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Sample records for controls iron homeostasis

  1. Control of bacterial iron homeostasis by manganese

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    Puri, Sumant; Hohle, Thomas H.; O'Brian, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Perception and response to nutritional iron availability by bacteria are essential to control cellular iron homeostasis. The Irr protein from Bradyrhizobium japonicum senses iron through the status of heme biosynthesis to globally regulate iron-dependent gene expression. Heme binds directly to Irr to trigger its degradation. Here, we show that severe manganese limitation created by growth of a Mn2+ transport mutant in manganese-limited media resulted in a cellular iron deficiency. In wild-type cells, Irr levels were attenuated under manganese limitation, resulting in reduced promoter occupancy of target genes and altered iron-dependent gene expression. Irr levels were high regardless of manganese availability in a heme-deficient mutant, indicating that manganese normally affects heme-dependent degradation of Irr. Manganese altered the secondary structure of Irr in vitro and inhibited binding of heme to the protein. We propose that manganese limitation destabilizes Irr under low-iron conditions by lowering the threshold of heme that can trigger Irr degradation. The findings implicate a mechanism for the control of iron homeostasis by manganese in a bacterium. PMID:20498065

  2. The Organization of Controller Motifs Leading to Robust Plant Iron Homeostasis.

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    Oleg Agafonov

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential element needed by all organisms for growth and development. Because iron becomes toxic at higher concentrations iron is under homeostatic control. Plants face also the problem that iron in the soil is tightly bound to oxygen and difficult to access. Plants have therefore developed special mechanisms for iron uptake and regulation. During the last years key components of plant iron regulation have been identified. How these components integrate and maintain robust iron homeostasis is presently not well understood. Here we use a computational approach to identify mechanisms for robust iron homeostasis in non-graminaceous plants. In comparison with experimental results certain control arrangements can be eliminated, among them that iron homeostasis is solely based on an iron-dependent degradation of the transporter IRT1. Recent IRT1 overexpression experiments suggested that IRT1-degradation is iron-independent. This suggestion appears to be misleading. We show that iron signaling pathways under IRT1 overexpression conditions become saturated, leading to a breakdown in iron regulation and to the observed iron-independent degradation of IRT1. A model, which complies with experimental data places the regulation of cytosolic iron at the transcript level of the transcription factor FIT. Including the experimental observation that FIT induces inhibition of IRT1 turnover we found a significant improvement in the system's response time, suggesting a functional role for the FIT-mediated inhibition of IRT1 degradation. By combining iron uptake with storage and remobilization mechanisms a model is obtained which in a concerted manner integrates iron uptake, storage and remobilization. In agreement with experiments the model does not store iron during its high-affinity uptake. As an iron biofortification approach we discuss the possibility how iron can be accumulated even during high-affinity uptake.

  3. A multi-scale model of hepcidin promoter regulation reveals factors controlling systemic iron homeostasis.

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    Guillem Casanovas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic iron homeostasis involves a negative feedback circuit in which the expression level of the peptide hormone hepcidin depends on and controls the iron blood levels. Hepcidin expression is regulated by the BMP6/SMAD and IL6/STAT signaling cascades. Deregulation of either pathway causes iron-related diseases such as hemochromatosis or anemia of inflammation. We quantitatively analyzed how BMP6 and IL6 control hepcidin expression. Transcription factor (TF phosphorylation and reporter gene expression were measured under co-stimulation conditions, and the promoter was perturbed by mutagenesis. Using mathematical modeling, we systematically analyzed potential mechanisms of cooperative and competitive promoter regulation by the transcription factors, and experimentally validated the model predictions. Our results reveal that hepcidin cross-regulation primarily occurs by combinatorial transcription factor binding to the promoter, whereas signaling crosstalk is insignificant. We find that the presence of two BMP-responsive elements enhances the steepness of the promoter response towards the iron-sensing BMP signaling axis, which promotes iron homeostasis in vivo. IL6 co-stimulation reduces the promoter sensitivity towards the BMP signal, because the SMAD and STAT transcription factors compete for recruiting RNA polymerase to the transcription start site. This may explain why inflammatory signals disturb iron homeostasis in anemia of inflammation. Taken together, our results reveal why the iron homeostasis circuit is sensitive to perturbations implicated in disease.

  4. Angiocrine Bmp2 signaling in murine liver controls normal iron homeostasis.

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    Koch, Philipp-Sebastian; Olsavszky, Victor; Ulbrich, Friederike; Sticht, Carsten; Demory, Alexandra; Leibing, Thomas; Henzler, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Zierow, Johanna; Schneider, Sven; Breitkopf-Heinlein, Katja; Gaitantzi, Haristi; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Arnold, Bernd; Klapproth, Kay; Schledzewski, Kai; Goerdt, Sergij; Géraud, Cyrill

    2017-01-26

    Microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) display a high degree of phenotypic and functional heterogeneity among different organs. Organ-specific ECs control their tissue microenvironment by angiocrine factors in health and disease. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are uniquely differentiated to fulfill important organ-specific functions in development, under homeostatic conditions, and in regeneration and liver pathology. Recently, Bmp2 has been identified by us as an organ-specific angiokine derived from LSECs. To study angiocrine Bmp2 signaling in the liver, we conditionally deleted Bmp2 in LSECs using EC subtype-specific Stab2-Cre mice. Genetic inactivation of hepatic angiocrine Bmp2 signaling in Stab2-Cre;Bmp2(fl/fl) (Bmp2(LSECKO)) mice caused massive iron overload in the liver and increased serum iron levels and iron deposition in several organs similar to classic hereditary hemochromatosis. Iron overload was mediated by decreased hepatic expression of hepcidin, a key regulator of iron homeostasis. Thus, angiocrine Bmp2 signaling within the hepatic vascular niche represents a constitutive pathway indispensable for iron homeostasis in vivo that is nonredundant with Bmp6. Notably, we demonstrate that organ-specific angiocrine signaling is essential not only for the homeostasis of the respective organ but also for the homeostasis of the whole organism.

  5. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  6. Brain iron homeostasis.

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    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    Iron is essential for virtually all types of cells and organisms. The significance of the iron for brain function is reflected by the presence of receptors for transferrin on brain capillary endothelial cells. The transport of iron into the brain from the circulation is regulated so that the extraction of iron by brain capillary endothelial cells is low in iron-replete conditions and the reverse when the iron need of the brain is high as in conditions with iron deficiency and during development of the brain. Whereas there is good agreement that iron is taken up by means of receptor-mediated uptake of iron-transferrin at the brain barriers, there are contradictory views on how iron is transported further on from the brain barriers and into the brain extracellular space. The prevailing hypothesis for transport of iron across the BBB suggests a mechanism that involves detachment of iron from transferrin within barrier cells followed by recycling of apo-transferrin to blood plasma and release of iron as non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain interstitium from where the iron is taken up by neurons and glial cells. Another hypothesis claims that iron-transferrin is transported into the brain by means of transcytosis through the BBB. This thesis deals with the topic "brain iron homeostasis" defined as the attempts to maintain constant concentrations of iron in the brain internal environment via regulation of iron transport through brain barriers, cellular iron uptake by neurons and glia, and export of iron from brain to blood. The first part deals with transport of iron-transferrin complexes from blood to brain either by transport across the brain barriers or by uptake and retrograde axonal transport in motor neurons projecting beyond the blood-brain barrier. The transport of iron and transport into the brain was examined using radiolabeled iron-transferrin. Intravenous injection of [59Fe-125]transferrin led to an almost two-fold higher accumulation of 59Fe than of

  7. Iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a case-control study

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    Roggli Victor L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung injury caused by both inhaled dusts and infectious agents depends on increased availability of iron and metal-catalyzed oxidative stress. Because inhaled particles, such as silica, and certain infections can cause secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP, we tested the hypothesis that idiopathic PAP is associated with an altered iron homeostasis in the human lung. Methods Healthy volunteers (n = 20 and patients with idiopathic PAP (n = 20 underwent bronchoalveolar lavage and measurements were made of total protein, iron, tranferrin, transferrin receptor, lactoferrin, and ferritin. Histochemical staining for iron and ferritin was done in the cell pellets from control subjects and PAP patients, and in lung specimens of patients without cardiopulmonary disease and with PAP. Lavage concentrations of urate, glutathione, and ascorbate were also measured as indices of oxidative stress. Results Lavage concentrations of iron, transferrin, transferrin receptor, lactoferrin, and ferritin were significantly elevated in PAP patients relative to healthy volunteers. The cells of PAP patients had accumulated significant iron and ferritin, as well as considerable amounts of extracellular ferritin. Immunohistochemistry for ferritin in lung tissue revealed comparable amounts of this metal-storage protein in the lower respiratory tract of PAP patients both intracellularly and extracellularly. Lavage concentrations of ascorbate, glutathione, and urate were significantly lower in the lavage fluid of the PAP patients. Conclusion Iron homeostasis is altered in the lungs of patients with idiopathic PAP, as large amounts of catalytically-active iron and low molecular weight anti-oxidant depletion are present. These findings suggest a metal-catalyzed oxidative stress in the maintenance of this disease.

  8. The Regulation of Iron Absorption and Homeostasis

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    Wallace, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential element in biology, required for numerous cellular processes. Either too much or too little iron can be detrimental, and organisms have developed mechanisms for balancing iron within safe limits. In mammals there are no controlled mechanisms for the excretion of excess iron, hence body iron homeostasis is regulated at the sites of absorption, utilisation and recycling. This review will discuss the discoveries that have been made in the past 20 years into advancing our understanding of iron homeostasis and its regulation. The study of iron-associated disorders, such as the iron overload condition hereditary haemochromatosis and various forms of anaemia have been instrumental in increasing our knowledge in this area, as have cellular and animal model studies. The liver has emerged as the major site of systemic iron regulation, being the location where the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin is produced. Hepcidin is a negative regulator of iron absorption and recycling, achieving this by binding to the only known cellular iron exporter ferroportin and causing its internalisation and degradation, thereby reducing iron efflux from target cells and reducing serum iron levels. Much of the research in the iron metabolism field has focussed on the regulation of hepcidin and its interaction with ferroportin. The advances in this area have greatly increased our knowledge of iron metabolism and its regulation and have led to the development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for iron-associated disorders.

  9. Iron homeostasis: new players, newer insights.

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    Edison, Eunice S; Bajel, Ashish; Chandy, Mammen

    2008-12-01

    Although iron is a relatively abundant element in the universe, it is estimated that more than 2 billion people worldwide suffer from iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency results in impaired production of iron-containing proteins, the most prominent of which is hemoglobin. Cellular iron deficiency inhibits cell growth and subsequently leads to cell death. Hemochromatosis, an inherited disorder results in disproportionate absorption of iron and the extra iron builds up in tissues resulting in organ damage. As both iron deficiency and iron overload have adverse effects, cellular and systemic iron homeostasis is critically important. Recent advances in the field of iron metabolism have led to newer understanding of the pathways involved in iron homeostasis and the diseases which arise from alteration in the regulators. Although insight into this complex regulation of the proteins involved in iron homeostasis has been obtained mainly through animal studies, it is most likely that this knowledge can be directly extrapolated to humans.

  10. Air pollution particles and iron homeostasis

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    Background: The mechanism underlying biological effects of particles deposited in the lung has not been defined. Major Conclusions: A disruption in iron homeostasis follows exposure of cells to all particulate matter including air pollution particles. Following endocytosis, fun...

  11. Air pollution particles and iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The mechanism underlying biological effects of particles deposited in the lung has not been defined. Major Conclusions: A disruption in iron homeostasis follows exposure of cells to all particulate matter including air pollution particles. Following endocytosis, fun...

  12. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss and Polymorphisms in Iron Homeostasis Genes: New Insights from a Case-Control Study

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    Alessandro Castiglione

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Even if various pathophysiological events have been proposed as explanations, the putative cause of sudden hearing loss remains unclear. Objectives. To investigate and to reveal associations (if any between the main iron-related gene variants and idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Study Design. Case-control study. Materials and Methods. A total of 200 sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients (median age 63.65 years; range 10–92 were compared with 400 healthy control subjects. The following genetic variants were investigated: the polymorphism c.−8CG in the promoter of the ferroportin gene (FPN1; SLC40A1, the two isoforms C1 and C2 (p.P570S of the transferrin protein (TF, the amino acidic substitutions p.H63D and p.C282Y in the hereditary hemochromatosis protein (HFE, and the polymorphism c.–582AG in the promoter of the HEPC gene, which encodes the protein hepcidin (HAMP. Results. The homozygous genotype c.−8GG of the SLC40A1 gene revealed an OR for ISSNHL risk of 4.27 (CI 95%, 2.65–6.89; P=0.001, being overrepresented among cases. Conclusions. Our study indicates that the homozygous genotype FPN1 −8GG was significantly associated with increased risk of developing sudden hearing loss. These findings suggest new research should be conducted in the field of iron homeostasis in the inner ear.

  13. The liver in regulation of iron homeostasis.

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    Rishi, Gautam; Subramaniam, V Nathan

    2017-09-01

    The liver is one of the largest and most functionally diverse organs in the human body. In addition to roles in detoxification of xenobiotics, digestion, synthesis of important plasma proteins, gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, and storage, the liver also plays a significant role in iron homeostasis. Apart from being the storage site for excess body iron, it also plays a vital role in regulating the amount of iron released into the blood by enterocytes and macrophages. Since iron is essential for many important physiological and molecular processes, it increases the importance of liver in the proper functioning of the body's metabolism. This hepatic iron-regulatory function can be attributed to the expression of many liver-specific or liver-enriched proteins, all of which play an important role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. This review focuses on these proteins and their known roles in the regulation of body iron metabolism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Ferritins control interaction between iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Arabidopsis.

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    Ravet, Karl; Touraine, Brigitte; Boucherez, Jossia; Briat, Jean-François; Gaymard, Frédéric; Cellier, Françoise

    2009-02-01

    Ferritin protein nanocages are the main iron store in mammals. They have been predicted to fulfil the same function in plants but direct evidence was lacking. To address this, a loss-of-function approach was developed in Arabidopsis. We present evidence that ferritins do not constitute the major iron pool either in seeds for seedling development or in leaves for proper functioning of the photosynthetic apparatus. Loss of ferritins in vegetative and reproductive organs resulted in sensitivity to excess iron, as shown by reduced growth and strong defects in flower development. Furthermore, the absence of ferritin led to a strong deregulation of expression of several metal transporters genes in the stalk, over-accumulation of iron in reproductive organs, and a decrease in fertility. Finally, we show that, in the absence of ferritin, plants have higher levels of reactive oxygen species, and increased activity of enzymes involved in their detoxification. Seed germination also showed higher sensitivity to pro-oxidant treatments. Arabidopsis ferritins are therefore essential to protect cells against oxidative damage.

  15. Iron Homeostasis in Health and Disease

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    Raffaella Gozzelino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is required for the survival of most organisms, including bacteria, plants, and humans. Its homeostasis in mammals must be fine-tuned to avoid iron deficiency with a reduced oxygen transport and diminished activity of Fe-dependent enzymes, and also iron excess that may catalyze the formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, oxidative stress, and programmed cell death. The advance in understanding the main players and mechanisms involved in iron regulation significantly improved since the discovery of genes responsible for hemochromatosis, the IRE/IRPs machinery, and the hepcidin-ferroportin axis. This review provides an update on the molecular mechanisms regulating cellular and systemic Fe homeostasis and their roles in pathophysiologic conditions that involve alterations of iron metabolism, and provides novel therapeutic strategies to prevent the deleterious effect of its deficiency/overload.

  16. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

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    Yatrik M. Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC.

  17. Air pollution particles and iron homeostasis | Science ...

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    Background: The mechanism underlying biological effects of particles deposited in the lung has not been defined. Major Conclusions: A disruption in iron homeostasis follows exposure of cells to all particulate matter including air pollution particles. Following endocytosis, functional groups at the surface of retained particle complex iron available in the cell. In response to a reduction in concentrations of requisite iron, a functional deficiency can result intracellularly. Superoxide production by the cell exposed to a particle increases ferrireduction which facilitates import of iron with the objective being the reversal of the metal deficiency. Failure to resolve the functional iron deficiency following cell exposure to particles activates kinases and transcription factors resulting in a release of inflammatory mediators and inflammation. Tissue injury is the end product of this disruption in iron homeostasis initiated by the particle exposure. Elevation of available iron to the cell precludes deficiency of the metal and either diminishes or eliminates biological effects.General Significance: Recognition of the pathway for biological effects after particle exposure to involve a functional deficiency of iron suggests novel therapies such as metal supplementation (e.g. inhaled and oral). In addition, the demonstration of a shared mechanism of biological effects allows understanding the common clinical, physiological, and pathological presentation fol

  18. Disruption of iron homeostasis in mesothelial cells after talc pleurodesis.

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    Ghio, Andrew J; Soukup, Joleen M; Dailey, Lisa A; Richards, Judy H; Turi, Jennifer L; Pavlisko, Elizabeth N; Roggli, Victor L

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism for biological effects after exposure to particles is incompletely understood. One postulate proposed to explain biological effects after exposure to particles involves altered iron homeostasis in the host. The fibro-inflammatory properties of mineral oxide particles are exploited therapeutically with the instillation of massive quantities of talc into the pleural space, to provide sclerosis. We tested the postulates that (1) in vitro exposure to talc induces a disruption in iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and a biological effect, and (2) talc pleurodesis in humans alters iron homeostasis. In vitro exposures of both mesothelial and airway epithelial cells to 100 μg/ml talc significantly increased iron importation and concentrations of the storage protein ferritin. Using dichlorodihydrofluorescein, exposure to talc was associated with a time-dependent and concentration-dependent generation of oxidants in both cell types. The expression of proinflammatory mediators was also increased after in vitro exposures of mesothelial and airway epithelial cells to talc. Relative to control lung tissue, lung tissue from patients treated with sclerodesis demonstrated an accumulation of iron and increased expression of iron-related proteins, including ferritin, the importer divalent metal transport-1 and the exporter ferroportin-1. Talc was also observed to translocate to the parenchyma, and changes in iron homeostasis were focally distributed to sites of retention. We conclude that exposure to talc disrupts iron homeostasis, is associated with oxidative stress, and results in a biological effect (i.e., a fibro-inflammatory response). Talc pleurodesis can function as a model of the human response to mineral oxide particle exposure, albeit a massive one.

  19. Iron homeostasis related genes in rice

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    Gross Jeferson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for plants. However, excess iron is toxic, leading to oxidative stress and decreased productivity. Therefore, plants must use finely tuned mechanisms to keep iron homeostasis in each of their organs, tissues, cells and organelles. A few of the genes involved in iron homeostasis in plants have been identified recently, and we used some of their protein sequences as queries to look for corresponding genes in the rice (Oryza sativa genome. We have assigned possible functions to thirty-nine new rice genes. Together with four previously reported sequences, we analyzed a total of forty-three genes belonging to five known protein families: eighteen YS (Yellow Stripe, two FRO (Fe3+-chelate reductase oxidase, thirteen ZIP (Zinc regulated transporter / Iron regulated transporter Protein, eight NRAMP (Natural Resistance - Associated Macrophage Protein, and two Ferritin proteins. The possible cellular localization and number of potential transmembrane domains were evaluated, and phylogenetic analysis performed for each gene family. Annotation of genomic sequences was performed. The presence and number of homologues in each gene family in rice and Arabidopsis is discussed in light of the established iron acquisition strategies used by each one of these two plants.

  20. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

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    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes.

  1. Hepcidin and Iron Homeostasis during Pregnancy

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    Mary Dawn Koenig

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepcidin is the master regulator of systemic iron bioavailability in humans. This review examines primary research articles that assessed hepcidin during pregnancy and postpartum and report its relationship to maternal and infant iron status and birth outcomes; areas for future research are also discussed. A systematic search of the databases Medline and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health returned 16 primary research articles including 10 human and six animal studies. Collectively, the results indicate that hepcidin is lower during pregnancy than in a non-pregnant state, presumably to ensure greater iron bioavailability to the mother and fetus. Pregnant women with undetectable serum hepcidin transferred a greater quantity of maternally ingested iron to their fetus compared to women with detectable hepcidin, indicating that maternal hepcidin in part determines the iron bioavailability to the fetus. However, inflammatory states, including preeclampsia, malaria infection, and obesity were associated with higher hepcidin during pregnancy compared to healthy controls, suggesting that maternal and fetal iron bioavailability could be compromised in such conditions. Future studies should examine the relative contribution of maternal versus fetal hepcidin to the control of placental iron transfer as well as optimizing maternal and fetal iron bioavailability in pregnancies complicated by inflammation.

  2. Targeting Iron Homeostasis in Acute Kidney Injury.

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    Walker, Vyvyca J; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential metal involved in several major cellular processes required to maintain life. Because of iron's ability to cause oxidative damage, its transport, metabolism, and storage is strictly controlled in the body, especially in the small intestine, liver, and kidney. Iron plays a major role in acute kidney injury and has been a target for therapeutic intervention. However, the therapies that have been effective in animal models of acute kidney injury have not been successful in human beings. Targeting iron trafficking via ferritin, ferroportin, or hepcidin may offer new insights. This review focuses on the biology of iron, particularly in the kidney, and its implications in acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Mutual interaction between iron homeostasis and obesity pathogenesis.

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    Nikonorov, Alexandr A; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Tinkov, Alexey A; Skalny, Anatoly V

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is identified as an important medical problem. One of the pathologic conditions observed in obesity is systemic iron deficiency and hypoferremia. Along with a large number of studies indicating disturbed iron homeostasis in obesity, recent data indicate a cause-effect relationship between iron status and obesity-related pathologies. The primary objective of the article is to consider two aspects of the iron-obesity interplay: (1) the mechanisms leading to impaired iron balance, and (2) the pathways of iron participation in obesity-related pathogenesis. While considering disturbance of iron homeostasis in obesity, a number of potential mechanisms of hypoferremia are proposed. At the same time, the inflammation of obesity and obesity-related hepcidin and lipocalin 2 hyperproduction seem to be the most probable reasons of obesity-related hypoferremia. Oversecretion of these proteins leads to iron sequestration in reticuloendothelial system cells. The latter also leads to increased adipose tissue iron content, thus producing preconditions for adverse effects of local iron overload. Being a redox-active metal, iron is capable of inducing oxidative stress as well as endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation and adipose tissue endocrine dysfunction. Iron-mediated mechanisms of toxicity may influence aspects of obesity pathogenesis possibly even leading to obesity aggravation. Thus, a mutual interaction between disturbance in iron homeostasis and obesity pathogenesis is proposed. All sides of this interaction should be considered to design new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of disturbed iron homeostasis in obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Alzheimer's disease therapeutics targeted to the control of amyloid precursor protein translation: maintenance of brain iron homeostasis.

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    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Rogers, Jack T

    2014-04-15

    The neurotoxicity of amyloid beta (Aβ), a major cleavage product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is enhanced by iron, as found in the amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. By contrast, the long-known neuroprotective activity of APP is evident after α-secretase cleavage of the precursor to release sAPPα, and depends on the iron export actions of APP itself. The latter underlie its neurotrophic and protective effects in facilitating the homeostatic actions of ferroportin mediated-iron export. Thus APP-dependent iron export may alleviate oxidative stress by minimizing labile iron thus protecting neurons from iron overload during stroke and hemorrhage. Consistent with this, altered phosphorylation of iron-regulatory protein-1 (IRP1) and its signaling processes play a critical role in modulating APP translation via the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of its transcript. The APP 5'UTR region encodes a functional iron-responsive element (IRE) RNA stem loop that represents a potential target for modulating APP production. Targeted regulation of APP gene expression via the modulation of 5'UTR sequence function represents a novel approach for the potential treatment of AD since altering APP translation can be used to improve both the protective brain iron balance and provide anti-amyloid efficacy. Approved drugs including paroxetine and desferrioxamine and several novel compounds have been identified that suppress abnormal metal-promoted Aβ accumulation with a subset of these acting via APP 5'UTR-dependent mechanisms to modulate APP translation and cleavage to generate the non-toxic sAPPα.

  5. Disruption of iron homeostasis in mesothelial cells following talc pleurodesis

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    The mechanism for biological effect following particle exposure is incompletely understood. One postulate proposed to explain biological effect after particles is an altered iron homeostasis in the host. The fibro-inflammatory properties of particles are exploited therapeutically...

  6. Retinal iron homeostasis in health and disease

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    Delu eSong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for life, but excess iron can be toxic. As a potent free radical creator, iron generates hydroxyl radicals leading to significant oxidative stress. Since iron is not excreted from the body, it accumulates with age in tissues, including the retina, predisposing to age-related oxidative insult. Both hereditary and acquired retinal diseases are associated with increased iron levels. For example, retinal degenerations have been found in hereditary iron overload disorders, like aceruloplasminemia, Friedreich’s ataxia, and pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. Similarly, mice with targeted mutation of the iron exporter ceruloplasmin and its homolog hephaestin showed age-related retinal iron accumulation and retinal degeneration with features resembling human age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Post mortem AMD eyes have increased levels of iron in retina compared to age-matched healthy donors. Iron accumulation in AMD is likely to result, in part, from inflammation, hypoxia, and oxidative stress, all of which can cause iron dysregulation. Fortunately, it has been demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo studies that iron in the retinal pigment epithelium and retina is chelatable. Iron chelation protects photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE in a variety of mouse models. This has therapeutic potential for diminishing iron-induced oxidative damage to prevent or treat AMD.

  7. Disrupted iron homeostasis causes dopaminergic neurodegeneration in mice.

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    Matak, Pavle; Matak, Andrija; Moustafa, Sarah; Aryal, Dipendra K; Benner, Eric J; Wetsel, William; Andrews, Nancy C

    2016-03-29

    Disrupted brain iron homeostasis is a common feature of neurodegenerative disease. To begin to understand how neuronal iron handling might be involved, we focused on dopaminergic neurons and asked how inactivation of transport proteins affected iron homeostasis in vivo in mice. Loss of the cellular iron exporter, ferroportin, had no apparent consequences. However, loss of transferrin receptor 1, involved in iron uptake, caused neuronal iron deficiency, age-progressive degeneration of a subset of dopaminergic neurons, and motor deficits. There was gradual depletion of dopaminergic projections in the striatum followed by death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Damaged mitochondria accumulated, and gene expression signatures indicated attempted axonal regeneration, a metabolic switch to glycolysis, oxidative stress, and the unfolded protein response. We demonstrate that loss of transferrin receptor 1, but not loss of ferroportin, can cause neurodegeneration in a subset of dopaminergic neurons in mice.

  8. Iron transport & homeostasis mechanisms: their role in health & disease.

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    Nadadur, S S; Srirama, K; Mudipalli, Anuradha

    2008-10-01

    Iron is an essential trace metal required by all living organisms and is toxic in excess. Nature has evolved a delicately balanced network to monitor iron entry, transport it to sites of need, and serve as a unique storage and recycling system, in the absence of an excretory system, to remove excess iron. Due to the unique nature of iron metabolism, iron homeostasis is achieved by integrated specialized mechanisms that operate at the cellular and organism level. The use of positional cloning approaches by multiple researchers has led to the identification and characterization of various proteins and peptides that play a critical role in iron metabolism. These efforts have led to elucidation of the molecular mechanisms involved in the uptake of iron by the enterocytes, transportation across the membrane to circulation, and delivery to diverse tissues for use and storage and sensor system to co-ordinate and achieve homeostasis. Molecular understanding of these processes and the key regulatory molecules involved in maintaining homeostasis will provide novel insights into understanding human disorders associated with either iron deficiency or overload.

  9. NCOA4 Deficiency Impairs Systemic Iron Homeostasis

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    Roberto Bellelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cargo receptor NCOA4 mediates autophagic ferritin degradation. Here we show that NCOA4 deficiency in a knockout mouse model causes iron accumulation in the liver and spleen, increased levels of transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, and liver hepcidin, and decreased levels of duodenal ferroportin. Despite signs of iron overload, NCOA4-null mice had mild microcytic hypochromic anemia. Under an iron-deprived diet (2–3 mg/kg, mice failed to release iron from ferritin storage and developed severe microcytic hypochromic anemia and ineffective erythropoiesis associated with increased erythropoietin levels. When fed an iron-enriched diet (2 g/kg, mice died prematurely and showed signs of liver damage. Ferritin accumulated in primary embryonic fibroblasts from NCOA4-null mice consequent to impaired autophagic targeting. Adoptive expression of the NCOA4 COOH terminus (aa 239–614 restored this function. In conclusion, NCOA4 prevents iron accumulation and ensures efficient erythropoiesis, playing a central role in balancing iron levels in vivo.

  10. Deficiency of a alpha-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Background: There is evidence that proteases and anti-proteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this anti-protease in humans are asso...

  11. Iron Homeostasis in Yellowstone National Park Hot Spring Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I.; Tringe, S. G.; Franklin, H.; Bryant, D. A.; Klatt, C. G.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Guevara, M.

    2010-01-01

    It has been postulated that life may have originated on Earth, and possibly on Mars, in association with hydrothermal activity and high concentrations of ferrous iron. However, it is not clear how an iron-rich thermal hydrosphere could be hospitable to microbes, since reduced iron appears to stimulate oxidative stress in all domains of life and particularly in oxygenic phototrophs. Therefore, the study of microbial diversity in iron-depositing hot springs (IDHS) and the mechanisms of iron homeostasis and suppression of oxidative stress may help elucidate how Precambrian organisms could withstand the extremely high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by interaction between environmental Fe(2+) and O2. Proteins and clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) involved in the maintenance of Fe homeostasis found in cyanobacteria (CB) inhabiting environments with high and low [Fe] were main target of this analysis. Preliminary results of the analysis suggest that the Chocolate Pots (CP) microbial community is heavily dominated by phototrophs from the cyanobacteria (CB), Chloroflexi and Chlorobi phyla, while the Mushroom Spring (MS) effluent channel harbors a more diverse community in which Chloroflexi are the dominant phototrophs. It is speculated that CB inhabiting IDHS have an increased tolerance to both high concentrations of Fe(2+) and ROS produced in the Fenton reaction. This hypothesis was explored via a comparative analysis of the diversity of proteins and COGs involved in Fe and redox homeostasis in the CP and MS microbiomes.

  12. Asthma as a disruption in iron homeostasis | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over several decades, asthma has evolved from being recognized as a single disease to include a diverse group of phenotypes with dissimilar natural histories, pathophysiologies, responses to treatment, and distinctive molecular pathways. With the application of Occam’s razor to asthma, it is proposed that there is one cause underlying the numerous phenotypes of this disease and that the responsible molecular pathway is a deficiency of iron in the lung tissues. This deficiency can be either absolute (e.g. asthma in the neonate and during both pregnancy and menstruation) or functional (e.g. asthma associated with infections, smoking, and obesity). Comparable associations between asthma co-morbidity (e.g. eczema, urticaria, restless leg syndrome, and pulmonary hypertension) with iron deficiency support such a shared mechanistic pathway. Therapies directed at asthma demonstrate a capacity to impact iron homeostasis, further strengthening the relationship. Finally, pathophysiologic events producing asthma, including inflammation, increases in Th2 cells, and muscle contraction, can correlate with iron availability. Recognition of a potential association between asthma and an absolute and/or functional iron deficiency suggests specific therapeutic interventions including inhaled iron. Asthma is a public health issue that has environmental triggers. Iron homeostasis is an essential mechanism whereby the body manages the impact of environmental agents on overall

  13. Iron uptake and homeostasis related genes in potato cultivated in vitro under iron deficiency and overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legay, Sylvain; Guignard, Cédric; Ziebel, Johanna; Evers, Danièle

    2012-11-01

    Potato is one of the most important staple food in the world because it is a good source of vitamin C, vitamin B6 but also an interesting source of minerals including mainly potassium, but also magnesium, phosphorus, manganese, zinc and iron to a lesser extent. The lack of iron constitutes the main form of micronutrient deficiency in the world, namely iron deficiency anemia, which strongly affects pregnant women and children from developing countries. Iron biofortification of major staple food such as potato is thus a crucial issue for populations from these countries. To better understand mechanisms leading to iron accumulation in potato, we followed in an in vitro culture experiment, by qPCR, in the cultivar Désirée, the influence of media iron content on the expression of genes related to iron uptake, transport and homeostasis. As expected, plantlets grown in a low iron medium (1 mg L(-1) FeNaEDTA) displayed a decreased iron content, a strong induction of iron deficiency-related genes and a decreased expression of ferritins. Inversely, plantlets grown in a high iron medium (120 mg L(-1) FeNaEDTA) strongly accumulated iron in roots; however, no significant change in the expression of our set of genes was observed compared to control (40 mg L(-1) FeNaEDTA).

  14. Copper Stress Affects Iron Homeostasis by Destabilizing Iron-Sulfur Cluster Formation in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chillappagari, Shashi; Seubert, Andreas; Trip, Hein; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Marahiel, Mohamed A.; Miethke, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Copper and iron are essential elements for cellular growth. Although bacteria have to overcome limitations of these metals by affine and selective uptake, excessive amounts of both metals are toxic for the cells. Here we investigated the influences of copper stress on iron homeostasis in Bacillus

  15. The murine growth differentiation factor 15 is not essential for systemic iron homeostasis in phlebotomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas, Guillem; Vujić Spasic, Maja; Casu, Carla; Rivella, Stefano; Strelau, Jens; Unsicker, Klaus; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2013-03-01

    In conditions of increased erythropoiesis, expression of hepcidin, the master regulator of systemic iron homeostasis, is decreased to allow for the release of iron into the blood stream from duodenal enterocytes and macrophages. It has been suggested that hepcidin suppression is controlled by growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily of cytokines that is secreted from developing erythroblasts. In this study, we analyzed iron-related parameters in mice deficient for GDF15 under steady-state conditions and in response to increased erythropoietic activity induced by blood loss. We demonstrate that GDF15 suppresses the hepatic mRNA expression of some BMP/TGFβ target genes but not of hepcidin, and show that GDF15 is not required to balance iron homeostasis in response to blood loss.

  16. Caenorhabditis elegans ATAD-3 modulates mitochondrial iron and heme homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ecker, Daniela; Hoffmann, Michael; Müting, Gesine; Maglioni, Silvia; Herebian, Diran; Mayatepek, Ertan; Ventura, Natascia; Distelmaier, Felix

    2015-11-13

    ATAD3 (ATPase family AAA domain-containing protein 3) is a mitochondrial protein, which is essential for cell viability and organismal development. ATAD3 has been implicated in several important cellular processes such as apoptosis regulation, respiratory chain function and steroid hormone biosynthesis. Moreover, altered expression of ATAD3 has been associated with several types of cancer. However, the exact mechanisms underlying ATAD3 effects on cellular metabolism remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Caenorhabditis elegans ATAD-3 is involved in mitochondrial iron and heme homeostasis. Knockdown of atad-3 caused mitochondrial iron- and heme accumulation. This was paralleled by changes in the expression levels of several iron- and heme-regulatory genes as well as an increased heme uptake. In conclusion, our data indicate a regulatory role of C. elegans ATAD-3 in mitochondrial iron and heme metabolism.

  17. Deficiency of α-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghio AJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrew J Ghio,1 Joleen M Soukup,1 Judy H Richards,1 Bernard M Fischer,2 Judith A Voynow,2 Donald E Schmechel31US Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2Division of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics,3Joseph and Kathleen Bryan Alzheimer Disease Research Center, Department of Medicine (Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: There is evidence that proteases and antiproteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that α-1 antitrypsin (A1AT polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this antiprotease in humans are associated with a systemic disruption in iron homeostasis. Archived plasma samples from Alpha-1 Foundation (30 MM, 30 MZ, and 30 ZZ individuals were analyzed for A1AT, ferritin, transferrin, and C-reactive protein (CRP. Plasma samples were also assayed for metals using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES. Plasma levels of A1AT in MZ and ZZ individuals were approximately 60% and 20% of those for MM individuals respectively. Plasma ferritin concentrations in those with the ZZ genotype were greater relative to those individuals with either MM or MZ genotype. Plasma transferrin for MM, MZ, and ZZ genotypes showed no significant differences. Linear regression analysis revealed a significant (negative relationship between plasma concentrations of A1AT and ferritin while that between A1AT and transferrin levels was not significant. Plasma CRP concentrations were not significantly different between MM, MZ, and ZZ individuals. ICPAES measurement of metals confirmed elevated plasma concentrations of nonheme iron among ZZ individuals. Nonheme iron concentrations correlated (negatively with levels of A1AT. A1AT deficiency is associated with evidence of a disruption in iron homeostasis with plasma ferritin and nonheme iron concentrations being elevated among those with the ZZ genotype.Keywords: α-1

  18. Dissecting plant iron homeostasis under short and long-term iron fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz Darbani; Briat, Jean-Francois; Holm, Preben Bach;

    2013-01-01

    A wealth of information on the different aspects of iron homeostasis in plants has been obtained during the last decade. However, there is no clear road-map integrating the relationships between the various components. The principal aim of the current review is to fill this gap. In this context we...... discuss the lack of low affinity iron uptake mechanisms in plants, the utilization of a different uptake mechanism by graminaceous plants compared to the others, as well as the roles of riboflavin, ferritin isoforms, nitric oxide, nitrosylation, heme, aconitase, and vacuolar pH. Cross-homeostasis between...... elements is also considered, with a specific emphasis on the relationship between iron homeostasis and phosphorus and copper deficiencies. As the environment is a crucial parameter for modulating plant responses, we also highlight how diurnal fluctuations govern iron metabolism. Evolutionary aspects...

  19. Iron biofortification and homeostasis in transgenic cassava roots expressing an algal iron assimilatory protein, FEA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzoma eIhemere

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have engineered the starchy root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory protein, FEA1, in roots to enhance its nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 gm meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 protein did not alter iron levels in leaves. Transgenic plants also had normal levels of zinc in leaves and roots consistent with the specific uptake of iron mediated by the FEA1 protein. Relative to wild-type plants, FEA1 expressing plants had reduced Fe(III chelate reductase activity and gene expression levels consistent with the more efficient uptake of iron in FEA1 transgenic plants. We also show that genes involved in iron homeostasis in cassava have altered tissue-specific patterns of expression in transgenic plants. Steady state transcript levels of the metal-chelate transporter MeYSL1, and the iron storage proteins, MeFER2 and MeFER6, were elevated in various tissues of FEA1 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. These results suggest that these gene products play a role in iron translocation and homeostasis in FEA1 transgenic cassava plants. These results are discussed in terms of enhanced strategies for the iron biofortification of plants.

  20. Dysregulation of iron and copper homeostasis innonalcoholic fatty liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elmar Aigner; Günter Weiss; Christian Datz

    2015-01-01

    Elevated iron stores as indicated by hyperferritinemiawith normal or mildly elevated transferrin saturationand mostly mild hepatic iron deposition are acharacteristic finding in subjects with non-alcoholicfatty liver disease (NAFLD). Excess iron is observedin approximately one third of NAFLD patients andis commonly referred to as the "dysmetabolic ironoverload syndrome". Clinical evidence suggests thatelevated body iron stores aggravate the clinical courseof NAFLD with regard to liver-related and extrahepaticdisease complications which relates to the fact thatexcess iron catalyses the formation of toxic hydroxylradicalssubsequently resulting in cellular damage. Ironremoval improves insulin sensitivity, delays the onsetof type 2 diabetes mellitus, improves pathologic liverfunction tests and likewise ameliorates NAFLD histology.Several mechanisms contribute to pathologic ironaccumulation in NAFLD. These include impaired ironexport from hepatocytes and mesenchymal Kupffer cellsas a consequence of imbalances in the concentrationsof iron regulatory factors, such as hepcidin, cytokines,copper or other dietary factors. This review summarizesthe knowledge about iron homeostasis in NAFLD andthe rationale for its therapeutic implications.

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria junction is required for iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yong; Schmollinger, Stefan; Attar, Narsis; Campos, Oscar A; Vogelauer, Maria; Carey, Michael F; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2017-08-11

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) is a protein complex that physically tethers the two organelles to each other and creates the physical basis for communication between them. ERMES functions in lipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria, protein import into mitochondria, and maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and genome. Here, we report that ERMES is also required for iron homeostasis. Loss of ERMES components activates an Aft1-dependent iron deficiency response even in iron-replete conditions, leading to accumulation of excess iron inside the cell. This function is independent of known ERMES roles in calcium regulation, phospholipid biosynthesis, or effects on mitochondrial morphology. A mutation in the vacuolar protein sorting 13 (VPS13) gene that rescues the glycolytic phenotype of ERMES mutants suppresses the iron deficiency response and iron accumulation. Our findings reveal that proper communication between the ER and mitochondria is required for appropriate maintenance of cellular iron levels. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Taurine Homeostasis and Volume Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasantes-Morales, Herminia

    2017-01-01

    Taurine content is high (mM) in mammalian brain. By its major role as an osmolyte, taurine contributes to the cell volume control, which is particularly critical in the brain. Taurine participates in osmotic adjustments required to maintain the organization and size of intracellular compartments. It counteracts volume fluctuations in unbalanced transmembrane fluxes of ions and neurotransmitters, preserving the functional synaptic contacts. Taurine has a key role in the long-term adaptation to chronic hyponatremia as well as in other pathologies leading to brain edema. Together with other osmolytes, taurine corrects cell shrinkage, preventing mysfunction of organelles and apoptosis. Swelling corrective taurine efflux occurs through a leak pathway, likely formed by LCRR8 protein isoforms. Shrinkage-activated influx comes largely by the increased activity of the Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent transporter. The brain taurine pool results from the equilibrium between (i) dietary intake and active transport into the cell, (ii) synthesis in the brain itself or import of that synthesized elsewhere, and (iii) leak and posterior excretion. The interplay between these elements preserves brain taurine homeostasis in physiological conditions and permits the proper adjustments upon deviations of normal in the internal/external environment.

  3. Misregulation of iron homeostasis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gajowiak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for all mammalian cells, but it is toxic in excess. Our understanding of molecular mechanisms ensuring iron homeostasis at both cellular and systemic levels has dramatically increased over the past 15 years. However, despite major advances in this field, homeostatic regulation of iron in the central nervous system (CNS requires elucidation. It is unclear how iron moves in the CNS and how its transfer to the CNS across the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers, which separate the CNS from the systemic circulation, is regulated. Increasing evidence indicates the role of iron dysregulation in neuronal cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective cortical czynand spinal motor neuron dysfunction that results from a complex interplay among various pathogenic factors including oxidative stress. The latter is known to strongly affect cellular iron balance, creating a vicious circle to exacerbate oxidative injury. The role of iron in the pathogenesis of ALS is confirmed by therapeutic effects of iron chelation in ALS mouse models. These models are of great importance for deciphering molecular mechanisms of iron accumulation in neurons. Most of them consist of transgenic rodents overexpressing the mutated human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 gene. Mutations in the SOD1 gene constituteone of the most common genetic causes of the inherited form of ALS. However, it should beconsidered that overexpression of the SOD1 gene usually leads to increased SOD1 enzymaticactivity, a condition which does not occur in human pathology and which may itself changethe expression of iron metabolism genes.

  4. Interplay between Iron Homeostasis and the Osmotic Stress Response in the Halophilic Bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argandoña, Montserrat; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Iglesias-Guerra, Fernando; Calderón, Maria Isabel; García-Estepa, Raúl; Vargas, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the connection between iron homeostasis and the osmostress response in the halophile Chromohalobacter salexigens was investigated. A decrease in the requirement for both iron and histidine and a lower level of siderophore synthesis were observed at high salinity, and these findings were correlated with a lower protein content in salt-stressed cells. A six-gene operon (cfuABC-fur-hisI-orf6 operon) located downstream of the ectABC ectoine synthesis genes was characterized. A fur strain (in which the ferric iron uptake regulator Fur was affected) had the Mn resistance phenotype typical of fur mutants, was deregulated for siderophore production, and displayed delayed growth under iron limitation conditions, indicating that fur encodes a functional iron regulator. hisI was essential for histidine synthesis, which in turn was necessary for siderophore production. Fur boxes were found in the promoters of the cfuABC-fur-hisI-orf6 and ectABC operons, suggesting that Fur directly interacts with DNA in these regions. Fur mediated the osmoregulated inhibition of cfuABC-fur-hisI-orf6 operon expression by iron and functioned as a positive regulator of the ectABC genes under high-salinity conditions, linking the salt stress response with iron homeostasis. Excess iron led to a higher cytoplasmic hydroxyectoine content, suggesting that hydroxyectoine protects against the oxidative stress caused by iron better than ectoine. This study provides the first evidence of involvement of the iron homeostasis regulator Fur as part of the complex circuit that controls the response to osmotic stress in halophilic bacteria. PMID:20363778

  5. Nicotianamine synthase overexpression positively modulates iron homeostasis-related genes in high iron rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng eWang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nearly one-third of the world population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anemia or impaired mental development. Biofortification of rice, which is a staple crop for nearly half of the world’s population, can significantly contribute in alleviating iron deficiency. NFP rice (transgenic rice expressing nicotianamine synthase, ferritin and phytase genes has a more than six-fold increase in iron content in polished rice grains, resulting from the synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase (NAS and ferritin transgenes. We investigated iron homeostasis in NFP plants by analyzing the expression of 28 endogenous rice genes known to be involved in the homeostasis of iron and other metals, in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. RNA was collected from different tissues (roots, flag leaves, grains and at three developmental stages during grain filling. NFP plants showed increased sensitivity to iron-deficiency conditions and changes in the expression of endogenous genes involved in nicotianamine (NA metabolism, in comparison to their non-transgenic siblings. Elevated transcript levels were detected in NFP plants for several iron transporters. In contrast, expression of OsYSL2, which encodes a member of Yellow Stripe-like protein family, and a transporter of the NA-Fe(II complex was reduced in NFP plants under low iron conditions, indicating that expression of OsYSL2 is regulated by the endogenous iron status. Expression of the transgenes did not significantly affect overall iron homeostasis in NFP plants, which establishes the engineered push-pull mechanism as a suitable strategy to increase rice endosperm iron content.

  6. Nicotianamine synthase overexpression positively modulates iron homeostasis-related genes in high iron rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2013-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anemia or impaired mental development. Biofortification of rice, which is a staple crop for nearly half of the world's population, can significantly contribute in alleviating iron deficiency. NFP rice (transgenic rice expressing nicotianamine synthase, ferritin and phytase genes) has a more than six-fold increase in iron content in polished rice grains, resulting from the synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase (NAS) and ferritin transgenes. We investigated iron homeostasis in NFP plants by analyzing the expression of 28 endogenous rice genes known to be involved in the homeostasis of iron and other metals, in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. RNA was collected from different tissues (roots, flag leaves, grains) and at three developmental stages during grain filling. NFP plants showed increased sensitivity to iron-deficiency conditions and changes in the expression of endogenous genes involved in nicotianamine (NA) metabolism, in comparison to their non-transgenic siblings (NTS). Elevated transcript levels were detected in NFP plants for several iron transporters. In contrast, expression of OsYSL2, which encodes a member of yellow stripe like protein family, and a transporter of the NA-Fe(II) complex was reduced in NFP plants under low iron conditions, indicating that expression of OsYSL2 is regulated by the endogenous iron status. Expression of the transgenes did not significantly affect overall iron homeostasis in NFP plants, which establishes the engineered push-pull mechanism as a suitable strategy to increase rice endosperm iron content.

  7. The diverse roles of FRO family metalloreductases in iron and copper homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshika eJain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron and copper are essential for plants and are important for the function of a number of protein complexes involved in photosynthesis and respiration. As the molecular mechanisms that control uptake, trafficking and storage of these nutrients emerge, the importance of metalloreductase-catalyzed reactions in iron and copper metabolism has become clear. This review focuses on the FRO family of metalloreductases in plants and highlights new insights into the roles of FRO family members in metal homeostasis. Arabidopsis FRO2 was first identified as the ferric chelate reductase that reduces ferric iron-chelates at the root surface-rhizosphere interface. The resulting ferrous iron is subsequently transported across the plasma membrane of root epidermal cells by the ferrous iron transporter, IRT1. Recent work has shown that two other members of the FRO family (FRO4 and FRO5 function redundantly to reduce copper to facilitate its uptake from the soil. In addition, FROs appear to play important roles in subcellular compartmentalization of iron as FRO7 is known to contribute to delivery of iron to chloroplasts while mitochondrial family members FRO3 and FRO8 are hypothesized to influence mitochondrial metal ion homeostasis. Finally, recent studies have underscored the importance of plasma membrane-localized ferric reductase activity in leaves for photosynthetic efficiency. Taken together, these studies highlight a number of diverse roles for FROs in both iron and copper metabolism in plants.

  8. Perturbation of iron homeostasis promotes the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méhi, Orsolya; Bogos, Balázs; Csörgő, Bálint; Pál, Ferenc; Nyerges, Akos; Papp, Balázs; Pál, Csaba

    2014-10-01

    Evolution of antibiotic resistance in microbes is frequently achieved by acquisition of spontaneous mutations during antimicrobial therapy. Here, we demonstrate that inactivation of a central transcriptional regulator of iron homeostasis (Fur) facilitates laboratory evolution of ciprofloxacin resistance in Escherichia coli. To decipher the underlying molecular mechanisms, we first performed a global transcriptome analysis and demonstrated that the set of genes regulated by Fur changes substantially in response to antibiotic treatment. We hypothesized that the impact of Fur on evolvability under antibiotic pressure is due to the elevated intracellular concentration of free iron and the consequent enhancement of oxidative damage-induced mutagenesis. In agreement with expectations, overexpression of iron storage proteins, inhibition of iron transport, or anaerobic conditions drastically suppressed the evolution of resistance, whereas inhibition of the SOS response-mediated mutagenesis had only a minor effect. Finally, we provide evidence that a cell permeable iron chelator inhibits the evolution of resistance. In sum, our work revealed the central role of iron metabolism in the de novo evolution of antibiotic resistance, a pattern that could influence the development of novel antimicrobial strategies.

  9. Genetic and biochemical markers in patients with Alzheimer's disease support a concerted systemic iron homeostasis dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Ângela C; Silva, Bruno; Marques, Liliana; Marcelino, Erica; Maruta, Carolina; Costa, Sónia; Timóteo, Angela; Vilares, Arminda; Couto, Frederico Simões; Faustino, Paula; Correia, Ana Paula; Verdelho, Ana; Porto, Graça; Guerreiro, Manuela; Herrero, Ana; Costa, Cristina; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Costa, Luciana; Martins, Madalena

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly individuals, resulting from a complex interaction between environmental and genetic factors. Impaired brain iron homeostasis has been recognized as an important mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of this disease. Nevertheless, the knowledge gathered so far at the systemic level is clearly insufficient. Herein, we used an integrative approach to study iron metabolism in the periphery, at both genotypic and phenotypic levels, in a sample of 116 patients with AD and 89 healthy control subjects. To assess the potential impact of iron metabolism on the risk of developing AD, genetic analyses were performed along with the evaluation of the iron status profile in peripheral blood by biochemical and gene expression studies. The results obtained showed a significant decrease of serum iron, ferritin, and transferrin concentrations in patients compared with the control subjects. Also, a significant decrease of ferroportin (SLC40A1) and both transferrin receptors TFRC and TFR2 transcripts was found in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients. At the genetic level, significant associations with AD were found for single nucleotide polymorphisms in TF, TFR2, ACO1, and SLC40A1 genes. Apolipoprotein E gene, a well-known risk factor for AD, was also found significantly associated with the disease in this study. Taken together, we hypothesize that the alterations on systemic iron status observed in patients could reflect an iron homeostasis dysregulation, particularly in cellular iron efflux. The intracellular iron accumulation would lead to a rise in oxidative damage, contributing to AD pathophysiology.

  10. Alteration of iron homeostasis following chronic exposure to manganese in rats1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Qiuqu; Slavkovich, Vesna; Aschner, Michael; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that manganese-induced neurodegenerative toxicity may be partly due to its action on aconitase, which participates in cellular iron regulation and mitochondrial energy production. This study was performed to investigate whether chronic manganese exposure in rats influenced the homeostasis of iron in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Groups of 8–10 rats received intraperitoneal injections of MnCl2 at the dose of 6 mg Mn/kg/day or equal volume of saline for 30 days. Concentrations of manganese and iron in plasma and CSF were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Rats exposed to manganese showed a greatly elevated manganese concentration in both plasma and CSF. The magnitude of increase in CSF manganese (11-fold) was equivalent to that of plasma (10-fold). Chronic manganese exposure resulted in a 32% decrease in plasma iron (p < 0.01) and no changes in plasma total iron binding capacity (TIBC). However, it increased CSF iron by 3-fold as compared to the controls (p < 0.01). Northern blot analyses of whole brain homogenates revealed a 34% increase in the expression of glutamine synthetase (p < 0.05) with unchanged metallothionein-I in manganese-intoxicated rats. When the cultured choroidal epithelial cells derived from rat choroid plexus were incubated with MnCl2 (100 µM) for four days, the expression of transferrin receptor mRNA appeared to exceed by 50% that of control (p < 0.002). The results indicate that chronic manganese exposure alters iron homeostasis possibly by expediting unidirectional influx of iron from the systemic circulation to cerebral compartment. The action appears likely to be mediated by manganese-facilitated iron transport at brain barrier systems. PMID:10375687

  11. Iron homeostasis and infIammatory biomarker analysis in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano-Engay, B; Irun, P; Gervas-Arruga, J; Andrade-Campos, M; Andreu, V; Alfonso, P; Pocovi, M; Giraldo, P

    2014-12-01

    Gaucher disease induces some metabolic abnormalities so increased serum ferritin appears in more than 60% at diagnosis. The storage of glucosylceramide in macrophages produces an inflammatory response with iron recycling deregulation and release of cytokines. Iron homeostasis is controlled by the circulating peptide hepcidin and its production is influenced by inflammatory cytokines. Iron damages cells by excess of catalyzing reactive oxygen species, removal of the excess iron has a positive influence on the response to treatment and survival in patients with iron overload. We have analyzed some inflammatory biomarkers of macrophage activation and related to the iron profile, including hepcidin and liver iron deposits determined by MRI, in 8 type 1 GD patients with hyperferritinemia. We have explored the changes in this profile after 4 months under therapy with two different iron chelators, deferoxamine or deferasirox, by evaluating response, adverse events and quality of life. We observed a significant reduction in serum ferritin and hepcidin levels and in liver iron deposits. No differences were observed in chitotriosidase activity, CCL18/PARC concentration and IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, IL-13, MIP-1α, MIP-1β,TNF-α cytokine levels. After two years on follow-up, clinical and analytical data were improved and stable ferritin levels maintained less than 700 ng/dL.

  12. Iron overload alters glucose homeostasis, causes liver steatosis, and increases serum triacylglycerols in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maísa; Silva, Marcelo E; de Paula, Heberth; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of iron overload with a hyperlipidemic diet on the histologic feature of hepatic tissue, the lipid and glycemic serum profiles, and the markers of oxidative damage and stress in a rat model. Twenty-four male Fischer rats, purchased from Experimental Nutrition Laboratory, Federal University of Ouro Preto, were assigned to 4 equal groups, 2 were fed a standard cholesterol-free diet (group C or control and CI or control with iron) containing 8.0% soybean oil and 2 were fed a hyperlipidemic diet (group H or hyperlipidemic and HI or hyperlipidemic with iron) containing 1.0% cholesterol and 25.0% soybean oil. A total of 50 mg of iron was administered to rats in groups CI and HI in 5 equal doses (1 every 3 weeks for a 16-week period) by intraperitoneal injections of 0.1 mL of iron dextran solution (100 g Fe(2+)/L; Sigma, St Louis, Mo). The other rats in groups C and H were treated in a similar manner but with sterile saline (0.1 mL). Irrespective of the diet, iron excess enhanced serum triacylglycerols (P .05) were observed in paraoxonase activities or in serum levels of free or total sulfhydryl radicals, malondialdehyde, or total antioxidants. The findings suggest that iron excess in the rat probably modifies lipid metabolism and, as a consequence, alters glucose homeostasis and increases the level of serum triacylglycerols but not of cholesterol.

  13. Producing a Set of Models for the Iron Homeostasis Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Mobilia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for modeling biological systems which combines formal techniques on intervals, numerical simulations and satisfaction of Signal Temporal Logic (STL formulas. The main modeling challenge addressed by this approach is the large uncertainty in the values of the parameters due to the experimental difficulties of getting accurate biological data. This method considers intervals for each parameter and a formal description of the expected behavior of the model. In a first step, it produces reduced intervals of possible parameter values. Then by performing a systematic search in these intervals, it defines sets of parameter values used in the next step. This procedure aims at finding a sub-space where the model robustly behaves as expected. We apply this method to the modeling of the cellular iron homeostasis network in erythroid progenitors. The produced model describes explicitly the regulation mechanism which acts at the translational level.

  14. Regulators of Iron Homeostasis: New Players in Metabolism, Cell Death, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Alexander R; Miyazawa, Masaki; Hashimoto, Kazunori; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2016-03-01

    Iron is necessary for life, but can also cause cell death. Accordingly, cells evolved a robust, tightly regulated suite of genes for maintaining iron homeostasis. Previous mechanistic studies on iron homeostasis have granted insight into the role of iron in human health and disease. We highlight new regulators of iron metabolism, including iron-trafficking proteins [solute carrier family 39, SLC39, also known as ZRT/IRT-like protein, ZIP; and poly-(rC)-binding protein, PCBP] and a cargo receptor (NCOA4) that is crucial for release of ferritin-bound iron. We also discuss emerging roles of iron in apoptosis and a novel iron-dependent cell death pathway termed 'ferroptosis', the dysregulation of iron metabolism in human pathologies, and the use of iron chelators in cancer therapy.

  15. Reciprocal interaction of the circadian clock with the iron homeostasis network in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sunghyun; Kim, Sun A; Guerinot, Mary Lou; McClung, C Robertson

    2013-02-01

    In plants, iron (Fe) uptake and homeostasis are critical for survival, and these processes are tightly regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillating mechanisms that allow an organism to anticipate environmental changes to coordinate biological processes both with one another and with the environmental day/night cycle. The plant circadian clock controls many physiological processes through rhythmic expression of transcripts. In this study, we examined the expression of three Fe homeostasis genes (IRON REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 [IRT1], BASIC HELIX LOOP HELIX39, and FERRITIN1) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using promoter:LUCIFERASE transgenic lines. Each of these promoters showed circadian regulation of transcription. The circadian clock monitors a number of clock outputs and uses these outputs as inputs to modulate clock function. We show that this is also true for Fe status. Fe deficiency results in a lengthened circadian period. We interrogated mutants impaired in the Fe homeostasis response, including irt1-1, which lacks the major high-affinity Fe transporter, and fit-2, which lacks Fe deficiency-induced TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor necessary for induction of the Fe deficiency response. Both mutants exhibit symptoms of Fe deficiency, including lengthened circadian period. To determine which components are involved in this cross talk between the circadian and Fe homeostasis networks, we tested clock- or Fe homeostasis-related mutants. Mutants defective in specific clock gene components were resistant to the change in period length under different Fe conditions observed in the wild type, suggesting that these mutants are impaired in cross talk between Fe homeostasis and the circadian clock.

  16. Metagenomic Study of Iron Homeostasis in Iron Depositing Hot Spring Cyanobacterial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I.; Franklin H.; Tringe, S. G.; Klatt, C. G.; Bryant, D. A.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Guevara, M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: It is not clear how an iron-rich thermal hydrosphere could be hospitable to cyanobacteria, since reduced iron appears to stimulate oxidative stress in all domains of life and particularly in oxygenic phototrophs. Therefore, metagenomic study of cyanobacterial community in iron-depositing hot springs may help elucidate how oxygenic prokaryotes can withstand the extremely high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by interaction between environmental Fe2+ and O2. Method: Anchor proteins from various species of cyanobacteria and some anoxygenic phototrophs were selected on the basis of their hypothetical role in Fe homeostasis and the suppression of oxidative stress and were BLASTed against the metagenomes of iron-depositing Chocolate Pots and freshwater Mushroom hot springs. Results: BLASTing proteins hypothesized to be involved in Fe homeostasis against the microbiomes from the two springs revealed that iron-depositing hot spring has a greater abundance of defensive proteins such as bacterioferritin comigratory protein (Bcp) and DNA-binding Ferritin like protein (Dps) than a fresh-water hot spring. One may speculate that the abundance of Bcp and Dps in an iron-depositing hot spring is connected to the need to suppress oxidative stress in bacteria inhabiting environments with high Fe2+ concnetration. In both springs, Bcp and Dps are concentrated within the cyanobacterial fractions of the microbial community (regardless of abundance). Fe3+ siderophore transport (from the transport system permease protein query) may be less essential to the microbial community of CP because of the high [Fe]. Conclusion: Further research is needed to confirm that these proteins are unique to photoautotrophs such as those living in iron-depositing hot spring.

  17. The pupylation machinery is involved in iron homeostasis by targeting the iron storage protein ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küberl, Andreas; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2016-04-26

    The balance of sufficient iron supply and avoidance of iron toxicity by iron homeostasis is a prerequisite for cellular metabolism and growth. Here we provide evidence that, in Actinobacteria, pupylation plays a crucial role in this process. Pupylation is a posttranslational modification in which the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup is covalently attached to a lysine residue in target proteins, thus resembling ubiquitination in eukaryotes. Pupylated proteins are recognized and unfolded by a dedicated AAA+ ATPase (Mycobacterium proteasomal AAA+ ATPase; ATPase forming ring-shaped complexes). In Mycobacteria, degradation of pupylated proteins by the proteasome serves as a protection mechanism against several stress conditions. Other bacterial genera capable of pupylation such as Corynebacterium lack a proteasome, and the fate of pupylated proteins is unknown. We discovered that Corynebacterium glutamicum mutants lacking components of the pupylation machinery show a strong growth defect under iron limitation, which was caused by the absence of pupylation and unfolding of the iron storage protein ferritin. Genetic and biochemical data support a model in which the pupylation machinery is responsible for iron release from ferritin independent of degradation.

  18. Molecular and clinical aspects of iron homeostasis: From anemia to hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairz, Manfred; Weiss, Günter

    2006-08-01

    The discovery in recent years of a plethora of new genes whose products are implicated in iron homeostasis has led to rapid expansion of our knowledge in the field of iron metabolism and its underlying complex regulation in both health and disease. Abnormalities of iron metabolism are among the most common disorders encountered in practical medicine and may have significant negative impact on physical condition and life expectancy. Basic insights into the principles of iron homeostasis and the pathophysiological and clinical consequences of iron overload, iron deficiency and misdistribution are thus of crucial importance in modern medicine. This review summarizes our current understanding of human iron metabolism and focuses on the clinically relevant features of hereditary and secondary hemochromatosis, iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease and anemia of critical illness. The interconnections between iron metabolism and immunity are also addressed, in as much as they may affect the risk and course of infections and malignancies.

  19. Effects of Environmental Pollutants on Cellular Iron Homeostasis and Ultimate Links to Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreinemachers, Dina M; Ghio, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic disease has increased in the past several decades, and environmental pollutants have been implicated. The magnitude and variety of diseases may indicate the malfunctioning of some basic mechanisms underlying human health. Environmental pollutants demonstrate a capability to complex iron through electronegative functional groups containing oxygen, nitrogen, or sulfur. Cellular exposure to the chemical or its metabolite may cause a loss of requisite functional iron from intracellular sites. The cell is compelled to acquire further iron critical to its survival by activation of iron-responsive proteins and increasing iron import. Iron homeostasis in the exposed cells is altered due to a new equilibrium being established between iron-requiring cells and the inappropriate chelator (the pollutant or its catabolite). Following exposure to environmental pollutants, the perturbation of functional iron homeostasis may be the mechanism leading to adverse biological effects. Understanding the mechanism may lead to intervention methods for this major public health concern.

  20. Simon Labbé’s work on iron and copper homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Iron and copper have a wealth of functions in biological systems, which makes them essential micronutrients for all living organisms. Defects in iron and copper homeostasis are directly responsible for diseases, and have been linked to impaired development, metabolic syndromes and fungal virulence. Consequently, it is crucial to gain a comprehensive understanding of the molecular bases of iron- and copper-dependent proteins in living systems. Simon Labbé maintains parallel programs on iron an...

  1. Particulate matter in cigarette smoke alters iron homeostasis to produce a biological effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghio, Andrew J; Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Stonehuerner, Jacqueline G; Dailey, Lisa A; Carter, Jacqueline D; Richards, Judy H; Crissman, Kay M; Foronjy, Robert F; Uyeminami, Dale L; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2008-12-01

    Lung injury after cigarette smoking is related to particle retention. Iron accumulates with the deposition of these particles. We tested the postulate that (1) injury after smoking correlates with exposure to the particulate fraction of cigarette smoke, (2) these particles alter iron homeostasis, triggering metal accumulation, and (3) this alteration in iron homeostasis affects oxidative stress and inflammation. Rats and human respiratory epithelial cells were exposed to cigarette smoke, filtered cigarette smoke, and cigarette smoke condensate (the particulate fraction of smoke), and indices of iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and inflammatory injury were determined. Comparable measures were also evaluated in nonsmokers and smokers. After exposure of rats to cigarette smoke, increased lavage concentrations of iron and ferritin, serum ferritin levels, and nonheme iron concentrations in the lung and liver tissue all increased. Lavage ascorbate concentrations were decreased, supporting an oxidative stress. After filtering of the cigarette smoke to remove particles, most of these changes were reversed. Exposure of cultured respiratory epithelial cells to cigarette smoke condensate caused a similar accumulation of iron, metal-dependent oxidative stress, and increased IL-8 release. Lavage samples in healthy smokers and smoking patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease revealed elevated concentrations of both iron and ferritin relative to healthy nonsmokers. Lavage ascorbate decreased with cigarette smoking. Serum iron and ferritin levels among smokers were increased, supporting systemic accumulation of this metal after cigarette smoke exposure. We conclude that cigarette smoke particles alter iron homeostasis, both in the lung and systemically.

  2. Calcineurin signaling and membrane lipid homeostasis regulates iron mediated multidrug resistance mechanisms in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Hameed

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that iron deprivation enhances drug susceptibility of Candida albicans by increasing membrane fluidity which correlated with the lower expression of ERG11 transcript and ergosterol levels. The iron restriction dependent membrane perturbations led to an increase in passive diffusion and drug susceptibility. The mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis and multidrug resistance (MDR, however, are not yet resolved. To evaluate the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS based lipidome analyses of iron deprived Candida cells to examine the new cellular circuitry of the MDR of this pathogen. Our transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and iron homeostasis. Among the several categories of iron deprivation responsive genes, the down regulation of calcineurin signaling genes including HSP90, CMP1 and CRZ1 was noteworthy. Interestingly, iron deprived Candida cells as well as iron acquisition defective mutants phenocopied molecular chaperone HSP90 and calcineurin mutants and thus were sensitive to alkaline pH, salinity and membrane perturbations. In contrast, sensitivity to above stresses did not change in iron deprived DSY2146 strain with a hyperactive allele of calcineurin. Although, iron deprivation phenocopied compromised HSP90 and calcineurin, it was independent of protein kinase C signaling cascade. Notably, the phenotypes associated with iron deprivation in genetically impaired calcineurin and HSP90 could be reversed with iron supplementation. The observed down regulation of ergosterol (ERG1, ERG2, ERG11 and ERG25 and sphingolipid biosynthesis (AUR1 and SCS7 genes followed by lipidome analysis confirmed that iron deprivation not only disrupted ergosterol biosynthesis, but it also affected sphingolipid homeostasis in Candida cells. These lipid compositional changes suggested extensive remodeling of the membranes in iron

  3. Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Negroni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs form a physiochemical barrier that separates the intestinal lumen from the host’s internal milieu and is critical for electrolyte passage, nutrient absorption, and interaction with commensal microbiota. Moreover, IECs are strongly involved in the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response as well as in mucosal innate and adaptive immune responses. Cell death in the intestinal barrier is finely controlled, since alterations may lead to severe disorders, including inflammatory diseases. The emerging picture indicates that intestinal epithelial cell death is strictly related to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. This review is focused on previous reports on different forms of cell death in intestinal epithelium.

  4. PfsR is a key regulator of iron homeostasis in Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Cheng

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential cofactor in numerous cellular processes. The iron deficiency in the oceans affects the primary productivity of phytoplankton including cyanobacteria. In this study, we examined the function of PfsR, a TetR family transcriptional regulator, in iron homeostasis of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Compared with the wild type, the pfsR deletion mutant displayed stronger tolerance to iron limitation and accumulated significantly more chlorophyll a, carotenoid, and phycocyanin under iron-limiting conditions. The mutant also maintained more photosystem I and photosystem II complexes than the wild type after iron deprivation. In addition, the activities of photosystem I and photosystem II were much higher in pfsR deletion mutant than in wild-type cells under iron-limiting conditions. The transcripts of pfsR were enhanced by iron limitation and inactivation of the gene affected pronouncedly expression of fut genes (encoding a ferric iron transporter, feoB (encoding a ferrous iron transporter, bfr genes (encoding bacterioferritins, ho genes (encoding heme oxygenases, isiA (encoding a chlorophyll-binding protein, and furA (encoding a ferric uptake regulator. The iron quota in pfsR deletion mutant cells was higher than in wild-type cells both before and after exposure to iron limitation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that PfsR bound to its own promoter and thereby auto-regulated its own expression. These data suggest that PfsR is a critical regulator of iron homeostasis.

  5. Metabolomic profiling identifies potential pathways involved in the interaction of iron homeostasis with glucose metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Stechemesser

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Our data suggest that high serum ferritin concentrations are linked to impaired glucose homeostasis in subjects with the MetS. Iron excess is associated to distinct changes in the serum concentrations of phosphatidylcholine subsets. A pathway involving sarcosine and citrulline also may be involved in iron-induced impairment of glucose metabolism.

  6. The biological effect of asbestos exposure is dependent on changes in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Functional groups on the surface of fibrous silicates can complex iron. We tested the postulate that 1) asbestos complexes and sequesters host cell iron resulting in a disruption of metal homeostasis and 2) this loss of essential metal results in an oxidative stress and...

  7. The biological effect of asbestos exposure is dependent on changes in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Functional groups on the surface of fibrous silicates can complex iron. We tested the postulate that 1) asbestos complexes and sequesters host cell iron resulting in a disruption of metal homeostasis and 2) this loss of essential metal results in an oxidative stress and...

  8. The Loss of Myocardial Benefit following Ischemic Preconditioning Is Associated with Dysregulation of Iron Homeostasis in Diet-Induced Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vinokur

    Full Text Available Whether the diabetic heart benefits from ischemic preconditioning (IPC, similar to the non-diabetic heart, is a subject of controversy. We recently proposed new roles for iron and ferritin in IPC-protection in Type 1-like streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat heart. Here, we investigated iron homeostasis in Cohen diabetic sensitive rat (CDs that develop hyperglycemia when fed on a high-sucrose/low-copper diet (HSD, but maintain normoglycemia on regular-diet (RD. Control Cohen-resistant rats (CDr maintain normoglycemia on either diet. The IPC procedure improved the post-ischemic recovery of normoglycemic hearts (CDr-RD, CDr-HSD and CDs-RD. CDs-HSD hearts failed to show IPC-associated protection. The recovery of these CDs-HSD hearts following I/R (without prior IPC was better than their RD controls. During IPC ferritin levels increased in normoglycemic hearts, and its level was maintained nearly constant during the subsequent prolonged ischemia, but decayed to its baseline level during the reperfusion phase. In CDs-HSD hearts the baseline levels of ferritin and ferritin-saturation with iron were notably higher than in the controls, and remained unchanged during the entire experiment. This unique and abnormal pattern of post-ischemic recovery of CDs-HSD hearts is associated with marked changes in myocardial iron homeostasis, and suggests that iron and iron-proteins play a causative role/s in the etiology of diabetes-associated cardiovascular disorders.

  9. Lipocalin 2 deficiency dysregulates iron homeostasis and exacerbates endotoxin-induced sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srinivasan, Gayathri; Aitken, Jesse D; Zhang, Benyue

    2012-01-01

    Various states of inflammation, including sepsis, are associated with hypoferremia, which limits iron availability to pathogens and reduces iron-mediated oxidative stress. Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2; siderocalin, 24p3) plays a central role in iron transport. Accordingly, Lcn2-deficient (Lcn2KO) mice exhib...... mortality, suggesting that Lcn2 may act as an antioxidant in vivo by regulating iron homeostasis. Thus, Lcn2-mediated regulation of labile iron protects the host against sepsis. Its small size and simple structure may make Lcn2 a deployable treatment for sepsis....

  10. Liver-gut axis in the regulation of iron homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deepak Darshan; Gregory J Anderson

    2007-01-01

    The human body requires about 1-2 mg of iron per day for its normal functioning, and dietary iron is the only source for this essential metal. Since humans do not possess a mechanism for the active excretion of iron,the amount of iron in the body is determined by the amount absorbed across the proximal small intestine and, consequently, intestinal iron absorption is a highly regulated process. In recent years, the liver has emerged as a central regulator of both iron absorption and iron release from other tissues. It achieves this by secreting a peptide hormone called hepcidin that acts on the small intestinal epithelium and other cells to limit iron delivery to the plasma. Hepcidin itself is regulated in response to various systemic stimuli including variations in body iron stores, the rate of erythropoiesis, inflammation and hypoxia, the same stimuli that have been known for many years to modulate iron absorption. This review will summarize recent findings on the role played by the liver and hepcidin in the regulation of body iron absorption.

  11. Vacuolar-Iron-Transporter1-Like proteins mediate iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollhofer, Julia; Timofeev, Roman; Lan, Ping; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Buckhout, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a nutritional problem in plants and reduces crop productivity, quality and yield. With the goal of improving the iron (Fe) storage properties of plants, we have investigated the function of three Arabidopsis proteins with homology to Vacuolar Iron Transporter1 (AtVIT1). Heterologous expression of Vacuolar Iron Transporter-Like1 (AtVTL1; At1g21140), AtVTL2 (At1g76800) or AtVTL5 (At3g25190) in the yeast vacuolar Fe transport mutant, Δccc1, restored growth in the presence of 4 mM Fe. Isolated vacuoles from yeast expressing either of the VTL genes in the Δccc1 background had a three- to four-fold increase in Fe concentration compared to vacuoles isolated from the untransformed mutant. Transiently expressed GFP-tagged AtVTL1 was localized exclusively and AtVTL2 was localized primarily to the vacuolar membrane of onion epidermis cells. Seedling root growth of the Arabidopsis nramp3/nramp4 and vit1-1 mutants was decreased compared to the wild type when seedlings were grown under Fe deficiency. When expressed under the 35S promoter in the nramp3/nramp4 or vit1-1 backgrounds, AtVTL1, AtVTL2 or AtVTL5 restored root growth in both mutants. The seed Fe concentration in the nramp3/nramp4 mutant overexpressing AtVTL1, AtVTL2 or AtVTL5 was between 50 and 60% higher than in non-transformed double mutants or wild-type plants. We conclude that the VTL proteins catalyze Fe transport into vacuoles and thus contribute to the regulation of Fe homeostasis in planta.

  12. Vacuolar-Iron-Transporter1-Like proteins mediate iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gollhofer

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is a nutritional problem in plants and reduces crop productivity, quality and yield. With the goal of improving the iron (Fe storage properties of plants, we have investigated the function of three Arabidopsis proteins with homology to Vacuolar Iron Transporter1 (AtVIT1. Heterologous expression of Vacuolar Iron Transporter-Like1 (AtVTL1; At1g21140, AtVTL2 (At1g76800 or AtVTL5 (At3g25190 in the yeast vacuolar Fe transport mutant, Δccc1, restored growth in the presence of 4 mM Fe. Isolated vacuoles from yeast expressing either of the VTL genes in the Δccc1 background had a three- to four-fold increase in Fe concentration compared to vacuoles isolated from the untransformed mutant. Transiently expressed GFP-tagged AtVTL1 was localized exclusively and AtVTL2 was localized primarily to the vacuolar membrane of onion epidermis cells. Seedling root growth of the Arabidopsis nramp3/nramp4 and vit1-1 mutants was decreased compared to the wild type when seedlings were grown under Fe deficiency. When expressed under the 35S promoter in the nramp3/nramp4 or vit1-1 backgrounds, AtVTL1, AtVTL2 or AtVTL5 restored root growth in both mutants. The seed Fe concentration in the nramp3/nramp4 mutant overexpressing AtVTL1, AtVTL2 or AtVTL5 was between 50 and 60% higher than in non-transformed double mutants or wild-type plants. We conclude that the VTL proteins catalyze Fe transport into vacuoles and thus contribute to the regulation of Fe homeostasis in planta.

  13. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Indicates a Disturbed Brain Iron Homeostasis in Neuromyelitis Optica – A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado, Vanessa; Rueda, Fernanda; Deistung, Andreas; Reichenbach, Juergen R.; Tukamoto, Gustavo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Schweser, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and can be associated with oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate brain iron in patients with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), a quantitative iron-sensitive MRI technique. 12 clinically confirmed NMO patients (6 female and 6 male; age 35.4y±14.2y) and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (7 female and 5 male; age 33.9±11.3y) underwent MRI of the brain at 3 Tesla. Quantitative maps of the effective transverse relaxation rate (R2*) and magnetic susceptibility were calculated and a blinded ROI-based group comparison analysis was performed. Normality of the data and differences between patients and controls were tested by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and t-test, respectively. Correlation with age was studied using Spearman’s rank correlation and an ANCOVA-like analysis. Magnetic susceptibility values were decreased in the red nucleus (p0.95; between -15 and -22 ppb depending on reference region) with a trend toward increasing differences with age. R2* revealed significantly decreased relaxation in the optic radiations of five of the 12 patients (p<0.0001; -3.136±0.567 s-1). Decreased relaxation in the optic radiation is indicative for demyelination, which is in line with previous findings. Decreased magnetic susceptibility in the red nucleus is indicative for a lower brain iron concentration, a chemical redistribution of iron into less magnetic forms, or both. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the pathological cause or consequence of this finding. PMID:27171423

  14. Genome-wide identification of Fas/CD95 alternative splicing regulators reveals links with iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, J Ramón; Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Valcárcel, Juan

    2015-01-08

    Alternative splicing of Fas/CD95 exon 6 generates either a membrane-bound receptor that promotes, or a soluble isoform that inhibits, apoptosis. Using an automatized genome-wide siRNA screening for alternative splicing regulators of endogenous transcripts in mammalian cells, we identified 200 genes whose knockdown modulates the ratio between Fas/CD95 isoforms. These include classical splicing regulators; core spliceosome components; and factors implicated in transcription and chromatin remodeling, RNA transport, intracellular signaling, and metabolic control. Coherent effects of genes involved in iron homeostasis and pharmacological modulation of iron levels revealed a link between intracellular iron and Fas/CD95 exon 6 inclusion. A splicing regulatory network linked iron levels with reduced activity of the Zinc-finger-containing splicing regulator SRSF7, and in vivo and in vitro assays revealed that iron inhibits SRSF7 RNA binding. Our results uncover numerous links between cellular pathways and RNA processing and a mechanism by which iron homeostasis can influence alternative splicing.

  15. Simon Labbé's work on iron and copper homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Simon

    2010-05-26

    Iron and copper have a wealth of functions in biological systems, which makes them essential micronutrients for all living organisms. Defects in iron and copper homeostasis are directly responsible for diseases, and have been linked to impaired development, metabolic syndromes and fungal virulence. Consequently, it is crucial to gain a comprehensive understanding of the molecular bases of iron- and copper-dependent proteins in living systems. Simon Labbé maintains parallel programs on iron and copper homeostasis using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Schiz. pombe) as a model system. The study of fission yeast transition-metal metabolism has been successful, not only in discerning the genes and pathways functioning in Schiz. pombe, but also the genes and pathways that are active in mammalian systems and for other fungi.

  16. Simon Labbé’s work on iron and copper homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simon; Labbé

    2010-01-01

    Iron and copper have a wealth of functions in biological systems,which makes them essential micronutrients for all living organisms.Defects in iron and copper homeostasis are directly responsible for diseases,and have been linked to impaired development,metabolic syndromes and fungal virulence.Consequently,it is crucial to gain a comprehensive understanding of the molecular bases of iron-and copper-dependent proteins in living systems.Simon Labbémaintains parallel programs on iron and copper homeostasis using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe(Schiz.pombe) as a model system.The study of fission yeast transition-metal metabolism has been successful,not only in discerning the genes and pathways functioning in Schiz.pombe,but also the genes and pathways that are active in mammalian systems and for other fungi.

  17. The extrahepatic role of TFR2 in iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eSilvestri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2, a protein homologous to the cell iron importer transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1, is expressed in the liver and erythroid cells and is reported to bind diferric transferrin, although at lower affinity than TFR1. TFR2 gene is mutated in type 3 hemochromatosis, a disorder characterized by iron overload and inability to upregulate hepcidin in response to iron. Liver TFR2 is considered a sensor of diferric transferrin, possibly in a complex with HFE. In erythroid cells TFR2 is a partner of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR and stabilizes the receptor on the cell surface. However, Tfr2 null mice as well as TFR2 hemochromatosis patients do not show defective erythropoiesis and tolerate repeated phlebotomy. The iron deficient Tfr2-Tmprss6 double knock out mice have higher red cells count and more severe microcytosis than the liver specific Tfr2 and Tmprss6 double knock out mice. TFR2 in the bone marrow might be a sensor of iron deficiency that protects against excessive microcytosis in a way that involves EPOR, although the mechanisms remain to be worked out.

  18. HIF-1 regulates iron homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans by activation and inhibition of genes involved in iron uptake and storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Joshua Romney

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans ftn-1 and ftn-2, which encode the iron-storage protein ferritin, are transcriptionally inhibited during iron deficiency in intestine. Intestinal specific transcription is dependent on binding of ELT-2 to GATA binding sites in an iron-dependent enhancer (IDE located in ftn-1 and ftn-2 promoters, but the mechanism for iron regulation is unknown. Here, we identify HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor -1 as a negative regulator of ferritin transcription. HIF-1 binds to hypoxia-response elements (HREs in the IDE in vitro and in vivo. Depletion of hif-1 by RNA interference blocks transcriptional inhibition of ftn-1 and ftn-2 reporters, and ftn-1 and ftn-2 mRNAs are not regulated in a hif-1 null strain during iron deficiency. An IDE is also present in smf-3 encoding a protein homologous to mammalian divalent metal transporter-1. Unlike the ftn-1 IDE, the smf-3 IDE is required for HIF-1-dependent transcriptional activation of smf-3 during iron deficiency. We show that hif-1 null worms grown under iron limiting conditions are developmentally delayed and that depletion of FTN-1 and FTN-2 rescues this phenotype. These data show that HIF-1 regulates intestinal iron homeostasis during iron deficiency by activating and inhibiting genes involved in iron uptake and storage.

  19. 铁稳态与骨质疏松%Iron homeostasis and osteoporosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟; 李光飞; 徐又佳

    2013-01-01

    Iron plays an important role in the normal physiological activity in human body.The regulatory mechanism of iron homeostasis has become a hot topic in domain of iron metabolism.Studies in recent years have revealed that the iron homeostasis disorders ( iron overload or iron deficiency) is closely related to bone metabolism abnormality, and it can also lead to osteoporosis. Hence, this paper reviews the recent related literatures about iron mediated bone metabolism abnormality, in order to provide theoretical evidence for the study of iron and bone metabolism.%铁在机体正常的生理活动中扮演着重要角色,铁稳态调节机制已成为目前铁代谢领域研究的热点。近年研究表明,铁稳态失调(铁过载或铁缺乏)与骨代谢异常密切相关,可导致骨质疏松的发生。因此,将近年“铁介导的骨代谢异常”相关文献进行梳理综述,以期为铁代谢与骨代谢的研究提供一定的参考。

  20. Reductive iron assimilation and intracellular siderophores assist extracellular siderophore-driven iron homeostasis and virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is an essential nutrient and prudent iron acquisition and management are key traits of a successful pathogen. Fungi use nonribosomally synthesized secreted iron chelators (siderophores) or Reductive Iron Assimilation (RIA) mechanisms to acquire iron in a high affinity manner. Previous studies...

  1. Iron biofortification and homeostasis in transgenic cassava roots expressing an algal iron assimilatory protein, FEA1

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered the starchy root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory protein, FEA1, in roots to enhance its nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 gm meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 protein did not alter iron levels in l...

  2. Increasing dissolved-oxygen disrupts iron homeostasis in production cultures of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, Antonino; Shiloach, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The damaging effect of high oxygen concentration on growth of Escherichia coli is well established. Over-oxygenation increases the intracellular concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing the destruction of the [4Fe-4S] cluster of dehydratases and limiting the biosynthesis of both branched-chain amino acids and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. A key enzyme that reduces the damaging effect of superoxide is superoxide dismutase (SOD). Its transcriptional regulation is controlled by global transcription regulators that respond to changes in oxygen and iron concentrations and pH. Production of biological compounds from E. coli is currently achieved using cultures grown to high cell densities which require oxygen-enriched air supply. It is, therefore, important to study the effect of over-oxygenation on E. coli metabolism and the bacterial protecting mechanism. The effect of over-oxygenation on the superoxide dismutase regulation system was evaluated in cultures grown in a bioreactor by increasing the oxygen concentration from 30 to 300 % air saturation. Following the change in the dissolved oxygen (DO), the expression of sodC, the periplasmic CuZn-containing SOD, and sodA, the cytosolic Mn-containing SOD, was higher in all the tested strains, while the expression of the sodB, the cytosolic Fe-containing SOD, was lower. The down-regulation of the sodB was found to be related to the activation of the small RNA RyhB. It was revealed that iron homeostasis, in particular ferric iron, was involved in the RyhB activation and in sodB regulation but not in sodA. Supplementation of amino acids to the culture medium reduced the intracellular ROS accumulation and reduced the activation of both SodA and SodC following the increase in the oxygen concentration. The study provides evidence that at conditions of over-oxygenation, sodA and sodC are strongly regulated by the amount of ROS, in particular superoxide; and sodB is regulated by iron availability through the

  3. Mitochondrial ferritin in the regulation of brain iron homeostasis and neurodegenerative diseases

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    Guofen eGao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt is a novel iron-storage protein in mitochondria. Evidences have shown that FtMt is structurally and functionally similar to the cytosolic H-chain ferritin. It protects mitochondria from iron-induced oxidative damage presumably through sequestration of potentially harmful excess free iron. It also participates in the regulation of iron distribution between cytosol and mitochondrial contents. Unlike the ubiquitously expressed H-ferritin, FtMt is mainly expressed in testis and brain, which suggests its tissue-related roles. FtMt is involved in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, as its increased expression has been observed in Alzheimer’s disease, restless legs syndrome and Friedreich’s ataxia. Studies from our laboratory showed that in Alzheimer’s disease, FtMt overexpression attenuated the β-amyloid induced neurotoxicity, which on the other hand increased significantly when FtMt expression was knocked down. It is also found that, by maintaining mitochondrial iron homeostasis, FtMt could prevent 6-hydroxydopamine induced dopaminergic cell damage in Parkinson’s disease. These recent findings on FtMt regarding its functions in regulation of brain iron homeostasis and its protective role in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases are summarized and reviewed.

  4. Perception and Homeostatic Control of Iron in the Rhizobia and Related Bacteria.

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    O'Brian, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient, but it can also be toxic. Therefore, iron homeostasis must be strictly regulated. Transcriptional control of iron-dependent gene expression in the rhizobia and other taxa of the Alphaproteobacteria is fundamentally different from the Fur paradigm in Escherichia coli and other model systems. Rather than sense iron directly, the rhizobia employ the iron response regulator (Irr) to monitor and respond to the status of an iron-dependent process, namely, heme biosynthesis. This novel control mechanism allows iron homeostasis to be integrated with other cellular processes, and it permits differential control of iron regulon genes in a manner not readily achieved by Fur. Moreover, studies of Irr have defined a role for heme in conditional protein stability that has been subsequently described in eukaryotes. Finally, Irr-mediated control of iron metabolism may reflect a cellular strategy that accommodates a greater reliance on manganese.

  5. The ESX-3 Secretion System Is Necessary for Iron and Zinc Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Agnese; Pisu, Davide; Palù, Giorgio; Rodriguez, G. Marcela; Manganelli, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    ESX-3 is one of the five type VII secretion systems encoded by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome. We recently showed the essentiality of ESX-3 for M. tuberculosis viability and proposed its involvement in iron and zinc metabolism. In this study we confirmed the role of ESX-3 in iron uptake and its involvement in the adaptation to low zinc environment in M. tuberculosis. Moreover, we unveiled functional differences between the ESX-3 roles in M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis showing that in the latter ESX-3 is only involved in the adaptation to iron and not to zinc restriction. Finally, we also showed that in M. tuberculosis this secretion system is essential for iron and zinc homeostasis not only in conditions in which the concentrations of these metals are limiting but also in metal sufficient conditions. PMID:24155985

  6. The Porphyromonas gingivalis ferric uptake regulator orthologue does not regulate iron homeostasis

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    Catherine Butler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that has an absolute requirement for iron which it transports from the host as heme and/or Fe2+. Iron transport must be regulated to prevent toxic effects from excess metal in the cell. P. gingivalis has one ferric uptake regulator (Fur orthologue encoded in its genome called Har, which would be expected to regulate the transport and usage of iron within this bacterium. As a gene regulator, inactivation of Har should result in changes in gene expression of several genes compared to the wild-type. This dataset (GEO accession number GSE37099 provides information on expression levels of genes in P. gingivalis in the absence of Har. Surprisingly, these genes do not relate to iron homeostasis.

  7. Role of iron homeostasis in the virulence of phytopathogenic bacteria: an 'à la carte' menu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franza, Thierry; Expert, Dominique

    2013-05-01

    The interaction between pathogenic microbes and their hosts is determined by survival strategies on both sides. As a result of its redox properties, iron is vital for the growth and proliferation of nearly all organisms, including pathogenic bacteria. In bacteria-vertebrate interactions, competition for this essential metal is critical for the outcome of the infection. The role of iron in the virulence of plant pathogenic bacteria has only been explored in a few pathosystems in the past. However, in the last 5 years, intensive research has provided new insights into the mechanisms of iron homeostasis in phytopathogenic bacteria that are involved in virulence. This review, which includes important plant pathosystems, discusses the recent advances in the understanding of iron transport and homeostasis during plant pathogenesis. By summarizing the recent progress, we wish to provide an updated view clarifying the various roles played by this metal in the virulence of bacterial phytopathogens as a nutritional and regulatory element. The complex intertwining of iron metabolism and oxidative stress during infection is emphasized.

  8. Iron Biofortification and Homeostasis in Transgenic Cassava Roots Expressing the Algal Iron Assimilatory Gene, FEA1

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered the tropical root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory gene, FEA1, in its storage roots with the objective of enhancing the root nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 g meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 gene...

  9. The PICALM protein plays a key role in iron homeostasis and cell proliferation.

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    Paula B Scotland

    Full Text Available The ubiquitously expressed phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly (PICALM protein associates with the plasma membrane, binds clathrin, and plays a role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Alterations of the human PICALM gene are present in aggressive hematopoietic malignancies, and genome-wide association studies have recently linked the PICALM locus to late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Inactivating and hypomorphic Picalm mutations in mice cause different degrees of severity of anemia, abnormal iron metabolism, growth retardation and shortened lifespan. To understand PICALM's function, we studied the consequences of PICALM overexpression and characterized PICALM-deficient cells derived from mutant fit1 mice. Our results identify a role for PICALM in transferrin receptor (TfR internalization and demonstrate that the C-terminal PICALM residues are critical for its association with clathrin and for the inhibitory effect of PICALM overexpression on TfR internalization. Murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs that are deficient in PICALM display several characteristics of iron deficiency (increased surface TfR expression, decreased intracellular iron levels, and reduced cellular proliferation, all of which are rescued by retroviral PICALM expression. The proliferation defect of cells that lack PICALM results, at least in part, from insufficient iron uptake, since it can be corrected by iron supplementation. Moreover, PICALM-deficient cells are particularly sensitive to iron chelation. Taken together, these data reveal that PICALM plays a critical role in iron homeostasis, and offer new perspectives into the pathogenesis of PICALM-associated diseases.

  10. Altered brain iron homeostasis and dopaminergic function in Restless Legs Syndrome (Willis-Ekbom Disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Christopher J; Connor, James; Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Jenner, Peter; Winkelman, John; Zee, Phyllis C; Allen, Richard

    2014-11-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom Disease (WED), is a sensorimotor disorder for which the exact pathophysiology remains unclear. Brain iron insufficiency and altered dopaminergic function appear to play important roles in the etiology of the disorder. This concept is based partly on extensive research studies using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), autopsy material, and brain imaging indicating reduced regional brain iron and on the clinical efficacy of dopamine receptor agonists for alleviating RLS symptoms. Finding causal relations, linking low brain iron to altered dopaminergic function in RLS, has required however the use of animal models. These models have provided insights into how alterations in brain iron homeostasis and dopaminergic system may be involved in RLS. The results of animal models of RLS and biochemical, postmortem, and imaging studies in patients with the disease suggest that disruptions in brain iron trafficking lead to disturbances in striatal dopamine neurotransmission for at least some patients with RLS. This review examines the data supporting an iron deficiency-dopamine metabolic theory of RLS by relating the results from animal model investigations of the influence of brain iron deficiency on dopaminergic systems to data from clinical studies in patients with RLS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcriptomic analyses of maize ys1 and ys3 mutants reveal maize iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozoye, Tomoko; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2015-09-01

    To acquire iron (Fe), graminaceous plants secrete mugineic acid family phytosiderophores (MAs) (Takagi, 1976 [1]) through the MAs efflux transporter TOM1 (Nozoye et al., 2011 [2]) and take up Fe in the form of Fe(III)-MAs complexes through the Fe(III)-MAs transporter YS1 (Curie et al., 2001 [3]). Yellow stripe 1 (ys1) and ys3 are recessive mutants of maize (Zea mays L.) that result in symptoms typical of Fe deficiency, i.e., interveinal chlorosis of the leaves. The ys1 mutant is defective in the YS1 transporter and is therefore unable to take up Fe(III)-MAs complexes. While the ys3 mutant has been shown to be defective in MA release, the causative gene has not been identified. The objective of the present work was to identify the genes responsible for the ys1 and ys3 phenotypes, so as to extend our understanding of Fe homeostasis in maize by qRT-PCR. In agreement with previous reports, the expression level of YS1 was decreased in the ys1 mutant. Moreover, we identified that the expression level of a homolog of TOM1 in maize (ZmTOM1) was significantly decreased in the ys3 mutant. Here described the quality control and analysis that were performed on the dataset. The data is publicly available through the GEO database with accession number GSE44557. The interpretation and description of these data are included in a manuscript (Nozoye et al., 2013 [4]).

  12. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

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    Petra Procházková

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP. The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant.

  13. Mutations of ferric uptake regulator (fur) impair iron homeostasis, growth, oxidative stress survival, and virulence of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jittawuttipoka, Thichakorn; Sallabhan, Ratiboot; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon; Fuangthong, Mayuree; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2010-05-01

    Iron is essential in numerous cellular functions. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron's toxic effects. Here, we characterize the roles of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) fur, which encodes an iron sensor and a transcriptional regulator that acts in iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and virulence. Herein, we isolated spontaneous Xcc fur mutants that had high intracellular iron concentrations due to constitutively high siderophore levels and increased expression of iron transport genes. These mutants also had reduced aerobic plating efficiency and resistance to peroxide killing. Moreover, one fur mutant was attenuated on a host plant, thus indicating that fur has important roles in the virulence of X. campestris pv. campestris.

  14. The dietary flavonoid myricetin regulates iron homeostasis by suppressing hepcidin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Mingdao; An, Peng; Wu, Qian; Shen, Xiaoyun; Shao, Dandan; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Yingqi; Zhang, Shenshen; Yao, Hui; Min, Junxia; Wang, Fudi

    2016-04-01

    Hepcidin, a master regulator of iron homeostasis, is a promising target in treatment of iron disorders such as hemochromatosis, anemia of inflammation and iron-deficiency anemia. We previously reported that black soybean seed coat extract could inhibit hepcidin expression. Based on this finding, we performed a screen in cultured cells in order to identify the compounds in black soybeans that inhibit hepcidin expression. We found that the dietary flavonoid myricetin significantly inhibited the expression of hepcidin both in vitro and in vivo. Treating cultured cells with myricetin decreased both HAMP mRNA levels and promoter activity by reducing SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation. This effect was observed even in the presence of bone morphogenic protein-6 (BMP6) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), two factors that stimulate hepcidin expression. Furthermore, mice that were treated with myricetin (either orally or systemically) had reduced hepatic hepcidin expression, decreased splenic iron levels and increased serum iron levels. Notably, myricetin-treated mice increased red blood cell counts and hemoglobin levels. In addition, pretreating mice with myricetin prevented LPS-induced hypoferremia. We conclude that myricetin potently inhibits hepcidin expression both in vitro and in vivo, and this effect is mediated by altering BMP/SMAD signaling. These experiments highlight the feasibility of identifying and characterizing bioactive phytochemicals to suppress hepcidin expression. These results also suggest that myricetin may represent a novel therapy for treating iron deficiency-related diseases.

  15. Neural Control Mechanisms and Body Fluid Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alan Kim

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to study the nature of afferent signals to the brain that reflect the status of body fluid balance and to investigate the central neural mechanisms that process this information for the activation of response systems which restore body fluid homeostasis. That is, in the face of loss of fluids from intracellular or extracellular fluid compartments, animals seek and ingest water and ionic solutions (particularly Na(+) solutions) to restore the intracellular and extracellular spaces. Over recent years, our laboratory has generated a substantial body of information indicating that: (1) a fall in systemic arterial pressure facilitates the ingestion of rehydrating solutions and (2) that the actions of brain amine systems (e.g., norepinephrine; serotonin) are critical for precise correction of fluid losses. Because both acute and chronic dehydration are associated with physiological stresses, such as exercise and sustained exposure to microgravity, the present research will aid in achieving a better understanding of how vital information is handled by the nervous system for maintenance of the body's fluid matrix which is critical for health and well-being.

  16. Serum retinol levels are positively correlated with hemoglobin concentrations, independent of iron homeostasis: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Seyed Mojtaba; Heidari, Gholamreza; Nabipour, Iraj; Amirinejad, Roya; Assadi, Majid; Bargahi, Afshar; Akbarzadeh, Samad; Tahmasebi, Rahim; Sanjdideh, Zahra

    2013-04-01

    Micronutrient interactions give rise to complex issues that have an impact on preventive strategies when multiple micronutrient deficiencies coexist. The aim of this population-based study was to determine the prevalence of vitamins A and E and iron deficiencies among women 15 to 49 years of age in the northern Persian Gulf region. We hypothesized that serum retinol levels may show correlations with hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations, independent of iron status. A total of 1242 nonpregnant women of reproductive age were selected via a multistage stratified random cluster sampling technique. Serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor levels were measured using enzyme immunoassay techniques. Serum retinol (vitamin A) and α-tocopherol (vitamin E) were determined for 727 women by high-performance liquid chromatography. The prevalence of anemia (Hb retinol levels exhibit a significant association with Hb concentrations after controlling for serum ferritin levels, anemia associated with chronic disease, and risk factors for anemia. Therefore, most nonpregnant women of reproductive age in the northern Persian Gulf were found to have adequate serum vitamin A and E levels. However, the status of anemia and iron deficiency anemia could be considered a mild public health problem in this region. On the basis of multivariate analyses, we conclude that low serum retinol levels may contribute to anemia, independent of iron homeostasis.

  17. HapX-Mediated Iron Homeostasis Is Essential for Rhizosphere Competence and Virulence of the Soilborne Pathogen Fusarium oxysporum[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Berges, Manuel S.; Capilla, Javier; Turrà, David; Schafferer, Lukas; Matthijs, Sandra; Jöchl, Christoph; Cornelis, Pierre; Guarro, Josep; Haas, Hubertus; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Soilborne fungal pathogens cause devastating yield losses and are highly persistent and difficult to control. During the infection process, these organisms must cope with limited availability of iron. Here we show that the bZIP protein HapX functions as a key regulator of iron homeostasis and virulence in the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Deletion of hapX does not affect iron uptake but causes derepression of genes involved in iron-consuming pathways, leading to impaired growth under iron-depleted conditions. F. oxysporum strains lacking HapX are reduced in their capacity to invade and kill tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants and immunodepressed mice. The virulence defect of ΔhapX on tomato plants is exacerbated by coinoculation of roots with a biocontrol strain of Pseudomonas putida, but not with a siderophore-deficient mutant, indicating that HapX contributes to iron competition of F. oxysporum in the tomato rhizosphere. These results establish a conserved role for HapX-mediated iron homeostasis in fungal infection of plants and mammals. PMID:22968717

  18. ER Stress and Iron Homeostasis: A New Frontier for the UPR

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    Susana J. Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The C282Y mutation of HFE accounts for the majority of cases of the iron overload disease Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH. The conformational changes introduced by this mutation impair the HFE association with β2-microglobulin (β2m and the cell surface expression of the protein: with two major consequences. From a functional perspective, the ability of HFE to bind to transferrin receptors 1 and 2 is lost in the C282Y mutant, thus affecting hepcidin regulation. Also due to the faulty assembly with β2m, HFE-C282Y molecules remain in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER as aggregates that undergo proteasomal degradation and activate an Unfolded Protein Response (UPR. UPR activation, regardless of the ER stress stimuli, was shown to reshape the expression profile of iron-related genes and to decrease MHC-I cell surface expression. The possibility of a HFE-C282Y-mediated interplay between the UPR and iron homeostasis influencing disease progression and the clinical heterogeneity among C282Y carriers is discussed. The responsiveness of the ER chaperone calreticulin to both ER and iron-induced oxidative stresses, and its correlation with HH patients’ phenotype, reinforce the interest of dissecting the UPR signaling/iron metabolism crosstalk and points to the potential clinical value of use of pharmacological chaperones in HFE-HH.

  19. Transcriptomic analyses of maize ys1 and ys3 mutants reveal maize iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Nozoye

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To acquire iron (Fe, graminaceous plants secrete mugineic acid family phytosiderophores (MAs (Takagi, 1976 [1] through the MAs efflux transporter TOM1 (Nozoye et al., 2011 [2] and take up Fe in the form of Fe(III–MAs complexes through the Fe(III-MAs transporter YS1 (Curie et al., 2001 [3]. Yellow stripe 1 (ys1 and ys3 are recessive mutants of maize (Zea mays L. that result in symptoms typical of Fe deficiency, i.e., interveinal chlorosis of the leaves. The ys1 mutant is defective in the YS1 transporter and is therefore unable to take up Fe(III–MAs complexes. While the ys3 mutant has been shown to be defective in MA release, the causative gene has not been identified. The objective of the present work was to identify the genes responsible for the ys1 and ys3 phenotypes, so as to extend our understanding of Fe homeostasis in maize by qRT-PCR. In agreement with previous reports, the expression level of YS1 was decreased in the ys1 mutant. Moreover, we identified that the expression level of a homolog of TOM1 in maize (ZmTOM1 was significantly decreased in the ys3 mutant. Here described the quality control and analysis that were performed on the dataset. The data is publicly available through the GEO database with accession number GSE44557. The interpretation and description of these data are included in a manuscript (Nozoye et al., 2013 [4].

  20. Stratum corneum barrier integrity controls skin homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W

    1999-04-01

    The stratum corneum water barrier controls structural and functional properties of both the epidermis and the dermis. Treatments which chronically disrupt the stratum corneum water barrier can induce changes similar to those seen with 'anti-aging' treatments such as (-Hydroxy acids (AHAs) and Retin Atrade mark. Barrier disruption via daily tape stripping increases epidermal and dermal thickness, superficial and integral skin firmness, and improves skin surface texture. Modest or transitory disruption did not produce such effects. Similar results were observed with topical application of AHAs, retinoids or mild irritants after about 4-6 weeks provided such treatments resulted in prolonged elevation in TEWL (trans-epidermal water loss). Treatments that did not chronically elevate TEWL could also produce positive cosmetic effects, but such effects were in general restricted to the skin surface or epidermis. Irritation, which was observed with some treatments, was not solely responsible for the positive effects observed.

  1. FIT interacts with AtbHLH38 and AtbHLH39 in regulating iron uptake gene expression for iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youxi Yuan; Huilan Wu; Ning Wang; Jie Li; Weina Zhao; Juan Du; Daowen Wang; Hong-Qing Ling

    2008-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for plant growth and development. Iron homeostasis in plants is tightly regulated at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional level. Several bHLH transcription factors involved in iron homeostasis have been identified recently. However, their regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. In this work, we demonstrate that the transcription factor FIT interacted with AtbHLH38 and AtbHLH39 and directly conferred the expression regulation of iron uptake genes for iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis. Yeast two-hybrid analysis and transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts showed that AtbH LH38 or AtbHLH39 interacted with FIT, a central transcription factor involved in iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis. Expression of FIT/AtbHLH38 or FIT/AtbHLH39 in yeast cells activated GUS expression driven by ferric chelate reductase (FRO2) and ferrous transporter (IRT1) promoters. Overexpression of FIT with either AtbHLH38 or AtbHLH39 in plants converted the expression of the iron uptake genes FRO2 and IRT1 from induced to constitutive. Further analysis revealed that FR02 and IRT1 were not regulated at the posttranscriptional level in these plants because IRT1 protein accumulation and high ferric chelate reductase activity were detected in the overexpression plants under both iron deficiency and iron sufficiency. The double overexpression plants accumulated more iron in their shoots than wild type or the plants overexpressing either AtbHLH38,AtbHLH39 or FIT. Our data support that ferric-chelate reductase FRO2 and ferrous-transporter IRT1 are the targets of the three transcription factors and the transcription of FRO2 and IRT1 is directly regulated by a complex of FIT/AtbHLH38 or FIT/AtbHLH39.

  2. Neuroendocrine control of body fluid homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCann S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP play important and opposite roles in the control of water and salt intake, with angiotensin II promoting the intake of both and ANP inhibiting the intake of both. Following blood volume expansion, baroreceptor input to the brainstem induces the release of ANP within the hypothalamus that releases oxytocin (OT that acts on its receptors in the heart to cause the release of ANP. ANP activates guanylyl cyclase that converts guanosine triphosphate into cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP. cGMP activates protein kinase G that reduces heart rate and force of contraction, decreasing cardiac output. ANP acts similarly to induce vasodilation. The intrinsic OT system in the heart and vascular system augments the effects of circulating OT to cause a rapid reduction in effective circulating blood volume. Furthermore, natriuresis is rapidly induced by the action of ANP on its tubular guanylyl cyclase receptors, resulting in the production of cGMP that closes Na+ channels. The OT released by volume expansion also acts on its tubular receptors to activate nitric oxide synthase. The nitric oxide released activates guanylyl cyclase leading to the production of cGMP that also closes Na+ channels, thereby augmenting the natriuretic effect of ANP. The natriuresis induced by cGMP finally causes blood volume to return to normal. At the same time, the ANP released acts centrally to decrease water and salt intake.

  3. Fungal Morphology, Iron Homeostasis, and Lipid Metabolism Regulated by a GATA Transcription Factor in Blastomyces dermatitidis.

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    Amber J Marty

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In response to temperature, Blastomyces dermatitidis converts between yeast and mold forms. Knowledge of the mechanism(s underlying this response to temperature remains limited. In B. dermatitidis, we identified a GATA transcription factor, SREB, important for the transition to mold. Null mutants (SREBΔ fail to fully complete the conversion to mold and cannot properly regulate siderophore biosynthesis. To capture the transcriptional response regulated by SREB early in the phase transition (0-48 hours, gene expression microarrays were used to compare SREB∆ to an isogenic wild type isolate. Analysis of the time course microarray data demonstrated SREB functioned as a transcriptional regulator at 37°C and 22°C. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses indicated SREB was involved in diverse biological processes including iron homeostasis, biosynthesis of triacylglycerol and ergosterol, and lipid droplet formation. Integration of microarray data, bioinformatics, and chromatin immunoprecipitation identified a subset of genes directly bound and regulated by SREB in vivo in yeast (37°C and during the phase transition to mold (22°C. This included genes involved with siderophore biosynthesis and uptake, iron homeostasis, and genes unrelated to iron assimilation. Functional analysis suggested that lipid droplets were actively metabolized during the phase transition and lipid metabolism may contribute to filamentous growth at 22°C. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, RNA interference, and overexpression analyses suggested that SREB was in a negative regulatory circuit with the bZIP transcription factor encoded by HAPX. Both SREB and HAPX affected morphogenesis at 22°C; however, large changes in transcript abundance by gene deletion for SREB or strong overexpression for HAPX were required to alter the phase transition.

  4. Comparative analysis of iron homeostasis in sub-Saharan African children with sickle cell disease and their unaffected siblings

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    Selma eGomez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential trace element subject to tight regulation to ensure adequate running of biological processes. In sub-Saharan Africa where hemoglobinopathies are common, iron homeostasis is likely to be impaired by these conditions. Here we assessed and compared key serum proteins associated with iron metabolism between sub-Saharan African children with sickle cell disease (SCD and their unaffected siblings. Complete blood counts and serum concentrations of four key proteins involved in iron regulation (ferritin, transferrin, sTfR and hepcidin were measured for 73 children with SCD and 68 healthy siblings in Benin, West Africa. We found significant differences in concentration of transferrin, sTfR and ferritin between the two groups. Hepcidin concentrations were found at unusually high concentrations but did not differ among the two groups. We found a significant negative correlation between hepcidin levels and both MCH and MCV in the SCD group and report that sTfR concentrations show a correlation with MCV and MHC in opposite directions in the two groups. These results highlight the unusually high levels of hepcidin in the Beninese population and the patterns of differential iron homeostasis taking place under sickle cell disease status. These results lay the foundation for a systematic evaluation of the underlying mechanisms deregulating iron homeostasis in populations with SCD or high prevalence of iron deficiency.

  5. A systems approach to mapping transcriptional networks controlling surfactant homeostasis

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    Dave Vrushank

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary surfactant is required for lung function at birth and throughout life. Lung lipid and surfactant homeostasis requires regulation among multi-tiered processes, coordinating the synthesis of surfactant proteins and lipids, their assembly, trafficking, and storage in type II cells of the lung. The mechanisms regulating these interrelated processes are largely unknown. Results We integrated mRNA microarray data with array independent knowledge using Gene Ontology (GO similarity analysis, promoter motif searching, protein interaction and literature mining to elucidate genetic networks regulating lipid related biological processes in lung. A Transcription factor (TF - target gene (TG similarity matrix was generated by integrating data from different analytic methods. A scoring function was built to rank the likely TF-TG pairs. Using this strategy, we identified and verified critical components of a transcriptional network directing lipogenesis, lipid trafficking and surfactant homeostasis in the mouse lung. Conclusions Within the transcriptional network, SREBP, CEBPA, FOXA2, ETSF, GATA6 and IRF1 were identified as regulatory hubs displaying high connectivity. SREBP, FOXA2 and CEBPA together form a common core regulatory module that controls surfactant lipid homeostasis. The core module cooperates with other factors to regulate lipid metabolism and transport, cell growth and development, cell death and cell mediated immune response. Coordinated interactions of the TFs influence surfactant homeostasis and regulate lung function at birth.

  6. Iron homeostasis and H63D mutations in alcoholics with and without liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariana Verdelho Machado; Paula Ravasco; Alexandra Martins; Maria Ermelinda Camilo; Helena Cortez-Pinto; Maria Rosario Almeida

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of HFE gene mutation and indices of disturbed iron homeostasis in alcoholics with and without liver disease. METHODS: One hundred and fifty-three heavy drinkers (defined as alcohol consumption > 80 g/d for at least 5 years) were included in the study. These comprised 78 patients with liver disease [liver disease alcoholics (LDA)] in whom the presence of liver disease was confirmed by liver biopsy or clinical evidence of hepatic decompensation, and 75 subjects with no evidence of liver disease, determined by normal liver tests on two occasions [non-liver disease alcoholics (NLDA)], were consecutively enrolled. Serum markers of iron status and HFE C282Y and H63D mutations were determined. HFE genotyping was compared with data obtained in healthy blood donors from the same geographical area. RESULTS: Gender ratio was similar in both study groups. LDA patients were older than NLDA patients third and one fifth of the study population had serum transferrin saturation (TS) greater than 45% and 60% respectively. Serum iron levels were similar in both groups. However, LDA patients had higher TS for having liver disease with TS greater than 45% was 2.20 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.37-3.54). There was no difference in C282Y allelic frequency between the two groups. However, H63D was more frequent in LDA patients (0.25 vs 0.16, P = 0.03). LDA patients had a greater probability of carrying at least one HFE mutation than NLDA patients (49.5% vs 31.6%, P = 0.02). The odds ratio for LDA in patients with H63D mutation was 1.57 (95% CI: 1.02-2.40).CONCLUSION: The present study confirms the presence of iron overload in alcoholics, which was more severe in the subset of subjects with liver disease,in parallel with an increased frequency of H63D HFE mutation.

  7. Homeostasis 3: nurses as external agents of control in hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, John; McVicar, Andrew

    The role of healthcare practitioners in reversing homeostatic imbalances essentially makes them external agents of homeostatic control-they are replacing the usual assessment, controlling and effector aspects that operate intrinsically in health (homeostasis) but have failed in ill-health (homeostatic imbalances). This article examines the homeostatic imbalance of hypothyroidism, using a case study to draw analogies between the components of homeostatic theory and those of the nursing process. After reading this article, nurses should be able to explain: how the components of homeostasis are associated with health, and how failure of one or more of these components of homeostasis is associated with illness; that illness arises from a cellular, and therefore chemical, homeostatic imbalance; that hypothyroidism is a cellular imbalance of low levels of thyroid hormone, which is identified by signs and symptoms (i.e. other homeostatic imbalances) related to these low levels; and understand how primary care nurses looking after people with hypothyroidism are acting as external agents of homeostatic control.

  8. Perchlorate exposure and association with iron homeostasis and other biological functions among NHANES 2005-2008 subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchlorate exposure and association with iron homeostasis and other biological functions among NHANES 2005-2008 subjects Schreinemachers DM, Ghio AJ, Cascio WE, Sobus JR. U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA Perchlorate (ClO4-), an environmental pollutant, is a known thyroid toxicant and...

  9. The chloroplast permease PIC1 regulates plant growth and development by directing homeostasis and transport of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duy, Daniela; Stübe, Roland; Wanner, Gerhard; Philippar, Katrin

    2011-04-01

    The membrane-spanning protein PIC1 (for permease in chloroplasts 1) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was previously described to mediate iron transport across the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The albino phenotype of pic1 knockout mutants was reminiscent of iron-deficiency symptoms and characterized by severely impaired plastid development and plant growth. In addition, plants lacking PIC1 showed a striking increase in chloroplast ferritin clusters, which function in protection from oxidative stress by sequestering highly reactive free iron in their spherical protein shell. In contrast, PIC1-overexpressing lines (PIC1ox) in this study rather resembled ferritin loss-of-function plants. PIC1ox plants suffered from oxidative stress and leaf chlorosis, most likely originating from iron overload in chloroplasts. Later during growth, plants were characterized by reduced biomass as well as severely defective flower and seed development. As a result of PIC1 protein increase in the inner envelope membrane of plastids, flower tissue showed elevated levels of iron, while the content of other transition metals (copper, zinc, manganese) remained unchanged. Seeds, however, specifically revealed iron deficiency, suggesting that PIC1 overexpression sequestered iron in flower plastids, thereby becoming unavailable for seed iron loading. In addition, expression of genes associated with metal transport and homeostasis as well as photosynthesis was deregulated in PIC1ox plants. Thus, PIC1 function in plastid iron transport is closely linked to ferritin and plastid iron homeostasis. In consequence, PIC1 is crucial for balancing plant iron metabolism in general, thereby regulating plant growth and in particular fruit development.

  10. A novel NAC transcription factor, IDEF2, that recognizes the iron deficiency-responsive element 2 regulates the genes involved in iron homeostasis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogo, Yuko; Kobayashi, Takanori; Nakanishi Itai, Reiko; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Kakei, Yusuke; Takahashi, Michiko; Toki, Seiichi; Mori, Satoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2008-05-09

    Iron is essential for most living organisms, and thus iron deficiency poses a major abiotic stress in crop production. Plants induce iron utilization systems under conditions of low iron availability, but the molecular mechanisms of gene regulation under iron deficiency remain largely unknown. We identified a novel transcription factor of rice and barley, IDEF2, which specifically binds to the iron deficiency-responsive cis-acting element 2 (IDE2) by yeast one-hybrid screening. IDEF2 belongs to an uncharacterized branch of the NAC transcription factor family and exhibits novel properties of sequence recognition. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and cyclic amplification and selection of targets experiment revealed that IDEF2 predominantly recognized CA(A/C)G(T/C)(T/C/A)(T/C/A) within IDE2 as the core-binding site. IDEF2 transcripts are constitutively present in rice roots and leaves. Repression of the function of IDEF2 by the RNA interference (RNAi) technique and chimeric repressor gene-silencing technology (CRES-T) caused aberrant iron homeostasis in rice. Several genes up-regulated by iron deficiency, including the Fe(II)-nicotianamine transporter gene OsYSL2, were less induced by iron deficiency in the RNAi rice of IDEF2, suggesting that IDEF2 is involved in the regulation of these genes. Many genes with repressed expression in IDEF2 RNAi rice possessed the IDEF2-binding core sites in their promoters, and the flanking sequences were also highly homologous to IDE2. IDEF2 bound to OsYSL2 promoter region containing the binding core site, suggesting direct regulation of OsYSL2 expression. These results reveal novel cis-element/trans-factor interactions functionally associated with iron homeostasis.

  11. Hiperpigmentación cutánea y homeostasis del hierro: rol de la hepcidina Cutaneous hyperpigmentation and homeostasis of iron: role of the hepcidin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wolf

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available La hiperpigmentación cutánea por melanina en zonas expuestas al sol puede estar asociada a un desequilibrio en la homeostasis del hierro. La hepcidina es un péptido responsable de la regulación negativa de la absorción del hierro en el intestino delgado y de su liberación por los macrófagos. Posee capacidad antimicrobiana. Es sintetizada en el hígado, secretada al torrente circulatorio y excretada por la orina. La sobreexpresión causa anemia y su déficit, sobrecarga de hierro (acumulación en diferentes órganos y hemocromatosis hereditaria. Los antagonistas de la hepcidina podrían utilizarse en el tratamiento de la anemia resistente a eritropoyetina, asociada a procesos crónicos. Por su parte, los agonistas o sustancias que estimulen la producción de hepcidina, podrían constituir un tratamiento en enfermedades con sobrecarga de hierro (siderosis y por consiguiente, corregir la hiperpigmentación asociada.The cutaneous hyperpigmentation by melanin in zones of the skin exposed to the sun can be associated to an imbalance in the homeostasis of the iron. The hepcidin is a peptide responsible for the negative regulation of the absorption of the iron in the small intestine and of its liberation by the macrophages. It has, in addition, antimicrobial capacity. It is synthesized in the liver, secreted to the circulatory torrent and excreted by the urine. Its overexpression causes anemia and its deficit iron overload (accumulation in different organs and hereditary hemochromatosis, The antagonists of the hepcidin, could be used in the treatment of anemia resistant to erythropoyetin associated to chronic processes. On the other hand, the agonists or substances that stimulate the hepcidin production, could constitute a treatment in diseases with overload of iron (siderosis and therefore, to correct the associate.hyperpigmentation.

  12. Homeostasis 4: nurses as agents of control in myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, John; McVicar, Andrew; Hubbard, Julia

    The role of health practitioners in attempting to reverse homeostatic imbalances essentially makes them external agents of homeostatic control-they are replacing the assessment, controlling and effector mechanisms that operate during health (homeostasis), but have failed in ill-health (homeostatic imbalances). Myocardial infarction (MI) is the homeostatic imbalance examined in this article, which aims to apply the analogy between the components of homeostatic theory and the components of the nursing process (Clancy and McVicar, 2011b) to the condition. After reading the article, nurses should be able to understand that: the components of homeostasis are associated with health, and the failure of one or more of these components results in illness; illness arises from a cellular, hence chemical, homeostatic imbalance(s); MI results from a cellular imbalance leading to a restriction in blood flow to the myocardium, and is identified by signs and symptoms (i.e. other homeostatic imbalances) related to the ischaemia; when caring for people with MI, coronary care nurses are acting as external agents of homeostatic control.

  13. Regulation of copper and iron homeostasis by metal chelators: a possible chemotherapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Anne; Liu, Yan; Nguyen, Michel; Meunier, Bernard

    2015-05-19

    With the increase of life expectancy of humans in more than two-thirds of the countries in the World, aging diseases are becoming the frontline health problems. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is now one of the major challenges in drug discovery, since, with the exception of memantine in 2003, all clinical trials with drug candidates failed over the past decade. If we consider that the loss of neurons is due to a high level of oxidative stress produced by nonregulated redox active metal ions like copper linked to amyloids of different sizes, regulation of metal homeostasis is a key target. The difficulty for large copper-carrier proteins to directly extract copper ions from metalated amyloids might be considered as being at the origin of the rupture of the copper homeostasis regulation in AD brains. So, there is an urgent need for new specific metal chelators that should be able to regulate the homeostasis of metal ions, specially copper and iron, in AD brains. As a consequence of that concept, chelators promoting metal excretion from brain are not desired. One should favor ligands able to extract copper ions from sinks (amyloids being the major one) and to transfer these redox-active metal ions to copper-carrier proteins or copper-containing enzymes. Obviously, the affinity of these chelators for the metal ion should not be a sufficient criterion, but the metal specificity and the ability of the chelators to release the metal under specific biological conditions should be considered. Such an approach is still largely unexplored. The requirements for the chelators are very high (ability to cross the brain-blood barrier, lack of toxicity, etc.), few chemical series were proposed, and, among them, biochemical or biological data are scarce. As a matter of fact, the bioinorganic pharmacology of AD represents less than 1% of all articles dedicated to AD drug research. The major part of these articles deals with an old and rather toxic drug, clioquinol and related analogs, that

  14. Aconitase post-translational modification as a key in linkage between Krebs cycle, iron homeostasis, redox signaling, and metabolism of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushchak, Oleh V; Piroddi, Marta; Galli, Francesco; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-01-01

    Aconitase, an enzyme possessing an iron-sulfur cluster that is sensitive to oxidation, is involved in the regulation of cellular metabolism. There are two isoenzymes of aconitase (Aco)--mitochondrial (mAco) and cytosolic (cAco) ones. The primary role of mAdco is believed to be to control cellular ATP production via regulation of intermediate flux in the Krebs cycle. The cytosolic Aco in its reduced form operates as an enzyme, whereas in the oxidized form it is involved in the control of iron homeostasis as iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a central role in regulation of Aco functions. Catalytic Aco activity is regulated by reversible oxidation of [4Fe-4S]²⁺ cluster and cysteine residues, so redox-dependent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) have gained increasing consideration as regards possible regulatory effects. These include modifications of cysteine residues by oxidation, nitrosylation and thiolation, as well as Tyr nitration and oxidation of Lys residues to carbonyls. Redox-independent PTMs such as phosphorylation and transamination also have been described. In the presence of a sustained ROS flux, redox-dependent PTMs may lead to enzyme damage and cell stress by impaired energy and iron metabolism. Aconitase has been identified as a protein that undergoes oxidative modification and inactivation in aging and certain oxidative stress-related disorders. Here we describe possible mechanisms of involvement of the two aconitase isoforms, cAco and mAco, in the control of cell metabolism and iron homeostasis, balancing the regulatory, and damaging effects of ROS.

  15. Arabidopsis HY1 Confers Cadmium Toleranceby Decreasing Nitric Oxide Production andImproving Iron Homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Up-regulation of the gene that encodes intracellular heme oxygenase 1 (HO1) benefits plants under cad-mium (Cd2+) stress; however, the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we elucidate the role of Arabidopsis HY1(AtHO1) in Cd2+ tolerance by using genetic and molecular approaches. Analysis of two HY1 null mutants, three HY1 over-expression lines, HO double or triple mutants, as well as phyA and phyB mutants revealed the specific hypersensitivityof by1 to Cd2+ stress. Supplementation with two enzymatic by-products of HY1, carbon monoxide (CO) and iron (Fe,especially), rescued the Cd2+-induced inhibition of primary root (PR) elongation in hy1-100. The mutation of HY1, whichexhibited lower glutathione content than Col-0 in root tissues, was able to induce nitric oxide (NO) overproduction,Cd2+ accumulation, and severe Fe deficiency in root tissues. However, the contrasting responses appeared in 35S:HY1-4.Additionally, reduced levels of Ferric Reduction Oxidase 2 (FRO2) and Iron-Regulated Transporter 1 (IRT1) transcripts,and increased levels of Heavy Metal ATPase 2/4 (HMA2/4) transcripts bolster the notion that HY1 up-regulation amelio-rates Fe deficiency, and might increase Cd2+ exclusion. Taken together, these results showed that HY1 plays a commonlink in Cd2+ tolerance by decreasing NO production and improving Fe homeostasis in Arabidopsis root tissues.

  16. The Arabidopsis AtOPT3 protein functions in metal homeostasis and movement of iron to developing seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Minviluz G; Patel, Ami; McClain, William E; Mathieu, Melanie; Remley, Melissa; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Gassmann, Walter; Blevins, Dale G; Stacey, Gary

    2008-02-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana AtOPT3 belongs to the oligopeptide transporter (OPT) family, a relatively poorly characterized family of peptide/modified peptide transporters found in archebacteria, bacteria, fungi, and plants. A null mutation in AtOPT3 resulted in embryo lethality, indicating an essential role for AtOPT3 in embryo development. In this article, we report on the isolation and phenotypic characterization of a second AtOPT3 mutant line, opt3-2, harboring a T-DNA insertion in the 5' untranslated region of AtOPT3. The T-DNA insertion in the AtOPT3 promoter resulted in reduced but sufficient AtOPT3 expression to allow embryo formation in opt3-2 homozygous seeds. Phenotypic analyses of opt3-2 plants revealed three interesting loss-of-function phenotypes associated with iron metabolism. First, reduced AtOPT3 expression in opt3-2 plants resulted in the constitutive expression of root iron deficiency responses regardless of exogenous iron supply. Second, deregulation of root iron uptake processes in opt3-2 roots resulted in the accumulation of very high levels of iron in opt3-2 tissues. Hyperaccumulation of iron in opt3-2 resulted in the formation of brown necrotic areas in opt3-2 leaves and was more pronounced during the seed-filling stage. Third, reduced AtOPT3 expression resulted in decreased accumulation of iron in opt3-2 seeds. The reduced accumulation of iron in opt3-2 seeds is especially noteworthy considering the excessively high levels of accumulated iron in other opt3-2 tissues. AtOPT3, therefore, plays a critical role in two important aspects of iron metabolism, namely, maintenance of whole-plant iron homeostasis and iron nutrition of developing seeds.

  17. Functional genomics of pH homeostasis in Corynebacterium glutamicum revealed novel links between pH response, oxidative stress, iron homeostasis and methionine synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persicke Marcus

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maintenance of internal pH in bacterial cells is challenged by natural stress conditions, during host infection or in biotechnological production processes. Comprehensive transcriptomic and proteomic analyses has been conducted in several bacterial model systems, yet questions remain as to the mechanisms of pH homeostasis. Results Here we present the comprehensive analysis of pH homeostasis in C. glutamicum, a bacterium of industrial importance. At pH values between 6 and 9 effective maintenance of the internal pH at 7.5 ± 0.5 pH units was found. By DNA microarray analyses differential mRNA patterns were identified. The expression profiles were validated and extended by 1D-LC-ESI-MS/MS based quantification of soluble and membrane proteins. Regulators involved were identified and thereby participation of numerous signaling modules in pH response was found. The functional analysis revealed for the first time the occurrence of oxidative stress in C. glutamicum cells at neutral and low pH conditions accompanied by activation of the iron starvation response. Intracellular metabolite pool analysis unraveled inhibition of the TCA and other pathways at low pH. Methionine and cysteine synthesis were found to be activated via the McbR regulator, cysteine accumulation was observed and addition of cysteine was shown to be toxic under acidic conditions. Conclusions Novel limitations for C. glutamicum at non-optimal pH values were identified by a comprehensive analysis on the level of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome indicating a functional link between pH acclimatization, oxidative stress, iron homeostasis, and metabolic alterations. The results offer new insights into bacterial stress physiology and new starting points for bacterial strain design or pathogen defense.

  18. Iron homeostasis and fire blight susceptibility in transgenic pear plants overexpressing a pea ferritin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djennane, Samia; Cesbron, Colette; Sourice, Sophie; Cournol, Raphael; Dupuis, Fabrice; Eychenne, Magali; Loridon, Karine; Chevreau, Elisabeth

    2011-05-01

    The bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora causes the devastating disease known as fire blight in some rosaceous plants including apple and pear. One of the pathogenicity factors affecting fire blight development is the production of a siderophore, desferrioxamine, which overcomes the limiting conditions in plant tissues and also protects bacteria against active oxygen species. In this paper we examine the effect of an iron chelator protein encoded by the pea ferritin gene on the fire blight susceptibility of pear (Pyrus communis). Transgenic pear clones expressing this gene controlled either by the constitutive promoter CaMV 35S or by the inducible promoter sgd24 promoter were produced. The transgenic clones produced were analysed by Q-RT-PCR to determine the level of expression of the pea transgene. A pathogen-inducible pattern of expression of the pea transgene was observed in sgd24-promoter transformants. Adaptation to iron deficiency in vitro was tested in some transgenic clones and different iron metabolism parameters were measured. No strong effect on iron and chlorophyll content, root reductase activity and fire blight susceptibility was detected in the transgenic lines tested. No transformants showed a significant reduction in susceptibility to fire blight in greenhouse conditions when inoculated with E. amylovora.

  19. Homeostasis control of building environment using sensor agent robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Eri; Mita, Akira

    2012-04-01

    A human centered system for building is demanded to meet variety of needs due to the diversification and maturation of society. Smart buildings and smart houses have been studied to satisfy this demand. However, it is difficult for such systems to respond flexibly to unexpected events and needs that are caused by aging and complicate emotion changes. With this regards, we suggest "Biofied Buildings". The goal for this research is to realize buildings that are safer, more comfortable and more energy-efficient by embedding adaptive functions of life into buildings. In this paper, we propose a new control system for building environments, focused on physiological adaptation, particularly homeostasis, endocrine system and immune system. Residents are used as living sensors and controllers in the control loop. A sensor agent robot is used to acquire resident's discomfort feeling, and to output hormone-like signals to activate devices to control the environments. The proposed system could control many devices without establishing complicated scenarios. Results obtained from some simulations and the demonstration experiments using an LED lighting system showed that the proposed system were able to achieve robust and stable control of environments without complicated scenarios.

  20. Mitochondria influence CDR1 efflux pump activity, Hog1-mediated oxidative stress pathway, iron homeostasis, and ergosterol levels in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Edwina; Roman, Elvira; Claypool, Steven; Manzoor, Nikhat; Pla, Jesús; Panwar, Sneh Lata

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in Candida albicans is known to be associated with drug susceptibility, cell wall integrity, phospholipid homeostasis, and virulence. In this study, we deleted CaFZO1, a key component required during biogenesis of functional mitochondria. Cells with FZO1 deleted displayed fragmented mitochondria, mitochondrial genome loss, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and were rendered sensitive to azoles and peroxide. In order to understand the cellular response to dysfunctional mitochondria, genome-wide expression profiling of fzo1Δ/Δ cells was performed. Our results show that the increased susceptibility to azoles was likely due to reduced efflux activity of CDR efflux pumps, caused by the missorting of Cdr1p into the vacuole. In addition, fzo1Δ/Δ cells showed upregulation of genes involved in iron assimilation, in iron-sufficient conditions, characteristic of iron-starved cells. One of the consequent effects was downregulation of genes of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway with a commensurate decrease in cellular ergosterol levels. We therefore connect deregulated iron metabolism to ergosterol biosynthesis pathway in response to dysfunctional mitochondria. Impaired activation of the Hog1 pathway in the mutant was the basis for increased susceptibility to peroxide and increase in reactive oxygen species, indicating the importance of functional mitochondria in controlling Hog1-mediated oxidative stress response. Mitochondrial phospholipid levels were also altered as indicated by an increase in phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine and decrease in phosphatidylcholine in fzo1Δ/Δ cells. Collectively, these findings reinforce the connection between functional mitochondria and azole tolerance, oxidant-mediated stress, and iron homeostasis in C. albicans.

  1. Functional genomics of drug-induced ion homeostasis identifies a novel regulatory crosstalk of iron and zinc regulons in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landstetter, Nathalie; Glaser, Walter; Gregori, Christa; Seipelt, Joachim; Kuchler, Karl

    2010-12-01

    Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), a known inhibitor of NFκB activation, has antioxidative as well as antiviral activities. PDTC is effective against several virus families, indicating that its antiviral mechanism targets host rather than viral functions. To investigate its mode of action, we used baker's yeast as a simple eukaryotic model system and two types of genome-wide analysis. First, expression profiling using whole-genome DNA microarrays identifies more than 200 genes differentially regulated upon PDTC exposure. Interestingly, the Aft1-dependent iron regulon is a main target of PDTC, indicating a lack of iron availability. Moreover, the PDTC-caused zinc influx triggers a strong regulatory effect on zinc transporters due to the cytoplasmic zinc excess. Second, phenotypic screening the EUROSCARF collection for PDTC hypersensitivity identifies numerous mutants implicated in vacuolar maintenance, acidification as well as in transport, mitochondrial organization, and translation. Notably, the screening data indicate significant overlaps of PDTC-sensitive genes and those mediating zinc tolerance. Hence, we show that PDTC induces cytoplasmic zinc excess, eliciting vacuolar detoxification, which in turn, disturbs iron homeostasis and activates the iron-dependent regulator Aft1. Our work reveals a complex crosstalk in yeast ion homeostasis and the underlying regulatory networks.

  2. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  3. High dose intravenous iron, mineral homeostasis and intact FGF23 in normal and uremic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Eva; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Mace, Maria L.

    2013-01-01

    High iron load might have a number of toxic effects in the organism. Recently intravenous (iv) iron has been proposed to induce elevation of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia in iron deficient subjects. High levels of FGF23 are associated with increased......, iron isomaltoside 1000 (IIM) and ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), on plasma levels of FGF23 and phosphate was examined in normal and uremic iron repleted rats....

  4. Monothiol CGFS glutaredoxins and BolA-like proteins: [2Fe-2S] binding partners in iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoran; Outten, Caryn E

    2012-06-05

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (Grxs) with a signature CGFS active site and BolA-like proteins have recently emerged as novel players in iron homeostasis. Elegant genetic and biochemical studies examining the functional and physical interactions of CGFS Grxs in the fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe have unveiled their essential roles in intracellular iron signaling, iron trafficking, and the maturation of Fe-S cluster proteins. Biophysical and biochemical analyses of the [2Fe-2S] bridging interaction between CGFS Grxs and a BolA-like protein in S. cerevisiae provided the first molecular-level understanding of the iron regulation mechanism in this model eukaryote and established the ubiquitous CGFS Grxs and BolA-like proteins as novel Fe-S cluster-binding regulatory partners. Parallel studies focused on Escherichia coli and human homologues for CGFS Grxs and BolA-like proteins have supported the studies in yeast and provided additional clues about their involvement in cellular iron metabolism. Herein, we review recent progress in uncovering the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which CGFS Grxs and BolA-like proteins help regulate iron metabolism in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms.

  5. Zinc transporter ZIP14 functions in hepatic zinc, iron and glucose homeostasis during the innate immune response (endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolunay Beker Aydemir

    Full Text Available ZIP14 (slc39A14 is a zinc transporter induced in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli. ZIP14 induction accompanies the reduction in serum zinc (hypozincemia of acute inflammation. ZIP14 can transport Zn(2+ and non-transferrin-bound Fe(2+ in vitro. Using a Zip14(-/- mouse model we demonstrated that ZIP14 was essential for control of phosphatase PTP1B activity and phosphorylation of c-Met during liver regeneration. In the current studies, a global screening of ZIP transporter gene expression in response to LPS-induced endotoxemia was conducted. Following LPS, Zip14 was the most highly up-regulated Zip transcript in liver, but also in white adipose tissue and muscle. Using ZIP14(-/- mice we show that ZIP14 contributes to zinc absorption from the gastrointestinal tract directly or indirectly as zinc absorption was decreased in the KOs. In contrast, Zip14(-/- mice absorbed more iron. The Zip14 KO mice did not exhibit hypozincemia following LPS, but do have hypoferremia. Livers of Zip14-/- mice had increased transcript abundance for hepcidin, divalent metal transporter-1, ferritin and transferrin receptor-1 and greater accumulation of iron. The Zip14(-/- phenotype included greater body fat, hypoglycemia and higher insulin levels, as well as increased liver glucose and greater phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and increased GLUT2, SREBP-1c and FASN expression. The Zip14 KO mice exhibited decreased circulating IL-6 with increased hepatic SOCS-3 following LPS, suggesting SOCS-3 inhibited insulin signaling which produced the hypoglycemia in this genotype. The results are consistent with ZIP14 ablation yielding abnormal labile zinc pools which lead to increased SOCS-3 production through G-coupled receptor activation and increased cAMP production as well as signaled by increased pSTAT3 via the IL-6 receptor, which inhibits IRS 1/2 phosphorylation. Our data show the role of ZIP14 in the hepatocyte is multi-functional since zinc and iron trafficking are

  6. 铁代谢紊乱与阿尔茨海默病%Iron homeostasis disruption and Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万莉; 赵保路

    2012-01-01

    很多研究表明脑内铁代谢紊乱与阿尔茨海默病有关,但其机理尚需深入探讨.综述这方面近年来的研究进展,特别是结合本实验室的研究结果,对铁代谢紊乱和氧化应激、β-淀粉样蛋白和金属离子代谢紊乱、转铁蛋白和转铁蛋白受体、铁调节蛋白、二价金属离子转运体,及天然抗氧化剂通过调节金属代谢平衡缓解β-淀粉样蛋白的毒性对细胞损伤的保护作用进行了深入讨论,旨在对今后这方面的研究及预防和治疗阿尔茨海默病有所帮助.%Many studies have shown there is a close relationship between iron homeostasis disruption and Alzheimer's disease, but the mechanism needs to be discussed. Recent progresses about these studies are reviewed especially the results in author's laboratory are discussed. Iron homeostasis disruption, oxidative stress, p-amyloid (AP), amyloid precursor protein (APP), iron regulatory protein (IRP) and divalent metal transporter 1(DMT1) are discussed in detail. The protective effects of natural antioxidant and mitochondria! ferritin (MtFt) against Alzheimer's disease through regulating iron homeostasis disruption and oxidative stress are also discussed. This review may be useful for further research and prevention and therapy of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. [Control of iron deficiency in developing countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jacques; Dillon, Jean-Claude

    2002-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional disorder worldwide, especially in developing countries. It occurs when iron absorption cannot compensate iron requirements and losses. Requirements are especially high in pregnant women, infants, young children and adolescents who run a higher risk of being iron-deficient. In developing countries, the main cause of iron deficiency is the low iron bioavailability of the diet. The consequences of iron deficiency are many and serious, affecting not only individuals' health but also the development of societies and countries. The prevention and the control of iron deficiency and anemia in all groups of a population with different iron requirements imply to coordinate different interventions. Iron fortification of staple foods or condiments directed to the whole population is a sustainable and low cost-effective approach. However, at some periods of life, especially during pregnancy and in children from the age of 6 months, iron requirements are high. For pregnant women, the current approach favours the daily iron-folate supplementation during pregnancy but the results in terms of public health are disappointing. The preventive weekly iron-folate supplementation of women during their reproductive life, whose efficacy is recognized, offers a promising alternative; its impact in terms of public health is under current evaluation. For infants and young children, iron fortification of complementary food is effective but this food is generally imported and economically inaccessible to populations with limited resources. The production, by small private units from local products, of complementary foods of low viscosity, good nutritional quality, fortified with vitamins and minerals, and of low cost is at hand in several countries. When complementary foods are not available, the preventive iron supplementation from 6 to 18 months of age has to be advised. This approach should be strengthened by the advantages of the weekly

  8. Anaemia and Iron Homeostasis in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Obirikorang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We determined the prevalence of anaemia and evaluated markers of iron homeostasis in a cohort of HIV patients. Methods. A comparative cross-sectional study on 319 participants was carried out at the Tamale Teaching Hospital from July 2013 to December 2013, 219 patients on HAART (designated On-HAART and 100 HAART-naive patients. Data gathered include sociodemography, clinical history, and selected laboratory assays. Results. Prevalence of anaemia was 23.8%. On-HAART participants had higher CD4/CD3 lymphocyte counts, Hb, HCT/PCV, MCV, MCH, iron, ferritin, and TSAT (P<0.05. Hb, iron, ferritin, and TSAT decreased from grade 1 to grade 3 anaemia and CD4/CD3 lymphocyte count was lowest in grade 3 anaemia (P<0.05. Iron (P=0.0072 decreased with disease severity whilst transferrin (P=0.0143 and TIBC (P=0.0143 increased with disease severity. Seventy-six (23.8% participants fulfilled the criteria for anaemia, 86 (26.9% for iron deficiency, 41 (12.8% for iron deficiency anaemia, and 17 (5.3% for iron overload. The frequency of anaemia was higher amongst participants not on HAART (OR 2.6 for grade 1 anaemia; OR 3.0 for grade 3 anaemia. Conclusion. In this study population, HIV-associated anaemia is common and is related to HAART status and disease progression. HIV itself is the most important cause of anaemia and treatment of HIV should be a priority compared to iron supplementation.

  9. Role of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Fur regulator and small RNAs RfrA and RfrB in iron homeostasis and interaction with host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Jean-Mathieu; Dozois, Charles M; Daigle, France

    2013-03-01

    Iron is an essential element but can be toxic at high concentrations. Therefore, its acquisition and storage require tight control. Salmonella encodes the global regulator Fur (ferric uptake regulator) and the small regulatory non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) RfrA and RfrB, homologues of RyhB. The role of these iron homeostasis regulators was investigated in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi). Strains containing either single or combined deletions of these regulators were obtained. The mutants were tested for growth in low and high iron conditions, resistance to oxidative stress, expression and production of siderophores, and during interaction with host cells. The fur mutant showed a growth defect and was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide. The expression of the sRNAs was responsible for these defects. Siderophore expression by S. Typhi and both sRNAs were regulated by iron and by Fur. Fur contributed to invasion of epithelial cells, and was shown for the first time to play a role in phagocytosis and intracellular survival of S. Typhi in human macrophages. The sRNAs RfrA and RfrB were not required for interaction with epithelial cells, but both sRNAs were important for optimal intracellular replication in macrophages. In S. Typhi, Fur is a repressor of both sRNAs, and loss of either RfrA or RfrB resulted in distinct phenotypes, suggesting a non-redundant role for these regulatory RNAs.

  10. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  11. Effects of iron deficiency anemia and its treatment on fibroblast growth factor 23 and phosphate homeostasis in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Myles; Koch, Todd A; Bregman, David B

    2013-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is an osteocyte-derived hormone that regulates phosphate and vitamin D homeostasis. Through unknown mechanisms, certain intravenous iron preparations induce acute, reversible increases in circulating FGF23 levels that lower serum phosphate in association with inappropriately low levels of calcitriol, similar to genetic diseases of primary FGF23 excess. In contrast, studies in wild-type mice suggest that iron deficiency stimulates fgf23 transcription but does not result in hypophosphatemia because FGF23 is cleaved within osteocytes by an unknown catabolic system. We tested the association of iron deficiency anemia with C-terminal FGF23 (cFGF23) and intact FGF23 (iFGF23) levels in 55 women with a history of heavy uterine bleeding, and assessed the longitudinal biochemical response over 35 days to equivalent doses of randomly-assigned, intravenous elemental iron in the form of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) or iron dextran. Iron deficiency was associated with markedly elevated cFGF23 (807.8 ± 123.9 relative units [RU]/mL) but normal iFGF23 (28.5 ± 1.1 pg/mL) levels at baseline. Within 24 hours of iron administration, cFGF23 levels fell by approximately 80% in both groups. In contrast, iFGF23 transiently increased in the FCM group alone, and was followed by a transient, asymptomatic reduction in serum phosphate iron dextran group. Reduced serum phosphate was accompanied by increased urinary fractional excretion of phosphate, decreased calcitriol levels, and increased parathyroid hormone levels. These findings suggest that iron deficiency increases cFGF23 levels, and that certain iron preparations temporarily increase iFGF23 levels. We propose that intravenous iron lowers cFGF23 in humans by reducing fgf23 transcription as it does in mice, whereas carbohydrate moieties in certain iron preparations may simultaneously inhibit FGF23 degradation in osteocytes leading to transient increases in iFGF23 and reduced serum phosphate.

  12. The Oral Iron Chelator, Deferasirox, Reverses the Age-Dependent Alterations in Iron and Amyloid-β Homeostasis in Rat Brain: Implications in the Therapy of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Priyanjalee; Sahoo, Arghyadip; Anand, Shruti; Bir, Aritri; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2016-01-01

    The altered metabolism of iron impacts the brain function in multiple deleterious ways during normal aging as well as in Alzheimer's disease. We have shown in this study that chelatable iron accumulates in the aged rat brain along with overexpression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and ferritin, accompanied by significant alterations in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide homeostasis in the aging brain, such as an increased production of the amyloid-β protein precursor, a decreased level of neprilysin, and increased accumulation of Aβ42. When aged rats are given daily the iron chelator, deferasirox, over a period of more than 4 months starting from the 18th month, the age-related accumulation of iron and overexpression of TfR1 and ferritin in the brain are significantly prevented. More interestingly, the chelator treatment also considerably reverses the altered Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging brain implying a significant role of iron in the latter phenomenon. Further, other results indicate that iron accumulation results in oxidative stress and the activation of NF-κB in the aged rat brain, which are also reversed by the deferasirox treatment. The analysis of the results together suggests that iron accumulation and oxidative stress interact at multiple levels that include transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to bring about changes in the expression levels of TfR1 and ferritin and also alterations in Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging rat brain. The efficacy of deferasirox in preventing age-related changes in iron and Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging brain, as shown here, has obvious therapeutic implications for Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Restoring the impaired cardiac calcium homeostasis and cardiac function in iron overload rats by the combined deferiprone and N-acetyl cysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongjaikam, Suwakon; Kumfu, Sirinart; Khamseekaew, Juthamas; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i dysregulation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of iron overload cardiomyopathy. Although either iron chelators or antioxidants provide cardioprotection, a comparison of the efficacy of deferoxamine (DFO), deferiprone (DFP), deferasirox (DFX), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or a combination of DFP plus NAC on cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis in chronic iron overload has never been investigated. Male Wistar rats were fed with either a normal diet or a high iron (HFe) diet for 4 months. At 2 months, HFe rats were divided into 6 groups and treated with either a vehicle, DFO (25 mg/kg/day), DFP (75 mg/kg/day), DFX (20 mg/kg/day), NAC (100 mg/kg/day), or combined DFP plus NAC. At 4 months, the number of cardiac T-type calcium channels was increased, whereas cardiac sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) was decreased, leading to cardiac iron overload and impaired cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis. All pharmacological interventions restored SERCA levels. Although DFO, DFP, DFX or NAC alone shared similar efficacy in improving cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis, only DFP + NAC restored cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis, leading to restoring left ventricular function in the HFe-fed rats. Thus, the combined DFP + NAC was more effective than any monotherapy in restoring cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis, leading to restored myocardial contractility in iron-overloaded rats. PMID:28287621

  14. Novel loci affecting iron homeostasis and their effects in individuals at risk for hemochromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benyamin, Beben; Esko, Tonu; Ried, Janina S.; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Traglia, Michela; Goegele, Martin; Anderson, Denise; Broer, Linda; Podmore, Clara; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Sanna, Serena; van der Meer, Peter; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wang, Fudi; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Haeldin, Jonas; Winkelmann, Juliane; Meitinger, Thomas; Thiery, Joachim; Peters, Annette; Waldenberger, Melanie; Rendon, Augusto; Jolley, Jennifer; Sambrook, Jennifer; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Sweep, Fred C.; Sala, Cinzia F.; Schwienbacher, Christine; Pichler, Irene; Hui, Jennie; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Amin, Najaf; Steri, Maristella; Waeber, Gerard; Verweij, Niek; Powell, Joseph E.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Visscher, Peter M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hernandez, Dena; Bandinelli, Stefania; van der Harst, Pim; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Scott, Robert A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Beilby, John; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Oexle, Konrad; Gieger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Whitfield, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Variation in body iron is associated with or causes diseases, including anaemia and iron overload. Here, we analyse genetic association data on biochemical markers of iron status from 11 European-population studies, with replication in eight additional cohorts (total up to 48,972 subjects). We find

  15. Novel loci affecting iron homeostasis and their effects in individuals at risk for hemochromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Benyamin (Beben); T. Esko (Tõnu); J.S. Ried (Janina); A. Radhakrishnan (Aparna); S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); M. Traglia (Michela); M. Gögele (Martin); D. Anderson (David); L. Broer (Linda); C. Podmore (Clara); J. Luan; Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); S. Sanna (Serena); P. van der Meer (Peter); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); F. Wang (Fudi); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); L. Franke (Lude); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); J. Häldin (Jonas); B. Winkelmann; T. Meitinger (Thomas); J. Thiery (Joachim); A. Peters (Annette); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); A. Rendon (Augusto); G.J. Jolley (Jason); J.G. Sambrook (Jennifer); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); F.C. Sweep (Fred); C. Sala (Cinzia); C. Schwienbacher (Christine); I. Pichler (Irene); J. Hui (Jennie); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); A. Isaacs (Aaron); N. Amin (Najaf); M. Steri (Maristella); G. Waeber (Gérard); N. Verweij (Niek); J.E. Powell (Joseph); A.S. Dimas (Antigone); A.C. Heath (Andrew); P.A. Madden (Pamela); P.M. Visscher (Peter); M.J. Wright (Margaret); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); P. van der Harst (Pim); M. Uda (Manuela); P. Vollenweider (Peter); R.A. Scott (Robert); C. Langenberg (Claudia); N.J. Wareham (Nick); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); J. Beilby (John); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); K. Oexle (Konrad); C. Gieger (Christian); A. Metspalu (Andres); C. Camaschella (Clara); D. Toniolo (Daniela); D.W. Swinkels (Dorine); J. Whitfield (John)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractVariation in body iron is associated with or causes diseases, including anaemia and iron overload. Here, we analyse genetic association data on biochemical markers of iron status from 11 European-population studies, with replication in eight additional cohorts (total up to 48,972 subject

  16. Debra-mediated Ci degradation controls tissue homeostasis in Drosophila adult midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-02-11

    Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control.

  17. CONTROLLING ODOROUS EMISSIONS FROM IRON FOUNDRIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses the control of odorous emissions from iron foundries. he main process sources of odors in iron foundries are mold and core making, casting, and sand shakeout. he odors are usually caused by chemicals, which may be present as binders and other additives to the...

  18. TCR down-regulation controls T cell homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Nielsen, Bodil L

    2009-01-01

    was caused by the combination of reduced thymic output, decreased T cell apoptosis, and increased transition of naive T cells to memory T cells. Experiments with bone marrow chimeric mice confirmed that the CD3gammaLLAA mutation exerted a T cell intrinsic effect on T cell homeostasis that resulted...... in an increased transition of CD3gammaLLAA naive T cells to memory T cells and a survival advantage of CD3gammaLLAA T cells compared with wild-type T cells. The experimental observations were further supported by mathematical modeling of T cell homeostasis. Our study thus identifies an important role of CD3gamma......-mediated TCR down-regulation in T cell homeostasis....

  19. Serum hepcidin levels in Helicobacter pylori-infected children with iron-deficiency anemia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Seham F A; Esh, Asmaa M H

    2013-11-01

    Recently, hepcidin, an antimicrobial-like peptide hormone, has evolved as the master regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin integrates signals from diverse physiological inputs, forming a key connection between iron trafficking and response to infection. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether Helicobacter pylori infection modulates serum hepcidin level and response to oral iron therapy in children with iron-deficiency anemia. This was a case-control study including 60 children with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA; 30 H. pylori infected and 30 H. pylori noninfected) and 30 healthy children with comparable age and gender as the control group. Iron parameters including serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin saturation and serum hepcidin levels were assessed initially and after 3 months of oral iron therapy for IDA. Compared to the control group, serum hepcidin was significantly lower in H. pylori-noninfected children with IDA (P iron therapy (P iron therapy (P > 0.05). Although hepcidin showed significant positive correlations with serum ferritin, hemoglobin (Hb), iron, and transferrin saturation in noninfected children with IDA (P iron, and transferrin saturation in H. pylori-infected children with IDA (P iron therapy in children with iron-deficiency anemia.

  20. Identification of two genes potentially associated in iron-heme homeostasis in human carotid plaque using microarray analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hanène Ayari; Giampiero Bricca

    2013-06-01

    Classic characteristics are poor predictors of the risk of thromboembolism. Thus, better markers for the carotid atheroma plaque formation and symptom causing are needed. Our objective was to study by microarray analysis gene expression of genes involved in homeostasis of iron and heme in carotid atheroma plaque from the same patient. mRNA gene expression was measured by an Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST arrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA) using RNA prepared from 68 specimens of endarteriectomy from 34 patients. Two genes involved in iron-heme homeostasis, CD163 and heme oxygenase (HO-1), were analysed in 34 plaques. CD163 (2.18, =1.45E−08) and HO-1 (fold-change 2.67, =2.07E−09) mRNAs were induced. We suggest that atheroma plaques show a more pronounced induction of CD163 and HO-1. Although further evidence is needed, our results support previous data. To our knowledge, this is the first report comparing gene expression between intact arterial tissue and carotid plaque using microarray analysis.

  1. The Ferroportin Metal Efflux Proteins Function in Iron and Cobalt Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relatively little is known about how metals such as iron are effluxed from cells, a necessary step for transport from the root to the shoot. Ferroportin is the sole iron efflux transporter in animals, and there are two closely related orthologs in Arabidopsis, FPN1 and FPN2. FPN1 localizes to the pl...

  2. Multilevel control of glucose homeostasis by adenylyl cyclase 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raoux, Matthieu; Vacher, Pierre; Papin, Julien; Picard, Alexandre; Kostrzewa, Elzbieta; Devin, Anne; Gaitan, Julien; Limon, Isabelle; Kas, Martien J.; Magnan, Christophe; Lang, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Nutrient homeostasis requires integration of signals generated by glucose metabolism and hormones. Expression of the calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase ADCY8 is regulated by glucose and the enzyme is capable of integrating signals from multiple pathways. It may thus have an

  3. Multilevel control of glucose homeostasis by adenylyl cyclase 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raoux, Matthieu; Vacher, Pierre; Papin, Julien; Picard, Alexandre; Kostrzewa, Elzbieta; Devin, Anne; Gaitan, Julien; Limon, Isabelle; Kas, Martien J.; Magnan, Christophe; Lang, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Nutrient homeostasis requires integration of signals generated by glucose metabolism and hormones. Expression of the calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase ADCY8 is regulated by glucose and the enzyme is capable of integrating signals from multiple pathways. It may thus have an importa

  4. The Abnormal Measures of Iron Homeostasis in Pediatric Obesity Are Associated with the Inflammation of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visintainer PaulF

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To determine if the low iron state described in obese children is associated with the chronic inflammatory state seen in obesity. Study Design. Obese children age from 2 to 19 years seen at a weight management clinic were studied prospectively. Data were collected on age, gender, BMI, BMI -score, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation, free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, high sensitivity creactive protein (hs-crp, and hemoglobin concentration. Results. 107 subjects were studied. Hs-crp levels correlated positively with BMI and BMI -score and negatively with serum iron . 11.2% of subjects had low serum iron. Median serum iron was significantly lower for subjects with American Heart Association high risk hs-crp values (3 mg/L compared to those with low risk hs-crp (1 mg/L, (65 mcg/dL versus 96 mcg/dL, . After adjusting for age, gender, and BMI -score, serum iron was still negatively associated with hs-crp . Conclusions. We conclude that the chronic inflammation of obesity results in the low iron state previously reported in obese children, similar to what is seen in other inflammatory diseases.

  5. The role of hepatic transferrin receptor 2 in the regulation of iron homeostasis in the body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christal A Worthen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fine tuning of body iron is required to prevent diseases such as iron-overload and anemia. The putative iron-sensor, transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2, is expressed in the liver and mutations in this protein result in the iron-overload disease Type III hereditary hemochromatosis (HH. With the loss of functional TfR2, the liver produces about two-fold less of the peptide hormone hepcidin, which is responsible for negatively regulating iron uptake from the diet. This reduction in hepcidin expression leads to the slow accumulation of iron in the liver, heart, joints, and pancreas and subsequent cirrhosis, heart disease, arthritis, and diabetes. TfR2 can bind iron-loaded transferrin in the bloodstream, and hepatocytes treated with transferrin respond with a two-fold increase in hepcidin expression through stimulation of the BMP-signaling pathway. Loss of functional TfR2 or its binding partner, the original HH protein (HFE, results in a loss of this transferrin-sensitivity. While much is known about the trafficking and regulation of TfR2, the mechanism of its transferrin-sensitivity through the BMP-signaling pathway is still not known.

  6. Tucum-Do-Cerrado (Bactris setosa Mart.) Consumption Modulates Iron Homeostasis and Prevents Iron-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni-Reis, Adriana M; Arruda, Sandra F; Dourado, Lívia P S; da Cunha, Marcela S B; Siqueira, Egle M A

    2016-02-17

    This study investigated the effect of tucum-do-cerrado consumption in the oxidative status of iron-supplemented rats. Four groups of rats were treated: Control (AIN-93G), Tuc (AIN-93G added of tucum-do-cerrado), Fe (AIN-93G iron-enriched), or TucFe (AIN-93G with tucum-do-cerrado and iron-enriched) diet, for 30 days. Iron-enriched diet increased serum, liver, spleen, and intestine iron levels; transferrin saturation; liver lipid oxidation; mRNA levels of hepatic Hamp and Bmp6, and Nrf2 in the intestine. Tucum-do-cerrado consumption reduced spleen lipid and protein oxidation; mRNA levels of hepatic Hamp and Ftl, and increased serum antioxidant capacity and hepatic mRNA levels of Bmp6, Hmox1, Nqo1, and Nrf2. TucFe diet consumption abrogated the liver Hamp iron-induced up-regulation, prevented intestinal iron accumulation; hepatic lipid peroxidation; splenic protein damage, and the increase of catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase activity in some tissues. These results suggest that tucum-do-cerrado protects tissues against oxidative damage, by reducing iron availability in liver and consequently inhibiting liver Hamp expression.

  7. Tucum-Do-Cerrado (Bactris setosa Mart.) Consumption Modulates Iron Homeostasis and Prevents Iron-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni-Reis, Adriana M.; Arruda, Sandra F.; Dourado, Lívia P. S.; da Cunha, Marcela S. B.; Siqueira, Egle M. A.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of tucum-do-cerrado consumption in the oxidative status of iron-supplemented rats. Four groups of rats were treated: Control (AIN-93G), Tuc (AIN-93G added of tucum-do-cerrado), Fe (AIN-93G iron-enriched), or TucFe (AIN-93G with tucum-do-cerrado and iron-enriched) diet, for 30 days. Iron-enriched diet increased serum, liver, spleen, and intestine iron levels; transferrin saturation; liver lipid oxidation; mRNA levels of hepatic Hamp and Bmp6, and Nrf2 in the intestine. Tucum-do-cerrado consumption reduced spleen lipid and protein oxidation; mRNA levels of hepatic Hamp and Ftl, and increased serum antioxidant capacity and hepatic mRNA levels of Bmp6, Hmox1, Nqo1, and Nrf2. TucFe diet consumption abrogated the liver Hamp iron-induced up-regulation, prevented intestinal iron accumulation; hepatic lipid peroxidation; splenic protein damage, and the increase of catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase activity in some tissues. These results suggest that tucum-do-cerrado protects tissues against oxidative damage, by reducing iron availability in liver and consequently inhibiting liver Hamp expression. PMID:26901220

  8. Tucum-Do-Cerrado (Bactris setosa Mart. Consumption Modulates Iron Homeostasis and Prevents Iron-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M. Fustinoni-Reis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of tucum-do-cerrado consumption in the oxidative status of iron-supplemented rats. Four groups of rats were treated: Control (AIN-93G, Tuc (AIN-93G added of tucum-do-cerrado, Fe (AIN-93G iron-enriched, or TucFe (AIN-93G with tucum-do-cerrado and iron-enriched diet, for 30 days. Iron-enriched diet increased serum, liver, spleen, and intestine iron levels; transferrin saturation; liver lipid oxidation; mRNA levels of hepatic Hamp and Bmp6, and Nrf2 in the intestine. Tucum-do-cerrado consumption reduced spleen lipid and protein oxidation; mRNA levels of hepatic Hamp and Ftl, and increased serum antioxidant capacity and hepatic mRNA levels of Bmp6, Hmox1, Nqo1, and Nrf2. TucFe diet consumption abrogated the liver Hamp iron-induced up-regulation, prevented intestinal iron accumulation; hepatic lipid peroxidation; splenic protein damage, and the increase of catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase activity in some tissues. These results suggest that tucum-do-cerrado protects tissues against oxidative damage, by reducing iron availability in liver and consequently inhibiting liver Hamp expression.

  9. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Leon J; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we

  10. Anemia and iron homeostasis in a cohort of HIV-infected patients in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jusuf Hadi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anemia is a common clinical finding in HIV-infected patients and iron deficiency or redistribution may contribute to the development of low hemoglobin levels. Iron overload is associated with a poor prognosis in HIV and Hepatitis C virus infections. Iron redistribution may be caused by inflammation but possibly also by hepatitis C co-infection. We examined the prevalence of anemia and its relation to mortality in a cohort of HIV patients in a setting where injecting drug use (IDU is a main mode of HIV transmission, and measured serum ferritin and sTfR, in relation to anemia, inflammation, stage of HIV disease, ART and HCV infection. Methods Patient characteristics, ART history and iron parameters were recorded from adult HIV patients presenting between September 2007 and August 2009 in the referral hospital for West Java, Indonesia. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox's regression were used to assess factors affecting survival. Logistic regression was used to identity parameters associated with high ferritin concentrations. Results Anemia was found in 49.6% of 611 ART-naïve patients, with mild (Hb 10.5 - 12.99 g/dL for men; and 10.5 - 11.99 g/dL for women anemia in 62.0%, and moderate to severe anemia (Hb Conclusion HIV-associated anemia is common among HIV-infected patients in Indonesia and strongly related to mortality. High ferritin with low sTfR levels suggest that iron redistribution and low erythropoietic activity, rather than iron deficiency, contribute to anemia. Serum ferritin and sTfR should be used cautiously to assess iron status in patients with advanced HIV infection.

  11. Control of Cast Iron Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J.; Lillybeck, N.; Franco, N.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The use of microgravity for industrial research in the processing of cast iron was investigated. Solidification experiments were conducted using the KC-135 and F-104 aircraft, and an experiment plan was developed for follow-on experiments using the Shuttle. Three areas of interest are identified: (1) measurement of thermophysical properties in the melt; (2) understanding of the relative roles of homogeneous nucleation, grain multiplication, and innocultants in forming the microstructure; and (3) exploring the possibility of obtaining an aligned graphite structure in hypereutectic Fe, Ni, and Co.

  12. The bitter fate of the sweet heart: impairment of iron homeostasis in diabetic heart leads to failure in myocardial protection by preconditioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vinokur

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular dysfunction is a major complication of diabetes. Examining mechanistic aspects underlying the incapacity of the diabetic heart to respond to ischemic preconditioning (IPC, we could show that the alterations in iron homeostasis can explain this phenomenon. Correlating the hemodynamic parameters with levels of ferritin, the main iron storage and detoxifying protein, without and with inhibitors of protein degradation, substantiated this explanation. Diabetic hearts were less sensitive to ischemia-reperfusion stress, as indicated by functional parameters and histology. Mechanistically, since ferritin has been shown to provide cellular protection against insults, including ischemia-reperfusion stress and as the basal ferritin level in diabetic heart was 2-fold higher than in controls, these are in accord with the greater resistance of the diabetic heart to ischemia-reperfusion. Additionally, during ischemia-reperfusion, preceded by IPC, a rapid and extensive loss in ferritin levels, during the prolonged ischemia, in diabetic heart but not in non-diabetic controls, provide additional substantiation to the explanation for loss of respond to IPC. Current research is shedding light on the mechanism behind ferritin degradation as well, suggesting a novel explanation for diabetes-induced loss of cardioprotection.

  13. The bitter fate of the sweet heart: impairment of iron homeostasis in diabetic heart leads to failure in myocardial protection by preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokur, Vladimir; Berenshtein, Eduard; Bulvik, Baruch; Grinberg, Leonid; Eliashar, Ron; Chevion, Mordechai

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular dysfunction is a major complication of diabetes. Examining mechanistic aspects underlying the incapacity of the diabetic heart to respond to ischemic preconditioning (IPC), we could show that the alterations in iron homeostasis can explain this phenomenon. Correlating the hemodynamic parameters with levels of ferritin, the main iron storage and detoxifying protein, without and with inhibitors of protein degradation, substantiated this explanation. Diabetic hearts were less sensitive to ischemia-reperfusion stress, as indicated by functional parameters and histology. Mechanistically, since ferritin has been shown to provide cellular protection against insults, including ischemia-reperfusion stress and as the basal ferritin level in diabetic heart was 2-fold higher than in controls, these are in accord with the greater resistance of the diabetic heart to ischemia-reperfusion. Additionally, during ischemia-reperfusion, preceded by IPC, a rapid and extensive loss in ferritin levels, during the prolonged ischemia, in diabetic heart but not in non-diabetic controls, provide additional substantiation to the explanation for loss of respond to IPC. Current research is shedding light on the mechanism behind ferritin degradation as well, suggesting a novel explanation for diabetes-induced loss of cardioprotection.

  14. A Model of the Cellular Iron Homeostasis Network Using Semi-Formal Methods for Parameter Space Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Fanchon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel framework for the modeling of biological networks. It makes use of recent tools analyzing the robust satisfaction of properties of (hybrid dynamical systems. The main challenge of this approach as applied to biological systems is to get access to the relevant parameter sets despite gaps in the available knowledge. An initial estimate of useful parameters was sought by formalizing the known behavior of the biological network in the STL logic using the tool Breach. Then, once a set of parameter values consistent with known biological properties was found, we tried to locally expand it into the largest possible valid region. We applied this methodology in an effort to model and better understand the complex network regulating iron homeostasis in mammalian cells. This system plays an important role in many biological functions, including erythropoiesis, resistance against infections, and proliferation of cancer cells.

  15. Negative elongation factor controls energy homeostasis in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Haihui; Qin, Kunhua; Guo, Zhanyong; Ma, Yonggang; April, Craig; Gao, Xiaoli; Andrews, Thomas G; Bokov, Alex; Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Yidong; Weintraub, Susan T; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang, Degeng; Hu, Yanfen; Aune, Gregory J; Lindsey, Merry L; Li, Rong

    2014-04-10

    Negative elongation factor (NELF) is known to enforce promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), a pervasive phenomenon observed across multicellular genomes. However, the physiological impact of NELF on tissue homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we show that whole-body conditional deletion of the B subunit of NELF (NELF-B) in adult mice results in cardiomyopathy and impaired response to cardiac stress. Tissue-specific knockout of NELF-B confirms its cell-autonomous function in cardiomyocytes. NELF directly supports transcription of those genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes in fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. NELF also shares extensively transcriptional target genes with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of energy metabolism in the myocardium. Mechanistically, NELF helps stabilize the transcription initiation complex at the metabolism-related genes. Our findings strongly indicate that NELF is part of the PPARα-mediated transcription regulatory network that maintains metabolic homeostasis in cardiomyocytes.

  16. Control of Homeostasis and Dendritic Cell Survival by the GTPase RhoA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuai; Dislich, Bastian; Brakebusch, Cord H

    2015-01-01

    Tissues accommodate defined numbers of dendritic cells (DCs) in highly specific niches where different intrinsic and environmental stimuli control DC life span and numbers. DC homeostasis in tissues is important, because experimental changes in DC numbers influence immunity and tolerance toward...... various immune catastrophes and inflammation. However, the precise molecular mechanisms regulating DC life span and homeostasis are unclear. We report that the GTPase RhoA controls homeostatic proliferation, cytokinesis, survival, and turnover of cDCs. Deletion of RhoA strongly decreased the numbers of CD...... findings identify RhoA as a central regulator of DC homeostasis, and its deletion decreases DC numbers below critical thresholds for immune protection and homeostasis, causing aberrant compensatory DC proliferation....

  17. Role of bone marrow macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simranpreet; Raggatt, Liza Jane; Batoon, Lena; Hume, David Arthur; Levesque, Jean-Pierre; Pettit, Allison Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages, named for their phagocytic ability, participate in homeostasis, tissue regeneration and inflammatory responses. Bone and adjacent marrow contain multiple functionally unique resident tissue macrophage subsets which maintain and regulate anatomically distinct niche environments within these interconnected tissues. Three subsets of bone-bone marrow resident tissue macrophages have been characterised; erythroblastic island macrophages, haematopoietic stem cell niche macrophages and osteal macrophages. The role of these macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches is reviewed in detail.

  18. Renal control of calcium, phosphate, and magnesium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, Judith; Chonchol, Michel; Levi, Moshe

    2015-07-01

    Calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are multivalent cations that are important for many biologic and cellular functions. The kidneys play a central role in the homeostasis of these ions. Gastrointestinal absorption is balanced by renal excretion. When body stores of these ions decline significantly, gastrointestinal absorption, bone resorption, and renal tubular reabsorption increase to normalize their levels. Renal regulation of these ions occurs through glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption and/or secretion and is therefore an important determinant of plasma ion concentration. Under physiologic conditions, the whole body balance of calcium, phosphate, and magnesium is maintained by fine adjustments of urinary excretion to equal the net intake. This review discusses how calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are handled by the kidneys.

  19. Neurotensin and its receptors in the control of glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean eMazella

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological roles of the neuropeptide neurotensin through its three known receptors are various and complex. Neurotensin is involved in several important biological functions including analgesia and hypothermia in the central nervous system and also food intake and glucose homeostasis in the periphery. This review focuses on recent works dealing with molecular mechanisms regulating blood glucose level and insulin secretion upon neurotensin action. Investigations on crucial cellular components involved in the protective effect of the peptide on beta cells are also detailed. The role of xenin, a neurotensin-related peptide, on the regulation of insulin release by glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide is summarized. The last section comments on the future research areas which should be developped to address the function of new effectors of the neurotensinergic system in the endocrine pancreas.

  20. Chloroquine interference with hemoglobin endocytic trafficking suppresses adaptive heme and iron homeostasis in macrophages: the paradox of an antimalarial agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaer, Christian A; Laczko, Endre; Schoedon, Gabriele; Schaer, Dominik J; Vallelian, Florence

    2013-01-01

    The CD163 scavenger receptor pathway for Hb:Hp complexes is an essential mechanism of protection against the toxicity of extracellular hemoglobin (Hb), which can accumulate in the vasculature and within tissues during hemolysis. Chloroquine is a lysosomotropic agent, which has been extensively used as an antimalarial drug in the past, before parasite resistance started to limit its efficacy in most parts of the world. More recent use of chloroquine is related to its immunomodulatory activity in patients with autoimmune diseases, which may also involve hemolytic disease components. In this study we examined the effects of chloroquine on the human Hb clearance pathway. For this purpose we developed a new mass-spectrometry-based method to specifically quantify intracellular Hb peptides within the endosomal-lysosomal compartment by single reaction monitoring (SRM). We found that chloroquine exposure impairs trafficking of Hb:Hp complexes through the endosomal-lysosomal compartment after internalization by CD163. Relative quantification of intracellular Hb peptides by SRM confirmed that chloroquine blocked cellular Hb:Hp catabolism. This effect suppressed the cellular heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) response and shifted macrophage iron homeostasis towards inappropriately high expression of the transferrin receptor with concurrent inhibition of ferroportin expression. A functional deficiency of Hb detoxification and heme-iron recycling may therefore be an adverse consequence of chloroquine treatment during hemolysis.

  1. Chloroquine Interference with Hemoglobin Endocytic Trafficking Suppresses Adaptive Heme and Iron Homeostasis in Macrophages: The Paradox of an Antimalarial Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A. Schaer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The CD163 scavenger receptor pathway for Hb:Hp complexes is an essential mechanism of protection against the toxicity of extracellular hemoglobin (Hb, which can accumulate in the vasculature and within tissues during hemolysis. Chloroquine is a lysosomotropic agent, which has been extensively used as an antimalarial drug in the past, before parasite resistance started to limit its efficacy in most parts of the world. More recent use of chloroquine is related to its immunomodulatory activity in patients with autoimmune diseases, which may also involve hemolytic disease components. In this study we examined the effects of chloroquine on the human Hb clearance pathway. For this purpose we developed a new mass-spectrometry-based method to specifically quantify intracellular Hb peptides within the endosomal-lysosomal compartment by single reaction monitoring (SRM. We found that chloroquine exposure impairs trafficking of Hb:Hp complexes through the endosomal-lysosomal compartment after internalization by CD163. Relative quantification of intracellular Hb peptides by SRM confirmed that chloroquine blocked cellular Hb:Hp catabolism. This effect suppressed the cellular heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1 response and shifted macrophage iron homeostasis towards inappropriately high expression of the transferrin receptor with concurrent inhibition of ferroportin expression. A functional deficiency of Hb detoxification and heme-iron recycling may therefore be an adverse consequence of chloroquine treatment during hemolysis.

  2. Transcriptional profiling of Helicobacter pylori Fur- and iron-regulated gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); S. Bereswill (Stefan); B. Waidner (Barbara); J. Stoof (Jeroen); U. Mader; J.G. Kusters (Johannes); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M. Kist (Manfred); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); G. Homuth (Georg)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIntracellular iron homeostasis is a necessity for almost all living organisms, since both iron restriction and iron overload can result in cell death. The ferric uptake regulator protein, Fur, controls iron homeostasis in most Gram-negative bacteria. In the human

  3. Transcriptional profiling of Helicobacter pylori Fur- and iron-regulated gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); S. Bereswill (Stefan); B. Waidner (Barbara); J. Stoof (Jeroen); U. Mader; J.G. Kusters (Johannes); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M. Kist (Manfred); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); G. Homuth (Georg)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIntracellular iron homeostasis is a necessity for almost all living organisms, since both iron restriction and iron overload can result in cell death. The ferric uptake regulator protein, Fur, controls iron homeostasis in most Gram-negative bacteria. In the human gastri

  4. Transcriptome analyses suggest a disturbance of iron homeostasis in soybean leaves during white mould disease establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calla, Bernarda; Blahut-Beatty, Laureen; Koziol, Lisa; Simmonds, Daina H; Clough, Steven J

    2014-08-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a serious pathogen of numerous crops around the world. The major virulence factor of this pathogen is oxalic acid (OA). Mutants that cannot produce OA do not cause disease, and plants that express enzymes that degrade OA, such as oxalate oxidase (OxO), are very resistant to S. sclerotiorum. To examine the effect of OA on plants, we infiltrated soybean leaves with 5 mm OA and examined the gene expression changes at 2 h post-infiltration. By comparing the gene expression levels between leaves of a transgenic soybean carrying an OxO gene (OxO) and its parent AC Colibri (AC) infiltrated with OA (pH 2.4) or water (pH 2.4 or 5.5), we were able to compare the effects of OA dependent or independent of its pH. Gene expression by microarray analysis identified 2390 genes that showed changes in expression, as determined using an overall F-test P-value cut-off of 0.001. The additional requirement that at least one pairwise t-test false discovery rate (FDR)-corrected P value should be less than 0.001 reduced the list of the most highly significant differentially expressed genes to 1054. Independent of pH, OA altered the expression levels of 78 genes, with ferritin showing the strongest induction by OA. The combination of OA plus its low pH caused 1045 genes (99% of all significant genes) to be differentially expressed, with many of the up-regulated genes being related to basal defence, such as genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway and various cytochrome P450s. RNA-seq was also conducted on four samples: OxO and AC genotypes infiltrated with either OA pH 2.4 or water pH 2.4. The RNA-seq analysis also identified ferritin paralogues as being strongly induced by OA. As the expression of ferritin, a gene that encodes for an iron storage protein, is induced by free iron, these results suggest that S. sclerotiorum benefits from the ability of OA to free iron from plant proteins, as this induces host cell death, and also allows the uptake and

  5. Effects of metal compounds with distinct physicochemical properties on iron homeostasis and antibacterial activity in the lungs: chromium and vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mitchell D; Sisco, Maureen; Prophete, Colette; Yoshida, Kotaro; Chen, Lung-chi; Zelikoff, Judith T; Smee, Jason; Holder, Alvin A; Stonehuerner, Jacqueline; Crans, Debbie C; Ghio, Andrew J

    2010-02-01

    In situ reactions of metal ions or their compounds are important mechanisms by which particles alter lung immune responses. The authors hypothesized that major determinants of the immunomodulatory effect of any metal include its redox behavior/properties, oxidation state, and/or solubility, and that the toxicities arising from differences in physicochemical parameters are manifest, in part, via differential shifts in lung iron (Fe) homeostasis. To test the hypotheses, immunomodulatory potentials for both pentavalent vanadium (VV; as soluble metavanadate or insoluble vanadium pentoxide) and hexavalent chromium (CrVI; as soluble sodium chromate or insoluble calcium chromate) were quantified in rats after inhalation (5h/day for 5 days) of each at 100 microg metal/m3. Differences in effects on local bacterial resistance between the two VV, and between each CrVI, agents suggested that solubility might be a determinant of in situ immunotoxicity. For the soluble forms, VV had a greater impact on resistance than CrVI, indicating that redox behavior/properties was likely also a determinant. The soluble VV agent was the strongest immunomodulant. Regarding Fe homeostasis, both VV agents had dramatic effects on airway Fe levels. Both also impacted local immune/airway epithelial cell Fe levels in that there were significant increases in production of select cytokines/chemokines whose genes are subject to regulation by HIF-1 (whose intracellular longevity is related to cell Fe status). Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the role that metal compound properties play in respiratory disease pathogenesis and provide a rationale for differing pulmonary immunotoxicities of commonly encountered ambient metal pollutants.

  6. Local and Systemic Signaling of Iron Status and Its Interactions with Homeostasis of Other Essential Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheena R. Gayomba

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is essential for plant growth and development. However, alkaline soils, which occupy approximately 30% of the world’s arable lands, are considered Fe-limiting for plant growth because insoluble Fe (III chelates prevail under these conditions. In contrast, high bioavailability of Fe in acidic soils can be toxic to plants due to the ability of Fe ions to promote oxidative stress. Therefore, plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense and respond to the fluctuation of Fe availability in the immediate environment and to the needs of developing shoot tissues to preclude deficiency while avoiding toxicity. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of local and systemic signaling of Fe status with emphasis on the contribution of Fe, its interaction with other metals and metal ligands in triggering molecular responses that regulate Fe uptake and partitioning in the plant body.

  7. The Arabidopsis AtOPT3 Protein Functions in Metal Homeostasis and Movement of Iron to Developing Seeds1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Minviluz G.; Patel, Ami; McClain, William E.; Mathieu, Melanie; Remley, Melissa; Rogers, Elizabeth E.; Gassmann, Walter; Blevins, Dale G.; Stacey, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana AtOPT3 belongs to the oligopeptide transporter (OPT) family, a relatively poorly characterized family of peptide/modified peptide transporters found in archebacteria, bacteria, fungi, and plants. A null mutation in AtOPT3 resulted in embryo lethality, indicating an essential role for AtOPT3 in embryo development. In this article, we report on the isolation and phenotypic characterization of a second AtOPT3 mutant line, opt3-2, harboring a T-DNA insertion in the 5′ untranslated region of AtOPT3. The T-DNA insertion in the AtOPT3 promoter resulted in reduced but sufficient AtOPT3 expression to allow embryo formation in opt3-2 homozygous seeds. Phenotypic analyses of opt3-2 plants revealed three interesting loss-of-function phenotypes associated with iron metabolism. First, reduced AtOPT3 expression in opt3-2 plants resulted in the constitutive expression of root iron deficiency responses regardless of exogenous iron supply. Second, deregulation of root iron uptake processes in opt3-2 roots resulted in the accumulation of very high levels of iron in opt3-2 tissues. Hyperaccumulation of iron in opt3-2 resulted in the formation of brown necrotic areas in opt3-2 leaves and was more pronounced during the seed-filling stage. Third, reduced AtOPT3 expression resulted in decreased accumulation of iron in opt3-2 seeds. The reduced accumulation of iron in opt3-2 seeds is especially noteworthy considering the excessively high levels of accumulated iron in other opt3-2 tissues. AtOPT3, therefore, plays a critical role in two important aspects of iron metabolism, namely, maintenance of whole-plant iron homeostasis and iron nutrition of developing seeds. PMID:18083798

  8. ZINC TOLERANCE INDUCED BY IRON 1 reveals the importance of glutathione in the cross-homeostasis between zinc and iron in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Varanavasiappan; Tsednee, Munkhtsetseg; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2012-03-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient for plants, but it is toxic in excess concentrations. In Arabidopsis, additional iron (Fe) can increase Zn tolerance. We isolated a mutant, zinc tolerance induced by iron 1, designated zir1, with a defect in Fe-mediated Zn tolerance. Using map-based cloning and genetic complementation, we identified that zir1 has a mutation of glutamate to lysine at position 385 on γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1), the enzyme involved in glutathione biosynthesis. The zir1 mutant contains only 15% of the wild-type glutathione level. Blocking glutathione biosynthesis in wild-type plants by a specific inhibitor of GSH1, buthionine sulfoximine, resulted in loss of Fe-mediated Zn tolerance, which provides further evidence that glutathione plays an essential role in Fe-mediated Zn tolerance. Two glutathione-deficient mutant alleles of GSH1, pad2-1 and cad2-1, which contain 22% and 39%, respectively, of the wild-type glutathione level, revealed that a minimal glutathione level between 22 and 39% of the wild-type level is required for Fe-mediated Zn tolerance. Under excess Zn and Fe, the recovery of shoot Fe contents in pad2-1 and cad2-1 was lower than that of the wild type. However, the phytochelatin-deficient mutant cad1-3 showed normal Fe-mediated Zn tolerance. These results indicate a specific role of glutathione in Fe-mediated Zn tolerance. The induced accumulation of glutathione in response to excess Zn and Fe suggests that glutathione plays a specific role in Fe-mediated Zn tolerance in Arabidopsis. We conclude that glutathione is required for the cross-homeostasis between Zn and Fe in Arabidopsis. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Pb-Free Soldering Iron Temperature Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamane, Hiroto; Wajima, Kenji; Hayashi, Yoichi; Komiyama, Eiichi; Tachibana, Toshiaki; Miyazaki, Kazuyoshi

    Recently, much importance has been attached to the environmental problem. The content of two directives to better control the management of waste electronic equipment was approved. The two directives are the Waste from Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) and the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS). These set phase-out dates for the use of lead materials contained in electronic products. Increasingly, attention is focusing on the potential use of Pb-free soldering in electronics manufacturing. It should be noted that many of the current solding irons are not suitable for Pb-free technology, due to the inferior wetting ability of Pb-free alloys compared with SnPb solder pastes. This paper presents a Pb-free soldering iron temperature controller using an embedded micro-processor with a low memory capacity.

  10. Unraveling transcriptional and translational control in plant energy homeostasis : a bioinformatic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peviani, A.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their sessile nature, plants require a tight regulation of energy homeostasis in order to survive and reproduce in changing environmental conditions. Regulation of gene expression is controlled at several levels, from transcription to translation and beyond. Sugars themselves can act directly

  11. The liver X receptor : Control of cellular lipid homeostasis and beyond Implications for drug design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Grefhorst, Aldo; Groen, Albert K.; Kuipers, Folkert

    2010-01-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR) alpha and beta are nuclear receptors that control cellular metabolism. LXRs modulate the expression of genes involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism in response to changes in cellular cholesterol status. Because of their involvement in cholesterol homeostasis, LXRs have e

  12. Homeostasis 6: nurses as external control agents in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, John; McVicar, Andrew; Mooney, Janice

    All disorders involve a disturbance of cellular and hence chemical function in the body. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory disease that usually attacks synovial joints and surrounding ligaments, muscles and their tendons and blood vessels. This article applies the concept of health professionals operating as external agents of homeostatic control (Clancy and McVicar, 20011a; 2011b) to RA and to the care of affected patients, using a case scenario to illustrate attempts to minimize homeostatic imbalances. After reading the article, nurses should be able to understand: how the principles of homeostatic theory apply to skeletomuscular function, in particular to synovial joint function; the skeletomuscular homeostatic role in movement; and that homeostatic failure of reduced mobility, as in RA, is a result of nature-nurture interaction; that illness arises from a cellular, hence chemical, homeostatic imbalance(s) (Clancy and McVicar, 2011a; 2011b; 2011c; 2011d; 2011e). RA is considered a cellular (B-lymphocyte) hence chemical (autoantibody) imbalance that causes the homeostatic imbalances (inflammatory pain, reduced mobility, reduced activities of daily living) associated with the condition. Health professionals are able at act as external agents of homeostatic control to only a limited extent when caring for people with RA because, as with any progressive disorder, they will only be managing signs and symptoms to improve patients' quality of life.

  13. Glutaredoxins in plant development, abiotic stress response, and iron homeostasis: From model organisms to crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant growth, development, and response to environmental stress require the judicious balance of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are a group of oxidoreductases that participate in the control of ROS and are traditionally defined as redox regulators. New studies suggest the member...

  14. Directly observed iron supplementation for control of iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Bairwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is major public health problem affecting 1.6 billion people worldwide. The poor compliance of iron supplementation remains main contributor for high prevalence of anemia. The current paper reviewed the effectiveness of direct observation of oral iron supplementation on anemia. A systematic search was performed through electronic databases and local libraries. Search strategies used subject headings and key words “directly observed” and “iron supplementation.” Searches were sought through April 2014. A total of 14 articles were included in the study. Findings were presented in three categories. First, all of those reported an improvement in compliance of iron supplementation. Second, reduction in the prevalence of anemia was reported by all and third, all except one reported increased blood hemoglobin level. Directly observed an iron supplementation is an effective approach for prevention and management of anemia in vulnerable groups. However, larger trials are needed before concluding that scaling up directly observed iron supplementation through community health volunteers would be beneficial.

  15. Identification of a novel mitochondrial protein, short postembryonic roots 1 (SPR1), involved in root development and iron homeostasis in Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Liqiang; Wu, Zhongchang; Hao, Xi; Carrie, Chris; Zheng, Libin; Whelan, James; Wu, Yunrong; Wang, Shoufeng; Wu, Ping; Mao, Chuanzao

    2011-02-01

    • A rice mutant, Oryza sativa short postembryonic roots 1 (Osspr1), has been characterized. It has short postembryonic roots, including adventitious and lateral roots, and a lower iron content in its leaves. • OsSPR1 was identified by map-based cloning. It encodes a novel mitochondrial protein with the Armadillo-like repeat domain. • Osspr1 mutants exhibited decreased root cell elongation. The iron content of the mutant shoots was significantly altered compared with that of wild-type shoots. A similar pattern of alteration of manganese and zinc concentrations in shoots was also observed. Complementation of the mutant confirmed that OsSPR1 is involved in post-embryonic root elongation and iron homeostasis in rice. OsSPR1 was found to be ubiquitously expressed in various tissues throughout the plant. The transcript abundance of various genes involved in iron uptake and signaling via both strategies I and II was similar in roots of wild-type and mutant plants, but was higher in the leaves of mutant plants. • Thus, a novel mitochondrial protein that is involved in root elongation and plays a role in metal ion homeostasis has been identified.

  16. Control of cytokinin and auxin homeostasis in cyanobacteria and algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žižková, Eva; Kubeš, Martin; Dobrev, Petre I; Přibyl, Pavel; Šimura, Jan; Zahajská, Lenka; Záveská Drábková, Lenka; Novák, Ondřej; Motyka, Václav

    2017-01-01

    phytohormones in algal growth and cell division. Our data suggest the existence and functioning of a complex network of metabolic pathways and activity control of CKs and auxins in cyanobacteria and algae that apparently differ from those in vascular plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  17. Human CIA2A (FAM96A) and CIA2B (FAM96B) integrate maturation of different subsets of cytosolic-nuclear iron-sulfur proteins and iron homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Stehling, Oliver; Mascarenhas, Judita; Ajay A Vashisht; Sheftel, Alex D.; Niggemeyer, Brigitte; Rösser, Ralf; Pierik, Antonio J.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Lill, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Numerous cytosolic and nuclear proteins involved in metabolism, DNA maintenance, protein translation, or iron homeostasis depend on iron-sulfur (Fe/S) cofactors, yet their assembly is poorly defined. Here, we identify and characterize human CIA2A (FAM96A), CIA2B (FAM96B), and CIA1 (CIAO1) as components of the cytosolic Fe/S protein assembly (CIA) machinery. CIA1 associates with either CIA2A or CIA2B and the CIA targeting factor MMS19. The CIA2B-CIA1-MMS19 complex binds to and facilitates asse...

  18. Practical homeostasis lighting control system using sensor agent robots for office space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Momoko; Mita, Akira

    2014-03-01

    The comfortable space can be changed by season, age, physical condition and the like. However, the current systems are not able to resolve them absolutely. This research proposes the Homeostasis lighting control system based on the mechanism of biotic homeostasis for making the algorithms of apparatus control. Homeostasis are kept by the interaction of the three systems, endocrine system, immune system, and nervous system[1]. By the gradual reaction in the endocrine system, body's protective response in the immune system, and the electrical reaction in the nerve system, we can keep the environments against variable changes. The new lighting control system utilizes this mechanism. Firstly, we focused on legibility and comfort in the office space to construct the control model learning from the endocrine and immune systems. The mechanism of the endocrine system is used for ambient lights in the space is used considering circadian rhythm for comfort. For the legibility, the immune system is used to control considering devices near the human depending on the distance between the human. Simulations and the demonstration were conducted to show the feasibility. Finally, the nerve system was intruded to enhance the system.

  19. Proteomic analysis of human bladder epithelial cells by 2D blue native SDS-PAGE reveals TCDD-induced alterations of calcium and iron homeostasis possibly mediated by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Nisha; Pink, Mario; Petrat, Frank; Rettenmeier, Albert W; Schmitz-Spanke, Simone

    2015-01-02

    A proteomic analysis of the interaction among multiprotein complexes involved in 2,3,7,8-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-mediated toxicity in urinary bladder epithelial RT4 cells was performed using two-dimensional blue native SDS-PAGE (2D BN/SDS-PAGE). To enrich the protein complexes, unexposed and TCDD-exposed cells were fractionated. BN/SDS-PAGE of the resulting fractions led to an effective separation of proteins and protein complexes of various origins, including cell membrane, mitochondria, and other intracellular compartments. Major differences between the proteome of control and exposed cells involved the alteration of many calcium-regulated proteins (calmodulin, protein S100-A2, annexin A5, annexin A10, gelsolin isoform b) and iron-regulated proteins (ferritin, heme-binding protein 2, transferrin). On the basis of these findings, the intracellular calcium concentration was determined, revealing a significant increase after 24 h of exposure to TCDD. Moreover, the concentration of the labile iron pool (LIP) was also significantly elevated in TCDD-exposed cells. This increase was strongly inhibited by the calmodulin (CaM) antagonist W-7, which pointed toward a possible interaction between iron and calcium signaling. Because nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly enhanced in TCDD-exposed cells and was also inhibited by W-7, we hypothesize that alterations in calcium and iron homeostasis upon exposure to TCDD may be linked through NO generated by CaM-activated nitric oxide synthase. In our model, we propose that NO produced upon TCDD exposure interacts with the iron centers of iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs) that modulate the alteration of ferritin and transferrin, resulting in an augmented cellular LIP and, hence, increased toxicity.

  20. Dietary iron controls circadian hepatic glucose metabolism through heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcox, Judith A; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-Hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu; McClain, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling.

  1. Control of cast iron and casts manufacturing by Inmold method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the usability of cast iron spheroidizing process in mould control by ATD method as well as by ultrasonic method were presented. Structure of instrumentation needed for control form performance of cast iron spheroidizing by Inmold method was illustrated. Author, pointed out that amount of magnesium master alloy should obtain 0,8 ÷ 1,0% of mass in form at all. Such quantity of preliminary alloy assure of obtain of nodular graphite in cast iron. In consequence of this, is reduce the cast iron liquidus temperature and decrease of recalescence temperature of graphite-eutectic crystallization in compare with initial cast iron. Control of casts can be carried out by ultrasonic method. In plain cast iron, ferritic-pearlitic microstructure is obtaining. Additives of 1,5% Cu ensure pearlitic structure.

  2. Iron-responsive regulation of the Helicobacter pylori iron-cofactored superoxide dismutase SodB is mediated by Fur.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); G. Homuth (Georg); J. Stoof (Jeroen); U. Mader; B. Waidner (Barbara); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M. Kist (Manfred); J.G. Kusters (Johannes); S. Bereswill (Stefan); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractMaintaining iron homeostasis is a necessity for all living organisms, as free iron augments the generation of reactive oxygen species like superoxide anions, at the risk of subsequent lethal cellular damage. The iron-responsive regulator Fur controls iron metabolism in many bacteria, inc

  3. An Arabidopsis ABC Transporter Mediates Phosphate Deficiency-Induced Remodeling of Root Architecture by Modulating Iron Homeostasis in Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinsong; Piñeros, Miguel A; Li, Xiaoxuan; Yang, Haibing; Liu, Yu; Murphy, Angus S; Kochian, Leon V; Liu, Dong

    2017-02-13

    The remodeling of root architecture is a major developmental response of plants to phosphate (Pi) deficiency and is thought to enhance a plant's ability to forage for the available Pi in topsoil. The underlying mechanism controlling this response, however, is poorly understood. In this study, we identified an Arabidopsis mutant, hps10 (hypersensitive to Pi starvation 10), which is morphologically normal under Pi sufficient condition but shows increased inhibition of primary root growth and enhanced production of lateral roots under Pi deficiency. hps10 is a previously identified allele (als3-3) of the ALUMINUM SENSITIVE3 (ALS3) gene, which is involved in plant tolerance to aluminum toxicity. Our results show that ALS3 and its interacting protein AtSTAR1 form an ABC transporter complex in the tonoplast. This protein complex mediates a highly electrogenic transport in Xenopus oocytes. Under Pi deficiency, als3 accumulates higher levels of Fe(3+) in its roots than the wild type does. In Arabidopsis, LPR1 (LOW PHOSPHATE ROOT1) and LPR2 encode ferroxidases, which when mutated, reduce Fe(3+) accumulation in roots and cause root growth to be insensitive to Pi deficiency. Here, we provide compelling evidence showing that ALS3 cooperates with LPR1/2 to regulate Pi deficiency-induced remodeling of root architecture by modulating Fe homeostasis in roots.

  4. Two-Component Signaling System VgrRS Directly Senses Extracytoplasmic and Intracellular Iron to Control Bacterial Adaptation under Iron Depleted Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Both iron starvation and excess are detrimental to cellular life, especially for animal and plant pathogens since they always live in iron-limited environments produced by host immune responses. However, how organisms sense and respond to iron is incompletely understood. Herein, we reveal that in the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, VgrS (also named ColS is a membrane-bound receptor histidine kinase that senses extracytoplasmic iron limitation in the periplasm, while its cognate response regulator, VgrR (ColR, detects intracellular iron excess. Under iron-depleted conditions, dissociation of Fe3+ from the periplasmic sensor region of VgrS activates the VgrS autophosphorylation and subsequent phosphotransfer to VgrR, an OmpR-family transcription factor that regulates bacterial responses to take up iron. VgrR-VgrS regulon and the consensus DNA binding motif of the transcription factor VgrR were dissected by comparative proteomic and ChIP-seq analyses, which revealed that in reacting to iron-depleted environments, VgrR directly or indirectly controls the expressions of hundreds of genes that are involved in various physiological cascades, especially those associated with iron-uptake. Among them, we demonstrated that the phosphorylated VgrR tightly represses the transcription of a special TonB-dependent receptor gene, tdvA. This regulation is a critical prerequisite for efficient iron uptake and bacterial virulence since activation of tdvA transcription is detrimental to these processes. When the intracellular iron accumulates, the VgrR-Fe2+ interaction dissociates not only the binding between VgrR and the tdvA promoter, but also the interaction between VgrR and VgrS. This relieves the repression in tdvA transcription to impede continuous iron uptake and avoids possible toxic effects of excessive iron accumulation. Our results revealed a signaling system that directly senses both extracytoplasmic and intracellular

  5. Enhanced erythropoiesis in Hfe-KO mice indicates a role for Hfe in the modulation of erythroid iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Pedro; Guy, Ella; Chen, Nan; Proenca, Catia C; Gardenghi, Sara; Casu, Carla; Follenzi, Antonia; Van Rooijen, Nico; Grady, Robert W; de Sousa, Maria; Rivella, Stefano

    2011-01-27

    In hereditary hemochromatosis, mutations in HFE lead to iron overload through abnormally low levels of hepcidin. In addition, HFE potentially modulates cellular iron uptake by interacting with transferrin receptor, a crucial protein during erythropoiesis. However, the role of HFE in this process was never explored. We hypothesize that HFE modulates erythropoiesis by affecting dietary iron absorption and erythroid iron intake. To investigate this, we used Hfe-KO mice in conditions of altered dietary iron and erythropoiesis. We show that Hfe-KO mice can overcome phlebotomy-induced anemia more rapidly than wild-type mice (even when iron loaded). Second, we evaluated mice combining the hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia phenotypes. Our results suggest that lack of Hfe is advantageous in conditions of increased erythropoietic activity because of augmented iron mobilization driven by deficient hepcidin response. Lastly, we demonstrate that Hfe is expressed in erythroid cells and impairs iron uptake, whereas its absence exclusively from the hematopoietic compartment is sufficient to accelerate recovery from phlebotomy. In summary, we demonstrate that Hfe influences erythropoiesis by 2 distinct mechanisms: limiting hepcidin expression under conditions of simultaneous iron overload and stress erythropoiesis, and impairing transferrin-bound iron uptake by erythroid cells. Moreover, our results provide novel suggestions to improve the treatment of hemochromatosis.

  6. The nuclear IκB family of proteins controls gene regulation and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MaruYama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The inhibitory IκB family of proteins is subdivided into two groups based on protein localization in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. These proteins interact with NF-κB, a major transcription factor regulating the expression of many inflammatory cytokines, by modulating its transcriptional activity. However, nuclear IκB family proteins not only interact with NF-κB to change its transcriptional activity, but they also bind to chromatin and control gene expression. This review provides an overview of nuclear IκB family proteins and their role in immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana: transcriptomic analyses reveal novel FIT-regulated genes, iron deficiency marker genes and functional gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Hans-Jörg; Pateyron, Stéphanie; Bauer, Petra

    2016-10-03

    FIT (FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR) is the central regulator of iron uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. We performed transcriptome analyses of six day-old seedlings and roots of six week-old plants using wild type, a fit knock-out mutant and a FIT over-expression line grown under iron-sufficient or iron-deficient conditions. We compared genes regulated in a FIT-dependent manner depending on the developmental stage of the plants. We assembled a high likelihood dataset which we used to perform co-expression and functional analysis of the most stably iron deficiency-induced genes. 448 genes were found FIT-regulated. Out of these, 34 genes were robustly FIT-regulated in root and seedling samples and included 13 novel FIT-dependent genes. Three hundred thirty-one genes showed differential regulation in response to the presence and absence of FIT only in the root samples, while this was the case for 83 genes in the seedling samples. We assembled a virtual dataset of iron-regulated genes based on a total of 14 transcriptomic analyses of iron-deficient and iron-sufficient wild-type plants to pinpoint the best marker genes for iron deficiency and analyzed this dataset in depth. Co-expression analysis of this dataset revealed 13 distinct regulons part of which predominantly contained functionally related genes. We could enlarge the list of FIT-dependent genes and discriminate between genes that are robustly FIT-regulated in roots and seedlings or only in one of those. FIT-regulated genes were mostly induced, few of them were repressed by FIT. With the analysis of a virtual dataset we could filter out and pinpoint new candidates among the most reliable marker genes for iron deficiency. Moreover, co-expression and functional analysis of this virtual dataset revealed iron deficiency-induced and functionally distinct regulons.

  8. Efficacy of Different Iron Fortificants in Wheat Flour in Controlling Iron Deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN HUANG; JING SUN; WEN-XIAN LI; LI-JUAN WANG; AN-XU WANG; JUN-SHENG HUO; JUN-SHI CHEN; CHUN-MING CHEN

    2009-01-01

    Objective To observe the different impacts of electrolytic iron, FeSO4, and NaFeEDTA on body iron store of anemic school students. Methods Four hundreds anemic students at the age of 11 -18 years were divided into four groups. Of which, three consumed different iron fortificants from wheat flour as food vehicle for six months and one consumed non-fortified flour (control). The fortification level of electrolytic iron, FeSO4, and NaFeEDTA was 60 mg Fe/kg, 30 mg Fe/kg, and 20 mg Fe/kg, respectively. Blood samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, and 6 months and hemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin (SF), and transferrin receptor (TfR) were measured. Results The hemoglobin levels in three intervention groups increased, the increments of Hb in the NaFeEDTA group were significantly higher than that in the other groups. SF and TfR levels increased in the tested groups and body iron store in the NaFeEDTA group was higher than that in the other groups. These parameters did not show any significant changes in the control group. Conclusion NaFeEDTA and FeSO4 fortified wheat flour has positive impacts on iron status in anemic students and NaFeEDTA is more effective than FeSO4, while electrolytic iron is less effective in improving iron store in anemic students.

  9. Control of metabolic homeostasis by stress signaling is mediated by the lipocalin NLaz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hull-Thompson

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic homeostasis in metazoans is regulated by endocrine control of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS activity. Stress and inflammatory signaling pathways--such as Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK signaling--repress IIS, curtailing anabolic processes to promote stress tolerance and extend lifespan. While this interaction constitutes an adaptive response that allows managing energy resources under stress conditions, excessive JNK activity in adipose tissue of vertebrates has been found to cause insulin resistance, promoting type II diabetes. Thus, the interaction between JNK and IIS has to be tightly regulated to ensure proper metabolic adaptation to environmental challenges. Here, we identify a new regulatory mechanism by which JNK influences metabolism systemically. We show that JNK signaling is required for metabolic homeostasis in flies and that this function is mediated by the Drosophila Lipocalin family member Neural Lazarillo (NLaz, a homologue of vertebrate Apolipoprotein D (ApoD and Retinol Binding Protein 4 (RBP4. Lipocalins are emerging as central regulators of peripheral insulin sensitivity and have been implicated in metabolic diseases. NLaz is transcriptionally regulated by JNK signaling and is required for JNK-mediated stress and starvation tolerance. Loss of NLaz function reduces stress resistance and lifespan, while its over-expression represses growth, promotes stress tolerance and extends lifespan--phenotypes that are consistent with reduced IIS activity. Accordingly, we find that NLaz represses IIS activity in larvae and adult flies. Our results show that JNK-NLaz signaling antagonizes IIS and is critical for metabolic adaptation of the organism to environmental challenges. The JNK pathway and Lipocalins are structurally and functionally conserved, suggesting that similar interactions represent an evolutionarily conserved system for the control of metabolic homeostasis.

  10. Control of metabolic homeostasis by stress signaling is mediated by the lipocalin NLaz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull-Thompson, Julie; Muffat, Julien; Sanchez, Diego; Walker, David W; Benzer, Seymour; Ganfornina, Maria D; Jasper, Heinrich

    2009-04-01

    Metabolic homeostasis in metazoans is regulated by endocrine control of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) activity. Stress and inflammatory signaling pathways--such as Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling--repress IIS, curtailing anabolic processes to promote stress tolerance and extend lifespan. While this interaction constitutes an adaptive response that allows managing energy resources under stress conditions, excessive JNK activity in adipose tissue of vertebrates has been found to cause insulin resistance, promoting type II diabetes. Thus, the interaction between JNK and IIS has to be tightly regulated to ensure proper metabolic adaptation to environmental challenges. Here, we identify a new regulatory mechanism by which JNK influences metabolism systemically. We show that JNK signaling is required for metabolic homeostasis in flies and that this function is mediated by the Drosophila Lipocalin family member Neural Lazarillo (NLaz), a homologue of vertebrate Apolipoprotein D (ApoD) and Retinol Binding Protein 4 (RBP4). Lipocalins are emerging as central regulators of peripheral insulin sensitivity and have been implicated in metabolic diseases. NLaz is transcriptionally regulated by JNK signaling and is required for JNK-mediated stress and starvation tolerance. Loss of NLaz function reduces stress resistance and lifespan, while its over-expression represses growth, promotes stress tolerance and extends lifespan--phenotypes that are consistent with reduced IIS activity. Accordingly, we find that NLaz represses IIS activity in larvae and adult flies. Our results show that JNK-NLaz signaling antagonizes IIS and is critical for metabolic adaptation of the organism to environmental challenges. The JNK pathway and Lipocalins are structurally and functionally conserved, suggesting that similar interactions represent an evolutionarily conserved system for the control of metabolic homeostasis.

  11. Characterization of Three New Glutaredoxin Genes in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis: Putative Role of RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 in Iron Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Elisabeth; Benabdellah, Karim; Ferrol, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are small ubiquitous oxidoreductases involved in the regulation of the redox state in living cells. In an attempt to identify the full complement of GRXs in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis, three additional GRX homologs, besides the formerly characterized GintGRX1 (renamed here as RiGRX1), were identified. The three new GRXs (RiGRX4, RiGRX5 and RiGRX6) contain the CXXS domain of monothiol GRXs, but whereas RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 belong to class II GRXs, RiGRX6 belongs to class I together with RiGRX1. By using a yeast expression system, we observed that the newly identified homologs partially reverted sensitivity of the GRX deletion yeast strains to external oxidants. Furthermore, our results indicated that RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 play a role in iron homeostasis in yeast. Gene expression analyses revealed that RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 were more highly expressed in the intraradical (IRM) than in the extraradical mycelium (ERM). Exposure of the ERM to hydrogen peroxide induced up-regulation of RiGRX1, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 gene expression. RiGRX4 expression was also up-regulated in the ERM when the fungus was grown in media supplemented with a high iron concentration. These data indicate the two monothiol class II GRXs, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5, might be involved in oxidative stress protection and in the regulation of fungal iron homeostasis. Increased expression of RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 in the IRM suggests that these GRXs should play a key role in oxidative stress protection of R. irregularis during its in planta phase. PMID:26900849

  12. Characterization of Three New Glutaredoxin Genes in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis: Putative Role of RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 in Iron Homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Tamayo

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxins (GRXs are small ubiquitous oxidoreductases involved in the regulation of the redox state in living cells. In an attempt to identify the full complement of GRXs in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis, three additional GRX homologs, besides the formerly characterized GintGRX1 (renamed here as RiGRX1, were identified. The three new GRXs (RiGRX4, RiGRX5 and RiGRX6 contain the CXXS domain of monothiol GRXs, but whereas RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 belong to class II GRXs, RiGRX6 belongs to class I together with RiGRX1. By using a yeast expression system, we observed that the newly identified homologs partially reverted sensitivity of the GRX deletion yeast strains to external oxidants. Furthermore, our results indicated that RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 play a role in iron homeostasis in yeast. Gene expression analyses revealed that RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 were more highly expressed in the intraradical (IRM than in the extraradical mycelium (ERM. Exposure of the ERM to hydrogen peroxide induced up-regulation of RiGRX1, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 gene expression. RiGRX4 expression was also up-regulated in the ERM when the fungus was grown in media supplemented with a high iron concentration. These data indicate the two monothiol class II GRXs, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5, might be involved in oxidative stress protection and in the regulation of fungal iron homeostasis. Increased expression of RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 in the IRM suggests that these GRXs should play a key role in oxidative stress protection of R. irregularis during its in planta phase.

  13. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin promotes BHV-1 infection in mammalian cells by interfering with iron homeostasis regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Fiorito

    Full Text Available Mammalian cells require iron to satisfy metabolic needs or to accomplish specialized functions, and DNA viruses, like bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1, require an iron-replete host to efficiently replicate, so that iron bioavailability is an important component of viral virulence. Cellular iron metabolism is coordinately controlled by the Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRP1 and IRP2, whose activity is affected by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, a current and persistent environmental contaminant. Considering that TCDD enhances BHV-1 replication, herein we analyzed the effects of TCDD on iron metabolism during BHV-1 infection in MDBK cells, and presented evidences of a divergent modulation of IRP1 and IRP2 RNA-binding capacity. Moreover, an up-regulation of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1 and a concomitant down-regulation of ferritin were observed. This scenario led to an expansion of the labile iron pool (LIP and induces a significant enhance of viral titer, as confirmed by increased levels of BHV-1 infected cell protein 0 (bICP0, the major transcriptional regulatory protein of BHV-1. Taken together, our data suggest that TCDD increases the free intracellular iron availability thereby promoting the onset of BHV-1 infection and rendering bovine cells more vulnerable to the virus.

  14. Exercise and Glycemic Control: Focus on Redox Homeostasis and Redox-Sensitive Protein Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lewan; Shaw, Christopher S.; Stepto, Nigel K.; Levinger, Itamar

    2017-01-01

    Physical inactivity, excess energy consumption, and obesity are associated with elevated systemic oxidative stress and the sustained activation of redox-sensitive stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Sustained SAPK activation leads to aberrant insulin signaling, impaired glycemic control, and the development and progression of cardiometabolic disease. Paradoxically, acute exercise transiently increases oxidative stress and SAPK signaling, yet postexercise glycemic control and skeletal muscle function are enhanced. Furthermore, regular exercise leads to the upregulation of antioxidant defense, which likely assists in the mitigation of chronic oxidative stress-associated disease. In this review, we explore the complex spatiotemporal interplay between exercise, oxidative stress, and glycemic control, and highlight exercise-induced reactive oxygen species and redox-sensitive protein signaling as important regulators of glucose homeostasis. PMID:28529499

  15. Interference of Nickel with Copper and Iron Homeostasis Contributes to Metal Toxicity Symptoms in the Nickel Hyperaccumulator Plant Alyssum inflatum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rasoul Ghasemi; S. Majid Ghaderian; Ute Krämer

    2009-01-01

    .... To better understand the role of interactions between transition metals in the development of metal toxicity symptoms in plants, the effects of exposure to excess nickel (Ni) on copper (Cu) and iron (Fe...

  16. Pulmonary Toxicity and Modifications in Iron Homeostasis Following Libby Amphibole Asbestos Exposure in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Individuals suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD) develop iron dysregulation which may influence pulmonary toxicity and injury upon exposure to asbestos. We hypothesized spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats woul...

  17. 哺乳动物铁稳态分子机制研究进展%Molecular Mechanisms of Mammalian Iron Homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉超; 沈媛媛; 晏向华; 王福俤

    2011-01-01

    铁是机体必需微量元素,参与机体合成血红蛋白、肌虹蛋白及多种酶的组成和功能发挥,对维持生命和健康至关重要.近四分之一的世界人口遭受铁缺乏或缺铁性贫血的成胁.此外部分人群还存在铁过载问题、以脏器铁离子蓄积为主要病理改变的遗传性血色病,其在欧美发病率高达1/200,在中国也有报道.血色病后期多诱发肝脏,胰腺及心脏的功能衰退.铁过少或过多对健康都会造成严重危害,机体需要复杂而精密的调控体系维持铁稳态平衡.铁代谢主要包括小肠吸收、肝脏储存、血液转运、巨噬细胞再循环以及周身细胞利用.过去十多年是铁代谢研究的“黄金时期”,先后发现众多铁稳态代谢相关基因.该文综述7近年来哺乳动物铁代谢领域的研究进展,并对铁稳态代谢中存在的问题进行了初步讨论,为理解和进一步深入研究铁代谢分子机制提供参考.%Trace element iron is essential for nearly all living organisms. It is the key component of iron-containing enzymes and proteins, which participate in many cellular biological processes. It is estimated that nearly one quarter of population worldwide has been suffered from anemia due to iron deficiency. In contrast, iron overload induces a disease termed as Hemochromatosis, which the incidence is approximately 1/200 in Caucasians. Recently, the disease has also been reported in China. It is fatal if the disease progresses to late stage as the sign of heart, pancreas and liver failures. Therefore, maintenance of iron homeostasis is crucial. It is believed that iron is uptake by small intestine, stored in liver, transported in blood, recycled by macrophages, and finally utilized by cells to fulfill the functions. In last "Golden Decade", many novel iron metabolic genes have been cloned and functionally characterized to further understanding of regulation of iron metabolism and maintenance of iron homeostasis

  18. Homeostasis 5: nurses as external agents of control in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, John; McVicar, Andrew

    Breast cancer is caused by a homeostatic imbalance of cell division. Healthcare practitioners need to understand cellular activities to appreciate the physiological basis of health (homeostasis), the pathophysiological basis of illness and the physiological rationale of healthcare. Cells are the 'basic unit of life' (Clancy and McVicar, 2011a). This article describes normal cell division and the anatomy and physiology of the breast and, using a case study, will show how breast cancer is a homeostatic imbalance of cell division. There are analogies between the components of homeostasis and the components of the nursing (healthcare) process (Clancy and McVicar, 2011b) in the condition of breast cancer. After reading this article, nurses should be able to: understand that breast cancer is a cellular hence chemical imbalance that causes uncontrollable mitotic division of breast cells; understand how the cell cycle of cancer cells differs from that of normal cells; identify nature-nurture interactions involved in the aetiology of breast cancer; understand that when caring for people with breast cancer, health professionals including oncology nurses are acting as external agents of homeostatic control as the patient 'recovers' from breast cancer, and also to some extent when reducing signs and symptoms, hence quality of life, by providing palliative care.

  19. Transcriptome Sequencing Identifies SPL7-Regulated Copper Acquisition Genes FRO4/FRO5 and the Copper Dependence of Iron Homeostasis in Arabidopsis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, María; Casero, David; Singh, Vasantika; Wilson, Grandon T.; Grande, Arne; Yang, Huijun; Dodani, Sheel C.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Huijser, Peter; Connolly, Erin L.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Krämer, Ute

    2012-01-01

    The transition metal copper (Cu) is essential for all living organisms but is toxic when present in excess. To identify Cu deficiency responses comprehensively, we conducted genome-wide sequencing-based transcript profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type plants and of a mutant defective in the gene encoding SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE7 (SPL7), which acts as a transcriptional regulator of Cu deficiency responses. In response to Cu deficiency, FERRIC REDUCTASE OXIDASE5 (FRO5) and FRO4 transcript levels increased strongly, in an SPL7-dependent manner. Biochemical assays and confocal imaging of a Cu-specific fluorophore showed that high-affinity root Cu uptake requires prior FRO5/FRO4-dependent Cu(II)-specific reduction to Cu(I) and SPL7 function. Plant iron (Fe) deficiency markers were activated in Cu-deficient media, in which reduced growth of the spl7 mutant was partially rescued by Fe supplementation. Cultivation in Cu-deficient media caused a defect in root-to-shoot Fe translocation, which was exacerbated in spl7 and associated with a lack of ferroxidase activity. This is consistent with a possible role for a multicopper oxidase in Arabidopsis Fe homeostasis, as previously described in yeast, humans, and green algae. These insights into root Cu uptake and the interaction between Cu and Fe homeostasis will advance plant nutrition, crop breeding, and biogeochemical research. PMID:22374396

  20. Isolation and characterization of Lotus japonicus genes involved in iron and zinc homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Jensen, Winnie; Sandal, Niels Nørgaard;

    in plants. We have used these sequences to search for L. japonicus ESTs and genomic loci that are likely to be involved in iron and zinc metabolism. We have identified sequences corresponding to ferritins, ferric reductases, metal transport proteins of the ZIP family, and cation transporters of the NRAMP....... japonicus Gifu recombinant inbred lines....

  1. Dopamine controls neurogenesis in the adult salamander midbrain in homeostasis and during regeneration of dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Daniel A; Kirkham, Matthew; Wang, Heng; Frisén, Jonas; Simon, András

    2011-04-08

    Appropriate termination of regenerative processes is critical for producing the correct number of cells in tissues. Here we provide evidence for an end-product inhibition of dopamine neuron regeneration that is mediated by dopamine. Ablation of midbrain dopamine neurons leads to complete regeneration in salamanders. Regeneration involves extensive neurogenesis and requires activation of quiescent ependymoglia cells, which express dopamine receptors. Pharmacological compensation for dopamine loss by L-dopa inhibits ependymoglia proliferation and regeneration in a dopamine receptor-signaling-dependent manner, specifically after ablation of dopamine neurons. Systemic administration of the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol alone causes ependymoglia proliferation and the appearance of excessive number of neurons. Our data show that stem cell quiescence is under dopamine control and provide a model for termination once normal homeostasis is restored. The findings establish a role for dopamine in the reversible suppression of neurogenesis in the midbrain and have implications for regenerative strategies in Parkinson's disease.

  2. Effects of acute creatine supplementation on iron homeostasis and uric acid-based antioxidant capacity of plasma after wingate test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros Marcelo P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary creatine has been largely used as an ergogenic aid to improve strength and athletic performance, especially in short-term and high energy-demanding anaerobic exercise. Recent findings have also suggested a possible antioxidant role for creatine in muscle tissues during exercise. Here we evaluate the effects of a 1-week regimen of 20 g/day creatine supplementation on the plasma antioxidant capacity, free and heme iron content, and uric acid and lipid peroxidation levels of young subjects (23.1 ± 5.8 years old immediately before and 5 and 60 min after the exhaustive Wingate test. Results Maximum anaerobic power was improved by acute creatine supplementation (10.5 %, but it was accompanied by a 2.4-fold increase in pro-oxidant free iron ions in the plasma. However, potential iron-driven oxidative insult was adequately counterbalanced by proportional increases in antioxidant ferric-reducing activity in plasma (FRAP, leading to unaltered lipid peroxidation levels. Interestingly, the FRAP index, found to be highly dependent on uric acid levels in the placebo group, also had an additional contribution from other circulating metabolites in creatine-fed subjects. Conclusions Our data suggest that acute creatine supplementation improved the anaerobic performance of athletes and limited short-term oxidative insults, since creatine-induced iron overload was efficiently circumvented by acquired FRAP capacity attributed to: overproduction of uric acid in energy-depleted muscles (as an end-product of purine metabolism and a powerful iron chelating agent and inherent antioxidant activity of creatine.

  3. Effects of acute creatine supplementation on iron homeostasis and uric acid-based antioxidant capacity of plasma after wingate test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Marcelo P; Ganini, Douglas; Lorenço-Lima, Leandro; Soares, Chrislaine O; Pereira, Benedito; Bechara, Etelvino Jh; Silveira, Leonardo R; Curi, Rui; Souza-Junior, Tacito P

    2012-06-12

    Dietary creatine has been largely used as an ergogenic aid to improve strength and athletic performance, especially in short-term and high energy-demanding anaerobic exercise. Recent findings have also suggested a possible antioxidant role for creatine in muscle tissues during exercise. Here we evaluate the effects of a 1-week regimen of 20 g/day creatine supplementation on the plasma antioxidant capacity, free and heme iron content, and uric acid and lipid peroxidation levels of young subjects (23.1 ± 5.8 years old) immediately before and 5 and 60 min after the exhaustive Wingate test. Maximum anaerobic power was improved by acute creatine supplementation (10.5 %), but it was accompanied by a 2.4-fold increase in pro-oxidant free iron ions in the plasma. However, potential iron-driven oxidative insult was adequately counterbalanced by proportional increases in antioxidant ferric-reducing activity in plasma (FRAP), leading to unaltered lipid peroxidation levels. Interestingly, the FRAP index, found to be highly dependent on uric acid levels in the placebo group, also had an additional contribution from other circulating metabolites in creatine-fed subjects. Our data suggest that acute creatine supplementation improved the anaerobic performance of athletes and limited short-term oxidative insults, since creatine-induced iron overload was efficiently circumvented by acquired FRAP capacity attributed to: overproduction of uric acid in energy-depleted muscles (as an end-product of purine metabolism and a powerful iron chelating agent) and inherent antioxidant activity of creatine.

  4. Roles of dorsomedial hypothalamic cholecystokinin signaling in the controls of meal patterns and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangjing; Yan, Jianqun; Smith, Wanli W; Moran, Timothy H; Bi, Sheng

    2012-01-18

    A role for dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) cholecystokinin (CCK) signaling in feeding control has been proposed. Administration of CCK into the DMH reduces food intake and OLETF rats lacking CCK1 receptors (CCK1R) become hyperphagic and obese. We hypothesized that site specific replenishment of CCK1R in the DMH of OLETF rats would attenuate aspects of their feeding deficits. Recombinant vectors of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated expression of CCK1R (AAVCCK1R) were bilaterally delivered into the DMH of OLETF. OLETF rats with AAVCCK1R injections demonstrated a 65% replenishment of Cck1r mRNA expression in the DMH relative to lean LETO control rats. Although this level of replenishment did not significantly affect overall food intake or body weight through 14 weeks following viral injections, meal patterns were partially normalized in OLETF rats receiving AAVCCK1R with a significant decrease in dark cycle meal size and a small but significant decrease in daily food intake in the meal analysis chambers. Importantly, the elevation in blood glucose level of OLETF rats was attenuated by the AAVCCK1R injections (p=0.03), suggesting a role for DMH CCK signaling in glucose homeostasis. In support of this role, administration of CCK into the DMH of intact rats enhanced glucose tolerance, as this occurred through activation of CCK1R but not CCK2R signaling. In conclusion, partial replenishment of CCK1R in the DMH of OLETF rats, although insufficient for altering overall food intake and body weight, normalizes meal pattern changes and reduces blood glucose levels. Our study also shows a novel role of DMH CCK signaling in glucose homeostasis.

  5. Association Studies of HFE C282Y and H63D Variants with Oral Cancer Risk and Iron Homeostasis Among Whites and Blacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan R. Jones

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis (HFE gene are associated with excessive iron absorption from the diet, and pro-oxidant effects of iron accumulation are thought to be a risk factor for several types of cancer. Methods: The C282Y (rs1800562 and H63D (rs1799945 polymorphisms were genotyped in 301 oral cancer cases and 437 controls and analyzed in relation to oral cancer risk, and serum iron biomarker levels from a subset of 130 subjects. Results: Individuals with the C282Y allele had lower total iron binding capacity (TIBC (321.2 ± 37.2 µg/dL vs. 397.7 ± 89.0 µg/dL, p = 0.007 and higher percent transferrin saturation (22.0 ± 8.7 vs. 35.6 ± 22.9, p = 0.023 than wild type individuals. Iron and ferritin levels approached significantly higher levels for the C282Y allele (p = 0.0632 and p = 0.0588, respectively. Conclusions: Iron biomarker levels were elevated by the C282Y allele, but neither (rs1800562 nor (rs1799945 was associated with oral cancer risk in blacks and whites.

  6. Iron and manganese contamination: sources, adverse effects and control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Y V V; Saraf, Renu

    2007-10-01

    This article discusses the problem of iron and manganese contamination, the adverse effects and available control methods. The presence of iron and manganese in water causes serious commercial and health problems. Various treatment methods are available to treat water contaminated with these elements. However, catalytic media is an excellent choice particularly increasing given the preference for non-chemical water treatment. INDION ISR and BIRM are the most popularly used synthetically manufactured catalytic media.

  7. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-05

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field.

  8. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  9. Prominent pancreatic endocrinopathy and altered control of food intake disrupt energy homeostasis in prion diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J.D.; Berardinelli, J.G.; Rocke, T.E.; Bessen, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that can induce endocrinopathies. The basis of altered endocrine function in prion diseases is not well understood, and the purpose of this study was to investigate the spatiotemporal relationship between energy homeostasis and prion infection in hamsters inoculated with either the 139H strain of scrapie agent, which induces preclinical weight gain, or the HY strain of transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), which induces clinical weight loss. Temporal changes in body weight, feed, and water intake were measured as well as both non-fasted and fasted concentrations of serum glucose, insulin, glucagon, ??-ketones, and leptin. In 139H scrapie-infected hamsters, polydipsia, hyperphagia, non-fasted hyperinsulinemia with hyperglycemia, and fasted hyperleptinemia were found at preclinical stages and are consistent with an anabolic syndrome that has similarities to type II diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome X. In HY TME-infected hamsters, hypodipsia, hypersecretion of glucagon (in both non-fasted and fasted states), increased fasted ??-ketones, fasted hypoglycemia, and suppressed non-fasted leptin concentrations were found while feed intake was normal. These findings suggest a severe catabolic syndrome in HY TME infection mediated by chronic increases in glucagon secretion. In both models, alterations of pancreatic endocrine function were not associated with PrPSc deposition in the pancreas. The results indicate that prominent endocrinopathy underlies alterations in body weight, pancreatic endocrine function, and intake of food. The prion-induced alterations of energy homeostasis in 139H scrapie- or HY TME-infected hamsters could occur within areas of the hypothalamus that control food satiety and/or within autonomic centers that provide neural outflow to the pancreas. ?? 2008 Society for Endocrinology.

  10. Monoubiquitin-dependent endocytosis of the IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) transporter controls iron uptake in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Barberon, Marie; Zelazny, Enric; Robert, Stéphanie; Conejero, Geneviève; Curie, Catherine; Friml, Jìrí; Vert, Grégory

    2011-01-01

    Plants take up iron from the soil using the IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) high-affinity iron transporter at the root surface. Sophisticated regulatory mechanisms allow plants to tightly control the levels of IRT1, ensuring optimal absorption of essential but toxic iron. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis thaliana IRT1 leads to constitutive IRT1 protein accumulation, metal overload, and oxidative stress. IRT1 is unexpectedly found in trans-Golgi network/early endosom...

  11. Phytoestrogens modulate hepcidin expression by Nrf2: Implications for dietary control of iron absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayele, Henry K; Balesaria, Sara; Srai, Surjit K S

    2015-12-01

    Hepcidin is a liver-derived antimicrobial peptide that regulates iron absorption and is also an integral part of the acute phase response. In a previous report, we found evidence that this peptide could also be induced by toxic heavy metals and xenobiotics, thus broadening its teleological role as a defensin. However it remained unclear how its sensing of disparate biotic and abiotic stressors might be integrated at the transcriptional level. We hypothesized that its function in cytoprotection may be regulated by NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the master transcriptional controller of cellular stress defenses. In this report, we show that hepcidin regulation is inextricably linked to the acute stress response through Nrf2 signaling. Nrf2 regulates hepcidin expression from a prototypical antioxidant response element in its promoter, and by synergizing with other basic leucine-zipper transcription factors. We also show that polyphenolic small molecules or phytoestrogens commonly found in fruits and vegetables including the red wine constituent resveratrol can induce hepcidin expression in vitro and post-prandially, with concomitant reductions in circulating iron levels and transferrin saturation by one such polyphenol quercetin. Furthermore, these molecules derepress hepcidin promoter activity when its transcription by Nrf2 is repressed by Keap1. Taken together, the data show that hepcidin is a prototypical antioxidant response or cytoprotective gene within the Nrf2 transcriptional circuitry. The ability of phytoestrogens to modulate hepcidin expression in vivo suggests a novel mechanism by which diet may impact iron homeostasis.

  12. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  13. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of iron stored in the body become low, iron deficiency anemia sets in. Red blood cells become smaller and ... from the lungs throughout the body. Symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include tiredness and lack of energy, GI upset, ...

  14. Zinc-dependent global transcriptional control, transcriptional deregulation, and higher gene copy number for genes in metal homeostasis of the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talke, Ina N; Hanikenne, Marc; Krämer, Ute

    2006-09-01

    The metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri exhibits naturally selected zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hypertolerance and accumulates extraordinarily high Zn concentrations in its leaves. With these extreme physiological traits, A. halleri phylogenetically belongs to the sister clade of Arabidopsis thaliana. Using a combination of genome-wide cross species microarray analysis and real-time reverse transcription-PCR, a set of candidate genes is identified for Zn hyperaccumulation, Zn and Cd hypertolerance, and the adjustment of micronutrient homeostasis in A. halleri. Eighteen putative metal homeostasis genes are newly identified to be more highly expressed in A. halleri than in A. thaliana, and 11 previously identified candidate genes are confirmed. The encoded proteins include HMA4, known to contribute to root-shoot transport of Zn in A. thaliana. Expression of either AtHMA4 or AhHMA4 confers cellular Zn and Cd tolerance to yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Among further newly implicated proteins are IRT3 and ZIP10, which have been proposed to contribute to cytoplasmic Zn influx, and FRD3 required for iron partitioning in A. thaliana. In A. halleri, the presence of more than a single genomic copy is a hallmark of several highly expressed candidate genes with possible roles in metal hyperaccumulation and metal hypertolerance. Both A. halleri and A. thaliana exert tight regulatory control over Zn homeostasis at the transcript level. Zn hyperaccumulation in A. halleri involves enhanced partitioning of Zn from roots into shoots. The transcriptional regulation of marker genes suggests that in the steady state, A. halleri roots, but not the shoots, act as physiologically Zn deficient under conditions of moderate Zn supply.

  15. Iron assimilation and transcription factor controlled synthesis of riboflavin in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorwieger, A; Gryczka, C; Czihal, A; Douchkov, D; Tiedemann, J; Mock, H-P; Jakoby, M; Weisshaar, B; Saalbach, I; Bäumlein, H

    2007-06-01

    Iron homeostasis is vital for many cellular processes and requires a precise regulation. Several iron efficient plants respond to iron starvation with the excretion of riboflavin and other flavins. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors (TF) are involved in the regulation of many developmental processes, including iron assimilation. Here we describe the isolation and characterisation of two Arabidopsis bHLH TF genes, which are strongly induced under iron starvation. Their heterologous ectopic expression causes constitutive, iron starvation independent excretion of riboflavin. The results show that both bHLH TFs represent an essential component of the regulatory pathway connecting iron deficiency perception and riboflavin excretion and might act as integrators of various stress reactions.

  16. FapR: From Control of Membrane Lipid Homeostasis to a Biotechnological Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Albanesi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipids and fatty acids are not only one of the major components of cell membranes but also important metabolic intermediates in bacteria. Since the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway is essential and energetically expensive, organisms have developed a diversity of homeostatic mechanisms to fine-tune the concentration of lipids at particular levels. FapR is the first global regulator of lipid synthesis discovered in bacteria and is largely conserved in Gram-positive organisms including important human pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, and Listeria monocytogenes. FapR is a transcription factor that negatively controls the expression of several genes of the fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis and was first identified in Bacillus subtilis. This review focuses on the genetic, biochemical and structural advances that led to a detailed understanding of lipid homeostasis control by FapR providing unique opportunities to learn how Gram-positive bacteria monitor the status of fatty acid biosynthesis and adjust the lipid synthesis accordingly. Furthermore, we also cover the potential of the FapR system as a target for new drugs against Gram-positive bacteria as well as its recent biotechnological applications in diverse organisms.

  17. The bHLH transcription factor bHLH104 interacts with IAA-LEUCINE RESISTANT3 and modulates iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Bing; Li, Mengshu; Feng, Dongru; Jin, Honglei; Wang, Peng; Liu, Jun; Xiong, Feng; Wang, Jinfa; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2015-03-01

    Iron (Fe) is an indispensable micronutrient for plant growth and development. The regulation of Fe homeostasis in plants is complex and involves a number of transcription factors. Here, we demonstrate that a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, bHLH104, belonging to the IVc subgroup of bHLH family, acts as a key component positively regulating Fe deficiency responses. Knockout of bHLH104 in Arabidopsis thaliana greatly reduced tolerance to Fe deficiency, whereas overexpression of bHLH104 had the opposite effect and led to accumulation of excess Fe in soil-grown conditions. The activation of Fe deficiency-inducible genes was substantially suppressed by loss of bHLH104. Further investigation showed that bHLH104 interacted with another IVc subgroup bHLH protein, IAA-LEUCINE RESISTANT3 (ILR3), which also plays an important role in Fe homeostasis. Moreover, bHLH104 and ILR3 could bind directly to the promoters of Ib subgroup bHLH genes and POPEYE (PYE) functioning in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses. Interestingly, genetic analysis showed that loss of bHLH104 could decrease the tolerance to Fe deficiency conferred by the lesion of BRUTUS, which encodes an E3 ligase and interacts with bHLH104. Collectively, our data support that bHLH104 and ILR3 play pivotal roles in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses via targeting Ib subgroup bHLH genes and PYE expression.

  18. Controlled oxidation of iron nanoparticles in chemical vapour synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruusunen, Jarno; Ihalainen, Mika; Koponen, Tarmo; Torvela, Tiina; Tenho, Mikko; Salonen, Jarno; Sippula, Olli; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Lähde, Anna

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, iron oxide nanoparticles (primary particle size of 80-90 nm) with controlled oxidation state were prepared via an atmospheric pressure chemical vapour synthesis (APCVS) method. Iron pentacarbonyl [Fe(CO)5], a precursor material, was thermally decomposed to iron in the APCVS reactor. Subsequently, the iron was oxidized with controlled amount of oxygen in the reactor to produce nearly pure magnetite or haematite particles depending on the oxygen concentration. Size, morphology and crystal structure of the synthesized nanoparticles were studied with scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and computational fluid dynamics model were used to predict the oxidation state of the iron oxides and the reaction conditions during mixing. Aggregates of crystalline particles were formed, determined as magnetite at the oxygen volumetric fraction of 0.1 % and haematite at volumetric fraction of 0.5 %, according to the XRD. The geometric mean electrical mobility diameter of the aggregates increased from 110 to 155 nm when the volumetric fraction of oxygen increased from 0.1 to 0.5 %, determined using the SMPS. The aggregates were highly sintered based on TEM analyses. As a conclusion, APCVS method can be used to produce nearly pure crystalline magnetite or haematite nanoparticles with controlled oxidation in a continuous one-stage gas-phase process.

  19. Analysis of aluminium content and iron homeostasis in nipple aspirate fluids from healthy women and breast cancer-affected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannello, Ferdinando; Tonti, Gaetana A; Medda, Virginia; Simone, Patrizia; Darbre, Philippa D

    2011-04-01

    Aluminium is not a physiological component of the breast but has been measured recently in human breast tissues and breast cyst fluids at levels above those found in blood serum or milk. Since the presence of aluminium can lead to iron dyshomeostasis, levels of aluminium and iron-binding proteins (ferritin, transferrin) were measured in nipple aspirate fluid (NAF), a fluid present in the breast duct tree and mirroring the breast microenvironment. NAFs were collected noninvasively from healthy women (NoCancer; n = 16) and breast cancer-affected women (Cancer; n = 19), and compared with levels in serum (n = 15) and milk (n = 45) from healthy subjects. The mean level of aluminium, measured by ICP-mass spectrometry, was significantly higher in Cancer NAF (268.4 ± 28.1 μg l(-1) ; n = 19) than in NoCancer NAF (131.3 ± 9.6 μg l(-1) ; n = 16; P Cancer NAF (280.0 ± 32.3 μg l(-1) ) than in NoCancer NAF (55.5 ± 7.2 μg l(-1) ), and furthermore, a positive correlation was found between levels of aluminium and ferritin in the Cancer NAF (correlation coefficient R = 0.94, P breast cancer. The reasons for the high levels of aluminium in NAF remain unknown but possibilities include either exposure to aluminium-based antiperspirant salts in the adjacent underarm area and/or preferential accumulation of aluminium by breast tissues.

  20. Preferential control of induced regulatory T cell homeostasis via a Bim/Bcl-2 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Szymczak-Workman, A L; Gravano, D M; Workman, C J; Green, D R; Vignali, D A A

    2012-02-09

    Apoptosis has an essential role in controlling T cell homeostasis, especially during the contraction phase of an immune response. However, its contribution to the balance between effector and regulatory populations remains unclear. We found that Rag1(-/-) hosts repopulated with Bim(-/-) conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tconv) resulted in a larger induced regulatory T cell (iTreg) population than mice given wild-type (WT) Tconv. This appears to be due to an increased survival advantage of iTregs compared with activated Tconv in the absence of Bim. Downregulation of Bcl-2 expression and upregulation of Bim expression were more dramatic in WT iTregs than activated Tconv in the absence of IL-2 in vitro. The iTregs generated following Tconv reconstitution of Rag1(-/-) hosts exhibited lower Bcl-2 expression and higher Bim/Bcl-2 ratio than Tconv, which indicates that iTregs were in an apoptosis-prone state in vivo. A significant proportion of the peripheral iTreg pool exhibits low Bcl-2 expression indicating increased sensitivity to apoptosis, which may be a general characteristic of certain Treg subpopulations. In summary, our data suggest that iTregs and Tconv differ in their sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli due to their altered ratio of Bim/Bcl-2 expression. Modulating the apoptosis pathway may provide novel therapeutic approaches to alter the balance between effector T cells and Tregs.

  1. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since th...

  2. CTLA-4 (CD152) controls homeostasis and suppressive capacity of regulatory T cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Paula; Knieke, Karin; Hegel, J Kolja E; Quandt, Dagmar; Burmester, Gerd-R; Hoff, Holger; Brunner-Weinzierl, Monika C

    2009-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (known as Treg cells) suppress unwanted and autoreactive T cell responses. Treg cells express the costimulatory molecule CTLA-4 intracellularly, but the mechanisms by which Treg cells exploit CTLA-4 signaling remain unclear. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of CTLA-4 in controlling the homeostasis and suppressive function of Treg cells. Murine Treg cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for coexpression of CTLA-4 and typical Treg cell-expressed molecules, and the influence of CTLA-4 on T cell proliferation, suppression, and apoptosis was investigated by in vitro assays. To analyze the importance of CTLA-4 in Treg cell-mediated suppression in vivo, wild-type Treg cells were transferred into CTLA-4-deficient mice displaying lymphoproliferation, and survival was monitored over time. A strong correlation between expression of forkhead box P3 and ex vivo expression of CTLA-4 in Treg cells was observed. Inhibition of CTLA-4 signaling in Treg cells during in vitro stimulation increased cell cycling and led to enhanced activation-induced cell death (AICD), which was mediated by CD95/CD95 ligand-induced activation of caspases. Blockade of CTLA-4 signaling resulted in impairment of the suppressive capacity of Treg cells. Despite these effects, high amounts of Treg cells persisted in CTLA-4-deficient mice. Results of transfer experiments in CTLA-4-deficient mice showed that the mice had a significantly prolonged lifespan when CTLA-4-competent Treg cells were injected. Expression of CTLA-4 on Treg cells serves to control T cell proliferation, to confer resistance against AICD, and to maintain the suppressive function of Treg cells.

  3. Do mitochondria regulate cellular iron homeostasis through citric acid and haem production? Implications for cancer and other diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S

    2003-01-01

    Citric acid is produced industrially by depriving Aspergillus niger of iron. The lack of Fe deactivates mitochondrial aconitase and interrupts the krebs cycle, causing the mitochondria to release citric acid as a siderophore (an Fe getter). When the mitochondrion has plenty of Fe and the cell has enough ATP, aerobic phosphorylation stops and fatty acid or haem synthesis take place, when the cell has plenty of haem, haem synthesis stops. Since most of the Fe activity in the cell is related to the mitochondria, I hypothesise that in the animal cell when the mitochondria are low in Fe, citric acid acts as a signal that triggers the production of transferrin receptor messenger RNA (TrR mRNA) in the nucleus, which in the absence of Fe causes the expression of transferrin receptor. When the cell has plenty of Fe, cytosolic aconitase detaches itself from the transferrin receptor and ferritin mRNA stopping expression of the former and initiating expression of the latter. The detached cytosolic aconitase transforms the citric acid, blocking the production of the transferrin receptor mRNA.

  4. Acupuncture Improves Intestinal Absorption of Iron in Iron-deficient Obese Patients: A Randomized Controlled Preliminary Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xin-Cai; Cao, Yan-Qiang; Gao, Qian; Wang, Chen; Li, Man; Wei, Shou-Gang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Obesity has an adverse effect on iron status. Hepcidin-mediated inhibition of iron absorption in the duodenum is a potential mechanism. Iron-deficient obese patients have diminished response to oral iron therapy. This study was designed to assess whether acupuncture could promote the efficacy of oral iron supplementation for the treatment of obesity-related iron deficiency (ID). Methods: Sixty ID or ID anemia (IDA) patients with obesity were screened at Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine and were randomly allocated to receive either oral iron replacement allied with acupuncture weight loss treatment (acupuncture group, n = 30) or oral iron combined with sham-acupuncture treatment (control group, n = 30). Anthropometric parameters were measured and blood samples were tested pre- and post-treatment. Differences in the treatment outcomes of ID/IDA were compared between the two groups. Results: After 8 weeks of acupuncture treatment, there was a significant decrease in body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, and waist/hip circumference ratio of patients in the acupuncture group, while no significant changes were observed in the control group. Oral iron supplementation brought more obvious improvements of iron status indicators including absolute increases in serum iron (11.08 ± 2.19 μmol/L vs. 4.43 ± 0.47 μmol/L), transferrin saturation (11.26 ± 1.65% vs. 1.01 ± 0.23%), and hemoglobin (31.47 ± 1.19 g/L vs. 21.00 ± 2.69 g/L) in the acupuncture group than control group (all P acupuncture group than those in the control group. Conclusion: Acupuncture-based weight loss can enhance the therapeutic effects of iron replacement therapy for obesity-related ID/IDA through improving intestinal iron absorption, probably by downregulating the systemic leptin-hepcidin levels. PMID:28229980

  5. Targeting iron metabolism in drug discovery and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crielaard, Bart J; Lammers, Twan; Rivella, Stefano

    2017-02-03

    Iron fulfils a central role in many essential biochemical processes in human physiology; thus, proper processing of iron is crucial. Although iron metabolism is subject to relatively strict physiological control, numerous disorders, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, have recently been linked to deregulated iron homeostasis. Consequently, iron metabolism constitutes a promising and largely unexploited therapeutic target for the development of new pharmacological treatments for these diseases. Several iron metabolism-targeted therapies are already under clinical evaluation for haematological disorders, and these and newly developed therapeutic agents are likely to have substantial benefit in the clinical management of iron metabolism-associated diseases, for which few efficacious treatments are currently available.

  6. Control of chilling tendency in grey cast iron reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliu Ojo Seidu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In grey cast iron remelt and recycling, white iron can result in the cast product if careful control of the chilling tendency is not ensured. Many jobbing foundries are constrained in furnace types and available foundry additives that the operation always results in white irons. This study is towards ensuring grey iron is reproduced from cast iron scrap auto engine blocks, when using a diesel fired rotary furnace and a FeSi alloy for structural modification (inoculation. With varying addition rate of the FeSi alloy to the tapped molten metal, chill wedge tests were performed on two different wedge samples of type W (according to ASTM A367- wedge test with cooling modulus of 0.45 cm (W3½ and 0.54 cm (W4. The carbon equivalents for the test casts were within hypoeutectic range (3.85 wt. (% to 4.11 wt. (%. In the W4 wedge sample, at 2.0 wt. (% addition rate of the FeSi alloy, the relative clear chill was totally reduced to zero from 19.76%, while the relative mottled chill was brought down to 9.59% from 33.71%. The microstructure from the cast at this level of addition was free of carbidic phases; it shows randomly oriented graphite flakes evenly distributed in the iron matrix. Hardness assessment shows that increasing rate of FeSi addition results in decreasing hardness, with maximum effect at 2.0 wt. (% addition. With equivalent aspect ratio (cooling modulus in a target cast product, this addition rate for this FeSi alloy under this furnace condition will attain graphitized microstructure in the cast product.

  7. Control of chilling tendency in grey cast iron reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliu Ojo Seidu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In grey cast iron remelt and recycling, white iron can result in the cast product if careful control of the chilling tendency is not ensured. Many jobbing foundries are constrained in furnace types and available foundry additives that the operation always results in white irons. This study is towards ensuring grey iron is reproduced from cast iron scrap auto engine blocks, when using a diesel fired rotary furnace and a FeSi alloy for structural modification (inoculation. With varying addition rate of the FeSi alloy to the tapped molten metal, chill wedge tests were performed on two different wedge samples of type W (according to ASTM A367- wedge test with cooling modulus of 0.45 cm (W3½ and 0.54 cm (W4. The carbon equivalents for the test casts were within hypoeutectic range (3.85 wt. (% to 4.11 wt. (%. In the W4 wedge sample, at 2.0 wt. (% addition rate of the FeSi alloy, the relative clear chill was totally reduced to zero from 19.76%, while the relative mottled chill was brought down to 9.59% from 33.71%. The microstructure from the cast at this level of addition was free of carbidic phases; it shows randomly oriented graphite flakes evenly distributed in the iron matrix. Hardness assessment shows that increasing rate of FeSi addition results in decreasing hardness, with maximum effect at 2.0 wt. (% addition. With equivalent aspect ratio (cooling modulus in a target cast product, this addition rate for this FeSi alloy under this furnace condition will attain graphitized microstructure in the cast product.

  8. Effect Of Iron Supplementation In Breastfed Infants: A Randomized Controlled Study

    OpenAIRE

    seyma Kayali; Nilgun Caylan; Gonca Yilmaz; Selim Gokce; Candemir Karacan

    2016-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of daily iron supplementation for prevention of iron-deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia in healthy exclusively breast-fed infants and the factors affecting development of iron-deficiency anemia. Methods This study was conducted with 65 infants (35 in the iron supplemented group and 30 in the non-supplemented controls) between January 2009-March 2010. Detailed physical examination of all infants was carried out at ages...

  9. The TNF receptor and Ig superfamily members form an integrated signaling circuit controlling dendritic cell homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Trez, Carl; Ware, Carl F.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) constitute the most potent antigen presenting cells of the immune system, playing a key role bridging innate and adaptive immune responses. Specialized DC subsets differ depending on their origin, tissue location and the influence of trophic factors, the latter remain to be fully understood. Stromal cell and myeloid-associated Lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR) signaling is required for the local proliferation of lymphoid tissue DC. This review focuses the LTβR signaling cascade as a crucial positive trophic signal in the homeostasis of DC subsets. The noncanonical coreceptor pathway comprised of the Immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily member, B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and TNFR superfamily member, Herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) counter regulates the trophic signaling by LTβR. Together both pathways form an integrated signaling circuit achieving homeostasis of DC subsets. PMID:18511331

  10. Intestinal ferritin H is required for an accurate control of iron absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanoaica, Liviu; Darshan, Deepak; Richman, Larry; Schümann, Klaus; Kühn, Lukas C

    2010-09-08

    To maintain appropriate body iron levels, iron absorption by the proximal duodenum is thought to be controlled by hepcidin, a polypeptide secreted by hepatocytes in response to high serum iron. Hepcidin limits basolateral iron efflux from the duodenal epithelium by binding and downregulating the intestinal iron exporter ferroportin. Here, we found that mice with an intestinal ferritin H gene deletion show increased body iron stores and transferrin saturation. As expected for iron-loaded animals, the ferritin H-deleted mice showed induced liver hepcidin mRNA levels and reduced duodenal expression of DMT1 and DcytB mRNA. In spite of these feedback controls, intestinal ferroportin protein and (59)Fe absorption were increased more than 2-fold in the deleted mice. Our results demonstrate that hepcidin-mediated regulation alone is insufficient to restrict iron absorption and that intestinal ferritin H is also required to limit iron efflux from intestinal cells.

  11. Iron regulatory proteins control a mucosal block to intestinal iron absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, Bruno; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Becker, Christiane; Gretz, Norbert; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Schümann, Klaus; Hentze, Matthias W

    2013-03-28

    Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated "mucosal block." We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin "mucosal block" and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  12. Iron Regulatory Proteins Control a Mucosal Block to Intestinal Iron Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Galy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated “mucosal block.” We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin “mucosal block” and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  13. Light element controlled iron isotope fractionation in planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, A.; Hillgren, V. J.; Horan, M. F.; Duke, L.; Mock, T. D.

    2013-12-01

    Using iron isotope fractionations measured in planetary and meteorite samples to trace planetary differentiation or formation has yielded contradictory results. Iron from high-Ti lunar basalts is more enriched in 57Fe/54Fe than mantle-derived terrestrial samples, in contrast to the isotopic similarity for almost every other element between the Earth and Moon. SNC (Shergottite, Nakhlite, Chassigny) and HED (Howardite, Eucrite, Diogenite) meteorites, which are thought to be derived from the mantles of Mars and Vesta, respectively, show no isotopic fractionation relative to chondrites. While the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) value is debated, recent work has shown effectively that basalts (mid-ocean ridge basalts, terrestrial basalts, and ocean island basalts) are enriched in 57Fe/54Fe relative to chondrites, but the causes of that fractionation are unclear (Craddock et al. 2013). Angrites, basaltic achondrite meteorites, also show enrichment in δ57Fe (Wang et al. 2012). Possible mechanisms include high-pressure core formation, oxidation during perovskite disproportionation, evaporation during the giant impact, and mantle melting. It is important to reconcile why the Earth's basalts are enriched in 57Fe/54Fe but the meteorites from Mars and Vesta are not. One possible explanation is that Mars and Vesta are smaller and the lower pressure attenuated the potential Fe fractionation during core formation. A second possibility is that the intrinsic oxidation states of the planets are causing the differences. However, another option is that the light elements (e.g. S, C, O, H, Si) in the cores of differentiated bodies control the iron isotope fractionation during differentiation. We have conducted experiments at 1 GPa and 1650-1800°C in a piston cylinder apparatus to address how sulfur, carbon and silicon alloyed with iron affect the iron isotopic fractionation between metallic alloy and silicate melt. We find that sulfur has the greatest effect on the iron isotopic

  14. Liver iron transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ross M Graham; Anita CG Chua; Carly E Herbison; John K Olynyk; Debbie Trinder

    2007-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in iron metabolism. It is the major storage site for iron and also expresses a complex range of molecules which are involved in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis. An increasing number of genes associated with hepatic iron transport or regulation have been identified. These include transferrin receptors (TFR1 and 2), a ferrireductase (STEAP3), the transporters divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and ferroportin (FPN) as well as the haemochromatosis protein, HFE and haemojuvelin (HJV),which are signalling molecules. Many of these genes also participate in iron regulatory pathways which focus on the hepatic peptide hepcidin. However, we are still only beginning to understand the complex interactions between liver iron transport and iron homeostasis. This review outlines our current knowledge of molecules of iron metabolism and their roles in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis.

  15. Redox control of iron biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie Rhianon

    Magnetotactic bacteria have evolved complex subcellular machinery to construct linear chains of magnetite nanocrystals that allow the host cell to sense direction. Each mixed-valent iron nanoparticle is mineralized from soluble iron within a membrane-encapsulated vesicle termed the magnetosome, which serves as a specialized compartment that regulates the iron, redox, and pH environment of the growing mineral. In order to dissect the biological components that control this process, we have carried out genetic and biochemical studies of proteins proposed to function in iron mineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. As iron biomineralization by magnetotactic bacteria represents a particularly interesting case for understanding how the production of nanomaterials can be programmed at the genetic level, we also apply synthetic biology techniques towards the production of new cellular materials and new cellular functions. As the production of magnetite requires both the formation of Fe(II) and Fe(III), the redox components of the magnetosome play an essential role in this process. Using genetic complementation studies, we show that the redox cofactors or heme sites of the two putative redox partners, MamP and MamT, are required for magnetite biomineralization in vivo and that removal of one or both sites leads to defects in mineralization. We develop and optimize a heterologous expression method in the E. coli periplasm to cleanly isolate fully heme-loaded MamP for biochemical studies. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the reduction potential of MamP lies in a different range than other c-type cytochrome involved in either Fe(III) reduction or Fe(II) oxidation. Nonetheless, in vitro mineralization studies with MamP and Fe(II) show that it is able to catalyze the formation of mixed-valent Fe(II)/Fe(III) oxides such as green rust. Biomineralization also requires lattice-templating proteins that guide the growth of the functional crystalline material. We

  16. GM-CSF Controls Nonlymphoid Tissue Dendritic Cell Homeostasis but Is Dispensable for the Differentiation of Inflammatory Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Greter, Melanie; Helft, Julie; Chow, Andrew; Hashimoto, Daigo; Mortha, Arthur; Agudo-Cantero, Judith; Bogunovic, Milena; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Miller, Jennifer; Leboeuf, Marylene; Lu, Geming; Aloman, Costica; Brown, Brian D.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Xiong, Huabao

    2012-01-01

    GM-CSF (Csf-2) is a critical cytokine for the in vitro generation of dendritic cells (DCs) and is thought to control the development of inflammatory DCs and resident CD103(+) DCs in some tissues. Here we showed that in contrast to the current understanding, Csf-2 receptor acts in the steady state to promote the survival and homeostasis of nonlymphoid tissue-resident CD103(+) and CD11b(+) DCs. Absence of Csf-2 receptor on lung DCs abrogated the induction of CD8(+) T cell immunity after immuniz...

  17. Arabidopsis ferritin 1 (AtFer1) gene regulation by the phosphate starvation response 1 (AtPHR1) transcription factor reveals a direct molecular link between iron and phosphate homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bournier, Marc; Tissot, Nicolas; Mari, Stéphane; Boucherez, Jossia; Lacombe, Eric; Briat, Jean-François; Gaymard, Frédéric

    2013-08-01

    A yeast one-hybrid screening allowed the selection of PHR1 as a factor that interacted with the AtFer1 ferritin gene promoter. In mobility shift assays, PHR1 and its close homologue PHL1 (PHR1-like 1) interact with Element 2 of the AtFer1 promoter, containing a P1BS (PHR1 binding site). In a loss of function mutant for genes encoding PHR1 and PHL1 (phr1 phl1 mutant), the response of AtFer1 to phosphate starvation was completely lost, showing that the two transcription factors regulate AtFer1 expression upon phosphate starvation. This regulation does not involve the IDRS (iron-dependent regulatory sequence) present in the AtFer1 promoter and involved in the iron-dependent regulation. The phosphate starvation response of AtFer1 is not linked to the iron status of plants and is specifically initiated by phosphate deficiency. Histochemical localization of iron, visualized by Perls DAB staining, was strongly altered in a phr1 phl1 mutant, revealing that both PHR1 and PHL1 are major factors involved in the regulation of iron homeostasis.

  18. Iron therapy and anthropometry: A case-control study among iron deficient preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany Ibrahim

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: IDA during the first 6 years of life, when growth is fast, adversely affects both linear growth and weight gain which is reversible with iron therapy, thus adequate iron status is crucial for normal growth (height, weight and GV. The findings of the present study supported the beneficial effects of oral iron supplementation on physical growth parameters of IDA preschool children.

  19. Iron overload and immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gra(c)a Porto; Maria De Sousa

    2007-01-01

    Progress in the characterization of genes involved in the control of iron homeostasis in humans and in mice has improved the definition of iron overload and of the cells affected by it. The cell involved in iron overload with the greatest effect on immunity is the macrophage.Intriguing evidence has emerged, however, in the last 12 years indicating that parenchymal iron overload is linked to genes classically associated with the immune system. This review offers an update of the genes and proteins relevant to iron metabolism expressed in cells of the innate immune system, and addresses the question of how this system is affected in clinical situations of iron overload. The relationship between iron and the major cells of adaptive immunity, the T lymphocytes,will also be reviewed. Most studies addressing this last question in humans were performed in the clinical model of Hereditary Hemochromatosis. Data will also be reviewed demonstrating how the disruption of molecules essentially involved in adaptive immune responses result in the spontaneous development of iron overload and how they act as modifiers of iron overload.

  20. Control of microstructure of cast irons Indefinite Chill Double Pour-ICDP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Válek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ICDP cast irons designated for working layer of centrifugal cylinders of rolling mill must have precisely defined properties. The most closely observed parameters of the ICDP (Indefinite Child Double Pour cast irons are the following: the amount of graphite in a microstructure and hardness of base metal material. Secretion of graphite in cast iron with ledeburitic basic metal compound is a complex process that can be controlled and managed with the use of thermal analysis. On the basis of the evaluation of cooling curve parameters of cast iron there is performed metallurgical adjustment of meltage by adding elements supporting graphite end carbide formation into cast iron. The identified structural and mechanical properties of ICDP cast irons were correlated with recorded KO. Subsequently, a methodology for control of the metallurgical adjustment of cast iron before casting was proposed so as to ensure the desired microstructure and properties the ICDP cast iron.

  1. Sensing the fuels: glucose and lipid signaling in the CNS controlling energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Sabine D; Könner, A Christine; Brüning, Jens C

    2010-10-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is capable of gathering information on the body's nutritional state and it implements appropriate behavioral and metabolic responses to changes in fuel availability. This feedback signaling of peripheral tissues ensures the maintenance of energy homeostasis. The hypothalamus is a primary site of convergence and integration for these nutrient-related feedback signals, which include central and peripheral neuronal inputs as well as hormonal signals. Increasing evidence indicates that glucose and lipids are detected by specialized fuel-sensing neurons that are integrated in these hypothalamic neuronal circuits. The purpose of this review is to outline the current understanding of fuel-sensing mechanisms in the hypothalamus, to integrate the recent findings in this field, and to address the potential role of dysregulation in these pathways in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  2. The importance of being subtle: small changes in calcium homeostasis control cognitive decline in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toescu, Emil C; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2007-06-01

    Aging is a complex, multifactorial process. One of the features of normal aging of the brain is a decline in cognitive functions and much experimental attention has been devoted to understanding this process. Evidence accumulated in the last decade indicates that such functional changes are not due to gross morphological alterations, but to subtle functional modification of synaptic connectivity and intracellular signalling and metabolism. Such synaptic modifications are compatible with a normal level of activity and allow the maintenance of a certain degree of functional reserve. This is in contrast to the changes in various neurodegenerative diseases, characterized by significant neuronal loss and dramatic and irreversible functional deficit. This whole special issue has been initiated with the intention of focusing on the processes of normal brain aging. In this review, we present data that shows how subtle changes in Ca(2+) homeostasis or in the state of various Ca(2+)-dependent processes or molecules, which occur in aging can have significant functional consequences.

  3. Gene-Environment Interactions Controlling Energy and Glucose Homeostasis and the Developmental Origins of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouret, Sebastien; Levin, Barry E.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) often occur together and affect a growing number of individuals in both the developed and developing worlds. Both are associated with a number of other serious illnesses that lead to increased rates of mortality. There is likely a polygenic mode of inheritance underlying both disorders, but it has become increasingly clear that the pre- and postnatal environments play critical roles in pushing predisposed individuals over the edge into a disease state. This review focuses on the many genetic and environmental variables that interact to cause predisposed individuals to become obese and diabetic. The brain and its interactions with the external and internal environment are a major focus given the prominent role these interactions play in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis in health and disease. PMID:25540138

  4. Early life origins of metabolic disease: Developmental programming of hypothalamic pathways controlling energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearden, Laura; Ozanne, Susan E

    2015-10-01

    A wealth of animal and human studies demonstrate that perinatal exposure to adverse metabolic conditions - be it maternal obesity, diabetes or under-nutrition - results in predisposition of offspring to develop obesity later in life. This mechanism is a contributing factor to the exponential rise in obesity rates. Increased weight gain in offspring exposed to maternal obesity is usually associated with hyperphagia, implicating altered central regulation of energy homeostasis as an underlying cause. Perinatal development of the hypothalamus (a brain region key to metabolic regulation) is plastic and sensitive to metabolic signals during this critical time window. Recent research in non-human primate and rodent models has demonstrated that exposure to adverse maternal environments impairs the development of hypothalamic structure and consequently function, potentially underpinning metabolic phenotypes in later life. This review summarizes our current knowledge of how adverse perinatal environments program hypothalamic development and explores the mechanisms that could mediate these effects.

  5. Recent advances in iron metabolism and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara; Strati, Paolo

    2010-10-01

    Iron is essential for life, because it is indispensable for several biological reactions such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis and cell proliferation, but is toxic if present in excess since it causes cellular damage through free radical formation. Either cellular or systemic iron regulation can be disrupted in disorders of iron metabolism. In the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has dramatically changed. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged and the role of iron has started to be recognized as a cofactor of other disorders. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory-iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited for a more effective treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders.

  6. Monoubiquitin-dependent endocytosis of the iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) transporter controls iron uptake in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberon, Marie; Zelazny, Enric; Robert, Stéphanie; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Curie, Cathy; Friml, Jìrí; Vert, Grégory

    2011-08-09

    Plants take up iron from the soil using the iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) high-affinity iron transporter at the root surface. Sophisticated regulatory mechanisms allow plants to tightly control the levels of IRT1, ensuring optimal absorption of essential but toxic iron. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis thaliana IRT1 leads to constitutive IRT1 protein accumulation, metal overload, and oxidative stress. IRT1 is unexpectedly found in trans-Golgi network/early endosomes of root hair cells, and its levels and localization are unaffected by iron nutrition. Using pharmacological approaches, we show that IRT1 cycles to the plasma membrane to perform iron and metal uptake at the cell surface and is sent to the vacuole for proper turnover. We also prove that IRT1 is monoubiquitinated on several cytosol-exposed residues in vivo and that mutation of two putative monoubiquitination target residues in IRT1 triggers stabilization at the plasma membrane and leads to extreme lethality. Together, these data suggest a model in which monoubiquitin-dependent internalization/sorting and turnover keep the plasma membrane pool of IRT1 low to ensure proper iron uptake and to prevent metal toxicity. More generally, our work demonstrates the existence of monoubiquitin-dependent trafficking to lytic vacuoles in plants and points to proteasome-independent turnover of plasma membrane proteins.

  7. Calcium Homeostasis and ER Stress in Control of Autophagy in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Kania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a basic catabolic process, serving as an internal engine during responses to various cellular stresses. As regards cancer, autophagy may play a tumor suppressive role by preserving cellular integrity during tumor development and by possible contribution to cell death. However, autophagy may also exert oncogenic effects by promoting tumor cell survival and preventing cell death, for example, upon anticancer treatment. The major factors influencing autophagy are Ca2+ homeostasis perturbation and starvation. Several Ca2+ channels like voltage-gated T- and L-type channels, IP3 receptors, or CRAC are involved in autophagy regulation. Glucose transporters, mainly from GLUT family, which are often upregulated in cancer, are also prominent targets for autophagy induction. Signals from both Ca2+ perturbations and glucose transport blockage might be integrated at UPR and ER stress activation. Molecular pathways such as IRE 1-JNK-Bcl-2, PERK-eIF2α-ATF4, or ATF6-XBP 1-ATG are related to autophagy induced through ER stress. Moreover ER molecular chaperones such as GRP78/BiP and transcription factors like CHOP participate in regulation of ER stress-mediated autophagy. Autophagy modulation might be promising in anticancer therapies; however, it is a context-dependent matter whether inhibition or activation of autophagy leads to tumor cell death.

  8. Epidermal development, growth control, and homeostasis in the face of centrosome amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulukian, Anita; Holland, Andrew J; Vitre, Benjamin; Naik, Shruti; Cleveland, Don W; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-11-17

    As nucleators of the mitotic spindle and primary cilium, centrosomes play crucial roles in equal segregation of DNA content to daughter cells, coordination of growth and differentiation, and transduction of homeostatic cues. Whereas the majority of mammalian cells carry no more than two centrosomes per cell, exceptions to this rule apply in certain specialized tissues and in select disease states, including cancer. Centrosome amplification, or the condition of having more than two centrosomes per cell, has been suggested to contribute to instability of chromosomes, imbalance in asymmetric divisions, and reorganization of tissue architecture; however, the degree to which these conditions are a direct cause of or simply a consequence of human disease is poorly understood. Here we addressed this issue by generating a mouse model inducing centrosome amplification in a naturally proliferative epithelial tissue by elevating Polo-like kinase 4 (Plk4) expression in the skin epidermis. By altering centrosome numbers, we observed multiciliated cells, spindle orientation errors, and chromosome segregation defects within developing epidermis. None of these defects was sufficient to impart a proliferative advantage within the tissue, however. Rather, impaired mitoses led to p53-mediated cell death and contributed to defective growth and stratification. Despite these abnormalities, mice remained viable and healthy, although epidermal cells with centrosome amplification were still appreciable. Moreover, these abnormalities were insufficient to disrupt homeostasis and initiate or enhance tumorigenesis, underscoring the powerful surveillance mechanisms in the skin.

  9. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in ad...

  10. Effects of probiotics and antibiotics on the intestinal homeostasis in a computer controlled model of the large intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Ateequr

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infection are frequent complications of broad spectrum antibiotic therapy. Probiotic bacteria are used as therapeutic and preventive agents in these disorders, but the exact functional mechanisms and the mode of action are poorly understood. The effects of clindamycin and the probiotic mixture VSL#3 (containing the 8 bacterial strains Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus consecutively or in combination were investigated and compared to controls without therapy using a standardized human fecal microbiota in a computer-controlled in vitro model of large intestine. Microbial metabolites (short chain fatty acids, lactate, branched chain fatty acids, and ammonia and the intestinal microbiota were analyzed. Results Compared to controls and combination therapy, short chain fatty acids and lactate, but also ammonia and branched chain fatty acids, were increased under probiotic therapy. The metabolic pattern under combined therapy with antibiotics and probiotics had the most beneficial and consistent effect on intestinal metabolic profiles. The intestinal microbiota showed a decrease in several indigenous bacterial groups under antibiotic therapy, there was no significant recovery of these groups when the antibiotic therapy was followed by administration of probiotics. Simultaneous application of anti- and probiotics had a stabilizing effect on the intestinal microbiota with increased bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Conclusions Administration of VSL#3 parallel with the clindamycin therapy had a beneficial and stabilizing effect on the intestinal metabolic homeostasis by decreasing toxic metabolites and protecting the endogenic microbiota from destruction. Probiotics could be a reasonable

  11. Iron stress in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Erin L; Guerinot, Mary

    2002-07-30

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches

  12. Iron stress in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Erin L.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2002-01-01

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches.

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis alters the expression patterns of three key iron homeostasis genes, ZmNAS1, ZmNAS3 and ZmYS1, in S deprived maize plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Styliani N. Chorianopoulou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nicotianamine is an essential molecule for Fe homeostasis in plants, its primary precursor is the S-containing compound methionine, and it is biosynthesized by the enzyme family of nicotianamine synthases. In maize, a graminaceous plant that follows Strategy II for Fe uptake, ZmNAS genes can be subgrouped into two classes, according to their roles and tissue specific expression profiles. In roots, the genes of class I provide NA for the production of deoxymugineic acid, which is secreted to the rhizosphere and chelates Fe(III. The Fe(III-DMA complex is then inserted to the root via a ZmYS1 transporter. The genes of class II provide NA for local translocation and detoxification of Fe in the leaves. Due to the connection between S and Fe homeostasis, S deficiency causes Fe deprivation responses to graminaceous plants and when S is supplied, these responses are inverted. In this study, maize plants were grown in pots with sterile river sand containing FePO4 and were inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. The plants were grown under S deficient conditions until day 60 from sowing and on that day sulfate was provided to the plants. In order to assess the impact of AM symbiosis on Fe homeostasis, the expression patterns of ZmNAS1, ZmNAS3 (representatives of ZmNAS class I and class II and ZmYS1 were monitored before and after S supply by means of real time RT-PCR and they were used as indicators of the plant Fe status. In addition, total shoot Fe concentration was determined before and after S supply. AM symbiosis prevented Fe deprivation responses in the S deprived maize plants and iron was possibly provided directly to the mycorrhizal plants through the fungal network. Furthermore, sulfate possibly regulated the expression of all three genes revealing its potential role as signal molecule for Fe homeostasis.

  14. AtbHLH29 of Arabidopsis thaliana is a functional ortholog of tomato FER involved in controlling iron acquisition in strategy I plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Xi YUAN; Juan ZHANG; Dao Wen WANG; Hong Qing LING

    2005-01-01

    AtbHLH29 of Arabidopsis, encoding a bHLH protein, reveals a high similarity to the tomato FER which is proposed as a transcriptional regulator involved in controlling the iron deficiency responses and the iron uptake in tomato. For identification of its biological functions, AtbHLH29 was introduced into the genome of the tomato FER mutant T3238fer mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciencs. Transgenic plants were regenerated and the stable integration of AtbHLH29 into their genomes was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Molecular analysis demonstrated that expression of the exogenous AtbHLH29 of Arabidopsis in roots of the FER mutant T3238fer enabled to complement the defect functions of FER. The transgenic plants regained the ability to activate the whole iron deficiency responses and showed normal growth as the wild type under iron-limiting stress. Our transformation data demonstrate that AtbHLH29 is a functional ortholog of the tomato FER and can completely replace FER in controlling the effective iron acquisition in tomato.Except of iron, FER protein was directly or indirectly involved in manganese homeostasis due to that loss functions of FER in T3238fer resulted in strong reduction of Mn content in leaves and the defect function on Mn accumulation in leaves was complemented by expression of AtbHLH29 in the transgenic plants. Identification of the similar biological functions of FER and AtbHLH29, which isolated from two systematically wide-diverged "strategy I" plants, suggests that FER might be a universal gene presented in all strategy I plants in controlling effective iron acquisition system in roots.

  15. AtbHLH29 of Arabidopsis thaliana is a functional ortholog of tomato FER involved in controlling iron acquisition in strategy I plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, You Xi; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Dao Wen; Ling, Hong Qing

    2005-08-01

    AtbHLH29 of Arabidopsis, encoding a bHLH protein, reveals a high similarity to the tomato FER which is proposed as a transcriptional regulator involved in controlling the iron deficiency responses and the iron uptake in tomato. For identification of its biological functions, AtbHLH29 was introduced into the genome of the tomato FER mutant T3238fer mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciencs. Transgenic plants were regenerated and the stable integration of AtbHLH29 into their genomes was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Molecular analysis demonstrated that expression of the exogenous AtbHLH29 of Arabidopsis in roots of the FER mutant T3238fer enabled to complement the defect functions of FER. The transgenic plants regained the ability to activate the whole iron deficiency responses and showed normal growth as the wild type under iron-limiting stress. Our transformation data demonstrate that AtbHLH29 is a functional ortholog of the tomato FER and can completely replace FER in controlling the effective iron acquisition in tomato. Except of iron, FER protein was directly or indirectly involved in manganese homeostasis due to that loss functions of FER in T3238fer resulted in strong reduction of Mn content in leaves and the defect function on Mn accumulation in leaves was complemented by expression of AtbHLH29 in the transgenic plants. Identification of the similar biological functions of FER and AtbHLH29, which isolated from two systematically wide-diverged "strategy I" plants, suggests that FER might be a universal gene presented in all strategy I plants in controlling effective iron acquisition system in roots.

  16. Research advances of iron homeostasis regulatory networks in Candida albicans%白念珠菌铁稳态调控网络研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐宁; 程欣欣; 喻其林; 邢来君; 李明春

    2012-01-01

    Iron is an essential element that is required for the growth and normal metabolism in most organisms. However, despite its much abundance in the Earth's crust, the bioavailable form of iron is very poor. To obtain iron in the environment, Candida albicans, as a common opportunistic human fugal pathogen, has evolved the iron regulatory networks to respond to the fluctuations in iron availability, which is associated with the adaptation to the hostile environment. As well as our study, this paper reviews the research advances of iron regulatory networks in recent years, focusing on the iron acquisition and regulatory strategies exhibited by C. Albicans when it responds to iron deprivation. This review also provides an insight into the mechanisms that how cellssense, transport, store and utilize iron.%铁是绝大多数生物生长和代谢过程中必需的营养元素.尽管自然界中铁元素含量非常丰富,但是其生物可利用性却很低.作为一种人体常见的条件致病真菌,白念珠菌在漫长的进化过程中形成了复杂的铁稳态调控网络,能够应答环境中铁浓度的变化,增强菌株对环境的适应力.结合课题组研究工作,简要综述近几年关于铁代谢表达调控途径的研究进展,主要关注白念珠菌在环境铁匮乏条件下铁获得和调控策略,揭示白念珠菌体内铁离子摄取、转运、储存和利用机制.

  17. Physical constraints on biological integral control design for homeostasis and sensory adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Jordan; McMillen, David R

    2013-01-22

    Synthetic biology includes an effort to use design-based approaches to create novel controllers, biological systems aimed at regulating the output of other biological processes. The design of such controllers can be guided by results from control theory, including the strategy of integral feedback control, which is central to regulation, sensory adaptation, and long-term robustness. Realization of integral control in a synthetic network is an attractive prospect, but the nature of biochemical networks can make the implementation of even basic control structures challenging. Here we present a study of the general challenges and important constraints that will arise in efforts to engineer biological integral feedback controllers or to analyze existing natural systems. Constraints arise from the need to identify target output values that the combined process-plus-controller system can reach, and to ensure that the controller implements a good approximation of integral feedback control. These constraints depend on mild assumptions about the shape of input-output relationships in the biological components, and thus will apply to a variety of biochemical systems. We summarize our results as a set of variable constraints intended to provide guidance for the design or analysis of a working biological integral feedback controller.

  18. Physical Constraints on Biological Integral Control Design for Homeostasis and Sensory Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Jordan; McMillen, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology includes an effort to use design-based approaches to create novel controllers, biological systems aimed at regulating the output of other biological processes. The design of such controllers can be guided by results from control theory, including the strategy of integral feedback control, which is central to regulation, sensory adaptation, and long-term robustness. Realization of integral control in a synthetic network is an attractive prospect, but the nature of biochemical networks can make the implementation of even basic control structures challenging. Here we present a study of the general challenges and important constraints that will arise in efforts to engineer biological integral feedback controllers or to analyze existing natural systems. Constraints arise from the need to identify target output values that the combined process-plus-controller system can reach, and to ensure that the controller implements a good approximation of integral feedback control. These constraints depend on mild assumptions about the shape of input-output relationships in the biological components, and thus will apply to a variety of biochemical systems. We summarize our results as a set of variable constraints intended to provide guidance for the design or analysis of a working biological integral feedback controller. PMID:23442873

  19. Randomised controlled trials of iron chelators for the treatment of cardiac siderosis in thalassaemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun John Baksi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In conditions requiring repeated blood transfusion or where iron metabolism is abnormal, heart failure may result from accumulation of iron in the heart (cardiac siderosis. Death due to heart failure from cardiac iron overload has accounted for considerable early mortality in β-thalassemia major. The ability to detect iron loading in the heart by cardiovascular magnetic resonance using T2* sequences has created an opportunity to intervene in the natural history of such conditions. However, effective and well tolerated therapy is required to remove iron from the heart. There are currently 3 approved commercially available iron chelators: deferoxamine, deferiprone and deferasirox. We review the high quality randomised controlled trials in this area for iron chelation therapy in the management of cardiac siderosis.

  20. A Study of the Effects of Latent Iron Deficiency on Measures of Cognition: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial of Iron Supplementation in Young Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alecia J. Leonard

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rates of iron deficiency are high amongst healthy young women. Cognitive impairment occurs secondary to iron deficiency in infants and children, but evaluation of the impact on cognition among young women is inconsistent. The aim was to determine the suitability of the IntegNeuro test battery for assessing cognitive function in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient young women. A pilot double-blinded, placebo-controlled intervention trial was conducted in iron-deficient (serum ferritin ≤ 20 μg/L and haemoglobin > 120 g/L and iron-sufficient young women (18–35 years. Cognitive function and haematological markers of iron status were measured at baseline and follow-up. Iron-deficient participants (n = 24 were randomised to receive placebo, 60 mg or 80 mg elemental iron daily supplements for 16 weeks. A control group of iron-sufficient participants (n = 8 was allocated to placebo. Change scores for Impulsivity and Attention were significantly greater in plasma ferritin improvers than in non-improvers (p = 0.004, p = 0.026. IntegNeuro was easy to administer and acceptable to young women. Based on the differences in Memory and Attention scores between iron-deficient participants on iron treatment and those on placebo, it was decided that between 26 and 84 participants would be required in each iron treatment group for an adequately powered extension of this pilot RCT.

  1. Servo-control of water and sodium homeostasis during renal clearance measurements in conscious rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Klaus; Shirley, David G

    2007-01-01

    Servo-controlled fluid and sodium replacement during clearance studies is used in order to prevent loss of body fluid and sodium following diuretic/natriuretic procedures. However, even under control conditions, the use of this technique is sometimes associated with increases in proximal tubular...

  2. Controls on radium transport by adsorption to iron minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Wang, T.; Kocar, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Radium is a naturally occurring radioactive metal found in many subsurface environments. Radium isotopes are generated by uranium and thorium decay, and are particularly abundant within groundwaters where minimal porewater flux leads to accumulation. These isotopes are used as natural tracers for estimating submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) [1], allowing for large scale estimation of GW fluxes into and out of the ocean [2]. They also represent a substantial hazard in wastewater produced after hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction [3], resulting in a significant risk of environmental release to surface and near-surface waters, and increased cost for water treatment or disposal. Adsorption to mineral surfaces represents a dominant pathway of radium retention in subsurface environments. For SGD studies, adsorption processes impact estimates of GW fluxes, while in hydraulic fracturing, radium adsorption to aquifer solids mediates wastewater radium activities. Analysis of past sorption studies revealed large variability in partition coefficients [4], while examination of radium adsorption kinetics and surface complexation have only recently started [5]. Accordingly, we present the results of sorption and column experiments of radium with a suite of iron minerals representative of those found within deep saline and near-surface (freshwater) aquifers, and evaluate impacts of varying salinity solutions through artificial waters. Further, we explore the impacts of pyrite oxidation and ferrihydrite transformation to other iron-bearing secondary minerals on the transport and retention of radium. These results will provide critical information on the mineralogical controls on radium retention in subsurface environments, and will therefore improve predictions of radium groundwater transport in natural and contaminated systems. [1] Charette, M.A., Buesseler, K.O. & Andrews, J.E., Limnol. Oceanogr. (2001). [2] Moore, W.S., Ann. Rev. Mar. Sci. (2010). [3] Vengosh, A

  3. Gibberellin homeostasis and plant height control by EUI and a role for gibberellin in root gravity responses in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingying Zhang; Yongyou Zhu; Yu Peng; Dawei Yan; Qun Li; Jianjun Wang; Linyou Wang; Zuhua He

    2008-01-01

    The rice Eui (ELONGATED UPPERMOST MTERNODE) gene encodes a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase that deactivates bioactive gibberellins (GAs). In this study, we investigated controlled expression of the Eui gene and its role in plant development. We found that Eui was differentially induced by exogenous GAs and that the Eui promoter had the highest activity in the vascular bundles. The eui mutant was defective in starch granule development in root caps and Eui overexpression enhanced starch granule generation and gravity responses, revealing a role for GA in root starch granule development and gravity responses. Experiments using embryoless half-seeds revealed that RAmy lA and GAmyb were highly upregulated in eui aleurone cells in the absence of exogenous GA. In addition, the GA biosynthesis genes GA3oxl and GA20ox2 were downregulated and GA2oxl was upregulated in eui seedlings. These results indicate that EUI is involved in GA homeostasis, not only in the internodes at the heading stage, but also in the seedling stage, roots and seeds. Disturbing GA homeostasis affected the expression of the GA signaling genes GID1 (GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF 1), GID2 and SLR1. Transgenic RNA interference of the Eui gene effectively increased plant height and improved heading performance. By contrast, the ectopic expression of Eui under the promoters of the rice GA biosynthesis genes GA3ox2 and GA20ox2 significantly reduced plant height. These results demonstrate that a slight increase in Eui expression could dramatically change rice morphology, indicating the practical application of the Eui gene in rice molecular breeding for a high yield potential.

  4. A beta cell ATGL-lipolysis/adipose tissue axis controls energy homeostasis and body weight via insulin secretion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attané, Camille; Peyot, Marie-Line; Lussier, Roxane; Poursharifi, Pegah; Zhao, Shangang; Zhang, Dongwei; Morin, Johane; Pineda, Marco; Wang, Shupei; Dumortier, Olivier; Ruderman, Neil B; Mitchell, Grant A; Simons, Brigitte; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Joly, Erik; Prentki, Marc

    2016-12-01

    To directly assess the role of beta cell lipolysis in insulin secretion and whole-body energy homeostasis, inducible beta cell-specific adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-deficient (B-Atgl-KO) mice were studied under normal diet (ND) and high-fat diet (HFD) conditions. Atgl (flox/flox) mice were cross-bred with Mip-Cre-ERT mice to generate Mip-Cre-ERT(/+);Atgl (flox/flox) mice. At 8 weeks of age, these mice were injected with tamoxifen to induce deletion of beta cell-specific Atgl (also known as Pnpla2), and the mice were fed an ND or HFD. ND-fed male B-Atgl-KO mice showed decreased insulinaemia and glucose-induced insulin secretion (GSIS) in vivo. Changes in GSIS correlated with the islet content of long-chain saturated monoacylglycerol (MAG) species that have been proposed to be metabolic coupling factors for insulin secretion. Exogenous MAGs restored GSIS in B-Atgl-KO islets. B-Atgl-KO male mice fed an HFD showed reduced insulinaemia, glycaemia in the fasted and fed states and after glucose challenge, as well as enhanced insulin sensitivity. Moreover, decreased insulinaemia in B-Atgl-KO mice was associated with increased energy expenditure, and lipid metabolism in brown (BAT) and white (WAT) adipose tissues, leading to reduced fat mass and body weight. ATGL in beta cells regulates insulin secretion via the production of signalling MAGs. Decreased insulinaemia due to lowered GSIS protects B-Atgl-KO mice from diet-induced obesity, improves insulin sensitivity, increases lipid mobilisation from WAT and causes BAT activation. The results support the concept that fuel excess can drive obesity and diabetes via hyperinsulinaemia, and that an islet beta cell ATGL-lipolysis/adipose tissue axis controls energy homeostasis and body weight via insulin secretion.

  5. Duodenal Cytochrome b (DCYTB in Iron Metabolism: An Update on Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius J. R. Lane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron and ascorbate are vital cellular constituents in mammalian systems. The bulk-requirement for iron is during erythropoiesis leading to the generation of hemoglobin-containing erythrocytes. Additionally; both iron and ascorbate are required as co-factors in numerous metabolic reactions. Iron homeostasis is controlled at the level of uptake; rather than excretion. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that in addition to the known ability of dietary ascorbate to enhance non-heme iron absorption in the gut; ascorbate regulates iron homeostasis. The involvement of ascorbate in dietary iron absorption extends beyond the direct chemical reduction of non-heme iron by dietary ascorbate. Among other activities; intra-enterocyte ascorbate appears to be involved in the provision of electrons to a family of trans-membrane redox enzymes; namely those of the cytochrome b561 class. These hemoproteins oxidize a pool of ascorbate on one side of the membrane in order to reduce an electron acceptor (e.g., non-heme iron on the opposite side of the membrane. One member of this family; duodenal cytochrome b (DCYTB; may play an important role in ascorbate-dependent reduction of non-heme iron in the gut prior to uptake by ferrous-iron transporters. This review discusses the emerging relationship between cellular iron homeostasis; the emergent “IRP1-HIF2α axis”; DCYTB and ascorbate in relation to iron metabolism.

  6. Obesity and the neuroendocrine control of energy homeostasis: the role of spontaneous locomotor activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Castañeda, Tamara R; Jürgens, Hella; Wiedmer, Petra; Pfluger, Paul; Diano, Sabrina; Horvath, Tamas L; Tang-Christensen, Mads; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2005-01-01

    .... Moreover, low levels of spontaneous physical activity (SPA) are a major predictor of fat mass accumulation during overfeeding in humans, pointing to a substantial role for SPA in the control of energy balance...

  7. A randomised controlled trial to compare intravenous iron sucrose and oral iron in treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Avantika; Manaktala, Usha; Rathore, Asmita Muthal

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose with oral iron therapy in pregnant patients with anemia. The primary outcome of the study was increase in haemoglobin on day 7, 14 & 28 and rise of serum ferritin over 28 days. The study population consisted of 100 patients with singleton pregnancy between 24 and 34 weeks, hemoglobin levels between 7.0-9.0 gm/dL and serum ferritin levels less than 15 ng/mL. The participants in the oral group were given daily 180 mg elemental iron in three divided oral doses for 4 weeks. Total calculated dose of iron sucrose with a target hemoglobin of 11 gm %, was given in 200 mg dose on alternate days. Mean haemoglobin rise was 0.58 gm/dL in the IV group as compared to 0.23 gm/dL in the oral group on day 14 and 1.9 gm/dL in the IV group & 1.3 gm/dL in the oral group on day 28, (p <0.05). In the IV group, 76% of the subjects achieved haemoglobin levels of ≥11 gm% at the time of delivery, as compared to only 54% of the subjects in the oral group who achieved these levels. Serum ferritin value was significantly higher in the IV group, 37.45 ± 5.73 ng/mL as compared to 13.96 ± 1.88 ng/mL in the oral group at 4th week (p <0.001). There was no major side effect in the IV group. 36% subjects in the oral group developed gastrointestinal side effects & 10% of the subjects were non compliant. The rate of hemoglobin rise is faster with intravenous iron sucrose therapy as compared to oral iron therapy which can be beneficial in pregnant women presenting with anemia at a later period of gestation. Intravenous iron sucrose is very well tolerated during pregnancy.

  8. Rotor Field Oriented Control with adaptive Iron Loss Compensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known from the literature that iron loses in an induction motor implies field angle estimation errors and hence detuning problems. In this paper a new method for estimating the iron loss resistor in an induction motor is presented. The method is based on a traditional dynamic model of ...

  9. Transcriptome analysis by GeneTrail revealed regulation of functional categories in response to alterations of iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenhof Hans-Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput technologies have opened new avenues to study biological processes and pathways. The interpretation of the immense amount of data sets generated nowadays needs to be facilitated in order to enable biologists to identify complex gene networks and functional pathways. To cope with this task multiple computer-based programs have been developed. GeneTrail is a freely available online tool that screens comparative transcriptomic data for differentially regulated functional categories and biological pathways extracted from common data bases like KEGG, Gene Ontology (GO, TRANSPATH and TRANSFAC. Additionally, GeneTrail offers a feature that allows screening of individually defined biological categories that are relevant for the respective research topic. Results We have set up GeneTrail for the use of Arabidopsis thaliana. To test the functionality of this tool for plant analysis, we generated transcriptome data of root and leaf responses to Fe deficiency and the Arabidopsis metal homeostasis mutant nas4x-1. We performed Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA with eight meaningful pairwise comparisons of transcriptome data sets. We were able to uncover several functional pathways including metal homeostasis that were affected in our experimental situations. Representation of the differentially regulated functional categories in Venn diagrams uncovered regulatory networks at the level of whole functional pathways. Over-Representation Analysis (ORA of differentially regulated genes identified in pairwise comparisons revealed specific functional plant physiological categories as major targets upon Fe deficiency and in nas4x-1. Conclusion Here, we obtained supporting evidence, that the nas4x-1 mutant was defective in metal homeostasis. It was confirmed that nas4x-1 showed Fe deficiency in roots and signs of Fe deficiency and Fe sufficiency in leaves. Besides metal homeostasis, biotic stress, root carbohydrate, leaf

  10. Differential control of immune cell homeostasis by Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in murine peripheral lymph nodes and spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanez-Almeida, Pedro; Klawonn, Frank; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Huehn, Jochen

    2014-09-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) hamper efficient immune responses to tumors and chronic infections. Therefore, depletion of Foxp3(+) Tregs has been proposed as therapeutic option to boost immune responses and to improve vaccinations. Although Treg-mediated control of T cell homeostasis is well established, Foxp3(+) Treg interaction with other immune cell subsets is only incompletely understood. Thus, the present study aimed at examining dynamic effects of experimental Foxp3(+) Treg depletion on a broad range of immune cell subsets, including B cells, natural killer cells, and myeloid cells. Striking differences were observed when peripheral lymph nodes (LN) and spleen were compared. B cells, for example, showed a massive and long-lasting accumulation only in LN but not in spleen of transiently Treg-depleted mice. In contrast, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, which are potent inducers of T cell responses, also accumulated selectively, but only transiently in LN, suggesting that this cell population is under very strict control of Foxp3(+) Tregs. In summary, the observations described here provide insights into the dynamics of immune cells after selective depletion of Foxp3(+) Tregs. This will allow a better prediction of the impact of Treg ablation in translational studies that aim at boosting immune responses and vaccinations.

  11. Many means to a common end: the intricacies of (p)ppGpp metabolism and its control of bacterial homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaca, Anthony O; Colomer-Winter, Cristina; Lemos, José A

    2015-04-01

    In nearly all bacterial species examined so far, amino acid starvation triggers the rapid accumulation of the nucleotide second messenger (p)ppGpp, the effector of the stringent response. While for years the enzymes involved in (p)ppGpp metabolism and the significance of (p)ppGpp accumulation to stress survival were considered well defined, a recent surge of interest in the field has uncovered an unanticipated level of diversity in how bacteria metabolize and utilize (p)ppGpp to rapidly synchronize a variety of biological processes important for growth and stress survival. In addition to the classic activation of the stringent response, it has become evident that (p)ppGpp exerts differential effects on cell physiology in an incremental manner rather than simply acting as a biphasic switch that controls growth or stasis. Of particular interest is the intimate relationship of (p)ppGpp with persister cell formation and virulence, which has spurred the pursuit of (p)ppGpp inhibitors as a means to control recalcitrant infections. Here, we present an overview of the enzymes responsible for (p)ppGpp metabolism, elaborate on the intricacies that link basal production of (p)ppGpp to bacterial homeostasis, and discuss the implications of targeting (p)ppGpp synthesis as a means to disrupt long-term bacterial survival strategies.

  12. AMPKα1-LDH pathway regulates muscle stem cell self-renewal by controlling metabolic homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theret, Marine; Gsaier, Linda; Schaffer, Bethany; Juban, Gaëtan; Ben Larbi, Sabrina; Weiss-Gayet, Michèle; Bultot, Laurent; Collodet, Caterina; Foretz, Marc; Desplanches, Dominique; Sanz, Pascual; Zang, Zizhao; Yang, Lin; Vial, Guillaume; Viollet, Benoit; Sakamoto, Kei; Brunet, Anne; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Mounier, Rémi

    2017-07-03

    Control of stem cell fate to either enter terminal differentiation versus returning to quiescence (self-renewal) is crucial for tissue repair. Here, we showed that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), the master metabolic regulator of the cell, controls muscle stem cell (MuSC) self-renewal. AMPKα1(-/-) MuSCs displayed a high self-renewal rate, which impairs muscle regeneration. AMPKα1(-/-) MuSCs showed a Warburg-like switch of their metabolism to higher glycolysis. We identified lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as a new functional target of AMPKα1. LDH, which is a non-limiting enzyme of glycolysis in differentiated cells, was tightly regulated in stem cells. In functional experiments, LDH overexpression phenocopied AMPKα1(-/-) phenotype, that is shifted MuSC metabolism toward glycolysis triggering their return to quiescence, while inhibition of LDH activity rescued AMPKα1(-/-) MuSC self-renewal. Finally, providing specific nutrients (galactose/glucose) to MuSCs directly controlled their fate through the AMPKα1/LDH pathway, emphasizing the importance of metabolism in stem cell fate. © 2017 The Authors.

  13. Efficacy of iron-fortified whole maize flour on iron status of schoolchildren in Kenya: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andang'o, P.E.A.; Osendarp, S.J.M.; Ayah, R.; West, C.E.; Mwaniki, D.; Wolf, de C.A.; Kraaijenhagen, R.; Kok, F.J.; Verhoef, H.

    2007-01-01

    Background Sodium iron edetic acid (NaFeEDTA) might be a more bioavailable source of iron than electrolytic iron, when added to maize flour. We aimed to assess the effect, on children's iron status, of consumption of whole maize flour fortified with iron as NaFeEDTA or electrolytic iron. Methods 516

  14. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortijo, Cedric; Gouzi, Mathieu; Tissir, Fadel

    2012-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.......5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased...

  15. Rotor Field Oriented Control with adaptive Iron Loss Compensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known from the literature that iron loses in an induction motor implies field angle estimation errors and hence detuning problems. In this paper a new method for estimating the iron loss resistor in an induction motor is presented. The method is based on a traditional dynamic model...... of the motor referenced to the rotor magnetizing current, and with the extension of an iron loss resistor added in parallel to the magnetizing inductance. The resistor estimator is based on the observation that the actual applied stator voltages deviates from the voltage estimated, when a motor is current...

  16. Association between functional iron deficiency and reactive thrombocytosis in hospitalised patients: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, H; Ho, K M; Cordingley, F

    2016-11-01

    The association of deficiency in total body iron with an increased risk of reactive thrombocytosis is well known, but whether 'functional iron deficiency' is also associated with reactive thrombocytosis is unknown. This retrospective case-control study assessed the relationships between functional iron deficiency, reactive thrombocytosis and risk of thromboembolism. A total of 150 patients with reactive thrombocytosis (platelet count >400 x 10(9)/l) and 343 controls (platelet count thrombocytosis, infection, and an elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration were all significantly more common in patients with functional iron deficiency than in those without functional iron deficiency (all P thrombocytosis (odds ratio 1.66, 95% confidence interval 1.10-2.75; P=0.048). Thromboembolic events occurred in 32 patients (6.6%). This was not significantly associated with functional iron deficiency. Our results suggest that in patients without haematological malignancy or recent chemotherapy there might be a link between functional iron deficiency and reactive thrombocytosis. Whether treating patients with functional iron deficiency with intravenous iron corrects reactive thrombocytosis without inducing infection remains uncertain, but merits further investigation.

  17. Brain Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF and hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacher Claire-Marie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines play an important role in energy-balance regulation. Notably leptin, an adipocyte-secreted cytokine, regulates the activity of hypothalamic neurons that are involved in the modulation of appetite. Leptin decreases appetite and stimulates weight loss in rodents. Unfortunately, numerous forms of obesity in humans seem to be resistant to leptin action. The ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a neurocytokine that belongs to the same family as leptin and that was originally characterized as a neurotrophic factor that promotes the survival of a broad spectrum of neuronal cell types and that enhances neurogenesis in adult rodents. It presents the advantage of stimulating weight loss in humans, despite the leptin resistance. Moreover, the weight loss persists several weeks after the cessation of treatment. Hence, CNTF has been considered as a promising therapeutic tool for the treatment of obesity and has prompted intense research aimed at identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its potent anorexigenic properties. It has been found that CNTF shares signaling pathways with leptin and is expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC, a key hypothalamic region controlling food intake. Endogenous CNTF may also participate in the control of energy balance. Indeed, its expression in the ARC is inversely correlated to body weight in rats fed a high-sucrose diet. Thus hypothalamic CNTF may act, in some individuals, as a protective factor against weight gain during hypercaloric diet and could account for individual differences in the susceptibility to obesity.

  18. Growth of airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface changes both the response to particle exposure and iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    We tested the hypothesis that 1) relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface and allowed to differentiate would have an altered response to particle exposure and 2) that these differences would be associated with indices of iron homeostas...

  19. Growth of airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface changes both the response to particle exposure and iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    We tested the hypothesis that 1) relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface and allowed to differentiate would have an altered response to particle exposure and 2) that these differences would be associated with indices of iron homeostas...

  20. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortijo, Cedric; Gouzi, Mathieu; Tissir, Fadel

    2012-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.......5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased...... glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal...

  1. ER Stress Sensor XBP1 Controls Anti-tumor Immunity by Disrupting Dendritic Cell Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R.; Silberman, Pedro C.; Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Chopra, Sahil; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Song, Minkyung; Zhang, Sheng; Bettigole, Sarah E.; Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Ellenson, Lora H.; Caputo, Thomas; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Glimcher, Laurie H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Dendritic cells (DCs) are required to initiate and sustain T cell-dependent anti-cancer immunity. However, tumors often evade immune control by crippling normal DC function. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response factor XBP1 promotes intrinsic tumor growth directly, but whether it also regulates the host anti-tumor immune response is not known. Here we show that constitutive activation of XBP1 in tumor-associated DCs (tDCs) drives ovarian cancer (OvCa) progression by blunting anti-tumor immunity. XBP1 activation, fueled by lipid peroxidation byproducts, induced a triglyceride biosynthetic program in tDCs leading to abnormal lipid accumulation and subsequent inhibition of tDC capacity to support anti-tumor T cells. Accordingly, DC-specific XBP1 deletion or selective nanoparticle-mediated XBP1 silencing in tDCs restored their immunostimulatory activity in situ and extended survival by evoking protective type 1 anti-tumor responses. Targeting the ER stress response should concomitantly inhibit tumor growth and enhance anti-cancer immunity, thus offering a unique approach to cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26073941

  2. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Cortijo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity (PCP refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal that tridimensional organization and collective communication of cells are needed in the pancreatic epithelium in order to generate appropriate numbers of endocrine cells.

  3. ER Stress Sensor XBP1 Controls Anti-tumor Immunity by Disrupting Dendritic Cell Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R; Silberman, Pedro C; Rutkowski, Melanie R; Chopra, Sahil; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Song, Minkyung; Zhang, Sheng; Bettigole, Sarah E; Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Ellenson, Lora H; Caputo, Thomas; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R; Glimcher, Laurie H

    2015-06-18

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are required to initiate and sustain T cell-dependent anti-cancer immunity. However, tumors often evade immune control by crippling normal DC function. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response factor XBP1 promotes intrinsic tumor growth directly, but whether it also regulates the host anti-tumor immune response is not known. Here we show that constitutive activation of XBP1 in tumor-associated DCs (tDCs) drives ovarian cancer (OvCa) progression by blunting anti-tumor immunity. XBP1 activation, fueled by lipid peroxidation byproducts, induced a triglyceride biosynthetic program in tDCs leading to abnormal lipid accumulation and subsequent inhibition of tDC capacity to support anti-tumor T cells. Accordingly, DC-specific XBP1 deletion or selective nanoparticle-mediated XBP1 silencing in tDCs restored their immunostimulatory activity in situ and extended survival by evoking protective type 1 anti-tumor responses. Targeting the ER stress response should concomitantly inhibit tumor growth and enhance anti-cancer immunity, thus offering a unique approach to cancer immunotherapy.

  4. Oxidative Homeostasis Regulates the Response to Reductive Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress through Translation Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuvadeep Maity

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Reductive stress leads to the loss of disulfide bond formation and induces the unfolded protein response of the endoplasmic reticulum (UPRER, necessary to regain proteostasis in the compartment. Here we show that peroxide accumulation during reductive stress attenuates UPRER amplitude by altering translation without any discernible effect on transcription. Through a comprehensive genetic screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we identify modulators of reductive stress-induced UPRER and demonstrate that oxidative quality control (OQC genes modulate this cellular response in the presence of chronic but not acute reductive stress. Using a combination of microarray and relative quantitative proteomics, we uncover a non-canonical translation attenuation mechanism that acts in a bipartite manner to selectively downregulate highly expressed proteins, decoupling the cell’s transcriptional and translational response during reductive ER stress. Finally, we demonstrate that PERK, a canonical translation attenuator in higher eukaryotes, helps in bypassing a ROS-dependent, non-canonical mode of translation attenuation.

  5. Regrowing the Adult Brain: NF-κB Controls Functional Circuit Formation and Tissue Homeostasis in the Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imielski, Yvonne; Schwamborn, Jens C.; Lüningschrör, Patrick; Heimann, Peter; Holzberg, Magdalena; Werner, Hendrikje; Leske, Oliver; Püschel, Andreas W.; Memet, Sylvie; Heumann, Rolf; Israel, Alain; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive decline during aging is correlated with a continuous loss of cells within the brain and especially within the hippocampus, which could be regenerated by adult neurogenesis. Here we show that genetic ablation of NF-κB resulted in severe defects in the neurogenic region (dentate gyrus) of the hippocampus. Despite increased stem cell proliferation, axogenesis, synaptogenesis and neuroprotection were hampered, leading to disruption of the mossy fiber pathway and to atrophy of the dentate gyrus during aging. Here, NF-κB controls the transcription of FOXO1 and PKA, regulating axogenesis. Structural defects culminated in behavioral impairments in pattern separation. Re-activation of NF-κB resulted in integration of newborn neurons, finally to regeneration of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by a complete recovery of structural and behavioral defects. These data identify NF-κB as a crucial regulator of dentate gyrus tissue homeostasis suggesting NF-κB to be a therapeutic target for treating cognitive and mood disorders. PMID:22312433

  6. Regrowing the adult brain: NF-κB controls functional circuit formation and tissue homeostasis in the dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Imielski

    Full Text Available Cognitive decline during aging is correlated with a continuous loss of cells within the brain and especially within the hippocampus, which could be regenerated by adult neurogenesis. Here we show that genetic ablation of NF-κB resulted in severe defects in the neurogenic region (dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Despite increased stem cell proliferation, axogenesis, synaptogenesis and neuroprotection were hampered, leading to disruption of the mossy fiber pathway and to atrophy of the dentate gyrus during aging. Here, NF-κB controls the transcription of FOXO1 and PKA, regulating axogenesis. Structural defects culminated in behavioral impairments in pattern separation. Re-activation of NF-κB resulted in integration of newborn neurons, finally to regeneration of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by a complete recovery of structural and behavioral defects. These data identify NF-κB as a crucial regulator of dentate gyrus tissue homeostasis suggesting NF-κB to be a therapeutic target for treating cognitive and mood disorders.

  7. Perfluoroalkyl acids-induced liver steatosis: Effects on genes controlling lipid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kaberi P; Wood, Carmen R; Lin, Mimi T; Starkov, Anatoly A; Lau, Christopher; Wallace, Kendall B; Corton, J Christopher; Abbott, Barbara D

    2017-03-01

    Persistent presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the environment is due to their extensive use in industrial and consumer products, and their slow decay. Biochemical tests in rodent demonstrated that these chemicals are potent modifiers of lipid metabolism and cause hepatocellular steatosis. However, the molecular mechanism of PFAAs interference with lipid metabolism remains to be elucidated. Currently, two major hypotheses are that PFAAs interfere with mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids and/or they affect the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in liver. To determine the ability of structurally-diverse PFAAs to cause steatosis, as well as to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, wild-type (WT) and PPARα-null mice were treated with perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), or perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), by oral gavage for 7days, and their effects were compared to that of PPARα agonist WY-14643 (WY), which does not cause steatosis. Increases in liver weight and cell size, and decreases in DNA content per mg of liver, were observed for all compounds in WT mice, and were also seen in PPARα-null mice for PFOA, PFNA, and PFHxS, but not for WY. In Oil Red O stained sections, WT liver showed increased lipid accumulation in all treatment groups, whereas in PPARα-null livers, accumulation was observed after PFNA and PFHxS treatment, adding to the burden of steatosis observed in control (untreated) PPARα-null mice. Liver triglyceride (TG) levels were elevated in WT mice by all PFAAs and in PPARα-null mice only by PFNA. In vitro β-oxidation of palmitoyl carnitine by isolated rat liver mitochondria was not inhibited by any of the 7 PFAAs tested. Likewise, neither PFOA nor PFOS inhibited palmitate oxidation by HepG2/C3A human liver cell cultures. Microarray analysis of livers from PFAAs-treated mice indicated that the PFAAs induce the expression of the lipid catabolism

  8. The Study of HFE Genotypes and Its Expression Effect on Iron Status of Iranian Haemochromatosis, Iron Deficiency Anemia Patients, Iron-Taker and Non Iron-Taker Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiranvand, Elham; Abediankenari, Saeid; Rostamian, Mosayeb; Beiranvand, Behnoush; Naazeri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    The role of HFE gene mutations or its expression in regulation of iron metabolism of hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) patients is remained controversial. Therefore here the correlation between two common HFE genotype (p.C282Y, p.H63D) and HFE gene expression with iron status in HH, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and healthy Iranian participants was studied. For this purpose genotype determination was done by polymerase chain reaction--restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Real-Time PCR was applied for evaluation of HFE gene expression. Biochemical parameters and iron consumption were also assessed. Homozygote p.H63D mutation was seen in all HH patients and p.C282Y was not observed in any member of the population. A significant correlation was observed between serum ferritin (SF) level and gender or age of HH patients. p.H63D homozygote was seen to be able to significantly increase SF and transferrin saturation (TS) level without affecting on liver function. Our results also showed that iron consumption affects on TS level increasing. HFE gene expression level of IDA patients was significantly higher than other groups. Also the HFE gene expression was negatively correlated with TS. Finally, the main result of our study showed that loss of HFE function in HH is not derived from its gene expression inhibition and much higher HFE gene expression might lead to IDA. However we propose repeating of the study for more approval of our finding.

  9. Metabolismo do ferro: uma revisão sobre os principais mecanismos envolvidos em sua homeostase Iron metabolism: an overview on the main mechanisms involved in its homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Z. W. Grotto

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Um perfeito sincronismo entre absorção, utilização e estoque de ferro é essencial para a manutenção do equilíbrio desse metal no organismo. Alterações nesses processos podem levar tanto à deficiência como ao seu acúmulo de ferro, duas situações com repercussões clínicas e laboratoriais importantes para o paciente. Essa revisão aborda os diversos aspectos relacionados com a cinética do ferro, descrevendo as proteínas e mediadores nela envolvidos. Apresenta, ainda, como é feita a regulação intracelular e sistêmica do ferro que visa a manutenção de uma quantidade ótima de ferro para o metabolismo das células e, em especial, para uma perfeita hematopoiese.É discutido também o importante papel da hepcidina, como regulador da homeostase sistêmica. Será a apresenta da a relação entre a hepcidina e a resposta de fase aguda, e como as alterações na expressão da hepcidina podem contribuir com a fisiopatogênese da anemia de doença crônica.The perfect synchronism of intestinal absorption, use and storage of iron is critical for maintaining a balance in the organism. Disorders in these processes may lead either to iron deficiency or to iron overload, both of which have important clinical and laboratorial consequences for the patient. This review describes aspects related to iron metabolism and the participation of several proteins and mediators in these mechanisms. Moreover, intracellular and systemic regulation is responsible for providing the optimal iron concentration for cellular metabolism and, in particular, for adequate hematopoiesis. The relationship between hepcidin and acute phase response is presented and how changes in hepcidin expression may be related to the physiopathogenesis of anemia of chronic disease.

  10. Hemojuvelin在铁稳态平衡中的关键作用%The critical role of Hemojuvelin in iron homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文杰; 王福俤

    2012-01-01

    Hepcidin, a peptide hormone secreted by the liver, regulates systemic iron metabolism by changing the levels of ferroportin on the cell membrane. Ferroportin, the only known mammalian cellular iron exporter, is expressed on the basolateral membrane of small intestinal enterocytes and the plasma membrane of macrophages. Hepcidin binding of ferroportin leads to internalization and degradation of ferroportin in lysosomes, which decreases iron absorption from the diet and iron release from macrophages that recycle iron from senescent erythrocytes. Hemojuvelin (HJV), a glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI) -linked membrane protein, acts as a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) co-receptor to activate hepcidin expression through a SMAD signaling pathway in hepatocytes. In addition to residing on the cell membrane, hemojuvelin can be cleaved and secreted from cells in a soluble form. Soluble hemojuvelin, produced after cleavage by furin, can selectively bind to BMP ligands and inhibit endogenous and BMP-induced hepcidin expression. TMPRSS6 has been shown to cleave hemojuvelin on the cell membrane and affect hepcidin expression. Most recent studies suggest HJV may be involved in the regulation of iron metabolism by adipose tissue. This review summarizes the current understanding of the mechanism by which membrane HJV and soluble HJV regulate hepcidin expression and iron metabolism. We also discuss gaps in the knowledge that will need to be filled by future research.%铁调素(hepcidin)是由肝脏分泌的一种肽类激素,它通过改变细胞膜上ferroportin的水平而调节全身铁代谢.Ferroportin是唯一已知的哺乳动物中的铁外排通道,它表达在小肠细胞的基底外侧膜和巨噬细胞的质膜上.铁调素结合ferroportin导致其在溶酶体内降解,从而减少铁从饮食的吸收和巨噬细胞铁的释放.Hemojuvelin (HJV)是一种glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI)相连的膜蛋白,它作为骨形态发生蛋白(BMP)的共受体可以激

  11. Levitation of an iron ball in midair without active control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Yagi, I.; Murakami, M.

    2004-02-01

    An iron ball floats in midair in a plastic box when several iron balls were attracted by a permanent magnet. A complex interaction between magnetized sphere materials and a lifting magnet enabled the suspension of an iron ball. The balls in the first row are simply attracted by the lifting magnet. The ball in the second row is also attracted by the lifting magnet, however, due to the repulsive forces exerted from the balls sitting above, it can float in midair. We also found that there are two stable positions for the ball to float. The floating ball could be transported from one equilibrium position to another by simply rotating the lifting magnet. This will make it possible to construct a noncontact load transport device.

  12. Ferric Citrate Controls Phosphorus and Delivers Iron in Patients on Dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sika, Mohammed; Koury, Mark J.; Chuang, Peale; Schulman, Gerald; Smith, Mark T.; Whittier, Frederick C.; Linfert, Douglas R.; Galphin, Claude M.; Athreya, Balaji P.; Nossuli, A. Kaldun Kaldun; Chang, Ingrid J.; Blumenthal, Samuel S.; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Kant, Kotagal S.; Olivero, Juan Jose; Greene, Tom; Dwyer, Jamie P.

    2015-01-01

    Patients on dialysis require phosphorus binders to prevent hyperphosphatemia and are iron deficient. We studied ferric citrate as a phosphorus binder and iron source. In this sequential, randomized trial, 441 subjects on dialysis were randomized to ferric citrate or active control in a 52-week active control period followed by a 4-week placebo control period, in which subjects on ferric citrate who completed the active control period were rerandomized to ferric citrate or placebo. The primary analysis compared the mean change in phosphorus between ferric citrate and placebo during the placebo control period. A sequential gatekeeping strategy controlled study-wise type 1 error for serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, and intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent usage as prespecified secondary outcomes in the active control period. Ferric citrate controlled phosphorus compared with placebo, with a mean treatment difference of −2.2±0.2 mg/dl (mean±SEM) (Pferric citrate and active control, with comparable safety profiles. Subjects on ferric citrate achieved higher mean iron parameters (ferritin=899±488 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=39%±17%) versus subjects on active control (ferritin=628±367 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=30%±12%; Pferric citrate received less intravenous elemental iron (median=12.95 mg/wk ferric citrate; 26.88 mg/wk active control; Pagent (median epoetin-equivalent units per week: 5306 units/wk ferric citrate; 6951 units/wk active control; P=0.04). Hemoglobin levels were statistically higher on ferric citrate. Thus, ferric citrate is an efficacious and safe phosphate binder that increases iron stores and reduces intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent use while maintaining hemoglobin. PMID:25060056

  13. Polo Kinase Phosphorylates Miro to Control ER-Mitochondria Contact Sites and Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Homeostasis in Neural Stem Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seongsoo; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Huh, Sungun; Liu, Song; Lee, Do-Yeon; Hong, Seung Hyun; Yu, Kweon; Lu, Bingwei

    2016-04-18

    Mitochondria play central roles in buffering intracellular Ca²⁺ transients. While basal mitochondrial Ca²⁺ (Ca²⁺ mito) is needed to maintain organellar physiology, Ca²⁺ mito overload can lead to cell death. How Ca²⁺ mito homeostasis is regulated is not well understood. Here we show that Miro, a known component of the mitochondrial transport machinery, regulates Drosophila neural stem cell (NSC) development through Ca²⁺ mito homeostasis control, independent of its role in mitochondrial transport. Miro interacts with Ca²⁺ transporters at the ER-mitochondria contact site (ERMCS). Its inactivation causes Ca²⁺ mito depletion and metabolic impairment, whereas its overexpression results in Ca²⁺ mito overload, mitochondrial morphology change, and apoptotic response. Both conditions impaired NSC lineage progression. Ca²⁺ mito homeostasis is influenced by Polo-mediated phosphorylation of a conserved residue in Miro, which positively regulates Miro localization to, and the integrity of, ERMCS. Our results elucidate a regulatory mechanism underlying Ca²⁺ mito homeostasis and how its dysregulation may affect NSC metabolism/development and contribute to disease.

  14. Aggregate-Scale Variation in Iron Biogeochemistry Controls Element Cycling from Nitrogen to Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendorf, S. E.; Ying, S.; Jones, L. C.; Jones, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Iron exerts a major control on element cycling in soils by serving as a prominent sorbent (principally when present as an oxide phase) and as an electron acceptor (in the ferric-form) or donor (ferrous-form) in both chemical and microbially-mediated reactions. Within the aggregated structure of soils, steep chemical gradients arise from the supply of oxygen and nutrients along macropores that are rapidly consumed (relative to supply) within the micropore domains of aggregate interiors. As a consequence, iron undergoes a dynamic biogeochemical cycle whereby ferric (hydr)oxides form within aggregate exteriors while ferrous-iron generation dominates within interior regions. Further, inter-aggregate cycling of iron can transpire through the supply of electron donors and acceptors, linked with diffusive controlled response to gradients. Coupling to iron transformation are the varying retention of adsorptives such as lead and phosphorus and the redox alterations of elements from nitrogen to uranium. Nitrate, for example, diffusing into aggregate interiors encounters ferrous-iron fronts where the ensuring oxidation of Fe(II)-coupled to nitrate reduction transpires. The outcome of aggregate-scale iron transformations, described within this presentation, is fundamental controls on the cycling of redox active elements from nutrients such as carbon and nitrogen to contaminants such arsenic and uranium.

  15. The Role of the Cytoplasmic Heme-binding Protein (PhuS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Intracellular Heme Trafficking and Iron Homeostasis*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The cytoplasmic heme-binding protein PhuS, encoded within the Fur-regulated Pseudomonas heme utilization (phu) operon, has previously been shown to traffic heme to the iron-regulated heme oxygenase (HO). We further investigate the role of PhuS in heme trafficking to HO on disruption of the phuS and hemO genes in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore-deficient and wild-type background. Previous studies have shown that deletion of hemO prevents the cells from utilizin...

  16. Relationship between Iron Homeostasis and Intestinal Immune Responses against Salmonella%铁稳衡调控与肠道沙门氏菌感染的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白世平; 张克英; 丁雪梅; 罗玉衡; 白洁

    2013-01-01

    沙门氏菌是危害畜禽生产和畜产品安全的主要病原菌,其最主要的感染途径是通过胃肠道入侵.铁是肠道沙门氏菌存活、繁殖的必需营养物质,过量的铁能增加小鼠肠上皮细胞上沙门氏菌的黏附和入侵数量.肠道上皮组织中铁的贮备对沙门氏菌感染引起的肠道免疫反应过程起着重要的调节作用;动物沙门氏菌感染也可引起机体铁的代谢紊乱.因此,本文就铁稳衡调控与动物肠道沙门氏菌感染二者间的关系研究作一综述,以期为通过营养手段防控沙门氏菌、保障畜产品安全性提供参考.%Salmonella enteritidis is reported to be the most common pathogen of animal salmonellosis, which is harmful to animal production and the safety of animal products. Salmonella organisms mainly infect animals by the oral route and lead to colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. Iron is an essential nutrient for intestinal Sal-monella survival and reproduction. Overload iron increases the amount of Salmonella adhered to or invaded in the small intestine. Intestinal iron status severely affects the process of intestinal immune responses against Sal-monella, and vice versa. Therefore, the relationship between iron hemeostasis and intestinal Salmonella infection was reviewed in this paper, in order to provide references for developing some nutritional stratagems to interrupt the process of Salmonella infection, and keep the safety of animal products.

  17. Seizure control through genetic and pharmacological manipulation of Pumilio in Drosophila: a key component of neuronal homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsiang Lin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a significant disorder for which approximately one-third of patients do not respond to drug treatments. Next-generation drugs, which interact with novel targets, are required to provide a better clinical outcome for these individuals. To identify potential novel targets for antiepileptic drug (AED design, we used RNA sequencing to identify changes in gene transcription in two seizure models of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The first model compared gene transcription between wild type (WT and bangsenseless1 (parabss, a gain-of-function mutant in the sole fly voltage-gated sodium channel (paralytic. The second model compared WT with WT fed the proconvulsant picrotoxin (PTX. We identified 743 genes (FDR≤1% with significant altered expression levels that are common to both seizure models. Of these, 339 are consistently upregulated and 397 downregulated. We identify pumilio (pum to be downregulated in both seizure models. Pum is a known homeostatic regulator of action potential firing in both flies and mammals, achieving control of neuronal firing through binding to, and regulating translation of, the mRNA transcripts of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav. We show that maintaining expression of pum in the CNS of parabss flies is potently anticonvulsive, whereas its reduction through RNAi-mediated knockdown is proconvulsive. Using a cell-based luciferase reporter screen, we screened a repurposed chemical library and identified 12 compounds sufficient to increase activity of pum. Of these compounds, we focus on avobenzone, which significantly rescues seizure behaviour in parabss flies. The mode of action of avobenzone includes potentiation of pum expression and mirrors the ability of this homeostatic regulator to reduce the persistent voltage-gated Na+ current (INaP in an identified neuron. This study reports a novel approach to suppress seizure and highlights the mechanisms of neuronal homeostasis as potential targets for next

  18. Seizure control through genetic and pharmacological manipulation of Pumilio in Drosophila: a key component of neuronal homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Giachello, Carlo N. G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epilepsy is a significant disorder for which approximately one-third of patients do not respond to drug treatments. Next-generation drugs, which interact with novel targets, are required to provide a better clinical outcome for these individuals. To identify potential novel targets for antiepileptic drug (AED) design, we used RNA sequencing to identify changes in gene transcription in two seizure models of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The first model compared gene transcription between wild type (WT) and bangsenseless1 (parabss), a gain-of-function mutant in the sole fly voltage-gated sodium channel (paralytic). The second model compared WT with WT fed the proconvulsant picrotoxin (PTX). We identified 743 genes (FDR≤1%) with significant altered expression levels that are common to both seizure models. Of these, 339 are consistently upregulated and 397 downregulated. We identify pumilio (pum) to be downregulated in both seizure models. Pum is a known homeostatic regulator of action potential firing in both flies and mammals, achieving control of neuronal firing through binding to, and regulating translation of, the mRNA transcripts of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav). We show that maintaining expression of pum in the CNS of parabss flies is potently anticonvulsive, whereas its reduction through RNAi-mediated knockdown is proconvulsive. Using a cell-based luciferase reporter screen, we screened a repurposed chemical library and identified 12 compounds sufficient to increase activity of pum. Of these compounds, we focus on avobenzone, which significantly rescues seizure behaviour in parabss flies. The mode of action of avobenzone includes potentiation of pum expression and mirrors the ability of this homeostatic regulator to reduce the persistent voltage-gated Na+ current (INaP) in an identified neuron. This study reports a novel approach to suppress seizure and highlights the mechanisms of neuronal homeostasis as potential targets for next

  19. Cable Bacteria Control Iron-Phosphorus Dynamics in Sediments of a Coastal Hypoxic Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulu-Gambari, Fatimah; Seitaj, Dorina; Meysman, Filip J R; Schauer, Regina; Polerecky, Lubos; Slomp, Caroline P

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for life. The release of phosphorus from sediments is critical in sustaining phytoplankton growth in many aquatic systems and is pivotal to eutrophication and the development of bottom water hypoxia. Conventionally, sediment phosphorus release is thought to be controlled by changes in iron oxide reduction driven by variations in external environmental factors, such as organic matter input and bottom water oxygen. Here, we show that internal shifts in microbial communities, and specifically the population dynamics of cable bacteria, can also induce strong seasonality in sedimentary iron-phosphorus dynamics. Field observations in a seasonally hypoxic coastal basin demonstrate that the long-range electrogenic metabolism of cable bacteria leads to a dissolution of iron sulfides in winter and spring. Subsequent oxidation of the mobilized ferrous iron with manganese oxides results in a large stock of iron-oxide-bound phosphorus below the oxic zone. In summer, when bottom water hypoxia develops and cable bacteria are undetectable, the phosphorus associated with these iron oxides is released, strongly increasing phosphorus availability in the water column. Future research should elucidate whether formation of iron-oxide-bound phosphorus driven by cable bacteria, as observed in this study, contributes to the seasonality in iron-phosphorus cycling in aquatic sediments worldwide.

  20. Microbial Community Composition Impacts Pathogen Iron Availability during Polymicrobial Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apollo Stacy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient for bacterial pathogenesis, but in the host, iron is tightly sequestered, limiting its availability for bacterial growth. Although this is an important arm of host immunity, most studies examine how bacteria respond to iron restriction in laboratory rather than host settings, where the microbiome can potentially alter pathogen strategies for acquiring iron. One of the most important transcriptional regulators controlling bacterial iron homeostasis is Fur. Here we used a combination of RNA-seq and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq to characterize the iron-restricted and Fur regulons of the biofilm-forming opportunistic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We discovered that iron restriction and Fur regulate 4% and 3.5% of the genome, respectively. While most genes in these regulons were related to iron uptake and metabolism, we found that Fur also directly regulates the biofilm-dispersing enzyme Dispersin B, allowing A. actinomycetemcomitans to escape from iron-scarce environments. We then leveraged these datasets to assess the availability of iron to A. actinomycetemcomitans in its primary infection sites, abscesses and the oral cavity. We found that A. actinomycetemcomitans is not restricted for iron in a murine abscess mono-infection, but becomes restricted for iron upon co-infection with the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Furthermore, in the transition from health to disease in human gum infection, A. actinomycetemcomitans also becomes restricted for iron. These results suggest that host iron availability is heterogeneous and dependent on the infecting bacterial community.

  1. Control of iron deficiency anemia in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasricha, Sant-Rayn; Drakesmith, Hal; Black, James; Hipgrave, David; Biggs, Beverley-Ann

    2013-04-04

    Despite worldwide economic and scientific development, more than a quarter of the world's population remains anemic, and about half of this burden is a result of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). IDA is most prevalent among preschool children and women. Among women, iron supplementation improves physical and cognitive performance, work productivity, and well-being, and iron during pregnancy improves maternal, neonatal, infant, and even long-term child outcomes. Among children, iron may improve cognitive, psychomotor, and physical development, but the evidence for this is more limited. Strategies to control IDA include daily and intermittent iron supplementation, home fortification with micronutrient powders, fortification of staple foods and condiments, and activities to improve food security and dietary diversity. The safety of routine iron supplementation in settings where infectious diseases, particularly malaria, are endemic remains uncertain. The World Health Organization is revising global guidelines for controlling IDA. Implementation of anemia control programs in developing countries requires careful baseline epidemiologic evaluation, selection of appropriate interventions that suit the population, and ongoing monitoring to ensure safety and effectiveness. This review provides an overview and an approach for the implementation of public health interventions for controlling IDA in low- and middle-income countries, with an emphasis on current evidence-based recommendations.

  2. Iron Status and Febrile Seizure- A Case Control Study in Children Less Than 3 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour SADEGHZADEH

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available  How to cite this article: Sadeghzadeh M, Khoshnevis P, Mahboubi E. Iron Status and Febrile Seizure- A Case Control Study in Children Less Than 3 Years. Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6(4:27-31.Abstract Objective: Febrile seizure is one of the most common neurological conditions of childhood. Several theories, such as iron deficiency anemia have been proposed as the pathogenesis of this condition. The aim of this study was to find the association between iron deficiency anemia and febrile seizures in children aged 6 months to 3 years admitted in Valie Asr hospital in Zanjan. Materials &Methods Hemoglobin (Hb, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, serum iron (SI, total iron binding capacity (TIBC and SI/TIBC ratio were assessed in one hundred children with febrile seizures and compared to the values of one hundred healthy children presenting in a heath care center in the same period as the control group. Results A total of 6% of cases had iron deficiency anemia which was similar to the control group. In the case group SI/TIBC ratio below 12% was seen in 58% of children which was significantly higher than that of the control group (29%. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that although anemia was not common among febrile seizure patients, iron deficiency was more frequent in these patients. ReferencesBidabadi E, Mashouf M.. Association between iron deficiency anemia and first febrile convulsion: A case-control study. Seizure. 2009 Jan;18(5:347-51.Sadeghzadeh M, Khoshnevisasl P, Moussavinassab N, Koosha A, Norouzi M. The Relation Between Serum Zinc Level and Febrile Seizures in Children Admitted to Zanjan Valie-Asr Hospital. J Zanjan Uni Med Sci. 2011;19(74:17-24.Kumari PL, Nair MK, Nair SM, Kailas L, Geetha S. Iron deficiency as a risk factor for simple febrile seizures-a case control study. Indian Pediatr. 2012 Jan;49(1:17-9.Pisacane A, Sansone R, Impagliazzo N, Coppola A, Rolando P, D'Apuzzo A, Tregrossi C. Iron deficiency anaemia and

  3. Effects of vitamin A supplementation on iron status indices and iron deficiency anaemia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Al-Zabedi, Ebtesam M; Al-Maktari, Mohamed T; Atroosh, Wahib M; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K; Moktar, Norhayati; Sallam, Atiya A; Abdullah, Wan Ariffin; Jani, Rohana; Surin, Johari

    2013-12-31

    Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world including developed and developing countries. Despite intensive efforts to improve the quality of life of rural and aboriginal communities in Malaysia, anaemia and IDA are still major public health problems in these communities particularly among children. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 250 Orang Asli (aboriginal) schoolchildren in Malaysia to investigate the effects of a single high-dose of vitamin A supplementation (200,000 IU) on iron status indices, anaemia and IDA status. The effect of the supplement was assessed after 3 months of receiving the supplements; after a complete 3-day deworming course of 400 mg/day of albendazole tablets. The prevalence of anaemia was found to be high: 48.5% (95% CI=42.3, 54.8). Moreover, 34% (95% CI=28.3, 40.2) of the children had IDA, which accounted for 70.1% of the anaemic cases. The findings showed that the reduction in serum ferritin level and the increments in haemoglobin, serum iron and transferrin saturation were found to be significant among children allocated to the vitamin A group compared to those allocated to the placebo group (psupplementation showed a significant impact on iron status indices and IDA among Orang Asli children. Hence, providing vitamin A supplementation and imparting the knowledge related to nutritious food should be considered in the efforts to improve the nutritional and health status of these children as a part of efforts to improve the quality of life in rural and aboriginal communities.

  4. Effects of Vitamin A Supplementation on Iron Status Indices and Iron Deficiency Anaemia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Al-Zabedi, Ebtesam M.; Al-Maktari, Mohamed T.; Atroosh, Wahib M.; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K.; Moktar, Norhayati; Sallam, Atiya A.; Abdullah, Wan Ariffin; Jani, Rohana; Surin, Johari

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world including developed and developing countries. Despite intensive efforts to improve the quality of life of rural and aboriginal communities in Malaysia, anaemia and IDA are still major public health problems in these communities particularly among children. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 250 Orang Asli (aboriginal) schoolchildren in Malaysia to investigate the effects of a single high-dose of vitamin A supplementation (200,000 IU) on iron status indices, anaemia and IDA status. The effect of the supplement was assessed after 3 months of receiving the supplements; after a complete 3-day deworming course of 400 mg/day of albendazole tablets. The prevalence of anaemia was found to be high: 48.5% (95% CI = 42.3, 54.8). Moreover, 34% (95% CI = 28.3, 40.2) of the children had IDA, which accounted for 70.1% of the anaemic cases. The findings showed that the reduction in serum ferritin level and the increments in haemoglobin, serum iron and transferrin saturation were found to be significant among children allocated to the vitamin A group compared to those allocated to the placebo group (p < 0.01). Moreover, a significant reduction in the prevalence of IDA by almost 22% than prevalence at baseline was reported among children in the vitamin A group compared with only 2.3% reduction among children in the placebo group. In conclusion, vitamin A supplementation showed a significant impact on iron status indices and IDA among Orang Asli children. Hence, providing vitamin A supplementation and imparting the knowledge related to nutritious food should be considered in the efforts to improve the nutritional and health status of these children as a part of efforts to improve the quality of life in rural and aboriginal communities. PMID:24384995

  5. Effects of Vitamin A Supplementation on Iron Status Indices and Iron Deficiency Anaemia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham M. Al-Mekhlafi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world including developed and developing countries. Despite intensive efforts to improve the quality of life of rural and aboriginal communities in Malaysia, anaemia and IDA are still major public health problems in these communities particularly among children. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 250 Orang Asli (aboriginal schoolchildren in Malaysia to investigate the effects of a single high-dose of vitamin A supplementation (200,000 IU on iron status indices, anaemia and IDA status. The effect of the supplement was assessed after 3 months of receiving the supplements; after a complete 3-day deworming course of 400 mg/day of albendazole tablets. The prevalence of anaemia was found to be high: 48.5% (95% CI = 42.3, 54.8. Moreover, 34% (95% CI = 28.3, 40.2 of the children had IDA, which accounted for 70.1% of the anaemic cases. The findings showed that the reduction in serum ferritin level and the increments in haemoglobin, serum iron and transferrin saturation were found to be significant among children allocated to the vitamin A group compared to those allocated to the placebo group (p < 0.01. Moreover, a significant reduction in the prevalence of IDA by almost 22% than prevalence at baseline was reported among children in the vitamin A group compared with only 2.3% reduction among children in the placebo group. In conclusion, vitamin A supplementation showed a significant impact on iron status indices and IDA among Orang Asli children. Hence, providing vitamin A supplementation and imparting the knowledge related to nutritious food should be considered in the efforts to improve the nutritional and health status of these children as a part of efforts to improve the quality of life in rural and aboriginal communities.

  6. Local geology controlled the feasibility of vitrifying Iron Age buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Fabian B; Heap, Michael J; Damby, David E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Najorka, Jens; Vasseur, Jérémie; Fahrner, Dominik; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-01-12

    During European prehistory, hilltop enclosures made from polydisperse particle-and-block stone walling were exposed to temperatures sufficient to partially melt the constituent stonework, leading to the preservation of glassy walls called 'vitrified forts'. During vitrification, the granular wall rocks partially melt, sinter viscously and densify, reducing inter-particle porosity. This process is strongly dependent on the solidus temperature, the particle sizes, the temperature-dependence of the viscosity of the evolving liquid phase, as well as the distribution and longevity of heat. Examination of the sintering behaviour of 45 European examples reveals that it is the raw building material that governs the vitrification efficiency. As Iron Age forts were commonly constructed from local stone, we conclude that local geology directly influenced the degree to which buildings were vitrified in the Iron Age. Additionally, we find that vitrification is accompanied by a bulk material strengthening of the aggregates of small sizes, and a partial weakening of larger blocks. We discuss these findings in the context of the debate surrounding the motive of the wall-builders. We conclude that if wall stability by bulk strengthening was the desired effect, then vitrification represents an Iron Age technology that failed to be effective in regions of refractory local geology.

  7. Local geology controlled the feasibility of vitrifying Iron Age buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian B Wadsworth,; Michael J Heap,; Damby, David; Kai-Uwe Hess,; Jens Najorka,; Jérémie Vasseur,; Dominik Fahrner,; Donald B Dingwell,

    2017-01-01

    During European prehistory, hilltop enclosures made from polydisperse particle-and-block stone walling were exposed to temperatures sufficient to partially melt the constituent stonework, leading to the preservation of glassy walls called ‘vitrified forts’. During vitrification, the granular wall rocks partially melt, sinter viscously and densify, reducing inter-particle porosity. This process is strongly dependent on the solidus temperature, the particle sizes, the temperature-dependence of the viscosity of the evolving liquid phase, as well as the distribution and longevity of heat. Examination of the sintering behaviour of 45 European examples reveals that it is the raw building material that governs the vitrification efficiency. As Iron Age forts were commonly constructed from local stone, we conclude that local geology directly influenced the degree to which buildings were vitrified in the Iron Age. Additionally, we find that vitrification is accompanied by a bulk material strengthening of the aggregates of small sizes, and a partial weakening of larger blocks. We discuss these findings in the context of the debate surrounding the motive of the wall-builders. We conclude that if wall stability by bulk strengthening was the desired effect, then vitrification represents an Iron Age technology that failed to be effective in regions of refractory local geology.

  8. Iron metabolism in the mononuclear phagocyte system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weina Kong; Xianglin Duan; Zhenhua Shi; Yanzhong Chang

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance of body iron homeostasis requires the coordination of multiple regulatory mechanisms of iron metabolism.The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS,composed of monocytes,macrophages,and their precursor cells) is crucial in the maintenance of iron homeostasis.Recycling of iron is carried out by specialized macrophages via engulfment of aged erythrocytes.The iron stores of macrophages depend on the levels of recovered and exported iron.However,the molecular mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis in macrophages are poorly understood.Recent studies characterizing the function and regulation of natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nrampl),divalent metal transporter 1 (DMTI),HLA-linked hemechromatosis gene (HFE),ferroportin 1 (FPN1),and hepcidin are rapidly expanding our knowledge on the molecular level of MPS iron handling.These studies are deepening our understanding about the molecular mechanism of iron homeostasis and iron-related diseases.

  9. Iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be ...

  10. Efficacy and safety of oral iron(III) polymaltose complex versus ferrous sulfate in pregnant women with iron-deficiency anemia: a multicenter, randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ricardo; Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Romero, Juan Diego; Monterrosa, Beatriz; Frer, Cristina; Macagno, Eugenia; Breymann, Christian

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of iron(III) polymaltose complex (Maltofer(®)) versus ferrous sulfate in iron-deficient pregnant women using recommended doses. An exploratory, open-label, randomized, controlled, multicenter study was undertaken in 80 pregnant women with iron-deficiency anemia (hemoglobin ≤ 10.5 g/dL, serum ferritin ≤ 15 ng/mL and mean corpuscular volume ferrous sulfate (each 100 mg iron twice daily) for 90 days. The primary endpoint, change in hemoglobin from baseline to days 60 and 90, did not differ significantly between treatment groups. The mean (SD) change to day 90 was 2.16 (0.67) g/dL in the iron(III) polymaltose complex group and 1.93 (0.97) g/dL in the ferrous sulfate group (n.s). Mean serum ferritin at day 90 was 179 (38) ng/mL and 157 (34) ng/mL with iron(III) polymaltose complex and ferrous sulfate, respectively (p = 0.014). Adverse events were significantly less frequent in the iron(III) polymaltose group, occurring in 12/41 (29.3%) patients, than in the ferrous sulfate group (22/39 [56.4%]) (p = 0.015). Oral iron(III) polymaltose complex offers at least equivalent efficacy and a superior safety profile compared to ferrous sulfate for the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia during pregnancy.

  11. Obesity modulate serum hepcidin and treatment outcome of iron deficiency anemia in children: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanad, Mohammed; Osman, Mohammed; Gharib, Amal

    2011-07-19

    Recently, hepcidin expression in adipose tissue has been described and shown to be increased in patients with severe obesity. We tried to assess the effect of obesity on hepcidin serum levels and treatment outcome of iron deficiency anemia in children. This was a case control study included 70 children with iron deficiency anemia "IDA" (35 obese and 35 non-obese) and 30 healthy non-obese children with comparable age and sex(control group). Parameters of iron status (Serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, total iron binding capacity and transferrin saturation) and serum hepcidin levels were assessed initially and after 3 months of oral iron therapy for IDA. Compared to the control group, serum hepcidin was significantly lower in non-obese children with IDA(p children with IDA (p children with IDA after 3 months of iron therapy (P children showed non-significant change in hepcidin level after iron therapy (p > 0.05). Although hepcidin showed significant positive correlations with Hb, serum iron and transferrin saturation in non-obese children with IDA, it showed significant negative correlations with Hb, serum iron and transferrin saturation in obese children with IDA (P iron therapy in childhood iron deficiency anemia.

  12. Shape control of the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles under different chain length of reducing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngoi, Kuan Hoon; Chia, Chin-Hua, E-mail: chia@ukm.edu.my; Zakaria, Sarani [School of Applied Physics, Faculty Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Chiu, Wee Siong [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Lembah Pantai, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    We report on the effect of using reducing agents with different chain-length on the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate in 1-octadecene. This modification allows us to control the shape of nanoparticles into spherical and cubic iron oxide nanoparticles. The highly monodisperse 14 nm spherical nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-dodecanediol and average 14 nm edge-length cubic iron oxide nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-tetradecanediol. The structural characterization such as transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows similar properties between two particles with different shapes. The vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) shows no significant difference between spherical and cubic nanoparticles, which are 36 emu/g and 37 emu/g respectively and superparamagnetic in nature.

  13. One-pot size and shape controlled synthesis of DMSO capped iron oxide nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debanjan Guin; Sunkara V Manorama; S Radha; A K Nigam

    2006-11-01

    We report here the capping of iron oxide nanoparticles with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to make chloroform soluble iron oxide nanoparticles. Size and shape of the capped iron oxide nanoparticles are well controlled by simply varying the reaction parameters. The synthesized nanocrystallites were characterized by thermal analysis (TG–DTA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for evaluating phase, structure and morphology. 1H NMR spectra of the synthesized samples confirm DMSO, and the capping of DMSO on the ferrite samples. Shift of the S=O stretching frequency in Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectra indicates that the bonding between DMSO and ferrite is through an oxygen moiety. The magnetic measurements of all the synthesized samples were investigated with a SQUID magnetometer which shows that the magnetic properties are strongly dependent on the size as well as shape of the iron oxide.

  14. Fur-type transcriptional repressors and metal homeostasis in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eLudwig

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal homeostasis is a crucial cellular function for nearly all organisms. Some heavy metals (e.g. Fe, Zn, Co, Mo are essential because they serve as cofactors for enzymes or metalloproteins, and chlorophototrophs such as cyanobacteria have an especially high demand for iron. At excessive levels, however, metals become toxic to cyanobacteria. Therefore, a tight control mechanism is essential for metal homeostasis. Metal homeostasis in microorganisms comprises two elements: metal acquisition from the environment and detoxification or excretion of excess metal ions. Different families of metal-sensing regulators exist in cyanobacteria and each addresses a more or less specific set of target genes. In this study the regulons of three Fur-type and two ArsR-SmtB-type regulators were investigated in a comparative approach in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. One Fur-type regulator controls genes for iron acquisition (Fur; one controls genes for zinc acquisition (Zur; and the third controls two genes involved in oxidative stress (Per. Compared to other well-investigated cyanobacterial strains, however, the set of target genes for each regulator is relatively small. Target genes for the two ArsR-SmtB transcriptional repressors (SmtB (SYNPCC7002_A2564 and SYNPCC7002_A0590; ArsR are involved in zinc homeostasis in addition to Zur. Their target genes, however, are less specific for zinc and point to roles in a broader heavy metal detoxification response.

  15. Post mortem identification of deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK) gene mutations combined with impaired glucose homeostasis and iron overload features in four infants with severe progressive liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronicka, Ewa; Węglewska-Jurkiewicz, Anna; Taybert, Joanna; Pronicki, Maciej; Szymańska-Dębińska, Tamara; Karkucińska-Więckowska, Agnieszka; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Kowalski, Paweł; Piekutowska-Abramczuk, Dorota; Pajdowska, Magdalena; Socha, Piotr; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2011-02-01

    ) iron overload may additionally damage mtDNA-depleted tissues; (iii) low birth weight, adaptation trouble, and abnormal amino acids in newborn screening are frequent in dGK-deficient neonates.

  16. Using iron fertilizer to control Cd accumulation in rice plants: A new promising technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Effects of two kinds of iron fertilizer, FeSO4 and EDTA·Na2Fe were studied on cadmium accumulation in rice plants with two rice genotypes, Zhongzao 22 and Zhongjiazao 02, with soil culture systems. The results showed that application of iron fertilizers could hardly make adverse effects on plant growth and rice grain yield. Soil application of EDTA·Na2Fe significantly reduced the Cd accumulation in rice roots, shoots and rice grain. Cd concentration in white rice of both rice genotypes in the treatment of soil application of EDTA·Na2Fe was much lower than 0.2 mg/kg, the maximal Cd permission concentra- tion in cereal crop foods in State standard. However, soil application of FeSO4 or foliar application of FeSO4 or EDTA·Na2Fe resulted in the significant increase of Cd accumulation in rice plants including rice grain compared with the control. The results also showed iron fertilizers increased the concentra- tion of iron, copper and manganese element in rice grain and also affected zinc concentration in plants. It may be a new promising way to regulate Cd accumulation in rice grain in rice production through soil application of EDTA·Na2Fe fertilizers to maintain higher content of available iron and ferrous iron in soils.

  17. Using iron fertilizer to control Cd accumulation in rice plants: a new promising technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, GuoSheng; Chen, MingXue; Wang, DanYing; Xu, ChunMei; Mou, RenXiang; Cao, ZhaoYun; Zhang, XiuFu

    2008-03-01

    Effects of two kinds of iron fertilizer, FeSO4 and EDTA.Na2Fe were studied on cadmium accumulation in rice plants with two rice genotypes, Zhongzao 22 and Zhongjiazao 02, with soil culture systems. The results showed that application of iron fertilizers could hardly make adverse effects on plant growth and rice grain yield. Soil application of EDTA.Na2Fe significantly reduced the Cd accumulation in rice roots, shoots and rice grain. Cd concentration in white rice of both rice genotypes in the treatment of soil application of EDTA.Na2Fe was much lower than 0.2 mg/kg, the maximal Cd permission concentration in cereal crop foods in State standard. However, soil application of FeSO4 or foliar application of FeSO4 or EDTA.Na2Fe resulted in the significant increase of Cd accumulation in rice plants including rice grain compared with the control. The results also showed iron fertilizers increased the concentration of iron, copper and manganese element in rice grain and also affected zinc concentration in plants. It may be a new promising way to regulate Cd accumulation in rice grain in rice production through soil application of EDTA.Na2Fe fertilizers to maintain higher content of available iron and ferrous iron in soils.

  18. Using iron fertilizer to control Cd accumulation in rice plants: A new promising technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO GuoSheng; CHEN MingXue; WANG DanYing; XU ChunMei; MOU RenXiang; CAO ZhaoYun; ZHANG XiuFu

    2008-01-01

    Effects of two kinds of iron fertilizer, FeSO4 and EDTA·Na2Fe were studied on cadmium accumulation in rice plants with two rice genotypes, Zhongzao 22 and Zhongjiazao 02, with soil culture systems. The results showed that application of iron fertilizers could hardly make adverse effects on plant growth and rice grain yield. Soil application of EDTA.Na=Fe significantly reduced the Cd accumulation in rice roots, shoots and rice grain. Cd concentration in white rice of both rice genotypes in the treatment of soil application of EDTA·Na2Fe was much lower than 0.2 mg/kg, the maximal Cd permission concentration in cereal crop foods in State standard. However, soil application of FeSO4 or foliar application of FeSO4 or EDTA·Na2Fe resulted in the significant increase of Cd accumulation in rice plants including rice grain compared with the control. The results also showed iron fertilizers increased the concentration of iron, copper and manganese element in rice grain and also affected zinc concentration in plants.It may be a new promising way to regulate Cd accumulation in rice grain in rice production through soil application of EDTA·Na2Fe fertilizers to maintain higher content of available iron and ferrous iron in soils.

  19. Iron-deficiency Anemia in Children with Febrile Seizure: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fateme GHASEMI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Ghasemi F, Valizadeh F, Taee N. Iron-deficiency Anemia in Children with Febrile Seizure: A Case-Control Study. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Spring 8(2:38-44.ObjectiveConsidering the recurrence of febrile seizure and costs for families, many studies have attempted to identify its risk factors. Some recent studies have reported that anemia is more common in children with febrile convulsion, whereas others have reported that iron deficiency raises the seizure threshold. This study was done to compare iron-deficiency anemia in children with first FS with children having febrile illness alone and with healthy children.Materials & MethodsThis case-control study evaluated 300 children in three groups (first FS, febrile without convulsion, and healthy in Khoramabad Madani Hospital from September 2009 to September 2010. Body temperature on admission wasmeasured using the tympanic method. CBC diff, MCV, MCH, MCHC, serum iron, plasma ferritin and TIBC tests were performed for all participants. Data were analyzed by frequency, mean, standard deviation, ANOVA, and chi-square statistical tests. Odds ratios were estimated by logistic regression at a confidence level of 95%.Results Forty percent of the cases with FS had iron-deficiency anemia, compared to 26% of children with febrile illness without seizure and 12% of healthy children. The Odds ratio for iron-deficiency anemia in the patients with FS was 1.89 (95% CI, 1.04-5.17 compared to the febrile children without convulsion and 2.21 (95% CI, 1.54-3.46 compared to the healthy group. ConclusionChildren with FS are more likely to be iron-deficient than those with febrile illness alone and healthy children. Thus, iron-deficiency anemia could be a risk factor for FS.References1. Østergaard J R. Febrile Seizures. Acta Pædiatr 2009;98(5:771-3.2. Jones T, Jacobsen SJ. Childhood Febrile Seizures: Overview and Implications. Int J Med Sci. 2007; 4(2:110-4.3. Flury T, Aebi

  20. Iron deficiency or anemia of inflammation?

    OpenAIRE

    Nairz, Manfred; Theurl, Igor; Wolf, Dominik; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Summary Iron deficiency and immune activation are the two most frequent causes of anemia, both of which are based on disturbances of iron homeostasis. Iron deficiency anemia results from a reduction of the body’s iron content due to blood loss, inadequate dietary iron intake, its malabsorption, or increased iron demand. Immune activation drives a diversion of iron fluxes from the erythropoietic bone marrow, where hemoglobinization takes place, to storage sites, particularly the mononuclear ph...

  1. The control of insulin secretion by adipokines: current evidence for adipocyte-beta cell endocrine signalling in metabolic homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantley, James

    2014-10-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is maintained by the coordinated action of multiple organ systems. Insulin secretion is often enhanced during obesity or insulin resistance to maintain glucose and lipid homeostasis, whereas a loss of insulin secretion is associated with type 2 diabetes. Adipocytes secrete hormones known as adipokines which act on multiple cell types to regulate metabolism. Many adipokines have been shown to influence beta cell function by enhancing or inhibiting insulin release or by influencing beta cell survival. Insulin, in turn, regulates lipolysis and promotes glucose uptake and lipid storage in adipocytes. As adipokine secretion and action is strongly influenced by obesity, this provides a potential route by which beta cell function is coordinated with adiposity, independently of alterations in blood glucose or lipid levels. In this review, I assess the evidence for the direct regulation of beta cell function by the adipokines leptin, adiponectin, extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, apelin, resistin, retinol binding protein 4, fibroblast growth factor 21, nesfatin-1 and fatty acid binding protein 4. I summarise in vitro and in vivo data and discuss the influence of obesity and diabetes on circulating adipokine concentrations, along with the potential for influencing beta cell function in human physiology. Finally, I highlight future research questions that are likely to yield new insights into the exciting field of insulinotropic adipokines.

  2. Controlled electropolymerisation of a carbazole-functionalised iron porphyrin electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Xinming; Salmi, Zakaria; Lillethorup, Mie;

    2016-01-01

    Using a one-step electropolymerisation procedure, CO2 absorbing microporous carbazole-functionalised films of iron porphyrins are prepared in a controlled manner. The electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 for these films is investigated to elucidate their efficiency and the origin of their ultimate...

  3. Oxidation Potential, Not Crystal Structure, Controls the Oxidation State of Iron in Perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panero, W. R.; Pigott, J. S.; Watson, H. C.; Scharenberg, M.; Green, H. W.; McComb, D. W.; Williams, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    The mantle's oxidation state has broad implications on the state and evolution of the earth's interior. The relatively high oxidation potential of the upper mantle is such that iron is predominantly Fe2+ with small amounts of Fe3+ . Fe3+ is more stable than Fe2+ in the dominant lower mantle mineral, perovskite, despite the fact that the effect of pressure is to reduce the oxidizing potential of a system. It is therefore suggested that iron undergoes a disproportionation reaction of 3Fe2+ =2Fe3+ +Fe0 , controlled by the crystallography instead of oxidation potential. We crystallized synthetic enstatite glass with 5% Al2O3, 14% FeO, and 3% Fe2O3 in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at 25-63 GPa and 1700-2800 K. We find that for temperatures nm iron precipitates on grain boundaries. The precipitates have small amounts of dissolved oxygen, but are Mg- and Al- free. We interpret that the stishovite is forming due to the oxidation of the ferric iron to ferrous iron according to (Mg2+,Al3+)(Fe3+,Si4+)O3 +SiO2 + Fe0 while the lower-temperature samples crystallizing as approximately (Mg2+ Fe2+ Al3+ )(Fe3+ Al3+ Si4+ )O3. We observe 2.8(2) Å3 volume expansion of the perovskite and a 28(2) GPa decrease in compressibility of the perovskite relative to the perovskite forming at lower temperature, consistent with the proposed compositions of the perovskites. As the increased temperature increases the oxidation potential of the system, we suggest that the oxidation state of iron in perovskite is dependent on oxidation potential as opposed to perovskite's crystal structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) coupled with Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) show iron precipitation on grain boundaries supporting the conclusion. We present a discussion of the results and implications for core formation and lower mantle dynamics.

  4. The feasibility study of autotrophic denitrification with iron sludge produced for sulfide control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yangyang; Dai, Ji; Mackey, Hamish R; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2017-10-01

    Ferric iron is widely dosed in wastewater treatment plants dealing with sulfide for septicity control, which generates a great amount of iron-rich chemical sludge that is challenging and costly to dispose. This study investigates the feasibility of using this iron sludge as the electron donor for autotrophic denitrification, not only realizing high nitrogen removal efficiency without additional carbon source requirement, but also partially mitigating iron-rich chemical sludge disposal and reduce sludge production by enriching low-yield autotrophic denitrifiers in the system. Both batch tests and performance monitoring of a lab-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor with a more than 300 days of operation were conducted. All the results confirmed the feasibility of using iron sludge as electron donor for autotrophic denitrification. The nitrate reduction rate with iron sludge was highly influenced by the type of ferrous electron donor and the electron donor/acceptor ratio. Ferrous hydroxide had significantly higher nitrate reduction rate than ferrous sulfide at the same electron donor/acceptor ratio. The nitrate reduction rate also accelerated with the increase of the electron donor/acceptor ratio. However, if the total surface area of the iron sludge is considered for comparison, it was shown that ferrous hydroxide and ferrous sulfide provided similar nitrate reduction rates of around 0.02 mmol N/m(2)/d in this study, indicating total surface area would be the key parameter for denitrification efficiency for the solid phase electron donor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. On-line iron loss resistance identification by a state observer for rotor-flux-oriented control of induction motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Pablo M. de la; Bossio, Guillermo R.; Garcia, Guillermo O. [Grupo de Electronica Aplicada (GEA), Facultad de Ingenieria, UNRC, Ruta Nacional 36 Km. 601, X5804BYA, Rio Cuarto (Argentina); Solsona, Jorge A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Ingenieria Electrica ' ' Alfredo Desages' ' , Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica y de Computadoras, UNS, Av. Alem 1253 (8000) Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2008-10-15

    A rotor flux state observer considering iron loss, for an Induction Motor (IM), is proposed. The aim of this proposal is to avoid detuning caused by the IM iron loss on a field-oriented control (FOC). An adaptive scheme for the K{sub Fe}, a parameter that represents the IM iron loss, is also proposed. The main objective of this scheme is to improve the dynamic response of control by compensating the variations of iron losses due to possible variations in the stator core characteristics. Simulation results demonstrated that the observer and the adaptive scheme showed a good performance fulfilling then the objectives. (author)

  6. Magma redox and structural controls on iron isotope variations in Earth's mantle and crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphas, N.; Roskosz, M.; Alp, E. E.; Neuville, D. R.; Hu, M. Y.; Sio, C. K.; Tissot, F. L. H.; Zhao, J.; Tissandier, L.; Médard, E.; Cordier, C.

    2014-07-01

    The heavy iron isotopic composition of Earth's crust relative to chondrites has been explained by vaporization during the Moon-forming impact, equilibrium partitioning between metal and silicate at core-mantle-boundary conditions, or partial melting and magma differentiation. The latter view is supported by the observed difference in the iron isotopic compositions of MORBS and peridotites. However, the precise controls on iron isotope variations in igneous rocks remain unknown. Here, we show that equilibrium iron isotope fractionation is mainly controlled by redox (Fe3+/Fetot ratio) and structural (e.g., polymerization) conditions in magmas. We measured, for the first time, the mean force constants of iron bonds in silicate glasses by synchrotron Nuclear Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (NRIXS, also known as Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy - NRVS, or Nuclear Inelastic Scattering - NIS). The same samples were studied by conventional Mössbauer and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The NRIXS results reveal a +0.2 to +0.4‰ equilibrium fractionation on 56Fe/54Fe ratio between Fe2+ and Fe3+ end-members in basalt, andesite, and dacite glasses at magmatic temperatures. These first measurements can already explain ∼1/3 of the iron isotopic shift measured in MORBs relative to their source. Further work will be required to investigate how pressure, temperature, and structural differences between melts and glasses affect equilibrium fractionation factors. In addition, large fractionation is also found between rhyolitic glass and commonly occurring oxide and silicate minerals. This fractionation reflects mainly changes in the coordination environment of Fe2+ in rhyolites relative to less silicic magmas and mantle minerals, as also seen by XANES. We provide a new calibration of XANES features vs. Fe3+/Fetot ratio determinations by Mössbauer to estimate Fe3+/Fetot ratio in situ in glasses of basaltic, andesitic, dacitic, and rhyolitic

  7. Control of energy homeostasis: role of enzymes and intermediates of fatty acid metabolism in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Michael J; Lane, M Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of energy homeostasis is critical for normal physiology and survival. Energy flux must be rigorously monitored and adjusted to ensure that fuel intake and expenditure remain within acceptable limits. The central nervous system (CNS) is, in large part, responsible for conducting this energy-monitoring function and for integrating the numerous inputs. It has become evident that neurons of the CNS monitor and respond to levels of metabolic intermediates that reflect peripheral energy status. Intermediates in the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway have been implicated as hypothalamic signaling mediators that sense and respond to changes in circulating fuels. Genetic and pharmacologic manipulation of the enzymes of fatty acid metabolism have led to the hypothesis that neuronal metabolic intermediates affect neural outputs that modify both feeding behavior and energy expenditure. This review focuses on the regulatory roles of these enzymes and intermediates in the regulation of food intake and energy balance.

  8. Association between iron status, iron deficiency anaemia, and severe early childhood caries: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroth Robert J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe tooth decay is known to affect the health and well-being of young children. However, little is known about the influence of Severe Early Childhood Caries (S-ECC on childhood nutritional status. The purpose of this study was to contrast ferritin and haemoglobin levels between preschoolers with S-ECC and caries-free controls. Methods Children were recruited as part of a larger case–control study examining differences in nutritional status between those with and without S-ECC. Preschoolers with S-ECC were recruited on the day of their dental surgery, while caries-free controls were recruited from the community. Parents completed a questionnaire and the child underwent venipuncture. The study was approved by the University’s Health Research Ethics Board. Statistics included descriptive, bivariate and logistic regression analyses. A p value ≤ .05 was significant. A total of 266 children were recruited; 144 with S-ECC and 122 caries-free. Results The mean age was 40.8 ± 14.1 months. The mean ferritin concentration for all children was 29.6 ± 17.9 μg/L while the mean haemoglobin level was 115.1 ± 10.1 g/L. Children with S-ECC were significantly more likely to have low ferritin (p=.033 and low haemoglobin levels (p>.001. Logistic regression analyses revealed that children with S-ECC were nearly twice as likely to have low ferritin levels and were over six times more likely to have iron deficiency anaemia than caries-free controls. Conclusions Children with S-ECC appear to be at significantly greater odds of having low ferritin status compared with caries-free children and also appear to have significantly lower haemoglobin levels than the caries-free control group. Children with S-ECC also appear to be at significantly greater odds for iron deficiency anaemia than cavity-free children.

  9. Homeostasis in anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per eSodersten

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem and hypothalamic orexigenic/anorexigenic networks are thought to maintain body weight homeostasis in response to hormonal and metabolic feedback from peripheral sites. This approach has not been successful in managing over- and underweight patients. It is suggested that concept of homeostasis has been misinterpreted; rather than exerting control, the brain permits eating in proportion to the amount of physical activity necessary to obtain food. In support, animal experiments have shown that while a hypothalamic orexigen excites eating when food is abundant, it inhibits eating and stimulates foraging when food is in short supply. As the physical price of food approaches zero, eating and body weight increase without constraints. Conversely, in anorexia nervosa body weight is homeostatically regulated, the high level of physical activity in anorexia is displaced hoarding for food that keeps body weight constantly low. A treatment based on this point of view, providing patients with computerized mealtime support to re-establish normal eating behavior, has brought 75% of patients with eating disorders into remission, reduced the rate of relapse to 10%, and eliminated mortality.

  10. Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Children With First Attack of Seizure and on Healthy Control Group: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh FALLAH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Fallah R, Tirandazi F, Ferdosian F, Fadavi N. Iron Deficiency And Iron Deficiency Anemia in Children With First Attack of Seizure and on Healthy Control Group : A Comparative Study. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Summer;8(3: 18-23. AbstractObjectiveSeizures are the most common pediatric neurologic problem. Research of the association between iron deficiency and seizures has shown conflicting results.This study evaluates iron status of children with a first seizure attack (febrile seizure (FS or first unprovoked afebrile seizure (FUS and healthy control group.Materials & MethodsIn a cross sectional case control study, iron status of 6–60 month year old admitted children with first seizure to Shahid Sadoughi Hospital from August 2011–December 2012 were evaluated and compared with healthy control children that were referred to primary health care center of Azadshar, Yazd, Iran.Results150 children were compared in three equal (FS, afebrile seizure, and control groups.Hemoglobin levels in FUS (11.39 ± 1.07 g/dl and FS (11.46 ± 1.18 g/dl were lower than the control group (11.9 ± 0.89 g/dl group.Serum iron levels in FS (38.52 ± 11.38 μg/dL and FUS (42.68 ± 14.76 μg/dL were lower than the control group (54.32 ± 13.46 μg/dL.Serum ferritin level in FUS (46.21 ± 27.63 ng/mL and FS (48.91 ±22.96 ng/mL was lower than the control group (75.13 ± 35.57 ng/mL.Iron deficiency (48% in FS, 44% in FUS and 28% in control group and iron deficiency anemia (26% in FUS, 22% in FS, and 10% in healthy children was more frequent in children with seizures.ConclusionIron status should be evaluated in children with a first attack of febrile or afebrile seizures.ReferencesMikati MA. Seizures in Childhood. Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, Schor NF, St. Geme JW, Behrman RE. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. Philadelphia, Saunders 2011; 19th edition, Pp: 2013-2017.Yadav D, Chandra J. Iron deficiency: beyond anemia. Indian J Pediatr 2011

  11. Ferritin polarization and iron transport across monolayer epithelial barriers in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther G. Meyron-Holtz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial barriers are found in many tissues such as the intestine, kidney and brain where they separate the external environment from the body or a specific compartment from its periphery. Due to the tight junctions that connect epithelial barrier-cells (EBCs, the transport of compounds takes place nearly exclusively across the apical or basolateral membrane, the cell-body and the opposite membrane of the polarized EBC, and is regulated on numerous levels including barrier-specific adapted trafficking-machineries.Iron is an essential element but toxic at excess. Therefore, all iron-requiring organisms tightly regulate iron concentrations on systemic and cellular levels. In contrast to most cell types that control just their own iron homeostasis, EBCs also regulate homeostasis of the compartment they enclose or the body as a whole. Iron is transported across EBCs by specialized transporters such as the transferrin receptor and ferroportin. Recently, the iron storage protein ferritin was also attributed a role in the regulation of systemic iron homeostasis and we gathered evidence from the literature and original data that ferritin is polarized in EBC, suggesting also a role for ferritin in iron trafficking across EBCs.

  12. Mitf is a master regulator of the v-ATPase, forming a control module for cellular homeostasis with v-ATPase and TORC1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyi; Zhou, Qingxiang; Ogmundsdottir, Margret Helga; Möller, Katrin; Siddaway, Robert; Larue, Lionel; Hsing, Michael; Kong, Sek Won; Goding, Colin Ronald; Palsson, Arnar; Steingrimsson, Eirikur; Pignoni, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The v-ATPase is a fundamental eukaryotic enzyme that is central to cellular homeostasis. Although its impact on key metabolic regulators such as TORC1 is well documented, our knowledge of mechanisms that regulate v-ATPase activity is limited. Here, we report that the Drosophila transcription factor Mitf is a master regulator of this holoenzyme. Mitf directly controls transcription of all 15 v-ATPase components through M-box cis-sites and this coordinated regulation affects holoenzyme activity in vivo. In addition, through the v-ATPase, Mitf promotes the activity of TORC1, which in turn negatively regulates Mitf. We provide evidence that Mitf, v-ATPase and TORC1 form a negative regulatory loop that maintains each of these important metabolic regulators in relative balance. Interestingly, direct regulation of v-ATPase genes by human MITF also occurs in cells of the melanocytic lineage, showing mechanistic conservation in the regulation of the v-ATPase by MITF family proteins in fly and mammals. Collectively, this evidence points to an ancient module comprising Mitf, v-ATPase and TORC1 that serves as a dynamic modulator of metabolism for cellular homeostasis. PMID:26092939

  13. Overweight impairs efficacy of iron supplementation in iron-deficient South African children: a randomized controlled intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgartner, J.; Smuts, C.M.; Aeberli, I.; Malan, L.; Tjalsma, H.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many countries in the nutrition transition have high rates of iron deficiency (ID) and overweight (OW). ID is more common in OW children; this may be due to adiposity-related inflammation reducing iron absorption. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether weight status predicts response to oral

  14. Hepatic miR-378 targets p110α and controls glucose and lipid homeostasis by modulating hepatic insulin signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Cao, Hongchao; Ye, Cheng; Chang, Cunjie; Lu, Minghua; Jing, Yanyan; Zhang, Duo; Yao, Xuan; Duan, Zhengjun; Xia, Hongfeng; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Jiang, Jingjing; Liu, Mo-Fang; Yan, Jun; Ying, Hao

    2014-12-04

    Understanding the regulation of insulin signalling in tissues provides insights into carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in physiology and disease. Here we show that hepatic miR-378/378* expression changes in response to fasting and refeeding in mice. Mice overexpressing hepatic miR-378/378* exhibit pure hepatic insulin resistance. miR-378 inhibits hepatic insulin signalling through targeting p110α, a subunit of PI3K and hence a critical component of insulin signalling. Knockdown of hepatic p110α mimics the effect of miR-378, while restoration of p110α expression abolishes the action of miR-378 on insulin signalling as well as its systemic effects on glucose and lipid homeostasis. miR-378/378* knockout mice display hypoglycemia and increased hepatic triglyceride level with enhanced insulin sensitivity. Inhibition of hepatic p110α in miR-378/378* knockout mice corrects the abnormal glucose tolerance. Finally, we show that overexpression of hepatic miR-378/378* ameliorates hepatic steatosis in ob/ob mice without exacerbating hyperglycemia. Our findings establish fasting-responsive miR-378 as a critical regulator of hepatic insulin signalling.

  15. A role for VGF in the hypothalamic arcuate and paraventricular nuclei in the control of energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saderi, N; Buijs, F N; Salgado-Delgado, R; Merkenstein, M; Basualdo, M C; Ferri, G-L; Escobar, C; Buijs, R M

    2014-04-18

    The arcuate nucleus is the main receptive area of the brain for peripheral and central metabolic cues and its integrity is essential for the maintenance of energy homeostasis. In the arcuate nucleus, different neuronal populations process metabolic signals and transmit this information to other nuclei of the hypothalamus by means of neurotransmitters and a combination of neuropeptides whose expression is modulated by the nutritional status. Here we investigated the changes in expression and synthesis of the polypeptide VGF in the arcuate nucleus of rats, in relation to the two main categories of neurons that show colocalization with VGF: the orexigenic NPY-expressing cells and the anorexigenic POMC-expressing cells. The results show that fasting is the most important stimulus for VGF expression, and that the up-regulation of VGF mRNA is restricted to the NPY area of the arcuate nucleus. POMC neurons express VGF under all feeding conditions, but especially in ad libitum-fed and fasted-refed animals. We also show that VGF arcuate neurons project to the pre-autonomic neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, providing anatomical evidence suggesting VGF as a central modulator of the autonomic nervous system.

  16. Asthma as a disruption in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over several decades, asthma has evolved from being recognized as a single disease to include a diverse group of phenotypes with dissimilar natural histories, pathophysiologies, responses to treatment, and distinctive molecular pathways. With the application of Occam’s raz...

  17. Asthma as a disruption in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over several decades, asthma has evolved from being recognized as a single disease to include a diverse group of phenotypes with dissimilar natural histories, pathophysiologies, responses to treatment, and distinctive molecular pathways. With the application of Occam’s raz...

  18. Iron ore sintering. Part 3: Automatic and control systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Cores

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El proceso de sinterización implica un gran número de parámetros, más de quinientos, cada uno de los cuales ejerce una mayor o menor influencia y necesita ser controlado, dentro de los límites posibles, con el fin de optimizar la productividad, la estabilidad del proceso, y la composición y la calidad de la sinterizado producido. Para cumplir con la legislación ambiental, un sistema de control de la contaminación debe monitorizar la composición de las partículas y los gases generados en la planta de sinterización y emitidos a la atmósfera. Los sistemas de automatización y control son herramientas vitales para ayudar a los operadores de la planta en el seguimiento de cada etapa del proceso de producción de sinterizado.

  19. Geochemical and microbiological controls on dissimilatory iron reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, Eric E.

    2006-06-01

    Recent experimental studies permit development of conceptual and quantitative models of microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction at circumneutral pH that can be compared to and contrasted with established models of abiotic mineral dissolution. The findings collectively support a model for controls on enzymatic reduction that differs fundamentally from those applied to abiotic reductive dissolution as a result of two basic phenomena: (1) the relatively minor influence of oxide mineralogical and thermodynamic properties on rates of enzymatic reduction compared to abiotic reductive dissolution, and (2) the major limitation which sorption and/or surface precipitation of biogenic Fe(II) on residual oxide and Fe(III)-reducing bacterial cell surfaces poses to enzymatic electron transfer in the presence of excess electron donor. Parallel studies with two well-characterized Fe(III)-reducing organisms ( Shewanella putrefaciens and Geobacter sulfurreducens) lead to common conclusions regarding the importance of these phenomena in regulating the rate and long-term extent of Fe(III) oxide reduction. Models in which rates of enzymatic reduction are limited by Fe(III)-reducing bacterial cell density together with the abundance of 'available' oxide surface sites (as controlled by oxide surface area and the accumulation of surface-bound biogenic Fe(II)) provide an adequate macroscopic description of controls on the initial rate and long-term extent of oxide reduction. To cite this article: E.E. Roden, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  20. Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wulp, Mariëtte Y M; Verkade, Henkjan J; Groen, Albert K

    2013-04-10

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is caused by a disturbed balance between cholesterol secretion into the blood versus uptake. The pathways involved are regulated via a complex interplay of enzymes, transport proteins, transcription factors and non-coding RNA's. The last two decades insight into underlying mechanisms has increased vastly but there are still a lot of unknowns, particularly regarding intracellular cholesterol transport. After decades of concentration on the liver, in recent years the intestine has come into focus as an important control point in cholesterol homeostasis. This review will discuss current knowledge of cholesterol physiology, with emphasis on cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and fecal excretion, and new (possible) therapeutic options for hypercholesterolemia.

  1. Opposing authigenic controls on the isotopic signature of dissolved iron in hydrothermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, A. J. M.; Klar, J. K.; Homoky, W. B.; Comer-Warner, S. A.; Milton, J. A.; Connelly, D. P.; James, R. H.; Mills, R. A.

    2017-04-01

    Iron is a scarce but essential micronutrient in the oceans that limits primary productivity in many regions of the surface ocean. The mechanisms and rates of Fe supply to the ocean interior are still poorly understood and quantified. Iron isotope ratios of different Fe pools can potentially be used to trace sources and sinks of the global Fe biogeochemical cycle if these boundary fluxes have distinct signatures. Seafloor hydrothermal vents emit metal rich fluids from mid-ocean ridges into the deep ocean. Iron isotope ratios have the potential to be used to trace the input of hydrothermal dissolved iron to the oceans if the local controls on the fractionation of Fe isotopes during plume dispersal in the deep ocean are understood. In this study we assess the behaviour of Fe isotopes in a Southern Ocean hydrothermal plume using a sampling program of Total Dissolvable Fe (TDFe), and dissolved Fe (dFe). We demonstrate that δ56Fe values of dFe (δ56dFe) within the hydrothermal plume change dramatically during early plume dispersal, ranging from -2.39 ± 0.05‰ to -0.13 ± 0.06‰ (2 SD). The isotopic composition of TDFe (δ56TDFe) was consistently heavier than dFe values, ranging from -0.31 ± 0.03‰ to 0.78 ± 0.05‰, consistent with Fe oxyhydroxide precipitation as the plume samples age. The dFe present in the hydrothermal plume includes stabilised dFe species with potential to be transported to the deep ocean. We estimate that stable dFe exported from the plume will have a δ56Fe of -0.28 ± 0.17‰. Further, we show that the proportion of authigenic iron-sulfide and iron-oxyhydroxide minerals precipitating in the buoyant plume exert opposing controls on the resultant isotope composition of dissolved Fe passed into the neutrally buoyant plume. We show that such controls yield variable dissolved Fe isotope signatures under the authigenic conditions reported from modern vent sites elsewhere, and so ought to be considered during iron isotope reconstructions of past

  2. Kinetics and corrosion products of aqueous nitrate reduction by iron powder without reaction conditions control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiaomeng; GUAN Xiaohong; MA Jun; AI Hengyu

    2009-01-01

    Although considerable research has been conducted on nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron powder (Fe0), these studies were mostly operated under anaerobic and invariable pH conditions that was unsuitable for practical application.Without reaction conditions (dissolved oxygen or reaction pH) control, this study aimed at subjecting the kinetics of denitrification by microscale Fe0 (160-200 mesh) to analysis the factors affecting the denitrification of nitrate and the composition of iron reductive products coating upon the iron surface.Results of the kinetics study have indicated that a higher initial concentration of nitrate would yield a greater reaction rate constant.Additional test results showed that the reduction rate of nitrate increased with increasing Fe0 dosage.The reaction can be described as a pseudo-first order reaction with respect to nitrate concentration or Fe0 dosage.Experimental results also suggested that nitrate reduction by microscale Fe0 without reaction condition control primarily was an acid-driven surface-mediated process, and the reaction order was 0.65 with respect to hydrogen ion concentration.X-ray diffractometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that a black coating, consisted of Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and FeO(OH), was formed on the surface of iron grains as an iron corrosion product when the system initial pH was lower than 5.The proportion of FeO(OH) increased as reaction time went on, whereas the proportion of Fe3O4 decreased.

  3. Feasibility of sulfide control in sewers by reuse of iron rich drinking water treatment sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Pikaar, Ilje; Sharma, Keshab Raj; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-15

    Dosage of iron salt is the most commonly used method for sulfide control in sewer networks but incurs high chemical costs. In this study, we experimentally investigate the feasibility of using iron rich drinking water treatment sludge for sulfide control in sewers. A lab-scale rising main sewer biofilm reactor was used. The sulfide concentration in the effluent decreased from 15.5 to 19.8 mgS/L (without dosing) to below 0.7-2.3 mgS/L at a sludge dosing rate achieving an iron to total dissolved inorganic sulfur molar ratio (Fe:S) of 1:1, with further removal of sulfide possible by prolonging the reaction time. In fact, batch tests revealed an Fe consumption to sulfide removal ratio of 0.5 ± 0.02 (mole:mole), suggesting the possible occurrence of other reactions involving the removal of sulfide. Modelling revealed that the reaction between iron in sludge and sulfide has reaction orders of 0.65 ± 0.01 and 0.77 ± 0.02 with respect to the Fe and sulfide concentrations, respectively. The addition of sludge slightly increased the total chemical oxidation demand (tCOD) concentration (by approximately 12%) as expected, but decreased the soluble chemical oxidation demand (sCOD) concentration and methane formation by 7% and 20%, respectively. Some phosphate removal (13%) was also observed at the sludge dosing rate of 1:1 (Fe:S), which is beneficial to nutrient removal from the wastewater. Overall, this study suggests that dosing iron-rich drinking water sludge to sewers could be an effective strategy for sulfide removal in sewer systems, which would also reduce the sludge disposal costs for drinking water treatment works. However, its potential side-effects on sewer sedimentation and on the wastewater treatment plant effluent remain to be investigated.

  4. MeCP2 post-translational modifications: a mechanism to control its involvement in synaptic plasticity and homeostasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eBellini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Although Rett syndrome (RTT represents one of the most frequent forms of severe intellectual disability in females worldwide, we still have an inadequate knowledge of the many roles played by MeCP2 (whose mutations are responsible for most cases of RTT and their relevance for RTT pathobiology. Several studies support a role of MeCP2 in the regulation of synaptic plasticity and homeostasis. At the molecular level, MeCP2 is described as a repressor capable of inhibiting gene transcription through chromatin compaction. Indeed, it interacts with several chromatin remodeling factors, such as HDAC-containing complexes and ATRX. Other studies have inferred that MeCP2 functions also as an activator; a role in regulating mRNA splicing and in modulating protein synthesis has also been proposed. Further, MeCP2 avidly binds both 5-methyl- and 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine. Recent evidence suggests that it is the highly disorganized structure of MeCP2, together with its post-translational modifications (PTMs that generate and regulate this functional versatility. Indeed, several reports have demonstrated that differential phosphorylation of MeCP2 is a key mechanism by which the methyl binding protein modulates its affinity for its partners, gene expression and cellular adaptations to stimuli and neuronal plasticity. As logic consequence, generation of phospho-defective Mecp2 knock-in mice has permitted associating alterations in neuronal morphology, circuit formation, and mouse behavioral phenotypes with specific phosphorylation events. MeCP2 undergoes various other PTMs, including acetylation, ubiquitination and sumoylation, whose functional roles remain largely unexplored. These results, together with the genome-wide distribution of MeCP2 and its capability to substitute histone H1, recall the complex regulation of histones and suggest the relevance of quickly gaining a deeper comprehension of MeCP2 PTMs, the respective writers and readers and the consequent

  5. Controlled growth of iron oxide nanoparticles in the aqueous microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bong-sik; Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Jong-Duk

    2008-09-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical coprecipitation of ferric and ferrous aqueous solutions via regulation of the microenvironment at ambient conditions. Nanocrystals having an average diameter of 6 to 12 nm were obtained by picoliter droplets, whereas only 9 nm diameter nanocrystals were prepared by microliter droplets. The size of the nanocrystals was controlled by a precise balance of reactions of hydroxide ions with positive ions at the surface layer and inner layers of the droplets. The crystal structure and average size were analyzed by X-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscope images. The field dependence and temperature dependence on magnetization measured by a superconducting quantum interference device demonstrate that the as-synthesized particles are superparamagnetic at room temperature and have a size-dependent magnetic property. The anisotropy constant calculated by the blocking temperature and particle size was found to decrease with increasing particle size.

  6. Alginate inhibits iron absorption from ferrous gluconate in a randomized controlled trial and reduces iron uptake into Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawer, Anna A; Harvey, Linda J; Dainty, Jack R; Perez-Moral, Natalia; Sharp, Paul; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    Previous in vitro results indicated that alginate beads might be a useful vehicle for food iron fortification. A human study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that alginate enhances iron absorption. A randomised, single blinded, cross-over trial was carried out in which iron absorption was measured from serum iron appearance after a test meal. Overnight-fasted volunteers (n = 15) were given a test meal of 200 g cola-flavoured jelly plus 21 mg iron as ferrous gluconate, either in alginate beads mixed into the jelly or in a capsule. Iron absorption was lower from the alginate beads than from ferrous gluconate (8.5% and 12.6% respectively, p = 0.003). Sub-group B (n = 9) consumed the test meals together with 600 mg calcium to determine whether alginate modified the inhibitory effect of calcium. Calcium reduced iron absorption from ferrous gluconate by 51%, from 11.5% to 5.6% (p = 0.014), and from alginate beads by 37%, from 8.3% to 5.2% (p = 0.009). In vitro studies using Caco-2 cells were designed to explore the reasons for the difference between the previous in vitro findings and the human study; confirmed the inhibitory effect of alginate. Beads similar to those used in the human study were subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion, with and without cola jelly, and the digestate applied to Caco-2 cells. Both alginate and cola jelly significantly reduced iron uptake into the cells, by 34% (p = 0.009) and 35% (p = 0.003) respectively. The combination of cola jelly and calcium produced a very low ferritin response, 16.5% (p ferrous gluconate alone. The results of these studies demonstrate that alginate beads are not a useful delivery system for soluble salts of iron for the purpose of food fortification. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01528644.

  7. Relationship between Iron Accumulation and White Matter Injury in Multiple Sclerosis: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Eytan; Branson, Brittany; Jensen, Jens H.; Bester, Maxim; Babb, James S.; Herbert, Joseph; Grossman, Robert I.; Inglese, Matilde

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the increasing development and applications of iron imaging, the pathophysiology of iron accumulation in multiple sclerosis (MS), and its role in disease progression and development of clinical disability, is poorly understood. The aims of our study were to determine the presence and extent of iron in T2 visible lesions and gray and white matter using magnetic field correlation (MFC) MRI and correlate with microscopic white matter (WM) injury as measured by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a case-control study incuding a series of 31 patients with clinically definite MS. The mean age was 39 years [standard deviation (SD)=9.55], they were 11 males and 20 females, with a disease duration average of 3 years (range 0-13) and a median EDSS of 2 (0-4.5). Seventeen healthy volunteers (6 males and 11 females) with a mean age of 36 years (SD=11.4) were recruited. All subjects underwent MR imaging on a 3T scanner using T2-weighted sequence, 3D T1 MPRAGE, MFC, single-shot DTI and postcontrast T1. T2-lesion volumes, brain volumetry, DTI parameters and iron quantification were calculated and multiple correlations were exploited. RESULTS Increased MFC was found in the putamen (p=0.061), the thalamus (p=0.123), the centrum semiovale (p=0.053), globus pallidus (p=0.008) and gray matter (GM) (p=0.004) of MS patients compared to controls. The mean lesional MFC was 121 s−2 (SD=67), significantly lower compared to the GM MFC (<0.0001). The GM mean diffusivity (MD) was inversely correlated with the MFC in the centrum semiovale (p<0.001), and in the splenium of the corpus callosum (p<0.001). CONCLUSION Patients with MS have increased iron in the globus pallidus, putamen and centrum with a trend toward increased iron in all the brain structures. Quantitative iron evaluation of WM and GM may improve the understanding of MS pathophysiology, and might serve as a surrogate marker of disease progression. PMID:25416468

  8. Mercury mass flow in iron and steel production process and its implications for mercury emission control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyang; Wang, Shuxiao; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Hai; Gao, Wei; Wu, Qingru; Hao, Jiming

    2016-05-01

    The iron and steel production process is one of the predominant anthropogenic sources of atmospheric mercury emissions worldwide. In this study, field tests were conducted to study mercury emission characteristics and mass flows at two iron and steel plants in China. It was found that low-sulfur flue gas from sintering machines could contribute up to 41% of the total atmospheric mercury emissions, and desulfurization devices could remarkably help reduce the emissions. Coal gas burning accounted for 17%-49% of the total mercury emissions, and therefore the mercury control of coal gas burning, specifically for the power plant burning coal gas to generate electricity, was significantly important. The emissions from limestone and dolomite production and electric furnaces can contribute 29.3% and 4.2% of the total mercury emissions from iron and steel production. More attention should be paid to mercury emissions from these two processes. Blast furnace dust accounted for 27%-36% of the total mercury output for the whole iron and steel production process. The recycling of blast furnace dust could greatly increase the atmospheric mercury emissions and should not be conducted. The mercury emission factors for the coke oven, sintering machine and blast furnace were 0.039-0.047gHg/ton steel, and for the electric furnace it was 0.021gHg/ton steel. The predominant emission species was oxidized mercury, accounting for 59%-73% of total mercury emissions to air.

  9. Age-related iron deposition in the basal ganglia of controls and Alzheimer disease patients quantified using susceptibility weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Li, Yan-Ying; Luo, Jian-Hua; Li, Yue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate age-related iron deposition changes in healthy subjects and Alzheimer disease patients using susceptibility weighted imaging. The study recruited 182 people, including 143 healthy volunteers and 39 Alzheimer disease patients. All underwent conventional magnetic resonance imaging and susceptibility weighted imaging sequences. The groups were divided according to age. Phase images were used to investigate iron deposition in the bilateral head of the caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen, and the angle radian value was calculated. We hypothesized that age-related iron deposition changes may be different between Alzheimer disease patients and controls of the same age, and that susceptibility weighted imaging would be a more sensitive method of iron deposition quantification. The results revealed that iron deposition in the globus pallidus increased with age, up to 40 years. In the head of the caudate nucleus, iron deposition peaked at 60 years. There was a general increasing trend with age in the putamen, up to 50-70 years old. There was significant difference between the control and Alzheimer disease groups in the bilateral globus pallidus in both the 60-70 and 70-80 year old group comparisons. In conclusion, iron deposition increased with age in the globus pallidus, the head of the caudate nucleus and putamen, reaching a plateau at different ages. Furthermore, comparisons between the control and Alzheimer disease group revealed that iron deposition changes were more easily detected in the globus pallidus. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A study on controlled cooling process for making bainitic ductile iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    In the present research, TTT curve of bainitic ductile iron under the condition of controlled cooling was generated. The cooling rate of grinding ball and its temperature distribution were also measured at the same time. It can be concluded that the bainitic zone of TTT curve is separated from the pearlitic zone. As compared to the water-quenching condition, more even cooling rate and temperature distribution can be achieved in the controlled cooling process. The controlled cooling can keep away from pearlitic zone in the high temperature cooling stage and produce similar results to the process of traditional isothermal cooling with a low cooling rate in the low temperature cooling stage.

  11. Bacterial iron-sulfur cluster sensors in mammalian pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Halie K.; Auerbuch, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters act as important cofactors for a number of transcriptional regulators in bacteria, including many mammalian pathogens. The sensitivity of iron-sulfur clusters to iron availability, oxygen tension, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species enables bacteria to use such regulators to adapt their gene expression profiles rapidly in response to changing environmental conditions. In this review, we discuss how the [4Fe-4S] or [2Fe-2S] cluster-containing regulators FNR, Wbl, aconitase, IscR, NsrR, SoxR, and AirSR contribute to bacterial pathogenesis through control of both metabolism and classical virulence factors. In addition, we briefly review mammalian iron homeostasis as well as oxidative/nitrosative stress to provide context for understanding the function of bacterial iron-sulfur cluster sensors in different niches within the host. PMID:25738802

  12. Effect Of Iron Supplementation In Breastfed Infants: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyma Kayali

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion Consumption of iron rich complementary foods together with routine iron supplementation of term, breast-fed infants from 4 months of age can improve their iron status. Receiving sufficient iron in diet is an effective way prevent iron-deficiency anemia. [J Contemp Med 2016; 6(3.000: 165-172

  13. Selective translational control of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein transcript by iron regulatory protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Hee; Cahill, Catherine M; Vanderburg, Charles R; Scherzer, Clemens R; Wang, Bin; Huang, Xudong; Rogers, Jack T

    2010-10-08

    Iron influx increases the translation of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) via an iron-responsive element (IRE) RNA stem loop in its 5'-untranslated region. Equal modulated interaction of the iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) with canonical IREs controls iron-dependent translation of the ferritin subunits. However, our immunoprecipitation RT-PCR and RNA binding experiments demonstrated that IRP1, but not IRP2, selectively bound the APP IRE in human neural cells. This selective IRP1 interaction pattern was evident in human brain and blood tissue from normal and Alzheimer disease patients. We computer-predicted an optimal novel RNA stem loop structure for the human, rhesus monkey, and mouse APP IREs with reference to the canonical ferritin IREs but also the IREs encoded by erythroid heme biosynthetic aminolevulinate synthase and Hif-2α mRNAs, which preferentially bind IRP1. Selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension analysis was consistent with a 13-base single-stranded terminal loop and a conserved GC-rich stem. Biotinylated RNA probes deleted of the conserved CAGA motif in the terminal loop did not bind to IRP1 relative to wild type probes and could no longer base pair to form a predicted AGA triloop. An AGU pseudo-triloop is key for IRP1 binding to the canonical ferritin IREs. RNA probes encoding the APP IRE stem loop exhibited the same high affinity binding to rhIRP1 as occurs for the H-ferritin IRE (35 pm). Intracellular iron chelation increased binding of IRP1 to the APP IRE, decreasing intracellular APP expression in SH-SY5Y cells. Functionally, shRNA knockdown of IRP1 caused increased expression of neural APP consistent with IRP1-APP IRE-driven translation.

  14. Iron deficiency: an emerging therapeutic target in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Solal, Alain; Leclercq, Christophe; Deray, Gilbert; Lasocki, Sigismond; Zambrowski, Jean-Jacques; Mebazaa, Alexandre; de Groote, Pascal; Damy, Thibaud; Galinier, Michel

    2014-09-15

    In patients with heart failure, iron deficiency is frequent but overlooked, with a prevalence of 30%-50%. Since it contributes to cardiac and peripheral muscle dysfunction, iron deficiency is associated with poorer clinical outcomes and a greater risk of death, independent of haemoglobin level. Therefore, iron deficiency emerges as a new comorbidity and a therapeutic target of chronic heart failure in addition to chronic renal insufficiency, anaemia and diabetes. In a series of placebo-controlled, randomised studies in patients with heart failure and iron deficiency, intravenous iron had a favourable effect on exercise capacity, functional class, LVEF, renal function and quality of life. These clinical studies were performed in the context of a renewed interest in iron metabolism. During the past 10 years, knowledge about the transport, storage and homeostasis of iron has improved dramatically, and new molecules involved in iron metabolism have been described (eg, hepcidin, ferroportin, divalent metal transporter 1). Recent European guidelines recommend the monitoring of iron parameters (ie, serum ferritin, transferrin saturation) for all patients with heart failure. Ongoing clinical trials will explore the benefits of iron deficiency correction on various heart failure parameters.

  15. Prion protein (PrP knock-out mice show altered iron metabolism: a functional role for PrP in iron uptake and transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Singh

    Full Text Available Despite overwhelming evidence implicating the prion protein (PrP in prion disease pathogenesis, the normal function of this cell surface glycoprotein remains unclear. In previous reports we demonstrated that PrP mediates cellular iron uptake and transport, and aggregation of PrP to the disease causing PrP-scrapie (PrP(Sc form results in imbalance of iron homeostasis in prion disease affected human and animal brains. Here, we show that selective deletion of PrP in transgenic mice (PrP(KO alters systemic iron homeostasis as reflected in hematological parameters and levels of total iron and iron regulatory proteins in the plasma, liver, spleen, and brain of PrP(KO mice relative to matched wild type controls. Introduction of radiolabeled iron ((59FeCl(3 to Wt and PrP(KO mice by gastric gavage reveals inefficient transport of (59Fe from the duodenum to the blood stream, an early abortive spike of erythropoiesis in the long bones and spleen, and eventual decreased (59Fe content in red blood cells and all major organs of PrP(KO mice relative to Wt controls. The iron deficient phenotype of PrP(KO mice is reversed by expressing Wt PrP in the PrP(KO background, demonstrating a functional role for PrP in iron uptake and transport. Since iron is required for essential metabolic processes and is also potentially toxic if mismanaged, these results suggest that loss of normal function of PrP due to aggregation to the PrP(Sc form induces imbalance of brain iron homeostasis, resulting in disease associated neurotoxicity.

  16. Effects of Saturated Fat, Polyunsaturated Fat, Monounsaturated Fat, and Carbohydrate on Glucose-Insulin Homeostasis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomised Controlled Feeding Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Imamura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of major dietary macronutrients on glucose-insulin homeostasis remain controversial and may vary by the clinical measures examined. We aimed to assess how saturated fat (SFA, monounsaturated fat (MUFA, polyunsaturated fat (PUFA, and carbohydrate affect key metrics of glucose-insulin homeostasis.We systematically searched multiple databases (PubMed, EMBASE, OVID, BIOSIS, Web-of-Knowledge, CAB, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, SIGLE, Faculty1000 for randomised controlled feeding trials published by 26 Nov 2015 that tested effects of macronutrient intake on blood glucose, insulin, HbA1c, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion in adults aged ≥18 years. We excluded trials with non-isocaloric comparisons and trials providing dietary advice or supplements rather than meals. Studies were reviewed and data extracted independently in duplicate. Among 6,124 abstracts, 102 trials, including 239 diet arms and 4,220 adults, met eligibility requirements. Using multiple-treatment meta-regression, we estimated dose-response effects of isocaloric replacements between SFA, MUFA, PUFA, and carbohydrate, adjusted for protein, trans fat, and dietary fibre. Replacing 5% energy from carbohydrate with SFA had no significant effect on fasting glucose (+0.02 mmol/L, 95% CI = -0.01, +0.04; n trials = 99, but lowered fasting insulin (-1.1 pmol/L; -1.7, -0.5; n = 90. Replacing carbohydrate with MUFA lowered HbA1c (-0.09%; -0.12, -0.05; n = 23, 2 h post-challenge insulin (-20.3 pmol/L; -32.2, -8.4; n = 11, and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR (-2.4%; -4.6, -0.3; n = 30. Replacing carbohydrate with PUFA significantly lowered HbA1c (-0.11%; -0.17, -0.05 and fasting insulin (-1.6 pmol/L; -2.8, -0.4. Replacing SFA with PUFA significantly lowered glucose, HbA1c, C-peptide, and HOMA. Based on gold-standard acute insulin response in ten trials, PUFA significantly improved insulin secretion capacity (+0.5 pmol/L/min; 0.2, 0.8 whether replacing

  17. Homeostasis in leaf water potentials on leeward and windward sides of desert shrub crowns: water loss control vs. high hydraulic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iogna, Patricia A; Bucci, Sandra J; Scholz, Fabián G; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    Phenotypic plasticity in morphophysiological leaf traits in response to wind was studied in two dominant shrub species of the Patagonian steppe, used as model systems for understanding effects of high wind speed on leaf water relations and hydraulic properties of small woody plants. Morpho-anatomical traits, hydraulic conductance and conductivity and water relations in leaves of wind-exposed and protected crown sides were examined during the summer with nearly continuous high winds. Although exposed sides of the crowns were subjected to higher wind speeds and air saturation deficits than the protected sides, leaves throughout the crown had similar minimum leaf water potential (ΨL). The two species were able to maintain homeostasis in minimum ΨL using different physiological mechanisms. Berberis microphylla avoided a decrease in the minimum ΨL in the exposed side of the crown by reducing water loss by stomatal control, loss of cell turgor and low epidermal conductance. Colliguaja integerrima increased leaf water transport efficiency to maintain transpiration rates without increasing the driving force for water loss in the wind-exposed crown side. Leaf physiological changes within the crown help to prevent the decrease of minimum ΨL and thus contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis, assuring the hydraulic integrity of the plant under unfavorable conditions. The responses of leaf traits that contribute to mechanical resistance (leaf mass per area and thickness) differed from those of large physiological traits by exhibiting low phenotypic plasticity. The results of this study help us to understand the unique properties of shrubs which have different hydraulic architecture compared to trees.

  18. Intervenções nutricionais na anemia ferropriva Nutritional strategies for controlling iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marly A. Cardoso

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo de revisão bibliográfica é fornecer subsídios para o planejamento e avaliação de medidas de combate à anemia ferropriva. A necessidade de intervenções para o controle da prevalência da anemia ferropriva deve ser determinada pela magnitude da defi ciência nutricional e pelo conhecimento de seus efeitos na qualidade de vida, morbidade e mortalidade. A abordagem mais usual é fornecer ferro suplementar a gestantes, nutrizes e lactentes em programas de assistência primária à saúde, reconhecidamente os grupos de maior vulnerabilidade. A fortificação de alimentos e orientações sobre modificações da dieta representam medidas complementares e devem ser incrementadas.This review was elaborated in order to contribute to the planning of strategies for controlling iron deficiency anemia in developing countries. The need for intervention should be determined by the degree of iron deficiency in the individual group and knowledge of its effects on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality. The most frequent approach is to provide iron supplementation during pregnancy, lactation, and early childhood as a basic primary healthcare measure. Fortification and dietary modification are complementary approaches, and should be developed.

  19. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked.

  20. Transferrin-mediated cellular iron delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Ashley N; Mason, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Essential to iron homeostasis is the transport of iron by the bilobal protein human serum transferrin (hTF). Each lobe (N- and C-lobe) of hTF forms a deep cleft which binds a single Fe(3+). Iron-bearing hTF in the blood binds tightly to the specific transferrin receptor (TFR), a homodimeric transmembrane protein. After undergoing endocytosis, acidification of the endosome initiates the release of Fe(3+) from hTF in a TFR-mediated process. Iron-free hTF remains tightly bound to the TFR at acidic pH; following recycling back to the cell surface, it is released to sequester more iron. Efficient delivery of iron is critically dependent on hTF/TFR interactions. Therefore, identification of the pH-specific contacts between hTF and the TFR is crucial. Recombinant protein production has enabled deconvolution of this complex system. The studies reviewed herein support a model in which pH-induced interrelated events control receptor-stimulated iron release from each lobe of hTF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrafast optical control of magnetization dynamics in polycrystalline bismuth doped iron garnet thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deb, Marwan, E-mail: marwan.deb@ipcms.unistra.fr; Vomir, Mircea; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Bigot, Jean-Yves [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504, CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, BP 43, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex 02 (France)

    2015-12-21

    Controlling the magnetization dynamics on the femtosecond timescale is of fundamental importance for integrated opto-spintronic devices. For industrial perspectives, it requires to develop simple growth techniques for obtaining large area magneto-optical materials having a high amplitude ultrafast Faraday or Kerr response. Here we report on optical pump probe studies of light induced spin dynamics in high quality bismuth doped iron garnet polycrystalline film prepared by the spin coating method. We demonstrate an ultrafast non-thermal optical control of the spin dynamics using both circularly and linearly polarized pulses.

  2. Controls on Arsenic Retention in Surface and Subsurface Environments: Resolving the Impact of Iron Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufano, K.; Fendorf, S.

    2007-12-01

    A transition from oxidizing to reducing conditions has long been implicated in increasing aqueous As concentrations. Confounding processes controlling the release of As, reductive transformation of ferrihydrite, a common Fe(III) (hydr)oxide, has recently been shown to promote As retention rather than release. Elucidating the processes controlling As desorption and subsequent migration in surface and subsurface environments and how environmental factors (for example, availability of labile carbon and duration/extent of flooding) affect these processes will allow predictions to be made regarding long-term stability of As in soil and sediment. In turn, this can aid in evaluating the likelihood of having measurable As in groundwater. To better resolve these processes, here we examine As desorption from ferrihydrite-coated sands pre-sorbed with As(III) at circumneutral pH under Fe-reducing conditions with the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium (DIRB) Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN- 32. We reveal that upon iron reduction, transformation of As-bearing ferrihydrite results in As(III) retention. However, over time there is a shift from reductive transformation to reductive dissolution of the As-bearing Fe phase(s) coupled with prolonged release of As to the aqueous phase. Our results suggest that arsenic retention may increase or decrease depending on the type of iron oxide, secondary iron transformations, and duration of reducing conditions. Immediately following a transition to anaerobic conditions there is potential for As retention on newly formed ferric/ferrous (hydr)oxide phases; however prolonged reduction will result in both the dissolution of ferric/ferrous (hydr)oxides and release of aqueous arsenic.

  3. Multivitamin and iron supplementation to prevent periconceptional anemia in rural tanzanian women: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilupa S Gunaratna

    Full Text Available Women's nutritional status during conception and early pregnancy can influence maternal and infant outcomes. This study examined the efficacy of pre-pregnancy supplementation with iron and multivitamins to reduce the prevalence of anemia during the periconceptional period among rural Tanzanian women and adolescent girls.A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in which participants were individually randomized to receive daily oral supplements of folic acid alone, folic acid and iron, or folic acid, iron, and vitamins A, B-complex, C, and E at approximately single recommended dietary allowance (RDA doses for six months.Rural Rufiji District, Tanzania.Non-pregnant women and adolescent girls aged 15-29 years (n = 802.The study arms were comparable in demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, food security, nutritional status, pregnancy history, and compliance with the regimen (p>0.05. In total, 561 participants (70% completed the study and were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Hemoglobin levels were not different across treatments (median: 11.1 g/dL, Q1-Q3: 10.0-12.4 g/dL, p = 0.65. However, compared with the folic acid arm (28%, there was a significant reduction in the risk of hypochromic microcytic anemia in the folic acid and iron arm (17%, RR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.42-0.90, p = 0.01 and the folic acid, iron, and multivitamin arm (19%, RR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.45-0.96, p = 0.03. Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW to adjust for potential selection bias due to loss to follow-up did not materially change these results. The effect of the regimens was not modified by frequency of household meat consumption, baseline underweight status, parity, breastfeeding status, or level of compliance (in all cases, p for interaction>0.2.Daily oral supplementation with iron and folic acid among women and adolescents prior to pregnancy reduces risk of anemia. The potential benefits of supplementation on the risk of

  4. Multivitamin and Iron Supplementation to Prevent Periconceptional Anemia in Rural Tanzanian Women: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaratna, Nilupa S.; Masanja, Honorati; Mrema, Sigilbert; Levira, Francis; Spiegelman, Donna; Hertzmark, Ellen; Saronga, Naomi; Irema, Kahema; Shuma, Mary; Elisaria, Ester; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2015-01-01

    Objective Women’s nutritional status during conception and early pregnancy can influence maternal and infant outcomes. This study examined the efficacy of pre-pregnancy supplementation with iron and multivitamins to reduce the prevalence of anemia during the periconceptional period among rural Tanzanian women and adolescent girls. Design A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in which participants were individually randomized to receive daily oral supplements of folic acid alone, folic acid and iron, or folic acid, iron, and vitamins A, B-complex, C, and E at approximately single recommended dietary allowance (RDA) doses for six months. Setting Rural Rufiji District, Tanzania. Subjects Non-pregnant women and adolescent girls aged 15–29 years (n = 802). Results The study arms were comparable in demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, food security, nutritional status, pregnancy history, and compliance with the regimen (p>0.05). In total, 561 participants (70%) completed the study and were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Hemoglobin levels were not different across treatments (median: 11.1 g/dL, Q1-Q3: 10.0–12.4 g/dL, p = 0.65). However, compared with the folic acid arm (28%), there was a significant reduction in the risk of hypochromic microcytic anemia in the folic acid and iron arm (17%, RR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.42–0.90, p = 0.01) and the folic acid, iron, and multivitamin arm (19%, RR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.45–0.96, p = 0.03). Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) to adjust for potential selection bias due to loss to follow-up did not materially change these results. The effect of the regimens was not modified by frequency of household meat consumption, baseline underweight status, parity, breastfeeding status, or level of compliance (in all cases, p for interaction>0.2). Conclusions Daily oral supplementation with iron and folic acid among women and adolescents prior to pregnancy reduces risk of anemia. The

  5. Importance of inflammation on iron homeostasis and functional iron deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Stella Figueiredo

    2010-01-01

    Deficiência funcional de ferro (Fe) pode ser definida como o desbalanço entre a quantidade necessária de Fe para a síntese de hemoglobina e o seu suprimento. Ela ocorre na ausência de estoque de Fe, característica da anemia ferropênica (AF), e na presença de bloqueio da homeostasia do Fe, como na anemia da inflamação (AI). Na AI, citocinas e células do sistema retículo-endotelial induzem alterações que interferem em diferentes vias da eritropoese levando à anemia. O bloqueio na mobilização do...

  6. Controlled synthesis of metallic iron nanoparticles and their magnetic hyperthermia performance in polyaniline composite nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ta-I.; Chang, Su-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Electrospun magnetic iron/polyaniline nanofibers with applicable heating performance in an AC magnetic field were developed. A new and low-cost method was introduced to synthesize metallic iron (Fe0) nanoparticles with uniform size distribution. The Fe0 nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous environment at room temperature with the assistance of polyvinylpyrrolidone and sodium citrate to tailor their particle sizes ranging from 10 to 20 nm. The experimental results showed that regulating the free iron ions present in the solution is critical for obtaining Fe0 nanoparticles with narrow size distribution. The Fe0 nanoparticles were subsequently incorporated with conductive polyaniline (PANI) to fabricate Fe0/PANI/polycaprolactone nanofibers using an electrospinning technique. The resultant composite nanofibers have controlled fiber diameters and also show electrochemical redox properties originating from the PANI polymer. The heating performance test concluded that both eddy current loss from PANI and Neel relaxation loss of magnetic Fe0 nanoparticles can contribute to the power dissipation of the prepared composite nanofibers. The optimal heating performance can be obtained by adjusting the composition of Fe0 nanoparticles and PANI in nanofibers.

  7. Effect of Intravenous Iron Supplementation on Acute Mountain Sickness: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xuewen; Zhang, Qiuying; Wang, Hao; Man, Chunyan; Hong, Heng; Chen, Li; Li, Tanshi; Ye, Ping

    2015-07-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of intravenous iron supplementation in the prevention of AMS. This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Forty-one (n=41) healthy Chinese low-altitude inhabitants living in Beijing, China (altitude of about 50 meters) were randomly assigned into intravenous iron supplementation (ISS group; n=21) and placebo (CON group; n=20) groups. Participants in the ISS group received iron sucrose supplement (200 mg) before flying to Lhasa, China (altitude of 4300 meters). Acute mountain sickness (AMS) severity was assessed with the Lake Louise scoring (LLS) system within 5 days after landing on the plateau (at high altitude). Routine check-ups, clinical biochemistry, and blood tests were performed before departure and 24 h after arrival. A total of 38 participants completed the study (ISS group: n=19; CON group: n=19). The rate of subjects with AMS (LLS>3) was lower in the ISS group compared with the CON group, but no significant differences were obtained (P>0.05). There were no differences in patients' baseline characteristics. The physiological indices were similar in both groups except for serum iron concentrations (19.44±10.02 vs. 85.10±26.78 μmol/L) and transferrin saturation rates (28.20±12.14 vs. 68.34±33.12%), which were significantly higher in the ISS group (Piron supplementation has no significant protective effect on AMS in healthy Chinese low-altitude inhabitants.

  8. The Iron Cage and the Gaze: Interpreting Medical Control in the English Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Exworthy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to determine the value of theoretical ideal-types of medical control. Whilst ideal types (such as the iron cage and gaze need revision in their application to medical settings, they remain useful in describing and explaining patterns of control and autonomy in the medical profession. The apparent transition from the cage to the gaze has often been over-stated since both types are found in many contemporary health reforms. Indeed, forms of neo-bureaucracy have emerged alongside surveillance of the gaze. These types are contextualised and elaborated in terms of two empirical examples: the management of medical performance and financial incentives for senior hospital doctors in England. Findings point towards the reformulation of medical control, an on-going re-stratification of the medical profession, and the internalisation of managerial discourses. The cumulative effect involves the medical profession’s ability to re-cast and enhance its position (vis-à-vis managerial interests.Keywords: medical profession, medical control, iron cage, gaze

  9. Iron load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cassarà

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addressed the main role of hepcidin in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, while this mechanism could be relevant in causing iron load in Thalassemia Intermedia and Sickle-Cell Anemia, its role in Thalassemia Major (TM is marginal. This is mainly due to the high impact of transfusional requirement into the severe increase of body iron. Moreover, the damage of iron load may be worsened by infections, as HCV hepatitis, or liver and endocrinological damage. One of the most relevant associations was found between splenectomy and increase of risk for mortality due,probably, to more severe iron load. These issues suggest as morbidity and mortality of this group of patients they do not depend only by our ability in controlling heart damage but even in preventing or treating particular infections and complications. This finding is supported by the impairment of survival curves in patients with complications different from heart damage. However, because, during recent years different direct and indirect methods to detect iron overload in patients affected by secondary hemochromatosis have been implemented, our ability to maintain under control iron load is significantly improved. Anyway, the future in iron load management remains to be able to have an iron load map of our body for targeting chelation and other medical treatment according to the single organ damage.

  10. Vitamin A deficiency modulates iron metabolism via ineffective erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Marcela S B; Siqueira, Egle M A; Trindade, Luciano S; Arruda, Sandra F

    2014-10-01

    Vitamin A modulates inflammatory status, iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Given that these factors modulate the expression of the hormone hepcidin (Hamp), we investigated the effect of vitamin A deficiency on molecular biomarkers of iron metabolism, the inflammatory response and the erythropoietic system. Five groups of male Wistar rats were treated: control (AIN-93G), the vitamin A-deficient (VAD) diet, the iron-deficient (FeD) diet, the vitamin A- and iron-deficient (VAFeD) diet or the diet with 12 mg atRA/kg diet replacing all-trans-retinyl palmitate by all-trans retinoic acid (atRA). Vitamin A deficiency reduced serum iron and transferrin saturation levels, increased spleen iron concentrations, reduced hepatic Hamp and kidney erythropoietin messenger RNA (mRNA) levels and up-regulated hepatic and spleen heme oxygenase-1 gene expression while reducing the liver HO-1 specific activity compared with the control. The FeD and VAFeD rats exhibited lower levels of serum iron and transferrin saturation, lower iron concentrations in tissues and lower hepatic Hamp mRNA levels compared with the control. The treatment with atRA resulted in lower serum iron and transferrin concentrations, an increased iron concentration in the liver, a decreased iron concentration in the spleen and in the gut, and decreased hepatic Hamp mRNA levels. In summary, these findings suggest that vitamin A deficiency leads to ineffective erythropoiesis by the down-regulation of renal erythropoietin expression in the kidney, resulting in erythrocyte malformation and the consequent accumulation of the heme group in the spleen. Vitamin A deficiency indirectly modulates systemic iron homeostasis by enhancing erythrophagocytosis of undifferentiated erythrocytes.

  11. Sequence analysis of dolphin ferritin H and L subunits and possible iron-dependent translational control of dolphin ferritin gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Yukako

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-storage protein, ferritin plays a central role in iron metabolism. Ferritin has dual function to store iron and segregate iron for protection of iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species. Tissue ferritin is composed of two kinds of subunits (H: heavy chain or heart-type subunit; L: light chain or liver-type subunit. Ferritin gene expression is controlled at translational level in iron-dependent manner or at transcriptional level in iron-independent manner. However, sequencing analysis of marine mammalian ferritin subunits has not yet been performed fully. The purpose of this study is to reveal cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits, and demonstrate the possibility of expression of these subunits, especially H subunit, by iron. Methods Sequence analyses of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits were performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR fragments from cDNAs generated via reverse transcription-PCR of leukocyte total RNA prepared from blood samples of six different dolphin species (Pseudorca crassidens, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens, Grampus griseus, Globicephala macrorhynchus, Tursiops truncatus, and Delphinapterus leucas. The putative iron-responsive element sequence in the 5'-untranslated region of the six different dolphin species was revealed by direct sequencing of PCR fragments obtained using leukocyte genomic DNA. Results Dolphin H and L subunits consist of 182 and 174 amino acids, respectively, and amino acid sequence identities of ferritin subunits among these dolphins are highly conserved (H: 99–100%, (99→98 ; L: 98–100%. The conserved 28 bp IRE sequence was located -144 bp upstream from the initiation codon in the six different dolphin species. Conclusion These results indicate that six different dolphin species have conserved ferritin sequences, and suggest that these genes are iron-dependently expressed.

  12. A case-control study of mesothelioma in Minnesota iron ore (taconite) miners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Christine S; Alexander, Bruce H; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; MacLehose, Richard F; Nelson, Heather H; Ryan, Andrew D; Mandel, Jeffrey H

    2016-02-01

    An excess of mesothelioma has been observed in iron ore miners in Northeastern Minnesota. Mining and processing of taconite iron ore generate exposures that include elongate mineral particles (EMPs) of amphibole and non-amphibole origin. We conducted a nested case-control study of mesothelioma in a cohort of 68,737 iron ore miners (haematite and taconite ore miners) to evaluate the association between mesothelioma, employment and EMP exposures from taconite mining. Mesothelioma cases (N=80) were identified through the Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System (MCSS) and death certificates. Four controls of similar age were selected for each case with 315 controls ultimately eligible for inclusion. Mesothelioma risk was evaluated by estimating rate ratios and 95% CIs with conditional logistic regression in relation to duration of taconite industry employment and cumulative EMP exposure [(EMP/cc)×years], defined by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) 7400 method. Models were adjusted for employment in haematite mining and potential exposure to commercial asbestos products used in the industry. All mesothelioma cases were male and 57 of the cases had work experience in the taconite industry. Mesothelioma was associated with the number of years employed in the taconite industry (RR=1.03, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.06) and cumulative EMP exposure (RR=1.10, 95% CI 0.97 to -1.24). No association was observed with employment in haematite mining. These results support an association between mesothelioma and employment duration and possibly EMP exposure in taconite mining and processing. The type of EMP was not determined. The potential role of commercial asbestos cannot be entirely ruled out. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Iron and iron-related proteins in asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: We tested the postulate that iron homeostasis is altered among patients diagnosed to have asbestosis. Lung tissue from six individuals diagnosed to have had asbestosis at autopsy was stained for iron, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (FP...

  14. Iron and iron-related proteins in asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: We tested the postulate that iron homeostasis is altered among patients diagnosed to have asbestosis. Lung tissue from six individuals diagnosed to have had asbestosis at autopsy was stained for iron, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (FP...

  15. Interactions between leptin and hypothalamic neuropeptide Y neurons in the control of food intake and energy homeostasis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Bing, C; Al-Barazanji, K; Mossakowaska, D E; Wang, X M; McBay, D L; Neville, W A; Taddayon, M; Pickavance, L; Dryden, S; Thomas, M E; McHale, M T; Gloyer, I S; Wilson, S; Buckingham, R; Arch, J R; Trayhurn, P; Williams, G

    1997-03-01

    Leptin acts on the brain to inhibit feeding, increase thermogenesis, and decrease body weight. Neuropeptide Y (NPY)-ergic neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) that project to the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) and dorsomedial nuclei (DMH) are postulated to control energy balance by stimulating feeding and inhibiting thermogenesis, especially under conditions of energy deficit. We investigated whether leptin's short-term effects on energy balance are mediated by inhibition of the NPY neurons. Recombinant murine leptin (11 microg) injected into the lateral ventricle of fasted adult Wistar rats inhibited food intake by 20-25% between 2 and 6 h after administration, compared with saline-treated controls (P ARC, PVN, and DMH and significantly decreased hypothalamic NPY mRNA levels (0.61 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.78 +/- 0.03 arbitrary units; P 0.1), but plasma leptin levels were significantly higher (4.88 +/- 0.66 vs. 2.85 +/- 0.20 ng/ml; P ARC-PVN projection; reduced NPY release in the PVN may mediate leptin's hypophagic and thermogenic actions. Conversely, NPY-induced obesity results in raised circulating leptin concentrations. Leptin and the NPY-ergic ARC-PVN neurons may interact in a homeostatic loop to regulate body fat mass and energy balance.

  16. New strategies to target iron metabolism for the treatment of beta thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomidou, Paraskevi Rea; Casu, Carla; Rivella, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant elements in the Earth and a fundamental component of enzymes and other proteins that participate in a wide range of biological processes. As the human body has no mechanisms to eliminate the excess of iron, its metabolism needs to be tightly controlled in order to avoid all the sequelae associated with high iron levels. Iron overload is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in beta thalassemia. The master regulator of iron homeostasis, hepcidin, is chronically repressed in this disorder, leading to increased intestinal iron absorption and consequent iron overload. Many groups have focused on obtaining a better understanding of the pathways involved in iron regulation. New molecules have recently been synthesized and used in animal models of dysregulated iron metabolism, demonstrating their ability to target and reduce iron load. Antisense oligonucleotides, as well as lipid nanoparticle-formulated small interfering RNAs and minihepcidins peptides, are novel agents that have already proved to be efficient in modulating iron metabolism in mouse models and are therefore promising candidates for the treatment of patients affected by iron disorders.

  17. Iron Phosphate Coating:A Novel Approach to Controlling Pyrite Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGXIAO; V.P.EVANGELOU

    1997-01-01

    A novel coating technique was develped for controlling pyrite oxidation .The technique involved leaching pyrite particles with a solution containing low concentrations of phosphate and hydrogen peroxide.During the leaching rpocess,the iron released from pyrite by hydrogen proxide was precipitated by phosphate as a ferric phosphate coating .This coating was shown to be able to effectively prevent pyirte from oxidation and it could be established at the expense of only surface portions of pyrite.The emergence of this technique could provide a unique potential route for abating acid mine draingage and reclaiming sulfide-containing degraded mining land.

  18. The role of VipAlbumin® as an immunostimulatory agent for controlling homeostasis and proliferation of lymphoid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djati, Muhammad Sasmito; Rifa'I, Muhaimin

    2016-01-01

    VipAlbumin® is a supplement from snakehead fish (Ophiocephalus striatus) which has high content of albumin that is very important to develop new cells. The aims of this study were to know the effect of VipAlbumin® to cell proliferation, expression level of CD4+CD62L+ T cell, regulatory T cell, and B220+ cell, and immunocompetent cell cycle. Cell isolated from spleen of pathogen free mice were cultured in RPMI 1640 with 10% FBS, 1% Pen/Strep 10×, 2-Mercaptoetanol, anti-CD3 and LPS. The concentrations of VipAlbumin ® used were 0 µg/ml; 0.33 µg/ml; 33.3 µg/ml; and 3333.3 µg/ml. The cell was incubated in CO2 5% incubator 37°C for 3 days for cell cycle and 5 days for proliferation analysis and cell expression. FACS analysis was done to know cell proliferation profile, status of cell, and cell cycle. Concentration 33.3 µg/ml and 3333.3 µg/ml significantly can increase cell proliferation and induce cell enter G2/M phase (p < 0.05) compared to control. VipAlbumin can significantly increase the relative number of CD4+CD62L+ T cell, regulatory T cell, and B220+ cell (p < 0.05) compared to control. This study gives scientific evidence that VipAlbumin can be used as an immunostimulant which accelerates immunocompetent cells growth. PMID:27095920

  19. The retinaldehyde reductase activity of DHRS3 is reciprocally activated by retinol dehydrogenase 10 to control retinoid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark K; Belyaeva, Olga V; Wu, Lizhi; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2014-05-23

    The retinoic acid-inducible dehydrogenase reductase 3 (DHRS3) is thought to function as a retinaldehyde reductase that controls the levels of all-trans-retinaldehyde, the immediate precursor for bioactive all-trans-retinoic acid. However, the weak catalytic activity of DHRS3 and the lack of changes in retinaldehyde conversion to retinol and retinoic acid in the cells overexpressing DHRS3 undermine its role as a physiologically important all-trans-retinaldehyde reductase. This study demonstrates that DHRS3 requires the presence of retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10) to display its full catalytic activity. The RDH10-activated DHRS3 acts as a robust high affinity all-trans-retinaldehyde-specific reductase that effectively converts retinaldehyde back to retinol, decreasing the rate of retinoic acid biosynthesis. In turn, the retinol dehydrogenase activity of RDH10 is reciprocally activated by DHRS3. At E13.5, DHRS3-null embryos have ∼4-fold lower levels of retinol and retinyl esters, but only slightly elevated levels of retinoic acid. The membrane-associated retinaldehyde reductase and retinol dehydrogenase activities are decreased by ∼4- and ∼2-fold, respectively, in Dhrs3(-/-) embryos, and Dhrs3(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit reduced metabolism of both retinaldehyde and retinol. Neither RDH10 nor DHRS3 has to be itself catalytically active to activate each other. The transcripts encoding DHRS3 and RDH10 are co-localized at least in some tissues during development. The mutually activating interaction between the two related proteins may represent a highly sensitive and conserved mechanism for precise control over the rate of retinoic acid biosynthesis.

  20. Role of α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors in the lateral parabrachial nucleus in the control of body fluid homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, C.A.F.; Andrade-Franzé, G.M.F.; De Paula, P.M.; De Luca, L.A. Jr.; Menani, J.V. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Patologia, Faculdade de Odontologia, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-10

    Central α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors and the pontine lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) are involved in the control of sodium and water intake. Bilateral injections of moxonidine (α{sub 2}-adrenergic/imidazoline receptor agonist) or noradrenaline into the LPBN strongly increases 0.3 M NaCl intake induced by a combined treatment of furosemide plus captopril. Injection of moxonidine into the LPBN also increases hypertonic NaCl and water intake and reduces oxytocin secretion, urinary sodium, and water excreted by cell-dehydrated rats, causing a positive sodium and water balance, which suggests that moxonidine injected into the LPBN deactivates mechanisms that restrain body fluid volume expansion. Pretreatment with specific α{sub 2}-adrenoceptor antagonists injected into the LPBN abolishes the behavioral and renal effects of moxonidine or noradrenaline injected into the same area, suggesting that these effects depend on activation of LPBN α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors. In fluid-depleted rats, the palatability of sodium is reduced by ingestion of hypertonic NaCl, limiting intake. However, in rats treated with moxonidine injected into the LPBN, the NaCl palatability remains high, even after ingestion of significant amounts of 0.3 M NaCl. The changes in behavioral and renal responses produced by activation of α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors in the LPBN are probably a consequence of reduction of oxytocin secretion and blockade of inhibitory signals that affect sodium palatability. In this review, a model is proposed to show how activation of α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors in the LPBN may affect palatability and, consequently, ingestion of sodium as well as renal sodium excretion.

  1. HPV16-associated tumors control myeloid cell homeostasis in lymphoid organs, generating a suppressor environment for T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Simone Cardozo; Rossetti, Renata Ariza Marques; Bolpetti, Aline; Boccardo, Enrique; Souza, Patricia Savio de Araujo; Lepique, Ana Paula

    2014-10-01

    Tumors are complex structures containing different types of cells and molecules. The importance of the tumor microenvironment in tumor progression, growth, and maintenance is well-established. However, tumor effects are not restricted to the tumor microenvironment. Molecules secreted by, as well as cells that migrate from tumors, may circulate and reach other tissues. This may cause a series of systemic effects, including modulation of immune responses, and in some cases, leukocytosis and metastasis promotion. Leukocytosis has been described as a poor prognostic factor in patients with cervical cancer. The main etiological factor for cervical cancer development is persistent infection with high oncogenic risk HPV. Our laboratory has been exploring the effects of high oncogenic risk, HPV-associated tumors on lymphoid organs of the host. In the present study, we observed an increase in myeloid cell proliferation and alteration in cell signaling in APCs in the spleen of tumor-bearing mice. In parallel, we characterized the cytokines secreted in the inflammatory and tumor cell compartments in the tumor microenvironment and in the spleen of tumor-bearing mice. We show evidence of constitutive activation of the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway in the tumor, including TAMs, and in APCs in the spleen. We also observed that IL-10 is a central molecule in the tolerance toward tumor antigens through control of NF-κB activation, costimulatory molecule expression, and T cell proliferation. These systemic effects over myeloid cells are robust and likely an important problem to be addressed when considering strategies to improve anti-tumor T cell responses.

  2. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadini, Luca; Pesaresi, Paolo; Kleine, Tatjana; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard; Leister, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes.

  3. Interface control by homoepitaxial growth in pulsed laser deposited iron chalcogenide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molatta, Sebastian; Haindl, Silvia; Trommler, Sascha; Schulze, Michael; Wurmehl, Sabine; Hühne, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    Thin film growth of iron chalcogenides by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is still a delicate issue in terms of simultaneous control of stoichiometry, texture, substrate/film interface properties, and superconducting properties. The high volatility of the constituents sharply limits optimal deposition temperatures to a narrow window and mainly challenges reproducibility for vacuum based methods. In this work we demonstrate the beneficial introduction of a semiconducting FeSe1-xTex seed layer for subsequent homoepitaxial growth of superconducting FeSe1-xTex thin film on MgO substrates. MgO is one of the most favorable substrates used in superconducting thin film applications, but the controlled growth of iron chalcogenide thin films on MgO has not yet been optimized and is the least understood. The large mismatch between the lattice constants of MgO and FeSe1-xTex of about 11% results in thin films with a mixed texture, that prevents further accurate investigations of a correlation between structural and electrical properties of FeSe1-xTex. Here we present an effective way to significantly improve epitaxial growth of superconducting FeSe1-xTex thin films with reproducible high critical temperatures (≥17 K) at reduced deposition temperatures (200 °C-320 °C) on MgO using PLD. This offers a broad scope of various applications.

  4. Ameliorated Austenite Carbon Content Control in Austempered Ductile Irons by Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Yun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron has emerged as a notable material in several engineering fields, including marine applications. The initial austenite carbon content after austenization transform but before austempering process for generating bainite matrix proved critical in controlling the resulted microstructure and thus mechanical properties. In this paper, support vector regression is employed in order to establish a relationship between the initial carbon concentration in the austenite with austenization temperature and alloy contents, thereby exercising improved control in the mechanical properties of the austempered ductile irons. Particularly, the paper emphasizes a methodology tailored to deal with a limited amount of available data with intrinsically contracted and skewed distribution. The collected information from a variety of data sources presents another challenge of highly uncertain variance. The authors present a hybrid model consisting of a procedure of a histogram equalizer and a procedure of a support-vector-machine (SVM- based regression to gain a more robust relationship to respond to the challenges. The results show greatly improved accuracy of the proposed model in comparison to two former established methodologies. The sum squared error of the present model is less than one fifth of that of the two previous models.

  5. Efficacy of Intravenous Iron Sucrose in Hemodialysis Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS): A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yinghui; Wu, Jinglin; Jia, Qiang

    2017-03-12

    BACKGROUND Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common disorder in hemodialysis (HD) patients that causes sleep disturbances and diminished quality of life. Because iron deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of RLS, we sought to investigate the effects of intravenous (IV) iron sucrose on symptoms of RLS in HD patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study was a randomized, placebo-controlled study of 1000 mg iron sucrose versus normal saline as placebo. Patients were evaluated at baseline and 2 weeks after the last injection. The severity of RLS was assessed using the International RLS Study Group rating scale (IRLS). Blood samples were taken to measure iron parameters reflecting the iron status, including serum ferritin (SF) concentration, percentage transferrin saturation (TSAT%) and hemoglobin (Hb), and other biochemical parameters as safety assessments, including creatinine (Cr), urea, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and the index of urea clearance (Kt/V). Adverse events were monitored in all subjects during the period of infusion. RESULTS After 2 weeks, IRLS scores decreased more in the IV-iron group (-7.38±2.03) than in the placebo group (-0.81±2.61) (P=0.000). Serum ferritin, TSAT, and hemoglobin increased more in the IV-iron group (227.63±77.64 µg/L; 26.06±7.77%; 13.98±3.62g/L, respectively) than in the placebo group (SF, p=0.000; TSAT, p=0.000; Hb, p=0.000, respectively). There were no significant differences between IV-iron and placebo groups in Cr, urea, iPTH, and Kt/V. No adverse effects were observed in the study. CONCLUSIONS IV iron sucrose is a safe and effective treatment for reducing RLS symptoms in HD patients over the short-term.

  6. The Iron-Dependent Regulator Fur Controls Pheromone Signaling Systems and Luminescence in the Squid Symbiont Vibrio fischeri ES114

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septer, Alecia N.; Lyell, Noreen L.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria often use pheromones to coordinate group behaviors in specific environments. While high cell density is required for pheromones to achieve stimulatory levels, environmental cues can also influence pheromone accumulation and signaling. For the squid symbiont Vibrio fischeri ES114, bioluminescence requires pheromone-mediated regulation, and this signaling is induced in the host to a greater extent than in culture, even at an equivalent cell density. Our goal is to better understand this environment-specific control over pheromone signaling and bioluminescence. Previous work with V. fischeri MJ1 showed that iron limitation induces luminescence, and we recently found that ES114 encounters a low-iron environment in its host. Here we show that ES114 induces luminescence at lower cell density and achieves brighter luminescence in low-iron media. This iron-dependent effect on luminescence required ferric uptake regulator (Fur), which we propose influences two pheromone signaling master regulators, LitR and LuxR. Genetic and bioinformatic analyses suggested that under low-iron conditions, Fur-mediated repression of litR is relieved, enabling more LitR to perform its established role as an activator of luxR. Interestingly, Fur may similarly control the LitR homolog SmcR of Vibrio vulnificus. These results reveal an intriguing regulatory link between low-iron conditions, which are often encountered in host tissues, and pheromone-dependent master regulators. PMID:23315731

  7. Trace element status and zinc homeostasis differ in breast and formula-fed piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miousse, Isabelle R; Mason, Andrew Z; Sharma, Neha; Blackburn, Michael L; Badger, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Differences in trace element composition and bioavailability between breast milk and infant formulas may affect metal homeostasis in neonates. However, there is a paucity of controlled studies in this area. Here, piglets were fed soy infant formula (soy), cow’s milk formula (milk), or were allowed to suckle from the sow from PND2 to PND21. Serum iron concentrations were higher in formula-fed compared to breastfed piglets (P supplementation, allows strong causal inference that significant differences in serum zinc after cow’s milk formula compared to soy formula consumption result in compensatory changes in expression of zinc transporters, binding proteins, and zinc-regulated genes. PMID:25179632

  8. Pressure-controlled injection of guar gum stabilized microscale zerovalent iron for groundwater remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, M; Gastone, F; Tosco, T; Sethi, R; Velimirovic, M; Gemoets, J; Muyshondt, R; Sapion, H; Klaas, N; Bastiaens, L

    2015-10-01

    The paper reports a pilot injection test of microsized zerovalent iron (mZVI) dispersed in a guar gum shear thinning solution. The test was performed in the framework of the EU research project AQUAREHAB in a site in Belgium contaminated by chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). The field application was aimed to overcome those critical aspects which hinder mZVI field injection, mainly due to the colloidal instability of ZVI-based suspensions. The iron slurry properties (iron particles size and concentration, polymeric stabilizer type and concentration, slurry viscosity) were designed in the laboratory based on several tests (reactivity tests towards contaminants, sedimentation tests and rheological measurements). The particles were delivered into the aquifer through an injection well specifically designed for controlled-pressure delivery (approximately 10 bars). The well characteristics and the critical pressure of the aquifer (i.e. the injection pressure above which fracturing occurs) were assessed via two innovative injection step rate tests, one performed with water and the other one with guar gum. Based on laboratory and field preliminary tests, a flow regime at the threshold between permeation and preferential flow was selected for mZVI delivery, as a compromise between the desired homogeneous distribution of the mZVI around the injection point (ensured by permeation flow) and the fast and effective injection of the slurry (guaranteed by high discharge rates and injection pressure, resulting in the generation of preferential flow paths). A monitoring setup was designed and installed for the real-time monitoring of relevant parameters during injection, and for a fast determination of the spatial mZVI distribution after injection via non-invasive magnetic susceptibility measurements.

  9. Why Homeodynamics, Not Homeostasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lloyd

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ideas of homeostasis derive from the concept of the organism as an open system. These ideas can be traced back to Heraclitus. Hopkins, Bernard, Hill, Cannon, Weiner and von Bertalanffy developed further the mechanistic basis of turnover of biological components, and Schoenheimer and Rittenberg were pioneers of experimental approaches to the problems of measuring pool sizes and dynamic fluxes. From the second half of the twentieth century, a biophysical theory mainly founded on self-organisation and Dynamic Systems Theory allowed us to approach the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the organised complexity that characterises living systems. This combination of theoretical framework and more refined experimental techniques revealed that feedback control of steady states is a mode of operation that, although providing stability, is only one of many modes and may be the exception rather than the rule. The concept of homeodynamics that we introduce here offers a radically new and all-embracing concept that departs from the classical homeostatic idea that emphasises the stability of the internal milieu toward perturbation. Indeed, biological systems are homeody- namic because of their ability to dynamically self-organise at bifurcation points of their behaviour where they lose stability. Consequently, they exhibit diverse behaviour; in addition to monotonic stationary states, living systems display complex behaviour with all its emergent characteristics, i.e., bistable switches, thresholds, waves, gradients, mutual entrainment, and periodic as well as chaotic behaviour, as evidenced in cellular phenomena such as dynamic (supramolecular organisation and flux coordination. These processes may proceed on different spatial scales, as well as across time scales, from the very rapid processes within and between molecules in membranes to the slow time scales of evolutionary change. It is dynamic organisation under homeodynamic conditions that make

  10. Metformin regulates glycemic homeostasis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an NO donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Sergeevich Kuznetsov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the influence of metformin on nitric oxide bioavailability in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM regarding glycemic homeostasis, and to investigate a correlation between metformin dosage and NO levels in vivo.Materials and Methods. Two groups – primary and control – were assembled for the clinical section of this study. Patients with newly diagnosed T2DM on metformin therapy were included to the primary group, while drug-naïve T2DM patients were enrolled as control subjects. Glycemic parameters and NO bioavailability was tested in both groups prior to and after the follow-up period. Experimental section was dedicated to the elucidation of potential dose-dependent effects of metformin on NO bioavailability. Mice were intraperitoneally infused with metformin at 0.5; 1.1; 5.6 mg per subject. Tissue detection of NO was performed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC iron complexes to form mononitrosyl iron compounds (MIC with paramagnetic properties. Control rodents were intraperitoneally infused with metformin without spin trapping.Results. We found nitrite and methaemoglobin (a marker for NO bioavailability to increase in parallel along with glycemic compensation in the primary but not control group. In vivo rodent models showed linear correlation between accumulation of DETC/MIC and dose of metformin, as well as formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes, known as endogenous NO transporters.Conclusion. Our data suggests that metformin benefits glycemic homeostasis in T2DM as an NO donor via formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes.

  11. Phosphate homeostasis and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghat, P; Sodi, R; Swaminathan, R

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies of inherited disorders of phosphate metabolism have shed new light on the understanding of phosphate metabolism. Phosphate has important functions in the body and several mechanisms have evolved to regulate phosphate balance including vitamin D, parathyroid hormone and phosphatonins such as fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23). Disorders of phosphate homeostasis leading to hypo- and hyperphosphataemia are common and have clinical and biochemical consequences. Notably, recent studies have linked hyperphosphataemia with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This review outlines the recent advances in the understanding of phosphate homeostasis and describes the causes, investigation and management of hypo- and hyperphosphataemia.

  12. The iron stimulon and fur regulon of Geobacter sulfurreducens and their role in energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embree, Mallory; Qiu, Yu; Shieu, Wendy; Nagarajan, Harish; O'Neil, Regina; Lovley, Derek; Zengler, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    Iron plays a critical role in the physiology of Geobacter species. It serves as both an essential component for proteins and cofactors and an electron acceptor during anaerobic respiration. Here, we investigated the iron stimulon and ferric uptake regulator (Fur) regulon of Geobacter sulfurreducens to examine the coordination between uptake of Fe(II) and the reduction of Fe(III) at the transcriptional level. Gene expression studies across a variety of different iron concentrations in both the wild type and a Δfur mutant strain were used to determine the iron stimulon. The stimulon consists of a broad range of gene products, ranging from iron-utilizing to central metabolism and iron reduction proteins. Integration of gene expression and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data sets assisted in the identification of the Fur transcriptional regulatory network and Fur's role as a regulator of the iron stimulon. Additional physiological and transcriptional analyses of G. sulfurreducens grown with various Fe(II) concentrations revealed the depth of Fur's involvement in energy metabolism and the existence of redundancy within the iron-regulatory network represented by IdeR, an alternative iron transcriptional regulator. These characteristics enable G. sulfurreducens to thrive in environments with fluctuating iron concentrations by providing it with a robust mechanism to maintain tight and deliberate control over intracellular iron homeostasis.

  13. Mineral composition control on inter-mineral iron isotopic fractionation in granitoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongjie; He, Yongsheng; Bao, Leier; Zhu, Chuanwei; Li, Shuguang

    2017-02-01

    This study reports elemental and iron isotopic compositions of feldspar and its coexisting minerals from four Dabie I-type granitoids to evaluate the factors that control inter-mineral Fe isotopic fractionation in granitoids. The order of heavy iron isotope enrichment is feldspar > pyrite > magnetite > biotite ≈ hornblende. Feldspar has heavier iron isotopic compositions than its co-existing magnetite (Δ56Feplagioclase-magnetite = +0.376‰ to +1.084‰, Δ56Fealkali-feldspar-magnetite = +0.516‰ to +0.846‰), which can be attributed to its high Fe3+/Fetot ratio and low coordination number (tetrahedrally-coordinated) of Fe3+. Δ56Femagnetite-biotite of coexisting magnetite and biotite ranges from 0.090‰ to 0.246‰. Based on homogeneous major and iron isotopic compositions of mineral replicates, the inter-mineral fractionation in this study should reflect equilibrium fractionation. The large variations of inter-mineral fractionation among feldspar, magnetite and biotite cannot be simply explained by temperature variation, but strongly depend on mineral compositions. The Δ56Feplagioclase-magnetite and Δ56Fealkali-feldspar-magnetite are positively correlated with albite mode in plagioclase and orthoclase mode in alkali-feldspar, respectively. This could be explained by different Fe-O bond strength in feldspar due to different Fe3+/∑Fe or different crystal parameters. The Δ56Femagnetite-biotite increases with decreasing Fe3+/∑Febiotite and increasing mole (Na + K)/Mgbiotite, indicating a decrease of β factor in low Fe3+/∑Fe and high (Na + K)/Mg biotite. High-silica leucosomes from Dabie migmatites with a feldspar accumulation petrogenesis have higher δ56Fe values (δ56Fe = 0.42-0.567‰) than leucosome that represents pristine partial melt (δ56Fe = 0.117 ± 0.016‰), indicating that accumulation of feldspar could account for high δ56Fe values of these rocks. High δ56Fe values are also predicted for other igneous rocks that are mainly composed of

  14. Potential for iron oxides to control metal releases in CO2 sequestration scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, P.M.; Roy, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    configuration to match measured geochemical changes due to CO2 injection, we modeled potential changes in groundwater chemistry at the Illinois Basin - Decatur Project (IBDP) site in Decatur, Illinois, USA. At the IBDP, the MGSC will inject 1 million tonnes of CO2 over the course of three years at a depth of about 2 km below the surface into the Mt. Simon Formation. Sections of the Mt. Simon Formation contain up to 10 percent iron oxide, and therefore surface complexes on iron oxides should play a major role in controlling brine chemistry. The batch simulation of this system showed a significant decrease in pH after the injection of CO2 with corresponding changes in brine chemistry resulting from both mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions and changes in the chemistry on iron oxide surfaces. To ensure the safety of shallow drinking water sources, there are several shallow monitoring wells at the IBDP that the MGSC samples regularly to determine baseline chemical concentrations. Knowing what geochemical parameters are most sensitive to CO2 disturbances allows us to focus monitoring efforts. Modeling a major influx of CO2 into the shallow groundwater allowed us to determine that were an introduction of CO2 to occur, the only immediate effect will be dolomite dissolution and calcite precipitation. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Space weathering simulations through controlled growth of iron nanoparticles on olivine

    CERN Document Server

    Kohout, T; Filip, J; Britt, D; Bradley, T; Tuček, J; Skála, R; Kletetschka, G; Kašlík, J; Malina, O; Šišková, K; Zbořil, R

    2014-01-01

    Airless planetary bodies are directly exposed to space weathering. The main spectral effects of space weathering are darkening, reduction in intensity of silicate mineral absorption bands, and an increase in the spectral slope towards longer wavelengths (reddening). Production of nanophase metallic iron (npFe$^{0}$) during space weathering plays major role in these spectral changes. A laboratory procedure for the controlled production of npFe$^{0}$ in silicate mineral powders has been developed. The method is based on a two-step thermal treatment of low-iron olivine, first in ambient air and then in hydrogen atmosphere. Through this process, a series of olivine powder samples was prepared with varying amounts of npFe$^{0}$ in the 7-20 nm size range. A logarithmic trend is observed between amount of npFe$^{0}$ and darkening, reduction of 1 um olivine absorption band, reddening, and 1 um band width. Olivine with a population of physically larger npFe$^{0}$ particles follows spectral trends similar to other samp...

  16. Control of Fur synthesis by the non-coding RNA RyhB and iron-responsive decoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecerek, Branislav; Moll, Isabella; Bläsi, Udo

    2007-02-21

    The Fe2+-dependent Fur protein serves as a negative regulator of iron uptake in bacteria. As only metallo-Fur acts as an autogeneous repressor, Fe2+scarcity would direct fur expression when continued supply is not obviously required. We show that in Escherichia coli post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms ensure that Fur synthesis remains steady in iron limitation. Our studies revealed that fur translation is coupled to that of an upstream open reading frame (uof), translation of which is downregulated by the non-coding RNA (ncRNA) RyhB. As RyhB transcription is negatively controlled by metallo-Fur, iron depletion creates a negative feedback loop. RyhB-mediated regulation of uof-fur provides the first example for indirect translational regulation by a trans-encoded ncRNA. In addition, we present evidence for an iron-responsive decoding mechanism of the uof-fur entity. It could serve as a backup mechanism of the RyhB circuitry, and represents the first link between iron availability and synthesis of an iron-containing protein.

  17. Iron-binding E3 ligase mediates iron response in plants by targeting basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selote, Devarshi; Samira, Rozalynne; Matthiadis, Anna; Gillikin, Jeffrey W; Long, Terri A

    2015-01-01

    Iron uptake and metabolism are tightly regulated in both plants and animals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), BRUTUS (BTS), which contains three hemerythrin (HHE) domains and a Really Interesting New Gene (RING) domain, interacts with basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that are capable of forming heterodimers with POPEYE (PYE), a positive regulator of the iron deficiency response. BTS has been shown to have E3 ligase capacity and to play a role in root growth, rhizosphere acidification, and iron reductase activity in response to iron deprivation. To further characterize the function of this protein, we examined the expression pattern of recombinant ProBTS::β-GLUCURONIDASE and found that it is expressed in developing embryos and other reproductive tissues, corresponding with its apparent role in reproductive growth and development. Our findings also indicate that the interactions between BTS and PYE-like (PYEL) basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors occur within the nucleus and are dependent on the presence of the RING domain. We provide evidence that BTS facilitates 26S proteasome-mediated degradation of PYEL proteins in the absence of iron. We also determined that, upon binding iron at the HHE domains, BTS is destabilized and that this destabilization relies on specific residues within the HHE domains. This study reveals an important and unique mechanism for plant iron homeostasis whereby an E3 ubiquitin ligase may posttranslationally control components of the transcriptional regulatory network involved in the iron deficiency response.

  18. Functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for controlling the movement of immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ethan E; Pai, Alex; Weng, Yiming; Suresh, Anil K; Van Haute, Desiree; Pailevanian, Torkom; Alizadeh, Darya; Hajimiri, Ali; Badie, Behnam; Berlin, Jacob M

    2015-05-07

    Immunotherapy is currently being investigated for the treatment of many diseases, including cancer. The ability to control the location of immune cells during or following activation would represent a powerful new technique for this field. Targeted magnetic delivery is emerging as a technique for controlling cell movement and localization. Here we show that this technique can be extended to microglia, the primary phagocytic immune cells in the central nervous system. The magnetized microglia were generated by loading the cells with iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with CpG oligonucleotides, serving as a proof of principle that nanoparticles can be used to both deliver an immunostimulatory cargo to cells and to control the movement of the cells. The nanoparticle-oligonucleotide conjugates are efficiently internalized, non-toxic, and immunostimulatory. We demonstrate that the in vitro migration of the adherent, loaded microglia can be controlled by an external magnetic field and that magnetically-induced migration is non-cytotoxic. In order to capture video of this magnetically-induced migration of loaded cells, a novel 3D-printed "cell box" was designed to facilitate our imaging application. Analysis of cell movement velocities clearly demonstrate increased cell velocities toward the magnet. These studies represent the initial step towards our final goal of using nanoparticles to both activate immune cells and to control their trafficking within the diseased brain.

  19. Serum Hepcidin Levels, Iron Dyshomeostasis and Cognitive Loss in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Zohara; Hu, Zihua; Sternberg, Daniel; Waseh, Shayan; Quinn, Joseph F.; Wild, Katharine; Jeffrey, Kaye; Zhao, Lin; Garrick, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study examined the status of the master iron regulatory peptide, hepcidin, and peripheral related iron parameters in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment patients, and evaluated the relationship between iron dyshomeostasis and amyloid-beta (Aβ), cognitive assessment tests, neuroimaging and clinical data. Frozen serum samples from the Oregon Tissue Bank were used to measure serum levels of hepcidin, ferritin, Aβ40, Aβ42 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum transferrin levels were determined indirectly as total iron binding capacity, serum iron was measured and the percent saturation of transferrin calculated. The study variables were correlated with the patients’ existing cognitive assessment tests, neuroimaging, and clinical data. Hepcidin, and iron-related proteins tended to be higher in AD patients than controls, reaching statistical significance for ferritin, whereas Aβ40, Aβ42 serum levels tended to be lower. Patients with pure AD had three times higher serum hepcidin levels than controls; gender differences in hepcidin and iron-related proteins were observed. Patient stratification based on clinical dementia rating-sum of boxes revealed significantly higher levels of iron and iron-related proteins in AD patients in the upper 50% as compared to controls, suggesting that iron dyshomeostasis worsens as cognitive impairment increases. Unlike Aβ peptides, iron and iron-related proteins showed significant association with cognitive assessment tests, neuroimaging, and clinical data. Hepcidin and iron-related proteins comprise a group of serum biomarkers that relate to AD diagnosis and AD disease progression. Future studies should determine whether strategies targeted to diminishing hepcidin synthesis/secretion and improving iron homeostasis could have a beneficial impact on AD progression. PMID:28400987

  20. Shape and size controlled synthesis of uniform iron oxide nanocrystals through new non-hydrolytic routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlu; Lee, Seung Soo; Wu, Jiewei; Hinton, Carl H.; Fortner, John D.

    2016-08-01

    New, non-hydrolytic routes to synthesize highly crystalline iron oxide nanocrystals (8-40 nm, magnetite) are described in this report whereby particle size and morphology were precisely controlled through reactant (precursor, e.g. (FeO(OH)) ratios, co-surfactant and organic additive, and/or reaction time. Particle size, with high monodispersivity (oxide nanocrystals can be reproducibly synthesized through simple one-pot thermal decomposition methods. High resolution transmission electron microscope, x-ray diffraction, and superconducting quantum interference device were used to characterize the size, structure and magnetic properties of the resulting nanocrystals. For aqueous applications, materials synthesized/purified in organic solvents are broadly water dispersible through a variety of phase (aqueous) transfer method(s).

  1. The folly of effort: ironic effects in the mental control of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, J D; Gaskovski, P; Bowers, K S

    1998-01-01

    During exposure to pain, participants who were engaged in hypnotic analgesia or stress inoculation provided pain reports every 5 s and 45 s, respectively. It was found that the frequency of pain reporting had a significant effect on participants' level of experienced pain. This finding is discussed in the context of important methodological implications for laboratory investigations of analgesia. Furthermore, preliminary evidence was obtained suggesting that high hypnotizables in hypnotic analgesia remained relatively undisrupted by frequent pain reporting. Based on Wegner's (1994) ironic process theory, it is argued that this pattern of results is inconsistent with theories of hypnosis that propose that hypnotized individuals intentionally engender responses while remaining unaware of their sustained, deliberate effort. The obtained pattern of results was, however, predicted from the dissociated control model of hypnosis (Bowers, 1990, 1992).

  2. Design and control of chemical compositions for high-performance austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Wenbang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effects of chemical compositions of austempered ductile iron (ADI on casting quality, heat treatment process parameters and mechanical properties of final products. Through experiment and production practice, the impacts of carbon equivalent on ADI and its mechanical properties have been studied. Proper content ranges for carbon and silicon have been obtained to avoid ADI casting shrinkage and graphite floatation, as well as to achieve the optimal mechanical properties. According to the impact of silicon content on austenite phase transformation, the existing form of carbon in ADI has been analyzed, and also the formula and diagram showing the relationship between austenitizing temperature and carbon content in austenite have been deduced. The chemical composition range for high performance ADI and its control points have been recommended, to serve as a reference for production process.

  3. Valence Control of Ce Ions in Cerium-substituted Yttrium Iron Garnet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Fengbing; LI Qiang; ZHONG Zhifeng

    2005-01-01

    Cerium-substituted yttrium iron garnet(CexY3-xFe5O12, Ce∶YIG) was prepared via coprecipitation. The structure, morphology, valence state and constituent of Ce ions were investigated respectively. X-ray powder diffraction(XRD) analysis shows that Ce∶YIG was of single cubic YIG phase. The result of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS) indicates the Ce ions in Ce∶YIG were in the state of trivalence. Scanning electron microscope(SEM) demonstrates the conglobation of Ce∶YIG particles about 0.2μm scale.The magnetic properties were studied by a vibrating sample magnetometer(VSM) and the result exhibits that substitution of Ce3+ changes the magnetic parameters of YIG. The effects of doping content of Ce ions and synthesis temperature on valence control were discussed in detail.

  4. Zinc homeostasis and neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadeta eSzewczyk

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is an essential trace element, whose importance to the function of the central nervous system (CNS is increasingly being appreciated. Alterations in zinc dyshomeostasis has been suggested as a key factor in the development of several neuropsychiatric disorders. In the CNS, zinc occurs in two forms: the first being tightly bound to proteins and, secondly, the free, cytoplasmic or extracellular form found in presynaptic vesicles. Under normal conditions, zinc released from the synaptic vesicles modulates both ionotropic and metabotropic post-synaptic receptors. While under clinical conditions such as traumatic brain injury, stroke or epilepsy, the excess influx of zinc into neurons has been found to result in neurotoxicity and damage to postsynaptic neurons. On the other hand, a growing body of evidence suggests that a deficiency, rather than an excess, of zinc leads to an increased risk for the development of neurological disorders. Indeed, zinc deficiency has been shown to affect neurogenesis and increase neuronal apoptosis, which can lead to learning and memory deficits. Altered zinc homeostasis is also suggested as a risk factor for depression, Alzheimer’s disease, aging and other neurodegenerative disorders. Under normal CNS physiology, homeostatic controls are put in place to avoid the accumulation of excess zinc or its deficiency. This cellular zinc homeostasis results from the actions of a coordinated regulation effected by different proteins involved in the uptake, excretion and intracellular storage/trafficking of zinc. These proteins include membranous transporters (ZnT and Zip and metallothioneins (MT which control intracellular zinc levels. Interestingly, alterations in ZnT and MT have been recently reported in both aging and Alzheimer’s disease. This paper provides an overview of both clinical and experimental evidence that implicates a dysfunction in zinc homeostasis in the pathophysiology of depression, Alzheimer

  5. ALUMINUM STIMULATES UPTAKE OF NON-TRANSFERRIN BOUND IRON AND TRANSFERRIN BOUND IRON IN HUMAN GLIAL CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Joseph P Bressler

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer’s Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer’s disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. ...

  6. Shape-control and characterization of iron nanocrystals prepared via a one-step solvothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Junmei, E-mail: jmfan@home.ipe.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Multi-phase Complex System, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao, Yuebin [Key Laboratory for Advanced Technology in Environmental Protection of Jiangsu Province, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Yancheng 224051 (China); Yuan, Fangli [State Key Laboratory of Multi-phase Complex System, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, iron nanocubes, nanorods and nanowires are successfully synthesized by one-step reduction approach in a solvothermal environment. It is analyzed that the iron nanocubes, nanorods and nanowires belong to the pure body-centered cubic structure of α-Fe. Effects of additive sort and the amount of Anionic Gemini surfactant 12-4-12 on the morphology evolution of Fe are discussed based on SEM and TEM images. The possible formation mechanisms of iron nanocubes, nanorods and nanowires are proposed. The Anionic Gemini surfactant 12-4-12 regarded as template plays an important role in the formation of iron nanocrystals. The microwave electromagnetic (EM) (80 wt% Fe) and calculated microwave-absorbing (0.5 mm thickness) properties in 2–18 GHz of the iron nanocubes, nanorods and nanowires are studied systematically. Results show that iron nanowires are superior to nanorods and nanocubes, which indicates the potential to be a super-thin microwave absorber. - Highlights: • Iron nanocubes, nanorods and nanowires were synthesized by one-step reduction. • The Anionic Gemini played a vital role in the formation of iron nanocrystals. • The microwave-absorbing properties in 2–18 GHz of iron nanowires were tiptop. • Iron nanowires have the potential to be a super-thin microwave absorber.

  7. Iron and a mixture of DHA and EPA supplementation, alone and in combination, affect bioactive lipid signalling and morbidity of iron deficient South African school children in a two-by-two randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, L; Baumgartner, J; Zandberg, L; Calder, P C; Smuts, C M

    2016-02-01

    We recently reported that iron supplementation increased respiratory morbidity in iron deficient South African children. This increase, however, was attenuated when iron was provided in combination with a mixture of DHA/EPA. To explore potential underlying mechanisms, we examined the effects of iron and DHA/EPA, alone and in combination, on plasma lipid-derived immune modulator concentrations and related gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). DHA/EPA decreased inflammatory 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and tended to increase anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA), while iron decreased 17-HDHA. However, in combination with iron, the anti-inflammatory effect of DHA/EPA was maintained. These biochemical changes may explain the prevention of iron-induced respiratory morbidity that we observed when iron was supplemented in combination with DHA/EPA during the 8.5 month randomised controlled trial and might lead to a safer approach of delivering iron supplementation. The study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01092377.

  8. Shape-control and characterization of iron nanocrystals prepared via a one-step solvothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Junmei; Cao, Yuebin; Yuan, Fangli

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, iron nanocubes, nanorods and nanowires are successfully synthesized by one-step reduction approach in a solvothermal environment. It is analyzed that the iron nanocubes, nanorods and nanowires belong to the pure body-centered cubic structure of α-Fe. Effects of additive sort and the amount of Anionic Gemini surfactant 12-4-12 on the morphology evolution of Fe are discussed based on SEM and TEM images. The possible formation mechanisms of iron nanocubes, nanorods and nanowires are proposed. The Anionic Gemini surfactant 12-4-12 regarded as template plays an important role in the formation of iron nanocrystals. The microwave electromagnetic (EM) (80 wt% Fe) and calculated microwave-absorbing (0.5 mm thickness) properties in 2-18 GHz of the iron nanocubes, nanorods and nanowires are studied systematically. Results show that iron nanowires are superior to nanorods and nanocubes, which indicates the potential to be a super-thin microwave absorber.

  9. Size-controlled synthesis of hierarchical nanoporous iron based fluorides and their high performances in rechargeable lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Wen, Zhao-yin; Jin, Jun; Wu, Xiang-wei; Rui, Kun

    2014-06-21

    High performance nanostructured iron fluorides with controllable sizes were successfully synthesized using oleylamine as a size tuning agent for the first time. They exhibited excellent cathode performances with large retensive capacities exceeding 200 mA h g(-1) after 50 cycles and outstanding rate performances of nearly 100 mA h g(-1) even at 10 C.

  10. Effects of thermal treatment on mineralogy and heavy metal behavior in iron oxide stabilized air pollution control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard; Bender-Koch, C.; Starckpoole, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    Stabilization of air pollution control residues by coprecipitation with ferrous iron and subsequent thermal treatment (at 600 and 900 °C) has been examined as a means to reduce heavy metal leaching and to improve product stability. Changes in mineralogy and metal binding were analyzed using various...

  11. TSLP and Immune Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shino Hanabuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In an immune system, dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs as well as powerful sensors of danger signals. When DCs receive signals from infection and tissue stress, they immediately activate and instruct the initiation of appropriate immune responses to T cells. However, it has remained unclear how the tissue microenvironment in a steady state shapes the function of DCs. Recent many works on thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, an epithelial cell-derived cytokine that has the strong ability to activate DCs, provide evidence that TSLP mediates crosstalk between epithelial cells and DCs, involving in DC-mediated immune homeostasis. Here, we review recent progress made on how TSLP expressed within the thymus and peripheral lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues regulates DC-mediated T-cell development in the thymus and T-cell homeostasis in the periphery.

  12. Iron Fortification Strategies for the Control of Childhood Anemia in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Lamounier, Joel Alves; Capanema, Flávio Diniz; Rocha,Daniela da Silva; Oliveira, Jose Eduardo Dutra de

    2010-01-01

    p. 448-451 This article presents data on the fortification of foods, necessary as an important public health approach for the success in reducing anemia. The use of food vehicles, iron salts and their costs, as well as recent work on iron fortification of foods in Brazil are reviewed. Recent research serves as a cornerstone for countries that attempt to implement permanent, long-lasting iron fortification programs aimed at the prevention of anemia considering cultural habits, type of ir...

  13. Iron deficiency generates secondary thrombocytosis and platelet activation in IBD: the randomized, controlled thromboVIT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie; Schmid, Werner; Howaldt, Stefanie; Stein, Jürgen; Mickisch, Oliver; Waldhör, Thomas; Evstatiev, Rayko; Kamali, Houman; Volf, Ivo; Gasche, Christoph

    2013-07-01

    Secondary thrombocytosis is a common clinical feature. In patients with cancer, it is a risk factor for venous thromboembolic events. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), thrombocytosis is so far considered a marker of active disease and may contribute to the increased thromboembolic risk in this population. Observed effects of iron therapy on normalization of platelet counts led us to hypothesize that iron itself may regulate megakaryopoiesis. Here, we want to test the effect of iron replacement on platelet count and activity in IBD-associated thrombocytosis. We performed a randomized, single-blinded placebo-controlled trial testing the effect of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) in patients with IBD with secondary thrombocytosis (platelets > 450 G/L). Changes in platelet counts, hemoglobin, iron parameters, disease activity, megakaryopoietic growth factors, erythropoietin, and platelet activity were assessed. Patients received placebo or up to 1500 mg iron as FCM. Endpoints were evaluated at week 6. A total of 26 patients were included in the study, 15 patients were available for the per protocol analysis. A drop in platelets >25% (primary endpoint) was observed in 4 of 8 (50%, iron group) and 1 of 7 patients (14%, placebo group, P = 0.143). Mean platelet counts dropped on FCM but not on placebo (536 G/L to 411 G/L versus 580 G/L to 559 G/L; P = 0.002). Disease activity and megakaryopoietic growth factors remained unchanged and hemoglobin and iron parameters increased on FCM. The normalization of platelet counts was associated with a decrease in platelet aggregation and P-selectin expression. FCM lowers platelet counts and platelet activation in patients with IBD-associated secondary thrombocytosis.

  14. Efficacy and tolerability of a prolonged release ferrous sulphate formulation in iron deficiency anaemia: a non-inferiority controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaim, Mohammed; Piselli, Leonardo; Fioravanti, Pino; Kanony-Truc, Claire

    2012-03-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is the last stage of iron deficiency, consecutive to an imbalance between iron supply through food intake and iron loss through physiological or pathological processes. As well as by haemoglobin levels, IDA is diagnosed by measuring biomarkers of iron stores. Women are most affected by IDA since their teenage years, as menstruation constitutes a chronic iron loss. Oral supplementation with ferrous sulphate is an effective therapy, but gastrointestinal side effects may impair treatment compliance. The present multicentric randomised controlled trial was designed to assess the non-inferiority of a ferrous sulphate prolonged release formulation called V0355 with the referential ferrous sulphate Ferrograd® in a population of Italian women aged 18-50 years diagnosed for IDA. Three hundred and ninety-nine patients were randomised to receive V0355 (80 mg Fe/day) or Ferrograd® (105 mg Fe/day). After 12 weeks of treatment, the difference in the mean haemoglobin level between the two groups was 0.081 g/dL ([-2.986;1.361], p = 0.54), which confirmed the hypothesis of non-inferiority. All the other biochemical parameters (serum iron, serum ferritin, transferrin, and soluble transferrin receptor) and haematological parameters (erythrocytes count, reticulocytes count, haematocrit, and mean corpuscular volume), as well as patient's anaemia-related symptoms, were not different between treatment groups throughout the study. Furthermore, the incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events of moderate and severe intensity was significantly lower (p = 0.007) in the V0355 group (5.6%) than in the Ferrograd® group (13.9%). V0355 was as efficient as Ferrograd® in the treatment of anaemia and exhibited a better gastrointestinal tolerance profile.

  15. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanis Missirlis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import, the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage. We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  16. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  17. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  18. Imparting magnetic dipole heterogeneity to internalized iron oxide nanoparticles for microorganism swarm control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Paul Seung Soo, E-mail: psk25@drexel.edu [Drexel University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics (United States); Becker, Aaron, E-mail: aaron.becker@childrens.harvard.edu [Harvard University, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (United States); Ou, Yan, E-mail: ouy2@rpi.edu; Julius, Anak Agung, E-mail: agung@rpi.edu [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering (United States); Kim, Min Jun, E-mail: mkim@coe.drexel.edu [Drexel University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Tetrahymena pyriformis is a single cell eukaryote that can be modified to respond to magnetic fields, a response called magnetotaxis. Naturally, this microorganism cannot respond to magnetic fields, but after modification using iron oxide nanoparticles, cells are magnetized and exhibit a constant magnetic dipole strength. In experiments, a rotating field is applied to cells using a two-dimensional approximate Helmholtz coil system. Using rotating magnetic fields, we characterize discrete cells’ swarm swimming which is affected by several factors. The behavior of the cells under these fields is explained in detail. After the field is removed, relatively straight swimming is observed. We also generate increased heterogeneity within a population of cells to improve controllability of a swarm, which is explored in a cell model. By exploiting this straight swimming behavior, we propose a method to control discrete cells utilizing a single global magnetic input. Successful implementation of this swarm control method would enable teams of microrobots to perform a variety of in vitro microscale tasks impossible for single microrobots, such as pushing objects or simultaneous micromanipulation of discrete entities.

  19. New rat models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu'o'ng Lê, Bá; Khorsi-Cauet, Hafida; Villegier, Anne-Sophie; Bach, Véronique; Gay-Quéheillard, Jérôme

    2011-07-01

    The majority of murine models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload were carried out in adult subjects. This cannot reflect the high risk of iron overload in children who have an increased need for iron. In this study, we developed four experimental iron overload models in young rats using iron sucrose and evaluated different markers of iron overload, tissue oxidative stress and inflammation as its consequences. Iron overload was observed in all iron-treated rats, as evidenced by significant increases in serum iron indices, expression of liver hepcidin gene and total tissue iron content compared with control rats. We also showed that total tissue iron content was mainly associated with the dose of iron whereas serum iron indices depended essentially on the duration of iron administration. However, no differences in tissue inflammatory and antioxidant parameters from controls were observed. Furthermore, only rats exposed to daily iron injection at a dose of 75 mg/kg body weight for one week revealed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation in iron-treated rats compared with their controls. The present results suggest a correlation between iron overload levels and the dose of iron, as well as the duration and frequency of iron injection and confirm that iron sucrose may not play a crucial role in inflammation and oxidative stress. This study provides important information about iron sucrose-induced iron overload in rats and may be useful for iron sucrose therapy for iron deficiency anemia as well as for the prevention and diagnosis of iron sucrose-induced iron overload in pediatric patients.

  20. Identification of novel microRNAs in post-transcriptional control of Nrf2 expression and redox homeostasis in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhanan Narasimhan

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2/NFE2L2, a redox-sensitive transcription factor plays a critical role in adaptation to cellular stress and affords cellular defense by initiating transcription of antioxidative and detoxification genes. While a protein can be regulated at multiple levels, control of Nrf2 has been largely studied at post-translational regulation points by Keap1. Importantly, post-transcriptional/translational based regulation of Nrf2 is less understood and to date there are no reports on such mechanisms in neuronal systems. In this context, studies involving the role of microRNAs (miRs which are normally considered as fine tuning regulators of protein production through translation repression and/or post-transcriptional alterations, are in place. In the current study, based on in-silico analysis followed by immunoblotting and real time analysis, we have identified and validated for the first time that human NFE2L2 could be targeted by miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells. Co-transfection studies with individual miR mimics along with either WT 3' UTR of human Nrf2 or mutated miRNA targeting seed sequence within Nrf2 3' UTR, demonstrated that Nrf2 is a direct regulatory target of these miRs. In addition, ectopic expression of miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 affected Nrf2 mRNA abundance and nucleo-cytoplasmic concentration of Nrf2 in a Keap1 independent manner resulting in inefficient transactivating ability of Nrf2. Furthermore, forced expression of miRs diminished GCLC and GSR expression resulting in alteration of Nrf2 dependent redox homeostasis. Finally, bioinformatics based miRNA-disease network analysis (MDN along with extended computational network analysis of Nrf2 associated pathologic processes suggests that if in a particular cellular scenario where any of these miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 either individually or as a group is altered, it could affect Nrf2 thus triggering and

  1. Differential control of Bradyrhizobium japonicum iron stimulon genes through variable affinity of the iron response regulator (Irr) for target gene promoters and selective loss of activator function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggavarapu, Siddharth; O'Brian, Mark R

    2014-05-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum Irr is a conditionally stable transcriptional activator and repressor that accumulates in cells under iron-limited, manganese-replete conditions, but degrades in a haem-dependent manner under high iron conditions, manganese limitation or upon exposure to H2 O2 . Here, we identified Irr-regulated genes that were relatively unresponsive to factors that promote Irr degradation. The promoters of those genes bound Irr with at least 200-fold greater affinity than promoters of the responsive genes, resulting in maintenance of promoter occupancy over a wide cellular Irr concentration range. For Irr-repressible genes, promoter occupancy correlated with transcriptional repression, resulting in differential levels of expression based on Irr affinity for target promoters. However, inactivation of positively controlled genes required neither promoter vacancy nor loss of DNA-binding activity by Irr. Thus, activation and repression functions of Irr may be uncoupled from each other under certain conditions. Abrogation of Irr activation function was haem-dependent, thus haem has two functionally separable roles in modulating Irr activity. The findings imply a greater complexity of control by Irr than can be achieved by conditional stability alone. We suggest that these regulatory mechanisms accommodate the differing needs for Irr regulon genes in response to the prevailing metabolic state of the cell.

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Ferric Carboxymaltose and Other Formulations in Iron-Deficient Patients: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Rognoni, Carla; Venturini, Sergio; Meregaglia, Michela; Marmifero, Melania; Tarricone, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency is very common in a number of medical conditions. Ferric carboxymaltose is a new stable iron preparation that can be administered in single infusions over short periods of time. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) regarding the efficacy and safety of the novel complex compared with other iron formulations. In addition, the feasibility of a network meta-analysis for indirect comparisons was investigated. Met...

  3. Estrogen response element-independent signaling partially restores post-ovariectomy body weight gain but is not sufficient for 17β-estradiol's control of energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamounis, Kyle J; Yang, Jennifer A; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A

    2014-03-01

    The steroid 17β-estradiol (E2) modulates energy homeostasis by reducing feeding behavior and increasing energy expenditure primarily through estrogen receptor α (ERα)-mediated mechanisms. Intact ERαKO female mice develop obesity as adults exhibiting decreased energy expenditure and increased fat deposition. However, intact transgenic female mice expressing a DNA-binding-deficient ERα (KIKO) are not obese and have similar energy expenditure, activity and fat deposition as to wild type (WT) females, suggesting that non-estrogen response element (ERE)-mediated signaling is important in E2 regulation of energy homeostasis. Initial reports did not examine the effects of ovariectomy on energy homeostasis or E2's attenuation of post-ovariectomy body weight gain. Therefore, we sought to determine if low physiological doses of E2 (250 ng QOD) known to suppress post-ovariectomy body weight gain in WT females would suppress body weight gain in ovariectomized KIKO females. We observed that the post-ovariectomy increase in body weight was significantly greater in WT females than in KIKO females. Furthermore, E2 did not significantly attenuate the body weight gain in KIKO females as it did in WT females. E2 replacement suppressed food intake and fat accumulation while increasing nighttime oxygen consumption and activity only in WT females. E2 replacement also increased arcuate POMC gene expression in WT females only. These data suggest that in the intact female, ERE-independent mechanisms are sufficient to maintain normal energy homeostasis and to partially restore the normal response to ovariectomy. However, they are not sufficient for E2's suppression of post-ovariectomy body weight gain and its effects on metabolism and activity.

  4. Estrogen response element-independent signaling partially restores post-ovariectomy body weight gain but is not sufficient for 17β-estradiol’s control of energy homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamounis, Kyle J.; Yang, Jennifer A.; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A.

    2013-01-01

    The steroid 17β-estradiol (E2) modulates energy homeostasis by reducing feeding behavior and increasing energy expenditure primarily through estrogen receptor α (ERα)-mediated mechanisms. Intact ERαKO female mice develop obesity as adults exhibiting decreased energy expenditure and increased fat deposition. However, intact transgenic female mice expressing a DNA-binding-deficient ERα (KIKO) are not obese and have similar energy expenditure, activity and fat deposition to wild type (WT) females, suggesting that non-Estrogen Response Element (ERE)-mediated signaling is important in E2 regulation of energy homeostasis. However, initial reports did not examine the effects of ovariectomy on energy homeostasis or E2’s attenuation of post-ovariectomy body weight gain. Therefore, we sought to determine if low physiological doses of E2 (250 ng QOD) known to suppress post-ovariectomy body weight gain in WT females, would suppress body weight gain in ovariectomized KIKO females. We observed that the post-ovariectomy increase in body weight was significantly greater in WT females than in KIKO females. Furthermore, E2 did not significantly attenuate the body weight gain in KIKO females as it did in WT females. E2 replacement suppressed food intake and fat accumulation while increasing nighttime oxygen consumption and activity only in WT females. E2 replacement also increased arcuate POMC gene expression in WT females only. These data suggest that in the intact female, ERE-independent mechanisms are sufficient to maintain normal energy homeostasis and to partially restore the normal response to ovariectomy. However, they are not sufficient for E2’s suppression of post-ovariectomy body weight gain and attenuation of decreases in metabolism and activity. PMID:24252383

  5. The effect of psychological stress on iron absorption in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Min

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological stress (PS is recognized as an important pathogenic factor which leads to metabolism disorder in many diseases. Previous studies have shown that systemic iron homeostasis in mammalians was changed under specific stress conditions. Methods In present study, we used communication box to create psychological stress model and investigated the iron apparent absorption, iron accumulation in the apical poles of villous enterocytes and protein expressions of ferroportin 1 (FPN1, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1. Results Our study showed that iron apparent absorption decreased and iron significantly accumulated in the apical poles of villous enterocytes in 3 d and 7 d PS groups. The expression of intestinal FPN1 in 3 d and 7 d PS groups was lower than that of control, while the change of intestinal ferritin was opposite. However, the expression of DMT1 did not change. Conclusion These results demonstrate that PS can decrease iron absorption in rats, which might be related to regulation expression of iron transporters.

  6. Experiences and challenges in industrialized countries: control of iron deficiency in industrialized countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Usha; Yip, Ray

    2002-04-01

    This paper provides a synopsis of the experience in combating iron deficiency in industrialized countries and identifies the reasons for the considerable success and future challenges. Significant progress has been made over the last century in reducing and even eliminating iron deficiency in many industrialized countries. Current estimates are that the prevalence of iron deficiency has declined to children, compared with 30 to 70% in many developing countries. The reasons for this success cannot be attributed solely to a single approach but rather to a range of factors that have occurred over time as a result of both economic development and the implementation of specific policies. Several factors have contributed to improving both iron intakes and reducing iron losses; these include fortification, supplementation, dietary diversification and public health measures. For example, the decline in anemia in infants can be attributed to the introduction of iron-fortified formula and complementary foods in the 1960s to 1970s. Similarly, the enrichment and fortification of cereals with iron that began during World War II in North America and Europe is a result of effective public-private partnerships. Despite these successes, iron deficiency remains a public health concern in industrialized countries for selected subgroups such as women of reproductive age with excess menstrual losses and pregnant women who cannot meet increased requirements from the diet alone. Constant vigilance and innovative approaches for screening and combating this problem are thus still required even in developed countries.

  7. Application of Time-series Analysis in Control of Chemical Composition of Grey Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Perzyk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was an attempt at applying the time-series analysis to the control of the melting process of grey cast iron inproduction conditions. The production data were collected in one of Polish foundries in the form of spectrometer printouts. The quality of the alloy was controlled by its chemical composition in about 0.5 hour time intervals. The procedure of preparation of the industrial data is presented, including OCR-based method of transformation to the electronic numerical format as well as generation of records related to particular weekdays. The computations for time-series analysis were made using the author’s own software having a wide range of capabilities, including detection of important periodicity in data as well as regression modeling of the residual data, i.e. the values obtained after subtraction of general trend, trend of variability amplitude and the periodical component. The most interesting results of the analysis include: significant 2-measurements periodicity of percentages of all components, significance 7-day periodicity of silicon content measured at the end of a day and the relatively good prediction accuracy obtained without modeling of residual data for various types ofexpected values. Some practical conclusions have been formulated, related to possible improvements in the melting process controlprocedures as well as more general tips concerning applications of time-series analysis in foundry production.

  8. Control of the interparticle spacing in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle clusters by surface ligand engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Wang; Bingbing, Lin; Taipeng, Shen; Jun, Wu; Fuhua, Hao; Chunchao, Xia; Qiyong, Gong; Huiru, Tang; Bin, Song; Hua, Ai

    2016-07-01

    Polymer-mediated self-assembly of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles allows modulation of the structure of SPIO nanocrystal cluster and their magnetic properties. In this study, dopamine-functionalized polyesters (DA-polyester) were used to directly control the magnetic nanoparticle spacing and its effect on magnetic resonance relaxation properties of these clusters was investigated. Monodisperse SPIO nanocrystals with different surface coating materials (poly(ɛ-caprolactone), poly(lactic acid)) of different molecular weights containing dopamine (DA) structure (DA-PCL2k, DA-PCL1k, DA-PLA1k)) were prepared via ligand exchange reaction, and these nanocrystals were encapsulated inside amphiphilic polymer micelles to modulate the SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was applied to quantify the interparticle spacing of SPIO clusters. The results demonstrated that the tailored magnetic nanoparticle clusters featured controllable interparticle spacing providing directly by the different surface coating of SPIO nanocrystals. Systematic modulation of SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing can regulate the saturation magnetization (M s) and T 2 relaxation of the aggregation, and lead to increased magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation properties with decreased interparticle spacing. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB933903), the National Key Technology R&D Program of China (Grant No. 2012BAI23B08), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 20974065, 51173117, and 50830107).

  9. Control of the interparticle spacing in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle clusters by surface ligand engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹; 艾华; 林兵兵; 申太鹏; 吴君; 豪富华; 夏春潮; 龚启勇; 唐惠儒; 宋彬

    2016-01-01

    Polymer-mediated self-assembly of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles allows modulation of the structure of SPIO nanocrystal cluster and their magnetic properties. In this study, dopamine-functionalized polyesters (DA-polyester) were used to directly control the magnetic nanoparticle spacing and its effect on magnetic resonance relaxation properties of these clusters was investigated. Monodisperse SPIO nanocrystals with different surface coating materials (poly(ε-caprolactone), poly(lactic acid)) of different molecular weights containing dopamine (DA) structure (DA-PCL2k, DA-PCL1k, DA-PLA1k)) were prepared via ligand exchange reaction, and these nanocrystals were encapsulated inside am-phiphilic polymer micelles to modulate the SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was applied to quantify the interparticle spacing of SPIO clusters. The results demonstrated that the tailored magnetic nanoparticle clusters featured controllable interparticle spacing providing directly by the different surface coating of SPIO nanocrystals. Systematic modulation of SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing can regulate the saturation magnetization (Ms) and T2 relaxation of the aggregation, and lead to increased magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation properties with de-creased interparticle spacing.

  10. A physiologist's view of homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Harold; Cliff, William; Michael, Joel; McFarland, Jenny; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Wright, Ann

    2015-12-01

    Homeostasis is a core concept necessary for understanding the many regulatory mechanisms in physiology. Claude Bernard originally proposed the concept of the constancy of the "milieu interieur," but his discussion was rather abstract. Walter Cannon introduced the term "homeostasis" and expanded Bernard's notion of "constancy" of the internal environment in an explicit and concrete way. In the 1960s, homeostatic regulatory mechanisms in physiology began to be described as discrete processes following the application of engineering control system analysis to physiological systems. Unfortunately, many undergraduate texts continue to highlight abstract aspects of the concept rather than emphasizing a general model that can be specifically and comprehensively applied to all homeostatic mechanisms. As a result, students and instructors alike often fail to develop a clear, concise model with which to think about such systems. In this article, we present a standard model for homeostatic mechanisms to be used at the undergraduate level. We discuss common sources of confusion ("sticky points") that arise from inconsistencies in vocabulary and illustrations found in popular undergraduate texts. Finally, we propose a simplified model and vocabulary set for helping undergraduate students build effective mental models of homeostatic regulation in physiological systems.

  11. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-04-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters.

  12. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-04-06

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters.

  13. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our...... results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects...... floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline...

  14. Effects of exercise training alone vs a combined exercise and nutritional lifestyle intervention on glucose homeostasis in prediabetic individuals: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slentz, Cris A; Bateman, Lori A; Willis, Leslie H; Granville, Esther O; Piner, Lucy W; Samsa, Gregory P; Setji, Tracy L; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Huffman, Kim M; Bales, Connie W; Kraus, William E

    2016-10-01

    Although the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) established lifestyle changes (diet, exercise and weight loss) as the 'gold standard' preventive therapy for diabetes, the relative contribution of exercise alone to the overall utility of the combined diet and exercise effect of DPP is unknown; furthermore, the optimal intensity of exercise for preventing progression to diabetes remains very controversial. To establish clinical efficacy, we undertook a study (2009 to 2013) to determine: how much of the effect on measures of glucose homeostasis of a 6 month programme modelled after the first 6 months of the DPP is due to exercise alone; whether moderate- or vigorous-intensity exercise is better for improving glucose homeostasis; and to what extent amount of exercise is a contributor to improving glucose control. The primary outcome was improvement in fasting plasma glucose, with improvement in plasma glucose AUC response to an OGTT as the major secondary outcome. The trial was a parallel clinical trial. Sedentary, non-smokers who were 45-75 year old adults (n = 237) with elevated fasting glucose (5.28-6.94 mmol/l) but without cardiovascular disease, uncontrolled hypertension, or diabetes, from the Durham area, were studied at Duke University. They were randomised into one of four 6 month interventions: (1) low amount (42 kJ kg body weight(-1) week(-1) [KKW])/moderate intensity: equivalent of expending 42 KKW (e.g. walking ∼16 km [8.6 miles] per week) with moderate-intensity (50% [Formula: see text]) exercise; (2) high amount (67 KKW)/moderate intensity: equivalent of expending 67 KKW (∼22.3 km [13.8 miles] per week) with moderate-intensity exercise; (3) high amount (67 KKW)/vigorous intensity: equivalent to group 2, but with vigorous-intensity exercise (75% [Formula: see text]); and (4) diet + 42 KKW moderate intensity: same as group 1 but with diet and weight loss (7%) to mimic the first 6 months of the DPP. Computer-generated randomisation lists

  15. Soft chemical control of superconductivity in lithium iron selenide hydroxides Li(1-x)Fe(x)(OH)Fe(1-y)Se.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hualei; Woodruff, Daniel N; Cassidy, Simon J; Allcroft, Genevieve M; Sedlmaier, Stefan J; Thompson, Amber L; Bingham, Paul A; Forder, Susan D; Cartenet, Simon; Mary, Nicolas; Ramos, Silvia; Foronda, Francesca R; Williams, Benjamin H; Li, Xiaodong; Blundell, Stephen J; Clarke, Simon J

    2015-02-16

    Hydrothermal synthesis is described of layered lithium iron selenide hydroxides Li(1-x)Fe(x)(OH)Fe(1-y)Se (x ∼ 0.2; 0.02 iron site vacancy concentrations in the iron selenide layers. This iron vacancy concentration is revealed as the only significant compositional variable and as the key parameter controlling the crystal structure and the electronic properties. Single crystal X-ray diffraction, neutron powder diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements are used to demonstrate that superconductivity at temperatures as high as 40 K is observed in the hydrothermally synthesized samples when the iron vacancy concentration is low (y iron oxidation state is reduced slightly below +2, while samples with a higher vacancy concentration and a correspondingly higher iron oxidation state are not superconducting. The importance of combining a low iron oxidation state with a low vacancy concentration in the iron selenide layers is emphasized by the demonstration that reductive postsynthetic lithiation of the samples turns on superconductivity with critical temperatures exceeding 40 K by displacing iron atoms from the Li(1-x)Fe(x)(OH) reservoir layer to fill vacancies in the selenide layer.

  16. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects...... floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline...

  17. Controlled manufacturing of nanoparticles by the laser pyrolysis: Application to cementite iron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morjan, I.; Alexandrescu, R.; Scarisoreanu, M.; Fleaca, C.; Dumitrache, F.; Soare, I.; Popovici, E.; Gavrila, L.; Vasile, E.; Ciupina, V.; Popa, N. C.

    2009-09-01

    The laser pyrolysis is an attractive technique for the synthesis of different nanostructures from gas-phase precursors. The characteristics of this synthesized method are here exemplified by the production of almost pure cementite Fe 3C nanomaterials, obtained by the pyrolysis of methyl methacrylate and iron pentacarbonyl (vapors). Those nanopowders exhibited core (Fe 3C)-shell (MMA polymer-based) morphologies and mean particle diameters of about 8-9 nm. Preliminary magnetic measurements indicate rather high values for the saturation magnetization. By irradiating the same reactive mixture with a lower intensity radiation, the chemical content of nanopowders shifts towards mixtures of iron and maghemite/magnetite iron oxides.

  18. Research of polishing process to control the iron contamination on the magnetorheological finished KDP crystal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoshan; Li, Shengyi; Peng, Xiaoqiang; Hu, Hao; Tie, Guipeng

    2015-02-20

    A new nonaqueous and abrasive-free magnetorheological finishing (MRF) method is adopted for processing a KDP crystal. MRF polishing is easy to result in the embedding of carbonyl iron (CI) powders; meanwhile, Fe contamination on the KDP crystal surface will affect the laser induced damage threshold seriously. This paper puts forward an appropriate MRF polishing process to avoid the embedding. Polishing results show that the embedding of CI powders can be avoided by controlling the polishing parameters. Furthermore, on the KDP crystal surface, magnetorheological fluids residua inevitably exist after polishing and in which the Fe contamination cannot be removed completely by initial ultrasonic cleaning. To solve this problem, a kind of ion beam figuring (IBF) polishing is introduced to remove the impurity layer. Then the content of Fe element contamination and the depth of impurity elements are measured by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. The measurement results show that there are no CI powders embedding in the MRF polished surface and no Fe contamination after the IBF polishing process, respectively. That verifies the feasibility of MRF polishing-IBF polishing (cleaning) for processing a KDP crystal.

  19. ACO-zeotype iron aluminum phosphates with variable Al/Fe ratios controlled by F⁻ ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanyan; Li, Yi; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jingzhe; Yan, Yan; Li, Jiyang; Yu, Jihong; Wang, Jincheng; Xu, Ruren

    2011-03-01

    Three new iron aluminum phosphates |(C(2)H(10)N(2))(4)|[Fe(8 - x)Al(x)F(x)(H(2)O)(2 - x)(PO(4))(8)]·2H(2)O (χ = 1.64, 1.33, 0.80) with ACO-zeotype structures denoted as FeAPO-CJ66(a), FeAPO-CJ66(b), and FeAPO-CJ66(c), respectively, have been synthesized in the fluoride ion system. Their framework structures are made of double 4-ring (D4R) building units formed by the alternating connection of Fe(Al)O(4)F(O) trigonal bipyramids and PO(4) tetrahedra, which possess 3D intersecting 8-ring channels running along the [001], [010], and [100] directions. Fluoride ions or water molecules reside in the center of D4Rs, and diprotonated ethylenediamine cations and water molecules are occluded in the free space of channels to stabilize the whole structure. Notably, the Al/Fe ratios in the frameworks can be effectively controlled from 1/3.9 to 1/5.0 to 1/9.0 by adjusting the amounts of phosphoric acid and hydrofluoric acid added to the initial reaction mixture. Mössbauer and magnetic measurements show that the Fe ions in the compounds are bivalent and undergo antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature.

  20. Rapid and controlled transformation of nitrate in water and brine by stabilized iron nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhong; Zhao, Dongye; Pan, Gang

    2009-05-01

    Highly reactive zero-valent iron (ZVI) nanoparticles stabilized with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were tested for reduction of nitrate in fresh water and brine. Batch kinetic tests showed that the pseudo first-order rate constant ( k obs) with the stabilized nanoparticles was five times greater than that for non-stabilized counterparts. The stabilizer not only increased the specific surface area of the nanoparticles, but also increased the reactive particle surface. The allocation between the two reduction products, NH4 + and N2, can be manipulated by varying the ZVI-to-nitrate molar ratio and/or applying a Cu-Pd bimetallic catalyst. Greater CMC-to-ZVI ratios lead to faster nitrate reduction. Application of a 0.05 M HEPES buffer increased the k obs value by 15 times compared to that without pH control. Although the presence of 6% NaCl decreased k obs by 30%, 100% nitrate was transformed within 2 h in the saline water. The technology provides a powerful alternative for treating water with concentrated nitrate such as ion exchange brine.

  1. Particulate phases are key in controlling dissolved iron concentrations in the (sub)tropical North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Angela; Schlosser, Christian; Wake, Bronwyn D.; Achterberg, Eric P.; Chance, Rosie; Baker, Alex R.; Forryan, Alex; Lohan, Maeve C.

    2017-03-01

    The supply and bioavailability of iron (Fe) controls primary productivity and N2 fixation in large parts of the global ocean. An important, yet poorly quantified, source to the ocean is particulate Fe (pFe). Here we present the first combined dataset of particulate, labile-particulate (L-pFe), and dissolved Fe (dFe) from the (sub)tropical North Atlantic. We show a strong relationship between L-pFe and dFe, indicating a dynamic equilibrium between these two phases whereby particles "buffer" dFe and maintain the elevated concentrations observed. Moreover, L-pFe can increase the overall "available" (L-pFe + dFe) Fe pool by up to 55%. The lateral shelf flux of this available Fe was similar in magnitude to observed soluble aerosol-Fe deposition, a comparison that has not been previously considered. These findings demonstrate that L-pFe is integral to Fe cycling and hence plays a role in regulating carbon cycling, warranting its inclusion in Fe budgets and biogeochemical models.

  2. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization: Microbial and Mineralogical Controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel E. Kostka

    2008-02-06

    This project represented a joint effort between Florida State University (FSU), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Illinois (U of I). FSU served as the lead institution and Dr. J.E. Kostka was responsible for project coordination, integration, and deliverables. This project was designed to elucidate the microbial ecology and geochemistry of metal reduction in subsurface environments at the U.S. DOE-NABIR Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORFRC). Our objectives were to: 1) characterize the dominant iron minerals and related geochemical parameters likely to limit U(VI) speciation, 2) directly quantify reaction rates and pathways of microbial respiration (terminal-electron-accepting) processes which control subsurface sediment chemistry, and 3) identify and enumerate the organisms mediating U(VI) transformation. A total of 31 publications and 47 seminars or meeting presentations were completed under this project. One M.S. thesis (by Nadia North) and a Ph.D. dissertation (by Lainie Petrie-Edwards) were completed at FSU during fall of 2003 and spring of 2005, respectively. Ph.D. students, Denise Akob and Thomas Gihring have continued the student involvement in this research since fall of 2004. All of the above FSU graduate students were heavily involved in the research, as evidenced by their regular attendance at PI meetings and ORFRC workshops.

  3. Acid-Base Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, L Lee; Nakhoul, Nazih; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S

    2015-12-07

    Acid-base homeostasis and pH regulation are critical for both normal physiology and cell metabolism and function. The importance of this regulation is evidenced by a variety of physiologic derangements that occur when plasma pH is either high or low. The kidneys have the predominant role in regulating the systemic bicarbonate concentration and hence, the metabolic component of acid-base balance. This function of the kidneys has two components: reabsorption of virtually all of the filtered HCO3(-) and production of new bicarbonate to replace that consumed by normal or pathologic acids. This production or generation of new HCO3(-) is done by net acid excretion. Under normal conditions, approximately one-third to one-half of net acid excretion by the kidneys is in the form of titratable acid. The other one-half to two-thirds is the excretion of ammonium. The capacity to excrete ammonium under conditions of acid loads is quantitatively much greater than the capacity to increase titratable acid. Multiple, often redundant pathways and processes exist to regulate these renal functions. Derangements in acid-base homeostasis, however, are common in clinical medicine and can often be related to the systems involved in acid-base transport in the kidneys.

  4. Ageing and water homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, David; Jordan, Jens; Jacob, Giris; Ketch, Terry; Shannon, John R.; Biaggioni, Italo

    2002-01-01

    This review outlines current knowledge concerning fluid intake and volume homeostasis in ageing. The physiology of vasopressin is summarized. Studies have been carried out to determine orthostatic changes in plasma volume and to assess the effect of water ingestion in normal subjects, elderly subjects, and patients with dysautonomias. About 14% of plasma volume shifts out of the vasculature within 30 minutes of upright posture. Oral ingestion of water raises blood pressure in individuals with impaired autonomic reflexes and is an important source of noise in blood pressure trials in the elderly. On the average, oral ingestion of 16 ounces (473ml) of water raises blood pressure 11 mmHg in elderly normal subjects. In patients with autonomic impairment, such as multiple system atrophy, strikingly exaggerated pressor effects of water have been seen with blood pressure elevations greater than 75 mmHg not at all uncommon. Ingestion of water is a major determinant of blood pressure in the elderly population. Volume homeostasis is importantly affected by posture and large changes in plasma volume may occur within 30 minutes when upright posture is assumed.

  5. Bone morphogenetic proteins in inflammation, glucose homeostasis and adipose tissue energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgurevic, Lovorka; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Schulz, Tim J; Vukicevic, Slobodan

    2016-02-01

    Bore morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β superfamily, a group of secreted proteins that regulate embryonic development. This review summarizes the effects of BMPs on physiological processes not exclusively linked to the musculoskeletal system. Specifically, we focus on the involvement of BMPs in inflammatory disorders, e.g. fibrosis, inflammatory bowel disease, anchylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, we discuss the role of BMPs in the context of vascular disorders, and explore the role of these signalling proteins in iron homeostasis (anaemia, hemochromatosis) and oxidative damage. The second and third parts of this review focus on BMPs in the development of metabolic pathologies such as type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. The pancreatic beta cells are the sole source of the hormone insulin and BMPs have recently been implicated in pancreas development as well as control of adult glucose homeostasis. Lastly, we review the recently recognized role of BMPs in brown adipose tissue formation and their consequences for energy expenditure and adiposity. In summary, BMPs play a pivotal role in metabolism beyond their role in skeletal homeostasis. However, increased understanding of these pleiotropic functions also highlights the necessity of tissue-specific strategies when harnessing BMP action as a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. β-Amyloid peptide increases levels of iron content and oxidative stress in human cell and Caenorhabditis elegans models of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Nie, Guangjun; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Yunfeng; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Baolu

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the deposition of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD); however, the underlying mechanism is still not clear. The abnormal interactions of Aβ with metal ions such as iron are implicated in the process of Aβ deposition and oxidative stress in AD brains. In this study, we observed that Aβ increased the levels of iron content and oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing the Swedish mutant form of human β-amyloid precursor protein (APPsw) and in Caenorhabditis elegans Aβ-expressing strain CL2006. Intracellular iron and calcium levels and reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide generation significantly increased in APPsw cells compared to control cells. The activity of superoxide dismutase and the antioxidant levels of APPsw cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. Moreover, iron treatment decreased cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential and aggravated oxidative stress damage as well as the release of Aβ1-40 from the APPsw cells. The iron homeostasis disruption in APPsw cells is very probably associated with elevated expression of the iron transporter divalent metal transporter 1, but not transferrin receptor. Furthermore, the C. elegans with Aβ-expression had increased iron accumulation. In aggregate, these results demonstrate that Aβ accumulation in neuronal cells correlated with neuronal iron homeostasis disruption and probably contributed to the pathogenesis of AD.

  7. 转铁蛋白基因烟草中内源铁蛋白基因的差异表达及含铁量的变化%Differential Expression of Endogenous Ferritin Genes and Iron Homeostasis Alteration in Transgenic Tobacco Overexpressing Soybean Ferritin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜廷波; 丁宝建; 李凤娟; 杨传平

    2006-01-01

    铁蛋白是一种由24个亚基组成的高分子贮藏蛋白质,可以储存多达4 500个铁原子,在动植物及微生物的新陈代谢中起着非常重要的作用.有研究表明,外源铁蛋白的大量表达可以提高植物储存铁离子的能力.为了明确外源铁蛋白基因转化植物中内源铁蛋白基因差异表达与植物含铁量的关系,本研究在成功获得2个烟草铁蛋白基因的全长cDNA克隆NtFerl(登录号:ay083924)和NtFer2(登录号:ay141105)的基础上,以烟草品种SR-1(Nicotiana tabacum cv.Petit Havana SR-1)为受体,培育了转铁蛋白基因烟草.将双元载体pBI121中的GUS基因用来自大豆的铁蛋白基因SoyFerl(登录号:m64337)置换,利用农杆菌介导法转化烟草叶盘,获得在CaMV 35S启动子驱动表达的大豆铁蛋白基因转化烟草植株.Northern杂交和Western杂交分析表明外源铁蛋白基因在转基因烟草中得到了正确表达.比较转基因烟草和非转基因烟草的内源铁蛋白基因表达强度、叶片铁含量、根系铁还原酶活性、株高和鲜重表明,外源铁蛋白基因不但促进了NtFerl的表达,提高转基因植株的储存铁的能力和根系铁还原酶活性,而且促进植株的生长速度.以上结果说明,外源铁蛋白基因转化烟草中内源铁蛋白基因的表达、铁离子的还原吸收及光和作用都得到了进一步的提高.%For studying the effects of endogenous ferritin gene expressions (NtFerl, GenBank accession number ay083924; and NtFer2, GenBank accession number ay141105) on the iron homeostasis in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants expressing soybean (Glycine max Merr) ferritin gene (SoyFerl, GenBank accession number m64337), the transgenic tobacco has been produced by placing soybean ferritin cDNA cassette under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter. The exogenous gene expression was examined by both Northern- and Western-blot analyses. Comparison of endogenous ferritin gene expressions

  8. 全球铁矿资源产出控制格局%Global iron ore controlling pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王威; 闫卫东

    2013-01-01

      本文所做的铁矿石资源控制格局研究主要以2011年铁矿石产量数据和全球主要矿业公司铁矿产出占全球所占份额为数据基础,总结当前铁矿石产出国、市场主体控制份额及其所在国格局现状,分析全球铁矿资源产出控制的主体特点,产出地优势明显,跨国矿业公司是铁矿资源产出控制格局的主要角色,及亚洲和南美等新兴市场铁矿生产格局特点等,为我国铁矿行业发展献言献策。%Based on the REG database of global iron ores production and the share of world production of global major mining companies ,the author in this paper analysises the situation of the countries where iron ores produce from ,the each share of the global market subjects and ,and the host country of global market subjects who control iron ores production .At the same time ,the author summarizes the feature of market subjects which control iron ores production ,ore producing countries ,multinational corporations ,and the Asia and South American market .In the end ,this paper makes suggestion for domestic iron ores industry .

  9. Research needed to strengthen science and programs for the control of iron deficiency and its consequences in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight critical research needs for the effective prevention and control of iron deficiency and its consequences in children living in low-income countries. Four types of research are highlighted: The first involves scaling up interventions that we know are effective, namely iron supplementation of pregnant women, delayed cord clamping at delivery, immediate and exclusive breast-feeding, and continued exclusive breast-feeding for approximately 6 mo. The second entails evaluation research of alternative interventions that are likely to work, to find the most cost-effective strategies for a given social, economic, and epidemiological context. This research is especially needed to expand the implementation of appropriate complementary feeding interventions. In this area, research needs to be designed to provide causal evidence, to measure cost-effectiveness, and to measure potential effect modifiers. The third is efficacy research to discover promising practices where we lack proven interventions. Examples include how to detect infants younger than 6 mo who are at high risk of iron deficiency, efficacious and safe interventions for those young high-risk infants, and best protocols for the treatment of severe anemia. The fourth includes basic research to elucidate physiological processes and mechanisms underlying the risks and benefits of supplemental iron for children exposed to infectious diseases, especially malaria. Strategic research in all 4 areas will ensure that interventions to control pediatric iron deficiency are integrated into national programs and global initiatives to make pregnancy safer, reduce newborn deaths, and promote child development, health, and survival.

  10. Iron homeostatis and oxidative stress in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Lung injury caused by both inhaled dusts and infectious agents depends on increased availability of iron and metal-catalyzed oxidative stress. Because inhaled particles, such as silica, and certain infections can cause secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosi...

  11. Climate engineering by mimicking the natural dust climate control: the Iron Salt Aerosols method

    OpenAIRE

    Oeste, Franz Dietrich; De Richter, Renaud; Ming, Tingzhen; Caillol, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Power stations, ship, and air traffic are among the most potent greenhouse gas emitters and primarily responsible for global warming. Iron salt aerosols (ISA) exert a cooling effect on climate in several ways. This article aims firstly to examine all direct and indirect natural climate cooling mechanisms driven by tropospheric aerosol particles composed partly of iron and chloride, showing their cooperation and interaction within the different environmental compartments. ...

  12. Climate engineering by mimicking natural dust climate control: the iron salt aerosol method

    OpenAIRE

    Oeste, Franz Dietrich; De Richter, Renaud; Ming, Tingzhen; Caillol, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Power stations, ships and air traffic are among the most potent greenhouse gas emitters and are primarily responsible for global warming. Iron salt aerosols (ISAs), composed partly of iron and chloride, exert a cooling effect on climate in several ways. This article aims firstly to examine all direct and indirect natural climate cooling mechanisms driven by ISA tropospheric aerosol particles, showing their cooperation and interaction within the different environmental compar...

  13. Intravenous iron sucrose v/s oral ferrous fumarate for treatment of anemia in pregnancy. A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavi, Shruti B; Jaju, Purushottam B

    2017-05-08

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy, safety and tolerability of intravenous iron sucrose with that of oral ferrous fumarate in iron deficiency anemia during 14 to 34 weeks of pregnancy. A randomized controlled trial was performed involving 112 patients attending the antenatal clinic at Shri B.M.Patil Medical college Hospital, Bijapur from October 2011 to August 2012,with hemoglobin levels between 70-110 g/L and serum ferritin of ferrous fumarate per day. The primary outcome measures for the trial, haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels were measured after 4 weeks. Statistical significance was assessed using Student's t-test. The change in haemoglobin in women receiving intravenous iron was higher than with oral ferrous fumarate 22 ± 11.5 g/L vs 12 ± 9 g/L (p ferrous fumarate in increasing maternal iron stores. The trial registration number is CTRI/2016/12/007552 registered in Clinical Trial Registry India on 8/12/2016. It is a retrospectively registered trial.

  14. Microarray analysis of iron deficiency chlorosis in near-isogenic soybean lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cianzio Silvia R

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is one of fourteen mineral elements required for proper plant growth and development of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.. Soybeans grown on calcareous soils, which are prevalent in the upper Midwest of the United States, often exhibit symptoms indicative of iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC. Yield loss has a positive linear correlation with increasing severity of chlorotic symptoms. As soybean is an important agronomic crop, it is essential to understand the genetics and physiology of traits affecting plant yield. Soybean cultivars vary greatly in their ability to respond successfully to iron deficiency stress. Microarray analyses permit the identification of genes and physiological processes involved in soybean's response to iron stress. Results RNA isolated from the roots of two near isogenic lines, which differ in iron efficiency, PI 548533 (Clark; iron efficient and PI 547430 (IsoClark; iron inefficient, were compared on a spotted microarray slide containing 9,728 cDNAs from root specific EST libraries. A comparison of RNA transcripts isolated from plants grown under iron limiting hydroponic conditions for two weeks revealed 43 genes as differentially expressed. A single linkage clustering analysis of these 43 genes showed 57% of them possessed high sequence similarity to known stress induced genes. A control experiment comparing plants grown under adequate iron hydroponic conditions showed no differences in gene expression between the two near isogenic lines. Expression levels of a subset of the differentially expressed genes were also compared by real time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR. The RT-PCR experiments confirmed differential expression between the iron efficient and iron inefficient plants for 9 of 10 randomly chosen genes examined. To gain further insight into the iron physiological status of the plants, the root iron reductase activity was measured in both iron efficient and inefficient genotypes for plants

  15. 铁代谢及铁过载%Iron Metabolism and Overload

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟昭升; 贾红英; 吴学琼; 盛玲玲

    2012-01-01

    人体缺乏有效的铁"排泄机制",机体铁稳态的维持主要通过调控其吸收、转运与储存来实现.现总结近10年铁调控的相关研究成果,从肠道铁的吸收,铁在细胞、组织及血浆中的相互转运,铁的储存,铁调控激素hepcidin及其相关调控因子等方面探讨维持铁稳态的分子学机制,并简述遗传性血色病相关的发病机制,为理解铁代谢疾病提供线索.%The iron homeostasis is maintained by regulating its absorption,transferring and storing,because humans have no physiologic pathway for excretion. Here is to make a review on the research achievements about iron regulating in the last ten years, and discuss the molecular mechanism associated with iron homeostasis in iron absorption,transferring,storing and hormone associated with iron controlling,and state the pathogenesis of hereditary hemochromatosis,provide clue to comprehend the iron metabolic disease.

  16. 蠕铁生产的过程控制%Process Control for the Production of Compacted Graphite Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史帝文·道森; 启明

    2012-01-01

    A thermal analysis-based measurement and process control system of compacted graphite iron (CGI) production was described. This system prevents flake graphite formation by simulating magnesium fade and thereafter conducting an on-line correction of the molten iron. This measurement and correclion control strategy can minimize process fluctuation and eliminate the risk associated with CGI production.%描述了基于热分析手段的蠕铁生产过程控制系统.该系统通过测量镁的损耗,以及在线调整铁液状态来防止片状石墨的产生.这种测量、调整的在线控制手段使生产蠕铁过程中的波动性降到最低,从根本上消除了蠕铁生产所带来的质量风险.

  17. Randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of a reusable fish-shaped iron ingot to increase hemoglobin concentration in anemic, rural Cambodian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Aviva I; Whitfield, Kyly C; Chapman, Gwen E; Yada, Rickey Y; Kheang, Khin Meng; Louise, Jennie; Summerlee, Alastair J; Armstrong, Gavin R; Green, Timothy J

    2017-08-01

    Background: Anemia affects 45% of women of childbearing age in Cambodia. Iron supplementation is recommended in populations in which anemia prevalence is high. However, there are issues of cost, distribution, and adherence. A potential alternative is a reusable fish-shaped iron ingot, which, when added to the cooking pot, leaches iron into the fluid in which it is prepared.Objective: We sought to determine whether there was a difference in hemoglobin concentrations in rural Cambodian anemic women (aged 18-49 y) who cooked with the iron ingot or consumed a daily iron supplement compared with a control after 1 y.Design: In Preah Vihear, 340 women with mild or moderate anemia were randomly assigned to 1) an iron-ingot group, 2) an iron-supplement (18 mg/d) group, or 3) a nonplacebo control group. A venous blood sample was taken at baseline and at 6 and 12 mo. Blood was analyzed for hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and serum transferrin receptor. Hemoglobin electrophoresis was used to detect structural hemoglobin variants.Results: Anemia prevalence was 44% with the use of a portable hemoglobinometer during screening. At baseline, prevalence of iron deficiency was 9% on the basis of a low serum ferritin concentration. There was no significant difference in mean hemoglobin concentrations between the iron-ingot group (115 g/L; 95% CI: 113, 118 g/L; P = 0.850) or iron-supplement group (115 g/L; 95% CI: 113, 117 g/L; P = 0.998) compared with the control group (115 g/L; 95% CI: 113, 117 g/L) at 12 mo. Serum ferritin was significantly higher in the iron-supplement group (73 μg/L; 95% CI: 64, 82 μg/L; P = 0.002) than in the control group at 6 mo; however, this significance was not maintained at 12 mo (73 μg/L; 95% CI: 58, 91 μg/L; P = 0.176).Conclusions: Neither the iron ingot nor iron supplements increased hemoglobin concentrations in this population at 6 or 12 mo. We do not recommend the use of the fish-shaped iron ingot in Cambodia or in countries where the prevalence of

  18. Iron decreases biological effects of ozone exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    CONTEXT: Ozone (0(3)) exposure is associated with a disruption of iron homeostasis and increased availability of this metal which potentially contributes to an oxidative stress and biologicaleffects. OBJECTIVE: We tested the postulate that increased concentrations of iron in c...

  19. Pain emotion and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, Alberto E

    2011-05-01

    Pain has always been considered as part of a defensive strategy, whose specific role is to signal an immediate, active danger. This definition partially fits acute pain, but certainly not chronic pain, that is maintained also in the absence of an active noxa or danger and that nowadays is considered a disease by itself. Moreover, acute pain is not only an automatic alerting system, but its severity and characteristics can change depending on the surrounding environment. The affective, emotional components of pain have been and are the object of extensive attention and research by psychologists, philosophers, physiologists and also pharmacologists. Pain itself can be considered to share the same genesis as emotions and as a specific emotion in contributing to the maintenance of the homeostasis of each unique subject. Interestingly, this role of pain reaches its maximal development in the human; some even argue that it is specific for the human primate.

  20. KlAft, the Kluyveromyces lactis Ortholog of Aft1 and Aft2, Mediates Activation of Iron-Responsive Transcription Through the PuCACCC Aft-Type Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde e Silva, Natalia; Gonçalves, Isabelle R.; Lemaire, Marc; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Camadro, Jean Michel; Blaiseau, Pierre Louis

    2009-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in fungi is regulated at the transcriptional level by two different mechanisms. It is mediated by a conserved GATA-type repressor in most fungi except in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where it is controlled by the transcription activators Aft1 and Aft2. These activators are encoded by the paralogous genes AFT1 and AFT2, which result from the whole-genome duplication. Here, we explore regulation of iron homeostasis in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that diverged from S. cerevisiae before this event. We identify an ortholog of AFT1/AFT2, designated KlAFT, whose deletion leads to the inability to grow under iron limitation. We show with quantitative real-time PCR analysis that KlAft activates the transcription of all homologs of the Aft1-target genes involved in the iron transport at the cell surface in response to iron limitation. However, homologs of Aft2-specific target genes encoding intracellular iron transporters are regulated neither by KlAft nor by iron. Both bioinformatic and DNA binding and transcription analyses demonstrate that KlAft activates iron-responsive gene expression through the PuCACCC Aft-type sequence. Thus, K. lactis is the first documented species with a positive iron-transcriptional control mediated by only one copy of the Aft-type regulator. This indicates that this function was acquired before the whole-genome duplication and was then diversified into two regulators in S. cerevisiae. PMID:19581449

  1. Benefits and harms of iron supplementation in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domellöf, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Due to high iron requirements, young children are at risk for iron deficiency anemia. Iron supplements are therefore often recommended, especially since iron deficiency anemia in children is associated with poor neurodevelopment. However, in contrast to most other nutrients, excess iron cannot be excreted by the human body and it has recently been suggested that excessive iron supplementation of young children may have adverse effects on growth, risk of infections, and even on cognitive development. Recent studies support that iron supplements are beneficial in iron-deficient children but there is a risk of adverse effects in those who are iron replete. In populations with a low prevalence of iron deficiency, general supplementation should therefore be avoided. Iron-fortified foods can still be generally recommended since they seem to be safer than medicinal iron supplements, but the level of iron fortification should be limited. General iron supplementation is recommended in areas with a high prevalence of iron deficiency, with the exception of malarious areas where a cautious supplementation approach needs to be adopted, based either on screening or a combination of iron supplements and infection control measures. More studies are urgently needed to better determine the risks and benefits of iron supplementation and iron-fortified foods given to iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

  2. New Insights on Iron Study in Myelodysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha M. El Husseiny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hepcidin plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis. It is predominantly produced by hepatocytes and inhibits iron release from macrophages and iron uptake by intestinal epithelial cells. Competitive ELISA is the current method of choice for the quantification of serum hepcidin because of its lower detection limit, low costs, and high throughput. This study aims to discuss the role of hepcidin in the pathogenesis of iron overload in recently diagnosed myelodysplasia (MDS cases. METHODS: The study included 21 recently diagnosed MDS patients and 13 healthy controls. Ferritin, hepcidin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTFR were measured in all subjects. RESULTS: There were 7 cases of hypocellular MDS, 8 cases of refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, and 6 cases of refractory anemia with excess blasts. No difference was observed among the 3 MDS subtypes in terms of hepcidin, sTFR, and ferritin levels (p>0.05. Mean hepcidin levels in the MDS and control groups were 55.8±21.5 ng/mL and 19.9±2.6 ng/ mL, respectively. Mean sTFR was 45.7±8.8 nmol/L in MDS patients and 31.1±5.6 nmol/L in the controls. Mean ferritin levels were significantly higher in MDS patients than in controls (539.14±83.5 ng/mL vs. 104.6±42.9 ng/mL, p0.05. CONCLUSION: Hepcidin may not be the main cause of iron overload in MDS. Further studies are required to test failure of production or peripheral unresponsiveness to hepcidin in MDS cases.

  3. Tissue distribution of manganese in iron-sufficient or iron-deficient rats after stainless steel welding-fume exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Duck; Kim, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Won; Choi, Seong-Jin; Choi, Byung-Sun; Chung, Yong Hyun; Han, Jeong Hee; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Kwon, Il Hoon; Mun, Je-Hyeok; Yu, Il Je

    2007-05-01

    Welders can be exposed to high levels of manganese through welding fumes. Although it has already been suggested that excessive manganese exposure causes neurotoxicity, called manganism, the pathway of manganese transport to the brain with welding-fume exposure remains unclear. Iron is an essential metal that maintains a homeostasis in the body. The divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) transports iron and other divalent metals, such as manganese, and the depletion of iron is known to upregulate DMT1 expression. Accordingly, this study investigated the tissue distribution of manganese in iron-sufficient and iron-deficient rats after welding-fume exposure. The feeding of an iron-deficient diet for 4 wk produced a depletion of body iron, such as decreased iron levels in the serum and tissues, and upregulated the DMT1 expression in the rat duodenum. The iron-sufficient and iron-deficient rats were then exposed to welding fumes generated from manual metal arc stainless steel at a concentration of 63.5 +/- 2.3 mg/m3 for 2 h per day over a 30-day period. Animals were sacrificed on days 1, 15, and 30. The level of body iron in the iron-deficient rats was restored to the control level after the welding-fume exposure. However, the tissue distributions of manganese after the welding-fume exposure showed similar patterns in both the iron-sufficient and iron-deficient groups. The concentration of manganese increased in the lungs and liver on days 15 and 30, and increased in the olfactory bulb on day 30. Slight and heterogeneous increases of manganese were observed in different brain regions. Consequently, these findings suggest that the presence of Fe in the inhaled welding fumes may not have a significant effect on the uptake of Mn into the brain. Thus, the condition of iron deficiency did not seem to have any apparent effect on the transport of Mn into the brain after the inhalation of welding fumes.

  4. The Deterioration Seen in Myelin Related Morphophysiology in Vanadium Exposed Rats is Partially Protected by Concurrent Iron Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usende, Ifukibot Levi; Leitner, Dominque F; Neely, Elizabeth; Connor, James R; Olopade, James O

    2016-08-30

    Oligodendrocyte development and myelination occurs vigorously during the early post natal period which coincides with the period of peak mobilization of iron. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are easily disturbed by any agent that affects iron homeostasis and its assimilation into these cells. Environmental exposure to vanadium, a transition metal can disrupt this iron homeostasis. We investigated the interaction of iron deficiency and vanadium exposure on the myelination infrastructure and its related neurobehavioural phenotypes, and neurocellular profiles in developing rat brains. Control group (C) dams were fed normal diet while Group 2 (V) dams were fed normal diet and pups were injected with 3mg/kg body weight of sodium metavanadate daily from postnatal day (PND) 1-21. Group 3 (I+V) dams were fed iron deficient diet after delivery and pups injected with 3mg/kg body weight sodium metavanadate from PND1-21. Body and brain weights deteriorated in I+V relative to C and V while neurobehavioral deficit occurred more in V. Whereas immunohistochemical staining shows more astrogliosis and microgliosis indicative of neuroinflammation in I+V, more intense OPCs depletion and hypomyelination were seen in the V, and this was partially protected in I+V. In in vitro studies, vanadium induced glial cells toxicity was partially protected only at the LD 50 dose with the iron chelator, desferroxamine. The data indicate that vanadium promotes myelin damage and iron deficiency in combination with vanadium partially protects this neurotoxicological effects of vanadium.

  5. Iron accumulates in the lavage and explanted lungs of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Oxidative stress participates in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF). An underlying disru