition of natural rainwater, suggesting that summer rain events stimulate primary production in the MAB by contributing new nitrogen (primarily as ammonium) and phosphorus, whilst maintaining iron-replete conditions.

  12. Effects of nanoparticle zinc oxide on emotional behavior and trace elements homeostasis in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Salem; Slama, Imen Ben; Omri, Karim; El Ghoul, Jaber; El Mir, Lassaad; Rhouma, Khemais Ben; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Sakly, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    Over recent years, nanotoxicology and the potential effects on human body have grown in significance, the potential influences of nanosized materials on the central nervous system have received more attention. The aim of this study was to determine whether zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) exposure cause alterations in emotional behavior and trace elements homeostasis in rat brain. Rats were treated by intraperitoneal injection of ZnO NPs (20-30 nm) at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight. Sub -: acute ZnO NPs treatment induced no significant increase in the zinc content in the homogenate brain. Statistically significant decreases in iron and calcium concentrations were found in rat brain tissue compared to control. However, sodium and potassium contents remained unchanged. Also, there were no significant changes in the body weight and the coefficient of brain. In the present study, the anxiety-related behavior was evaluated using the plus-maze test. ZnO NPs treatment modulates slightly the exploratory behaviors of rats. However, no significant differences were observed in the anxious index between ZnO NP-treated rats and the control group (p > 0.05). Interestingly, our results demonstrated minimal effects of ZnO NPs on emotional behavior of animals, but there was a possible alteration in trace elements homeostasis in rat brain. © The Author(s) 2012.

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ... heavy menstrual bleeding, your doctor will want to control these other conditions to prevent you from developing ...

  14. Ochrobactrum anthropi used to control ammonium for nitrate removal by starch-stabilized nanoscale zero valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Sun, Qianyu; Chen, Dan; Wang, Hongyu; Yang, Kai

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the hydrogenotrophic denitrifying bacterium Ochrobactrum anthropi was added in to the process of nitrate removal by starch-stabilized nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) to minimize undesirable ammonium. The ammonium control performance and cooperative mechanism of this combined process were investigated, and batch experiments were conducted to discuss the effects of starch-stabilized nZVI dose, biomass, and pH on nitrate reduction and ammonium control of this system. The combined system achieved satisfactory performance because the anaerobic iron corrosion process generates H 2 , which is used as an electron donor for the autohydrogenotrophic bacterium Ochrobactrum anthropi to achieve the autohydrogenotrophic denitrification process converting nitrate to N 2 . When starch-stabilized nZVI dose was increased from 0.5 to 2.0 g/L, nitrate reduction rate gradually increased, and ammonium yield also increased from 9.40 to 60.51 mg/L. Nitrate removal rate gradually decreased and ammonium yield decreased from 14.93 to 2.61 mg/L with initial OD 600 increasing from 0.015 to 0.080. The abiotic Fe 0 reduction process played a key role in nitrate removal in an acidic environment and generated large amounts of ammonium. Meanwhile, the nitrate removal rate decreased and ammonium yield also reduced in an alkaline environment.

  15. Evaluation of the Genetic and Nutritional Control of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in a Novel Mouse Model on Chromosome 7: An Insight into Insulin Signaling and Glucose Homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.; Dhar, M.

    2003-01-01

    Obesity is the main cause of type 2 diabetes, accounting for 90-95% of all diabetes cases in the US. Human obesity is a complex trait and can be studied using appropriate mouse models. A novel polygenic mouse model for studying the genetic and environmental contributions to and the physiological ramifications of obesity and related phenotypes is found in specific lines of mice bred and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Heterozygous mice with a maternally inherited copy of two radiation-induced deletions in the p region of mouse chromosome 7, p23DFioD and p30PUb, have significantly greater body fat and show hyperinsulinemia compared to the wild-type. A single gene, Atp10c, maps to this critical region and codes for a putative aminophospholipid translocase. Biochemical and molecular studies were initiated to gain insight into obesity and glucose homeostasis in these animals and to study the biological role of Atp10c in creating these phenotypes. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were standardized for the heterozygous p23DFioD and control mice on a custom-made diet containing 20% protein, 70% carbohydrate, and 10% fat (kcal). Atp10c expression profiles were also generated using Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Heterozygous p23DFioD animals showed insulin resistance after receiving a dose of either 0.375 or 0.75 U/kg Illetin R insulin. RT-PCR data also shows differences in Atp10c expression in the mutants versus control mice. Using these standardized biochemical assays, future studies will further the understanding of genetic and nutritional controls of glucose homeostasis and obesity in animal models and subsequently in human populations.

  16. Control of manganese and iron in Skagerrak sediments (northeastern North Sea)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajendran, A.; DileepKumar, M.; Bakker, J.F.

    - 80. I00 E E 40" "I- l-- n 6Or hl 80" ioo (a) MANGANESE ( mmo\\[. kg ''1 ) ,? 2,0 3p ~, A ,o =o 40" 6O" I00 B (b) IRON (mmol. kg '-I ) 4o 6o- 8O" IO( ~o,oo ,ooo i I I 590 I A o 20- . 40" 60" ,J o 2o 40" 60" 80- IOO... in these sediments, expressed as change in concentration with time on a volume basis of sediments or pore water \\[see Berner (1980) for a discussion \\], the steady-state equations of Burdige and Gieskes (1983) have been used. These are, ( 1 ) oxic zone...

  17. Prebiotic galacto-oligosaccharides mitigate the adverse effects of iron fortification on the gut microbiome: a randomised controlled study in Kenyan infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini, Daniela; Uyoga, Mary A; Kortman, Guus A M; Cercamondi, Colin I; Moretti, Diego; Barth-Jaeggi, Tanja; Schwab, Clarissa; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Lacroix, Christophe; Karanja, Simon; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2017-11-01

    Iron-containing micronutrient powders (MNPs) reduce anaemia in African infants, but the current high iron dose (12.5 mg/day) may decrease gut Bifidobacteriaceae and Lactobacillaceae , and increase enteropathogens, diarrhoea and respiratory tract infections (RTIs). We evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new MNP formula with prebiotic galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) combined with a low dose (5 mg/day) of highly bioavailable iron. In a 4-month, controlled, double-blind trial, we randomised Kenyan infants aged 6.5-9.5 months (n=155) to receive daily (1) a MNP without iron (control); (2) the identical MNP but with 5 mg iron (2.5 mg as sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetate and 2.5 mg as ferrous fumarate) (Fe group); or (3) the identical MNP as the Fe group but with 7.5 g GOS (FeGOS group). Anaemia decreased by ≈50% in the Fe and FeGOS groups (pgut microbiome and morbidity in African infants. NCT02118402. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. The Aging of Iron Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhaar Ashraf

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain iron is tightly regulated by a multitude of proteins to ensure homeostasis. Iron dyshomeostasis has become a molecular signature associated with aging which is accompanied by progressive decline in cognitive processes. A common theme in neurodegenerative diseases where age is the major risk factor, iron dyshomeostasis coincides with neuroinflammation, abnormal protein aggregation, neurodegeneration, and neurobehavioral deficits. There is a great need to determine the mechanisms governing perturbations in iron metabolism, in particular to distinguish between physiological and pathological aging to generate fruitful therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present review is to focus on the age-related alterations in brain iron metabolism from a cellular and molecular biology perspective, alongside genetics, and neuroimaging aspects in man and rodent models, with respect to normal aging and neurodegeneration. In particular, the relationship between iron dyshomeostasis and neuroinflammation will be evaluated, as well as the effects of systemic iron overload on the brain. Based on the evidence discussed here, we suggest a synergistic use of iron-chelators and anti-inflammatories as putative anti-brain aging therapies to counteract pathological aging in neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. The Aging of Iron Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Azhaar; Clark, Maryam; So, Po-Wah

    2018-01-01

    Brain iron is tightly regulated by a multitude of proteins to ensure homeostasis. Iron dyshomeostasis has become a molecular signature associated with aging which is accompanied by progressive decline in cognitive processes. A common theme in neurodegenerative diseases where age is the major risk factor, iron dyshomeostasis coincides with neuroinflammation, abnormal protein aggregation, neurodegeneration, and neurobehavioral deficits. There is a great need to determine the mechanisms governing perturbations in iron metabolism, in particular to distinguish between physiological and pathological aging to generate fruitful therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present review is to focus on the age-related alterations in brain iron metabolism from a cellular and molecular biology perspective, alongside genetics, and neuroimaging aspects in man and rodent models, with respect to normal aging and neurodegeneration. In particular, the relationship between iron dyshomeostasis and neuroinflammation will be evaluated, as well as the effects of systemic iron overload on the brain. Based on the evidence discussed here, we suggest a synergistic use of iron-chelators and anti-inflammatories as putative anti-brain aging therapies to counteract pathological aging in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Rationale and design of the oral HEMe iron polypeptide Against Treatment with Oral Controlled Release Iron Tablets trial for the correction of anaemia in peritoneal dialysis patients (HEMATOCRIT trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isbel Nicole M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main hypothesis of this study is that oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP; Proferrin® ES administration will more effectively augment iron stores in erythropoietic stimulatory agent (ESA-treated peritoneal dialysis (PD patients than conventional oral iron supplementation (Ferrogradumet®. Methods Inclusion criteria are peritoneal dialysis patients treated with darbepoietin alpha (DPO; Aranesp®, Amgen for ≥ 1 month. Patients will be randomized 1:1 to receive either slow-release ferrous sulphate (1 tablet twice daily; control or HIP (1 tablet twice daily for a period of 6 months. The study will follow an open-label design but outcome assessors will be blinded to study treatment. During the 6-month study period, haemoglobin levels will be measured monthly and iron studies (including transferring saturation [TSAT] measurements will be performed bi-monthly. The primary outcome measure will be the difference in TSAT levels between the 2 groups at the end of the 6 month study period, adjusted for baseline values using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA. Secondary outcome measures will include serum ferritin concentration, haemoglobin level, DPO dosage, Key's index (DPO dosage divided by haemoglobin concentration, and occurrence of adverse events (especially gastrointestinal adverse events. Discussion This investigator-initiated multicentre study has been designed to provide evidence to help nephrologists and their peritoneal dialysis patients determine whether HIP administration more effectively augments iron stores in ESP-treated PD patients than conventional oral iron supplementation. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number ACTRN12609000432213.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia. Return to Signs, Symptoms, and Complications to review signs and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency ... NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and ... Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  3. Impact of intermittent fasting on glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varady, Krista A

    2016-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the most recent human trials that have examined the impact of intermittent fasting on glucose homeostasis. Our literature search retrieved one human trial of alternate day fasting, and three trials of Ramadan fasting published in the past 12 months. Current evidence suggests that 8 weeks of alternate day fasting that produces mild weight loss (4% from baseline) has no effect on glucose homeostasis. As for Ramadan fasting, decreases in fasting glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance have been noted after 4 weeks in healthy normal weight individuals with mild weight loss (1-2% from baseline). However, Ramadan fasting may have little impact on glucoregulatory parameters in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome who failed to observe weight loss. Whether intermittent fasting is an effective means of regulating glucose homeostasis remains unclear because of the scarcity of studies in this area. Large-scale, longer-term randomized controlled trials will be required before the use of fasting can be recommended for the prevention and treatment of metabolic diseases.

  4. Changes in serum iron, total iron binding capacity and transferrin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Iron is a vital constituent of cells but in excess may be harmful and is associated with a raised risk for some malignant diseases including breast cancer. We aimed to study changes in iron profile in Sudanese females newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods: A case- control study in which serum iron, Total ...

  5. MicroRNAs and Periodontal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, X; Zhou, X; Trombetta-eSilva, J; Francis, M; Gaharwar, A K; Atsawasuwan, P; Diekwisch, T G H

    2017-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small RNAs that control gene expression in all aspects of eukaryotic life, primarily through RNA silencing mechanisms. The purpose of the present review is to introduce key miRNAs involved in periodontal homeostasis, summarize the mechanisms by which they affect downstream genes and tissues, and provide an introduction into the therapeutic potential of periodontal miRNAs. In general, miRNAs function synergistically to fine-tune the regulation of biological processes and to remove expression noise rather than by causing drastic changes in expression levels. In the periodontium, miRNAs play key roles in development and periodontal homeostasis and during the loss of periodontal tissue integrity as a result of periodontal disease. As part of the anabolic phase of periodontal homeostasis and periodontal development, miRNAs direct periodontal fibroblasts toward alveolar bone lineage differentiation and new bone formation through WNT, bone morphogenetic protein, and Notch signaling pathways. miRNAs contribute equally to the catabolic aspect of periodontal homeostasis as they affect osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast function, either by directly promoting osteoclast activity or by inhibiting osteoclast signaling intermediaries or through negative feedback loops. Their small size and ability to target multiple regulatory networks of related sets of genes have predisposed miRNAs to become ideal candidates for drug delivery and tissue regeneration. To address the immense therapeutic potential of miRNAs and their antagomirs, an ever growing number of delivery approaches toward clinical applications have been developed, including nanoparticle carriers and secondary structure interference inhibitor systems. However, only a fraction of the miRNAs involved in periodontal health and disease are known today. It is anticipated that continued research will lead to a more comprehensive understanding of the periodontal miRNA world, and a systematic

  6. Comparing the analgesic effect of heat patch containing iron chip and ibuprofen for primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navvabi Rigi Shahindokht

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary dysmenorrhea is a common and sometimes disabling condition. In recent years, some studies aimed to improve the treatment of dysmenorrhea, and therefore, introduced several therapeutic measures. This study was designed to compare the analgesic effect of iron chip containing heat wrap with ibuprofen for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea. Methods In this randomized (IRCT201107187038N2 controlled trial, 147 students (18–30 years old with the diagnosis of primary dysmenorrhea were enrolled considering the CONSORT guideline. Screening for primary dysmenorrhea was done by a two-question screening tool. The participants were randomly assigned into one of the intervention groups (heat Patch and ibuprofen. Data regarding the severity and emotional impact of the pain were recorded by a shortened version of McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. Results The maximum and minimum pain severities were observed at 2 and 24 hours in both groups. The severity of sensual pain at 8, 12, and 24 hours was non-significantly less in the heat Patch group. There was also no significant difference between the groups regarding the emotional impact of pain at the first 2, 4, 8, 12 and 12 hours of menstruation. Conclusions Heat patch containing Iron chip has comparable analgesic effects to ibuprofen and can possibly be used for primary dysmenorrhea. Trial registration IRCT201107187038N2

  7. A systematic study of the controlled generation of crystalline iron oxide nanoparticles on graphene using a chemical etching process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Krauß

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical vapor deposition (CVD of carbon precursors employing a metal catalyst is a well-established method for synthesizing high-quality single-layer graphene. Yet the main challenge of the CVD process is the required transfer of a graphene layer from the substrate surface onto a chosen target substrate. This process is delicate and can severely degrade the quality of the transferred graphene. The protective polymer coatings typically used generate residues and contamination on the ultrathin graphene layer. In this work, we have developed a graphene transfer process which works without a coating and allows the transfer of graphene onto arbitrary substrates without the need for any additional post-processing. During the course of our transfer studies, we found that the etching process that is usually employed can lead to contamination of the graphene layer with the Faradaic etchant component FeCl3, resulting in the deposition of iron oxide FexOy nanoparticles on the graphene surface. We systematically analyzed the removal of the copper substrate layer and verified that crystalline iron oxide nanoparticles could be generated in controllable density on the graphene surface when this process is optimized. It was further confirmed that the FexOy particles on graphene are active in the catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes when employing a water-assisted CVD process.

  8. Control of the flame front advance in a sintering bed of iron ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cores, A.; Mochon, J.; Ruiz-Bustinza, I.; Parra, R.

    2010-01-01

    A sintering pan of 40 cm cubed is loaded with a mixture of iron ores, limestone and coke weighing 110 kg in a sintering pilot plant. In this sintering pan, a series of thermocouples have been introduced at different depths. Tests have been carried out to study the width of the combustion zone and the maximum temperature of the flame front across the sintering bed. For the analysis of the results, a data acquisition system was used. This consisted of two modules connected in serie, for performing the analogue-digital conversion. The analogue entry point is the exit point of the thermocouples and the digital exit point was the temperature average. A computer was used for conserving and storing the data and for carrying out interpolations, simulating the state and evolution of the flame front across the bed. (Author) 21 refs.

  9. Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

    2011-07-01

    Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2 {micro}m h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger ({approx}100 nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

  10. Mechanism for iron control of the Vibrio fischeri luminescence system: involvement of cyclic AMP and cyclic AMP receptor protein and modulation of DNA level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, P V

    1992-07-01

    Iron controls luminescence in Vibrio fischeri by an indirect but undefined mechanism. To gain insight into that mechanism, the involvement of cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cAMP receptor protein (CRP) and of modulation of DNA levels in iron control of luminescence were examined in V. fischeri and in Escherichia coli containing the cloned V. fischeri lux genes on plasmids. For V. fischeri and E. coli adenylate cyclase (cya) and CRP (crp) mutants containing intact lux genes (luxR luxICDABEG), presence of the iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid) (EDDHA) increased expression of the luminescence system like in the parent strains only in the cya mutants in the presence of added cAMP. In the E. coli strains containing a plasmid with a Mu dl(lacZ) fusion in luxR, levels of beta-galactosidase activity (expression from the luxR promoter) and luciferase activity (expression from the lux operon promoter) were both 2-3-fold higher in the presence of EDDHA in the parent strain, and for the mutants this response to EDDHA was observed only in the cya mutant in the presence of added cAMP. Therefore, cAMP and CRP are required for the iron restriction effect on luminescence, and their involvement in iron control apparently is distinct from the known differential control of transcription from the luxR and luxICDABEG promoters by cAMP-CRP. Furthermore, plasmid and chromosomal DNA levels were higher in E. coli and V. fischeri in the presence of EDDHA. The higher DNA levels correlated with an increase in expression of chromosomally encoded beta-galactosidase in E. coli and with a higher level of autoinducer in cultures of V. fischeri. These results implicate cAMP-CRP and modulation of DNA levels in the mechanism of iron control of the V. fischeri luminescence system.

  11. Tightening the Iron Cage: Concertive Control in Self-Managing Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Describes how an (industrial) organization's control system evolved in response to a managerial change from hierarchical, bureaucratic control to concertive control via self-management teams. The organization's members developed a system of value-based normative rules that controlled their actions more powerfully and completely than did the former…

  12. Iron dissolution from volcanic ash in low-pH atmospheric water: a key control on volcanic iron input to the surface ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maters, E.; Delmelle, P.; Ayris, P. M.; Opfergelt, S.

    2012-12-01

    A low concentration of dissolved iron (Fe) limits phytoplankton growth in approximately 30% of the ocean. The input of soluble Fe to these High-Nutrient Low-Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions has the potential to boost primary production and thereby enhance the drawdown of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Over geological timescales, volcanic activity may alter the flux of Fe to the surface ocean and so contribute to modulating atmospheric CO2 concentrations, ultimately impacting the global climate. Ocean Fe fertilisation has also recently been found to contribute to century-scale carbon sequestration via the export of biomass to the seafloor. Atmospherically deposited volcanic ash is now increasingly seen as an intermittent source of Fe to the surface ocean. Understanding the process of Fe release from ash in solution is key for assessing the potential for ash, particularly that produced by large but rare explosive eruptions or during sustained periods of intense volcanism, to fertilise the marine environment. Previous studies have measured the release of Fe from ash in near-neutral pH solution, but the influence of interaction between ash and acidic cloud- or rainwater during transport on Fe release is poorly understood. In this study, seven volcanic ash samples ranging from tephrite to rhyolite (49-74 wt.% SiO2) were leached in pH 1 H2SO4 in batch reactors for 336 h, at a 1:500 ash-to-solution ratio, to investigate Fe release under acidic conditions. Major element concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma- atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) across a time series of ash leachates. Changes in ash surface composition induced by contact with acid solution were assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio in ash leachates was also determined for the first time, using the Ferrozine method. The ash samples released 42 to 411 μmol m-2 of Fe over 336 h of leaching. High initial Fe release rates (>1 μmol m-2 h-1) sustained for up

  13. [Peritoneal fluid iron levels in women with endometriosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Grzegorz; Wertel, Iwona; Tarkowski, Rafał; Kotarski, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by a cyclic hemorrhage within the peritoneal cavity. Accumulating data suggests that iron homeostasis in the peritoneal cavity may be disrupted by endometriosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate iron levels in peritoneal fluid (PF) of women with and without endometriosis. Seventy-five women were studied: 50 women with endometriosis and, as a reference group, 25 patients with functional follicle ovarian cysts. Iron concentrations in the PF were measured using a commercially available colorimetric assay kit. Iron concentrations were significantly higher in PF from women with endometriosis as compared to the reference group. Patients with stages III/IV endometriosis had significantly higher PF iron concentrations than women with stages I/II of the disease. Disrupted iron homeostasis in the peritoneal cavity of women with endometriosis plays a role in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  14. Subsurface Conditions Controlling Uranium Incorporation in Iron Oxides: A Redox Stable Sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendorf, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Toxic metals and radionuclides throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex pose a serious threat to ecosystems and to human health. Of particular concern is the redox-sensitive radionuclide uranium, which is classified as a priority pollutant in soils and groundwaters at most DOE sites owing to its large inventory, its health risks, and its mobility with respect to primary waste sources. The goal of this research was to contribute to the long-term mission of the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Program by determining reactions of uranium with iron (hydr)oxides that lead to long-term stabilization of this pervasive contaminant. The research objectives of this project were thus to (1) identify the (bio)geochemical conditions, including those of the solid-phase, promoting uranium incorporation in Fe (hydr)oxides, (2) determine the magnitude of uranium incorporation under a variety of relevant subsurface conditions in order to quantify the importance of this pathway when in competition with reduction or adsorption; (3) identify the mechanism(s) of U(VI/V) incorporation in Fe (hydr)oxides; and (4) determine the stability of these phases under different biogeochemical (inclusive of redox) conditions. Our research demonstrates that redox transformations are capable of achieving U incorporation into goethite at ambient temperatures, and that this transformation occurs within days at U and Fe(II) concentrations that are common in subsurface geochemical environments with natural ferrihydrites - inclusive of those with natural impurities. Increasing Fe(II) or U concentration, or initial pH, made U(VI) reduction to U(IV) a more competitive sequestration pathway in this system, presumably by increasing the relative rate of U reduction. Uranium concentrations commonly found in contaminated subsurface environments are often on the order of 1-10 μM, and groundwater Fe(II) concentrations can reach exceed 1 mM in reduced zones of the subsurface. The redox-driven U(V) incorporation

  15. Subsurface Conditions Controlling Uranium Incorporation in Iron Oxides: A Redox Stable Sink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendorf, Scott [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-04-05

    Toxic metals and radionuclides throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex pose a serious threat to ecosystems and to human health. Of particular concern is the redox-sensitive radionuclide uranium, which is classified as a priority pollutant in soils and groundwaters at most DOE sites owing to its large inventory, its health risks, and its mobility with respect to primary waste sources. The goal of this research was to contribute to the long-term mission of the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Program by determining reactions of uranium with iron (hydr)oxides that lead to long-term stabilization of this pervasive contaminant. The research objectives of this project were thus to (1) identify the (bio)geochemical conditions, including those of the solid-phase, promoting uranium incorporation in Fe (hydr)oxides, (2) determine the magnitude of uranium incorporation under a variety of relevant subsurface conditions in order to quantify the importance of this pathway when in competition with reduction or adsorption; (3) identify the mechanism(s) of U(VI/V) incorporation in Fe (hydr)oxides; and (4) determine the stability of these phases under different biogeochemical (inclusive of redox) conditions. Our research demonstrates that redox transformations are capable of achieving U incorporation into goethite at ambient temperatures, and that this transformation occurs within days at U and Fe(II) concentrations that are common in subsurface geochemical environments with natural ferrihydrites—inclusive of those with natural impurities. Increasing Fe(II) or U concentration, or initial pH, made U(VI) reduction to U(IV) a more competitive sequestration pathway in this system, presumably by increasing the relative rate of U reduction. Uranium concentrations commonly found in contaminated subsurface environments are often on the order of 1-10 μM, and groundwater Fe(II) concentrations can reach exceed 1 mM in reduced zones of the subsurface. The redox-driven U(V) incorporation

  16. Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) in the brain: implications for a role in iron transport at the blood-brain barrier, and neuronal and glial pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Burkhart, Annette; Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Iron is required in a variety of essential processes in the body. In this review, we focus on iron transport in the brain and the role of the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) vital for iron uptake in most cells. DMT1 locates to cellular membranes and endosomal membranes, where it is a key player in non-transferrin bound iron uptake and transferrin-bound iron uptake, respectively. Four isoforms of DMT1 exist, and their respective characteristics involve a complex cell-specific regulatory machinery all controlling iron transport across these membranes. This complexity reflects the fine balance required in iron homeostasis, as this metal is indispensable in many cell functions but highly toxic when appearing in excess. DMT1 expression in the brain is prominent in neurons. Of serious dispute is the expression of DMT1 in non-neuronal cells. Recent studies imply that DMT1 does exist in endosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells denoting the blood-brain barrier. This supports existing evidence that iron uptake at the BBB occurs by means of transferrin-receptor mediated endocytosis followed by detachment of iron from transferrin inside the acidic compartment of the endosome and DMT1-mediated pumping iron into the cytosol. The subsequent iron transport across the abluminal membrane into the brain likely occurs by ferroportin. The virtual absent expression of transferrin receptors and DMT1 in glial cells, i.e., astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes, suggest that the steady state uptake of iron in glia is much lower than in neurons and/or other mechanisms for iron uptake in these cell types prevail.

  17. Iron overload and HFE gene mutations in Polish patients with liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska, Katarzyna; Romanowski, Tomasz; Stalke, Piotr; Iżycka-Świeszewska, Ewa; Bielawski, Krzysztof Piotr

    2011-06-01

    Increased liver iron stores may contribute to the progression of liver injury and fibrosis, and are associated with a higher risk of hepatocellular carcinoma development. Pre-transplant symptoms of iron overload in patients with liver cirrhosis are associated with higher risk of infectious and malignant complications in liver transplant recipients. HFE gene mutations may be involved in the pathogenesis of liver iron overload and influence the progression of chronic liver diseases of different origins. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of iron overload in relation to HFE gene mutations among Polish patients with liver cirrhosis. Sixty-one patients with liver cirrhosis included in the study were compared with a control group of 42 consecutive patients subjected to liver biopsy because of chronic liver diseases. Liver function tests and serum iron markers were assessed in both groups. All patients were screened for HFE mutations (C282Y, H63D, S65C). Thirty-six of 61 patients from the study group and all controls had liver biopsy performed with semiquantitative assessment of iron deposits in hepatocytes. The biochemical markers of iron overload and iron deposits in the liver were detected with a higher frequency (70% and 47% respectively) in patients with liver cirrhosis. There were no differences in the prevalence of all HFE mutations in both groups. In patients with a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma, no significant associations with iron disorders and HFE gene mutations were found. Iron disorders were detected in patients with liver cirrhosis frequently but without significant association with HFE gene mutations. Only the homozygous C282Y mutation seems to occur more frequently in the selected population of patients with liver cirrhosis. As elevated biochemical iron indices accompanied liver iron deposits more frequently in liver cirrhosis compared to controls with chronic liver disease, there is a need for more extensive studies searching for

  18. Seasonal Hydrologic Controls on Uranium and Iron Biogeochemistry in a Riparian Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, M.; Williams, K. H.; Danczak, R. E.; Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Hobson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The maintenance of geochemically reducing conditions is generally optimal for the formation and preservation of reduced metals and mineral phases that can limit contaminant fate and transport. At a riparian aquifer near Rifle, CO, we tracked over six months the biogeochemical response within the aquifer to an annual pulse of dissolved oxygen (DO) that results from snowmelt-driven changes in Colorado River stage. In reduced portions of the aquifer (naturally reduced zones; NRZs) the re-oxidation of abundant iron sulfide minerals was the dominant oxygen-consuming process, and resulted in little DO intrusion into the deeper aquifer. In less reduced areas, DO intruded through the entire vertical profile of the aquifer. Across both regions, these perturbations resulted in changes to the microbial community structure, and aqueous metal pools. Two potentially different mechanisms of uranium mobilization were observed; (1) re-oxidation of reduced U(IV) phases in response to DO intrusion, and (2) mobilization of U(VI) from the vadose zone during water table rise. This high-resolution, long-term monitoring of aquifer biogeochemistry at the Rifle site has revealed dynamic microbial and geochemical responses to predictable, annual hydrologic perturbations, and offers an opportunity to further refine modeling approaches for such regions.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health [NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact ... Email Alerts Receive automatic alerts about NHLBI related news and highlights from ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron to support the growth of their unborn babies, so their bodies produce more blood. With ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that ...

  2. Impact of Preconception Micronutrient Supplementation on Anemia and Iron Status during Pregnancy and Postpartum: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Rural Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong H Nguyen

    Full Text Available Preconception micronutrient interventions may be a promising approach to reduce anemia and iron deficiency during pregnancy, but currently we have limited data to inform policies. We evaluated whether providing additional pre-pregnancy weekly iron-folic acid (IFA or multiple micronutrient (MM supplements compared to only folic acid (FA improves iron status and anemia during pregnancy and early postpartum.We conducted a double blind randomized controlled trial in which 5011 Vietnamese women were provided with weekly supplements containing either only 2800 μg FA (control group, IFA (60 mg Fe and 2800 μg FA or MM (15 micronutrients with similar amounts of IFA. All women who became pregnant (n = 1813 in each of the 3 groups received daily IFA (60 mg Fe and 400 μg FA through delivery. Hematological indicators were assessed at baseline (pre-pregnancy, during pregnancy, 3 months post-partum, and in cord blood. Adjusted generalized linear models were applied to examine the impact of preconception supplementation on anemia and iron stores, using both intention to treat and per protocol analyses (women consumed supplements ≥ 26 weeks before conception.At baseline, 20% of women were anemic, but only 14% had low iron stores (ferritin <30 μg/L and 3% had iron deficiency (ferritin <12 μg/L. The groups were balanced for baseline characteristics. Anemia prevalence increased during pregnancy and post-partum but was similar among intervention groups. In intention to treat analyses, prenatal ferritin was significantly higher among women receiving MM (geometric mean (μg/L [95% CI]: 93.6 [89.3-98.2] and IFA (91.9 [87.6-96.3] compared to control (85.3 [81.5-89.2]. In per protocol analyses, women receiving MM or IFA had higher ferritin 3 months postpartum (MM 118.2 [109.3-127.8], IFA 117.8 [108.7-127.7] vs control 101.5 [94.0-109.7] and gave birth to infants with greater iron stores (MM 184.3 [176.1-192.9], IFA 189.9 [181.6-198.3] vs control 175.1 [167

  3. Integrating themes, evidence gaps, and research needs identified by workshop on iron screening and supplementation in iron-replete pregnant women and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Patsy M; Stover, Patrick J; Taylor, Christine L

    2017-12-01

    This report addresses the evidence and the uncertainties, knowledge gaps, and research needs identified by participants at the NIH workshop related to iron screening and routine iron supplementation of largely iron-replete pregnant women and young children (6-24 mo) in developed countries. The workshop presentations and panel discussions focused on current understanding and knowledge gaps related to iron homeostasis, measurement of and evidence for iron status, and emerging concerns about supplementing iron-replete members of these vulnerable populations. Four integrating themes emerged across workshop presentations and discussion and centered on 1 ) physiologic or developmental adaptations of iron homeostasis to pregnancy and early infancy, respectively, and their implications, 2 ) improvement of the assessment of iron status across the full continuum from iron deficiency anemia to iron deficiency to iron replete to iron excess, 3 ) the linkage of iron status with health outcomes beyond hematologic outcomes, and 4 ) the balance of benefit and harm of iron supplementation of iron-replete pregnant women and young children. Research that addresses these themes in the context of the full continuum of iron status is needed to inform approaches to the balancing of benefits and harms of screening and routine supplementation. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Nigella Sativa and Oriental Spices with Protective Role in Iron Intoxication: in vivo Experiments on Rabbits

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    Mirela Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of hematological parameters is essential for assuring a general health status for any living organism. Iron is one of the essential mineral, involved in many vital processes – mainly in blood cells production, but in the same way it can become toxic in very high concentration. Hemoglobin and red blood cells are directed related with the iron ion, due to the high quantity (70% of total iron from organism being part of the blood (hemoglobin and muscle (myoglobin cells. Ferrous ion is part of hemoglobin structure, and red blood cells. But, the administration of high doses of iron can negatively affect the general health status, because the iron alters the enzymatic system in the vital organs. The aim of our experimental study was to verify the hypothesis that in rabbit’s organism, after intraperitoneal administration of 15g Fe2+/body weight as ferrous-gluconate hydro solution, a special diet based on a complex, fresh, organic vegetables (roots and leaves protects the organism by iron intoxication and help the hematological homeostasis. The research experiment was conducted during 43 days in summer time, on German Lop Eared breed young rabbits, which were protected with a diet that consisted of administration of Nigella sativa, some oriental spices (Allium ampeloprasum, Allium tuberosum, Coriandrum sativum, Eruca sativa, Cucumis sativus, Raphanus sativus, Trigonella foenum-graecum and other vegetables (Trifolium, Petroselinum crispum, Dacus carrota subsp.sativus and Cucumis sativus. At the final of experiment we collected blood samples for hematological test and we evaluated the erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and red cell distribution width. The results were analytical evaluated and only for hemoglobin we obtained significant increase value in experimental rabbits compared to control group of rabbits.

  5. Ironic processes in the mental control of mood and mood-related thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, D M; Erber, R; Zanakos, S

    1993-12-01

    The mental control of mood and mood-related thought was investigated. In Experiment 1, Ss reminiscing about a happy or sad event were asked to make their mood positive, were given no instructions, or were asked to make their mood negative. Ss attempting mood control without an imposed cognitive load were successful, whereas those who attempted control while rehearsing a 9-digit number not only failed to control their moods but also showed self-reported mood change opposite the mood they intended to create. In Experiment 2, Ss attempting to control mood-related thoughts under cognitive load showed increased accessibility of those thoughts contrary to the direction of intended control in a Stroop-type color-naming task.

  6. Controllable labelling of stem cells with a novel superparamagnetic iron oxide-loaded cationic nanovesicle for MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Ruo Mi; Zhang, Fang; Wen, Xue Hua; Shen, Jun [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Cao, Nuo; Wang, Yi Ru; Shuai, Xin Tao [Sun Yat-Sen University, BME Center, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-11-15

    To investigate the feasibility of highly efficient and controllable stem cell labelling for cellular MRI. A new class of cationic, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION)-loaded nanovesicles was synthesised to label rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells without secondary transfection agents. The optimal labelling conditions and controllability were assessed, and the effect of labelling on cell viability, proliferation activity and multilineage differentiation was determined. In 18 rats, focal ischaemic cerebral injury was induced and the rats randomly injected with 1 x 10{sup 6} cells labelled with 0-, 8- or 20-mV nanovesicles (n = 6 each). In vivo MRI was performed to follow grafted cells in contralateral striata, and results were correlated with histology. Optimal cell labelling conditions involved a concentration of 3.15 {mu}g Fe/mL nanovesicles with 20-mV positive charge and 1-h incubation time. Labelling efficiency showed linear change with an increase in the electric potentials of nanovesicles. Labelling did not affect cell viability, proliferation activity or multilineage differentiation capacity. The distribution and migration of labelled cells could be detected by MRI. Histology confirmed that grafted cells retained the label and remained viable. Stem cells can be effectively and safely labelled with cationic, SPION-loaded nanovesicles in a controllable way for cellular MRI. (orig.)

  7. Co-control of local air pollutants and CO2 in the Chinese iron and steel industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xianqiang; Zeng, An; Hu, Tao; Zhou, Ji; Xing, Youkai; Liu, Shengqiang

    2013-01-01

    The present study proposes an integrated multipollutant cocontrol strategy framework in the context of the Chinese iron and steel industry. The unit cost of pollutant reduction (UCPR) was used to examine the cost-effectiveness of each emission reduction measure. The marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves for SO2, NOx, PM2.5, and CO2 were drawn based on the UCPR and the abatement potential. Air pollutant equivalence (APeq) captures the nature of the damage value-weights of various air pollutants and acts as uniformization multiple air pollutants index. Single pollutant abatement routes designed in accordance with the corresponding reduction targets revealed that the cocontrol strategy has promising potential. Moreover, with the same reduction cost limitations as the single pollutant abatement routes, the multipollutant cocontrol routes are able to obtain more desirable pollution reduction and health benefits. Co-control strategy generally shows cost-effective advantage over single-pollutant abatement strategy. The results are robust to changing parameters according to sensitivity analysis. Co-control strategy would be an important step to achieve energy/carbon intensity targets and pollution control targets in China. Though cocontrol strategy has got some traction in policy debates, there are barriers to integrate it into policy making in the near future in China.

  8. Políticas públicas para o controle da anemia ferropriva Public policies to control iron deficiency in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia C. Szarfarc

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A anemia por deficiência de ferro configura um problema epidemiológico da maior relevância atuando nos gastos públicos de saúde, nas consequências sociais do aumento de riscos no período gestacional, na redução da produtividade e, ainda, nas consequências, em longo prazo, do desenvolvimento mental. Algumas datas marcam o envolvimento do governo brasileiro em busca de alternativas de controle da deficiência marcial: 1977 - 1ª Reunião do Ministério da Saúde (INAN, com especialistas nacionais e internacionais, para discutir perspectivas e intervenções para o controle da anemia; 1982/83 - distribuição de suplemento de ferro para a clientela do Programa de Atenção à Gestante e dosagem de hemoglobina na 1ª consulta; 1992 - assinatura de compromisso brasileiro de reduzir em 1/3 a prevalência de anemia em gestantes; 1994 - implantação do Programa de Leite Vivaleite, no estado de São Paulo, fornecendo leite fortificado com ferro a famílias com crianças até 6 anos e renda inferior a dois salários mínimos; 2002/junho 2004 - fortificação das farinhas de trigo e de milho com ferro; 2005 - programa de suplementação de ferro a lactentes; 2009/março - divulgação do resultado do levantamento de prevalência de anemia em mulheres (15-49 anos e crianças (6 - 59 meses no Brasil; 2009/agosto - foi reeditada a Portaria no 1793/GM/agosto/2009 do Ministério da Saúde, instituindo a Comissão Interinstitucional para implementação, acompanhamento e monitorização das ações de fortificação das farinhas de trigo e milho e seus subprodutos.Iron deficiency anemia is a vast epidemiologic problem evidenced by health public spending, the social consequences of increased risk in pregnancy, low production, and also by long term consequences of cognitive development. Some points in time highlight the involvement of the Brazilian government: 1977 - 1st Health Minister Meeting (INAN, with international and national specialists to

  9. Obesity as an Emerging Risk Factor for Iron Deficiency

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    Elmar Aigner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis is affected by obesity and obesity-related insulin resistance in a many-facetted fashion. On one hand, iron deficiency and anemia are frequent findings in subjects with progressed stages of obesity. This phenomenon has been well studied in obese adolescents, women and subjects undergoing bariatric surgery. On the other hand, hyperferritinemia with normal or mildly elevated transferrin saturation is observed in approximately one-third of patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. This constellation has been named the “dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome (DIOS”. Both elevated body iron stores and iron deficiency are detrimental to health and to the course of obesity-related conditions. Iron deficiency and anemia may impair mitochondrial and cellular energy homeostasis and further increase inactivity and fatigue of obese subjects. Obesity-associated inflammation is tightly linked to iron deficiency and involves impaired duodenal iron absorption associated with low expression of duodenal ferroportin (FPN along with elevated hepcidin concentrations. This review summarizes the current understanding of the dysregulation of iron homeostasis in obesity.

  10. Trichoderma asperellum strain T34 controls Fusarium wilt disease in tomato plants in soilless culture through competition for iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, Guillem; Casanova, Eva; Avilés, Manuel; Trillas, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Trichoderma asperellum strain T34 has been reported to control the disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (Fol) on tomato plants. To study the importance of iron concentration in the growth media for the activity and competitiveness of T34 and the pathogen, we tested four iron concentrations in the nutrient solution [1, 10, 100, and 1000 microM provided as EDTA/Fe(III)] in a biological control experiment with T34 and Fol in tomato plants. The reduction of the Fusarium-infected shoot by T34 was only significant at 10 microM Fe. We hypothesized that Fe competition is one of the key factors in the biocontrol activity exerted by T34 against Fol, as an increase in Fe concentration over 10 microM would lead to the suppression of T34 siderophore synthesis and thus inhibition of Fe competition with Fol. T34 significantly reduced the populations of Fol at all the doses of Fe assayed. In contrast, Fol enhanced the populations of T34 at 1 and 10 microM Fe. Nevertheless, several plant physiological parameters like net CO(2) assimilation (A), stomatal conductance (g(s)), relative quantum efficiency of PSII (Phi(PSII)), and efficiency of excitation energy capture by open PSII reactive centers (Fv'/Fm') demonstrated the protection against Fol damage by treatment with T34 at 100 microM Fe. The first physiological parameter affected by the disease progression was g(s). Plant dry weight was decreased by Fe toxicity at 100 and 1,000 microM. T34-treated plants had significantly greater heights and dry weights than control plants at 1,000 microM Fe, even though T34 did not reduce the Fe content in leaves or stems. Furthermore, T34 enhanced plant height even at the optimal Fe concentration (10 microM) compared to control plants. In conclusion, T. asperellum strain T34 protected tomato plants from both biotic (Fusarium wilt disease) and abiotic stress [Fe(III) toxic effects].

  11. [Iron deficiency and pica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, J A; Marcos, J; Risueño, C E; de Cos, C; López, R; Capote, F J; Martín, M V; Gil, J L

    1998-02-01

    To study the relationship between pica and iron-lack anaemia in a series of iron-deficiency patients in order to establish the pathogenesis of such relationship. Four-hundred and thirty-three patients were analysed. Pica was studied by introducing certain diet queries into the clinical history. All patients received oral iron and were periodically controlled with the usual clinico-haematological procedures. Pica was present in 23 patients (5.3%). Eight nourishing (namely, coffee grains, almonds, chocolate, ice, lettuce, carrots, sunflower seeds and bread) and 2 non-nourishing (clay and paper) substances were involved. A second episode of pica appeared in 9 cases upon relapsing of iron deficiency. Both anaemia and pica were cured by etiologic and substitutive therapy in all instances. No clear correlation was found with either socio-economic status or pathogenetic causes of iron deficiency and pica, and no haematological differences were seen between patients with pica and those without this alteration. (1) The pathogenesis of pica is unclear, although it appears unrelated to the degree of iron deficiency. (2) According to the findings in this series, pica seems a consequence of iron deficiency rather than its cause. (3) Adequate therapy can cure both conditions, although pica may reappear upon relapse of iron deficiency.

  12. Iron and genome stability: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prá, Daniel; Franke, Silvia Isabel Rech; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas; Fenech, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient which is required in a relatively narrow range for maintaining metabolic homeostasis and genome stability. Iron participates in oxygen transport and mitochondrial respiration as well as in antioxidant and nucleic acid metabolism. Iron deficiency impairs these biological pathways, leading to oxidative stress and possibly carcinogenesis. Iron overload has been linked to genome instability as well as to cancer risk increase, as seen in hereditary hemochromatosis. Iron is an extremely reactive transition metal that can interact with hydrogen peroxide to generate hydroxyl radicals that form the 8-hydroxy-guanine adduct, cause point mutations as well as DNA single and double strand breaks. Iron overload also induces DNA hypermethylation and can reduce telomere length. The current Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for iron, according with Institute of Medicine Dietary Reference Intake (DRI), is based in the concept of preventing anemia, and ranges from 7 mg/day to 18 mg/day depending on life stage and gender. Pregnant women need 27 mg/day. The maximum safety level for iron intake, the Upper Level (UL), is 40–45 mg/day, based on the prevention of gastrointestinal distress associated to high iron intakes. Preliminary evidence indicates that 20 mg/day iron, an intake slightly higher than the RDA, may reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer in the elderly as well as increasing genome stability in lymphocytes of children and adolescents. Current dietary recommendations do not consider the concept of genome stability which is of concern because damage to the genome has been linked to the origin and progression of many diseases and is the most fundamental pathology. Given the importance of iron for homeostasis and its potential influence over genome stability and cancer it is recommended to conduct further studies that conclusively define these relationships.

  13. Iron and genome stability: An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pra, Daniel, E-mail: daniel_pra@yahoo.com [PPG em Promocao da Saude, Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); PPG em Saude e Comportamento, Universidade Catolica de Pelotas, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Franke, Silvia Isabel Rech [PPG em Promocao da Saude, Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); Henriques, Joao Antonio Pegas [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Fenech, Michael [CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2012-05-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient which is required in a relatively narrow range for maintaining metabolic homeostasis and genome stability. Iron participates in oxygen transport and mitochondrial respiration as well as in antioxidant and nucleic acid metabolism. Iron deficiency impairs these biological pathways, leading to oxidative stress and possibly carcinogenesis. Iron overload has been linked to genome instability as well as to cancer risk increase, as seen in hereditary hemochromatosis. Iron is an extremely reactive transition metal that can interact with hydrogen peroxide to generate hydroxyl radicals that form the 8-hydroxy-guanine adduct, cause point mutations as well as DNA single and double strand breaks. Iron overload also induces DNA hypermethylation and can reduce telomere length. The current Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for iron, according with Institute of Medicine Dietary Reference Intake (DRI), is based in the concept of preventing anemia, and ranges from 7 mg/day to 18 mg/day depending on life stage and gender. Pregnant women need 27 mg/day. The maximum safety level for iron intake, the Upper Level (UL), is 40-45 mg/day, based on the prevention of gastrointestinal distress associated to high iron intakes. Preliminary evidence indicates that 20 mg/day iron, an intake slightly higher than the RDA, may reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer in the elderly as well as increasing genome stability in lymphocytes of children and adolescents. Current dietary recommendations do not consider the concept of genome stability which is of concern because damage to the genome has been linked to the origin and progression of many diseases and is the most fundamental pathology. Given the importance of iron for homeostasis and its potential influence over genome stability and cancer it is recommended to conduct further studies that conclusively define these relationships.

  14. Iron Fortified Complementary Foods Containing a Mixture of Sodium Iron EDTA with Either Ferrous Fumarate or Ferric Pyrophosphate Reduce Iron Deficiency Anemia in 12- to 36-Month-Old Children in a Malaria Endemic Setting: A Secondary Analysis of a Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinz, Dominik; Wegmüller, Rita; Ouattara, Mamadou; Diakité, Victorine G; Aaron, Grant J; Hofer, Lorenz; Zimmermann, Michael B; Adiossan, Lukas G; Utzinger, Jürg; N'Goran, Eliézer K; Hurrell, Richard F

    2017-07-14

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. The efficacy of iron fortification against IDA is uncertain in malaria-endemic settings. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a complementary food (CF) fortified with sodium iron EDTA (NaFeEDTA) plus either ferrous fumarate (FeFum) or ferric pyrophosphate (FePP) to combat IDA in preschool-age children in a highly malaria endemic region. This is a secondary analysis of a nine-month cluster-randomized controlled trial conducted in south-central Côte d'Ivoire. 378 children aged 12-36 months were randomly assigned to no food intervention ( n = 125; control group), CF fortified with 2 mg NaFeEDTA plus 3.8 mg FeFum for six days/week ( n = 126; FeFum group), and CF fortified with 2 mg NaFeEDTA and 3.8 mg FePP for six days/week ( n = 127; FePP group). The outcome measures were hemoglobin (Hb), plasma ferritin (PF), iron deficiency (PF anemia (Hb iron deficiency with or without anemia ( p = 0.068). IDA prevalence sharply decreased in the FeFum (32.8% to 1.2%, p anemia. These data indicate that, despite the high endemicity of malaria and elevated inflammation biomarkers (C-reactive protein or α-1-acid-glycoprotein), IDA was markedly reduced by provision of iron fortified CF to preschool-age children for 9 months, with no significant differences between a combination of NaFeEDTA with FeFum or NaFeEDTA with FePP. However, there was no overall effect on anemia, suggesting most of the anemia in this setting is not due to ID. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01634945).

  15. Telomere Homeostasis: Interplay with Magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donogh Maguire

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Telomere biology, a key component of the hallmarks of ageing, offers insight into dysregulation of normative ageing processes that accompany age-related diseases such as cancer. Telomere homeostasis is tightly linked to cellular metabolism, and in particular with mitochondrial physiology, which is also diminished during cellular senescence and normative physiological ageing. Inherent in the biochemistry of these processes is the role of magnesium, one of the main cellular ions and an essential cofactor in all reactions that use ATP. Magnesium plays an important role in many of the processes involved in regulating telomere structure, integrity and function. This review explores the mechanisms that maintain telomere structure and function, their influence on circadian rhythms and their impact on health and age-related disease. The pervasive role of magnesium in telomere homeostasis is also highlighted.

  16. [Glucose homeostasis and gut-brain connection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vadder, Filipe; Mithieux, Gilles

    2015-02-01

    Since the XIX(th) century, the brain has been known for its role in regulating food intake (via the control of hunger sensation) and glucose homeostasis. Further interest has come from the discovery of gut hormones, which established a clear link between the gut and the brain in regulating glucose and energy homeostasis. The brain has two particular structures, the hypothalamus and the brainstem, which are sensitive to information coming either from peripheral organs or from the gut (via circulating hormones or nutrients) about the nutritional status of the organism. However, the efforts for a better understanding of these mechanisms have allowed to unveil a new gut-brain neural axis as a key regulator of the metabolic status of the organism. Certain nutrients control the hypothalamic homeostatic function via this axis. In this review, we describe how the gut is connected to the brain via different neural pathways, and how the interplay between these two organs drives the energy balance. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  17. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis in celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Mustafa; Ates, Ihsan; Yuksel, Mahmut; Ozderin Ozin, Yasemin; Alisik, Murat; Erel, Ozcan; Kayacetin, Ertugrul

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine dynamic thiol/disulphide homeostasis in celiac disease and to examine the associate with celiac autoantibodies and gluten-free diet. METHODS Seventy three patients with celiac disease and 73 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. In both groups, thiol/disulphide homeostasis was examined with a new colorimetric method recently developed by Erel and Neselioglu. RESULTS In patients with celiac disease, native thiol (P = 0.027) and total thiol (P = 0.031) levels were lower, while disulphide (P < 0.001) level, disulphide/native thiol (P < 0.001) and disulphide/total thiol (P < 0.001) ratios were higher compared to the control group. In patients who do not comply with a gluten-free diet, disulphide/native thiol ratio was found higher compared to the patients who comply with the diet (P < 0.001). In patients with any autoantibody-positive, disulphide/native thiol ratio was observed higher compared to the patients with autoantibody-negative (P < 0.05). It is found that there is a negative correlation between celiac autoantibodies, and native thiol, total thiol levels and native thiol/total thiol ratio, while a positive correlation is observed between disulphide, disulphide/native thiol and disulphide/total thiol levels. CONCLUSION This study is first in the literature which found that the patients with celiac disease the dynamic thiol/disulphide balance shifts through disulphide form compared to the control group. PMID:28533921

  18. Lipid Raft, Regulator of Plasmodesmal Callose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Bagus Boedi Iswanto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts are enriched by sterols and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts facilitate cellular signal transduction by controlling the assembly of signaling molecules and membrane protein trafficking. Another specialized compartment of plant cells, the plasmodesmata (PD, which regulates the symplasmic intercellular movement of certain molecules between adjacent cells, also contains a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The dynamic permeability of plasmodesmata (PDs is highly controlled by plasmodesmata callose (PDC, which is synthesized by callose synthases (CalS and degraded by β-1,3-glucanases (BGs. In recent studies, remarkable observations regarding the correlation between lipid raft formation and symplasmic intracellular trafficking have been reported, and the PDC has been suggested to be the regulator of the size exclusion limit of PDs. It has been suggested that the alteration of lipid raft substances impairs PDC homeostasis, subsequently affecting PD functions. In this review, we discuss the substantial role of membrane lipid rafts in PDC homeostasis and provide avenues for understanding the fundamental behavior of the lipid raft–processed PDC.

  19. Lipid Raft, Regulator of Plasmodesmal Callose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iswanto, Arya Bagus Boedi; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2017-04-03

    A bstract: The specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts are enriched by sterols and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts facilitate cellular signal transduction by controlling the assembly of signaling molecules and membrane protein trafficking. Another specialized compartment of plant cells, the plasmodesmata (PD), which regulates the symplasmic intercellular movement of certain molecules between adjacent cells, also contains a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The dynamic permeability of plasmodesmata (PDs) is highly controlled by plasmodesmata callose (PDC), which is synthesized by callose synthases (CalS) and degraded by β-1,3-glucanases (BGs). In recent studies, remarkable observations regarding the correlation between lipid raft formation and symplasmic intracellular trafficking have been reported, and the PDC has been suggested to be the regulator of the size exclusion limit of PDs. It has been suggested that the alteration of lipid raft substances impairs PDC homeostasis, subsequently affecting PD functions. In this review, we discuss the substantial role of membrane lipid rafts in PDC homeostasis and provide avenues for understanding the fundamental behavior of the lipid raft-processed PDC.

  20. Sleep Homeostasis and Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202...circuit (a homeostat) that operates in concert with the circadian circuitry or does sleep drive accumulate everywhere in the brain? To answer these...neurons is capable of generating sleep drive. RNAi-mediated knockdown of insomniac in R2 neurons abolished sleep homeostasis without affecting baseline

  1. A COMMUNITY BASED RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF IRON AND ZINC SUPPLEMENTATION IN INFANTS: EFFECTS ON GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lind

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies of iron and zinc are associated with delayed development, growth faltering, and increased infectious disease morbidity during infancy and childhood. Combined iron and zinc supplementation may therefore be a logical preventive strategy. Objective: the objective of the study was to compare the effects of combined iron and zinc supplementation in infancy with the effects of iron and zinc as single micronutrients on growth, psychomotor development, and incidence of infectious disease. Design: Indonesian infants (n = 680 were randomly assigned to daily supplementation with 10 mg Fe (Fe group, 10 mg Zn (Zn group, 10 mg Fe and 10 mg Zn (Fe + Zn group, or placebo from 6 to 12 mo of age. Anthropometric indexes, developmental indexes (bay ley scales of infant development; sid, and morbidity were recorded. Results: at 12 mo, two factor analysis of variance showed a significant interaction between Iron and Zinc for weight for age z score, knee heel length, and sid psychomotor development. Weight forage z score was higher in the Zn group than in the placebo and Fe + Zn groups, knee heel length was higher in the Zn and Fe groups than in the placebo group, and the sid psychomotor development index was higher in the Fe group than in the placebo group. No significant effect on morbidity was found. Conclusions: single supplementation with zinc significantly improved growth, and single supplementation with iron significantly improved growth and psychomotor development, but combined supplementation with iron and zinc had no significant effect on growth or development. Combined, simultaneous supplementation with iron and zinc to infants cannot be routinely recommended at the iron to zinc ratio used in this study.Key words: infants, growth, knee heel length, development, iron, zinc.

  2. Modern iron replacement therapy: clinical and pathophysiological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girelli, Domenico; Ugolini, Sara; Busti, Fabiana; Marchi, Giacomo; Castagna, Annalisa

    2018-01-01

    Iron deficiency, with or without anemia, is extremely frequent worldwide, representing a major public health problem. Iron replacement therapy dates back to the seventeenth century, and has progressed relatively slowly until recently. Both oral and intravenous traditional iron formulations are known to be far from ideal, mainly because of tolerability and safety issues, respectively. At the beginning of this century, the discovery of hepcidin/ferroportin axis has represented a turning point in the knowledge of the pathophysiology of iron metabolism disorders, ushering a new era. In the meantime, advances in the pharmaceutical technologies are producing newer iron formulations aimed at minimizing the problems inherent with traditional approaches. The pharmacokinetic of oral and parenteral iron is substantially different, and diversities have become even clearer in light of the hepcidin master role in regulating systemic iron homeostasis. Here we review how iron therapy is changing because of such important advances in both pathophysiology and pharmacology.

  3. Supplementation of iron in pulmonary hypertension: Rationale and design of a phase II clinical trial in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Luke S.G.E.; Watson, Geoffrey M.J.; Wharton, John; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Chan, Kakit; Khengar, Rajeshree; Robbins, Peter A.; Kiely, David G.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliott, Charlie A.; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Sheares, Karen; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Davies, Rachel; Ashby, Deborah; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Wilkins, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to assess the safety and potential clinical benefit of intravenous iron (Ferinject) infusion in iron deficient patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Iron deficiency in the absence of anemia (1) is common in patients with IPAH; (2) is associated with inappropriately raised levels of hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis; and (3) correlates with disease severity and worse clinical outcomes. Oral iron absorption may be impeded by reduced absorption due to elevated hepcidin levels. The safety and benefits of parenteral iron replacement in IPAH are unknown. Supplementation of Iron in Pulmonary Hypertension (SIPHON) is a Phase II, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical trial of iron in IPAH. At least 60 patients will be randomized to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject) or saline placebo with a crossover point after 12 weeks of treatment. The primary outcome will be the change in resting pulmonary vascular resistance from baseline at 12 weeks, measured by cardiac catheterization. Secondary measures include resting and exercise hemodynamics and exercise performance from serial bicycle incremental and endurance cardiopulmonary exercise tests. Other secondary measurements include serum iron indices, 6-Minute Walk Distance, WHO functional class, quality of life score, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and cardiac anatomy and function from cardiac magnetic resonance. We propose that intravenous iron replacement will improve hemodynamics and clinical outcomes in IPAH. If the data supports a potentially useful therapeutic effect and suggest this drug is safe, the study will be used to power a Phase III study to address efficacy. PMID:23662181

  4. Homeostasis of metals in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Domínguez, Raúl; García-Barrera, Tamara; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2014-06-01

    In order to study the involvement of metals in the progression of Alzheimer's disease, serum samples from patients with Alzheimer and mild cognitive impairment were investigated. For this purpose, metal content was analyzed after size-fractionation of species and then, inter-element and inter-fraction ratios were computed. In this way, the analysis allowed discovering changes that could be used as markers of disease, but also provided a new insight into the interactions in the homeostasis of elements in neurodegeneration and its progression. Aluminum and labile forms of iron and copper were increased in demented patients, while manganese, zinc and selenium were reduced. Interestingly, levels of different elements, principally iron, aluminum and manganese, were closely inter-related, which could evidence a complex interdependency between the homeostasis of the different metals in this disorder. On the other hand, imbalances in metabolism of copper, zinc and selenium could be associated to abnormal redox status. Therefore, this study may contribute to our understanding of the pathological mechanisms related to metals in Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Diurnal variations in iron concentrations and expression of genes involved in iron absorption and metabolism in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiming; Wan, Dan; Zhou, Xihong; Long, Ciming; Wu, Xin; Li, Lan; He, Liuqin; Huang, Pan; Chen, Shuai; Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong

    2017-09-02

    Diurnal variations in serum iron levels have been well documented in clinical studies, and serum iron is an important diagnostic index for iron-deficiency anemia. However, the underlying mechanism of dynamic iron regulation in response to the circadian rhythm is still unclear. In this study, we investigated daily variations in iron status in the plasma and liver of pigs. The transcripts encoding key factors involved in iron uptake and homeostasis were evaluated. The results showed that iron levels in the plasma and liver exhibited diurnal rhythms. Diurnal variations were also observed in transcript levels of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), membrane-associated ferric reductase 1 (DCYTB), and transferrin receptor (TfR) in the duodenum and jejunum, as well as hepcidin (HAMP) and TfR in the liver. Moreover, the results showed a network in which diurnal variations in systemic iron levels were tightly regulated by hepcidin and Tf/TfR via DCYTB and DMT1. These findings provide new insights into circadian iron homeostasis regulation. The diurnal variations in serum iron levels may also have pathophysiological implications for clinical diagnostics related to iron deficiency anemia in pigs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Translational control of ceruloplasmin gene expression: Beyond the IRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARSANJIT MAZUMDER

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Translational control is a common regulatory mechanism for the expression of iron-related proteins. For example, three enzymes involved in erythrocyte development are regulated by three different control mechanisms: globin synthesis is modulated by heme-regulated translational inhibitor; erythroid 5-aminolevulinate synthase translation is inhibited by binding of the iron regulatory protein to the iron response element in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR; and 15-lipoxygenase is regulated by specific proteins binding to the 3'-UTR. Ceruloplasmin (Cp is a multi-functional, copper protein made primarily by the liver and by activated macrophages. Cp has important roles in iron homeostasis and in inflammation. Its role in iron metabolism was originally proposed because of its ferroxidase activity and because of its ability to stimulate iron loading into apo-transferrin and iron efflux from liver. We have shown that Cp mRNA is induced by interferon (IFN-γ in U937 monocytic cells, but synthesis of Cp protein is halted by translational silencing. The silencing mechanism requires binding of a cytosolic inhibitor complex, IFN-Gamma-Activated Inhibitor of Translation (GAIT, to a specific GAIT element in the Cp 3'-UTR. Here, we describe our studies that define and characterize the GAIT element and elucidate the specific trans-acting proteins that bind the GAIT element. Our experiments describe a new mechanism of translational control of an iron-related protein and may shed light on the role that macrophage-derived Cp plays at the intersection of iron homeostasis and inflammation.

  7. Chloroplast Iron Transport Proteins - Function and Impact on Plant Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Millán, Ana F; Duy, Daniela; Philippar, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated about three billion years ago by endosymbiosis of an ancestor of today's cyanobacteria with a mitochondria-containing host cell. During evolution chloroplasts of higher plants established as the site for photosynthesis and thus became the basis for all life dependent on oxygen and carbohydrate supply. To fulfill this task, plastid organelles are loaded with the transition metals iron, copper, and manganese, which due to their redox properties are essential for photosynthetic electron transport. In consequence, chloroplasts for example represent the iron-richest system in plant cells. However, improvement of oxygenic photosynthesis in turn required adaptation of metal transport and homeostasis since metal-catalyzed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes oxidative damage. This is most acute in chloroplasts, where radicals and transition metals are side by side and ROS-production is a usual feature of photosynthetic electron transport. Thus, on the one hand when bound by proteins, chloroplast-intrinsic metals are a prerequisite for photoautotrophic life, but on the other hand become toxic when present in their highly reactive, radical generating, free ionic forms. In consequence, transport, storage and cofactor-assembly of metal ions in plastids have to be tightly controlled and are crucial throughout plant growth and development. In the recent years, proteins for iron transport have been isolated from chloroplast envelope membranes. Here, we discuss their putative functions and impact on cellular metal homeostasis as well as photosynthetic performance and plant metabolism. We further consider the potential of proteomic analyses to identify new players in the field.

  8. Treatment of air pollution control residues with iron rich waste sulfuric acid: does it work for antimony (Sb)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkenhaug, Gudny; Breedveld, Gijs D; Kirkeng, Terje; Lægreid, Marit; Mæhlum, Trond; Mulder, Jan

    2013-03-15

    Antimony (Sb) in air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration has gained increased focus due to strict Sb leaching limits set by the EU landfill directive. Here we study the chemical speciation and solubility of Sb at the APC treatment facility NOAH Langøya (Norway), where iron (Fe)-rich sulfuric acid (∼3.6M, 2.3% Fe(II)), a waste product from the industrial extraction of ilmenite, is used for neutralization. Antimony in water extracts of untreated APC residues occurred exclusively as pentavalent antimonate, even at low pH and Eh values. The Sb solubility increased substantially at pH<10, possibly due to the dissolution of ettringite (at alkaline pH) or calcium (Ca)-antimonate. Treated APC residues, stored anoxically in the laboratory, simulating the conditions at the NOAH Langøya landfill, gave rise to decreasing concentrations of Sb in porewater, occurring exclusively as Sb(V). Concentrations of Sb decreased from 87-918μgL(-1) (day 3) to 18-69μgL(-1) (day 600). We hypothesize that an initial sorption of Sb to Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rust) and eventually precipitation of Ca- and Fe-antimonates (tripuhyite; FeSbO4) occurred. We conclude that Fe-rich, sulfuric acid waste is efficient to immobilize Sb in APC residues from waste incineration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Controlling laser-induced magnetization reversal dynamics in a rare-earth iron garnet across the magnetization compensation point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Marwan; Molho, Pierre; Barbara, Bernard; Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2018-04-01

    In this work we explore the ultrafast magnetization dynamics induced by femtosecond laser pulses in a doped film of gadolinium iron garnet over a broad temperature range including the magnetization compensation point TM. By exciting the phonon-assisted 6S→4G and 6S→4P electronic d -d transitions simultaneously by one- and two-photon absorption processes, we find out that the transfer of heat energy from the lattice to the spin has, at a temperature slightly below TM, a large influence on the magnetization dynamics. In particular, we show that the speed and the amplitude of the magnetization dynamics can be strongly increased when increasing either the external magnetic field or the laser energy density. The obtained results are explained by a magnetization reversal process across TM. Furthermore, we find that the dynamics has unusual characteristics which can be understood by considering the weak spin-phonon coupling in magnetic garnets. These results open new perspectives for controlling the magnetic state of magnetic dielectrics using an ultrashort optically induced heat pulse.

  10. Dynamic thiol/disulfide homeostasis and effects of smoking on homeostasis parameters in patients with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emre, Selma; Demirseren, Duriye Deniz; Alisik, Murat; Aktas, Akin; Neselioglu, Salim; Erel, Ozcan

    2017-12-01

    Recently, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced antioxidant capacity, and oxidative stress have been suggested in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. The aim of this study to evaluate the thiol/disulfide homeostasis in patients with psoriasis. Ninety patients with psoriasis who did not receive any systemic treatment in the last six  months were included in the study. Seventy-six age and gender-matched healthy volunteers served as control group. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis was measured in venous blood samples obtained from patient and control groups. Native thiol and total thiol levels were significantly higher in patients than in control group. When thiol/disulfide hemostasis parameters and clinical and demographic characteristics were compared, a negative correlation was detected between native thiol and total thiol with age. The levels of total thiols had also negative correlation with PASI and duration of the disease. When we divided the patients into smokers and non-smokers, native thiol and total thiol levels were significantly higher in smokers than in controls, whereas native thiol and total thiol levels were comparable in non-smoker patients and controls. Thiol/disulfide balance shifted towards thiol in psoriasis patients and this may be responsible for increased keratinocyte proliferation in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  11. pH controls over methanogenesis and iron reduction along soil depth profile in Arctic tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Gu, B.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Graham, D. E.

    2017-12-01

    Increasing soil temperature in the Arctic is expected to accelerate rates of soil organic matter decomposition. However, the magnitude of this impact is uncertain due to the many physical, chemical, and biological processes that control the decomposition pathways. Varying soil redox conditions present a key control over pathways of organic matter decomposition by diverting the flow of reductants among different electron accepting processes and further driving acid-base reactions that alter soil pH. In this study we investigated the pH controls over anaerobic carbon mineralization, methanogenesis, Fe(III) reduction and the interplay between these processes across a range of pH and redox conditions. pH manipulation experiments were conducted by incubating soils representing organic, mineral, cryoturbated transitional layers and permafrost. In the experiments we sought to understand (1) if methanogenesis or Fe(III) reduction had similar pH optima; (2) if this pH response also occurs at `upstream' fermentation process; and (3) if pH alters organo-mineral association or organic matter sorption and desorption and its availability for microbial degradation. Our preliminary results suggest that the common bell-shaped pH response curve provides a good fit for both Fe(III) reduction and methanogenesis, with optimum pH at 6.0-7.0. Exceptions to this were found in transitional layer where methanogenesis rates positively correlated with increasing pH, with maximum rates measured at pH 8.5. It is likely that the transitional layer harbors distinct groups of methanogens that prefer a high pH. Variations in the optimum pH of Fe(III) reduction and methanogenesis may play a significant role in regulating organic matter decomposition pathways and thus greenhouse gas production in thawing soils. These results support biogeochemical modeling efforts to accurately simulate organic matter decomposition under changing redox and pH conditions.

  12. Salt stress induced ion accumulation, ion homeostasis, membrane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salt stress induced ion accumulation, ion homeostasis, membrane injury and sugar contents in salt-sensitive rice ( Oryza sativa L. spp. indica ) roots under isoosmotic conditions. ... The accumulation of sugars in PT1 roots may be a primary salt-defense mechanism and may function as an osmotic control. Key words: ...

  13. TRPV5, the gateway to Ca2+ homeostasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Ca2+ homeostasis in the body is tightly controlled, and is a balance between absorption in the intestine, excretion via the urine, and exchange from bone. Recently, the epithelial Ca2+ channel (TRPV5) has been identified as the gene responsible for the Ca2+ influx in epithelial cells of the renal

  14. Treg cell-IgA axis in maintenance of host immune homeostasis with microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Ting; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2010-01-01

    The intestine is the home to a vast diversity of microbiota and a complex of mucosal immune system. Multiple regulatory mechanisms control host immune responses to microbiota and maintain intestinal immune homeostasis. This mini review will provide evidence indicating a Treg cell-IgA axis and such axis playing a major role in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis.

  15. Peculiarities of plasma homeostasis in the patients with rectal cancer according to laser correlation spectroscopy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byilenko, O.A.; Bazhora, Yu.Yi.; Sokolov, V.M.; Andronov, D.Yu.

    1997-01-01

    Laser correlation spectroscopy was used to investigate plasma homeostasis in 82 patients with rectal cancer. The spectra of the blood plasma from 21 donors of the transfusion station were used as the control. The blood plasma homeostasis changes reheated with laser correlation spectrometry in the patients with rectal cancer allow to use them for diagnosis of this pathology

  16. Alkali metal control over N-N cleavage in iron complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubel, Katarzyna; Brennessel, William W; Mercado, Brandon Q; Holland, Patrick L

    2014-12-03

    Though N2 cleavage on K-promoted Fe surfaces is important in the large-scale Haber-Bosch process, there is still ambiguity about the number of Fe atoms involved during the N-N cleaving step and the interactions responsible for the promoting ability of K. This work explores a molecular Fe system for N2 reduction, particularly focusing on the differences in the results obtained using different alkali metals as reductants (Na, K, Rb, Cs). The products of these reactions feature new types of Fe-N2 and Fe-nitride cores. Surprisingly, adding more equivalents of reductant to the system gives a product in which the N-N bond is not cleaved, indicating that the reducing power is not the most important factor that determines the extent of N2 activation. On the other hand, the results suggest that the size of the alkali metal cation can control the number of Fe atoms that can approach N2, which in turn controls the ability to achieve N2 cleavage. The accumulated results indicate that cleaving the triple N-N bond to nitrides is facilitated by simultaneous approach of least three low-valent Fe atoms to a single molecule of N2.

  17. Atypical antipsychotics and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Richard N; Ader, Marilyn

    2005-04-01

    Persistent reports have linked atypical antipsychotics with diabetes, yet causative mechanisms responsible for this linkage are unclear. Goals of this review are to outline the pathogenesis of nonimmune diabetes and to survey the available literature related to why antipsychotics may lead to this disease. We accessed the literature regarding atypical antipsychotics and glucose homeostasis using PubMed. The search included English-language publications from 1990 through October 2004. Keywords used included atypical antipsychotics plus one of the following: glucose, insulin, glucose tolerance, obesity, or diabetes. In addition, we culled information from published abstracts from several national and international scientific meetings for the years 2001 through 2004, including the American Diabetes Association, the International Congress on Schizophrenia Research, and the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. The latter search was necessary because of the paucity of well-controlled prospective studies. We examined publications with significant new data or publications that contributed to the overall comprehension of the impact of atypical antipsychotics on glucose metabolism. We favored original peer-reviewed articles and were less likely to cite single case studies and/or anecdotal information. Approximately 75% of the fewer than 150 identified articles were examined and included in this review. Validity of data was evaluated using the existence of peer-review status as well as our own experience with methodology described in the specific articles. The metabolic profile caused by atypical antipsychotic treatment resembles type 2 diabetes. These agents cause weight gain in treated subjects and may induce obesity in both visceral and subcutaneous depots, as occurs in diabetes. Insulin resistance, usually associated with obesity, occurs to varying degrees with different antipsychotics, although more comparative studies with direct assessment of resistance are

  18. Restoration of growth by manganese in a mutant strain of Escherichia coli lacking most known iron and manganese uptake systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudte, Nadine; German, Nadezhda; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron/manganese-uptake ......The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron...

  19. Brain transcriptome perturbations in the Hfe(-/-) mouse model of genetic iron loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Daniel; Graham, Ross M; Trinder, Debbie; Delima, Roheeth D; Riveros, Carlos; Olynyk, John K; Scott, Rodney J; Moscato, Pablo; Milward, Elizabeth A

    2012-04-11

    Severe disruption of brain iron homeostasis can cause fatal neurodegenerative disease, however debate surrounds the neurologic effects of milder, more common iron loading disorders such as hereditary hemochromatosis, which is usually caused by loss-of-function polymorphisms in the HFE gene. There is evidence from both human and animal studies that HFE gene variants may affect brain function and modify risks of brain disease. To investigate how disruption of HFE influences brain transcript levels, we used microarray and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to assess the brain transcriptome in Hfe(-/-) mice relative to wildtype AKR controls (age 10 weeks, n≥4/group). The Hfe(-/-) mouse brain showed numerous significant changes in transcript levels (pgenes relating to transcriptional regulation (FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene Fos, early growth response genes), neurotransmission (glutamate NMDA receptor Grin1, GABA receptor Gabbr1) and synaptic plasticity and memory (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα Camk2a). As previously reported for dietary iron-supplemented mice, there were altered levels of transcripts for genes linked to neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, a disease characterized by excessive lipofuscin deposition. Labile iron is known to enhance lipofuscin generation which may accelerate brain aging. The findings provide evidence that iron loading disorders can considerably perturb levels of transcripts for genes essential for normal brain function and may help explain some of the neurologic signs and symptoms reported in hemochromatosis patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrated System of Thermal/Dimensional Analysis for Quality Control of Metallic Melt and Ductile Iron Casting Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Stelian; Chisamera, Mihai; Riposan, Iulian; Neacsu, Loredana; Cojocaru, Ana Maria; Stan, Iuliana

    2018-03-01

    The main objective of the present work is to introduce a specific experimental instrument and technique for simultaneously evaluating cooling curves and expansion or contraction of cast metals during solidification. Contraction/expansion analysis illustrates the solidification parameters progression, according to the molten cast iron characteristics, which are dependent on the melting procedure and applied metallurgical treatments, mold media rigidity and thermal behavior [heat transfer parameters]. The first part of the paper summarizes the performance of this two-mold device. Its function is illustrated by representative shrinkage tendency results in ductile cast iron as affected by mold rigidity (green sand and furan resin sand molds) and inoculant type (FeSi-based alloys), published in part previously. The second part of the paper illustrates an application of this equipment adapted for commercial foundry use. It conducts thermal analysis and volume change measurements in a single ceramic cup so that mold media as well as solidification conditions are constants, with cast iron quality as the variable. Experiments compared gray and ductile cast iron solidification patterns. Gray iron castings are characterized by higher undercooling at the beginning and at the end of solidification and lower graphitic expansion. Typically, ductile cast iron exhibits higher graphitic, initial expansion, conducive for shrinkage formation in soft molds.

  1. Iron-related gene variants and brain iron in multiple sclerosis and healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Hagemeier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain iron homeostasis is known to be disturbed in multiple sclerosis (MS, yet little is known about the association of common gene variants linked to iron regulation and pathological tissue changes in the brain. In this study, we investigated the association of genetic determinants linked to iron regulation with deep gray matter (GM magnetic susceptibility in both healthy controls (HC and MS patients. Four hundred (400 patients with MS and 150 age- and sex-matched HCs were enrolled and obtained 3 T MRI examination. Three (3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with iron regulation were genotyped: two SNPs in the human hereditary hemochromatosis protein gene HFE: rs1800562 (C282Y mutation and rs1799945 (H63D mutation, as well as the rs1049296 SNP in the transferrin gene (C2 mutation. The effects of disease and genetic status were studied using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM voxel-based analysis (VBA and region-of-interest (ROI analysis of the deep GM. The general linear model framework was used to compare groups. Analyses were corrected for age and sex, and adjusted for false discovery rate. We found moderate increases in susceptibility in the right putamen of participants with the C282Y (+6.1 ppb and H63D (+6.9 ppb gene variants vs. non-carriers, as well as a decrease in thalamic susceptibility of progressive MS patients with the C282Y mutation (left: −5.3 ppb, right: −6.7 ppb, p < 0.05. Female MS patients had lower susceptibility in the caudate (−6.0 ppb and putamen (left: −3.9 ppb, right: −4.6 ppb than men, but only when they had a wild-type allele (p < 0.05. Iron-gene linked increases in putamen susceptibility (in HC and relapsing remitting MS and decreases in thalamus susceptibility (in progressive MS, coupled with apparent sex interactions, indicate that brain iron in healthy and disease states may be influenced by genetic factors.

  2. Demerit control chart as a decision support tool in quality control of ductile cast-iron casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sika Robert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In many industrial areas the product quality can be unequivocally assigned to classes such as: “good”, “bad” or “to repair”. In case of casting processes, the product is approved to sales considering customer’s requirements. Except for common characteristics, such as structure, compactness and mechanical properties, physical state of the product is also important. This state is assessed by checking occurrence of specific kind of defects. They are often conditionally accepted by a customer if they do not have any influence on functionality of the product (e.g. negative adhesive and cohesive phenomena, fatigue strength, thermal shocks. Authors’ experience shows that current registering of the most frequently occurring defects and comparing them to customers’ requirements can be very useful and help a quality engineer to control the casting process. They suggest using the Demerit Control Chart (DCC, according to authors’ own methodology, in aspect of information about the castings accepted conditionally by a customer (DCC-recognition. DCC-recognition can be used to assess this quality by monitoring the value of just one aggregated measure for all kinds of defects instead of using a single attribute control chart for each of them. The test version of this tool considering severity of defects proved to be useful in one of the European foundries.

  3. Decreased serum hepcidin, inflammation, and improved functional iron status six-months post-restrictive bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excess adiposity is associated with low-grade inflammation and decreased iron status. Iron depletion (ID) in obesity is thought to be mediated by an inflammation-induced increase in the body’s main regulator of iron homeostasis, hepcidin. Elevated hepcidin can result in ID as it prevents the release...

  4. Serum hepcidin is significantly associated with iron absorption from food and supplemental sources in healthy young woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepcidin is a key regulator of iron homeostasis, but to date no studies have examined the effect of hepcidin on iron absorption in humans. Our objective was to assess relations between both serum hepcidin and serum prohepcidin with nonheme-iron absorption in the presence and absence of food with the...

  5. In a Randomized Controlled Trial of Iron Fortification, Anthelmintic Treatment, and Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria for Anemia Control in Ivorian Children, only Anthelmintic Treatment Shows Modest Benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohner, F.; Zimmermann, M.B.; Amon, R.J.; Vounatsou, P.; Tschannen, A.B.; N'goran, E.K.; Nindjin, C.; Cacou, M.C.; Té-Bonlé, D.; Aka, H.; Sess, D.E.; Utzinger, J.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is common among children in sub-Saharan Africa and its etiology is multifactorial. Likely causes of anemia are low bioavailability of dietary iron, malaria, and helminth infection. In this study, we aimed to assess the effect of iron fortification, intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) of

  6. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  7. Nickel decreases cellular iron level and converts cytosolic aconitase to iron-regulatory protein 1 in A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haobin; Davidson, Todd; Singleton, Steven; Garrick, Michael D.; Costa, Max

    2005-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are well-established carcinogens and are known to initiate a hypoxic response in cells via the stabilization and transactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). This change may be the consequence of nickel's interference with the function of several Fe(II)-dependent enzymes. In this study, the effects of soluble nickel exposure on cellular iron homeostasis were investigated. Nickel treatment decreased both mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitase (c-aconitase) activity in A549 cells. Cytosolic aconitase was converted to iron-regulatory protein 1, a form critical for the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. The increased activity of iron-regulatory protein 1 after nickel exposure stabilized and increased transferrin receptor (Tfr) mRNA and antagonized the iron-induced ferritin light chain protein synthesis. The decrease of aconitase activity after nickel treatment reflected neither direct interference with aconitase function nor obstruction of [4Fe-4S] cluster reconstitution by nickel. Exposure of A549 cells to soluble nickel decreased total cellular iron by about 40%, a decrease that likely caused the observed decrease in aconitase activity and the increase of iron-regulatory protein 1 activity. Iron treatment reversed the effect of nickel on cytosolic aconitase and iron-regulatory protein 1. To assess the mechanism for the observed effects, human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells over expressing divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) were compared to A549 cells expressing only endogenous transporters for inhibition of iron uptake by nickel. The inhibition data suggest that nickel can enter via DMT1 and compete with iron for entry into the cell. This disturbance of cellular iron homeostasis by nickel may have a great impact on the ability of the cell to regulate a variety of cell functions, as well as create a state of hypoxia in cells under normal oxygen tension. These effects may be very important in how nickel exerts phenotypic

  8. [Central nervous system control of energy homeostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machleidt, F; Lehnert, H

    2011-03-01

    The brain is continuously supplied with information about the distribution and amount of energy stores from the body periphery. Endocrine, autonomic and cognitive-hedonic signals are centrally integrated and exert effects on the whole organism via anabolic and catabolic pathways. The adiposity signals insulin and leptin reflect the amount of body fat and are part of a negative feedback mechanism between the periphery and the central nervous system. The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is the most important central nervous structure, which integrates this information. Furthermore, the CNS is able to directly measure and to respond to changes in the concentration of certain nutrients. In order to develop effective therapies for the treatment of disorders of energy balance the further elucidation of these neuro-biological processes is of crucial importance. This article provides an overview of the CNS regulation of metabolism and its underlying molecular mechanisms. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. MFehi adipose tissue macrophages compensate for tissue iron pertubations in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubler, Merla J; Erikson, Keith M; Kennedy, Arion J; Hasty, Alyssa H

    2018-05-16

    Resident adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) play multiple roles to maintain tissue homeostasis, such as removing excess FFAs and regulation of extracellular matrix. The phagocytic nature and oxidative resiliency of macrophages not only allows them to function as innate immune cells but also to respond to specific tissue needs, such as iron homeostasis. MFe hi ATMs are a subtype of resident ATMs that we recently identified to have twice the intracellular iron content as other ATMs and elevated expression of iron handling genes. While studies have demonstrated iron homeostasis is important for adipocyte health, little is known about how MFe hi ATMs may respond to and influence AT iron availability. Two methodologies were used to address this question - dietary iron supplementation and intraperitoneal iron injection. Upon exposure to high dietary iron, MFe hi ATMs accumulated excess iron, while the iron content of MFe lo ATMs and adipocytes remained unchanged. In this model of chronic iron excess, MFe hi ATMs exhibited increased expression of genes involved in iron storage. In the injection model, MFe hi ATMs incorporated high levels of iron and adipocytes were spared iron overload. This acute model of iron overload was associated with increased numbers of MFe hi ATMs; 17% could be attributed to monocyte recruitment and 83% to MFe lo ATM incorporation into the MFe hi pool. The MFe hi ATM population maintained its low inflammatory profile and iron cycling expression profile. These studies expand the field's understanding of ATMs and confirm that they can respond as a tissue iron sink in models of iron overload.

  10. Single Atomic Iron Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Acidic Media: Particle Size Control and Thermal Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hanguang; Hwang, Sooyeon; Wang, Maoyu; Feng, Zhenxing; Karakalos, Stavros; Luo, Langli; Qiao, Zhi; Xie, Xiaohong; Wang, Chongmin; Su, Dong; Shao, Yuyan; Wu, Gang (BNL); (Oregon State U.); (SC); (PNNL); (Buffalo)

    2017-09-26

    It remains a grand challenge to replace platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts with earth-abundant materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media, which is crucial for large-scale deployment of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Here, we report a high-performance atomic Fe catalyst derived from chemically Fe-doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) by directly bonding Fe ions to imidazolate ligands within 3D frameworks. Although the ZIF was identified as a promising precursor, the new synthetic chemistry enables the creation of well-dispersed atomic Fe sites embedded into porous carbon without the formation of aggregates. The size of catalyst particles is tunable through synthesizing Fe-doped ZIF nanocrystal precursors in a wide range from 20 to 1000 nm followed by one-step thermal activation. Similar to Pt nanoparticles, the unique size control without altering chemical properties afforded by this approach is able to increase the number of PGM-free active sites. The best ORR activity is measured with the catalyst at a size of 50 nm. Further size reduction to 20 nm leads to significant particle agglomeration, thus decreasing the activity. Using the homogeneous atomic Fe model catalysts, we elucidated the active site formation process through correlating measured ORR activity with the change of chemical bonds in precursors during thermal activation up to 1100 °C. The critical temperature to form active sites is 800 °C, which is associated with a new Fe species with a reduced oxidation number (from Fe3+ to Fe2+) likely bonded with pyridinic N (FeN4) embedded into the carbon planes. Further increasing the temperature leads to continuously enhanced activity, linked to the rise of graphitic N and Fe–N species. The new atomic Fe catalyst has achieved respectable ORR activity in challenging acidic media (0.5 M H2SO4), showing a half-wave potential of 0.85 V vs RHE and leaving only a 30 mV gap with Pt/C (60 μgPt/cm2). Enhanced stability

  11. Mitochondrial redox biology and homeostasis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noctor, Graham; De Paepe, Rosine; Foyer, Christine H

    2007-03-01

    Mitochondria are key players in plant cell redox homeostasis and signalling. Earlier concepts that regarded mitochondria as secondary to chloroplasts as the powerhouses of photosynthetic cells, with roles in cell proliferation, death and ageing described largely by analogy to animal paradigms, have been replaced by the new philosophy of integrated cellular energy and redox metabolism involving mitochondria and chloroplasts. Thanks to oxygenic photosynthesis, plant mitochondria often operate in an oxygen- and carbohydrate-rich environment. This rather unique environment necessitates extensive flexibility in electron transport pathways and associated NAD(P)-linked enzymes. In this review, mitochondrial redox metabolism is discussed in relation to the integrated cellular energy and redox function that controls plant cell biology and fate.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  13. Hepcidin: A Critical Regulator of Iron Metabolism during Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korry J. Hintze

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron status affects cognitive and physical performance in humans. Recent evidence indicates that iron balance is a tightly regulated process affected by a series of factors other than diet, to include hypoxia. Hypoxia has profound effects on iron absorption and results in increased iron acquisition and erythropoiesis when humans move from sea level to altitude. The effects of hypoxia on iron balance have been attributed to hepcidin, a central regulator of iron homeostasis. This paper will focus on the molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia affects hepcidin expression, to include a review of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF/hypoxia response element (HRE system, as well as recent evidence indicating that localized adipose hypoxia due to obesity may affect hepcidin signaling and organismal iron metabolism.

  14. Salinomycin kills cancer stem cells by sequestering iron in lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Trang Thi; Hamaï, Ahmed; Hienzsch, Antje; Cañeque, Tatiana; Müller, Sebastian; Wicinski, Julien; Cabaud, Olivier; Leroy, Christine; David, Amandine; Acevedo, Verónica; Ryo, Akihide; Ginestier, Christophe; Birnbaum, Daniel; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Codogno, Patrice; Mehrpour, Maryam; Rodriguez, Raphaël

    2017-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subset of cells within tumours that exhibit self-renewal properties and the capacity to seed tumours. CSCs are typically refractory to conventional treatments and have been associated to metastasis and relapse. Salinomycin operates as a selective agent against CSCs through mechanisms that remain elusive. Here, we provide evidence that a synthetic derivative of salinomycin, which we named ironomycin (AM5), exhibits a more potent and selective activity against breast CSCs in vitro and in vivo, by accumulating and sequestering iron in lysosomes. In response to the ensuing cytoplasmic depletion of iron, cells triggered the degradation of ferritin in lysosomes, leading to further iron loading in this organelle. Iron-mediated production of reactive oxygen species promoted lysosomal membrane permeabilization, activating a cell death pathway consistent with ferroptosis. These findings reveal the prevalence of iron homeostasis in breast CSCs, pointing towards iron and iron-mediated processes as potential targets against these cells.

  15. Hepcidin Plays a Key Role in 6-OHDA Induced Iron Overload and Apoptotic Cell Death in a Cell Culture Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Elevated brain iron levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, the precise mechanism underlying abnormal iron accumulation in PD is not clear. Hepcidin, a hormone primarily produced by hepatocytes, acts as a key regulator in both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis. Objective. We investigated the role of hepcidin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA induced apoptosis in a cell culture model of PD. Methods. We downregulated hepcidin using siRNA interference in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells and made a comparison with control siRNA transfected cells to investigate the role of hepcidin in 6-OHDA induced neurodegeneration. Results. Hepcidin knockdown (32.3%, P<0.0001 upregulated ferroportin 1 expression and significantly (P<0.05 decreased intracellular iron by 25%. Hepcidin knockdown also reduced 6-OHDA induced caspase-3 activity by 42% (P<0.05 and DNA fragmentation by 29% (P=0.086 and increased cell viability by 22% (P<0.05. In addition, hepcidin knockdown significantly attenuated 6-OHDA induced protein carbonyls by 52% (P<0.05 and intracellular iron by 28% (P<0.01, indicating the role of hepcidin in oxidative stress. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that hepcidin knockdown protected N27 cells from 6-OHDA induced apoptosis and that hepcidin plays a major role in reducing cellular iron burden and oxidative damage by possibly regulating cellular iron export mediated by ferroportin 1.

  16. Metal Homeostasis Regulators Suppress FRDA Phenotypes in a Drosophila Model of the Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirena Soriano

    Full Text Available Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA, the most commonly inherited ataxia in populations of European origin, is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a decrease in frataxin levels. One of the hallmarks of the disease is the accumulation of iron in several tissues including the brain, and frataxin has been proposed to play a key role in iron homeostasis. We found that the levels of zinc, copper, manganese and aluminum were also increased in a Drosophila model of FRDA, and that copper and zinc chelation improve their impaired motor performance. By means of a candidate genetic screen, we identified that genes implicated in iron, zinc and copper transport and metal detoxification can restore frataxin deficiency-induced phenotypes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the metal dysregulation in FRDA includes other metals besides iron, therefore providing a new set of potential therapeutic targets.

  17. Shoot to root communication is necessary to control the expression of iron-acquisition genes in Strategy I plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, María J; Romera, Francisco J; Stacey, Minviluz G; Stacey, Gary; Villar, Eduardo; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Previous research showed that auxin, ethylene, and nitric oxide (NO) can activate the expression of iron (Fe)-acquisition genes in the roots of Strategy I plants grown with low levels of Fe, but not in plants grown with high levels of Fe. However, it is still an open question as to how Fe acts as an inhibitor and which pool of Fe (e.g., root, phloem, etc.) in the plant acts as the key regulator for gene expression control. To further clarify this, we studied the effect of the foliar application of Fe on the expression of Fe-acquisition genes in several Strategy I plants, including wild-type cultivars of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh], pea [Pisum sativum L.], tomato [Solanum lycopersicon Mill.], and cucumber [Cucumis sativus L.], as well as mutants showing constitutive expression of Fe-acquisition genes when grown under Fe-sufficient conditions [Arabidopsis opt3-2 and frd3-3, pea dgl and brz, and tomato chln (chloronerva)]. The results showed that the foliar application of Fe blocked the expression of Fe-acquisition genes in the wild-type cultivars and in the frd3-3, brz, and chln mutants, but not in the opt3-2 and dgl mutants, probably affected in the transport of a Fe-related repressive signal in the phloem. Moreover, the addition of either ACC (ethylene precursor) or GSNO (NO donor) to Fe-deficient plants up-regulated the expression of Fe-acquisition genes, but this effect did not occur in Fe-deficient plants sprayed with foliar Fe, again suggesting the existence of a Fe-related repressive signal moving from leaves to roots.

  18. Brain iron overload, insulin resistance, and cognitive performance in obese subjects: a preliminary MRI case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Gerard; Puig, Josep; Daunis-I-Estadella, Josep; Molina, Xavier; Xifra, Gemma; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Pedraza, Salvador; Ricart, Wifredo; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2014-11-01

    The linkage among the tissue iron stores, insulin resistance (IR), and cognition remains unclear in the obese population. We aimed to identify the factors that contribute to increased hepatic iron concentration (HIC) and brain iron overload (BIO), as evaluated by MRI, and to evaluate their impact on cognitive performance in obese and nonobese subjects. We prospectively recruited 23 middle-aged obese subjects without diabetes (13 women; age 50.4 ± 7.7 years; BMI 43.7 ± 4.48 kg/m2) and 20 healthy nonobese volunteers (10 women; age 48.8 ± 9.5 years; BMI 24.3 ± 3.54 kg/m2) in whom iron load was assessed in white and gray matter and the liver by MRI. IR was measured from HOMA-IR and an oral glucose tolerance test. A battery of neuropsychological tests was used to evaluate the cognitive performance. Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify the independent associations of BIO and cognitive performance. A significant increase in iron load was detected at the caudate nucleus (P cognitive performance. Obesity and IR may contribute to increased HIC and BIO being associated with worse cognitive performance. BIO could be a potentially useful MRI biomarker for IR and obesity-associated cognitive dysfunction. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. Iron phthalocyanine supported on amidoximated PAN fiber as effective catalyst for controllable hydrogen peroxide activation in oxidizing organic dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Zhenbang; Han, Xu; Zhao, Xiaoming; Yu, Jiantao; Xu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Iron(II) phthalocyanine was immobilized onto amidoximated polyacrylonitrile fiber to construct a bioinspired catalytic system for oxidizing organic dyes by H 2 O 2 activation. The amidoxime groups greatly helped to anchor Iron(II) phthalocyanine molecules onto the fiber through coordination interaction, which has been confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV diffuse reflectance spectroscopy analyses. Electron spin resonance studies indicate that the catalytic process of physically anchored Iron(II) phthalocyanine performed via a hydroxyl radical pathway, while the catalyst bonded Iron(II) phthalocyanine through coordination effect could selectively catalyze the H 2 O 2 decomposition to generate high-valent iron-oxo species. This may result from the amidoxime groups functioning as the axial fifth ligands to favor the heterolytic cleavage of the peroxide O−O bond. This feature also enables the catalyst to only degrade the dyes adjacent to the catalytic active centers and enhances the efficient utilization of H 2 O 2 . In addition, this catalyst could effectively catalyze the mineralization of organic dyes and can be easily recycled without any loss of activity.

  20. Iron phthalocyanine supported on amidoximated PAN fiber as effective catalyst for controllable hydrogen peroxide activation in oxidizing organic dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Zhenbang, E-mail: hzbang@aliyun.com [School of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composite Materials, Ministry of Education of China, Tianjin 300387 (China); Han, Xu [School of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Zhao, Xiaoming, E-mail: zhaoxiaoming@tjpu.edu.cn [School of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composite Materials, Ministry of Education of China, Tianjin 300387 (China); Yu, Jiantao; Xu, Hang [School of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Iron(II) phthalocyanine was immobilized onto amidoximated polyacrylonitrile fiber to construct a bioinspired catalytic system for oxidizing organic dyes by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation. The amidoxime groups greatly helped to anchor Iron(II) phthalocyanine molecules onto the fiber through coordination interaction, which has been confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV diffuse reflectance spectroscopy analyses. Electron spin resonance studies indicate that the catalytic process of physically anchored Iron(II) phthalocyanine performed via a hydroxyl radical pathway, while the catalyst bonded Iron(II) phthalocyanine through coordination effect could selectively catalyze the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition to generate high-valent iron-oxo species. This may result from the amidoxime groups functioning as the axial fifth ligands to favor the heterolytic cleavage of the peroxide O−O bond. This feature also enables the catalyst to only degrade the dyes adjacent to the catalytic active centers and enhances the efficient utilization of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. In addition, this catalyst could effectively catalyze the mineralization of organic dyes and can be easily recycled without any loss of activity.

  1. The Process of Nanostructuring of Metal (Iron Matrix in Composite Materials for Directional Control of the Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zemtsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We justified theoretical and experimental bases of synthesis of new class of highly nanostructured composite nanomaterials based on metal matrix with titanium carbide nanowires as dispersed phase. A new combined method for obtaining of metal iron-based composite materials comprising the powder metallurgy processes and the surface design of the dispersed phase is considered. The following stages of material synthesis are investigated: (1 preparation of porous metal matrix; (2 surface structuring of the porous metal matrix by TiC nanowires; (3 pressing and sintering to give solid metal composite nanostructured materials based on iron with TiC nanostructures with size 1–50 nm. This material can be represented as the material type “frame in the frame” that represents iron metal frame reinforcing the frame of different chemical compositions based on TiC. Study of material functional properties showed that the mechanical properties of composite materials based on iron with TiC dispersed phase despite the presence of residual porosity are comparable to the properties of the best grades of steel containing expensive dopants and obtained by molding. This will solve the problem of developing a new generation of nanostructured metal (iron-based materials with improved mechanical properties for the different areas of technology.

  2. Control of intracellular heme levels: Heme transporters and heme oxygenases

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Anwar A.; Quigley, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Heme serves as a co-factor in proteins involved in fundamental biological processes including oxidative metabolism, oxygen storage and transport, signal transduction and drug metabolism. In addition, heme is important for systemic iron homeostasis in mammals. Heme has important regulatory roles in cell biology, yet excessive levels of intracellular heme are toxic; thus, mechanisms have evolved to control the acquisition, synthesis, catabolism and expulsion of cellular heme. Recently, a number...

  3. Enforcement Alert: U.S. EPA Encourages Iron and Steel Minimills to Self Audits to Address Noncompliance with Environmental Requirements; Nucor Corp. agrees to Control Practices; Provides Model for Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the enforcement alert for U.S. EPA Encourages Iron and Steel Minimills to Self Audits to Address Noncompliance with Environmental Requirements; Nucor Corp. agrees to Control Practices; Provides Model for Industry

  4. The expression of selected non-ribosomal peptide synthetases in Aspergillus fumigatus is controlled by the availability of free iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiber, Kathrin; Reeves, Emer P; Neville, Claire M; Winkler, Robert; Gebhardt, Peter; Kavanagh, Kevin; Doyle, Sean

    2005-07-01

    Three non-ribosomal peptide synthetase genes, termed sidD, sidC and sidE, have been identified in Aspergillus fumigatus. Gene expression analysis by RT-PCR confirms that expression of both sidD and C was reduced by up to 90% under iron-replete conditions indicative of a likely role in siderophore biosynthesis. SidE expression was less sensitive to iron levels. In addition, two proteins purified from mycelia grown under iron-limiting conditions corresponded to SidD ( approximately 200 kDa) and SidC (496 kDa) as determined by MALDI ToF peptide mass fingerprinting and MALDI LIFT-ToF/ToF. Siderophore synthetases are unique in bacteria and fungi and represent an attractive target for antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  5. CHF: circulatory homeostasis gone awry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Karl T; Burlew, Brad S; Davis, Richard C; Newman, Kevin P; D'Cruz, Ivan A; Hawkins, Ralph G; Wall, Barry M; Parker, Robert B

    2002-01-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is integral to salt and water retention, particularly by the kidneys. Over time, positive sodium balance leads first to intra- and then to extravascular volume expansion, with subsequent symptomatic heart failure. This report examines the role of the RAAS in regulating a less well recognized component essential to circulatory homeostasis--central blood volume. The regulation of central blood volume draws on integrative cardiorenal physiology and a key role played by the RAAS in its regulation. In presenting insights into the role of the RAAS in regulating central blood volume, this review also addresses other sodium-retaining states with a predisposition to edema formation, such as cirrhosis and nephrosis. (c)2002 CHF, Inc

  6. [Bone homeostasis and Mechano biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Tomoki

    The weight-bearing exercises help to build bones and to maintain them strength. Bone is constantly renewed by the balanced action of osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption both of which mainly occur at the bone surface. This restructuring process called "bone remodeling" is important not only for normal bone mass and strength, but also for mineral homeostasis. Bone remodeling is stringently regulated by communication between bone component cells such as osteoclasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes. An imbalance of this process is often linked to various bone diseases. During bone remodeling, resorption by osteoclasts precedes bone formation by osteoblasts. Based on the osteocyte location within the bone matrix and the cellular morphology, it is proposed that osteocytes potentially contribute to the regulation of bone remodeling in response to mechanical and endocrine stimuli.

  7. Impact of Multi-Micronutrient Fortified Rice on Hemoglobin, Iron and Vitamin A Status of Cambodian Schoolchildren: a Double-Blind Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlène Perignon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Cambodia, micronutrient deficiencies remain a critical public health problem. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of multi-micronutrient fortified rice (MMFR formulations, distributed through a World Food Program school-meals program (WFP-SMP, on the hemoglobin concentrations and iron and vitamin A (VA status of Cambodian schoolchildren. The FORISCA-UltraRice+NutriRice study was a double-blind, cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Sixteen schools participating in WFP-SMP were randomly assigned to receive extrusion-fortified rice (UltraRice Original, UltraRice New (URN, or NutriRice or unfortified rice (placebo six days a week for six months. Four additional schools not participating in WFP-SMP were randomly selected as controls. A total of 2440 schoolchildren (6–16 years old participated in the biochemical study. Hemoglobin, iron status, estimated using inflammation-adjusted ferritin and transferrin receptors concentrations, and VA status, assessed using inflammation-adjusted retinol-binding protein concentration, were measured at the baseline, as well as at three and six months. Baseline prevalence of anemia, depleted iron stores, tissue iron deficiency, marginal VA status and VA deficiency were 15.6%, 1.4%, 51.0%, 7.9%, and 0.7%, respectively. The strongest risk factors for anemia were hemoglobinopathy, VA deficiency, and depleted iron stores (all p < 0.01. After six months, children receiving NutriRice and URN had 4 and 5 times less risk of low VA status, respectively, in comparison to the placebo group. Hemoglobin significantly increased (+0.8 g/L after three months for the URN group in comparison to the placebo group; however, this difference was no longer significant after six months, except for children without inflammation. MMFR containing VA effectively improved the VA status of schoolchildren. The impact on hemoglobin and iron status was limited, partly by sub-clinical inflammation. MMFR combined with non

  8. The role of siderophores in metal homeostasis of members of the genus Burkholderia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Anugraha; Jenul, Christian; Carlier, Aurelien L; Eberl, Leo

    2016-02-01

    Although members of the genus Burkholderia can utilize a high-affinity iron uptake system to sustain growth under iron-limiting conditions, many strains also produce siderophores, suggesting that they may serve alternative functions. Here we demonstrate that the two Burkholderia siderophores pyochelin and ornibactin can protect the cells from metal toxicity and thus play an alternative role in metal homeostasis. We also demonstrate that metals such as copper and zinc induce the production of ornibactin. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Facing the challenges of Cu, Fe and Zn homeostasis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Christine M; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2009-05-01

    Plants have recently moved into the spotlight owing to the growing realization that the world needs solutions to energy and food production that are sustainable and environmentally sound. Iron, copper and zinc are essential for plant growth and development, yet the same properties that make these transition metals indispensable can also make them deadly in excess. Iron and copper are most often used for their redox properties, whereas zinc is primarily used for its ability to act as a Lewis acid. Here we review recent advances in the field of metal homeostasis and integrate the findings on uptake and transport of these three metals.

  10. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taifeng Zhuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iron supplements (e.g., 10× RDA or more for oral supplements or direct iron supplementation via injection or addition to the cell culture medium for a short or long duration will induce DNA damage. Higher heme-iron intake or iron status measured by various biomarkers, especially serum ferritin, might contribute to greater risk of gestational diabetes, which may be mediated by iron oxidative stress though lipid oxidation and/or DNA damage. However, information is lacking about the effect of low dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily on lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and gestational diabetes. Randomized trials of low-dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily for pregnant women are warranted to test the relationship between iron oxidative stress and insulin resistance/gestational diabetes, especially for iron-replete women.

  11. An investigation of air emission levels from distinct iron and steel production processes with the adoption of pollution control and pollution prevention alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.M.; Schaeffer, R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate environmental aspects from different iron and steel production processes. A methodology based on material flows is developed in order to verify some air emission levels attained by Pollution Control and Pollution Prevention alternatives. The data basis for modeling energy and materials flows in iron and steel production is obtained from a literature review on different technological processes, energy and materials consumption and pollutant releases to the environmental Modeling combines both process analysis and input-output techniques to simulate the different iron and steel production routes and to estimate the resulting total atmospheric pollution releases based on air emission factors for several pollutants by each production step. Processes examined include: (1) Conventional Integrated (100% ore-based and partly scrap-based); (2) Mini-mill with EAF (100% scrap-based and partly DRI-based); and (3) New Integrated based on the COREX smelting reduction process. Among the alternatives considered for air emissions reductions are those related to Pollution Control (mainly gas cleaning systems) and to Pollution Prevention (change/reduction in input materials, operational procedures and housekeeping improvements, on-site recycling and technology innovations and modifications). Results indicate higher air pollution intensity for the Conventional Integrated Route over the Mini-mill with EAF and COREX smelting reduction processes, though pointing out that final figures are strongly affected by the systems' boundaries and the different air emission levels of each production step

  12. Hamp1 mRNA and plasma hepcid