WorldWideScience

Sample records for controls general compliance

  1. Audit-based compliance control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cederquist, J.G.; Dimitrakos, T.; Corin, R.J.; Martinelli, F.; Ryan, P.Y.A.; Dekker, M.A.C.; Etalle, Sandro; Schneider, S.; den Hartog, Jeremy; Lenzini, Gabriele

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new framework for controlling compliance to discretionary access control policies [Cederquist et al. in Proceedings of the International Workshop on Policies for Distributed Systems and Networks (POLICY), 2005; Corin et al. in Proceedings of the IFIP Workshop on Formal

  2. Supporting the patient's role in guideline compliance: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Stephen N; Shnaiden, Tatiana L; Wegh, Arnold A; Juster, Iver A

    2008-11-01

    Clinical messages alerting physicians to gaps in the care of specific patients have been shown to increase compliance with evidence-based guidelines. This study sought to measure any additional impact on compliance when alerting messages also were sent to patients. For alerts that were generated by computerized clinical rules applied to claims, compliance was determined by subsequent claims evidence (eg, that recommended tests were performed). Compliance was measured in the baseline year and the study year for 4 study group employers (combined membership >100,000) that chose to add patient messaging in the study year, and 28 similar control group employers (combined membership >700,000) that maintained physician messaging but did not add patient messaging. The impact of patient messaging was assessed by comparing changes in compliance from baseline to study year in the 2 groups. Multiple logistic regression was used to control for differences between the groups. Because a given member or physician could receive multiple alerts, generalized estimating equations with clustering by patient and physician were used. Controlling for differences in age, sex, and the severity and types of clinical alerts between the study and control groups, the addition of patient messaging increased compliance by 12.5% (P compliance with the evidence-based guidelines underlying the alerts.

  3. Impact, compliance and control of legislation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panek, Aleksander; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Rose, Jørgen

    on the requirements and how MS deal with the respect of requirements. Compliance and control are essential parts of successfully implementing the EPBD. The main recommendations and findings from reports collected vary significantly regarding EPBD implementation, the large potential for further savings, the needs...

  4. Compliance or good control and accountability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkkila, B.H.

    1993-01-01

    DOE Orders and draft orders for nuclear material control and accountability address the need for a complete material control and accountability (MC ampersand A) program for all DOE contractors processing, using, and/or storing nuclear materials. These orders also address performance as well as compliance issues. Very often the existence of a program or an element of a program satisfies the compliance aspect of DOE requirements. The concept of performance requirements is new and requires new thinking with all of the elements of the MC ampersand A program. The contractor is so accustomed to compliance with DOE requirements that dealing with performance is not well understood. In this paper I will address the receptiveness of performance requirements by the contractor. Auditing for performance is also a new concept and has not been implemented. The contractor will have to learn how to measure the performance of the MC ampersand A program and be able to demonstrate a certain level of performance to the oversight organization. This paper will contain a discussion of a well organized MC ampersand A program, the compliance issues associated with the program, the performance criteria associated with the program, and how to audit such a program

  5. 40 CFR 63.103 - General compliance, reporting, and recordkeeping provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Chemical Manufacturing Industry § 63.103 General compliance, reporting, and recordkeeping provisions. (a... during periods when the primary control device is out of service), records must be kept of whether the... both the Administrator and the owner or operator of a source, reports may be submitted on electronic...

  6. Hand hygiene compliance in patients under contact precautions and in the general hospital population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaguer-Leyva, Martín; Mendoza-Flores, Lidia; Medina-Torres, Ana Gabriela; Salinas-Caballero, Ana Gabriela; Vidaña-Amaro, Jose Antonio; Garza-Gonzalez, Elvira; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián

    2013-11-01

    Hand hygiene (HH) is the single most important intervention for preventing hospital-acquired infections. Contact precautions are a series of actions that infection control units take to reduce the transmission of nosocomial pathogens. We conducted an observational study of HH compliance. Observations were stratified as opportunities in patients under contact precautions and in the general hospital population. Trained infection control personnel performed all direct evaluations. A total of 3,270 opportunities were recorded. HH compliance was statistically higher in patients on contact precautions than in the overall population (70.3% vs 60.4%; P = .0001). Critical care areas had higher HH compliance when patients were isolated by contact precautions. Medical wards were statistically lower in HH when patients were under contact precautions. Respiratory technicians had the highest HH compliance in both overall performance and in patients under contact precautions. Medical students had a lower HH compliance in both evaluations (P Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Canister storage building compliance assessment DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLACK, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents the Project's position on compliance with DOE Order 6430.1A ''General Design Criteria.'' No non-compliances are shown. The compliance statements have been reviewed and approved by DOE. Open items are scheduled to be closed prior to project completion

  8. COMPLIANCE AS FACTORING BUSINESS RISK MANAGEMENT: CONTROL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Makarovych

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Indetermination of modern economy conditions and the lack of theoretical knowledge gained by domestic scientists about risk in factoring business actualize the research concerning the methodology and technique of factoring companies’ risk management. The article examines compliance which is the technology innovative for Ukrainian market of factoring risk management technologies. It is determined that the compliance is the risk management process directed to free will correspondence to state, international legislation as well as to the ethics standards accepted in the field of regulated legal relations and to the traditions of business circulation to sustain the necessary regulations and standards of market behaviour, and to consolidate the image of a factoring company. Compliance risks should be understood as the risks of missed profit or losses caused by the conflicts of interests and the discrepancy of employees’ actions to internal and external standard documents. The attention is paid to the control over the compliance. The author singles out 3 kinds of the compliance control such as institutional, operational and the compliance control over the observance of conducting business professional ethics regulations which are necessary for providing of efficient management of factoring business risks. The paper shows the organizing process of factoring business compliance control (by the development of internal standard documents, a compliance program, the foundation of compliance control subdivision, monitoring of the risks cause the choice, made by management entities of a factoring company, of the management methods of risks for their business. The development of new and improvement of existed forms of compliance control organizing process help satisfy users’ information needs and requests of the risk management factoring company department. The suggestions proposed create the grounds for the transformation and improvement of factoring

  9. A Shared Compliance Control for Application in High Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sung Ho; Jung, Hoan Sung; Lee, Kye Hong; Kim, Young Ki; Kim, Hark Rho

    2005-01-01

    Bilateral control systems present a technical alternative for intelligent robotic systems performing dexterous tasks in unstructured environments such as a nuclear facility, outer space and underwater. A shared compliance control scheme is proposed for application in high radiation fields in which the force sensor can not be installed because of a radiation effect. A position difference between the master system and the slave system is treated as an equivalent contact force and used for an input to the compliance controller. The compliance controller is implemented by a first order low pass filter and it modifies the position of the master to the reference position. Thus the compliance control task is shared by both the human operator's direct manual control and the autonomous compliance control of the slave system. Consequently, the position of a slave system tracks well the reference position and the compliance of the slave system is autonomously controlled in a contact condition. The simulation results show the excellence of the proposed scheme

  10. Improving homework compliance in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Robert L

    2002-05-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder is a chronic condition characterized by beliefs that worry prepares and protects, but that excessive worry is out of control. In this article, I review the cognitive-behavioral model of generalized anxiety, focusing specifically on problems related to excessive worrying. Noncompliance in self-help homework is reflected in the patient's excessive focus on negative feelings, difficulty identifying automatic thoughts, demand for immediate results, and the belief that worries are realistic. Interventions for these problems are illustrated in the case of the treatment of a patient characterized by persistent worries, low self-confidence, procrastination, and avoidance. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Blood glucose control and compliance of diabetic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. P. R. de Villiers

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-compliance is an important factor hindering good control in diabetics. The aim of this study was to identify areas of poor compliance with the diabetes management regimen in the children attending our clinic. A questionnaire was administered to 57 patients who attend the Paediatric Diabetes Clinic. It was designed to elicit socio-demographic data and information about the diabetic regimen. Prior to the administration of the questionnaire, patients were classified as being well, satisfactorily or poorly controlled, based on their average glycosylated Haemoglobin results over the past year.

  12. Report: ECHO Data Quality Audit – Phase I Results: The Integrated Compliance Information System Needs Security Controls to Protect Significant Non-Compliance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #09-P-0226, August 31, 2009. End users of the Permit Compliance System and Integrated Compliance Information System National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System can override the Significant Non-Compliance data field without more access controls.

  13. Smart auditing - Innovating compliance checking in customs control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhsh, F.A.; Weigand, H.; Hofreiter, B.

    2013-01-01

    While risk regulations and compliance requirements grow, the capacity of governmental controls only shrinks in many countries. Automation provides a partial solution to this problem, but more is expected from new modes of supervision. The reliability of the provided data becomes essential then.

  14. Revisiting the generalized scaling law for adhesion: role of compliance and extension to progressive failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojdehi, Ahmad R; Holmes, Douglas P; Dillard, David A

    2017-10-25

    A generalized scaling law, based on the classical fracture mechanics approach, is developed to predict the bond strength of adhesive systems. The proposed scaling relationship depends on the rate of change of debond area with compliance, rather than the ratio of area to compliance. This distinction can have a profound impact on the expected bond strength of systems, particularly when the failure mechanism changes or the compliance of the load train increases. Based on the classical fracture mechanics approach for rate-independent materials, the load train compliance should not affect the force capacity of the adhesive system, whereas when the area to compliance ratio is used as the scaling parameter, it directly influences the bond strength, making it necessary to distinguish compliance contributions. To verify the scaling relationship, single lap shear tests were performed for a given pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) tape specimens with different bond areas, number of backing layers, and load train compliance. The shear lag model was used to derive closed-form relationships for the system compliance and its derivative with respect to the debond area. Digital image correlation (DIC) is implemented to verify the non-uniform shear stress distribution obtained from the shear lag model in a lap shear geometry. The results obtained from this approach could lead to a better understanding of the relationship between bond strength and the geometry and mechanical properties of adhesive systems.

  15. Risk aversion and compliance in markets for pollution control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranlund, John K

    2008-07-01

    This paper examines the effects of risk aversion on compliance choices in markets for pollution control. A firm's decision to be compliant or not is independent of its manager's risk preference. However, non-compliant firms with risk-averse managers will have lower violations than otherwise identical firms with risk-neutral managers. The violations of non-compliant firms with risk-averse managers are independent of differences in their profit functions and their initial allocations of permits if and only if their managers' utility functions exhibit constant absolute risk aversion. However, firm-level characteristics do impact violation choices when managers have coefficients of absolute risk aversion that are increasing or decreasing in profit levels. Finally, in the equilibrium of a market for emissions rights with widespread non-compliance, risk aversion is associated with higher permit prices, better environmental quality, and lower aggregate violations.

  16. Computing exact bundle compliance control charts via probability generating functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Binchao; Matis, Timothy; Benneyan, James

    2016-06-01

    Compliance to evidenced-base practices, individually and in 'bundles', remains an important focus of healthcare quality improvement for many clinical conditions. The exact probability distribution of composite bundle compliance measures used to develop corresponding control charts and other statistical tests is based on a fairly large convolution whose direct calculation can be computationally prohibitive. Various series expansions and other approximation approaches have been proposed, each with computational and accuracy tradeoffs, especially in the tails. This same probability distribution also arises in other important healthcare applications, such as for risk-adjusted outcomes and bed demand prediction, with the same computational difficulties. As an alternative, we use probability generating functions to rapidly obtain exact results and illustrate the improved accuracy and detection over other methods. Numerical testing across a wide range of applications demonstrates the computational efficiency and accuracy of this approach.

  17. Generalized Predictive Control and Neural Generalized Predictive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhana CHIDRAWAR

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available As Model Predictive Control (MPC relies on the predictive Control using a multilayer feed forward network as the plants linear model is presented. In using Newton-Raphson as the optimization algorithm, the number of iterations needed for convergence is significantly reduced from other techniques. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Generalized Predictive Control and Neural Generalized Predictive Control with Newton-Raphson as minimization algorithm. Taking three separate systems, performances of the system has been tested. Simulation results show the effect of neural network on Generalized Predictive Control. The performance comparison of this three system configurations has been given in terms of ISE and IAE.

  18. Current standards for infection control: audit assures compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Pauline

    Having robust policies and procedures in place for infection control is fundamentally important. However, each organization has to go a step beyond this; evidence has to be provided that these policies and procedures are followed. As of 1 April 2009, with the introduction of the Care Quality Commission and The Health and Social Care Act 2008 Code of Practice for the NHS on the Prevention and Control of Healthcare-Associated Infections and Related Guidance, the assurance of robust infection control measures within any UK provider of health care became an even higher priority. Also, the commissioning of any service by the NHS must provide evidence that the provider has in place robust procedures for infection control. This article demonstrates how the clinical audit team at the Douglas Macmillan Hospice in North Staffordshire, UK, have used audit to assure high rates of compliance with the current national standards for infection control. Prior to the audit, hospice staff had assumed that the rates of compliance for infection control approached 100%. This article shows that a good quality audit tool can be used to identify areas of shortfall in infection control and the effectiveness of putting in place an action plan followed by re-audit.

  19. Programmer's manual for CAMCON: Compliance Assessment Methodology CONtroller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechard, R.P.; Gilkey, A.P.; Rudeen, D.K.; Byle, K.A.; Iuzzolino, H.J.

    1993-05-01

    CAMCON, the Compliance Assessment Methodology CONtroller, is an analysis system that assists in assessing the compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) with applicable long-term regulations of the US Environmental Protection Agency, including Subpart B of the Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191 and 40CFR268.6, which is the portion of the Land Disposal Restrictions implementing the Resource, Conservative, and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended that states the conditions for disposal of hazardous chemical wastes. This manual provides an architectural overview of the CAMCON system. Furthermore this manual presents guidelines and presents suggestions for programmers developing the many different types of software necessary to investigate various events and physical processes of the WIPP. These guidelines include user interface requirements, minimum quality assurance requirements, coding style suggestions, and the use of numerous software libraries developed specifically for or adapted for the CAMCON system

  20. Programmer`s manual for CAMCON: Compliance Assessment Methodology CONtroller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gilkey, A.P.; Rudeen, D.K.; Byle, K.A. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Iuzzolino, H.J. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01

    CAMCON, the Compliance Assessment Methodology CONtroller, is an analysis system that assists in assessing the compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) with applicable long-term regulations of the US Environmental Protection Agency, including Subpart B of the Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191 and 40CFR268.6, which is the portion of the Land Disposal Restrictions implementing the Resource, Conservative, and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended that states the conditions for disposal of hazardous chemical wastes. This manual provides an architectural overview of the CAMCON system. Furthermore this manual presents guidelines and presents suggestions for programmers developing the many different types of software necessary to investigate various events and physical processes of the WIPP. These guidelines include user interface requirements, minimum quality assurance requirements, coding style suggestions, and the use of numerous software libraries developed specifically for or adapted for the CAMCON system.

  1. A new approach of active compliance control via fuzzy logic control for multifingered robot hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, M. F. A.; Jalani, J.; Ahmad, A.

    2016-07-01

    Safety is a vital issue in Human-Robot Interaction (HRI). In order to guarantee safety in HRI, a model reference impedance control can be a very useful approach introducing a compliant control. In particular, this paper establishes a fuzzy logic compliance control (i.e. active compliance control) to reduce impact and forces during physical interaction between humans/objects and robots. Exploiting a virtual mass-spring-damper system allows us to determine a desired compliant level by understanding the behavior of the model reference impedance control. The performance of fuzzy logic compliant control is tested in simulation for a robotic hand known as the RED Hand. The results show that the fuzzy logic is a feasible control approach, particularly to control position and to provide compliant control. In addition, the fuzzy logic control allows us to simplify the controller design process (i.e. avoid complex computation) when dealing with nonlinearities and uncertainties.

  2. Validation of gamma irradiator controls for quality and regulatory compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, R.B.; Pinteric, F.J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Since 1978 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has had both the legal authority and the Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP) regulations in place to require irradiator owners who process medical devices to produce evidence of Irradiation Process Validation. One of the key components of Irradiation Process Validation is the validation of the irradiator controls. However, it is only recently that FDA audits have focused on this component of the process validation. What is Irradiator Control System Validation? What constitutes evidence of control? How do owners obtain evidence? What is the irradiator supplier's role in validation? How does the ISO 9000 Quality Standard relate to the FDA's CGMP requirement for evidence of Control System Validation? This paper presents answers to these questions based on the recent experiences of Nordion's engineering and product management staff who have worked with several US-based irradiator owners. This topic - Validation of Irradiator Controls - is a significant regulatory compliance and operations issues within the irradiator suppliers' and users' community. (author)

  3. 77 FR 18830 - Small Entity Compliance Guide: Further Amendments to General Regulations of the Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0121] Small Entity Compliance Guide: Further Amendments to General Regulations of the Food and Drug... Food and Drug Administration to Incorporate Tobacco Products--Small Entity Compliance Guide'' to the...

  4. Higher Education IT Compliance through the Prism of Risk Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feehan, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2013, compliance issues march, unceasingly, through every aspect of higher education. Yet the intricacies of privacy, information security, data governance, and IT policy as compliance and risk areas within the IT organization can reverberate and impact every other department within the higher education institution. The primary focus is always…

  5. A Method to Establish Stimulus Control and Compliance with Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgen, John G.; Mace, F. Charles; Cavanaugh, Brenna M.; Shamlian, Kenneth; Lit, Keith R.; Wilson, Jillian B.; Trauschke, Stephanie L.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated a unique procedure to establish compliance with instructions in four young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who had low levels of compliance. Our procedure included methods to establish a novel therapist as a source of positive reinforcement, reliably evoke orienting responses to the therapist, increase the…

  6. Hierarchical Compliance Control of a Soft Ankle Rehabilitation Robot Actuated by Pneumatic Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan; Liu, Aiming; Meng, Wei; Ai, Qingsong; Xie, Sheng Q

    2017-01-01

    Traditional compliance control of a rehabilitation robot is implemented in task space by using impedance or admittance control algorithms. The soft robot actuated by pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs) is becoming prominent for patients as it enables the compliance being adjusted in each active link, which, however, has not been reported in the literature. This paper proposes a new compliance control method of a soft ankle rehabilitation robot that is driven by four PMAs configured in parallel to enable three degrees of freedom movement of the ankle joint. A new hierarchical compliance control structure, including a low-level compliance adjustment controller in joint space and a high-level admittance controller in task space, is designed. An adaptive compliance control paradigm is further developed by taking into account patient's active contribution and movement ability during a previous period of time, in order to provide robot assistance only when it is necessarily required. Experiments on healthy and impaired human subjects were conducted to verify the adaptive hierarchical compliance control scheme. The results show that the robot hierarchical compliance can be online adjusted according to the participant's assessment. The robot reduces its assistance output when participants contribute more and vice versa , thus providing a potentially feasible solution to the patient-in-loop cooperative training strategy.

  7. Hierarchical Compliance Control of a Soft Ankle Rehabilitation Robot Actuated by Pneumatic Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional compliance control of a rehabilitation robot is implemented in task space by using impedance or admittance control algorithms. The soft robot actuated by pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs is becoming prominent for patients as it enables the compliance being adjusted in each active link, which, however, has not been reported in the literature. This paper proposes a new compliance control method of a soft ankle rehabilitation robot that is driven by four PMAs configured in parallel to enable three degrees of freedom movement of the ankle joint. A new hierarchical compliance control structure, including a low-level compliance adjustment controller in joint space and a high-level admittance controller in task space, is designed. An adaptive compliance control paradigm is further developed by taking into account patient’s active contribution and movement ability during a previous period of time, in order to provide robot assistance only when it is necessarily required. Experiments on healthy and impaired human subjects were conducted to verify the adaptive hierarchical compliance control scheme. The results show that the robot hierarchical compliance can be online adjusted according to the participant’s assessment. The robot reduces its assistance output when participants contribute more and vice versa, thus providing a potentially feasible solution to the patient-in-loop cooperative training strategy.

  8. Compliance with preventive care following dental treatment of children under general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerbhay, F B M

    2009-11-01

    This study evaluated the self-reported preventive dental care compliance of parents/families whose children received dental treatment under general anaesthesia. Complete records of 68 pediatric patients who attended the University of Stellenbosch's Paediatric Dentistry Department for dental treatment were included in the survey. Parents of 41 (60%) patients were interviewed telephonically to evaluate parental dental health knowledge and preventive practices. The majority (85%) of parents had a good idea about the aetiology of dental caries. An assessment of the children's dental health behaviour reveals that parents were mostly responsible for brushing the childs' teeth (44%).The majority of parents (51%) reported that following dental treatment of the child under general anaesthesia, there was no change in their child's frequency of sugar consumption. Sixty-three percent of children treated under GA had returned for the one-week follow-up. However, only 22% of children returned for the three-month follow up appointment. Parents were informed about the importance of these follow-up appointments. Parental belief that proper dental health behaviour helps maintain the teeth, did not influence parents preventive compliance, despite them having received preventive instruction. Parents were mostly responsible for brushing their child's teeth following dental treatment of their children under general anaesthesia. This research found however that, in the majority of cases there was no change in the children's frequency of sugar intake.

  9. COMPLIANCE AS FACTORING BUSINESS RISK MANAGEMENT: CONTROL ASPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    V.K. Makarovych

    2016-01-01

    Indetermination of modern economy conditions and the lack of theoretical knowledge gained by domestic scientists about risk in factoring business actualize the research concerning the methodology and technique of factoring companies’ risk management. The article examines compliance which is the technology innovative for Ukrainian market of factoring risk management technologies. It is determined that the compliance is the risk management process directed to free will correspondence to sta...

  10. 76 FR 64296 - Oil Pollution Prevention; Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Rule-Compliance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... Oil Pollution Prevention; Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Rule--Compliance Date... Federal Register. List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 112 Oil pollution prevention, Farms, Compliance date... proposing to amend the date by which farms must prepare or amend, and implement their Spill Prevention...

  11. Frequent Evaluation To Improve Compliance In Patients Treated With Occlusion For Amblyopia: A Randomized controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturriaga, Hernan; Zanolli, Mario; Damm, Constanza; Oporto, Jorge; Acuna, Olga; Valenzuela, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of occlusion treatment for amblyopia are well established.True compliance can be difficult to assess and is usually based on patient history. We hypothesize that more visits to the physician provides more chances to improve compliance. We conducted a prospective, comparative, blind trial in which 30 children with amblyopia were randomly assigned to be followed up more frequently (every 4 to 6 weeks) (study group) or as established on our standard regular basis (month intervals based on age in years) (control group). The primary outcome was to study differences in treatment compliance between these groups. The secondary outcome was to report compliance in a group of Chilean children and to compare survey results with adherence, to assess concordance between them. Baseline clinical characteristics were similar in the two groups. 30 patients were recruited. Mean compliance for all patients was 82%. Study group compliance was 83% versus 76% in control group (p = 0.5). Without epidemiology, intention to treat analysis (ITT), study group compliance was 97% compared to 76% in control group (p = 0.049). Pearson correlation between negative responses to a parental survey after treatment, of the percentage of adherence and compliance, was -0.57 and statistically significant (p = 0.013). There were no differences in patient compliance comparing more frequent evaluation versus a follow up evaluation based in an age according scheme. There is a high compliance to occlusion therapy in this group of Chilean children. If parents reported more negative adherence aspects in the survey, the worse the compliance.

  12. Title IV compliance strategies and the incidence of co-pollutants and synergistic pollution controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.

    1993-01-01

    Title 4 of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 (Pub.L. 101-549) authorizes a system of tradeable SO 2 allowances in order to reduce Utility SO 2 emissions in a cost-effective manner. The CAAA also expanded and strengthened regulation of urban ozone nonattainment (Title 1), air toxics (Title 3) and utility NO x emissions (Title 4). Implementation of the requirements of each of these titles will force the utility industry to incur additional control expenditures. Utilities also face the potential for regulation of CO 2 emissions within the next decade, and increased regulation and reclassification of high volume combustion wastes, i.e., scrubber sludge, fly ash and bottom ash. Unfortunately for the utility industry, many of the issues in Titles 1, 3, 4 and other regulations have not been resolved, even though utility Phase 1 compliance planning has begun. This paper will examine compliance conflicts and synergies resulting from utility compliance with Title IV SO 2 requirements. The fundamental question addressed is: what multi-media effects are introduced and what opportunities exist through utility compliance with Title 4-SO 2 . Several issues will be addressed including: (1) the potential impact of non-SO 2 regulation on utility compliance and compliance costs, (2) the flexibility of utility SO 2 compliance options, (3) the synergies and co-pollutant effects associated with particular compliance options, (4) the impact of the timing and uncertainty of the various rules on utility compliance choice

  13. Improving ambulatory saliva-sampling compliance in pregnant women: a randomized controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Moeller

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Noncompliance with scheduled ambulatory saliva sampling is common and has been associated with biased cortisol estimates in nonpregnant subjects. This study is the first to investigate in pregnant women strategies to improve ambulatory saliva-sampling compliance, and the association between sampling noncompliance and saliva cortisol estimates. METHODS: We instructed 64 pregnant women to collect eight scheduled saliva samples on two consecutive days each. Objective compliance with scheduled sampling times was assessed with a Medication Event Monitoring System and self-reported compliance with a paper-and-pencil diary. In a randomized controlled study, we estimated whether a disclosure intervention (informing women about objective compliance monitoring and a reminder intervention (use of acoustical reminders improved compliance. A mixed model analysis was used to estimate associations between women's objective compliance and their diurnal cortisol profiles, and between deviation from scheduled sampling and the cortisol concentration measured in the related sample. RESULTS: Self-reported compliance with a saliva-sampling protocol was 91%, and objective compliance was 70%. The disclosure intervention was associated with improved objective compliance (informed: 81%, noninformed: 60%, F(1,60  = 17.64, p<0.001, but not the reminder intervention (reminders: 68%, without reminders: 72%, F(1,60 = 0.78, p = 0.379. Furthermore, a woman's increased objective compliance was associated with a higher diurnal cortisol profile, F(2,64  = 8.22, p<0.001. Altered cortisol levels were observed in less objective compliant samples, F(1,705  = 7.38, p = 0.007, with delayed sampling associated with lower cortisol levels. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that in pregnant women, objective noncompliance with scheduled ambulatory saliva sampling is common and is associated with biased cortisol estimates. To improve sampling compliance, results suggest

  14. Compliance with referrals to medical specialist care: patient and general practice determinants: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Christel E; de Jong, Judith D; Verheij, Robert A; Jansen, Tessa; Korevaar, Joke C; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2016-02-01

    In a gatekeeper system, primary care physicians and patients jointly decide whether or not medical specialist care is needed. However, it is the patient who decides to actually use the referral. Referral non-compliance could delay diagnosis and treatment. The objective of this study was to assess patient compliance with a referral to medical specialist care and identify patient and practice characteristics that are associated with it. Observational study using data on 48,784 referrals to medical specialist care derived from electronic medical records of 58 general practices for the period 2008-2010. Referral compliance was based on claims data of medical specialist care. Logistic multilevel regression analyses were conducted to determine associations between patient and general practice characteristics and referral compliance. In 86.6% of the referrals, patients complied. Patient and not practice characteristics were significantly associated with compliance. Patients from deprived urban areas and patients aged 18-44 years were less likely to comply, whereas patients aged 65 years and older were more likely to comply. About 1 in 8 patients do not use their referral. These patients may not receive adequate care. Demographic and socio-economic factors appear to affect compliance. The results of this study may be used to make general practitioners more aware that some patients are more likely to be noncompliant with referrals.

  15. A randomized, controlled clinical trial of a geriatric consultation team. Compliance with recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C M; Becker, P M; McVey, L J; Saltz, C; Feussner, J R; Cohen, H J

    1986-05-16

    As part of a prospective, randomized, controlled study of the effectiveness of a geriatric consultation team, we examined compliance by the house staff with recommendations made by the team. Recommendations were formulated for 185 patients, aged 75 years or older, who were randomized into intervention (n = 92) and control (n = 93) groups. In the control group, only 27.1% of the actions that would have been recommended by the team were implemented independently by the house staff. Problems commonly neglected included polypharmacy, sensory impairment, confusion, and depression. In the intervention group, overall compliance was 71.7%. Highest compliance occurred for recommendations addressing instability and falls (95.0%) and discharge planning (94.3%). We conclude that a geriatric consultation team contributes substantial additional input into the care of older patients. Furthermore, relatively high compliance can be achieved with recommendations made by a geriatric consultation team, thereby overcoming the first barrier to the establishment of such a service.

  16. An effective group psychoeducational intervention for improving compliance with vaginal dilation: A randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffries, Sherryl A.; Robinson, John W.; Craighead, Peter S.; Keats, Melanie R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Although vaginal dilation is often recommended to minimize or prevent vaginal scarring after pelvic radiotherapy, compliance with this recommendation has historically been very low. Therefore, effective intervention strategies are needed to enhance compliance with vaginal dilation after radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial of a psychoeducational intervention specifically designed to increase compliance with vaginal dilation. The information-motivation-behavioral skills model of enhancing compliance with behavioral change was the basis for the intervention design. Forty-two sexually active women, 21 to 65 years of age, diagnosed with Stages Ic-III cervical or endometrial cancer, who received pelvic radiotherapy, were randomized to either the experimental psychoeducational group or the information-only control group. Assessment via questionnaire occurred before treatment and at 6-week, 6-month, 12-month, 18-month, and 24-month follow-up. Assessment via interview also occurred at 6-month, 12-month, 18-month, and 24-month follow-up. Results: The psychoeducational intervention was successful in increasing compliance with vaginal dilation. Conclusions: This study is the first randomized controlled study to demonstrate the effectiveness of an intervention in increasing compliance with the use of vaginal dilators

  17. 75 FR 63093 - Oil Pollution Prevention; Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Rule-Compliance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... Oil Pollution Prevention; Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Rule--Compliance Date... certain facilities must prepare or amend their Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plans... facilities must prepare or amend their Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plans (or ``Plan...

  18. Generalized synchronization via impulsive control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Rong; Xu Zhenyuan; Yang, Simon X.; He Xueming

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates theoretically that two completely different systems can implement GS via impulsive control, moreover by using impulsive control, for a given manifold y = H(x) we construct a response system to achieve GS with drive system and the synchronization manifold is y = H(x). Our theoretical results are supported by numerical examples

  19. INTERNAL CONTROL AND AUDIT OF ENTERPRISES’ COMPLIANCE WITH CUSTOMS REQUIREMENTS WHILE CON-DUCTING FOREIGN ECONOMIC ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Vakulchyk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the reliability of enterprises engaged in the foreign economic activity and simplifying of Customs procedures have become a relevant issue in the context of globalization. The capabilities and preferences of the “Authorized Economic Operator” status are the cause of a new challenge for managers of enterprises – creation of an internal control system to ensure a systematic monitoring of the conditions of Customs compliance standards of reliability and safety, which would allow identifying risks of loss of the “Authorized Economic Operator” status. The purpose of the scientific paper is to improve the internal control system of an enterprise engaged in foreign economic activity in the process of obtaining and saving the “Authorized Economic Operator” status in accordance with the international Custom requirements for safety and reliability. Methodology. The research is based on the methods of logical and analytical modelling of the impact assessment of individual factors on the value of the generalization indicator. The results are tested on the internal accounting data of the existing machine-building enterprises. Results. The paper shows the results of adapting the concept of COSO to the system of internal control of the foreign economic activity of the enterprise in the process of obtaining or retaining the “Authorized Economic Operator” status. The internal control system within the concept of COSO should ensure the achievement of the objectives – operations, reporting, and compliance. The criteria for estimating the objective “compliance” for an enterprise engaged in foreign economic activity can be an integral indicator of compliance. Value/originality. It is suggested to perform internal control of an enterprise’s compliance with Customs requirements based on the analysis of deviations of the compliance integral indicator. Practical implications. The result of control is to perform a steady in

  20. 7 CFR 1773.32 - Report on compliance and on internal control over financial reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... financial reporting. 1773.32 Section 1773.32 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... RUS Reporting Requirements § 1773.32 Report on compliance and on internal control over financial... control over financial reporting including whether or not the tests performed provided sufficient evidence...

  1. Retailer opinions about and compliance with family smoking prevention and tobacco control act point of sale provisions: a survey of tobacco retailers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Shyanika W; Emery, Sherry L; Ennett, Susan; Reyes, Heathe Luz McNaughton; Scott, John C; Ribisl, Kurt M

    2015-09-11

    The objectives of this study were to document retailer opinions about tobacco control policy at the point of sale (POS) and link these opinions with store level compliance with sales and marketing provisions of the Tobacco Control Act. This study conducted interviews of 252 tobacco retailers in three counties in North Carolina and linked their opinions with in-person observational audit data of their stores' compliance with POS policies. We conducted analyses examining retailer factors associated with noncompliance using Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) controlling for individual, store, neighborhood, and county factors. Over 90 % of retailers support minors' access provisions and a large minority (over 40 %) support graphic warnings and promotion bans. Low levels of support were found for a potential ban on menthol cigarettes (17 %). Store noncompliance with tobacco control policies was associated with both more reported retailer barriers to compliance and less support for POS policies. Awareness of and source of information about tobacco control regulations were not associated with compliance when accounting for neighborhood and county characteristics. Retailers expressed some support for a wide range of POS policies. Advocates and government agencies tasked with enforcement can work with retailers as stakeholders to enhance support, mitigate barriers, and promote compliance with tobacco control efforts at the point of sale.

  2. Compliance in the banking sector: checking the observance of legislation on controlled foreign companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Shapkina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to identify the features of law implementation in the banking sector when fulfilling the compliance procedures as well as specificity of the identification of clients by credit institutions in the implementation of the law provisions on controlled foreign companies. Methods dialectic approach to cognition of legal phenomena allowing to analyze them in their development and functioning in the context of objective and subjective factors. Comparative method formallogical method method of deduction. Results in the article the necessity is proved to introduce the compliance procedures as a mechanism for internal control systems in the banking sector and for impeding the development of the shadow economy corruption and extremist manifestations. It is determined that the application of the compliance system allows to solve the problem of the effectiveness of anticorruption policy. The approaches are analyzed to the problem of offshorization of the Russian economy and measures for its resolution including by creating mechanisms of taxation of controlled foreign companies. The aims and approaches are viewed to defining the controlled foreign companies and the impact of Russian reforms on the legal systems of foreign countries. In particular we consider changes in Swiss law aimed at tightening controls over financial transactions in the banking sector with the aim of combating money laundering as well as compliance with Russian antioffshore legislation. It is stated that the change in the legal field in Russia will contribute to the protection of fiscal interests of the state and modernization of thebanking systems of internal control. Scientific novelty basing on the use of complex scientific methods for the first time the study is carried out of the compliance procedure in the banking sector from the point of view of checking the observance of the legislation on controlled foreign companies. Practical significance the main provisions and

  3. Compliance with point-of-sale tobacco control policies and student tobacco use in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Ritesh; Pednekar, Mangesh S; McCarthy, William J; Resnicow, Ken; Pimple, Sharmila A; Hsieh, Hsing-Fang; Mishra, Gauravi A; Gupta, Prakash C

    2018-05-09

    We measured how student tobacco use and psychological risk factors (intention to use and perceived ease of access to tobacco products) were associated with tobacco vendor compliance with India's Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products Act provisions regulating the point-of-sale (POS) environment. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional survey of high school students (n=1373) and tobacco vendors (n=436) in school-adjacent communities (n=26) in Mumbai, India. We used in-class self-administered questionnaires of high school students, face-to-face interviews with tobacco vendors and compliance checks of tobacco POS environments. Logistic regression models with adjustments for clustering were used to measure associations between student tobacco use, psychological risk factors and tobacco POS compliance. Compliance with POS laws was low overall and was associated with lower risk of student current tobacco use (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.91) and current smokeless tobacco use (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.77), when controlling for student-level and community-level tobacco use risk factors. Compliance was not associated with student intention to use tobacco (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.21 to 1.18) and perceived ease of access to tobacco (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.53 to 1.00). Improving vendor compliance with tobacco POS laws may reduce student tobacco use. Future studies should test strategies to improve compliance with tobacco POS laws, particularly in low-income and middle-income country settings like urban India. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. The Role of Mothers' and Fathers' Parental Control and Coparenting in Toddlers' Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyong-Ah; Elicker, James G.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined the unique and relative contributions of mothers' and fathers' parental control and coparenting to toddlers' committed compliance with parents in both dyadic parent-child and triadic family play contexts. Sixty-eight mostly middle-class, 2-parent families with toddlers (16-37 months) were observed in a…

  5. 76 FR 72120 - Oil Pollution Prevention; Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Rule-Compliance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    ... Oil Pollution Prevention; Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Rule--Compliance Date... rule will be effective November 22, 2011. List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 112 Oil pollution prevention... Regulations is amended as follows: PART 112--OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION 0 1. The authority citation for part 112...

  6. 76 FR 64245 - Oil Pollution Prevention; Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Rule-Compliance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... Oil Pollution Prevention; Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Rule--Compliance Date... burden to comply with the regulations contained in 40 CFR part 112--Oil Pollution Prevention. However, in... rule will be effective November 7, 2011. List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 112 Oil pollution prevention...

  7. Diabetes Support Groups Improve Patient’s Compliance and Control Blood Glucose Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamrotul Izzah

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Providing information is not enough to improve diabetic patient’s compliance and achieve goals of therapy. Patient’s good awareness as well as emotional and social supports from family and community may play an important role to improve their compliance and clinical outcomes. Therefore, diabetes support groups were developed and each support group consisted of two pharmacists, two nurses, diabetic patients and their family members. A total of 70 type 2 diabetic patient’s were enrolled and randomized into support group 1 and support group 2. Patients in the group 1 received information leaflets only, while patient in the group 2 received pharmacist counselling and information leaflets at each meeting. Patient’s awareness of diabetes and compliance with medications were assessed by a short questionnaire at baseline and final follow-up. Blood glucose and cholesterol levels were also evaluated in both groups. At the end of study, the overall patient’s awareness and compliance improved by 61.5%. The random and fasting blood glucose levels decreased over than 30% in the group 2 and around 14% in the group 1. This study reveals that collaboration between health care professionals and community in the diabetes support group might help diabetic patients to increase their knowledge and compliance with the diabetes therapy as well as glycaemic control.

  8. Ethylene Production Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Compliance Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    This July 2006 document is intended to help owners and operators of ethylene processes understand and comply with EPA's maximum achievable control technology standards promulgated on July 12, 2002, as amended on April 13, 2005 and April 20, 2006.

  9. Performing compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wimmelmann, Camilla Lawaetz

    2017-01-01

    the local policy workers front-staged some practices in the implementation process and back-staged others. The local policy workers deliberately performed ‘guideline compliance’ by using information control and impression management techniques. The findings suggest that local guideline compliance should...... be regarded as a staged performance in which deliberate techniques are used to produce and manage certain impressions of compliance....

  10. 48 CFR 1401.304 - Agency control and compliance procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and control of the Director, PAM, who is responsible for reviewing and preparing the issuance of all Department-wide and bureau-wide acquisition regulations published in the Federal Register to ensure... Director, PAM, at the time of issuance. (2) The Director, PAM, is also responsible for reviewing and...

  11. Validation of gamma irradiator controls for quality and regulatory compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, R.B.; Pinteric, F.J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Since 1978 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has had both the legal authority and the current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) regulations in progress to require irradiator owners who process medical devices to produce evidence of Irradiation Process Validation. One of the key components of Irradiation Process Validation is the validation of the irradiator controls. However it is only recently that FDA audits have focussed on this component of the process validation. (author)

  12. ATEX explosive atmospheres : risk assessment, control and compliance

    CERN Document Server

    Jespen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    This book details how safety (i.e. the absence of unacceptable risks) is ensured in areas where potentially explosive atmospheres (ATEX) can arise. The book also offers readers essential information on how to comply with the newest (April 2016) EU legislation when the presence of ATEX cannot be avoided. By presenting general guidance on issues arising out of the EU ATEX legislation – especially on zone classification, explosion risk assessment, equipment categorization, Ex-marking and related technical/chemical aspects – the book provides equipment manufacturers, responsible employers, and others with the essential knowledge they need to be able to understand the different – and often complicated – aspects of ATEX and to implement the necessary safety precautions. As such, it represents a valuable resource for all those concerned with maintaining high levels of safety in ATEX environments.

  13. Efficient Multivariable Generalized Predictive Control for Autonomous Underwater Vehicle in Vertical Plane

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Xuliang; Yang, Guangyi

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and simulation validation of a multivariable GPC (generalized predictive control) for AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle) in vertical plane. This control approach has been designed in the case of AUV navigating with low speed near water surface, in order to restrain wave disturbance effectively and improve pitch and heave motion stability. The proposed controller guarantees compliance with rudder manipulation, AUV output constraints, and driving energy consumpti...

  14. Asthma control in general practice -- GP and patient perspectives compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Joan; Hancock, Kerry L; Armour, Carol; Harrison, Christopher; Miller, Graeme

    2013-10-01

    How general practitioners (GPs) and patients perceive asthma control, and concordance between these perceptions, may influence asthma management and medication adherence. The aims of this study were to determine asthma prevalence in adult patients, measure patient asthma control and the correlation between GP and patient perceptions of asthma control or impact. A Supplementary Analysis of Nominated Data (SAND) sub-study of the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) program surveyed 2563 patients from 103 GPs. Asthma control was measured using the Asthma Control Questionnaire 5-item version (ACQ-5), and medication adherence by patient self-report. Survey procedures in SAS software and Pearson's correlation statistics were used. Asthma prevalence was 12.7% (95% confidence interval: 10.9-14.5), with good correlation between GP and patient perceptions of asthma control/impact, and with raw ACQ-5 scores. Grouped ACQ-5 scores showed higher levels of uncontrolled asthma. Medication adherence was sub-optimal. The ACQ-5 questions are useful for assessing asthma control, for prompting medication reviews, and for reinforcing benefits of medication compliance to improve long-term asthma control.

  15. An EMG Interface for the Control of Motion and Compliance of a Supernumerary Robotic Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Irfan; Spagnoletti, Giovanni; Salvietti, Gionata; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel electromyographic (EMG) control interface to control motion and joints compliance of a supernumerary robotic finger. The supernumerary robotic fingers are a recently introduced class of wearable robotics that provides users additional robotic limbs in order to compensate or augment the existing abilities of natural limbs without substituting them. Since supernumerary robotic fingers are supposed to closely interact and perform actions in synergy with the human limbs, the control principles of extra finger should have similar behavior as human’s ones including the ability of regulating the compliance. So that, it is important to propose a control interface and to consider the actuators and sensing capabilities of the robotic extra finger compatible to implement stiffness regulation control techniques. We propose EMG interface and a control approach to regulate the compliance of the device through servo actuators. In particular, we use a commercial EMG armband for gesture recognition to be associated with the motion control of the robotic device and surface one channel EMG electrodes interface to regulate the compliance of the robotic device. We also present an updated version of a robotic extra finger where the adduction/abduction motion is realized through ball bearing and spur gears mechanism. We have validated the proposed interface with two sets of experiments related to compensation and augmentation. In the first set of experiments, different bimanual tasks have been performed with the help of the robotic device and simulating a paretic hand since this novel wearable system can be used to compensate the missing grasping abilities in chronic stroke patients. In the second set, the robotic extra finger is used to enlarge the workspace and manipulation capability of healthy hands. In both sets, the same EMG control interface has been used. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed control interface is intuitive and can

  16. Factors associated with compliance with community directed treatment with ivermectin for onchocerciasis control in Southwestern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wondafrash Mekite

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although ivermectin is distributed free of charge through the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC, not all eligible individuals within communities receive the annual treatment. This poses a serious threat to efforts aimed to control onchocerciasis. This study attempts to determine factors associated with compliance to Community Directed Treatment with Ivermectin (CDTI and provides a basis for trying to understand how best to sustain long-term compliance in order to achieve success in the control of onchocerciasis. Methods An unmatched case-control study was conducted in Bebeka coffee plantation southwest Ethiopia. Cases were, compliant i.e., those individuals who had been registered on the relevant treatment registers and had taken all the five annual doses of Ivermectin. Controls were non-compliant, i.e. those individuals who had been recorded in the relevant treatment registers during the first treatment round(2003, and did not take at least two doses of which one being in the last treatment round (2007. Data were collected using a pre-tested interviewer administered structured questionnaire. Data were edited, cleaned, coded and analyzed using SPSS version 12.0.1 for Microsoft Windows. Multiple logistic regression models was used to identify factors associated with compliance to ivermectin. Results From the total of 456 individuals selected for administration of the survey questionnaire, 450(225 cases and 225 controls were contacted and completed the study 2 refused and 4 were unavailable. Five factors associated with compliance were identified: high risk perception [Adjusted Odds Ratio(AOR = 1.98, 95% Confidence Interval (CI, 1.32-2.95], one's family support [AOR = 1.86, 95% CI, 1.22-2.84], perceiving that the Community Drug Distributors (CDDs are doing their work well [AOR = 2.84, 95% CI, 1.50-5.37] and perceiving measuring height is the best way to determine a person's treatment dose [AOR = 6.37, 95% CI, 2

  17. General Pest Control - Industrial. Manual 95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the general pest control category. The text discusses general, parasitic and miscellaneous pests such as ants, ticks, and spiders; fabric, wood-destroying, and grain pests such as beetles, termites, and…

  18. Non-Compliance and Follow-Up in Swedish Official and Private Animal Welfare Control of Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Lundmark Hedman

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Farmers often have to comply with several sets of animal welfare regulations, since private standards have been developed in addition to legislation. Using an epidemiological approach, we analysed protocols from animal welfare inspections carried out in Swedish dairy herds by the County Administrative Board (CAB; official control of legislation and by the dairy company Arla Foods (private control of Arlagården standard during 2010–2013 in the county of Västra Götaland. CAB and Arla inspections were not carried out simultaneously. We aimed to identify common non-compliances, quantify risk factors of non-compliance, and investigate if non-compliances were based on animal-, resource-, or management-based requirements, as well as determining the time period allowed for achieving compliance. Non-compliance was found in 58% of CAB cases, and 51% of Arla cases (each case comprising a sequence of one or several inspections. Dirty dairy cattle was one of the most frequent non-compliances in both control systems. However, the differences in control results were large, suggesting a difference in focus between the two systems. Tie-stall housing and winter season (Dec–Feb were common risk factors for non-compliance, and overall organic farms had a lower predicted number of non-compliances compared to conventional farms. The presence of both similarities and differences between the systems underlines the need for transparency, predictability, and clarity of inspections.

  19. Compliance with the gluten-free diet: the role of locus of control in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Anna; Zanchi, Chiara; Martelossi, Stefano; Di Leo, Grazia; Not, Tarcisio; Ventura, Alessandro

    2011-03-01

    To verify whether subjects with celiac disease (CD) have a different locus of control (LoC) compared with healthy subjects, and to evaluate the relationship between LoC and compliance with a prescribed gluten-free diet (GFD) and quality of life (QoL). We studied 156 subjects on a GFD (mean age, 10 years) and 353 healthy controls (mean age, 12 years). All subjects completed tests on the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale; the subjects with CD also completed a questionnaire to measure compliance with dietary treatment and the disease's impact on QoL. There was no difference in LoC values between patients with CD and controls. Subjects with CD with good dietary compliance had a more internal LoC compared with those who were not compliant (P = .01). Patients who reported a satisfactory QoL had a more internal LoC compared with those who reported negative affects on QoL due to CD (P = .01). Our study confirms the usefulness of the LoC concept for identifying those patients who might be at risk for dietary transgression. Given the enhanced, psychological, and social well being that can result from adherence to a GFD, educational and psychological support can help internalize the LoC in those patients at risk for dietary transgression. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Feasibility, Safety, and Compliance in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Physical Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. McGinley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Both efficacy and clinical feasibility deserve consideration in translation of research outcomes. This study evaluated the feasibility of rehabilitation programs within the context of a large randomized controlled trial of physical therapy. Ambulant participants with Parkinson's disease (PD (n=210 were randomized into three groups: (1 progressive strength training (PST; (2 movement strategy training (MST; or (3 control (“life skills”. PST and MST included fall prevention education. Feasibility was evaluated in terms of safety, retention, adherence, and compliance measures. Time to first fall during the intervention phase did not differ across groups, and adverse effects were minimal. Retention was high; only eight participants withdrew during or after the intervention phase. Strong adherence (attendance >80% did not differ between groups (P=.435. Compliance in the therapy groups was high. All three programs proved feasible, suggesting they may be safely implemented for people with PD in community-based clinical practice.

  1. Use of tactile feedback to control exploratory movements to characterize object compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhe; Fishel, Jeremy A; Yamamoto, Tomonori; Loeb, Gerald E

    2012-01-01

    Humans have been shown to be good at using active touch to perceive subtle differences in compliance. They tend to use highly stereotypical exploratory strategies, such as applying normal force to a surface. We developed similar exploratory and perceptual algorithms for a mechatronic robotic system (Barrett arm/hand system) equipped with liquid-filled, biomimetic tactile sensors (BioTac(®) from SynTouch LLC). The distribution of force on the fingertip was measured by the electrical resistance of the conductive liquid trapped between the elastomeric skin and a cluster of four electrodes on the flat fingertip surface of the rigid core of the BioTac. These signals provided closed-loop control of exploratory movements, while the distribution of skin deformations, measured by more lateral electrodes and by the hydraulic pressure, were used to estimate material properties of objects. With this control algorithm, the robot plus tactile sensor was able to discriminate the relative compliance of various rubber samples.

  2. General distributed control system for fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingner, P.L.; Levings, S.J.; Wilkins, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    A general control system using distributed LSI-11 microprocessors is being developed. Common software residues in each LSI-11 and is tailored to an application by control specifications downloaded from a host computer. The microprocessors, their control interfaces, and the micro-to-host communications are CAMAC based. The host computer also supports an operator interface, coordination of multiple microprocessors, and utilities to create and maintain the control specifications. Typical applications include monitoring safety interlocks as well as controlling vacuum systems, high voltage charging systems, and diagnostics

  3. Business Process Risk Management, Compliance and Internal Control: A Research Agenda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.; Best, Peter; Green, Peter

    (COSO). Based on an inductive methodological approach using literature review and interviews with managers engaged in risk management and internal control projects, this paper identifies three main areas that currently have management attention. These are business process risk management, compliance......Integration of risk management and management control is emerging as an important area in the wake of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and with ongoing development of frameworks such as the Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework from the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission...... management and internal control development. This paper discusses these areas and identifies a series of research questions regarding these critical issues....

  4. Compliance Framing - Framing Compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Lutz-Ulrich Haack; Martin C. Reimann

    2012-01-01

    Corporations have to install various organizational measures to comply with legal as well as internal guidelines systematically. Compliance management systems have the challenging task to make use of an internal compliance-marketing approach in order to ensure not only an adequate but also effective compliance-culture. Compliance-literature and findings of persuasive goal-framing-theory give opposite implications for establishing a rather values- versus rule-based compliance-culture respectiv...

  5. General predictive control using the delta operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Rostgaard; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Ravn, Ole

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with two-discrete-time operators, the conventional forward shift-operator and the δ-operator. Both operators are treated in view of construction of suitable solutions to the Diophantine equation for the purpose of prediction. A general step-recursive scheme is presented. Finally...... a general predictive control (GPC) is formulated and applied adaptively to a continuous-time plant...

  6. Dietary compliance and its association with glycemic control among poorly controlled type 2 diabetic outpatients in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S L; Juliana, S; Sakinah, H

    2011-12-01

    Compliance with medical nutrition therapy is important to improve patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine dietary compliance and its association with glycemic control among outpatients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). In this cross-sectional study, patients who had a glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level of at least 6.5%, after attending a diet counseling session at the Outpatient Dietetic Clinic, HUSM, were enrolled. Out of 150 diabetic patients reviewed between 2006 and 2008, 61 adults (32 men and 29 women) agreed to participate in this study. A questionnaire-based interview was used to collect socio-demographic, clinical and diabetes self-care data. The patient's dietary compliance rate was determined by the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) measure. Anthropometric and biological measurements were also taken. Only 16.4% of the respondents adhered to the dietary regimen provided by dietitians. Among the 7 dietary self-care behaviours, item number 6 (eat lots of food high in dietary fibre such as vegetable or oats) had the highest compliant rate (54.1%); whereas item number 3 (eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day) had the lowest compliant rate (23.0%). There was a significant association between gender (p = 0.037) and fasting blood sugar (FBS) (p = 0.007) with the compliance status. Dietary non-compliance is still common among T2DM patients. Dietitians need to improve their skills and use more effective intervention approaches in providing dietary counseling to patients.

  7. Internal Controls and Compliance with Laws and Regulations for the DOD Military Retirement Trust Fund Financial Statements for FY 1995

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    ... No. 94-01, "Form and Content of Agency Financial Statements," November 16, 1993. In addition, we assessed the internal controls and compliance with laws and regulations related to the financial statements...

  8. Internal Controls and Compliance with Laws and Regulations for the DOD Military Retirement Trust Fund Financial Statements for FY 1996

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    1997-01-01

    ... No. 94-01, "Form and Content of Agency Financial Statements," November 16, 1993. In addition, we assessed the internal controls and compliance with laws and regulations related to the financial statements...

  9. Compliance with the national palestinian infection prevention and control protocol at governmental paediatric hospitals in gaza governorates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eljedi, Ashraf; Dalo, Shareef

    2014-08-01

    Nosocomial infections are a significant burden for both patients and the healthcare system. For this reason, infection prevention and control (IPC) practices are extremely important. The Palestinian Ministry of Health adopted the national IPC Protocol in 2004. This study aimed to assess the compliance of healthcare providers (HCPs) with the Protocol in three governmental paediatric hospitals in Gaza governorates. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from February to November 2010. Data were collected from a sample of doctors, nurses and physiotherapists (N = 334) using a self-administered questionnaire and observation checklists to record HCP practices and assess the hospital environment. The response rate was 92%. The most important reasons for non-compliance with the IPC Protocol were the absence of an education programme (61.5%), lack of knowledge (52.4%) and the scarcity of required supplies (46.9%). Only 2.3% of respondents had a copy of the IPC Protocol, while 65.8% did not know of its existence. Only 16.9% had participated in training sessions regarding general IPC practices. The observation checklist regarding HCP practices revealed low levels of compliance in hand washing (45.9%), wearing gloves (40.7%) and using antiseptics/disinfectants (49.16%). The health facilities checklist indicated that there was a lack of certain essential equipment and materials, such as covered waste containers and heavy-duty gloves. Due to the lack of HPC knowledge, the authors recommend that the IPC Protocol be made available in all hospitals. In addition, a qualified team should implement intensive IPC education and training programmes and facilities should provide the required equipment and materials.

  10. Monitoring the hand hygiene compliance of health care workers in a general intensive care unit: Use of continuous closed circle television versus overt observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotfain, Evgeni; Livshiz-Riven, Ilana; Gushansky, Alexander; Erblat, Alexander; Koyfman, Leonid; Ziv, Tomer; Saidel-Odes, Lisa; Klein, Moti; Borer, Abraham

    2017-08-01

    A variety of hand hygiene monitoring programs (HHMPs) have come into use in hospitals throughout the world. In the present study, we compare continuous closed circle television (CCTV) with overt observation for monitoring the hand hygiene compliance of health care workers (HCWs) in a general intensive care unit (GICU). This is a cross-sectional and comparative study. In this study, we use a novel hand hygiene CCTV monitoring system for hand hygiene performance monitoring. The study population incorporated all the GICU HCWs, including registered nurses, staff physicians, and auxiliary workers. All HCWs of our GICU were observed, including ICU registered nurses, ICU staff physicians, and auxiliary workers participated in the present study. Overall, each observer team did 50 sessions in each arm of the study. Total number of hand hygiene opportunities was approaching 500 opportunities. The compliance rates when only overt observations were performed was higher than when only covert observations were performed with a delta of approximately 10% (209 out of 590 [35.43%] vs 130 out of 533 [24.39%]; P hand hygiene. However, there is no clear basis for incorporating a CCTV observation modality into a health care system that already operates an overt observation program. We have shown that CCTV methodology records a different distribution of opportunities for performing hand hygiene and of actual performances of hand hygiene compared with overt observation. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Non-Compliance and Follow-Up in Swedish Official and Private Animal Welfare Control of Dairy Cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Jan; Röcklinsberg, Helena; Wahlberg, Birgitta

    2018-01-01

    Simple Summary In many cases, different animal welfare inspections are taking place at an animal farm over time, as the farmer has to comply with both the legislation and with various private standards. In this study, we compared official inspections carried out by CAB (the County Administrative Board, a governmental agency) with private inspections carried out by Arla Foods (a private company) on dairy farms in one Swedish county. For example, we looked at seasonal effects and compared the incidence of different non-compliances. This study shows that long time periods were sometimes allowed for correction, that follow-up systems are diverse, and that there were differences in the inspection result between CAB and Arla due to different focuses during the inspections. Dirty dairy cattle were, however, a common non-compliance found by both CAB and Arla. Tie-stall housing and winter season (Dec–Feb) were risk factors for non-compliance, while the risk was lower for both CAB and Arla to find non-compliances at organic farms compared to conventional farms. We conclude that the presence of both similarities and differences between different control systems underlines the need for transparency, predictability, and clarity of inspections. Abstract Farmers often have to comply with several sets of animal welfare regulations, since private standards have been developed in addition to legislation. Using an epidemiological approach, we analysed protocols from animal welfare inspections carried out in Swedish dairy herds by the County Administrative Board (CAB; official control of legislation) and by the dairy company Arla Foods (private control of Arlagården standard) during 2010–2013 in the county of Västra Götaland. CAB and Arla inspections were not carried out simultaneously. We aimed to identify common non-compliances, quantify risk factors of non-compliance, and investigate if non-compliances were based on animal-, resource-, or management-based requirements, as

  12. Training children aged 5-10 years in manual compliance control to improve drawing and handwriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Geoffrey P; Snapp-Childs, Winona

    2018-04-12

    post-training performance. We conclude that the method improves manual compliance control, and more generally, prospective control of movements used in drawing performance. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Glycemic control, compliance, and satisfaction for diabetic gravidas in centering group care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Laura I; Jelin, Angie C; Iqbal, Sara N; Belna, Sarah L; Fries, Melissa H; Patel, Misbah; Desale, Sameer; Ramsey, Patrick S

    2017-05-01

    To determine if diabetic gravidas enrolled in Centering® group care have improved glycemic control compared to those attending standard prenatal care. To compare compliance and patient satisfaction between the groups. We conducted a prospective cohort study of diabetics enrolled in centering group care from October 2013 to December 2015. Glycemic control, compliance and patient satisfaction (five-point Likert scale) were evaluated. Student's t-test, Chi-Square and mixed effects model were used to compare outcomes. We compared 20 patients in centering to 28 standard prenatal care controls. Mean fasting blood sugar was lower with centering group care (91.0 versus 105.5 mg/dL, p =0.017). There was no difference in change in fasting blood sugar over time between the two groups (p = 0.458). The percentage of time patients brought their blood glucose logs did not differ between the centering group and standard prenatal care (70.7 versus 73.9%, p = 0.973). Women in centering group care had better patient satisfaction scores for "ability to be seen by a physician" (5 versus 4, p = 0.041) and "time in waiting room" (5 versus 4, p =0.001). Fasting blood sugar was lower for patients in centering group care. Change in blood sugar over time did not differ between groups. Diabetic gravidas enrolled in centering group care report improved patient satisfaction.

  14. Compliance and control characteristics of an additive manufactured-flexure stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a compliance and positioning control characteristics of additive manufactured-nanopositioning system consisted of the flexure mechanism and voice coil motor (VCM). The double compound notch type flexure stage was designed to utilize the elastic deformation of two symmetrical four-bar mechanisms to provide a millimeter-level working range. Additive manufacturing (AM) process, stereolithography, was used to fabricate the flexure stage. The AM stage was inspected by using 3D X-ray computerized tomography scanner: air-voids and shape irregularity. The compliance, open-loop resonance peak, and damping ratio of the AM stage were measured 0.317 mm/N, 80 Hz, and 0.19, respectively. The AM stage was proportional-integral-derivative positioning feedback-controlled and the capacitive type sensor was used to measure the displacement. As a result, the AM flexure mechanism was successfully 25 nm positioning controlled within 500 μm range. The resonance peak was found approximately at 280 Hz in closed-loop. This research showed that the AM flexure mechanism and the VCM can provide millimeter range with high precision and can be a good alternative to an expensive metal-based flexure mechanism and piezoelectric transducer

  15. Compliance and control characteristics of an additive manufactured-flexure stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main St., Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents a compliance and positioning control characteristics of additive manufactured-nanopositioning system consisted of the flexure mechanism and voice coil motor (VCM). The double compound notch type flexure stage was designed to utilize the elastic deformation of two symmetrical four-bar mechanisms to provide a millimeter-level working range. Additive manufacturing (AM) process, stereolithography, was used to fabricate the flexure stage. The AM stage was inspected by using 3D X-ray computerized tomography scanner: air-voids and shape irregularity. The compliance, open-loop resonance peak, and damping ratio of the AM stage were measured 0.317 mm/N, 80 Hz, and 0.19, respectively. The AM stage was proportional-integral-derivative positioning feedback-controlled and the capacitive type sensor was used to measure the displacement. As a result, the AM flexure mechanism was successfully 25 nm positioning controlled within 500 μm range. The resonance peak was found approximately at 280 Hz in closed-loop. This research showed that the AM flexure mechanism and the VCM can provide millimeter range with high precision and can be a good alternative to an expensive metal-based flexure mechanism and piezoelectric transducer.

  16. The observance of the Kyoto Protocol on climate changes: stakes of the international control of compliance with commitments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maljean-Dubois, S.

    2007-01-01

    The author presents the conclusions of multidisciplinary research which has examined the relationship between the Kyoto protocol's observance mechanisms (control of compliance of commitments and sanction in case of non compliance) and the more conventional mechanisms of international conflict solving. It also examines the peculiar characteristics of these mechanisms, whether legal or not. Finally, the author examines the impact of the adopted procedure, and whether it is constraining

  17. General Purpose Crate (GPC) for control applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Kundan; Munda, Deepak K.; Jain, Mamta; Archunan, M.; Barua, P.; Ajith Kumar, B.P.

    2011-01-01

    A General Purpose Crate (GPC) capable of handling digital and analog Inputs/Outputs signals has been developed at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi, for accelerator control system applications. The system includes back-plane bus with on board plugged-in single board computer with PC104 and Ethernet interface, running Linux operating system. The bus control logic is designed on the back-plane pcb itself, making the system more rugged. The various types of digital and analog input/output modules can be plugged into the back plane bus randomly with standard euro connectors, which provides highly reliable and dust free contacts. Maximum eight modules can be inserted into the crate. The total power consumption for various types of modules and back-plane controller is approximately 50 watts. The multi-output DC power supply from COSEL has been used in the crate. The general purpose crate is software compatible with the CAMAC crates used in the accelerator control system. (author)

  18. Use of tactile feedback to control exploratory movements to characterize object compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe eSu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Humans have been shown to be good at using active touch to perceive subtle differences in compliance. They tend to use highly stereotypical exploratory strategies, such as applying normal force to a surface. We developed similar exploratory and perceptual algorithms for a mechatronic robotic system (Barrett arm/hand system equipped with liquid-filled, biomimetic tactile sensors (BioTac® from SynTouch LLC. The distribution of force on the fingertip was measured by the electrical resistance of the conductive liquid trapped between the elastomeric skin and a cluster of four electrodes on the flat fingertip surface of the rigid core of the BioTac. These signals provided closed-loop control of exploratory movements, while the distribution of skin deformations, measured by more lateral electrodes and by the hydraulic pressure, were used to estimate material properties of objects. With this control algorithm, the robot plus tactile sensor was able to discriminate the relative compliance of various rubber samples.

  19. Breathing circuit compliance and accuracy of displayed tidal volume during pressure-controlled ventilation of infants: A quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenski, Todd A; Diehl, Carrie; Clopton, Rachel G; Friesen, Robert H

    2017-09-01

    Anesthesia machines have evolved to deliver desired tidal volumes more accurately by measuring breathing circuit compliance during a preuse self-test and then incorporating the compliance value when calculating expired tidal volume. The initial compliance value is utilized in tidal volume calculation regardless of whether the actual compliance of the breathing circuit changes during a case, as happens when corrugated circuit tubing is manually expanded after the preuse self-test but before patient use. We noticed that the anesthesia machine preuse self-test was usually performed on nonexpanded pediatric circuit tubing, and then the breathing circuit was subsequently expanded for clinical use. We aimed to demonstrate that performing the preuse self-test in that manner could lead to incorrectly displayed tidal volume on the anesthesia machine monitor. The goal of this quality improvement project was to change the usual practice and improve the accuracy of displayed tidal volume in infants undergoing general anesthesia. There were four stages of the project: (i) gathering baseline data about the performance of the preuse self-test and using infant and adult test lungs to measure discrepancies of displayed tidal volumes when breathing circuit compliance was changed after the initial preuse self-test; (ii) gathering clinical data during pressure-controlled ventilation comparing anesthesia machine displayed tidal volume with actual spirometry tidal volume in patients less than 10 kg before (machine preuse self-test performed while the breathing circuit was nonexpanded) and after an intervention (machine preuse self-test performed after the breathing circuit was fully expanded); (iii) performing department-wide education to help implement practice change; (iv) gathering postintervention data to determine the prevalence of proper machine preuse self-test. At constant pressure-controlled ventilation through fully expanded circuit tubing, displayed tidal volume was 83

  20. Therapist empathy, homework compliance, and outcome in cognitive behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder: partitioning within- and between-therapist effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kimberley M; Aviram, Adi; Constantino, Michael J; Westra, Henny A; Antony, Martin M

    2017-09-01

    Although client-perceived therapist empathy relates to positive therapy outcomes, including in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), little is known about how empathy exerts its ameliorative effect. One possible way is by promoting clients' subsequent homework compliance, a variable that also predicts positive outcomes in CBT. The present study sought to investigate simultaneously, in the context of 43 therapist-client dyads receiving 15 sessions of CBT for generalized anxiety disorder, (1) the association of early client-perceived therapist empathy (averaged over sessions 1, 3, 5) with mid-treatment client homework compliance (averaged over sessions 6, 8, 10); (2) the association of mid-treatment homework compliance on client posttreatment worry severity; and (3) the indirect effect of early perceived therapist empathy on posttreatment worry through mid-treatment homework compliance. Given that clients were nested within therapists, we examined both within- and between-therapist differences in clients' ratings of therapist empathy and homework compliance, and tested both of these indices as predictors of the relevant dependent variables in a multilevel model. At the within-therapist level (i.e., differences between clients within a given therapist's caseload), greater early empathy was associated with greater mid-treatment homework compliance. At the between-therapist level (i.e., differences between therapists across all of their cases), greater between-therapist homework compliance was related to lower posttreatment worry. Finally, homework compliance was not found to mediate the relationship between empathy and posttreatment outcome. The results underscore the importance of parsing client and therapist effects, and are discussed with regard to their training and research implications.

  1. Ship Compliance in Emission Control Areas: Technology Costs and Policy Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Edward W; Corbett, James J

    2015-08-18

    This paper explores whether a Panama Canal Authority pollution tax could be an effective economic instrument to achieve Emission Control Area (ECA)-like reductions in emissions from ships transiting the Panama Canal. This tariff-based policy action, whereby vessels in compliance with International Maritime Organisation (IMO) ECA standards pay a lower transit tariff than noncompliant vessels, could be a feasible alternative to petitioning for a Panamanian ECA through the IMO. A $4.06/container fuel tax could incentivize ECA-compliant emissions reductions for nearly two-thirds of Panama Canal container vessels, mainly through fuel switching; if the vessel(s) also operate in IMO-defined ECAs, exhaust-gas treatment technologies may be cost-effective. The RATES model presented here compares current abatement technologies based on hours of operation within an ECA, computing costs for a container vessel to comply with ECA standards in addition to computing the Canal tax that would reduce emissions in Panama. Retrofitted open-loop scrubbers are cost-effective only for vessels operating within an ECA for more than 4500 h annually. Fuel switching is the least-cost option to industry for vessels that operate mostly outside of ECA regions, whereas vessels operating entirely within an ECA region could reduce compliance cost with exhaust-gas treatment technology (scrubbers).

  2. Applying Positive Deviance for Improving Compliance to Adolescent Anemia Control Program in Tribal Communities of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Vani; Sternin, Monique; Sharma, Deepika; Bhanot, Arti; Mebrahtu, Saba

    2017-09-01

    Positive deviance (PD) is an asset-based social and behavior change communication strategy, utilizing successful outliers within a specific context. It has been applied to tackling major public health problems but not adolescent anemia. The study, first of its kind, used PD to improve compliance to adolescent anemia control program in Jharkhand, India, where anemia prevalence in adolescent girls is 70%, and program compliance is low. With leadership of state government, the study was designed and implemented by a multidisciplinary 42 member PD team, in Khunti district, in 2014. Participatory appraisals were undertaken with 434 adolescent girls, 18 frontline workers, 15 teachers, and 751 community leaders/parents/relatives. Stakeholders were interviewed to identify positive deviants and PD determinants across 17 villages. Perceived benefits of iron folic acid tablet and nutritional care during adolescence are low. Positive deviants exist among adolescent girls (26 of 434), villages (2 of 17), and schools (2 of 17). Positive deviant adolescent girls consumed variety of iron-rich foods and in higher frequency, consumed iron folic acid tablets, and practiced recommended personal hygiene behaviors. Deviant practices in schools included supervision of students during tablet distribution among others. Government-led PD approach uncovered local solutions and provided a forum for government functionaries to listen to and dialogue with, and an opportunity to adapt the program according to the needs of the affected communities, who are missing partners in program design and management.

  3. The impact of a daily smartphone-based feedback system among women with gestational diabetes on compliance, glycemic control, satisfaction, and pregnancy outcome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miremberg, Hadas; Ben-Ari, Tal; Betzer, Tal; Raphaeli, Hagit; Gasnier, Rose; Barda, Giulia; Bar, Jacob; Weiner, Eran

    2018-04-01

    Patient compliance and tight glycemic control have been demonstrated to improve outcome in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus. The use of advanced technological tools, including smartphone-based platforms, to improve medical care and outcomes has been demonstrated in various fields of medicine, but only a few small studies were performed with gestational diabetes mellitus patients. We aimed to study the impact of introducing a smartphone-based daily feedback and communication platform between gestational diabetes mellitus patients and their physicians, on patient compliance, glycemic control, pregnancy outcome, and patient satisfaction. This is a prospective, single-center, randomized controlled trial. Newly diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus patients presenting to our multidisciplinary diabetes-in-pregnancy clinic were randomized to: (1) routine biweekly prenatal clinic care (control group); or (2) additional daily detailed feedback on their compliance and glycemic control from the clinic team via an application installed on their smartphone (smartphone group). The primary outcome was patient compliance defined as the actual blood glucose measurements/instructed measurements ×100. The secondary outcomes included diabetes-control parameters, pregnancy, and neonatal outcomes. The study was adequately powered to detect a 20% difference in patient compliance, based on a preliminary phase that demonstrated 70% baseline compliance to glucose measurements. A total of 120 newly diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus patients were analyzed. The 2 groups did not differ in terms of age, parity, education, body mass index, family history, maternal comorbidities, oral glucose tolerance test values, and hemoglobin A1C at randomization. The smartphone group demonstrated higher level of compliance (84 ± 0.16% vs 66 ± 0.28%, P diabetes mellitus patients and the multidisciplinary diabetes-in-pregnancy clinic team improved patient compliance and

  4. Evaluation of Blood Pressure Control Levels and Treatment Compliances of Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Aypak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate the knowledge of patients about hypertension (HT, compliance with lifestyle changes and to determine their blood pressure levels under antihypertensive therapy. Method: Hypertensive patients that applied to Family medicine outpatient clinics of Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit Education and Research Hospital for the first time, in 2012 (between February 1 to April 30, were included in our cross-sectional study. Patients are evaluated primarily for the control and the factors that can affect high blood pressure and the rate on achieving treatment goals. Results: Three hundred and forty patients were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 60.5±10.7 years and 222 of them (65.3% were female. The blood pressure was not under control in 108 (31.8% patients. The mean body weight of male patients was statistically higher than females (p=0.015. The number of the patients that knew the normal blood pressure value was 249 (73.2%. Among those 155 (62.2% were women and 179 (71.9% were younger than 65 years of age (p=0.0001. Forty one patients (12.1% were still smoking, 46 (13.5% patients were exercising regularly and 32 (9.4% were consuming regular diet. Blood pressure was better controlled in the group that was exercising regularly (p=0.001. The rate of male patients that were on regular exercise and diet, were higher than females (p=0.09. Only 86 patients (25.3% knew the name of their antihypertensive medication and 65 of patients (19.1% knew the dose of their medication. Female patients knew the name of their medication better than males (p=0.002. 156 patients (45.9% were using two kinds of antihypertensive medication. 58 patients (17.1% were skipping doses a few times a week. Conclusion: The knowledge of hypertensive patients on their illness and their compliance on non-drug treatments were inadequate. The compliance of patients should be improved by development of patient-doctor should be improved

  5. Compliance of SLAC's Laser Safety Program with OSHA Requirements for the Control of Hazardous Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, M.

    2009-01-01

    SLAC's COHE program requires compliance with OSHA Regulation 29CFR1910.147, 'The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)'. This regulation specifies lockout/tagout requirements during service and maintenance of equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the equipment, or release of stored energy, could cause injury to workers. Class 3B and Class 4 laser radiation must be considered as hazardous energy (as well as electrical energy in associated equipment, and other non-beam energy hazards) in laser facilities, and therefore requires careful COHE consideration. This paper describes how COHE is achieved at SLAC to protect workers against unexpected Class 3B or Class 4 laser radiation, independent of whether the mode of operation is normal, service, or maintenance

  6. LLNL Compliance Plan for TRUPACT-2 Authorized Methods for Payload Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This document describes payload control at LLNL to ensure that all shipments of CH-TRU waste in the TRUPACT-II (Transuranic Package Transporter-II) meet the requirements of the TRUPACT-II SARP (safety report for packaging). This document also provides specific instructions for the selection of authorized payloads once individual payload containers are qualified for transport. The physical assembly of the qualified payload and operating procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II, including loading and unloading operations, are described in HWM Procedure No. 204, based on the information in the TRUPACT-II SARP. The LLNL TRAMPAC, along with the TRUPACT-II operating procedures contained in HWM Procedure No. 204, meet the documentation needs for the use of the TRUPACT-II at LLNL. Table 14-1 provides a summary of the LLNL waste generation and certification procedures as they relate to TRUPACT-II payload compliance

  7. 28 CFR 73.4 - Partial compliance not deemed compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Partial compliance not deemed compliance. 73.4 Section 73.4 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) NOTIFICATIONS TO THE ATTORNEY GENERAL BY AGENTS OF FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS § 73.4 Partial compliance not deemed compliance. The fact...

  8. Dropouts and Compliance in Exercise Interventions Targeting Bone Mineral Density in Adults: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Kelley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dropouts and compliance to exercise interventions targeting bone mineral density (BMD in adults are not well established. The purpose of this study was to address that gap. Methods. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled exercise intervention trials in adults ≥18 years of age. The primary outcomes were dropouts in the exercise and control groups as well as compliance to the exercise interventions. A random-effects model was used to pool results. Moderator analyses were conducted using mixed-effects ANOVA-like models and metaregression. Statistical significance was set at . Results. Thirty-six studies representing 3,297 participants (1,855 exercise, 1,442 control were included. Dropout rates in the exercise and control groups averaged 20.9% (95% CI 16.7%–25.9% and 15.9% (11.8%–21.1% while compliance to exercise was 76.3% (71.7%–80.3%. For both exercise and control groups, greater dropout rates were associated with studies conducted in the USA versus other countries, females versus males, premenopausal versus postmenopausal women, younger versus older participants, longer studies (controls only, and high- versus moderate-intensity training (exercisers only. Greater compliance to exercise was associated with being female, home- or facility-based exercise versus both, and shorter studies. Conclusion. These findings provide important information for researchers and practitioners with respect to exercise programs targeting BMD in adults.

  9. SNF project's MCO compliance assessment with DOE ''general design criteria,'' order 6430.1A and ''SNF project MCO additional NRC requirements,'' HNF-SD-SNF-DB-005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GOLDMANN, L.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document is presented to demonstrate the MCOs compliance to the major design criteria invoked on the MCO. This document is broken down into a section for the MCO's evaluation against DOE Order 6430.1A General Design Criteria sixteen divisions and then the evaluation of the MCO against HNF-SD-SNF-DB-005 ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Multi-Canister Overpack Additional NRC Requirements.'' The compliance assessment is presented as a matrix in tabular form. The MCO is the primary container for the K-basin's spent nuclear fuel as it leaves the basin pools and through to the 40 year interim storage at the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The MCO and its components interface with; the K basins, shipping cask and transportation system, Cold Vacuum Drying facility individual process bays and equipment, and CSB facility including the MCO handling machine (MHM), the storage tubes, and the MCO work stations where sampling, welding, and inspection of the MCO is performed. As the MCO is the primary boundary for handling, process, and storage, its main goals are to minimize the spread of its radiological contents to the outside of the MCO and provide for nuclear criticality control. The MCO contains personnel radiation shielding only on its upper end, in the form of a shield plug, where the process interfaces are located. Shielding beyond the shield plug is the responsibility of the using facilities. The design of the MCO and its components is depicted in drawings H-2-828040 through H-2-828075. Not every drawing number in the sequence is used. The first drawing number, H-2-828040, is the drawing index for the MCO. The design performance specification for the MCO is HW-S-0426, and was reviewed and approved by the interfacing design authorities, the safety, regulatory, and operations groups, and the local DOE office. The current revision for the design performance specification is revision 5. The designs of the MCO have been reviewed and approved in a similar way and the reports

  10. The application of quality control circle in neurosurgery ICU nurses in raising compliance of the head of a bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na LI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the application of quality control circle in raising compliance of the head of a bed in neurosurgery ICU nurses. Methods: The quality control circle was made up of 4 ICU nurses, determine the subject in order to improve the neurosurgery ICU nurses in raising compliance of the head of a bed, according to the QCC activity steps to formulate plans, including grasp the current situation, goal setting, through analysis, circle members develop strategy and plan implementation and review, finally compared the situation before and after neurosurgery ICU nurses raised bed activities compliance. Results: After implementation of QCC, neurosurgery ICU nurses raised bed to 30 ~ 45 degrees. After activities, circle members in the team cooperation ability, cohesion, to accept new things ability, and innovative thinking ability and to raise the understanding of the relevant knowledge of the head of a bed has improved significantly. Conclusion: The application of quality management circle activity improves the neurosurgery ICU nurses effectively raise the compliance of the head of a bed, improve the comprehensive quality of the clinical nurses.

  11. Cutting edge SRU control : improved environmental compliance with Jacobs advanced burner control+ (ABC+)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molenaar, G. [Jacobs Canada Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Henning, A.; Kobussen, S. [Jacobs Nederland BV, Hoogvliet (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    Oil sands bitumen contains approximately 4 to 5 per cent sulphur by weight and the bitumen is upgraded to produce lighter fractions. During coking the bitumen is heated and cracked into lighter molecules and a mixture of kerosene, naphtha and gas oil is recovered via fractionation. Then, the vapors leaving the fractionator are processed through hydrodesulphurization, followed by removal by amine based sweetening units. The acid gas from the ASUs is sent to the sulphur recovery units (SRUs) where most of the sulphur is recovered as elemental sulphur. The oil sands industry faces many challenges with respect to environmental impact, energy use and greenhouse gas emissions including the recovery of sulphur and minimizing hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions from the oil sands production facilities. In order to improve the SRU control response to acid gas feed variations, Jacobs Comprimo Sulphur Solutions implemented advanced burner control+ (ABC+) at Suncor's Simonette Gas Plant's SRU in northern Alberta. This control system used an acid gas feed analyzer and dynamic algorithms to control the combustion air to the reaction furnace. The analyzer measures H{sub 2}S, total hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and water (H{sub 2}O) accurately and quickly, which is important for having effective and fast air-to-acid gas ratio control. The paper provided background information on the Suncor Simonette Gas Plant and discussed ABC+ versus conventional control. An overview of the simplified ABC and ABC+ systems was then illustrated and presented. The ABB multiwave process photometer was also explained. Last, a dynamic simulation of the potential benefits of ABC+ was discussed and the ABC+ benefits for oil sands were presented. It was concluded that ABC+ provides improved SRU performance, reduced SO{sub 2} emissions and violations, and reduced flaring. 1 tab., 3 figs.

  12. Oral hygiene compliance in orthodontic patients: a randomized controlled study on the effects of a post-treatment communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzani, Mauro; Ragazzini, Giulia; Delucchi, Alessia; Mutinelli, Sabrina; Barreca, Carlo; Rinchuse, Daniel J; Servetto, Roberto; Piras, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    Several studies have recently demonstrated that a post-treatment communication to explain the importance of an oral hygiene can improve the orthodontic patients' compliance over a period of 66 days. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of a structured follow-up communication after orthodontic appliance application on oral hygiene compliance after 30-40 days. Eighty-four orthodontic participants enrolled from patients who were beginning fixed orthodontic treatment at the Orthodontic Department, Gaslini Hospital, Genova, between July and October 2014 were randomly assigned to one of three trial arms. Before the bonding, all patients underwent a session of oral hygiene aimed at obtaining an plaque index of "zero." At the following orthodontic appointment, the plaque index was calculated for each patient in order to assess oral hygiene compliance. The first group served as control and did not receive any post-procedure communication, the second group received a structured text message giving reassurance, and the third group received a structured telephone call. Participants were blinded to group assignment and were not made aware that the text message or the telephone call was part of the study. (The research protocol was approved by the Italian Comitato Etico Regionale della Liguria-sezione 3^ c/o IRCCS-Istituto G. Gaslini 845/2014, and it is not registered in the trial's register.) RESULTS: Thirty patients were randomly assigned to the control group, 28 participants to the text message group, and 26 to the telephone group. Participants who received a post-treatment communication reported higher level of oral hygiene compliance than participants in the control group. The plaque index was 0.3 (interquartile range (Iqr), 0.60) and 0.75 (Iqr, 1.30), respectively, with a significant difference (P = 0.0205). A follow-up procedure after orthodontic treatment may be an effective tool to increase oral hygiene compliance also over a short period.

  13. General unifying features of controlled quantum phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechen, Alexander; Brif, Constantin; Wu, Rebing; Chakrabarti, Raj; Rabitz, Herschel

    2010-01-01

    Many proposals have been put forth for controlling quantum phenomena, including open-loop, adaptive feedback, and real-time feedback control. Each of these approaches has been viewed as operationally, and even physically, distinct from the others. This work shows that all such scenarios inherently share the same fundamental control features residing in the topology of the landscape relating the target physical observable to the applied controls. This unified foundation may provide a basis for development of hybrid control schemes that would combine the advantages of the existing approaches to achieve the best overall performance.

  14. Training compliance control yields improvements in drawing as a function of Beery scores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winona Snapp-Childs

    Full Text Available Many children have difficulty producing movements well enough to improve in sensori-motor learning. Previously, we developed a training method that supports active movement generation to allow improvement at a 3D tracing task requiring good compliance control. Here, we tested 7-8 year old children from several 2nd grade classrooms to determine whether 3D tracing performance could be predicted using the Beery VMI. We also examined whether 3D tracing training lead to improvements in drawing. Baseline testing included Beery, a drawing task on a tablet computer, and 3D tracing. We found that baseline performance in 3D tracing and drawing co-varied with the visual perception (VP component of the Beery. Differences in 3D tracing between children scoring low versus high on the Beery VP replicated differences previously found between children with and without motor impairments, as did post-training performance that eliminated these differences. Drawing improved as a result of training in the 3D tracing task. The training method improved drawing and reduced differences predicted by Beery scores.

  15. Training Compliance Control Yields Improvements in Drawing as a Function of Beery Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp-Childs, Winona; Flatters, Ian; Fath, Aaron; Mon-Williams, Mark; Bingham, Geoffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Many children have difficulty producing movements well enough to improve in sensori-motor learning. Previously, we developed a training method that supports active movement generation to allow improvement at a 3D tracing task requiring good compliance control. Here, we tested 7–8 year old children from several 2nd grade classrooms to determine whether 3D tracing performance could be predicted using the Beery VMI. We also examined whether 3D tracing training lead to improvements in drawing. Baseline testing included Beery, a drawing task on a tablet computer, and 3D tracing. We found that baseline performance in 3D tracing and drawing co-varied with the visual perception (VP) component of the Beery. Differences in 3D tracing between children scoring low versus high on the Beery VP replicated differences previously found between children with and without motor impairments, as did post-training performance that eliminated these differences. Drawing improved as a result of training in the 3D tracing task. The training method improved drawing and reduced differences predicted by Beery scores. PMID:24651280

  16. The role of GPs in increasing compliance to colorectal cancer screening: a randomised controlled trial (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Antonio; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo; Bartolozzi, Francesco; Farchi, Sara; Borgia, Piero; Guastcchi, Gabriella

    2006-02-01

    To assess the effect of the provider (GPs versus hospital) on the compliance in returning the faecal occult blood test. To analyse the characteristics of the GP associated with high compliance among his beneficiaries. A questionnaire about screening attitudes was mailed to the 1192 GPs working in 13 districts of the Lazio region. We asked the GPs to participate in a randomised trial, we sampled 130 GPs and about 1/10 of the GPs' 50-75 year old beneficiaries (n = 3657) were invited to be screened at the GP office and 1/10 (3675) at the nearest gastroenterology centre. 58.5% of the GPs completed the questionnaire and 22.7% agreed to participate in the trial. The compliance in the GP arm was 50%, in the hospital arm 16% (RR 3.4; 95% CI: 3.13-3.70). There was a high variability in the compliance obtained by the GPs. GPs with more than 25 patients visited/day and those incorrectly recommended screening of colorectal cancer obtained a lower compliance (OR 0.74, 95% CI: 0.57-0.95 and OR 0.76, 95% CI: 0.59-0.97, respectively). The involvement of GPs in colorectal cancer screening can be very effective to enhance the compliance, but the effectiveness is dependent on their willingness to be involved.

  17. Endogenous Generalized Weights under DEA Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    Non-parametric efficiency analysis, such as Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) relies so far on endogenous local or exogenous general weights, based on revealed preferences or market prices. However, as DEA is gaining popularity in regulation and normative budgeting, the strategic interest...... of the evaluated industry calls for attention. We offer endogenous general prices based on a reformulation of DEA where the units collectively propose the set of weights that maximize their efficiency. Thus, the sector-wide efficiency is then a result of compromising the scores of more specialized smaller units...

  18. Adopt-A-MACT Project: A Manual of Model Documents and Guidance to Aid Compliance and Enforcement of the Nutritional Yeast MACT (Maximum Achievable Control Technology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manual provides a compliance checklist, and overview of emissions limitations, how to do performance tests, and an overview of applicability of general provisions for the Nutritional Yeast NESHAP.

  19. Compliance with infection control standard precautions guidelines: a survey among dental healthcare workers in Hail Region, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridi, Hassan Kasim; Al-Ammar, Abdalmohsen Saud; Al-Mansour, Moazzy Ibraheim

    2016-11-01

    The concept of standard precautions (SP) has been a cornerstone of dental infection control (IC) practice. Full adherence with SP guidelines is still a matter of concern in many institutions. The objectives of the present study were to assess and characterise compliance with SP guidelines among dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) and to analyse factors that affect compliance. A regional cross-sectional questionnaire survey among DHCWs in all health facilities was carried out from August to November 2014. A total of 307 returned valid self-report questionnaires with a response rate of 73.1%. Most participants (86.3%) were aware of the SP guidelines, 84.4% received IC training and 88.9% received hepatitis B vaccination. Compliance with SP was found to be high; the majority (90.1%) attained 75% on the compliance scale. In the multivariate logistic regression model, perceived higher institutional commitment as regard IC requirements (odds ratio [OR], 4.34; P guidelines. Institutional factors appear to have an important role. Attention should be paid to dental assistants and private DHCWs.

  20. Predictors of compliance with community-directed treatment with ivermectin for onchocerciasis control in Kabo area, southwestern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endale, Adugna; Erko, Berhanu; Weldegebreal, Fitsum; Legesse, Mengistu

    2015-02-15

    Compliance with annual ivermectin treatment is a major challenge in community-directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI) implementation. There are individuals who do not comply with the annual mass treatment, which contributes to the continuity for disease transmission. Hence, ensuring high treatment coverage and sustained compliance should be given due emphasis in the control of onchocerciasis. The aim of this study was to determine CDTI compliance rate and predictors of compliance where the CDTI was in its 9(th) round in Kabo area, southwestern Ethiopia. Community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Kabo area, three weeks after the 9th round of annual ivermectin distribution. Systematic random sampling was used to select head of households and structured, pre-tested questionnaire was used to interview the study participants. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16. Descriptive statistics was used to compute mean and standard deviation of continuous variables and frequency for categorical variables, while bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to assess the effects of independent variables on the outcome variable. Variables which showed association in multivariate analysis were considered as final predictors of compliance and strength of association was measured through adjusted odds ratio (AOR). A total of 308 respondents (age range 18-70, mean age ± SD, 32.21 ± 9.64) participated in the study. Of these, 249 (80.8%) reported that they took ivermectin during the 9th round annual treatment. Significantly higher rate of treatment compliance was reported by participants age ≥35 years (AOR = 5.48, 95% CI; 1.97 - 15.23), participants who stayed in the area for more than ten years (AOR = 3.86, 95% CI; 1.83- 8.11), participants who perceive that they are at risk of contracting the disease(AOR = 7.05, 2.70- 18.43), participants who perceive community drug distributors (CDDs) are doing their work well (AOR = 2.35 95% CI; 1

  1. Compliance with tobacco control policies in India: an examination of facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M M; Rimal, R N; Lumby, E; Cohen, J; Surette, A; Roundy, V; Feighery, E; Shah, V

    2016-03-01

    India's Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products Act (COTPA) prohibits smoking in public places, limits advertising at points of sale, and bans sales in close proximity to educational institutions. To examine key stakeholders' (i.e., tobacco retailers, hotel and restaurant owners/managers, law enforcement officials, school principals/administrators) perceptions of facilitators and barriers to compliance with COTPA. Using semi-structured in-depth interviews (n = 60), we identified a range of facilitators and barriers that varied across the venues. A number of simple measures to increase compliance were identified: provide signs to retailers, provide aesthetically pleasing signs more fitting for the atmosphere of the hotel/restaurant, etc., and empower law enforcement to implement the law. Priority should be placed on public awareness, as it can facilitate compliance in numerous venues. Communication efforts could be undertaken to change the public's residual negative attitudes toward the policy.

  2. A controllability test for general first-order representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U. Helmke; J. Rosenthal; J.M. Schumacher (Hans)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we derive a new controllability rank test for general first-order representations. The criterion generalizes the well-known controllability rank test for linear input-state systems as well as a controllability rank test by Mertzios et al. for descriptor systems.

  3. 49 CFR 192.475 - Internal corrosion control: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: General. 192.475... Control § 192.475 Internal corrosion control: General. (a) Corrosive gas may not be transported by... taken to minimize internal corrosion. (b) Whenever any pipe is removed from a pipeline for any reason...

  4. The role of patient isolation and compliance with isolation practices in the control of nosocomial MRSA in acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Griffiths, Rhonda; Fernandez, Ritin

    2008-06-01

    Background  Nosocomial infection remains the most common complication of hospitalisation. Despite infection control efforts, nosocomial methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission continues to rise. Various isolation practices are used to minimise MRSA transmission in acute care. However, the effectiveness of these practices has seldom been evaluated. Objectives  This review sought to evaluate the efficacy of isolation practices in minimising MRSA transmission in the acute hospital setting and explore staff, visitor and patient compliance with isolation practices. This review updates a review published in 2002. Search strategy  A systematic search for relevant published or unpublished English language literature was undertaken using electronic databases, the reference lists of retrieved papers and the Internet. This extended the search published in the original review. Databases searched included: Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and Joanna Briggs Institute Evidence Library. Selection criteria  All English language research reports published between 1990 and August 2005 that focused on the role of isolation practices on the nosocomial transmission of MRSA in adult, paediatric or neonatal acute care settings were eligible for inclusion in the review. Studies that evaluated multiple infection control strategies or control of MRSA outbreaks were excluded. The main outcome of interest was the incidence of new cases of MRSA. The secondary outcome was staff, visitor and patient compliance with the isolation practices. Data collection and analysis  Two reviewers assessed each paper against the inclusion criteria and a validated quality scale. Data extraction was undertaken using a tool designed specifically for this review. Statistical comparisons of findings were not possible, so findings are presented in a narrative form. Results  Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Given the small number of included studies and variable

  5. 40 CFR 63.997 - Performance test and compliance assessment requirements for control devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... operations at affected sources in subcategories where the applicability criteria includes a TRE index value... or operator make product that does not meet an existing specification for sale to a customer; or (C... satisfaction that the regulated source is in compliance with the relevant standard; or (E) Approves the use of...

  6. Does training frequency and supervision affect compliance, performance and muscular health? A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalager, Tina; Bredahl, Thomas G V; Pedersen, Mogens T; Boyle, Eleanor; Andersen, Lars L; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2015-10-01

    The aim was to determine the effect of one weekly hour of specific strength training within working hours, performed with the same total training volume but with different training frequencies and durations, or with different levels of supervision, on compliance, muscle health and performance, behavior and work performance. In total, 573 office workers were cluster-randomized to: 1 WS: one 60-min supervised session/week, 3 WS: three 20-min supervised sessions/week, 9 WS: nine 7-min supervised sessions/week, 3 MS: three 20-min sessions/week with minimal supervision, or REF: a reference group without training. Outcomes were diary-based compliance, total training volume, muscle performance and questionnaire-based health, behavior and work performance. Comparisons were made among the WS training groups and between 3 WS and 3 MS. If no difference, training groups were collapsed (TG) and compared with REF. Results demonstrated similar degrees of compliance, mean(range) of 39(33-44)%, and total training volume, 13.266(11.977-15.096)kg. Musculoskeletal pain in neck and shoulders were reduced with approx. 50% in TG, which was significant compared with REF. Only the training groups improved significantly their muscle strength 8(4-13)% and endurance 27(12-37)%, both being significant compared with REF. No change in workability, productivity or self-rated health was demonstrated. Secondary analysis showed exercise self-efficacy to be a significant predictor of compliance. Regardless of training schedule and supervision, similar degrees of compliance were shown together with reduced musculoskeletal pain and improved muscle performance. These findings provide evidence that a great degree of flexibility is legitimate for companies in planning future implementation of physical exercise programs at the workplace. ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01027390. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Compliance with McDonald criteria and red flag recognition in a general neurology practice in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Albertyn, Christine

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The revised McDonald criteria aim to simplify and speed the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). An important principle of the criteria holds there should be no better explanation for the clinical presentation. In Miller et al.\\'s consensus statement on the differential diagnosis of MS, red flags are identified that may suggest a non-MS diagnosis. OBJECTIVE: All new patients with a practice diagnosis of MS were assessed for compliance with McDonald criteria. The group of patients not fulfilling criteria was followed up to assess compliance over time. At the end of the follow-up period, red flags were sought in the group of patients who remained McDonald criteria negative. METHODS: Clinical notes and paraclinical tests were examined retrospectively for compliance with McDonald criteria and for the presence of red flags. RESULTS: Sixty-two patients were identified, with two lost to follow-up. Twenty-six (42%) patients fulfilled criteria at diagnosis. After 53 months follow-up, 47 (78%) patients fulfilled criteria. In the 13 (22%) patients who remain McDonald criteria negative, a total of 20 red flags were identified, ranging from one to six per patient. Alternative diagnoses were considered and further investigations performed in 10 patients with no significantly abnormal results. CONCLUSION: Twenty-two percent of patients still do not fulfill McDonald criteria after 53 months. Dissemination in time was not proven in the majority of patients and the lack of follow-up neuroimaging was an important factor in this. Red flags may be useful in identifying alternative diagnoses, but the yield was low in our cohort.

  8. Internal Controls and Compliance With Laws and Regulations for the FY 1996 Financial Statements of the "Other Defense Organizations" Receiving Department 97 Appropriations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    The overall audit objective was to assess internal controls and compliance with laws and regulations and to review and evaluate the adjustments to the FY 1996 "Other Defense Organizations" financial statements...

  9. Oral hygiene compliance in orthodontic patients: a randomized controlled study on the effects of a post-treatment communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cozzani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have recently demonstrated that a post-treatment communication to explain the importance of an oral hygiene can improve the orthodontic patients’ compliance over a period of 66 days. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of a structured follow-up communication after orthodontic appliance application on oral hygiene compliance after 30–40 days. Methods Eighty-four orthodontic participants enrolled from patients who were beginning fixed orthodontic treatment at the Orthodontic Department, Gaslini Hospital, Genova, between July and October 2014 were randomly assigned to one of three trial arms. Before the bonding, all patients underwent a session of oral hygiene aimed at obtaining an plaque index of “zero.” At the following orthodontic appointment, the plaque index was calculated for each patient in order to assess oral hygiene compliance. The first group served as control and did not receive any post-procedure communication, the second group received a structured text message giving reassurance, and the third group received a structured telephone call. Participants were blinded to group assignment and were not made aware that the text message or the telephone call was part of the study. (The research protocol was approved by the Italian Comitato Etico Regionale della Liguria-sezione 3^ c/o IRCCS-Istituto G. Gaslini 845/2014, and it is not registered in the trial’s register. Results Thirty patients were randomly assigned to the control group, 28 participants to the text message group, and 26 to the telephone group. Participants who received a post-treatment communication reported higher level of oral hygiene compliance than participants in the control group. The plaque index was 0.3 (interquartile range (Iqr, 0.60 and 0.75 (Iqr, 1.30, respectively, with a significant difference (P = 0.0205. Conclusions A follow-up procedure after orthodontic treatment may be an effective tool to

  10. Criminal Compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Antonella Andretta

    2015-10-01

    The article discusses the concepts of both compliance and criminal compliance, its main components and structure as well as the main rules relating to its global application, and finally his emergence in the Ecuadorian legal system.

  11. Weak Compliance Undermines the Success of No-Take Zones in a Large Government-Controlled Marine Protected Area

    KAUST Repository

    Campbell, Stuart J.

    2012-11-30

    The effectiveness of marine protected areas depends largely on whether people comply with the rules. We quantified temporal changes in benthic composition, reef fish biomass, and fishing effort among marine park zones (including no-take areas) to assess levels of compliance following the 2005 rezoning of the government-controlled Karimunjawa National Park (KNP), Indonesia. Four years after the rezoning awareness of fishing regulations was high amongst local fishers, ranging from 79.5±7.9 (SE) % for spatial restrictions to 97.7±1.2% for bans on the use of poisons. Despite this high awareness and strong compliance with gear restrictions, compliance with spatial restrictions was weak. In the four years following the rezoning reef fish biomass declined across all zones within KNP, with >50% reduction within the no-take Core and Protection Zones. These declines were primarily driven by decreases in the biomass of groups targeted by local fishers; planktivores, herbivores, piscivores, and invertivores. These declines in fish biomass were not driven by changes in habitat quality; coral cover increased in all zones, possibly as a result of a shift in fishing gears from those which can damage reefs (i.e., nets) to those which cause little direct damage (i.e., handlines and spears). Direct observations of fishing activities in 2009 revealed there was limited variation in fishing effort between zones in which fishing was allowed or prohibited. The apparent willingness of the KNP communities to comply with gear restrictions, but not spatial restrictions is difficult to explain and highlights the complexities of the social and economic dynamics that influence the ecological success of marine protected areas. Clearly the increased and high awareness of fishery restrictions following the rezoning is a positive step. The challenge now is to understand and foster the conditions that may facilitate compliance with spatial restrictions within KNP and marine parks worldwide. © 2012

  12. Controlling Business Object States in Business Process Models to Support Compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Peņicina, L

    2016-01-01

    The doctoral thesis addresses the existing gap between business process models and states of business objects. Existing modelling methods such as BPMN and ArchiMate lack an explicitly declarative approach for capturing states of business objects and laws of state transitions. This gap hinders the compliance of business process models with regulations imposed internally or externally, and can result in potential legal problems for organizations. Also this g...

  13. Generalized Mutual Synchronization between Two Controlled Interdependent Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Quan; Zhuang, Shengxian; Hu, Dan; Zeng, Yingfeng; Xiao, Jian

    2014-01-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the generalized mutual synchronization between two controlled interdependent networks. First, we propose the general model of controlled interdependent networks $A$ and $B$ with time-varying internetwork delays coupling. Then, by constructing Lyapunov functions and utilizing adaptive control technique, some sufficient conditions are established to ensure that the mutual synchronization errors between the state variables of networks $A$ and $B$ can asymptotically c...

  14. Fuzzy Logic Decoupled Lateral Control for General Aviation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Noel

    1997-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that a human pilot uses the same set of generic skills to control a wide variety of aircraft. If this is true, then it should be possible to construct an electronic controller which embodies this generic skill set such that it can successfully control different airplanes without being matched to a specific airplane. In an attempt to create such a system, a fuzzy logic controller was devised to control aileron or roll spoiler position. This controller was used to control bank angle for both a piston powered single engine aileron equipped airplane simulation and a business jet simulation which used spoilers for primary roll control. Overspeed, stall and overbank protection were incorporated in the form of expert systems supervisors and weighted fuzzy rules. It was found that by using the artificial intelligence techniques of fuzzy logic and expert systems, a generic lateral controller could be successfully used on two general aviation aircraft types that have very different characteristics. These controllers worked for both airplanes over their entire flight envelopes. The controllers for both airplanes were identical except for airplane specific limits (maximum allowable airspeed, throttle ]ever travel, etc.). This research validated the fact that the same fuzzy logic based controller can control two very different general aviation airplanes. It also developed the basic controller architecture and specific control parameters required for such a general controller.

  15. Client-controlled case information: a general system theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Dale

    2004-07-01

    The author proposes a model for client control of case information via the World Wide Web built on principles of general system theory. It incorporates the client into the design, resulting in an information structure that differs from traditional human services information-sharing practices. Referencing general system theory, the concepts of controller and controlled system, as well as entropy and negentropy, are applied to the information flow and autopoietic behavior as they relate to the boundary-maintaining functions of today's organizations. The author's conclusions synthesize general system theory and human services values to lay the foundation for an information-sharing framework for human services in the 21st century.

  16. Compliance to antihypertensive drugs, salt restriction, exercise and control of systemic hypertension in hypertensive patients at abbottabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Waqas, A.; Khaliq, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most important cardiovascular risk factor but its control is still a challenge for physicians all around the world. Control of blood pressure can reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, so the compliance to antihypertensive drugs and life style modification play an important role for the control of hypertension. This analytical (cross-sectional) study was conducted to assess prevalence of control of hypertension among hypertensive patients and to assess the relationship of control of hypertension with factors like compliance to antihypertensive drugs, salt restriction and exercise among the hypertensive patients. This study was conducted at outpatient clinic of medicine at Shahina Jamil Hospital Abbottabad from April 2007 to September 2007. Eighty-nine patients seen in the outpatient clinic of medicine were enrolled in the study. All the patients with age 15 years or above, diagnosed as a case of systemic hypertension were included. Among eighty nine patients, 67 were female and 22 were male with mean age of 55.8+-13.4 years, mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 160+-28.6 and 97.8+-14.1 mm Hg respectively, and pulse rate of 85.9+-11.4 per minutes. Out of 89 patients, 25.8% were having controlled hypertension, 48.3% were compliant and 51.7% were not compliant to antihypertensive drugs, 55.1% were having salt restriction and 44.9% were having no salt restriction and 23.6% were used to do physical activity while 76.4% were not used to do physical activity. In group A consisted of patients with controlled hypertension, 95.7% patients were compliant to antihypertensive patients, 95.7% were having salt restriction and 43.5% were used to do physical activity. In group B consisted of patients with uncontrolled hypertension, only 31.8% were compliant to antihypertensive drugs, 40.9% were having salt restriction, 16.7% were used to do physical activity. Hypertension can be controlled if the hypertensive patients have good compliance

  17. Compliance and quality control monitoring of diagnostic X-ray facilities in Dar es Salaam city, Tanzania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nkuba, Leonid L.; Nyanda, Pendo B., E-mail: leonid.nkuba@taec.or.tz [Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission, Radiation Control Directorate, Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    2017-09-01

    The compliance evaluation and quality control measurements on 60 diagnostic X-ray units were performed. The results on legal compliance show that 25 % of X-ray facilities operated without or with an expired license. The rest of the centers were new and had already applied for license and others had valid licenses. For basic requirements compliance, 47 % of X-ray facilities did not have the changing cubicles, 37 % of X-ray facilities did not post radiation warning sign and symbols also 46 % of units were found either without protective gear or operated by unqualified personnel. The QC test results showed that 93 % had X-ray tube voltage within the tolerance limit of 10 % and HVL ≥ 2.3 mmAl, at 80 kV was observed in 98.2 % of the units, whereas 98 % of exposure had acceptable kV reproducibility within the tolerance limit of 5 %. Of the X-ray generators assessed, 93 % had tolerable mAs linearity. 93 % and 97 % had acceptable beam alignment and light beam diaphragm. Of the assessed units, 13 (93 %) had tube leakage < 1000 μGy/hr at 1m. For shielding tests, 47 % of units had radiation levels above 0.5 μSv/hr at the main door leading to the X-ray rooms and the registration area. The dose rates > 10 μSv/hr were recorded at viewing windows, walls and doors of control cubicles and behind the doors of changing cubicles. These dose rates indicating higher health risk to workers and member of public. (author)

  18. Client-Controlled Case Information: A General System Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Dale

    2004-01-01

    The author proposes a model for client control of case information via the World Wide Web built on principles of general system theory. It incorporates the client into the design, resulting in an information structure that differs from traditional human services information-sharing practices. Referencing general system theory, the concepts of…

  19. Optimal control of large space structures via generalized inverse matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Fang, Xiaowen

    1987-01-01

    Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) is a control scheme that decouples the space structure into n independent second-order subsystems according to n controlled modes and controls each mode independently. It is well-known that the IMSC eliminates control and observation spillover caused when the conventional coupled modal control scheme is employed. The independent control of each mode requires that the number of actuators be equal to the number of modelled modes, which is very high for a faithful modeling of large space structures. A control scheme is proposed that allows one to use a reduced number of actuators to control all modeled modes suboptimally. In particular, the method of generalized inverse matrices is employed to implement the actuators such that the eigenvalues of the closed-loop system are as closed as possible to those specified by the optimal IMSC. Computer simulation of the proposed control scheme on a simply supported beam is given.

  20. Synchronization of generalized Henon map by using adaptive fuzzy controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Yueju E-mail: xueyj@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Yang Shiyuan E-mail: ysy-dau@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, an adaptive fuzzy control method is presented to synchronize model-unknown discrete-time generalized Henon map. The proposed method is robust to approximate errors and disturbances, because it integrates the merits of adaptive fuzzy and the variable structure control. Moreover, it can realize the synchronizations of non-identical chaotic systems. The simulation results of synchronization of generalized Henon map show that it not only can synchronize model-unknown generalized Henon map but also is robust against the noise of the systems. These merits are advantageous for engineering realization.

  1. Synchronization of generalized Henon map by using adaptive fuzzy controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yueju; Yang Shiyuan

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive fuzzy control method is presented to synchronize model-unknown discrete-time generalized Henon map. The proposed method is robust to approximate errors and disturbances, because it integrates the merits of adaptive fuzzy and the variable structure control. Moreover, it can realize the synchronizations of non-identical chaotic systems. The simulation results of synchronization of generalized Henon map show that it not only can synchronize model-unknown generalized Henon map but also is robust against the noise of the systems. These merits are advantageous for engineering realization

  2. Generalized projective synchronization of chaotic systems via adaptive learning control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun-Ping, Sun; Jun-Min, Li; Hui-Lin, Wang; Jiang-An, Wang

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a learning control approach is applied to the generalized projective synchronisation (GPS) of different chaotic systems with unknown periodically time-varying parameters. Using the Lyapunov–Krasovskii functional stability theory, a differential-difference mixed parametric learning law and an adaptive learning control law are constructed to make the states of two different chaotic systems asymptotically synchronised. The scheme is successfully applied to the generalized projective synchronisation between the Lorenz system and Chen system. Moreover, numerical simulations results are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. (general)

  3. Speed Control of General Purpose Engine with Electronic Governor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawut, Umerujan; Tohti, Gheyret; Takigawa, Buso; Tsuji, Teruo

    This paper presents a general purpose engine speed control system with an electronic governor in order to improve the current system with a mechanical governor which shows unstable characteristics by change of mecanical friction or A/F ratio (Air/Fuel ratio). For the control system above, there are problems that the feedback signal is only a crank angle because of cost and the controlled object is a general purpose engine which is strongly nonlinear. In order to overcome these problems, the system model is shown for the dynamic estimation of the amount of air flow and the robust controller is designed. That is, the proposed system includes the robust sliding-mode controller by the feedback signal of only a crank angle where Genetic Algorithm is applied for the controller design. The simulation and the experiments by MATLAB/Simulink are performed to show the effectiveness of our proposal.

  4. Proposed general amendments to the atomic energy control regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Canada's Atomic Energy Control Act defines the powers and responsibilities of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). Among these is to make regulations to control the development, application and use of atomic energy. In these proposed general amendments to the Atomic Energy Control Regulations substantial changes are proposed in the designation of the authority of AECB staff, exemptions from licensing, international safeguards, duties of licensees and atomic radiation workers, security of information, and provision for hearings. The scope of the control of atomic energy has been redefined as relating to matters of health, safety, security, international safeguards, and the protection of the environment

  5. Impacts and Compliance Implementation Plans and Required Deviations for Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) Regulation of Double Shell Tanks (DST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    In May 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held meetings regarding the management of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Hanford tank waste. It was decided that the radioactive waste currently stored in the double-shell tanks (DSTs) contain waste which will become subject to the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) (40 CFR 761). As a result, DOE-ORP directed the River Protection Project tank farm contractor (TFC) to prepare plans for managing the PCB inventory in the DSTs. Two components of the PCB management plans are this assessment of the operational impacts of TSCA regulation and the identifications of deviations from TSCA that are required to accommodate tank farm unique limitations. This plan provides ORP and CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) with an outline of TSCA PCB requirements and their applicability to tank farm activities, and recommends a compliance/implementation approach. Where strict compliance is not possible, the need for deviations from TSCA PCB requirements is identified. The purpose of assembling this information is to enhance the understanding of PCB management requirements, identify operational impacts and select impact mitigation strategies. This information should be useful in developing formal agreements with EPA where required

  6. Towards changing healthcare workers' behaviour: a qualitative study exploring non-compliance through appraisals of infection prevention and control practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N; Castro-Sánchez, E; Charani, E; Drumright, L N; Holmes, A H

    2015-06-01

    Improving behaviour in infection prevention and control (IPC) practice remains a challenge, and understanding the determinants of healthcare workers' (HCWs) behaviour is fundamental to develop effective and sustained behaviour change interventions. To identify behaviours of HCWs that facilitated non-compliance with IPC practices, focusing on how appraisals of IPC duties and social and environmental circumstances shaped and influenced non-compliant behaviour. This study aimed to: (1) identify how HCWs rationalized their own behaviour and the behaviour of others; (2) highlight challenging areas of IPC compliance; and (3) describe the context of the working environment that may explain inconsistencies in IPC practices. Clinical staff at a National Health Service hospital group in London, UK were interviewed between December 2010 and July 2011 using qualitative methods. Responses were analysed using a thematic framework. Three ways in which HCWs appraised their behaviour were identified through accounts of IPC policies and practices: (1) attribution of responsibilities, with ambiguity about responsibility for certain IPC practices; (2) prioritization and risk appraisal, which demonstrated a divergence in values attached to some IPC policies and practices; and (3) hierarchy of influence highlighted that traditional clinical roles challenged work relationships. Overall, behaviours are not entirely independent of policy rules, but often an amalgamation of local normative practices, individual preferences and a degree of professional isolation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Computational assessment of pregnant woman models exposed to uniform ELF-magnetic fields: compliance with the European current exposure regulations for the general public and occupational exposures at 50 Hz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liorni, Ilaria; Parazzini, Marta; Fiocchi, Serena; Ravazzani, Paolo; Douglas, Mark; Capstick, Myles; Kuster, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The Recommendation 1999/529/EU and the Directive 2013/35/EU suggest limits for both general public and occupational exposures to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields, but without special limits for pregnant women. This study aimed to assess the compliance of pregnant women to the current regulations, when exposed to uniform MF at 50 Hz (100 μT for EU Recommendation and 1 and 6 mT for EU Directive). For general public, exposure of pregnant women and fetus always resulted in compliance with EU Recommendation. For occupational exposures, (1) Electric fields in pregnant women were in compliance with the Directive, with exposure variations due to fetal posture of 40 % in head tissues, (3) Electric fields in fetal CNS tissues of head are above the ICNIRP 2010 limits for general public at 1 mT (in 7 and 9 months gestational age) and at 6 mT (in all gestational ages). (authors)

  8. Effects of a mixed media education intervention program on increasing knowledge, attitude, and compliance with standard precautions among nursing students: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Peng; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Wu, Tat Leong; Hall, Brian J

    2017-04-01

    Standard precautions (SPs) are considered fundamental protective measures to manage health care-associated infections and to reduce occupational health hazards. This study intended to assess the effectiveness of a mixed media education intervention to enhance nursing students' knowledge, attitude, and compliance with SPs. A randomized controlled trial with 84 nursing students was conducted in a teaching hospital in Hubei, China. The intervention group (n = 42) attended 3 biweekly mixed media education sessions, consisting of lectures, videos, role-play, and feedback with 15-20 minutes of individual online supervision and feedback sessions following each class. The control group learned the same material through self-directed readings. Pre- and posttest assessments of knowledge, attitudes, and compliance were assessed with the Knowledge with Standard Precautions Questionnaire, Attitude with Standard Precautions Scale, and the Compliance with Standard Precautions Scale, respectively. The Standard Bacterial Colony Index was used to assess handwashing effectiveness. At 6-week follow-up, performance on the Knowledge with Standard Precautions Questionnaire, Attitude with Standard Precautions Scale, and Compliance with Standard Precautions Scale were significantly improved in the intervention group compared with the control group (P media education intervention is effective in improving knowledge, attitude, and compliance with SPs. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Generalized internal model robust control for active front steering intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Zhao, Youqun; Ji, Xuewu; Liu, Yahui; Zhang, Lipeng

    2015-03-01

    Because of the tire nonlinearity and vehicle's parameters' uncertainties, robust control methods based on the worst cases, such as H ∞, µ synthesis, have been widely used in active front steering control, however, in order to guarantee the stability of active front steering system (AFS) controller, the robust control is at the cost of performance so that the robust controller is a little conservative and has low performance for AFS control. In this paper, a generalized internal model robust control (GIMC) that can overcome the contradiction between performance and stability is used in the AFS control. In GIMC, the Youla parameterization is used in an improved way. And GIMC controller includes two sections: a high performance controller designed for the nominal vehicle model and a robust controller compensating the vehicle parameters' uncertainties and some external disturbances. Simulations of double lane change (DLC) maneuver and that of braking on split- µ road are conducted to compare the performance and stability of the GIMC control, the nominal performance PID controller and the H ∞ controller. Simulation results show that the high nominal performance PID controller will be unstable under some extreme situations because of large vehicle's parameters variations, H ∞ controller is conservative so that the performance is a little low, and only the GIMC controller overcomes the contradiction between performance and robustness, which can both ensure the stability of the AFS controller and guarantee the high performance of the AFS controller. Therefore, the GIMC method proposed for AFS can overcome some disadvantages of control methods used by current AFS system, that is, can solve the instability of PID or LQP control methods and the low performance of the standard H ∞ controller.

  10. Compliance status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the activities conducted to ensure that the Hanford Site is in compliance with federal environmental protection statutes and related Washington State and local environmental protection regulations and the status of Hanford's compliance with these requirements. Environmental permits required under the environmental protection regulations are discussed under the applicable statute

  11. Compliance status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the activities conducted to ensure that the Hanford Site is in compliance with federal environmental protection statutes and related Washington State and local environmental protection regulations and the status of Hanford`s compliance with these requirements. Environmental permits required under the environmental protection regulations are discussed under the applicable statute.

  12. On generalized fixed sequence procedures for controlling the FWER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhiying; Guo, Wenge; Lynch, Gavin

    2015-12-30

    Testing a sequence of pre-ordered hypotheses to decide which of these can be rejected or accepted while controlling the familywise error rate (FWER) is of importance in many scientific studies such as clinical trials. In this paper, we first introduce a generalized fixed sequence procedure whose critical values are defined by using a function of the numbers of rejections and acceptances, and which allows follow-up hypotheses to be tested even if some earlier hypotheses are not rejected. We then construct the least favorable configuration for this generalized fixed sequence procedure and present a sufficient condition for the FWER control under arbitrary dependence. Based on the condition, we develop three new generalized fixed sequence procedures controlling the FWER under arbitrary dependence. We also prove that each generalized fixed sequence procedure can be described as a specific closed testing procedure. Through simulation studies and a clinical trial example, we compare the power performance of these proposed procedures with those of the existing FWER controlling procedures. Finally, when the pairwise joint distributions of the true null p-values are known, we further improve these procedures by incorporating pairwise correlation information while maintaining the control of the FWER. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. State-space Generalized Predicitve Control for redundant parallel robots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Belda, Květoslav; Böhm, Josef; Valášek, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 3 (2003), s. 413-432 ISSN 1539-7734 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/03/0620 Grant - others:CTU(CZ) 0204512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1075907 Keywords : parallel robot construction * generalized predictive control * drive redundancy Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/historie/belda-0411126.pdf

  14. A General Model for Repeated Audit Controls Using Monotone Subsampling

    OpenAIRE

    Raats, V.M.; van der Genugten, B.B.; Moors, J.J.A.

    2002-01-01

    In categorical repeated audit controls, fallible auditors classify sample elements in order to estimate the population fraction of elements in certain categories.To take possible misclassifications into account, subsequent checks are performed with a decreasing number of observations.In this paper a model is presented for a general repeated audit control system, where k subsequent auditors classify elements into r categories.Two different sub-sampling procedures will be discussed, named 'stra...

  15. Neural Generalized Predictive Control of a non-linear Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Paul Haase; Nørgård, Peter Magnus; Ravn, Ole

    1998-01-01

    The use of neural network in non-linear control is made difficult by the fact the stability and robustness is not guaranteed and that the implementation in real time is non-trivial. In this paper we introduce a predictive controller based on a neural network model which has promising stability qu...... detail and discuss the implementation difficulties. The neural generalized predictive controller is tested on a pneumatic servo sys-tem.......The use of neural network in non-linear control is made difficult by the fact the stability and robustness is not guaranteed and that the implementation in real time is non-trivial. In this paper we introduce a predictive controller based on a neural network model which has promising stability...... qualities. The controller is a non-linear version of the well-known generalized predictive controller developed in linear control theory. It involves minimization of a cost function which in the present case has to be done numerically. Therefore, we develop the numerical algorithms necessary in substantial...

  16. General problems of dynamics and control of vibratory gyroscopes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, MY

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A general model of operation of vibratory gyroscopes, which is applicable to a broad class of instruments, including cylindrical, disc and micro-machined gyros, is formulated on the basis of analysis of dynamics and control of a hemispherical...

  17. Controlling general projective synchronization of fractional order Rossler systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Shiquan

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposed a method to achieve general projective synchronization of two fractional order Rossler systems. First, we construct the fractional order Rossler system's corresponding approximation integer order system. Then, a control method based on a partially linear decomposition and negative feedback of state errors was utilized on the integer order system. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. A Robust Practical Generalized Predictive Control for BoilerSuper Heater Temperature Control

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki Maki Mohialdeen

    2015-01-01

    A practical method of robust generalized predictive controller (GPC) application is developed using a combination of Ziegler-Nichols type functions relating the GPC controller parameters to a first order with time delay process parameters and a model matching controller. The GPC controller and the model matching controller are used in a master/slave configuration, with the GPC as the master controller and the model matching controller as the slave controlle...

  19. Mapping automotive like controls to a general aviation aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Christopher G.

    The purpose of this thesis was to develop fly-by-wire control laws enabling a general aviation aircraft to be flown with automotive controls, i.e. a steering wheel and gas/brake pedals. There was a six speed shifter used to change the flight mode of the aircraft. This essentially allows the pilot to have control over different aspects of the flight profile such as climb/descend or cruise. A highway in the sky was used to aid in the navigation since it is not intuitive to people without flight experience how to navigate from the sky or when to climb and descend. Many believe that general aviation could become as widespread as the automobile. Every person could have a personal aircraft at their disposal and it would be as easy to operate as driving an automobile. The goal of this thesis is to fuse the ease of drivability of a car with flight of a small general aviation aircraft. A standard automotive control hardware setup coupled with variably autonomous control laws will allow new pilots to fly a plane as easily as driving a car. The idea is that new pilots will require very little training to become proficient with these controls. Pilots with little time to stay current can maintain their skills simply by driving a car which is typically a daily activity. A human factors study was conducted to determine the feasibility of the applied control techniques. Pilot performance metrics were developed to compare candidates with no aviation background and experienced pilots. After analyzing the relative performance between pilots and non-pilots, it has been determined that the control system is robust and easy to learn. Candidates with no aviation experience whatsoever can learn to fly an aircraft as safely and efficiently as someone with hundreds of hours of flight experience using these controls.

  20. Solution of generalized control system equations at steady state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilim, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Although a number of reactor systems codes feature generalized control system models, none of the models offer a steady-state solution finder. Indeed, if a transient is to begin from steady-state conditions, the user must provide estimates for the control system initial conditions and run a null transient until the plant converges to steady state. Several such transients may have to be run before values for control system demand signals are found that produce the desired plant steady state. The intent of this paper is (a) to present the control system equations assumed in the SASSYS reactor systems code and to identify the appropriate set of initial conditions, (b) to describe the generalized block diagram approach used to represent these equations, and (c) to describe a solution method and algorithm for computing these initial conditions from the block diagram. The algorithm has been installed in the SASSYS code for use with the code's generalized control system model. The solution finder greatly enhances the effectiveness of the code and the efficiency of the user in running it

  1. Generalized Mutual Synchronization between Two Controlled Interdependent Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly focuses on the generalized mutual synchronization between two controlled interdependent networks. First, we propose the general model of controlled interdependent networks A and B with time-varying internetwork delays coupling. Then, by constructing Lyapunov functions and utilizing adaptive control technique, some sufficient conditions are established to ensure that the mutual synchronization errors between the state variables of networks A and B can asymptotically converge to zero. Finally, two numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results and to explore potential application in future smart grid. The simulation results also show how interdependent topologies and internetwork coupling delays influence the mutual synchronizability, which help to design interdependent networks with optimal mutual synchronizability.

  2. Effective and Robust Generalized Predictive Speed Control of Induction Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patxi Alkorta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and validates a new proposal for effective speed vector control of induction motors based on linear Generalized Predictive Control (GPC law. The presented GPC-PI cascade configuration simplifies the design with regard to GPC-GPC cascade configuration, maintaining the advantages of the predictive control algorithm. The robust stability of the closed loop system is demonstrated by the poles placement method for several typical cases of uncertainties in induction motors. The controller has been tested using several simulations and experiments and has been compared with Proportional Integral Derivative (PID and Sliding Mode (SM control schemes, obtaining outstanding results in speed tracking even in the presence of parameter uncertainties, unknown load disturbance, and measurement noise in the loop signals, suggesting its use in industrial applications.

  3. Towards a general neural controller for quadrupedal locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maufroy, Christophe; Kimura, Hiroshi; Takase, Kunikatsu

    2008-05-01

    Our study aims at the design and implementation of a general controller for quadruped locomotion, allowing the robot to use the whole range of quadrupedal gaits (i.e. from low speed walking to fast running). A general legged locomotion controller must integrate both posture control and rhythmic motion control and have the ability to shift continuously from one control method to the other according to locomotion speed. We are developing such a general quadrupedal locomotion controller by using a neural model involving a CPG (Central Pattern Generator) utilizing ground reaction force sensory feedback. We used a biologically faithful musculoskeletal model with a spine and hind legs, and computationally simulated stable stepping motion at various speeds using the neuro-mechanical system combining the neural controller and the musculoskeletal model. We compared the changes of the most important locomotion characteristics (stepping period, duty ratio and support length) according to speed in our simulations with the data on real cat walking. We found similar tendencies for all of them. In particular, the swing period was approximately constant while the stance period decreased with speed, resulting in a decreasing stepping period and duty ratio. Moreover, the support length increased with speed due to the posterior extreme position that shifted progressively caudally, while the anterior extreme position was approximately constant. This indicates that we succeeded in reproducing to some extent the motion of a cat from the kinematical point of view, even though we used a 2D bipedal model. We expect that such computational models will become essential tools for legged locomotion neuroscience in the future.

  4. Generalized space vector control for current source inverters and rectifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseline J. Anitha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Current source inverters (CSI is one of the widely used converter topology in medium voltage drive applications due to its simplicity, motor friendly waveforms and reliable short circuit protection. The current source inverters are usually fed by controlled current source rectifiers (CSR with a large inductor to provide a constant supply current. A generalized control applicable for both CSI and CSR and their extension namely current source multilevel inverters (CSMLI are dealt in this paper. As space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM features the advantages of flexible control, faster dynamic response, better DC utilization and easy digital implementation it is considered for this work. This paper generalizes SVPWM that could be applied for CSI, CSR and CSMLI. The intense computation involved in framing a generalized space vector control are discussed in detail. The algorithm includes determination of band, region, subregions and vectors. The algorithm is validated by simulation using MATLAB /SIMULINK for CSR 5, 7, 13 level CSMLI and for CSR fed CSI.

  5. High user control in game design elements increases compliance and in-game performance in a memory training game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniket eNagle

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Computer games are increasingly being used for training cognitive functions like working memory and attention among the growing population of older adults. While cognitive training games often include elements like difficulty adaptation, rewards, and visual themes to make the games more enjoyable and effective, the effect of different degrees of afforded user control in manipulating these elements has not been systematically studied. To address this issue, two distinct implementations of the three aforementioned game elements were tested among healthy older adults (N = 21, 69.9 ± 6.4 years old playing a game-like version of the n-back task on a tablet at home for three weeks. Two modes were considered, differentiated by the afforded degree of user control of the three elements: user control of difficulty vs. automatic difficulty adaptation, difficulty-dependent rewards vs. automatic feedback messages, and user choice of visual theme vs. no choice. The two modes (USER-CONTROL and AUTO were compared for frequency of play, duration of play, and performance. Participants were free to play the game whenever and for however long they wished. Participants in USER-CONTROL exhibited significantly higher frequency of playing, total play duration, and performance than participants in AUTO. The results of the present study demonstrate the efficacy of providing user control in the three game elements, while validating a home-based study design in which participants were not bound by any training regimen, and could play the game whenever they wished. The results have implications for designing cognitive training games that elicit higher compliance and better performance, with an emphasis on home-based training.

  6. High User Control in Game Design Elements Increases Compliance and In-game Performance in a Memory Training Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Aniket; Riener, Robert; Wolf, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Computer games are increasingly being used for training cognitive functions like working memory and attention among the growing population of older adults. While cognitive training games often include elements like difficulty adaptation, rewards, and visual themes to make the games more enjoyable and effective, the effect of different degrees of afforded user control in manipulating these elements has not been systematically studied. To address this issue, two distinct implementations of the three aforementioned game elements were tested among healthy older adults (N = 21, 69.9 ± 6.4 years old) playing a game-like version of the n-back task on a tablet at home for 3 weeks. Two modes were considered, differentiated by the afforded degree of user control of the three elements: user control of difficulty vs. automatic difficulty adaptation, difficulty-dependent rewards vs. automatic feedback messages, and user choice of visual theme vs. no choice. The two modes ("USER-CONTROL" and "AUTO") were compared for frequency of play, duration of play, and in-game performance. Participants were free to play the game whenever and for however long they wished. Participants in USER-CONTROL exhibited significantly higher frequency of playing, total play duration, and in-game performance than participants in AUTO. The results of the present study demonstrate the efficacy of providing user control in the three game elements, while validating a home-based study design in which participants were not bound by any training regimen, and could play the game whenever they wished. The results have implications for designing cognitive training games that elicit higher compliance and better in-game performance, with an emphasis on home-based training.

  7. Effectiveness of the GAEC standard of cross compliance retain terraces on soil erosion control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzoffi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The GAEC standard retain terraces of cross compliance prohibits farmers the elimination of existing terraces, with the aim to ensure the protection of soil from erosion. In the Italian literature there are not field studies to quantify the effects of the elimination or degradation of terraces on soil erosion. Therefore, the modeling approach was chosen and applied in a scenario analysis to evaluate increasing levels of degradation of stone wall terraces. The study was conducted on two sample areas: Lamole (700.8 ha, Tuscany and Costaviola (764.73 ha, Calabria with contrasting landscapes. The Universal Soil Loss Equation model (USLE was applied in the comparative assessment of the soil erosion risk (Mg . ha-1 . yr-1, by simulating five increasing intensity of terrace degradation, respectively: conserved partially damaged, very damaged, partially removed, removed, each of which corresponding to different values of the indexes of verification in case of infringement to GAEC standard provided for by the AGEA rules which have come into force since December 2009 (Agency for Agricultural Payments. To growing intensity of degradation, a progressive loss of efficacy of terraces was attributed by increasing the values of the LS factor (length and slope of USLE in relation with the local modification of the length and steepness of the slope between adjacent terraces. Basically, it was simulated the gradual return to the natural morphology of the slope. The results of the analysis showed a significant increase in erosion in relationship with increasing degradation of terraces. Furthermore, it is possible to conclude that the GAEC standard retain terraces is very effective with regard to the primary objective of reducing erosion. A further statistical analysis was performed to test the protective value of terraces against soil erosion in areas where agriculture was abandoned. The analysis was carried out by comparing the specific risk of erosion (Mg . ha-1

  8. Business Process Risk Management, Compliance and Internal Control: A Research Agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Rikhardsson, Pall; Best, Peter; Green, Peter; Rosemann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Integration of risk management and management control is emerging as an important area in the wake of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and with ongoing development of frameworks such as the Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework from the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Based on an inductive methodological approach using literature review and interviews with managers engaged in risk management and internal control projects, this paper identifies three main ar...

  9. Synchronization of generalized Henon map using polynomial controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, H.K.

    2010-01-01

    This Letter presents the chaos synchronization of two discrete-time generalized Henon map, namely the drive and response systems. A polynomial controller is proposed to drive the system states of the response system to follow those of the drive system. The system stability of the error system formed by the drive and response systems and the synthesis of the polynomial controller are investigated using the sum-of-squares (SOS) technique. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, stability conditions in terms of SOS are derived to guarantee the system stability and facilitate the controller synthesis. By satisfying the SOS-based stability conditions, chaotic synchronization is achieved. The solution of the SOS-based stability conditions can be found numerically using the third-party Matlab toolbox SOSTOOLS. A simulation example is given to illustrate the merits of the proposed polynomial control approach.

  10. Generalized approach to bilateral control for EMG driven exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gradetsky Valery

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses a generalized approach to bilateral control for EMG driven exoskeleton systems. In this paper we consider a semi-automatic mechatronic system that is controlled via human muscle activity (EMG level. The problem is to understand how the movement of the exoskeleton effects on the control. The considered system can be described in terms of bilateral control. This means the existence of force feedback from the object via the exoskeleton links and drives to operator. The simulation of the considered model was held on the MATLAB Simulink. The mathematical model of the bilateral system with exoskeleton and operator was developed. Transient functions for different dynamic parameters were obtained. It was shown that force feedback is essential for the R&D of such systems.

  11. Generalized Predictive Control for Non-Stationary Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palsson, Olafur Petur; Madsen, Henrik; Søgaard, Henning Tangen

    1994-01-01

    This paper shows how the generalized predictive control (GPC) can be extended to non-stationary (time-varying) systems. If the time-variation is slow, then the classical GPC can be used in context with an adaptive estimation procedure of a time-invariant ARIMAX model. However, in this paper prior...... knowledge concerning the nature of the parameter variations is assumed available. The GPC is based on the assumption that the prediction of the system output can be expressed as a linear combination of present and future controls. Since the Diophantine equation cannot be used due to the time......-variation of the parameters, the optimal prediction is found as the general conditional expectation of the system output. The underlying model is of an ARMAX-type instead of an ARIMAX-type as in the original version of the GPC (Clarke, D. W., C. Mohtadi and P. S. Tuffs (1987). Automatica, 23, 137-148) and almost all later...

  12. Generalized predictive control in the delta-domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Morten Bach; Jensen, Morten Rostgaard; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes new approaches to generalized predictive control formulated in the delta (δ) domain. A new δ-domain version of the continuous-time emulator-based predictor is presented. It produces the optimal estimate in the deterministic case whenever the predictor order is chosen greater...... than or equal to the number of future predicted samples, however a “good” estimate is usually obtained in a much longer range of samples. This is particularly advantageous at fast sampling rates where a “conventional” predictor is bound to become very computationally demanding. Two controllers...

  13. High User Control in Game Design Elements Increases Compliance and In-game Performance in a Memory Training Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Aniket; Riener, Robert; Wolf, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Computer games are increasingly being used for training cognitive functions like working memory and attention among the growing population of older adults. While cognitive training games often include elements like difficulty adaptation, rewards, and visual themes to make the games more enjoyable and effective, the effect of different degrees of afforded user control in manipulating these elements has not been systematically studied. To address this issue, two distinct implementations of the three aforementioned game elements were tested among healthy older adults (N = 21, 69.9 ± 6.4 years old) playing a game-like version of the n-back task on a tablet at home for 3 weeks. Two modes were considered, differentiated by the afforded degree of user control of the three elements: user control of difficulty vs. automatic difficulty adaptation, difficulty-dependent rewards vs. automatic feedback messages, and user choice of visual theme vs. no choice. The two modes (“USER-CONTROL” and “AUTO”) were compared for frequency of play, duration of play, and in-game performance. Participants were free to play the game whenever and for however long they wished. Participants in USER-CONTROL exhibited significantly higher frequency of playing, total play duration, and in-game performance than participants in AUTO. The results of the present study demonstrate the efficacy of providing user control in the three game elements, while validating a home-based study design in which participants were not bound by any training regimen, and could play the game whenever they wished. The results have implications for designing cognitive training games that elicit higher compliance and better in-game performance, with an emphasis on home-based training. PMID:26635681

  14. Higher-Order Generalized Invexity in Control Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Padhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a higher-order duality (Mangasarian type and Mond-Weir type for the control problem. Under the higher-order generalized invexity assumptions on the functions that compose the primal problems, higher-order duality results (weak duality, strong duality, and converse duality are derived for these pair of problems. Also, we establish few examples in support of our investigation.

  15. Knowledge, compliance with good clinical practices and barriers to effective control of postoperative pain among nurses from hospitals with and without a "Hospital without Pain" certificate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszek, Lucyna; Dębska, Grażyna

    2018-04-01

    (i) To compare knowledge and compliance with good clinical practices regarding control of postoperative pain among nurses employed at hospitals with and without a "Hospital without Pain" certificate, (ii) to identify the determinants of nurses' knowledge and (iii) to define barriers to effective control of postoperative pain. Only a slight improvement in postoperative pain control has been observed recently, if any. Implementation of good clinical practices in the control of postoperative pain requires involvement of nurses. A cross-sectional study. The study included 257 nurses from hospitals with a "Hospital without Pain" certificate and 243 nurses from noncertified hospitals, with mean job seniority of 17.6 ± 9.6 years. All respondents answered 26 questions regarding postoperative pain control-related issues. Based on the answers, overall scores were calculated for (i) nurses' knowledge, (ii) compliance with good clinical practices and (iii) barriers to effective control of postoperative pain. Nurses from the certified hospitals presented with significantly higher levels of knowledge and compliance with good clinical practices and identified significantly more barriers to effective control of postoperative pain. Apart from certification of a hospital, better knowledge of postoperative pain control was determined by higher education, participation in postgraduate training programmes and other relevant courses, self-education from medical journals, employment at paediatric ward or intensive care unit. The most commonly reported barriers to effective control of pain included too low doses of painkillers prescribed by physicians and inability to modify the protocol of pain treatment by the nurse. Control of postoperative pain can be improved by enrolling nurses in various forms of continuous training and by providing them with greater autonomy in administering painkillers to surgical patients. Better quality of care offered to patients with postoperative pain

  16. Providing detailed information about latent tuberculosis and compliance with the PPD test among healthcare workers in Israel: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubman, Danielle; Titler, Nava; Edelstein, Hana; Elias, Mazen; Saliba, Walid

    2013-12-01

    The compliance of screening for latent tuberculosis (TB) with the tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) test is very low among healthcare workers (HCWs) in Israel. This randomized controlled study uses the Health Belief Model (HBM) as a conceptual framework to examine whether providing more information about latent TB and the PPD test increases the response rate for PPD screening among HCWs. All candidate HCWs for latent TB screening were randomly allocated to one of the following two invitations to perform the PPD test: regular letter (control group, n=97), and a letter with information about latent TB and the PPD test (intervention group, n=196). 293 HCWs were included (185 nurses, and 108 physicians). Overall, 36 (12.3%) HCWs were compliant with the PPD test screening. Compliance with PPD testing in the intervention group was not statistically different from the control group, RR 0.87 (95% CI, 0.46-1.65). Compliance for latent TB screening is low among HCWs in northeastern Israel. Providing detailed information about latent TB was not associated with increased test compliance. Understanding existing disparities in screening rates and potential barriers to latent TB screening among HCWs is important in order to move forward and successfully increase screening rates. Copyright © 2013 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 75 FR 74128 - Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) Compliance Dates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... existing non-compliant devices based on what it believes to be a reasonable balance of the safety benefits... public works agencies, that State and local governments must balance with highway safety and traffic... service life of sign sheeting materials. \\7\\ D. Ripley. Quantifying the Safety Benefits of Traffic Control...

  18. Political control of implementation agencies - Effects of political consensus on agency compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torenvlied, R

    This article describes a positive model of the implementation of policy decisions. The model combines the salience of implementation agencies for policy decisions with the extent to which these agencies are effectively controlled, in order to predict agency deviations from policy decisions. Special

  19. Force Control for a Pneumatic Cylinder Using Generalized Predictive Controller Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Faudzi, Ahmad ’Athif; Mustafa, Nu’man Din; Osman, Khairuddin

    2014-01-01

    Pneumatic cylinder is a well-known device because of its high power to weight ratio, easy use, and environmental safety. Pneumatic cylinder uses air as its power source and converts it to a possible movement such as linear and rotary movement. In order to control the pneumatic cylinder, controller algorithm is needed to control the on-off solenoid valve with encoder and pressure sensor as the feedback inputs. In this paper, generalized predictive controller (GPC) is proposed as the control st...

  20. Cyber Security for the Spaceport Command and Control System: Vulnerability Management and Compliance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Ryan A.

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of the Internet, the number of malicious threats to organizations is continually increasing. In June of 2015, the United States Office of Personnel Management (OPM) had a data breach resulting in the compromise of millions of government employee records. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is not exempt from these attacks. Cyber security is becoming a critical facet to the discussion of moving forward with projects. The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) project at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) aims to develop the launch control system for the next generation launch vehicle in the coming decades. There are many ways to increase the security of the network it uses, from vulnerability management to ensuring operating system images are compliant with securely configured baselines recommended by the United States Government.

  1. Stability analysis of embedded nonlinear predictor neural generalized predictive controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham F. Abdel Ghaffar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear Predictor-Neural Generalized Predictive Controller (NGPC is one of the most advanced control techniques that are used with severe nonlinear processes. In this paper, a hybrid solution from NGPC and Internal Model Principle (IMP is implemented to stabilize nonlinear, non-minimum phase, variable dead time processes under high disturbance values over wide range of operation. Also, the superiority of NGPC over linear predictive controllers, like GPC, is proved for severe nonlinear processes over wide range of operation. The necessary conditions required to stabilize NGPC is derived using Lyapunov stability analysis for nonlinear processes. The NGPC stability conditions and improvement in disturbance suppression are verified by both simulation using Duffing’s nonlinear equation and real-time using continuous stirred tank reactor. Up to our knowledge, the paper offers the first hardware embedded Neural GPC which has been utilized to verify NGPC–IMP improvement in realtime.

  2. Compliance with the CONSORT checklist in obstetric anaesthesia randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, S H; Darani, R; Douglas, M J; Wight, W; Yee, J

    2004-10-01

    The Consolidated Standards for Reporting of Trials (CONSORT) checklist is an evidence-based approach to help improve the quality of reporting randomised controlled trials. The purpose of this study was to determine how closely randomised controlled trials in obstetric anaesthesia adhere to the CONSORT checklist. We retrieved all randomised controlled trials pertaining to the practice of obstetric anaesthesia and summarised in Obstetric Anesthesia Digest between March 2001 and December 2002 and compared the quality of reporting to the CONSORT checklist. The median number of correctly described CONSORT items was 65% (range 36% to 100%). Information pertaining to randomisation, blinding of the assessors, sample size calculation, reliability of measurements and reporting of the analysis were often omitted. It is difficult to determine the value and quality of many obstetric anaesthesia clinical trials because journal editors do not insist that this important information is made available to readers. Both clinicians and clinical researchers would benefit from uniform reporting of randomised trials in a manner that allows rapid data retrieval and easy assessment for relevance and quality.

  3. Compliance control based on PSO algorithm to improve the feeling during physical human-robot interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhongliang; Sun, Yu; Gao, Peng; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Jianwei

    2016-01-01

    Robots play more important roles in daily life and bring us a lot of convenience. But when people work with robots, there remain some significant differences in human-human interactions and human-robot interaction. It is our goal to make robots look even more human-like. We design a controller which can sense the force acting on any point of a robot and ensure the robot can move according to the force. First, a spring-mass-dashpot system was used to describe the physical model, and the second-order system is the kernel of the controller. Then, we can establish the state space equations of the system. In addition, the particle swarm optimization algorithm had been used to obtain the system parameters. In order to test the stability of system, the root-locus diagram had been shown in the paper. Ultimately, some experiments had been carried out on the robotic spinal surgery system, which is developed by our team, and the result shows that the new controller performs better during human-robot interaction.

  4. The Feedback Intervention Trial (FIT) — Improving Hand-Hygiene Compliance in UK Healthcare Workers: A Stepped Wedge Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Christopher; Michie, Susan; Savage, Joanne; McAteer, John; Besser, Sarah; Charlett, Andre; Hayward, Andrew; Cookson, Barry D.; Cooper, Ben S.; Duckworth, Georgia; Jeanes, Annette; Roberts, Jenny; Teare, Louise; Stone, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Achieving a sustained improvement in hand-hygiene compliance is the WHO’s first global patient safety challenge. There is no RCT evidence showing how to do this. Systematic reviews suggest feedback is most effective and call for long term well designed RCTs, applying behavioural theory to intervention design to optimise effectiveness. Methods Three year stepped wedge cluster RCT of a feedback intervention testing hypothesis that the intervention was more effective than routine practice in 16 English/Welsh Hospitals (16 Intensive Therapy Units [ITU]; 44 Acute Care of the Elderly [ACE] wards) routinely implementing a national cleanyourhands campaign). Intervention-based on Goal & Control theories. Repeating 4 week cycle (20 mins/week) of observation, feedback and personalised action planning, recorded on forms. Computer-generated stepwise entry of all hospitals to intervention. Hospitals aware only of own allocation. Primary outcome: direct blinded hand hygiene compliance (%). Results All 16 trusts (60 wards) randomised, 33 wards implemented intervention (11 ITU, 22 ACE). Mixed effects regression analysis (all wards) accounting for confounders, temporal trends, ward type and fidelity to intervention (forms/month used). Intention to Treat Analysis Estimated odds ratio (OR) for hand hygiene compliance rose post randomisation (1.44; 95% CI 1.18, 1.76;phand-hygiene compliance, in wards implementing a national hand-hygiene campaign. Further implementation studies are needed to maximise the intervention’s effect in different settings. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN65246961 PMID:23110040

  5. Diagnostic information for compliance checking of temporal compliance requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramezani Taghiabadi, E.; Fahland, D.; Dongen, van B.F.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Salinesi, C.; Norrie, M.C.; Pastor, O.

    2013-01-01

    Compliance checking is gaining importance as today’s organizations need to show that operational processes are executed in a controlled manner while satisfying predefined (legal) requirements or service level agreements. Deviations may be costly and expose an organization to severe risks. Compliance

  6. Compliance with physical exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Anne Sofie; Bønnelycke, Julie; Rosenkilde Larsen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Sixty-one healthy, sedentary, moderately overweight young men participated in a randomised controlled trial to examine the effects of two different doses of endurance exercise on health behaviour and exercise compliance. Methods: Participants were randomised to a sedentary control group......), a post hoc thematic analysis was conducted to connect qualitative and quantitative data in a joint analysis. Results: Of the subjects interviewed, exercise compliance expressed as 95% CI was [96.8; 103%] in the MOD group and [82.9; 99.6%] in the HIGH group. The different doses of daily exercise equally...... or quantitative methodology alone. The preconditions of the TBP were fulfilled, and it represents a methodological model to explain the high degree of compliance and motivation to exercise....

  7. Elementary Assessment Handbook; a self-assessment handbook for compliance with the laws relating to elementary school boards of trustees and the state board of education policies for the general operation of a school district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    As an alternative to assessments conducted by the State Department of Education, Arizona school districts can use this handbook for self evaluation of their compliance with school law, which is basically controlled by Arizona Revised Statute (ARS) Title 15 and State Board of Education policy. This handbook is divided into seven parts which…

  8. Compliance. Regulatory policy P-211

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This regulatory policy describes the basic principles and directives for establishing and conducting the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) Compliance Program. The program is aimed at securing compliance by regulated persons with regulatory requirements made under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act ('the Act'). The policy applies to persons who are regulated by the CNSC through the Act, regulations and licences, as well as by decisions and orders made under the Act. The policy applies to officers and employees of the CNSC, and its authorized representatives or agents, who are involved in developing and carrying out compliance activities. Compliance, in the context of this policy, means conformity by regulated persons with the legally binding requirements of the Act, and the CNSC regulations, licences, decisions, and orders made under the Act. Compliance activities are CNSC measures of promotion, verification and enforcement aimed at securing compliance by regulated person with the applicable legally binding requirements. (author)

  9. Compliance Issues in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency in the 1980's, quality in the 1990's, compliance in the 2010's - private sector management techniques and mechanisms find their way to public services. This paper facilitates the understanding of how compliance management controls can improve operations and prevent or detect failure or wrong doing. The last few years' empirical research…

  10. Diagnostic information in compliance checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramezani Taghiabadi, E.; Fahland, D.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Compliance checking is gaining importance as today's organizations need to show that operational processes are executed in a controlled manner while satisfying predefined (legal) requirements. Deviations may be costly and expose the organization to severe risks. Compliance checking is of growing

  11. Advanced control room evaluation: General approach and rationale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Wachtel, J.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced control rooms (ACRs) for future nuclear power plants (NPPs) are being designed utilizing computer-based technologies. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews the human engineering aspects of such control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported in order to protect public health and safety. This paper describes the rationale and general approach to the development of a human factors review guideline for ACRs. The factors influencing the guideline development are discussed, including the review environment, the types of advanced technologies being addressed, the human factors issues associated with advanced technology, and the current state-of-the-art of human factors guidelines for advanced human-system interfaces (HSIs). The proposed approach to ACR review would track the design and implementation process through the application of review guidelines reflecting four review modules: planning, design process analysis, human factors engineering review, and dynamic performance evaluation. 21 refs

  12. Using interactive voice response to improve disease management and compliance with acute coronary syndrome best practice guidelines: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrard, Heather; Duchesne, Lloyd; Wells, George; Kearns, Sharon Ann; Struthers, Christine

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence from large clinical trials that compliance with standardized best practice guidelines (BPGs) improves survival of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. However, their application is often suboptimal. In this study, the researchers evaluated whether the use of an interactive voice response (IVR) follow-up system improved ACS BPG compliance. This was a single-centre randomized control trial (RCT) of 1,608 patients (IVR=803; usual care=805). The IVR group received five automated calls in 12 months. The primary composite outcome was increased medication compliance and decreased adverse events. A significant improvement of 60% in the IVR group for the primary composite outcome was found (RR 1.60, 95% CI: 1.29 to 2.00, p <0.001). There was significant improvement in medication compliance (p <0.001) and decrease in unplanned medical visits (p = 0.023). At one year, the majority of patients ( 85%) responded positively to using the system again. Follow-up by IVR produced positive outcomes in ACS patients.

  13. Effectiveness of the GAEC cross-compliance standard Short-term measures for runoff water control on sloping land (temporary ditches and grass strips in controlling soil erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzoffi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The agronomic measures made obligatory by the cross-compliance Standard Temporary measures for runoff water control on sloping land included in the Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies (MiPAAF decree on cross compliance until 2008, and by Standard 1.1 Creation of temporary ditches for the prevention of soil erosion in the 2009 decree, certainly appear to be useful for the control of soil erosion and runoff. The efficacy of temporary drainage ditches and of grass strips in controlling runoff and erosion has been demonstrated in trials conducted in field test plots in Italy. When level temporary drainage ditches are correctly built, namely with an inclination of not more than 2.5% in relation to the maximum hillslope gradient, they allow the suspended sediment eroded upstream to settle in the ditches, retaining the material carried away on the slope and, as a result, reducing the quantity of sediment delivered to the hydrographic network. In particular, among all the results, the erosion and runoff data in a trial conducted in Guiglia (Modena showed that in corn plots, temporary drainage ditches reduced soil erosion by 94%, from 14.4 Mg ha-1 year-1 (above the limit established by the NRCS-USDA of 11.2 Mg ha-1 year-1 to 0.8 Mg ha-1 year-1 (within the NRCS limit and also within the more restrictive limit established by the OECD of 6.0 Mg ha-1 year-1. With respect to the grass buffer strips the most significant research was carried out in Volterra. This research demonstrated their efficacy in reducing erosion from 8.15 Mg ha-1 to 1.6 Mg ha-1, which is approximately 5 times less than the erosion observed on bare soil. The effectiveness of temporary drainage ditches was also assessed through the application of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE erosion model to 60 areas under the control of the Agency for Agricultural Payments (AGEA in 2009, comparing the risk of erosion in these sample areas by simulating the presence and

  14. Design of compliant mechanisms with selective compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasse, Alexander; Campanile, Lucio Flavio

    2009-01-01

    Conventional mechanisms provide a defined mobility, which expresses the number of degrees of freedom of the mechanism. This allows the system to be driven by a low number of control outputs. This property is virtually retained in the case of compliant mechanisms with lumped compliance, which are obtained by replacing the conventional hinges by solid-state ones. Compliant mechanisms with distributed compliance have, in general, an infinite number of degrees of freedom and therefore cannot guarantee defined kinematics. In this paper the concept of compliant mechanisms with selective compliance is introduced. This special class of compliant mechanisms combines the advantages of distributed compliance with the easy controllability of systems with defined kinematics. The task is accomplished by introducing a new design criterion based on a modal formulation. After this design criterion has been implemented in an optimization formulation for a formal optimization procedure, mechanisms are obtained in which a freely chosen deformation pattern is associated with a low deformation energy while other deformation patterns are considerably stiffer. Besides the description of the modal design criterion and the associated objective function, the sensitivity analysis of the objective function is presented and an application example is shown

  15. Comparison of H-infinity control and generalized predictive control for a laser scanner system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordys, A.W.; Stoustrup, Jakob; Smillie, I.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes tests performed on a laser scanner system to assess the feasibility of H-infinity control and generalized predictive control design techniques in achieving a required performance in a trajectory folowing problem. The two methods are compared with respect to achieved scan times...

  16. Exponential stability for formation control systems with generalized controllers: A unified approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Zhiyong; Mou, Shaoshuai; Anderson, Brian D.O.; Cao, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses generalized controllers for distance-based rigid formation shape stabilization and aims to provide a unified approach for the convergence analysis. We consider two types of formation control systems according to different characterizations of target formations: minimally rigid

  17. The effect of a health communication campaign on compliance with mass drug administration for schistosomiasis control in western Kenya--the SCORE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omedo, Martin; Ogutu, Michael; Awiti, Alphonce; Musuva, Rosemary; Muchiri, Geoffrey; Montgomery, Susan P; Secor, W Evan; Mwinzi, Pauline

    2014-11-01

    Compliance with mass drug administration (MDA) can be affected by rumors and mistrust about the drug. Communication campaigns are an effective way to influence attitudes and health behaviors in diverse public health contexts, but there is very little documentation about experiences using health communications in schistosomiasis control programs. A qualitative study was conducted with community health workers (CHWs) as informants to explore the effect of a health communication campaign on their experiences during subsequent praziquantel MDA for schistosomiasis. Discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, translated into English where applicable, and analyzed thematically using ATLAS.ti software. According to the CHWs, exposure to mass media messages improved awareness of the MDA, which in turn, led to better treatment compliance. Our findings suggest that communication campaigns influence health behaviors and create awareness of schistosomiasis control interventions, which may ultimately improve praziquantel MDA. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  18. Team care to cure adolescents with braces (avoiding low quality of life, pain and bad compliance): a case–control retrospective study. 2011 SOSORT Award winner

    OpenAIRE

    Tavernaro, Marta; Pellegrini, Anna; Tessadri, Fabrizio; Zaina, Fabio; Zonta, Andrea; Negrini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Bracing could be efficacious, given good compliance and quality of braces. Recently the SOSORT Brace Treatment Management Guidelines (SBTMG) have highlighted the perceived importance of the professional teams surrounding braced patients. Purpose To verify the impact of a complete rehabilitation team in the adolescent patient with bracing. Materials and methods Design. Initial cross-sectional study, followed by a retrospective case–control study. Population: Thirty-eight pa...

  19. Effectiveness of the GAEC standard of cross compliance Prohibition of performing unauthorized land levelling on soil erosion control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzoffi

    2011-08-01

    regional regulations are more rigorous. Land levelling in other agricultural areas is excluded from the requirement to obtain prior authorization. Owners are only required to submit a DIA (statement of commencement of activity to the Public Authority. However, permission is granted by law, in the event of lack of ruling by the Authority (implicit consent principle. This GAEC standard assumes that permission (where due granted by the local authorities responsible for territorial governance is sufficient to avoid the damage that could be caused by land levelling. In other words, the standard does not dictate the agronomic rules to be followed in carrying out land levelling, but refers to already existing local rules and assumes that the authorization is granted on the basis of a detailed Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA. At the present time, only a few local governments take land levelling into consideration in their territorial governance legislation. In general, there is no rule requiring that the application for authorization be accompanied by a project containing the items considered necessary, in the present study, to enable the authorities to express well-pondered judgment. In addition, local territorial rules do not require the execution of land levelling and subsequent approval of the finished work to be carried out under the supervision of a geologist or a pedologist . At present, the GAEC standard is very weak, due to the lack of coordination between the provisions of cross compliance and territorial governance legislation focused on land levelling. It is common practice for the landowner, after obtaining permission, to assign the work to an earthmoving company with no expertise in soil protection and which possibly also has an interest in moving large volumes of earth. This may contribute to an increase in severe environmental damage. Land levelling, undertaken by virtue of a simple DIA and lacking environmental expertise, is very risky and can cause severe

  20. Neighborhood Inequalities in Retailers' Compliance With the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009, January 2014-July 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph G L; Baker, Hannah M; Ranney, Leah M; Goldstein, Adam O

    2015-10-08

    Retailer noncompliance with limited US tobacco regulations on advertising and labeling was historically patterned by neighborhood in ways that promote health disparities. In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began enforcing stronger tobacco retailer regulations under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009. However, recent research has found no differences in compliance by neighborhood characteristics for FDA advertising and labeling inspections. We sought to investigate the neighborhood characteristics associated with retailer noncompliance with specific FDA advertising and labeling inspections (ie, violations of bans on self-service displays, selling single cigarettes, false or mislabeled products, vending machines, flavored cigarettes, and free samples). We coded FDA advertising and labeling warning letters (n = 718) for type of violations and geocoded advertising and labeling inspections from January 1 through July 31, 2014 (N = 33,543). Using multilevel models, we examined cross-sectional associations between types of violations and neighborhood characteristics previously associated with disparities (ie, percentage black, Latino, under the poverty line, and younger than 18 years). Retailer advertising and labeling violations are patterned by who lives in the neighborhood; regulated tobacco products are more likely to be stored behind the counter as the percentage of black or Latino residents increases, and single cigarettes are more often available for purchase in neighborhoods as the percentage of black, poor, or young residents increases. Contrary to previous null findings, noncompliance with FDA advertising and labeling regulations is patterned by neighborhood characteristics, sometimes in opposite directions. Given the low likelihood of self-service violations in the same neighborhoods that have high likelihood of single cigarette sales, we suggest targeted approaches to FDA retailer inspections and education campaigns.

  1. A Generalized Correlation Plot Package for the CEBAF Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Wu; W. Akers; S. Schaffner; H. Shoaee; W. A. Watson; D. Wetherholt

    1996-01-01

    The Correlation Package is a general facility for data acquisition and analysis serving as an online environment for performing a wide variety of machine physics experiments and engineering diagnostics. Typical correlation experiments consist of an initial set of actions followed by stepping one or two accelerator parameters while measuring up to several hundred control system parameters. The package utilizes the CDEV [1] device API to access accelerator systems. A variety of analysis and graphics tools are included through integration with the Matlab math modeling package. A post- acquisition script capability is available to automate the data reduction process. A callable interface allows this facility to serve as the data acquisition and analysis engine for high level applications. A planned interface to archived accelerator data will allow the same analysis and graphics tools to be used for viewing and correlating history data. The object oriented design and C++ implementation details as well as the current status of the Correlation Package will be presented

  2. Force Control for a Pneumatic Cylinder Using Generalized Predictive Controller Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad ’Athif Mohd Faudzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic cylinder is a well-known device because of its high power to weight ratio, easy use, and environmental safety. Pneumatic cylinder uses air as its power source and converts it to a possible movement such as linear and rotary movement. In order to control the pneumatic cylinder, controller algorithm is needed to control the on-off solenoid valve with encoder and pressure sensor as the feedback inputs. In this paper, generalized predictive controller (GPC is proposed as the control strategy for the pneumatic cylinder force control. To validate and compare the performance, proportional-integral (PI controller is also presented. Both controllers algorithms GPC and PI are developed using existing linear model of the cylinder from previous research. Results are presented in simulation and experimental approach using MATLAB-Simulink as the platform. The results show that the GPC is capable of fast response with low steady state error and percentage overshoot compared to PI.

  3. State regulatory issues in acid rain compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, B.D.; Brick, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a US EPA workshop for state regulators and commission staff on acid rain compliance concerns. The topics of the article include the results of market-based emissions control, how emissions trading is expected to reduce emissions, public utility commissions approval of compliance plans, the purposes of the workshop, market information, accounting issues, regulatory process and utility planning, multi-state compliance planning, and relationship to other compliance issues

  4. Evaluation of the effectiveness and compliance of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) in the control of malaria in pregnant women in south eastern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduka, F O; Nwosu, E; Oguariri, R M

    2011-01-01

    Controlling malaria in pregnancy has been an important component of the millennium development goal and intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) is considered an important tool in controlling malaria among pregnant women. In this study, we evaluated the level of compliance to IPT use as well as its effect on malaria infection among pregnant women attending antenatal clinic in south eastern Nigeria. Peripheral blood smears and placental histology were used as diagnostic tools to determine infection rate. Our data show that compliance to IPT use was poor (33%) when compared with non-compliance (67%). Infection rate was significantly lower among IPT users (39%) than in non-users (71%) (X2 = 39.95; P<0.05). Maternal anaemia was also lower in IPT users (4%) than in non-users (18%). Taken together, IPT use appears to be important in reducing infection rate and maternal anaemia. Therefore, its adoption is highly recommended and this could be improved through public enlightenment campaign and adequate funding. PMID:22325819

  5. [Insufficient medication compliance in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Marjolein B; van der Eijk, Martijn; Kramers, Kees; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2011-01-01

    Medication compliance is generally suboptimal, particularly in patients with complex polypharmacy. This generic treatment problem is described here for Parkinson's disease (PD). We would expect patients with PD to have good medication compliance, since missed doses immediately result in worsening of symptoms. However, recent research has revealed that PD patients demonstrate poor medication compliance. Poor medication compliance is particularly undesirable for patients with PD because regular intake of medication is required for optimal treatment effect. Possible ways of improving medication compliance are pharmacotherapeutic measures and behavioural interventions. Modern methods of communication (text message reminders) and 'smart' pill dispensers may be beneficial, but the advantages of such interventions have not yet been scientifically studied.

  6. Quality Control Review of the Commonwealth of Virginia Auditor of Public Accounts The College of William & Mary Fiscal Year Ended June 30,1996

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smolenyak, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    ...: due professional care, planning, supervision, independence, quality control, internal controls, substantive testing, general and specific compliance testing, and the Schedule of Federal Assistance...

  7. Importance of Perioperative Glycemic Control in General Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Steve; Thompson, Rachel; Dellinger, Patchen; Yanez, David; Farrohki, Ellen; Flum, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship of perioperative hyperglycemia and insulin administration on outcomes in elective colon/rectal and bariatric operations. Background There is limited evidence to characterize the impact of perioperative hyperglycemia and insulin on adverse outcomes in patients, with and without diabetes, undergoing general surgical procedures. Methods The Surgical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program is a Washington State quality improvement benchmarking-based initiative. We evaluated the relationship of perioperative hyperglycemia (>180 mg/dL) and insulin administration on mortality, reoperative interventions, and infections for patients undergoing elective colorectal and bariatric surgery at 47 participating hospitals between fourth quarter of 2005 and fourth quarter of 2010. Results Of the 11,633 patients (55.4 ± 15.3 years; 65.7% women) with a serum glucose determination on the day of surgery, postoperative day 1, or postoperative day 2, 29.1% of patients were hyperglycemic. After controlling for clinical factors, those with hyperglycemia had a significantly increased risk of infection [odds ratio (OR) 2.0; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.63–2.44], reoperative interventions (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.41–2.3), and death (OR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.72–4.28). Increased risk of poor outcomes was observed both for patients with and without diabetes. Those with hyperglycemia on the day of surgery who received insulin had no significant increase in infections (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.72–1.42), reoperative interventions (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.89–1.89), or deaths (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.61–2.42). A dose-effect relationship was found between the effectiveness of insulin-related glucose control (worst 180–250 mg/dL, best adverse outcomes. Conclusions Perioperative hyperglycemia was associated with adverse outcomes in general surgery patients with and without diabetes. However, patients with hyperglycemia who received insulin were at no greater risk than

  8. Job Burnout Reduces Hand Hygiene Compliance Among Nursing Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manomenidis, Georgios; Panagopoulou, Efharis; Montgomery, Anthony

    2017-10-13

    Health professional burnout has been associated with suboptimal care and reduced patient safety. However, the extent to which burnout influences hand hygiene compliance among health professionals has yet to be explored. The aim of the study was to examine whether job burnout reduces hand washing compliance among nursing staff. A diary study was conducted. Forty registered nurses working in a general city hospital in Thessaloniki, Greece, completed a questionnaire, while they were monitored for hand hygiene compliance following the World Health Organization protocol for hand hygiene assessment. Burnout was measured using validated items from the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Data were collected from September to October 2015. Multiple regression analysis showed that controlling for years in practice, burnout was negatively associated with hand hygiene compliance (R = 0.322, F(3,36) = 5.704, P compliance to hand hygiene among nurses. Given the crucial role of hand hygiene compliance for the prevention of in-hospital infections, this study highlights the need for interventions targeting the prevention of burnout among nursing staff.

  9. Compliance, clinical outcome, and quality of life of patients with stable angina pectoris receiving once-daily betaxolol versus twice daily metoprolol: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemyslaw Kardas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Przemyslaw KardasThe First Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of LodzBackground: A randomized, controlled trial was conducted in an outpatient setting to examine the effect of beta-blocker dosing frequency on patient compliance, clinical outcome, and health-related quality of life in patients with stable angina pectoris.Methods: One hundred and twelve beta-blockers-naive outpatients with stable angina pectoris were randomized to receive betaxolol, 20 mg once daily or metoprolol tartrate, 50 mg twice daily for 8 weeks. The principal outcome measure was overall compliance measured electronically, whereas secondary outcome measures were drug effectiveness and health-related quality of life.Results: The overall compliance was 86.5 ± 21.3% in the betaxolol group versus 76.1 ± 26.3% in the metoprolol group (p < 0.01, and the correct number of doses was taken on 84.4 ± 21.6% and 64.0 ± 31.7% of treatment days, respectively (p < 0.0001. The percentage of missed doses was 14.5 ± 21.5% in the once-daily group and 24.8 ± 26.4% in the twice-daily group (p < 0.01. The percentage of doses taken in the correct time window (58.6% vs 42.0%, p = 0.01, correct interdose intervals (77.4% v 53.1%, p < 0.0001, and therapeutic coverage (85.6% vs 73.7%, p < 0.001 were significantly higher in the once-daily group. Both studied drugs had similar antianginal effectiveness. Health-related quality of life improved in both groups, but this increase was more pronounced in the betaxolol arm in some dimensions.Conclusions: The study demonstrates that patient compliance with once-daily betaxolol is significantly better than with twice daily metoprolol. Similarly, this treatment provides better quality of life. These results demonstrate possible therapeutic advantages of once-daily over twice-daily beta-blockers in the treatment of stable angina pectoris.Keywords: patient compliance, quality of life, stable angina pectoris, randomized controlled trial

  10. Environmental Compliance Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkouris, Panagiotis; Fitzmaurice, Malgosia

    2017-01-01

    Compliance mechanisms can be found in treaties regulating such diverse issues as human rights, disarmament law, and environmental law. In this bibliography, the focus will be on compliance mechanisms of multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs). Compliance with norms of international

  11. General model and control of an n rotor helicopter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidea, A G; Brogaard, R Yding; Andersen, N A; Ravn, O

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a dynamic, nonlinear mathematical model of a multirotor that would be valid for different numbers of rotors. Furthermore, a set of Single Input Single Output (SISO) controllers were implemented for attitude control. Both model and controllers were tested experimentally on a quadcopter. Using the combined model and controllers, simple system simulation and control is possible, by replacing the physical values for the individual systems

  12. General model and control of an n rotor helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidea, A. G.; Yding Brogaard, R.; Andersen, N. A.; Ravn, O.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a dynamic, nonlinear mathematical model of a multirotor that would be valid for different numbers of rotors. Furthermore, a set of Single Input Single Output (SISO) controllers were implemented for attitude control. Both model and controllers were tested experimentally on a quadcopter. Using the combined model and controllers, simple system simulation and control is possible, by replacing the physical values for the individual systems.

  13. Influence of self-efficacy on compliance to workplace exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt; Langberg, Henning; Poulsen, Otto Melchior; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Jensen, Jette Nygaard; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Bredahl, Thomas; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2013-09-01

    Continuous neck and shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint. Physical exercise can reduce pain symptoms, but compliance to exercise is a challenge. Exercise-specific self-efficacy has been found to be a predictor of participation in preplanned exercise. Little is known about the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to workplace physical exercise. To determine the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to specific strength exercises during working hours for laboratory technicians. We performed a cluster-randomized controlled trial, including laboratory technicians from two industrial production units in Copenhagen, Denmark. The participants were randomized to supervised specific strength exercises for the neck and shoulder muscles for 20 minutes three times a week (n = 282) or to a reference group (n = 255). The participants answered baseline and follow-up questions regarding self-efficacy and registered all exercises in a diary. Overall compliance to exercises was 45 %. Compliance in company A (private sector) differed significantly between the three self-efficacy groups after 20 weeks. The odds ratio of compliance was 2.37 for moderate versus low self-efficacy, and 2.93 for high versus low self-efficacy. No significant difference was found in company B (public sector) or in the intervention group as a whole. We did not find self-efficacy to be a general statistically significant predictor of compliance to exercises during 20 weeks, but found self-efficacy to be a predictor of compliance in a private sector setting. Workplace-specific differences might be present and should be taken into account.

  14. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): When Worry Gets Out of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    WHAT IS GAD? Occasional anxiety is a normal part of life. You might worry about things like health, money, or family problems. But people with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) feel extremely worried or feel nervous ...

  15. General Quality Control (QC) Guidelines for SAM Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  16. General model and control of an n rotor helicopter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidea, Adriana-Gabriela; Brogaard, Rune Yding; Andersen, Nils Axel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a dynamic, nonlinear mathematical model ofa multirotor that would be valid for different numbers of rotors. Furthermore, a set of SingleInput Single Output (SISO) controllers were implemented for attitude control. Both model andcontrollers were tested exper...

  17. Exact Boundary Controllability of Electromagnetic Fields in a General Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eller, M. M.; Masters, J. E.

    2002-01-01

    We prove exact controllability for Maxwell's system with variable coefficients in a bounded domain by a current flux in the boundary. The proof relies on a duality argument which reduces the proof of exact controllability to the proof of continuous observability for the homogeneous adjoint system. There is no geometric restriction imposed on the domain

  18. RoboCon: A general purpose telerobotic control center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, J.V.; Noakes, M.W.; Blair, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes human factors issues involved in the design of RoboCon, a multi-purpose control center for use in US Department of Energy remote handling applications. RoboCon is intended to be a flexible, modular control center capable of supporting a wide variety of robotic devices

  19. RoboCon: A general purpose telerobotic control center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draper, J.V.; Noakes, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics and Process Systems Div.; Schempf, H. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Blair, L.M. [Human Machine Interfaces, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This report describes human factors issues involved in the design of RoboCon, a multi-purpose control center for use in US Department of Energy remote handling applications. RoboCon is intended to be a flexible, modular control center capable of supporting a wide variety of robotic devices.

  20. General-purpose microprocessor-based control chassis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Swenson, D.A.

    1979-12-01

    The objective of the Pion Generation for Medical Irradiations (PIGMI) program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is to develop the technology to build smaller, less expensive, and more reliable proton linear accelerators for medical applications. For this program, a powerful, simple, inexpensive, and reliable control and data acquisition system was developed. The system has a NOVA 3D computer with a real time disk-operating system (RDOS) that communicates with distributed microprocessor-based controllers which directly control data input/output chassis. At the heart of the controller is a microprocessor crate which was conceived at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. This idea was applied to the design of the hardware and software of the controller

  1. Dilemmas of compliance in the CIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobyev, A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine some of the difficulties faced by Russia and other Common Independent States (CIS) in the field of compliance with disarmament treaties and non-proliferation regimes, as well as ways and means, particularly with regard to the legal framework, designed to overcome these difficulties. Naturally, the fate and pace of overcoming the existing problems will depend only partially on development of CIS States. A large variety of international factors and the general security will be essential for progress in resolving disarmament and arms control issues in the CIS

  2. General man-machine interface used in accelerators controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutheon, M.; Di Maio, F.; Pace, A.

    1992-01-01

    A large community is now using Workstations as Accelerators Computer Controls Interface, through the concepts of windows - menus - synoptics - icons. Some standards were established for the CERN-PS control systems rejuvenation. The Booster-to-PS transfer and injection process is now entirely operated with these tools. This application constitutes a global environment providing the users with the controls, analysis, visualization of a part of an accelerator. Individual commands, measurements, and specialized programs including complex treatments are available in a homogeneous frame. Some months of experience in current operation have shown that this model can be extended to the whole project. (author)

  3. Treatment Compliance with Fixed-Dose Combination of Vildagliptin/Metformin in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Inadequately Controlled with Metformin Monotherapy: A 24-Week Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorios Rombopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the differences in treatment compliance with vildagliptin/metformin fixed-dose versus free-dose combination therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in Greece. Design. Adult patients with T2DM, inadequately controlled with metformin monotherapy, (850 mg bid, participated in this 24-week, multicenter, observational study. Patients were enrolled in two cohorts: vildagliptin/metformin fixed-dose combination (group A and vildagliptin metformin free-dose combination (group B. Results. 659 patients were enrolled, 360 were male, with mean BMI 30.1, mean T2DM duration 59.6 months, and mean HbA1c at baseline 8%; 366 patients were assigned to group A and 293 to group B; data for 3 patients was missing. In group A, 98.9% of patients were compliant with their treatment compared to 84.6% of group B. The odds ratio for compliance in group A versus B was (OR 18.9 (95% CI: 6.2, 57.7; P<0.001. In group A mean HbA1c decreased from 8.1% at baseline to 6.9% (P<0.001 at the study end and from 7.9% to 6.8% (P<0.001 in group B. Conclusions. Patients in group A were more compliant than patients in group B. These results are in accordance with international literature suggesting that fixed-dose combination therapies lead to increased compliance to treatment.

  4. 40 CFR 425.05 - Compliance dates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance dates. 425.05 Section 425.05 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 425.05 Compliance dates...

  5. [Insufficient medication compliance in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, M.B.; Eijk, M. van der; Kramers, C.; Bloem, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Medication compliance is generally suboptimal, particularly in patients with complex polypharmacy. This generic treatment problem is described here for Parkinson's disease (PD). We would expect patients with PD to have good medication compliance, since missed doses immediately result in worsening of

  6. A General Theory of Markovian Time Inconsistent Stochastic Control Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björk, Tomas; Murgochi, Agatha

    We develop a theory for stochastic control problems which, in various ways, are time inconsistent in the sense that they do not admit a Bellman optimality principle. We attach these problems by viewing them within a game theoretic framework, and we look for Nash subgame perfect equilibrium points...... examples of time inconsistency in the literature are easily seen to be special cases of the present theory. We also prove that for every time inconsistent problem, there exists an associated time consistent problem such that the optimal control and the optimal value function for the consistent problem...

  7. Do federal and state audits increase compliance with a grant program to improve municipal infrastructure (AUDIT study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La O, Ana L; Martel García, Fernando

    2014-09-03

    Poor governance and accountability compromise young democracies' efforts to provide public services critical for human development, including water, sanitation, health, and education. Evidence shows that accountability agencies like superior audit institutions can reduce corruption and waste in federal grant programs financing service infrastructure. However, little is know about their effect on compliance with grant reporting and resource allocation requirements, or about the causal mechanisms. This study protocol for an exploratory randomized controlled trial tests the hypothesis that federal and state audits increase compliance with a federal grant program to improve municipal service infrastructure serving marginalized households. The AUDIT study is a block randomized, controlled, three-arm parallel group exploratory trial. A convenience sample of 5 municipalities in each of 17 states in Mexico (n=85) were block randomized to be audited by federal auditors (n=17), by state auditors (n=17), and a control condition outside the annual program of audits (n=51) in a 1:1:3 ratio. Replicable and verifiable randomization was performed using publicly available lottery numbers. Audited municipalities were included in the national program of audits and received standard audits on their use of federal public service infrastructure grants. Municipalities receiving moderate levels of grant transfers were recruited, as these were outside the auditing sampling frame--and hence audit program--or had negligible probabilities of ever being audited. The primary outcome measures capture compliance with the grant program and markers for the causal mechanisms, including deterrence and information effects. Secondary outcome measure include differences in audit reports across federal and state auditors, and measures like career concerns, political promotions, and political clientelism capturing synergistic effects with municipal accountability systems. The survey firm and research

  8. An FPGA- Based General-Purpose Data Acquisition Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, C. C. W.; Bousselham, A.; Bohm

    2006-08-01

    System development in advanced FPGAs allows considerable flexibility, both during development and in production use. A mixed firmware/software solution allows the developer to choose what shall be done in firmware or software, and to make that decision late in the process. However, this flexibility comes at the cost of increased complexity. We have designed a modular development framework to help to overcome these issues of increased complexity. This framework comprises a generic controller that can be adapted for different systems by simply changing the software or firmware parts. The controller can use both soft and hard processors, with or without an RTOS, based on the demands of the system to be developed. The resulting system uses the Internet for both control and data acquisition. In our studies we developed the embedded system in a Xilinx Virtex-II Pro FPGA, where we used both PowerPC and MicroBlaze cores, http, Java, and LabView for control and communication, together with the MicroC/OS-II and OSE operating systems

  9. Control rod computer code IAMCOS: general theory and numerical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, G.

    1982-11-01

    IAMCOS is a computer code for the description of mechanical and thermal behavior of cylindrical control rods for fast breeders. This code version was applied, tested and modified from 1979 to 1981. In this report are described the basic model (02 version), theoretical definitions and computation methods [fr

  10. A General Model for Repeated Audit Controls Using Monotone Subsampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raats, V.M.; van der Genugten, B.B.; Moors, J.J.A.

    2002-01-01

    In categorical repeated audit controls, fallible auditors classify sample elements in order to estimate the population fraction of elements in certain categories.To take possible misclassifications into account, subsequent checks are performed with a decreasing number of observations.In this paper a

  11. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Bibliographic Control Division. Section: Bibliography. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on bibliographic control presented at the 1986 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Bibliographic Interchange/Coordination in Southeast Asia (Huck Tee Lim, Malaysia); (2) "Project for 'Chinese National Bibliography' and Its Progress" (Huang Jungui, China); (3) "Subject…

  12. Systems control with generalized probabilistic fuzzy-reinforcement learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinojosa, J.; Nefti, S.; Kaymak, U.

    2011-01-01

    Reinforcement learning (RL) is a valuable learning method when the systems require a selection of control actions whose consequences emerge over long periods for which input-output data are not available. In most combinations of fuzzy systems and RL, the environment is considered to be

  13. Model-free adaptive sliding mode controller design for generalized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M WANG

    2017-08-16

    Aug 16, 2017 ... The main contribution of this paper is that a control strategy is provided for ... differential equation provides a new mathematical tool, ... methods of synchronization and GPS, which only use ... the effectiveness of the proposed method by numerical ...... [24] M Anthony and P L Bartlett, Neural network learning.

  14. Compliance with air quality regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, D.V.; Tackett, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    Due to the probable passage of Clean Air Act Amendments in 1990, electric utilities throughout the United States are faced with numerous choices to comply with the new acid rain regulations, expected in 1991. The choice of a compliance plan is not a simple task. Every compliance option will be costly. At Ohio Edison, deliberations are quite naturally influenced by past compliance with air quality regulations. This paper discusses compliance with air quality regulations in the 1970's, clean coal technologies and advanced scrubbers, and compliance with air quality regulations in 1995 - 2000. The choice of a compliance strategy for many utilities will involve serving customer loads through some combination of scrubbers, clean coal technologies, fuel switching, fuel blending, redispatch of units, and emissions trading. Whatever the final choice, it must be economic while providing sufficient flexibility to accommodate the critical uncertainties of load growth, state regulatory treatment, markets for emission allowances, advancements in control technologies, additional federal requirements for air emissions, equipment outages and fuel supply disruptions.s

  15. Estimation of CANDU reactor zone controller level by generalized perturbation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Heon; Kim, Jong Kyung; Choi, Hang Bok; Roh, Gyu Hong; Yang, Won Sik

    1998-01-01

    The zone controller level change due to refueling operation has been studied using a generalized perturbation method. The generalized perturbation method provides sensitivity of zone power to individual refueling operation and incremental change of zone controller level. By constructing a system equation for each zone power, the zone controller level change was obtained. The details and a proposed model for future work are described

  16. Compliance with removable orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirmal

    2017-12-22

    Data sourcesMedline via OVID, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science Core Collection, LILACS and BBO databases. Unpublished clinical trials accessed using ClinicalTrials.gov, National Research Register, ProQuest Dissertation and Thesis database.Study selectionTwo authors searched studies from inception until May 2016 without language restrictions. Quantitative and qualitative studies incorporating objective data on compliance with removable appliances, barriers to appliance wear compliance, and interventions to improve compliance were included.Data extraction and synthesisQuality of research was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool, the risk of bias in non-randomised studies of interventions (ROBINS-I), and the mixed methods appraisal tool. Statistical heterogeneity was investigated by examining a graphic display of the estimated compliance levels in conjunction with 95% confidence intervals and quantified using the I-squared statistic. A weighted estimate of objective compliance levels for different appliances in relation to stipulated wear and self-reported levels was also calculated. Risk of publication bias was assessed using funnel plots. Meta-regression was undertaken to assess the relative effects of appliance type on compliance levels.ResultsTwenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 11 were included in the quantitative synthesis. The mean duration of objectively measured wear was considerably lower than stipulated wear time amongst all appliances. Headgear had the greatest discrepancy (5.81 hours, 95% confidence interval, 4.98, 6.64). Self-reported wear time was consistently higher than objectively measured wear time amongst all appliances. Headgear had the greatest discrepancy (5.02 hours, 95% confidence interval, 3.64, 6.40). Two studies found an increase in compliance with headgear and Hawley retainers when patients were aware of monitoring. Five studies found younger age groups to

  17. A Framework for a General Purpose Intelligent Control System for Particle Accelerators. Phase II Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westervelt, Robert; Klein, William; Kroupa, Michael; Olsson, Eric; Rothrock, Rick

    1999-01-01

    Vista Control Systems, Inc. has developed a portable system for intelligent accelerator control. The design is general in scope and is thus configurable to a wide range of accelerator facilities and control problems. The control system employs a multi-layer organization in which knowledge-based decision making is used to dynamically configure lower level optimization and control algorithms

  18. Using a cognitive architecture for general purpose service robot control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigbo, Jordi-Ysard; Pumarola, Albert; Angulo, Cecilio; Tellez, Ricardo

    2015-04-01

    A humanoid service robot equipped with a set of simple action skills including navigating, grasping, recognising objects or people, among others, is considered in this paper. By using those skills the robot should complete a voice command expressed in natural language encoding a complex task (defined as the concatenation of a number of those basic skills). As a main feature, no traditional planner has been used to decide skills to be activated, as well as in which sequence. Instead, the SOAR cognitive architecture acts as the reasoner by selecting which action the robot should complete, addressing it towards the goal. Our proposal allows to include new goals for the robot just by adding new skills (without the need to encode new plans). The proposed architecture has been tested on a human-sized humanoid robot, REEM, acting as a general purpose service robot.

  19. Transforming the ASDEX Upgrade discharge control system to a general-purpose plasma control platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treutterer, Wolfgang; Cole, Richard; Gräter, Alexander; Lüddecke, Klaus; Neu, Gregor; Rapson, Christopher; Raupp, Gerhard; Zasche, Dieter; Zehetbauer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Control framework split in core and custom part. • Core framework deployable in other fusion device environments. • Adaptible through customizable modules, plug-in support and generic interfaces. - Abstract: The ASDEX Upgrade Discharge Control System DCS is a modern and mature product, originally designed to regulate and supervise ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak plasma operation. In its core DCS is based on a generic, versatile real-time software framework with a plugin architecture that allows to easily combine, modify and extend control function modules in order to tailor the system to required features and let it continuously evolve with the progress of an experimental fusion device. Due to these properties other fusion experiments like the WEST project have expressed interest in adopting DCS. For this purpose, essential parts of DCS must be unpinned from the ASDEX Upgrade environment by exposure or introduction of generalised interfaces. Re-organisation of DCS modules allows distinguishing between intrinsic framework core functions and device-specific applications. In particular, DCS must be prepared for deployment in different system environments with their own realisations for user interface, pulse schedule preparation, parameter server, time and event distribution, diagnostic and actuator systems, network communication and data archiving. The article explains the principles of the revised DCS structure, derives the necessary interface definitions and describes major steps to achieve the separation between general-purpose framework and fusion device specific components.

  20. Transforming the ASDEX Upgrade discharge control system to a general-purpose plasma control platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treutterer, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Treutterer@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Cole, Richard [Unlimited Computer Systems, Seeshaupter Str. 15, 82393 Iffeldorf (Germany); Gräter, Alexander [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lüddecke, Klaus [Unlimited Computer Systems, Seeshaupter Str. 15, 82393 Iffeldorf (Germany); Neu, Gregor; Rapson, Christopher; Raupp, Gerhard; Zasche, Dieter; Zehetbauer, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Control framework split in core and custom part. • Core framework deployable in other fusion device environments. • Adaptible through customizable modules, plug-in support and generic interfaces. - Abstract: The ASDEX Upgrade Discharge Control System DCS is a modern and mature product, originally designed to regulate and supervise ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak plasma operation. In its core DCS is based on a generic, versatile real-time software framework with a plugin architecture that allows to easily combine, modify and extend control function modules in order to tailor the system to required features and let it continuously evolve with the progress of an experimental fusion device. Due to these properties other fusion experiments like the WEST project have expressed interest in adopting DCS. For this purpose, essential parts of DCS must be unpinned from the ASDEX Upgrade environment by exposure or introduction of generalised interfaces. Re-organisation of DCS modules allows distinguishing between intrinsic framework core functions and device-specific applications. In particular, DCS must be prepared for deployment in different system environments with their own realisations for user interface, pulse schedule preparation, parameter server, time and event distribution, diagnostic and actuator systems, network communication and data archiving. The article explains the principles of the revised DCS structure, derives the necessary interface definitions and describes major steps to achieve the separation between general-purpose framework and fusion device specific components.

  1. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume II: Control Technology and General Source Inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume II, explains in detail the following: technology of source control, modification of operations, particulate control equipment, sulfur dioxide removal systems for power plants, and control equipment for gases and vapors; inspection procedures for general sources, fuel…

  2. Scintillation camera-computer systems: General principles of quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Scintillation camera-computer systems are designed to allow the collection, digital analysis and display of the image data from a scintillation camera. The components of the computer in such a system are essentially the same as those of a computer used in any other application, i.e. a central processing unit (CPU), memory and magnetic storage. Additional hardware items necessary for nuclear medicine applications are an analogue-to-digital converter (ADC), which converts the analogue signals from the camera to digital numbers, and an image display. It is possible that the transfer of data from camera to computer degrades the information to some extent. The computer can generate the image for display, but it also provides the capability of manipulating the primary data to improve the display of the image. The first function of conversion from analogue to digital mode is not within the control of the operator, but the second type of manipulation is in the control of the operator. These type of manipulations should be done carefully without sacrificing the integrity of the incoming information

  3. Improvements in cross-infection control in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, E M; Sarll, D W

    1995-07-08

    A questionnaire about cross-infection control was sent to all GDPs in five FHSAs in the North Western Region. Replies came from 312 dentists, a response rate of 74%. They worked in 185 practices, a response rate of 85%. Gloves were worn routinely by 86% of dentists and 80% of DSAs. Handpieces were autoclaved between patients in 77% of practices. Much however, remains to be improved. DSAs could be better protected if more ultrasonic cleaners were used, eye protection encouraged and heavy duty gloves were available for cleaning instruments. BDA guidelines were reported as being the most influential factor, though it would appear that the media did persuade many practitioners to use autoclavable handpieces and sterilise them after each use.

  4. A case study of the Australian Plague Locust Commission and environmental due diligence: why mere legislative compliance is no longer sufficient for environmentally responsible locust control in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Paul G; Walker, Paul W; McRae, Heath; Hamilton, John G

    2005-07-01

    The Australian Plague Locust Commission (APLC) manages locust populations across 2 million square kilometers of eastern Australia using the aerial application of chemical and biological control agents to protect agricultural production. This occurs via a preventative control strategy involving ultralow-volume spray equipment to distribute small droplets of control agent over a target area. The economic costs of, and potential gains stemming from, locust control are well documented. The application of insecticides, however, to fragile arid and semiarid ecosystems is a task that brings with it both real and perceived environmental issues. The APLC is proactive in addressing these issues through a combination of targeted environmental operational research, an ISO-14001-aligned Environmental Management System (EMS), and links with environmental regulatory and research institutions. Increasing due diligence components within Australian environmental legislation dictate that mere legislative compliance is no longer sufficient for industries to ensure that they meet their environmental obligations. The development of external research links and the formulation of an EMS for locust control have enabled the APLC to identify environmental issues and trends, quantify objective environmental targets and strategies, and facilitate continuous improvement in its environmental performance, while maintaining stakeholder support. This article outlines the environmental issues faced by the APLC, the research programs in place to address these issues, and the procedures in place to incorporate research findings into the organization's operational structure.

  5. Inspector General, DOD, Oversight of the Naval Audit Service Audit of the FY 2000 Department of the Navy General Fund Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... This Bulletin requires the Inspector General, DoD, to express an opinion on the DoD financial statements and to report on the adequacy of internal controls and compliance with laws and regulations...

  6. Diagnostic information in temporal compliance checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramezani Taghiabadi, E.; Fahland, D.; Dongen, van B.F.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Compliance checking is gaining importance as today’s organizations need to show that operational processes are executed in a controlled manner while satisfying prede¿ned (legal) requirements. Deviations may be costly and expose the organization to severe risks. Compliance checking is of growing

  7. 40 CFR 63.496 - Back-end process provisions-procedures to determine compliance using control or recovery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... boiler or process heater. (iii) The control efficiency of the boiler or process heater shall be calculated using Equation 29. ER05SE96.027 where: R=Control efficiency of boiler or process heater, percent..., the control efficiency of the boiler or process heater shall be determined using the procedures in...

  8. The effect of changing stool collection processes on compliance in nationwide organized screening using a fecal occult blood test (FOBT) in Korea: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hye Young; Suh, Mina; Baik, Hyung Won; Choi, Kui Son; Park, Boyoung; Jun, Jae Kwan; Lee, Chan Wha; Oh, Jae Hwan; Lee, You Kyoung; Han, Dong Soo; Lee, Do-Hoon

    2014-11-26

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening by fecal occult blood test (FOBT) significantly reduces CRC mortality, and compliance rates directly influence the efficacy of this screening method. The aim of this study is to investigate whether stool collection strategies affect compliance with the FOBT. In total, 3,596 study participants aged between 50 and 74 years will be recruited. The study will be conducted using a randomized controlled trial, with a 2 × 2 factorial design resulting in four groups. The first factor is the method of stool-collection device distribution (mailing vs. visiting the clinic) and the second is the type of stool-collection device (sampling kit vs. conventional container). Participants will be randomly assigned to one of four groups: (1) sampling kit received by mail; (2) conventional container received by mail; (3) sampling kit received at the clinic; (4) conventional container received at the clinic (control group). The primary outcome will be the FOBT compliance rate; satisfaction and intention to be rescreened in the next screening round will also be evaluated. The rates of positive FOBT results and detection of advanced adenomas or cancers through colonoscopies will also be compared between the two collection containers. Identifying a method of FOBT that yields high compliance rates will be a key determinant of the success of CRC screening. The findings of this study will provide reliable information for health policy makers to develop evidence-based strategies for a high compliance rate. KCT0000803 Date of registration in primary registry: 9 January, 2013.

  9. Deadline Compliance Status Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — These monthly Deadline Compliance Status Reports assist Participating Jurisdictions and HUD Field Offices in monitoring compliance with the 2-year commitment and...

  10. Team care to cure adolescents with braces (avoiding low quality of life, pain and bad compliance): a case-control retrospective study. 2011 SOSORT Award winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernaro, Marta; Pellegrini, Anna; Tessadri, Fabrizio; Zaina, Fabio; Zonta, Andrea; Negrini, Stefano

    2012-09-20

    Bracing could be efficacious, given good compliance and quality of braces. Recently the SOSORT Brace TREATMENT Management Guidelines (SBTMG) have highlighted the perceived importance of the professional teams surrounding braced patients. To verify the impact of a complete rehabilitation team in the adolescent patient with bracing. Design. Initial cross-sectional study, followed by a retrospective case-control study. Thirty-eight patients (15.8 ± 1.6 years; 26 females; 10 hyperkyphosis, 28 scoliosis of 29.2 ± 7.9° Cobb) extracted from a single orthotist database (between January 1, 2008 and September 1, 2009) and treated by the same physician; brace wearing at least 15 hours/day for a minimum of 6 months; age 10 or more. Braces: Sforzesco, Sibilla, Lapadula or Maguelone. Exercises: SEAS. Two questionnaires filled in blindly by patients: SRS-22 and one especially developed and validated with 25 questions on adherence to treatment. Groups (main risk factor): TEAM (private institute: satisfied 44/44 SOSORT criteria; grade of teamwork, "excellent") included 13 patients and NOT 25 (National Health Service Rehabilitation Department: 35/44 SOSORT criteria respected; grade, "insufficient"). TEAM was more compliant to bracing than NOT (97 ± 6% vs. 80 ± 24%) and performed nearly double the exercises (38 ± 12 vs. 20 ± 13 minutes/session). The self-reduction of bracing was significant in NOT (from 16.8 ± 3.7 to 14.8 ± 4.9 hours/day, , Pversus 7% of TEAM (P < 0.05). The populations did not differ at the baseline studied outcomes. The absence of a good team surrounding the patient increases by five times the risk of reduced compliance to bracing (odds ratio OR 5.5 - 95% confidence interval 95CI 3.6-7.4), along with more than 15 times that of QoL problems (OR 15.7 - 95CI 13.6-17.9) and pain (OR 16.8 - 95CI 14.5-19.1). Provided the limits of this first study on the topic, the SBTMG seems to be important for brace treatment

  11. Hand hygiene compliance in transplant and other special patient groups: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Karolin; Ott, Ella; Wolny, Michael; Tramp, Nadine; Vonberg, Ralf-Peter; Haverich, Axel; Chaberny, Iris Freya

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluates hand hygiene behavior of health care workers in a German university hospital stratified for treatment of special patient groups (eg, transplant patients). From 2008 to 2010, comprehensive education and training of all health care workers was implemented to improve hand hygiene compliance. Consumption rates of alcohol-based hand rub and gloves were collected and evaluated. Of the 5,647 opportunities of hand disinfection evaluated, 1,607 occurred during care for transplant patients. To our knowledge, this is the largest survey of hand hygiene compliance in special patient groups on intensive care units in a university hospital in Germany. Health care workers on surgical intensive care units showed lower hand hygiene compliance compared with health care workers on other types of intensive care units. Compliance toward hand hygiene was significantly higher on hemato-oncologic and pediatric wards. In general, hand disinfection was performed significantly more frequently after an intervention than before (P hand hygiene compliance when caring for transplant patients or other patients (odds ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval: 0.95-1.42). Nurse's and physician's hand hygiene compliance improved because of education. Hand hygiene compliance is not increased in the care for transplant patients (despite their predisposition for nosocomial infections) compared with other patients. Additional studies will be necessary to further investigate these findings. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The impact of cost recovery on electric utilities' Clean Air Act compliance strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensinger, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    By 1995, over 200 electric power plant units in twenty one states must comply with Phase I of the acid rain requirements in Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). By the year 2000, an additional 2200 units must comply with the Title IV. Compliance costs are expected to necessitate significant electricity rate increases. In order to recover their compliance costs, utilities must file rate increase requests with state public utility commissions (PUC's), and undergo a rate proceeding involving public heatings. Because of the magnitude of cost and the complexity of compliance options, including interaction with Titles I and III of the CAAA, extensive PUC reviews of compliance strategies are likely. These reviews could become as adversarial as the nuclear prudence reviews of the 1980's. A lack of understanding of air pollution and the CAA by much of the general public and the flexibility of compliance options creates an environment conducive to adverse public reaction to the cost of complying with the Clean Air Act. Public attitudes toward pollution control technologies will be greatly affected by these hearings, and the early plant hearings will shape the utility rate making process under the Clean Air Act. Inadequate cost recovery due to constrained compliance strategies or adverse hearings could significantly inhibit industry willingness to invest in certain control technologies or advanced combustion technologies. There are already signs that Clean Air Act compliance will be the prudence issue of the 1990's for utilities, even where state statutes mandate particular compliance approaches. Specific actions should be undertaken now by the utility industry to improve the probability of sound cost recovery decisions, preserve compliance options, including multimedia strategies, and avoid the social- and cost-acceptance problems of nuclear power

  13. Year 2000 Compliance of Selected Mission Critical Command, Control, and Communications Systems Managed by The Defense Information Systems Agency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    ...) has adequately planned for and managed year 2000 conversion risks to avoid undue disruption to selected mission critical command, control, and communications systems used in support of Unified...

  14. Caregivers' compliance with referral advice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Sham; Ndyomugenyi, Richard; Paintain, Lucy

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several malaria endemic countries have implemented community health worker (CHW) programmes to increase access to populations underserved by health care. There is considerable evidence on CHW adherence to case management guidelines, however, there is limited evidence on the compliance...... in the control arm were trained to treat malaria with ACTs based on fever symptoms. Caregivers' referral forms were linked with CHW treatment forms to determine whether caregivers complied with the referral advice. Factors associated with compliance were examined with logistic regression. RESULTS: CHW saw 18......,497 child visits in the moderate-to-high transmission setting and referred 15.2% (2815/18,497) of all visits; in the low-transmission setting, 35.0% (1135/3223) of all visits were referred. Compliance to referral was low, in both settings

  15. Compliance to antihypertensive therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almas, A.; Hameed, A.; Ahmed, B.; Islam, M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine compliance, factors affecting compliance to antihypertensive therapy and to compare compliant and non-compliant groups, in a tertiary care setting. Study Design: Analytical (cross-sectional) study. Place and Duration of Study: The outpatient clinics at the Aga Khan University from May 2004 to February 2005. Patients and Methods: Two hundred patients presenting to the outpatients clinic were included. All patients 18 years and above, who had stage 1 and 2 hypertension, had one clinic visit to a medicine clinic, 6 months prior to presentation and started on antihypertensive medicines, were included. Results: Sixty-six percent were males and 33.5 % were females. Mean age was 58.1 ( +- 12) years and mean duration of hypertension was 7.2 (+- 6.7) years. Fifty-seven percent were compliant and 43% were noncompliant. In the noncompliant group, 53.4 % had mild noncompliance, 24.4 % had severe non-compliance, while 22% had moderate noncompliance. Factors of noncompliance were 56.8% missed doses due to forgetfulness, 12.7% deliberately missed their doses, 11.6% could not take the medicine due to side effects, 10.4% did not take the dose due to increased number of tablets, 4.6% were not properly counseled by the physician and 3.48% did not take medicines due to cost issues. The mean systolic blood pressure was 126 +- 19.2 mmHg in the compliant group while it was 133 +- 16.5 mmHg in the noncompliant group (p-value 0.004). The mean diastolic blood pressure in the compliant group was 76 +- 11.9 mmHg, while in the noncompliant group it was 81.9 +- 10.9 mmHg (p-value 0.001). Conclusion: Compliance to antihypertensive therapy in a tertiary care center is significantly good. Forgetfulness was the major reason for noncompliance. The mean blood pressure control was better in the compliant group. (author)

  16. Inspector General, DOD, Oversight of the Audit of the FY 2000 Military Retirement Fund Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    2001-01-01

    .... This Bulletin requires the Inspector General, DoD, or an independent auditor, to express an opinion on the DoD financial statements and to report on the adequacy of internal controls and compliance...

  17. Providing detailed information about latent tuberculosis and compliance with the PPD test among healthcare workers in Israel: A randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Taubman

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: Compliance for latent TB screening is low among HCWs in northeastern Israel. Providing detailed information about latent TB was not associated with increased test compliance. Understanding existing disparities in screening rates and potential barriers to latent TB screening among HCWs is important in order to move forward and successfully increase screening rates.

  18. Student manual, Book 2: Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colley, D.L.

    1993-10-01

    This is a student hand-book an Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE. Topics include the following: Electrical; materials handling & storage; inspection responsibilities & procedures; general environmental controls; confined space entry; lockout/tagout; office safety, ergonomics & human factors; medical & first aid, access to records; construction safety; injury/illness reporting system; and accident investigation procedures.

  19. Student manual, Book 2: Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colley, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    This is a student hand-book an Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE. Topics include the following: Electrical; materials handling ampersand storage; inspection responsibilities ampersand procedures; general environmental controls; confined space entry; lockout/tagout; office safety, ergonomics ampersand human factors; medical ampersand first aid, access to records; construction safety; injury/illness reporting system; and accident investigation procedures

  20. Internal Controls and Compliance With Laws and Regulations for the Defense Business Operations Fund Consolidated Financial Statements for FY 1995

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, Frederick

    1996-01-01

    ... No. 94-01, "Form and Content of Agency Financial Statements," November 16, 1993. In addition, we determined whether controls were adequate to ensure that the consolidated financial statements were free of material error...

  1. Progressing quality control in environmental impact assessment beyond legislative compliance: An evaluation of the IEMA EIA Quality Mark certification scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); Research Unit for Environmental Sciences and Management, North-West University (South Africa); Fischer, Thomas B, E-mail: fischer@liverpool.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Fothergill, Josh, E-mail: j.fothergill@iema.net [Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment, Lincoln (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    The effectiveness of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) systems is contingent on a number of control mechanisms: procedural; judicial; evaluative; public and government agency; professional; and development aid agency. If we assume that procedural and judicial controls are guaranteed in developed EIA systems, then progressing effectiveness towards an acceptable level depends on improving the performance of other control mechanisms over time. These other control mechanisms are either absent, or are typically centrally controlled, requiring public finances; this we argue is an unpopular model in times of greater Government austerity. Here we evaluate a market-based mechanism for improving the performance of evaluative and professional control mechanisms, the UK Institute of Environmental Management and Assessments' EIA Quality Mark. We do this by defining dimensions of effectiveness for the purposes of our evaluation, and by identifying international examples of the approaches taken to delivering the other control measures to validate the approach taken in the EIA Quality Mark. We then evaluate the EIA Quality Mark, when used in combination with legal procedures and an active judiciary, against the effectiveness dimensions and use time-series analysis of registrant data to examine its ability to progress practice. We conclude that the EIA Quality Mark has merit as a model for a market-based mechanism, and may prove a more financially palatable approach for delivering effective EIA in mature systems in countries that lack centralised agency oversight. It may, therefore, be of particular interest to some Member States of the European Union for ensuring forthcoming certification requirements stemming from recent amendments to the EIA Directive. - Highlights: • Quality control mechanisms in EIA are identified. • Effectiveness of EIA is conceptualised for evaluation purposes. • The UK IEMA EIA Quality Mark is introduced as a market-based mechanism. • The

  2. Progressing quality control in environmental impact assessment beyond legislative compliance: An evaluation of the IEMA EIA Quality Mark certification scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, Alan; Fischer, Thomas B; Fothergill, Josh

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) systems is contingent on a number of control mechanisms: procedural; judicial; evaluative; public and government agency; professional; and development aid agency. If we assume that procedural and judicial controls are guaranteed in developed EIA systems, then progressing effectiveness towards an acceptable level depends on improving the performance of other control mechanisms over time. These other control mechanisms are either absent, or are typically centrally controlled, requiring public finances; this we argue is an unpopular model in times of greater Government austerity. Here we evaluate a market-based mechanism for improving the performance of evaluative and professional control mechanisms, the UK Institute of Environmental Management and Assessments' EIA Quality Mark. We do this by defining dimensions of effectiveness for the purposes of our evaluation, and by identifying international examples of the approaches taken to delivering the other control measures to validate the approach taken in the EIA Quality Mark. We then evaluate the EIA Quality Mark, when used in combination with legal procedures and an active judiciary, against the effectiveness dimensions and use time-series analysis of registrant data to examine its ability to progress practice. We conclude that the EIA Quality Mark has merit as a model for a market-based mechanism, and may prove a more financially palatable approach for delivering effective EIA in mature systems in countries that lack centralised agency oversight. It may, therefore, be of particular interest to some Member States of the European Union for ensuring forthcoming certification requirements stemming from recent amendments to the EIA Directive. - Highlights: • Quality control mechanisms in EIA are identified. • Effectiveness of EIA is conceptualised for evaluation purposes. • The UK IEMA EIA Quality Mark is introduced as a market-based mechanism. • The

  3. Strategies for Controlling Item Exposure in Computerized Adaptive Testing with the Generalized Partial Credit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Laurie Laughlin

    2004-01-01

    Choosing a strategy for controlling item exposure has become an integral part of test development for computerized adaptive testing (CAT). This study investigated the performance of six procedures for controlling item exposure in a series of simulated CATs under the generalized partial credit model. In addition to a no-exposure control baseline…

  4. Ozone modeling for compliance planning: A synopsis of ''The Use of Photochemical Air Quality Models for Evaluating Emission Control Strategies: A Synthesis Report''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, C.L.

    1992-12-01

    The 1990 federal Clean Air Act Amendments require that many nonattainment areas use gridded, photochemical air quality models to develop compliance plans for meeting the ambient ozone standard. Both industry and regulatory agencies will need to consider explicitly the strengths and limitations of the models. Photochemical air quality models constitute the principal tool available for evaluating the relative effectiveness of alternative emission control strategies. Limitations in the utility of modeling results stem from the uncertainty and bias of predictions for modeled episodes, possible compensating errors, limitations in the number of modeled episodes, and incompatibility between deterministic model predictions and the statistical form of the air quality standard for ozone. If emissions estimates (including naturally produced ''biogenic'' emissions) are accurate, intensive aerometric data are available, and an evaluation of performance (including diagnostic evaluations) is successfully completed, gridded photochemical airquality models can determine (1) the types of emission controls - VOC, NO x , or both - that would be most effective for reducing ozone concentrations, and (2) the approximate magnitudes - to within about 20--40% - of the estimated ozone reductions

  5. Parametric Synthesis of Automatic Control System of Industrial Robot Manipulator in Compliance with Requirements of Robust Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Nesenchuk

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers an application of a root-locus method for synthesis of dynamic systems with uncertainty that meet the requirements of pre-set quality. This method is used for parametric synthesis of automatic control system of industrial robot manipulator that is used for transportation of engineering products. The synthesis takes place under conditions of substantial changes in inertia moment of robot load. As a result of investigations it is possible to determine range of values of variable parameter that ensures the required quality of control system operation. A system of computer programs has been developed in order to solve the problem.

  6.  Sarbanes-Oxley compliance, internal control and ERP systems: Automation and the case of mySAP ERP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.; Best, Peter; Juhl-Christensen, Claus

      The effort to comply with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) has focused management attention on the importance of assessing, developing and maintaining an effective and efficient internal control system. ERP systems are a crucial factor in developing such a system. Despite the attention this has att...

  7. e-Monitoring of Asthma Therapy to Improve Compliance in children (e-MATIC): a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasbinder, E.C.; Goossens, J.M.A.W.; Rutten-van Mölken, M.P.M.H.; Winter, B.C.M. de; Dijk, L. van; Vulto, A.G.; Blankman, E.; Dehhan, N; Veenstra-van Schie, M.T.M.; Versteegh, F.G.A.; Wolf, B.H.M.; Janssens, H.M.; Bemt, P.M.L.A. van den

    2016-01-01

    Real-time medication monitoring (RTMM) is a promising tool for improving adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), but has not been sufficiently tested in children with asthma. We aimed to study the effects of RTMM with short message service (SMS) reminders on adherence to ICS, asthma control,

  8. Relationship between Risk Factor Control and Compliance with a Lifestyle Modification Program in the Stenting Aggressive Medical Management for Prevention of Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Tanya N; Al Kasab, Sami; Nizam, Azhar; Lynn, Michael J; Harrell, Jamie; Derdeyn, Colin P; Fiorella, David; Janis, L Scott; Lane, Bethany F; Montgomery, Jean; Chimowitz, Marc I

    2018-03-01

    Lifestyle modification programs have improved the achievement of risk factor targets in a variety of clinical settings, including patients who have previously suffered a stroke or transient ischemic attack and those with multiple risk factors. Stenting Aggressive Medical Management for Prevention of Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) was the first vascular disease prevention trial to provide a commercially available lifestyle modification program to enhance risk factor control. We sought to determine the relationship between compliance with this program and risk factor control in SAMMPRIS. SAMMPRIS aggressive medical management included a telephonic lifestyle modification program provided free of charge to all subjects (n = 451) during their participation in the study. Subjects with fewer than 3 expected lifestyle-coaching calls were excluded from these analyses. Compliant subjects (n = 201) had  greater than or equal to 78.5% of calls (median % of completed/expected calls). Noncompliant subjects (n = 200) had less than 78.5% of calls or refused to participate. Mean risk factor values or % in-target for each risk factor was compared between compliant versus noncompliant subjects, using t tests and chi-square tests. Risk factor changes from baseline to follow-up were compared between the groups to account for baseline differences. Compliant subjects had better risk factor control throughout follow-up for low-density lipoprotein, systolic blood pressure (SBP), hemoglobin A1c (HgA1c), non-high-density lipoprotein, nonsmoking, and exercise than noncompliant subjects, but there was no difference for body mass index. After adjusting for baseline differences between the groups, compliant subjects had a greater change from baseline than noncompliant subjects for SBP did at 24 months and HgA1c at 6 months. SAMMPRIS subjects who were compliant with the lifestyle modification program had better risk factor control during the study for almost

  9. 12 CFR 308.303 - Filing of safety and soundness compliance plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... time within which those steps will be taken. (c) Review of safety and soundness compliance plans... PRACTICE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Submission and Review of Safety and Soundness Compliance Plans and... compliance plan. (a) Schedule for filing compliance plan—(1) In general. A bank shall file a written safety...

  10. A double-blind placebo-controlled study of controlled release fluvoxamine for the treatment of generalized social anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenberg, HGM; Stein, DJ; Yang, HC; Li, D; Barbato, LM

    This was a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled multicenter study to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of fluvoxamine in a controlled release (CR) formulation for treatment of generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD). A total of 300 subjects with GSAD were randomly assigned to

  11. A Decoupling Control Method for Shunt Hybrid Active Power Filter Based on Generalized Inverse System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel decoupling control method based on generalized inverse system is presented to solve the problem of SHAPF (Shunt Hybrid Active Power Filter possessing the characteristics of 2-input-2-output nonlinearity and strong coupling. Based on the analysis of operation principle, the mathematical model of SHAPF is firstly built, which is verified to be invertible using interactor algorithm; then the generalized inverse system of SHAPF is obtained to connect in series with the original system so that the composite system is decoupled under the generalized inverse system theory. The PI additional controller is finally designed to control the decoupled 1-order pseudolinear system to make it possible to adjust the performance of the subsystem. The simulation results demonstrated by MATLAB show that the presented generalized inverse system strategy can realise the dynamic decoupling of SHAPF. And the control system has fine dynamic and static performance.

  12. Hazard banding in compliance with the new Globally Harmonised System (GHS) for use in control banding tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, Mario; Koppisch, Dorothea; Smola, Thomas; Gabriel, Stefan; Verbist, Koen; Visser, Remco

    2015-10-01

    Many control banding tools use hazard banding in risk assessments for the occupational handling of hazardous substances. The outcome of these assessments can be combined with advice for the required risk management measures (RMMs). The Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) has resulted in a change in the hazard communication elements, i.e. Hazard (H) statements instead of Risk-phrases. Hazard banding schemes that depend on the old form of safety information have to be adapted to the new rules. The purpose of this publication is to outline the rationales for the assignment of hazard bands to H statements under the GHS. Based on this, this publication proposes a hazard banding scheme that uses the information from the safety data sheets as the basis for assignment. The assignment of hazard bands tiered according to the severity of the underlying hazards supports the important principle of substitution. Additionally, the set of assignment rules permits an exposure-route-specific assignment of hazard bands, which is necessary for the proposed route-specific RMMs. Ideally, all control banding tools should apply the same assignment rules. This GHS-compliant hazard banding scheme can hopefully help to establish a unified hazard banding strategy in the various control banding tools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fractional-Order Generalized Predictive Control: Application for Low-Speed Control of Gasoline-Propelled Cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Romero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest in using fractional calculus applied to control theory generalizing classical control strategies as the PID controller and developing new ones with the intention of taking advantage of characteristics supplied by this mathematical tool for the controller definition. In this work, the fractional generalization of the successful and spread control strategy known as model predictive control is applied to drive autonomously a gasoline-propelled vehicle at low speeds. The vehicle is a Citroën C3 Pluriel that was modified to act over the throttle and brake pedals. Its highly nonlinear dynamics are an excellent test bed for applying beneficial characteristics of fractional predictive formulation to compensate unmodeled dynamics and external disturbances.

  14. 40 CFR 63.6105 - What are my general requirements for complying with this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What are my general requirements for... Turbines General Compliance Requirements § 63.6105 What are my general requirements for complying with this..., oxidation catalyst emission control device or other air pollution control equipment, and monitoring...

  15. Mapping Tax Compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Tax compliance denotes the act of reporting and paying taxes in accordance with the tax laws. Current social science scholarship on tax compliance can almost entirely be divided into behavioural psychology analyses and critical tax studies. This article, which presents two cases of how tax...... compliance is constructed, challenges the explanatory reaches of today's social science approaches, arguing that an alternative approach to understanding tax compliance is worthwhile exploring. This other choice of approach, inspired by actor–network theory (ANT), adopts a more practice-oriented focus...... that studies tax compliance where it takes place as well as what it is made of. Consequently, this article argues that tax compliance is a socio-material assemblage and that complying is a distributed action. The article concludes by highlighting how an ANT approach contributes to the further theoretical...

  16. Multistrategy childcare-based intervention to improve compliance with nutrition guidelines versus usual care in long day care services: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, Kirsty; Finch, Meghan; Wiggers, John; Wyse, Rebecca; Jones, Jannah; Gillham, Karen; Yoong, Sze Lin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Interventions to improve child diet are recommended as dietary patterns developed in childhood track into adulthood and influence the risk of chronic disease. For child health, childcare services are required to provide foods to children consistent with nutrition guidelines. Research suggests that foods and beverages provided by services to children are often inconsistent with nutrition guidelines. The primary aim of this study is to assess, relative to a usual care control group, the effectiveness of a multistrategy childcare-based intervention in improving compliance with nutrition guidelines in long day care services. Methods and analysis The study will employ a parallel group randomised controlled trial design. A sample of 58 long day care services that provide all meals (typically includes 1 main and 2 mid-meals) to children while they are in care, in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales, Australia, will be randomly allocated to a 6-month intervention to support implementation of nutrition guidelines or a usual care control group in a 1:1 ratio. The intervention was designed to overcome barriers to the implementation of nutrition guidelines assessed using the theoretical domains framework. Intervention strategies will include the provision of staff training and resources, audit and feedback, ongoing support and securing executive support. The primary outcome of the trial will be the change in the proportion of long day care services that have a 2-week menu compliant with childcare nutrition guidelines, measured by comprehensive menu assessments. As a secondary outcome, child dietary intake while in care will also be assessed. To assess the effectiveness of the intervention, the measures will be undertaken at baseline and ∼6 months postbaseline. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee. Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications. PMID

  17. Compliance checking of data-aware and resource-aware compliance requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramezani Taghiabadi, E.; Gromov, V.; Fahland, D.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Meersman, R.; Panetto, H.; Dillon, T.; Missikoff, M.; Liu, L.; Pastor, O.; Cuzzocrea, A.; Sllis, T.

    2014-01-01

    Compliance checking is gaining importance as today’s organizations need to show that their business practices are in accordance with predefined (legal) requirements. Current compliance checking techniques are mostly focused on checking the control-flow perspective of business processes. This paper

  18. Team care to cure adolescents with braces (avoiding low quality of life, pain and bad compliance: a case–control retrospective study. 2011 SOSORT Award winner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavernaro Marta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bracing could be efficacious, given good compliance and quality of braces. Recently the SOSORT Brace Treatment Management Guidelines (SBTMG have highlighted the perceived importance of the professional teams surrounding braced patients. Purpose To verify the impact of a complete rehabilitation team in the adolescent patient with bracing. Materials and methods Design. Initial cross-sectional study, followed by a retrospective case–control study. Population: Thirty-eight patients (15.8 ± 1.6 years; 26 females; 10 hyperkyphosis, 28 scoliosis of 29.2 ± 7.9° Cobb extracted from a single orthotist database (between January 1, 2008 and September 1, 2009 and treated by the same physician; brace wearing at least 15 hours/day for a minimum of 6 months; age 10 or more. Treatment: Braces: Sforzesco, Sibilla, Lapadula or Maguelone. Exercises: SEAS. Methods: Two questionnaires filled in blindly by patients: SRS-22 and one especially developed and validated with 25 questions on adherence to treatment. Groups (main risk factor: TEAM (private institute: satisfied 44/44 SOSORT criteria; grade of teamwork, “excellent” included 13 patients and NOT 25 (National Health Service Rehabilitation Department: 35/44 SOSORT criteria respected; grade, “insufficient”. Results TEAM was more compliant to bracing than NOT (97 ± 6% vs. 80 ± 24% and performed nearly double the exercises (38 ± 12 vs. 20 ± 13 minutes/session. The self-reduction of bracing was significant in NOT (from 16.8 ± 3.7 to 14.8 ± 4.9 hours/day, , P Conclusions Provided the limits of this first study on the topic, the SBTMG seems to be important for brace treatment, influencing pain, QoL and compliance (and so, presumably, final results. Future studies on the topic are advisable.

  19. Optimizing Compliance and Thermal Conductivity of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings via Controlled Powders and Processing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yang; Srinivasan, Vasudevan; Nakamura, Toshio; Sampath, Sanjay; Bertrand, Pierre; Bertrand, Ghislaine

    2012-09-01

    The properties and performance of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are strongly dependent on the microstructural defects, which are affected by starting powder morphology and processing conditions. Of particular interest is the use of hollow powders which not only allow for efficient melting of zirconia ceramics but also produce lower conductivity and more compliant coatings. Typical industrial hollow spray powders have an assortment of densities resulting in masking potential advantages of the hollow morphology. In this study, we have conducted process mapping strategies using a novel uniform shell thickness hollow powder to control the defect microstructure and properties. Correlations among coating properties, microstructure, and processing reveal feasibility to produce highly compliant and low conductivity TBC through a combination of optimized feedstock and processing conditions. The results are presented through the framework of process maps establishing correlations among process, microstructure, and properties and providing opportunities for optimization of TBCs.

  20. Self-organization of critical behavior in controlled general queueing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, Ph.; Hongler, M.-O.

    2004-01-01

    We consider general queueing models of the (G/G/1) type with service times controlled by the busy period. For feedback control mechanisms driving the system to very high traffic load, it is shown the busy period probability density exhibits a generic -((3)/(2)) power law which is a typical mean field behavior of SOC models

  1. A Comparison of Item Exposure Control Procedures with the Generalized Partial Credit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Edgar Isaac

    2008-01-01

    To enhance test security of high stakes tests, it is vital to understand the way various exposure control strategies function under various IRT models. To that end the present dissertation focused on the performance of several exposure control strategies under the generalized partial credit model with an item pool of 100 and 200 items. These…

  2. Self-organization of critical behavior in controlled general queueing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Ph.; Hongler, M.-O.

    2004-03-01

    We consider general queueing models of the (G/G/1) type with service times controlled by the busy period. For feedback control mechanisms driving the system to very high traffic load, it is shown the busy period probability density exhibits a generic - {3}/{2} power law which is a typical mean field behavior of SOC models.

  3. Modeling generalized interline power-flow controller (GIPFC using 48-pulse voltage source converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ghorbani

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Generalized interline power-flow controller (GIPFC is one of the voltage-source controller (VSC-based flexible AC transmission system (FACTS controllers that can independently regulate the power-flow over each transmission line of a multiline system. This paper presents the modeling and performance analysis of GIPFC based on 48-pulsed voltage-source converters. This paper deals with a cascaded multilevel converter model, which is a 48-pulse (three levels voltage source converter. The voltage source converter described in this paper is a harmonic neutralized, 48-pulse GTO converter. The GIPFC controller is based on d-q orthogonal coordinates. The algorithm is verified using simulations in MATLAB/Simulink environment. Comparisons between unified power flow controller (UPFC and GIPFC are also included. Keywords: Generalized interline power-flow controller (GIPFC, Voltage source converter (VCS, 48-pulse GTO converter

  4. Selection, integration, and conflict monitoring; assessing the nature and generality of prefrontal cognitive control mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badre, David; Wagner, Anthony D

    2004-02-05

    Prefrontal cortex (PFC) supports flexible behavior by mediating cognitive control, though the elemental forms of control supported by PFC remain a central debate. Dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC) is thought to guide response selection under conditions of response conflict or, alternatively, may refresh recently active representations within working memory. Lateral frontopolar cortex (FPC) may also adjudicate response conflict, though others propose that FPC supports higher order control processes such as subgoaling and integration. Anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is hypothesized to upregulate response selection by detecting response conflict; it remains unclear whether ACC functions generalize beyond monitoring response conflict. The present fMRI experiment directly tested these competing theories regarding the functional roles of DLPFC, FPC, and ACC. Results reveal dissociable control processes in PFC, with mid-DLPFC selectively mediating resolution of response conflict and FPC further mediating subgoaling/integration. ACC demonstrated a broad sensitivity to control demands, suggesting a generalized role in modulating cognitive control.

  5. Internal budget control

    OpenAIRE

    MSc. Mervete Shala

    2011-01-01

    Internal control is established by the Government to ensure effective and proper operations of ministries, institutions and generally of all public agencies, in compliance with the law, the goals and objectives stated by them, to provide protection against abuse and mismanagement or poor governance. The instrument of internal audit entails a series of mechanisms which aim at enabling budgetary policies compliance, such as: financial reporting; effective system of communication between mana...

  6. General principles of control method of passenger car bodies bending vibration parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skachkov, A. N.; Samoshkin, S. L.; Korshunov, S. D.; Kobishchanov, V. V.; Antipin, D. Ya

    2018-03-01

    Weight reduction of passenger cars is a promising direction of reducing the cost of their production and increasing transportation profitability. One way to reduce the weight of passenger cars is the lightweight metal body design by means of using of high-strength aluminum alloys, low-alloy and stainless steels. However, it has been found that the limit of the lightweight metal body design is not determined by the total mode of deformation, but its flexural rigidity, as the latter influences natural frequencies of body bending vibrations. With the introduction of mandatory certification for compliance with the Customs Union technical regulations, the following index was confirmed: “first natural frequency of body bending vibrations in the vertical plane”. This is due to the fact that vibration, noise and car motion depend on this index. To define the required indexes, the principles of the control method of bending vibration parameters of passenger car bodies are proposed in this paper. This method covers all stages of car design – development of design documentation, manufacturing and testing experimental and pilot models, launching the production. The authors also developed evaluation criteria and the procedure of using the results for introduction of control method of bending vibration parameters of passenger car bodies.

  7. A Wind Tunnel Model to Explore Unsteady Circulation Control for General Aviation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, Christopher M.; Jones, Gregory S.

    2002-01-01

    Circulation Control airfoils have been demonstrated to provide substantial improvements in lift over conventional airfoils. The General Aviation Circular Control model is an attempt to address some of the concerns of this technique. The primary focus is to substantially reduce the amount of air mass flow by implementing unsteady flow. This paper describes a wind tunnel model that implements unsteady circulation control by pulsing internal pneumatic valves and details some preliminary results from the first test entry.

  8. Quality control procedure for a general diagnostic x-ray machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Saion Salikin; Mazlyfarina Mohamad

    2001-01-01

    Performance tests of a particular medical diagnostic x-ray machine have to be carried out regularly in order to ensure that the machine always complies with the required standard. A performance report which is prepared based on the performance tests on the x-ray machine is used as one of the requirement by the authority for issuance and renewal licence to operate and use of the x-ray machine in a clinic or hospital. The Ministry of Health will only issue a licence to the clinic or hospital to use and operate x-ray machines, if the machines have complied with the standards. The clinic or hospital may get the service to carry out performance tests on a diagnostic x-ray machine from any licence H holder, issued by the authority under Atomic Energy Licensing Act 1984. A comparative study between the standard procedure and other procedures on performance test of a general diagnostic x-ray machine is carried out and presented in brief in this paper. The criteria for compliance or otherwise as required by the Ministry of Health Malaysia is discussed and explained in brief. (Author)

  9. Compliance Groundwater Monitoring of Nonpoint Sources - Emerging Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, T.

    2008-12-01

    Groundwater monitoring networks are typically designed for regulatory compliance of discharges from industrial sites. There, the quality of first encountered (shallow-most) groundwater is of key importance. Network design criteria have been developed for purposes of determining whether an actual or potential, permitted or incidental waste discharge has had or will have a degrading effect on groundwater quality. The fundamental underlying paradigm is that such discharge (if it occurs) will form a distinct contamination plume. Networks that guide (post-contamination) mitigation efforts are designed to capture the shape and dynamics of existing, finite-scale plumes. In general, these networks extend over areas less than one to ten hectare. In recent years, regulatory programs such as the EU Nitrate Directive and the U.S. Clean Water Act have forced regulatory agencies to also control groundwater contamination from non-incidental, recharging, non-point sources, particularly agricultural sources (fertilizer, pesticides, animal waste application, biosolids application). Sources and contamination from these sources can stretch over several tens, hundreds, or even thousands of square kilometers with no distinct plumes. A key question in implementing monitoring programs at the local, regional, and national level is, whether groundwater monitoring can be effectively used as a landowner compliance tool, as is currently done at point-source sites. We compare the efficiency of such traditional site-specific compliance networks in nonpoint source regulation with various designs of regional nonpoint source monitoring networks that could be used for compliance monitoring. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of the site vs. regional monitoring approaches with respect to effectively protecting groundwater resources impacted by nonpoint sources: Site-networks provide a tool to enforce compliance by an individual landowner. But the nonpoint source character of the contamination

  10. Information security policy development for compliance

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Barry L

    2013-01-01

    Although compliance standards can be helpful guides to writing comprehensive security policies, many of the standards state the same requirements in slightly different ways. Information Security Policy Development for Compliance: ISO/IEC 27001, NIST SP 800-53, HIPAA Standard, PCI DSS V2.0, and AUP V5.0 provides a simplified way to write policies that meet the major regulatory requirements, without having to manually look up each and every control. Explaining how to write policy statements that address multiple compliance standards and regulatory requirements, the book will he

  11. The effects of cognitive load on attention control in subclinical anxiety and Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmi, Sadia; Amir, Nader; Frosio, Kristen E.; Ayers, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Poor regulation of emotions may involve impaired attention control. In the current paper, we report the results of two studies examining the interaction of anxiety, attention control, and cognitive load. In Study I, using a performance-based task to assess attention control, we examined whether anxiety is associated with impaired attention control, and whether these effects are influenced by working memory load. In Study II we examined these effects in patients with a diagnosis of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) compared to non-anxious control (NAC) participants. Results of Study I showed that high anxiety was associated with increased attention control, that is decreased interference from distractors, but only under high cognitive load. These results were replicated in Study II such that individuals with GAD showed increased attention control relative to NACs, but only under high cognitive load. These results help clarify previous predictions regarding the effect of anxiety on attention control. PMID:25355423

  12. Real time simulation of nonlinear generalized predictive control for wind energy conversion system with nonlinear observer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouari, Kamel; Rekioua, Toufik; Ouhrouche, Mohand

    2014-01-01

    In order to make a wind power generation truly cost-effective and reliable, an advanced control techniques must be used. In this paper, we develop a new control strategy, using nonlinear generalized predictive control (NGPC) approach, for DFIG-based wind turbine. The proposed control law is based on two points: NGPC-based torque-current control loop generating the rotor reference voltage and NGPC-based speed control loop that provides the torque reference. In order to enhance the robustness of the controller, a disturbance observer is designed to estimate the aerodynamic torque which is considered as an unknown perturbation. Finally, a real-time simulation is carried out to illustrate the performance of the proposed controller. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Choices that increase compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    A compliance model is developed and tested using a survey of corporate officials and the regulatory arena of equal employment opportunity. Findings support the economic model of compliance in its conclusion that probability of detection and probable level of sanctions influence compliance decisions. Results also indicate that adjustments to the model that account for bounded rationality are valid. The key outcome, however, is that although all types of investigations play some role in enhancing compliance, those that stress sanctions and thus severity rather than certainty of detection may have the greatest positive influence on compliance. Enforcement programs attempting to operate simply as investigators of small-scale complaints will have less success than those with different types of investigations or a balanced type of single investigation. The results also suggest a more complex cognitive process on the part of regulated individuals than initially theorized. 34 refs., 3 tabs

  14. The Prevalence and Typologies of Controlling Behaviors in a General Population Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kate; Sleath, Emma; Tramontano, Carlo

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and typologies of controlling behaviors within a general population sample. Participants ( N = 427) completed the Revised Controlling Behaviors Scale and the Revised Conflict Tactics Scale. Prevalence of perpetration and victimization of controlling behaviors was relatively high, although the frequency and severity of the behaviors was mainly low level. Five clusters were established based on the use of five types of controlling behaviors: economic, threatening, intimidating, emotional, and isolating. Significant differences were found between the perpetration clusters and (a) minor physical assault, (b) severe physical assault, (c) minor psychological aggression, and (d) severe psychological aggression. Furthermore, significant differences were found between the victimization clusters and (a) physical assault, (b) minor psychological aggression, and (c) severe psychological aggression. It is clear that controlling behaviors are a feature within general population relationships, and further research is required to understand when such behaviors become problematic, and what needs to be done to prevent this from happening.

  15. A general method for handling missing binary outcome data in randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Dan; White, Ian R; Mason, Dan; Sutton, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Aims The analysis of randomized controlled trials with incomplete binary outcome data is challenging. We develop a general method for exploring the impact of missing data in such trials, with a focus on abstinence outcomes. Design We propose a sensitivity analysis where standard analyses, which could include ‘missing = smoking’ and ‘last observation carried forward’, are embedded in a wider class of models. Setting We apply our general method to data from two smoking cessation trials. Partici...

  16. Neighborhood Inequalities in Retailers’ Compliance With the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009, January 2014–July 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Hannah M.; Ranney, Leah M.; Goldstein, Adam O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Retailer noncompliance with limited US tobacco regulations on advertising and labeling was historically patterned by neighborhood in ways that promote health disparities. In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began enforcing stronger tobacco retailer regulations under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009. However, recent research has found no differences in compliance by neighborhood characteristics for FDA advertising and labeling inspections. We sought to investigate the neighborhood characteristics associated with retailer noncompliance with specific FDA advertising and labeling inspections (ie, violations of bans on self-service displays, selling single cigarettes, false or mislabeled products, vending machines, flavored cigarettes, and free samples). Methods We coded FDA advertising and labeling warning letters (n = 718) for type of violations and geocoded advertising and labeling inspections from January 1 through July 31, 2014 (N = 33,543). Using multilevel models, we examined cross-sectional associations between types of violations and neighborhood characteristics previously associated with disparities (ie, percentage black, Latino, under the poverty line, and younger than 18 years). Results Retailer advertising and labeling violations are patterned by who lives in the neighborhood; regulated tobacco products are more likely to be stored behind the counter as the percentage of black or Latino residents increases, and single cigarettes are more often available for purchase in neighborhoods as the percentage of black, poor, or young residents increases. Conclusion Contrary to previous null findings, noncompliance with FDA advertising and labeling regulations is patterned by neighborhood characteristics, sometimes in opposite directions. Given the low likelihood of self-service violations in the same neighborhoods that have high likelihood of single cigarette sales, we suggest targeted approaches to FDA

  17. General self-esteem and locus of control of young sportsmen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gašić-Pavišić Slobodanka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the relationship between some elements of self-concept (general self-esteem and locus of control and going in for sport in adolescence. The relationship between going in for sport and variables of self-concept (general self-esteem and external locus of control was investigated in a sample of 300 adolescent boys and girls (150 sportsmen and 150 non-sportsmen. Modification of the Rosenberg’s General self-esteem scale and Bezinović-Savčić’s Scale of externality were used to measure variables of self-concept. The significant positive correlation between variables of going in for sport and general selfesteem, as well as negative ones between variables of going in for sport and external locus of control were found in the whole sample of subjects and in the sample of boys, but not of girls. The sex role stereotypes and greater importance that the culture puts on success in sport for boys have contributed to such results. The sex differences in correlations between variables of self-concept and going in for sport suggest that going in for sport influences general self-esteem and locus of control in adolescents through social feedback and social evaluation of sport achievement and physical fitness. .

  18. Hierarchical Control of Droop-Controlled DC and AC Microgrids - A General Approach Towards Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrero, Josep M.; Vásquez, Juan V.; Teodorescu, Remus

    2009-01-01

    DC and AC Microgrids are key elements to integrate renewable and distributed energy resources as well as distributed energy storage systems. In the last years, efforts toward the standardization of these Microgrids have been made. In this sense, this paper present the hierarchical control derived...

  19. Controlled Remote State Preparation via General Pure Three-Qubit State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuebo Zha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The protocols for controlled remote state preparation of a single qubit and a general two-qubit state are presented in this paper. The general pure three-qubit states are chosen as shared quantum channel, which are not Local operations and classical communication (LOCC equivalent to the mostly used GHz state. This is the first time that general pure three-qubit states have been introduced to complete remote state preparation. The probability of successful preparation is presented. Moreover, in some special cases, the successful probability could reach a unit value.

  20. Compliance and Enforcement Actions (CEA) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Compliance and Enforcement Actions application provides process assistance / improvements for conducting investigation and enforcement activities. The Compliance and...

  1. An Evaluation of Automatic Control System Concepts for General Aviation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, E. C.

    1990-01-01

    A piloted simulation study of automatic longitudinal control systems for general aviation airplanes has been conducted. These automatic control systems were designed to make the simulated airplane easy to fly for a beginning or infrequent pilot. Different control systems are presented and their characteristics are documented. In a conventional airplane control system each cockpit controller commands combinations of both the airspeed and the vertical speed. The best system in the present study decoupled the airspeed and vertical speed responses to cockpit controller inputs. An important feature of the automatic system was that neither changing flap position nor maneuvering in steeply banked turns affected either the airspeed or the vertical speed. All the pilots who flew the control system simulation were favorably impressed with the very low workload and the excellent handling qualities of the simulated airplane.

  2. Inflammatory Profile of Awake Function-Controlled Craniotomy and Craniotomy under General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Klimek

    2009-01-01

    Results. Plasma IL-6 level significantly increased with time similarly in both groups. No significant plasma IL-8 and IL-10 change was observed in both experimental groups. The VAS pain score was significantly lower in the awake group compared to the anesthesia group at 12 hours postoperative. Postoperative anxiety and stress declined similarly in both groups. Conclusion. This study suggests that awake function-controlled craniotomy does not cause a significantly different inflammatory response than craniotomy performed under general anesthesia. It is also likely that function-controlled craniotomy does not cause a greater emotional challenge than tumor resection under general anesthesia.

  3. A General Attribute and Rule Based Role-Based Access Control Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Growing numbers of users and many access control policies which involve many different resource attributes in service-oriented environments bring various problems in protecting resource. This paper analyzes the relationships of resource attributes to user attributes in all policies, and propose a general attribute and rule based role-based access control(GAR-RBAC) model to meet the security needs. The model can dynamically assign users to roles via rules to meet the need of growing numbers of users. These rules use different attribute expression and permission as a part of authorization constraints, and are defined by analyzing relations of resource attributes to user attributes in many access policies that are defined by the enterprise. The model is a general access control model, and can support many access control policies, and also can be used to wider application for service. The paper also describes how to use the GAR-RBAC model in Web service environments.

  4. Synchronization criteria for generalized reaction-diffusion neural networks via periodically intermittent control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qintao; Lv, Tianshi; Fu, Zhenhua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the synchronization problem for a class of generalized neural networks with time-varying delays and reaction-diffusion terms is investigated concerning Neumann boundary conditions in terms of p-norm. The proposed generalized neural networks model includes reaction-diffusion local field neural networks and reaction-diffusion static neural networks as its special cases. By establishing a new inequality, some simple and useful conditions are obtained analytically to guarantee the global exponential synchronization of the addressed neural networks under the periodically intermittent control. According to the theoretical results, the influences of diffusion coefficients, diffusion space, and control rate on synchronization are analyzed. Finally, the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods are shown by simulation examples, and by choosing different diffusion coefficients, diffusion spaces, and control rates, different controlled synchronization states can be obtained.

  5. 78 FR 55245 - Activities and Methodology for Assessing Compliance With Building Energy Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ...-0036] Activities and Methodology for Assessing Compliance With Building Energy Codes AGENCY: Office of... available to states to evaluate compliance with building energy codes and general approaches towards... building energy codes and general approaches towards compliance. The comment period ended on September 5...

  6. General Form of Model-Free Control Law and Convergence Analyzing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuying Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The general form of model-free control law is introduced, and its convergence is analyzed. Firstly, the necessity to improve the basic form of model free control law is explained, and the functional combination method as the approach of improvement is presented. Then, a series of sufficient conditions of convergence are given. The analysis denotes that these conditions can be satisfied easily in the engineering practice.

  7. Multimorbidity and blood pressure control in 37 651 hypertensive patients from Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Maja Skov; Andersen, Morten; Thomsen, Janus L

    2013-01-01

    Patients with hypertension are primarily treated in general practice. However, major studies of patients with hypertension are rarely based on populations from primary care. Knowledge of blood pressure (BP) control rates in patients with diabetes and/or cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), who have...... additional comorbidities, is lacking. We aimed to investigate the association of comorbidities with BP control using a large cohort of hypertensive patients from primary care practices....

  8. Regulatory Enforcement and Compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Peter J.; Winter, Søren

    1999-01-01

    This study of municipal enforcement of agro-environmental regulations in Denmark provides an empirical understanding of how enforcement affects compliance. A key contribution is sorting out the relative influence of inspectors' different styles of enforcement and choices made by enforcement...... agencies. The latter are shown to be more important in bringing about compliance than are inspectors' enforcement styles. Municipal agencies are shown to increase compliance through the use of third parties, more frequent inspection, and setting priorities for inspection of major items. The findings about...

  9. Chaos control and generalized projective synchronization of heavy symmetric chaotic gyroscope systems via Gaussian radial basis adaptive variable structure control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farivar, Faezeh; Aliyari Shoorehdeli, Mahdi; Nekoui, Mohammad Ali; Teshnehlab, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A systematic procedure for GPS of unknown heavy chaotic gyroscope systems. ► Proposed methods are based on Lyapunov stability theory. ► Without calculating Lyapunov exponents and Eigen values of the Jacobian matrix. ► Capable to extend for a variety of chaotic systems. ► Useful for practical applications in the future. - Abstract: This paper proposes the chaos control and the generalized projective synchronization methods for heavy symmetric gyroscope systems via Gaussian radial basis adaptive variable structure control. Because of the nonlinear terms of the gyroscope system, the system exhibits chaotic motions. Occasionally, the extreme sensitivity to initial states in a system operating in chaotic mode can be very destructive to the system because of unpredictable behavior. In order to improve the performance of a dynamic system or avoid the chaotic phenomena, it is necessary to control a chaotic system with a periodic motion beneficial for working with a particular condition. As chaotic signals are usually broadband and noise like, synchronized chaotic systems can be used as cipher generators for secure communication. This paper presents chaos synchronization of two identical chaotic motions of symmetric gyroscopes. In this paper, the switching surfaces are adopted to ensure the stability of the error dynamics in variable structure control. Using the neural variable structure control technique, control laws are established which guarantees the chaos control and the generalized projective synchronization of unknown gyroscope systems. In the neural variable structure control, Gaussian radial basis functions are utilized to on-line estimate the system dynamic functions. Also, the adaptation laws of the on-line estimator are derived in the sense of Lyapunov function. Thus, the unknown gyro systems can be guaranteed to be asymptotically stable. Also, the proposed method can achieve the control objectives. Numerical simulations are presented to

  10. Army Needs to Improve Controls and Audit Trails for the General Fund Enterprise Business System Acquire-to-Retire Business Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    Event 1.4.4,” August 7, 2012 AAA Attestation Report A-2010-0187- FFM , “General Fund Enterprise Business System - Federal Financial Management...Improvement Act Compliance. Examination of Requirements Through Test Event 1.4.0,” September 14, 2010 AAA Audit Report A-2009-0232- FFM , “General Fund...September 30, 2009 AAA Audit Report A-2009-0231- FFM , “General Fund Enterprise Business System - Federal Financial Management Improvement Act

  11. Motivation and compliance with intraoral elastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeroo, Helen J; Cunningham, Susan J; Newton, Jonathon Timothy; Travess, Helen C

    2014-07-01

    Intraoral elastics are commonly used in orthodontics and require regular changing to be effective. Unfortunately, poor compliance with elastics is often encountered, especially in adolescents. Intention for an action and its implementation can be improved using "if-then" plans that spell out when, where, and how a set goal, such as elastic wear, can be put into action. Our aim was to determine the effect of if-then plans on compliance with elastics. To identify common barriers to compliance with recommendations concerning elastic wear, semistructured interviews were carried out with 14 adolescent orthodontic patients wearing intraoral elastics full time. Emerging themes were used to develop if-then plans to improve compliance with elastic wear. A prospective pilot study assessed the effectiveness of if-then planning aimed at overcoming the identified barriers on compliance with elastic wear. Twelve participants were randomized equally into study and control groups; the study group received information about if-then planning. The participants were asked to collect used elastics, and counts of these were used to assess compliance. A wide range of motivational and volitional factors were described by the interviewed participants, including the perceived benefits of elastics, cues to remember, pain, eating, social situations, sports, loss of elastics, and breakages. Compliance with elastic wear was highly variable among patients. The study group returned more used elastics, suggesting increased compliance, but the difference was not significant. The use of if-then plans might improve compliance with elastic wear when compared with routine clinical instructions. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. General algebraic method applied to control analysis of complex engine types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boksenbom, Aaron S; Hood, Richard

    1950-01-01

    A general algebraic method of attack on the problem of controlling gas-turbine engines having any number of independent variables was utilized employing operational functions to describe the assumed linear characteristics for the engine, the control, and the other units in the system. Matrices were used to describe the various units of the system, to form a combined system showing all effects, and to form a single condensed matrix showing the principal effects. This method directly led to the conditions on the control system for noninteraction so that any setting disturbance would affect only its corresponding controlled variable. The response-action characteristics were expressed in terms of the control system and the engine characteristics. The ideal control-system characteristics were explicitly determined in terms of any desired response action.

  13. One Layer Nonlinear Economic Closed-Loop Generalized Predictive Control for a Wastewater Treatment Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham El bahja

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The main scope of this paper is the proposal of a new single layer Nonlinear Economic Closed-Loop Generalized Predictive Control (NECLGPC as an efficient advanced control technique for improving economics in the operation of nonlinear plants. Instead of the classic dual-mode MPC (model predictive controller schemes, where the terminal control law defined in the terminal region is obtained offline solving a linear quadratic regulator problem, here the terminal control law in the NECLGPC is determined online by an unconstrained Nonlinear Generalized Predictive Control (NGPC. In order to make the optimization problem more tractable two considerations have been made in the present work. Firstly, the prediction model consisting of a nonlinear phenomenological model of the plant is expressed with linear structure and state dependent matrices. Secondly, instead of including the nonlinear economic cost in the objective function, an approximation of the reduced gradient of the economic function is used. These assumptions allow us to design an economic unconstrained nonlinear GPC analytically and to state the NECLGPC allow for the design of an economic problem as a QP (Quadratic Programing problem each sampling time. Four controllers based on GPC that differ in designs and structures are compared with the proposed control technique in terms of process performance and energy costs. Particularly, the methodology is implemented in the N-Removal process of a Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP and the results prove the efficiency of the method and that it can be used profitably in practical cases.

  14. Enhanced performance feedback and patient participation to improve hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers in the setting of established multimodal promotion: a single-centre, cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, Andrew James; Sax, Hugo; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Touveneau, Sylvie; Longtin, Yves; Zingg, Walter; Pittet, Didier

    2016-12-01

    Hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers remains suboptimal despite standard multimodal promotion, and evidence for the effectiveness of novel interventions is urgently needed. We aimed to assess the effect of enhanced performance feedback and patient participation on hand hygiene compliance in the setting of multimodal promotion. We did a single-centre, cluster randomised controlled trial at University of Geneva Hospitals (Geneva, Switzerland). All wards hosting adult, lucid patients, and all health-care workers and patients in these wards, were eligible. After a 15-month baseline period, eligible wards were assigned by computer-generated block randomisation (1:1:1), stratified by the type of ward, to one of three groups: control, enhanced performance feedback, or enhanced performance feedback plus patient participation. Standard multimodal hand hygiene promotion was done hospital-wide throughout the study. The primary outcome was hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (according to the WHO Five Moments of Hand Hygiene) at the opportunity level, measured by direct observation (20-min sessions) by 12 validated infection control nurses, with each ward audited at least once every 3 months. This trial is registered with ISRCTN, number ISRCTN43599478. We randomly assigned 67 wards to the control group (n=21), enhanced performance feedback (n=24), or enhanced performance feedback plus patient participation (n=22) on May 19, 2010. One ward in the control group became a high-dependency unit and was excluded from analysis. During 1367 observation sessions, 12 579 hand hygiene opportunities were recorded. Between the baseline period (April 1, 2009, to June 30, 2010) and the intervention period (July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2012), mean hand hygiene compliance increased from 66% (95% CI 62-70) to 73% (70-77) in the control group (odds ratio [OR] 1·41, 95% CI 1·21-1·63), from 65% (62-69) to 75% (72-77) in the enhanced performance feedback group (1·61, 1·41-1

  15. Attention Training in Individuals with Generalized Social Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Nader; Beard, Courtney; Taylor, Charles T.; Klumpp, Heide; Elias, Jason; Burns, Michelle; Chen, Xi

    2009-01-01

    The authors conducted a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial to examine the efficacy of an attention training procedure in reducing symptoms of social anxiety in 44 individuals diagnosed with generalized social phobia (GSP). Attention training comprised a probe detection task in which pictures of faces with either a threatening or…

  16. A dissent from the many dissents from Attorney General Ashcroft's interpretation of the Controlled Substances Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindelman, Marc

    2003-01-01

    In this essay, Professor Marc Spindelman examines the states' rights arguments that have been deployed in the Oregon v. Ashcroft litigation to challenge Attorney General John Ashcroft's interpretation of the federal Controlled Substances Act. Professor Spindelman criticizes those arguments as reflecting bad politics--politics of complicity--that self-styled liberals should resist and reject.

  17. A Reliability Generalization Study of Scores on Rotter's and Nowicki-Strickland's Locus of Control Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretvas, S. Natasha; Suizzo, Marie-Anne; Durham, Jennifer A.; Yarnell, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    The most commonly used measures of locus of control are Rotter's Internality-Externality Scale (I-E) and Nowicki and Strickland's Internality-Externality Scale (NSIE). A reliability generalization study is conducted to explore variability in I-E and NSIE score reliability. Studies are coded for aspects of the scales used (number of response…

  18. Longitudinal Factor Structure of General Self-Concept and Locus of Control among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze; Su, Ihui

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the longitudinal factor structure of general self-concept and locus of control among high school students over a 4-year period, with data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988. Measurement invariance was tested over time and across gender and ethnic groups; second-order piecewise latent growth models were…

  19. Parenthood in survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma: An EORTC-GELA general population case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.E. van der Kaaij (Marleen A.); N. Heutte (Natacha); P. Meijnders (Paul); E. Abeilard-Lemoisson (Edwige); M. Spina (Michele); L.C. Moser (Lotte); A. Allgeier (Anouk); B. Meulemans (Bart); B. Dubois (Brice); A.H.M. Simons; P.J. Lugtenburg (Pieternella); B.M.P. Aleman (Berthe); E.M. Noordijk (Evert); C. Fermé (Christophe); J. Thomas (Jose); A. Stamatoullas (Aspasia); C. Fruchart (Christophe); P. Brice (Pauline); I. Gaillard (Isabelle); J.K. Doorduijn (Jeanette); C. Sebban (Catherine); W.G. Smit (Wilma); S. Bologna (Serge); J.M. Roesink (Judith); F. Ong (Francisca); J.-L. André (Jean-Luc); J. Raemaekers (John); M. Henry-Amar (Michel); J.C. Kluin-Nelemans (Hanneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: We investigated the impact of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) on parenthood, including factors influencing parenthood probability, by comparing long-term HL survivors with matched general population controls. Patients and Methods: A Life Situation Questionnaire was sent to 3,604 survivors

  20. Parenthood in survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma: an EORTC-GELA general population case-control study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaij, M.A. van der; Heutte, N.; Meijnders, P.; Abeilard-Lemoisson, E.; Spina, M.; Moser, L.C.; Allgeier, A.; Meulemans, B.; Dubois, B.; Simons, A.H.; Lugtenburg, P.J.; Aleman, B.M.; Noordijk, E.M.; Ferme, C.; Thomas, J.; Stamatoullas, A.; Fruchart, C.; Brice, P.; Gaillard, I.; Doorduijn, J.K.; Sebban, C.; Smit, W.G.; Bologna, S.; Roesink, J.M.; Ong, F.; Andre, M.P.; Raemaekers, J.M.M.; Henry-Amar, M.; Kluin-Nelemans, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated the impact of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) on parenthood, including factors influencing parenthood probability, by comparing long-term HL survivors with matched general population controls. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A Life Situation Questionnaire was sent to 3,604 survivors treated

  1. Randomized controlled trial of the effect of medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandbæk, Annelli

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the effect of a medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice. METHODS: We conducted a prospective randomized controlled study performed as 'lagged intervention'. At the time of comparison, the intervention group had completed 6 months of audit including a p...... of such consultations initiated by the GPs. CONCLUSIONS: Medical audit had no observed effect on AIDS prevention in general practice. Udgivelsesdato: 1999-Oct......OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the effect of a medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice. METHODS: We conducted a prospective randomized controlled study performed as 'lagged intervention'. At the time of comparison, the intervention group had completed 6 months of audit including....... One hundred and thirty-three GPs completed the project. The main outcome measures were the number of consultations involving AIDS prevention and the number of talks about AIDS initiated by the GP, and some elements of the content were registered on a chart. RESULTS: No statistically significant...

  2. Support for and reported compliance among smokers with smoke-free policies in air-conditioned hospitality venues in Malaysia and Thailand: findings from the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Hua-Hie; Foong, Kin; Borland, Ron; Omar, Maizurah; Hamann, Stephen; Sirirassamee, Buppha; Fong, Geoffrey T; Fotuhi, Omid; Hyland, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This study examined support for and reported compliance with smoke-free policy in air-conditioned restaurants and other similar places among adult smokers in Malaysia and Thailand. Baseline data (early 2005) from the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Survey (ITC-SEA), conducted face-to-face in Malaysia and Thailand (n = 4005), were used. Among those attending venues, reported total smoking bans in indoor air-conditioned places such as restaurants, coffee shops, and karaoke lounges were 40% and 57% in Malaysia and Thailand, respectively. Support for a total ban in air-conditioned venues was high and similar for both countries (82% Malaysian and 90% Thai smokers who believed there was a total ban), but self-reported compliance with bans in such venues was significantly higher in Thailand than in Malaysia (95% vs 51%, P air-conditioned venues was associated with a greater support for a ban in such venues in both countries.

  3. Use of low level of continuous heat and Ibuprofen as an adjunct to physical therapy improves pain relief, range of motion and the compliance for home exercise in patients with nonspecific neck pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Laymon, Michael; Alshammari, Faris; Khowailed, Iman Akef; Lee, Haneul

    2017-01-01

    It has been well documented at heat reduces pain and increases healing by increasing blood flow in tissue. The purpose of this study was to see if the use of low level continuous heat (LLCH) and Ibuprofen used as a home therapy between physical therapy sessions at a clinic resulted in better therapy outcomes in people with chronic neck pain. Ninety-two patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain were randomly divided into 4 groups; LLCH group, LLCH with Ibuprofen (IP) group, sham LLCH with sham IP group, and controls. All subjects underwent 45 minutes of conventional physical therapy twice a week for 2 weeks. the neck disability index (NDI), subjective pain, range of motion (ROM), strength of the neck, and home exercise compliance were measured. Both LLCH and IP significantly reduced pain and NDI score, and increased ROM (ppain significantly improved pain attenuation and it causes greater compliance for home.

  4. Human-like Compliance for Dexterous Robot Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jau, Bruno M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Active Electromechanical Compliance (AEC) system that was developed for the Jau-JPL anthropomorphic robot. The AEC system imitates the functionality of the human muscle's secondary function, which is to control the joint's stiffness: AEC is implemented through servo controlling the joint drive train's stiffness. The control strategy, controlling compliant joints in teleoperation, is described. It enables automatic hybrid position and force control through utilizing sensory feedback from joint and compliance sensors. This compliant control strategy is adaptable for autonomous robot control as well. Active compliance enables dual arm manipulations, human-like soft grasping by the robot hand, and opens the way to many new robotics applications.

  5. Environmental Compliance Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The Guide is intended to assist Department of Energy personnel by providing information on the NEPA process, the processes of other environmental statutes that bear on the NEPA process, the timing relationships between the NEPA process and these other processes, as well as timing relationships between the NEPA process and the development process for policies, programs, and projects. This information should be helpful not only in formulating environmental compliance plans but also in achieving compliance with NEPA and various other environmental statutes. The Guide is divided into three parts with related appendices: Part I provides guidance for developing environmental compliance plans for DOE actions; Part II is devoted to NEPA with detailed flowcharts depicting the compliance procedures required by CEQ regulations and Department of Energy NEPA Guidelines; and Part III contains a series of flowcharts for other Federal environmental requirements that may apply to DOE projects

  6. 340 Facility compliance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, S.L.

    1993-10-01

    This study provides an environmental compliance evaluation of the RLWS and the RPS systems of the 340 Facility. The emphasis of the evaluation centers on compliance with WAC requirements for hazardous and mixed waste facilities, federal regulations, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) requirements pertinent to the operation of the 340 Facility. The 340 Facility is not covered under either an interim status Part A permit or a RCRA Part B permit. The detailed discussion of compliance deficiencies are summarized in Section 2.0. This includes items of significance that require action to ensure facility compliance with WAC, federal regulations, and WHC requirements. Outstanding issues exist for radioactive airborne effluent sampling and monitoring, radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, non-radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, less than 90 day waste storage tanks, and requirements for a permitted facility

  7. Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    An order to establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for coordination of significant environmental compliance issues to ensure timely development and consistent application of Departmental environmental policy and guidance

  8. Environmental Compliance Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-01

    The Guide is intended to assist Department of Energy personnel by providing information on the NEPA process, the processes of other environmental statutes that bear on the NEPA process, the timing relationships between the NEPA process and these other processes, as well as timing relationships between the NEPA process and the development process for policies, programs, and projects. This information should be helpful not only in formulating environmental compliance plans but also in achieving compliance with NEPA and various other environmental statutes. The Guide is divided into three parts with related appendices: Part I provides guidance for developing environmental compliance plans for DOE actions; Part II is devoted to NEPA with detailed flowcharts depicting the compliance procedures required by CEQ regulations and Department of Energy NEPA Guidelines; and Part III contains a series of flowcharts for other Federal environmental requirements that may apply to DOE projects.

  9. Sensorimotor control and neuromuscular activity of the shoulder in adolescent competitive swimmers with generalized joint hypermobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendal, Thomas; Eshøj, Henrik; Liaghat, Behnam

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Shoulder pain is highly prevalent in competitive swimmers, and generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is considered a risk factor. Sensorimotor control deficiencies and altered neuromuscular activation of the shoulder may represent underlying factors. RESEARCH QUESTION: To investigate...... whether competitive swimmers with GJH including shoulder hypermobility (GJHS) differ in shoulder sensorimotor control and muscle activity from those without GJH and no shoulder hypermobility (NGJH). METHODS: Competitive swimmers (aged 13-17) were recruited. GJHS or NGJH status was determined using...... (29%) pectoralis major activity during BL-EO compared to NGJH (5.35 ± 1.77%MVE vs. 7.51 ± 1.96%MVE; p = 0.043). SIGNIFICANCE: Adolescent competitive swimmers with GJHS displayed no shoulder sensorimotor control deficiencies and no generally altered shoulder muscle activity pattern, except...

  10. Controlled teleportation of high-dimension quantum-states with generalized Bell-state measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan You-Bang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a scheme for controlled teleportation of arbitrary high-dimensional unknown quantum states is proposed by using the generalized Bell-basis measurement and the generalized Hadamard transformation. As two special cases, two schemes of controlled teleportation of an unknown single-qutrit state and an unknown two-qutrit state are investigated in detail. In the first scheme, a maximally entangled three-qutrit state is used as the quantum channel, while in the second scheme, an entangled two-qutrit state and an entangled three-qutrit state are employed as the quantum channels. In these schemes, an unknown qutrit state can be teleported to either one of two receivers, but only one of them can reconstruct the qutrit state with the help of the other. Based on the case of qutrits, a scheme of controlled teleportation of an unknown qudit state is presented.

  11. Scared to lose control? General and health locus of control in females with a phobia of vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Angela L; Boyle, Christopher; Lauchlan, Fraser

    2008-01-01

    The term emetophobia (i.e., a fear of vomiting) exists as rather an elusive predicament, often eluding conventional treatment. The present study involved 149 participants, consisting of 51 emetophobics, 48 phobic controls (i.e. those who suffered from a different phobia), and 50 nonphobic controls. Participants were administered the Rotter (1966) Locus of Control Scale and the Health Locus of Control Scale by B.S. Wallston, Wallston, Kaplan, and Maides (1976). Significant differences were found among the three groups; specifically, that emetophobics had a significantly higher internal Locus of Control Scale score with regard to both general and health-related issues than did the two control groups. It is suggested that vomiting phobics may have a fear of losing control, and that their vomiting phobia is reflective of this alternative, underlying problem. More research is required to explore the association between emetophobia and issues surrounding control; however, the current study suggests that it may be helpful for therapists to consider this aspect when treating a patient with vomiting phobia. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Damage control strategy for the treatment of perforated diverticulitis with generalized peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, M; Agha, A; Heitland, W; Gundling, F; Steiner, P; Iesalnieks, I

    2016-08-01

    The best surgical strategy for the management of perforated diverticulitis with generalized peritonitis of the sigmoid colon is not clearly defined. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the value of a damage control strategy. All patients who underwent emergency laparotomy for perforated diverticular disease of the sigmoid colon with generalized peritonitis between 2010 and 2015 were included. The damage control strategy (study group), included a two- stage procedure: limited resection of the diseased colonic segment, closure of proximal colon and distal stump, and application of an abdominal vacuum at the initial surgery followed by second-look laparotomy 24-48 h later At this point a choice was made between anastomosis and Hartmann's procedure. The control group consisted of patients receiving definitive reconstruction (anastomosis or Hartmann's procedure) at the initial operation. Thirty-seven patients were included in the study. Damage control strategy was applied in 19 patients and the control group consisted of 18 patients. Both groups were comparable in terms of demographics, severity of peritonitis, and comorbidities. The overall postoperative mortality was 11 % (n = 4). There were no statistically significant differences between both groups regarding postoperative morbidity and mortality; however, a significantly higher proportion of patients in the control group had a stoma after the initial hospital stay (83 vs. 47 %, p = 0.038). This difference was still significant after adjustment for sex, age, Mannheim Peritonitis Index, American Society of Anesthesiologists class and presence of septic shock at presentation. At the end of the follow-up period, 15 of 17 survivors in the study group and 13 of 16 survivors in the control group had their intestinal continuity restored (p = 0.66). Damage control strategy in patients with generalized peritonitis due to perforated diverticulitis leads to a significantly reduced stoma rate

  13. Robust Monotonically Convergent Iterative Learning Control for Discrete-Time Systems via Generalized KYP Lemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of P-type iterative learning control for a class of multiple-input multiple-output linear discrete-time systems, whose aim is to develop robust monotonically convergent control law design over a finite frequency range. It is shown that the 2 D iterative learning control processes can be taken as 1 D state space model regardless of relative degree. With the generalized Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov lemma applied, it is feasible to describe the monotonically convergent conditions with the help of linear matrix inequality technique and to develop formulas for the control gain matrices design. An extension to robust control law design against systems with structured and polytopic-type uncertainties is also considered. Two numerical examples are provided to validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Inflammatory Profile of Awake Function-Controlled Craniotomy and Craniotomy under General Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Markus; Hol, Jaap W.; Wens, Stephan; Heijmans-Antonissen, Claudia; Niehof, Sjoerd; Vincent, Arnaud J.; Klein, Jan; Zijlstra, Freek J.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Surgical stress triggers an inflammatory response and releases mediators into human plasma such as interleukins (ILs). Awake craniotomy and craniotomy performed under general anesthesia may be associated with different levels of stress. Our aim was to investigate whether those procedures cause different inflammatory responses. Methods. Twenty patients undergoing craniotomy under general anesthesia and 20 patients undergoing awake function-controlled craniotomy were included in this prospective, observational, two-armed study. Circulating levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 were determined pre-, peri-, and postoperatively in both patient groups. VAS scores for pain, anxiety, and stress were taken at four moments pre- and postoperatively to evaluate physical pain and mental duress. Results. Plasma IL-6 level significantly increased with time similarly in both groups. No significant plasma IL-8 and IL-10 change was observed in both experimental groups. The VAS pain score was significantly lower in the awake group compared to the anesthesia group at 12 hours postoperative. Postoperative anxiety and stress declined similarly in both groups. Conclusion. This study suggests that awake function-controlled craniotomy does not cause a significantly different inflammatory response than craniotomy performed under general anesthesia. It is also likely that function-controlled craniotomy does not cause a greater emotional challenge than tumor resection under general anesthesia. PMID:19536349

  15. Educational outreach to general practitioners reduces children's asthma symptoms: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladden Michael

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood asthma is common in Cape Town, a province of South Africa, but is underdiagnosed by general practitioners. Medications are often prescribed inappropriately, and care is episodic. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of educational outreach to general practitioners on asthma symptoms of children in their practice. Methods This is a cluster randomised trial with general practices as the unit of intervention, randomisation, and analysis. The setting is Mitchells Plain (population 300,000, a dormitory town near Cape Town. Solo general practitioners, without nurse support, operate from storefront practices. Caregiver-reported symptom data were collected for 318 eligible children (2 to 17 years with moderate to severe asthma, who were attending general practitioners in Mitchells Plain. One year post-intervention follow-up data were collected for 271 (85% of these children in all 43 practices. Practices randomised to intervention (21 received two 30-minute educational outreach visits by a trained pharmacist who left materials describing key interventions to improve asthma care. Intervention and control practices received the national childhood asthma guideline. Asthma severity was measured in a parent-completed survey administered through schools using a symptom frequency and severity scale. We compared intervention and control group children on the change in score from pre-to one-year post-intervention. Results Symptom scores declined an additional 0.84 points in the intervention vs. control group (on a nine-point scale. p = 0.03. For every 12 children with asthma exposed to a doctor allocated to the intervention, one extra child will have substantially reduced symptoms. Conclusion Educational outreach was accepted by general practitioners and was effective. It could be applied to other health care quality problems in this setting.

  16. Low-Cost Quality Control and Nondestructive Evaluation Technologies for General Aviation Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Gavinsky, Bob; Semanskee, Grant

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) Program has as a goal to reduce the overall cost of producing private aviation aircraft while maintaining the safety of these aircraft. In order to successfully meet this goal, it is necessary to develop nondestructive inspection techniques which will facilitate the production of the materials used in these aircraft and assure the quality necessary to maintain airworthiness. This paper will discuss a particular class of general aviation materials and several nondestructive inspection techniques that have proven effective for making these inspections. Additionally, this paper will discuss the investigation and application of other commercially available quality control techniques applicable to these structures.

  17. Automatic control of the NMB level in general anaesthesia with a switching total system mass control strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Miguel; Mendonça, Teresa; Rocha, Paula; Rabiço, Rui

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a model based switching control strategy to drive the neuromuscular blockade (NMB) level of patients undergoing general anesthesia to a predefined reference. A single-input single-output Wiener system with only two parameters is used to model the effect of two different muscle relaxants, atracurium and rocuronium, and a switching controller is designed based on a bank of total system mass control laws. Each of such laws is tuned for an individual model from a bank chosen to represent the behavior of the whole population. The control law to be applied at each instant corresponds to the model whose NMB response is closer to the patient's response. Moreover a scheme to improve the reference tracking quality based on the analysis of the patient's response, as well as, a comparison between the switching strategy and the Extended Kalman Kilter (EKF) technique are presented. The results are illustrated by means of several simulations, where switching shows to provide good results, both in theory and in practice, with a desirable reference tracking. The reference tracking improvement technique is able to produce a better reference tracking. Also, this technique showed a better performance than the (EKF). Based on these results, the switching control strategy with a bank of total system mass control laws proved to be robust enough to be used as an automatic control system for the NMB level.

  18. 42 CFR 35.2 - Compliance with hospital rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT General § 35.2 Compliance with hospital rules. All patients and visitors in stations and hospitals of the Service are expected to comply with the rules and instructions... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance with hospital rules. 35.2 Section 35.2...

  19. 17 CFR 37.6 - Compliance with core principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compliance with core principles. 37.6 Section 37.6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION DERIVATIVES TRANSACTION EXECUTION FACILITIES § 37.6 Compliance with core principles. (a) In general. To...

  20. 49 CFR 663.7 - Certification of compliance to FTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification of compliance to FTA. 663.7 Section... General § 663.7 Certification of compliance to FTA. A recipient purchasing revenue service rolling stock with funds obligated by FTA on or after October 24, 1991, must certify to FTA that it will conduct or...

  1. 40 CFR 160.17 - Effects of non-compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effects of non-compliance. 160.17... GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS General Provisions § 160.17 Effects of non-compliance. (a) EPA may refuse to consider reliable for purposes of supporting an application for a research or marketing permit...

  2. 42 CFR 3.304 - Principles for achieving compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Principles for achieving compliance. 3.304 Section 3.304 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Principles for achieving compliance. (a) Cooperation. The Secretary will, to the extent practicable, seek the...

  3. Analyze for the Quality Control of General X-ray Systems in Capital region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Byung Sam; Lee, Kang Min; Shin, Woo Yong; Park, Soon Chul; Choi, Hak Dong; Cho, Yong Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to the rapid increase of the interest in the quality control of the General X-ray systems, this research proposes the direction of the quality control through comparing and inspecting the actual condition of the respective quality control in the Clinic, the educational institution and the hospital. The subjects of the investigation are diagnostic radiation equipment's in the clinic, the educational institution and the hospital around the capital. A test of kVp, mR/mAs out put test and reproducibility of the exposure dose, half value layer, an accordance between the light field and the beam alignment test, and lastly reproducibility of the exposure time. Then the mean difference of the percentage, the CV (Coefficient of Variation, CV) and the attenuated curve which are respectively resulted from the above tests are computed. After that we have evaluated the values according to the regulations on the Diagnostic Radiation Equipment Safety Administration regulations. In the case of the clinic and the educational institution, there were 22 general X-ray devices. And 18.2% of the kVp test, 13.6% of the reproducibility of exposure dose test, 9.1% of the mR/mAs out put test, and 13.6% of the HVL (Half Value Layer) test appeared to be improper. In the case of the hospital, however, there were 28 devices. And 7.1% of the reproducibility of exposure dose, 7.1% of the difference in the light field/ beam alignment, and 7.1% of the reproducibility of the exposure time appeared to be improper. According to the investigation, the hospital's quality control condition is better than the condition in the clinic and the educational institution. The quality control condition of the general X-ray devices in the clinic is unsatisfactory compared to the hospital. Thus, it is considered that realizing the importance of the quality control is necessary.

  4. Energy Efficient Control of High Speed IPMSM Drives - A Generalized PSO Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GECIC, M.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a generalized particle swarm optimization (GPSO algorithm was applied to the problems of optimal control of high speed low cost interior permanent magnet motor (IPMSM drives. In order to minimize the total controllable electrical losses and to increase the efficiency, the optimum current vector references are calculated offline based on GPSO for the wide speed range and for different load conditions. The voltage and current limits of the drive system and the variation of stator inductances are all included in the optimization method. The stored optimal current vector references are used during the real time control and the proposed algorithm is compared with the conventional high speed control algorithm, which is mostly voltage limit based. The computer simulations and experimental results on 1 kW low cost high speed IPMSM drive are discussed in details.

  5. Generalized Synchronization of Nonlinear Chaotic Systems through Natural Bioinspired Controlling Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yu Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel bioinspired control strategy design is proposed for generalized synchronization of nonlinear chaotic systems, combining the bioinspired stability theory, fuzzy modeling, and a novel, simple-form Lyapunov control function design of derived high efficient, heuristic and bioinspired controllers. Three main contributions are concluded: (1 apply the bioinspired stability theory to further analyze the stability of fuzzy error systems; the high performance of controllers has been shown in previous study by Li and Ge 2009, (2 a new Lyapunov control function based on bioinspired stability theory is designed to achieve synchronization without using traditional LMI method, which is a simple linear homogeneous function of states and the process of designing controller to synchronize two fuzzy chaotic systems becomes much simpler, and (3 three different situations of synchronization are proposed; classical master and slave Lorenz systems, slave Chen’s system, and Rossler’s system as functional system are illustrated to further show the effectiveness and feasibility of our novel strategy. The simulation results show that our novel control strategy can be applied to different and complicated control situations with high effectiveness.

  6. Time for a second look at SOX compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, John T; Burrill, Stephen J

    2007-08-01

    Incentives for tax-exempt healthcare organizations to comply with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) abound from many quarters, including government, various associations, and the capital markets. New proposals from the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Public Company Accountability Oversight Board will streamline the processes of SOX compliance, even as the cost of compliance is dropping. Voluntary SOX compliance can best be achieved by adopting a four-phased control rationalization approach to implementation and maintenance.

  7. Randomized controlled trial of the effect of medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandbæk, Annelli

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the effect of a medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice. METHODS: We conducted a prospective randomized controlled study performed as 'lagged intervention'. At the time of comparison, the intervention group had completed 6 months of audit including...... of such consultations initiated by the GPs. CONCLUSIONS: Medical audit had no observed effect on AIDS prevention in general practice. Udgivelsesdato: 1999-Oct...... a primary activity registration, feedback of own data and a meeting with colleagues and experts, and had received brief summaries of the meetings and reminders about the project (a full 'audit circle'). The participants were from general practices in Copenhagen and the Counties of Funen and Vejle, Denmark...

  8. Evaluation of implementation, compliance and acceptance of partial smoking bans among hospitality workers before and after the Swiss Tobacco Control Act

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkumar, Sarah; Hoffmann, Susanne; Röösli, Martin; Bauer, Georg F.

    2017-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization recommends uniform comprehensive smoking bans in public places. In Switzerland, regulations differ between various areas and are mostly incomplete for hospitality venues. As ambiguous regulations offer more leeway for implementation, we evaluated the Swiss regulations with respect to their effects on implementation, acceptance and compliance among hospitality workers. Methods In our longitudinal study, a standardized, self-administered questionnaire wa...

  9. The role of the control variable in the heuristically based generalized perturbation theory (HGPT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandini, A.

    1995-01-01

    The heuristically based generalized perturbation theory (HGPT) applied to the neutron field of a reactor system is discussed in relation to the criticality reset procedure. This procedure is implicit within the GPT methodology, corresponding to the so called filtering of the importance function relevant to the neutron field from the fundamental mode contamination. It is common practice to use the so called γ-mode filter. In order to account for any possible reset option, a general definition is introduced of an intensive control variable (ρ) entering into the governing equations, and correspondingly a fundamental ρ-mode filtering of the importance function is defined, relevant to the real criticality reset mechanism (control) adopted. A simple example illustrates the need in many circumstances of interest of taking into proper account the correct filtering so to avoid significant inaccuracies in the sensitivity calculation results

  10. Discrete-Time Stable Generalized Self-Learning Optimal Control With Approximation Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qinglai; Li, Benkai; Song, Ruizhuo

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a generalized policy iteration (GPI) algorithm with approximation errors is developed for solving infinite horizon optimal control problems for nonlinear systems. The developed stable GPI algorithm provides a general structure of discrete-time iterative adaptive dynamic programming algorithms, by which most of the discrete-time reinforcement learning algorithms can be described using the GPI structure. It is for the first time that approximation errors are explicitly considered in the GPI algorithm. The properties of the stable GPI algorithm with approximation errors are analyzed. The admissibility of the approximate iterative control law can be guaranteed if the approximation errors satisfy the admissibility criteria. The convergence of the developed algorithm is established, which shows that the iterative value function is convergent to a finite neighborhood of the optimal performance index function, if the approximate errors satisfy the convergence criterion. Finally, numerical examples and comparisons are presented.

  11. Software design of a general purpose data acquisition and control executive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labiak, W.G.; Minor, E.G.

    1981-01-01

    The software design of an executive which performs general purpose data acquisition, monitoring, and control is presented. The executive runs on a memory-based mini or micro-computer and communicates with a disk-based computer where data analysis and display are done. The executive design stresses reliability and versatility, and has yielded software which can provide control and monitoring for widely different hardware systems. Applications of this software on two major fusion energy experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will be described

  12. Comparing Locus of Control, Assertiveness and General Health among Young Drug Addicts in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Shahidi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "n "nObjective:The aim of this research was to compare the characteristics of assertiveness, locus of control and general health among young drug dependent patients in Iran. "n "nMethods: Three groups of Iranians: were choosed. The first group included drug dependent patients who had volunteered for treatment and had registered in the local Welfare Organization; the second group included dependent patients who were in the prison; and the third group held nondependent patients. All the participants were male and were matched for age and educational level . The following instruments were used in the present study: locus of control  uestionnaire , Assertiveness Scale and the General Health Questionnaire, GHQ. "n "nResults: The results of the present research showed that there were significant differences among the three groups in ssertiveness, locus of control and GHQ scores. It was found that participants in the non addictive group were more assertive and more internal in their locus of control and had higher GHQ scores than the other two groups. The participants in the prison group reported less assertiveness and lower GHQ scores than the non addictive group ; and their locus of control was more external. Conclusion: "n The results this study may be useful in terms of possible strategies for changing an attributive style in young adults in the framework of psychotherapy

  13. A general digital computer procedure for synthesizing linear automatic control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, J.D.

    1961-10-01

    The fundamental concepts required for synthesizing a linear automatic control system are considered. A generalized procedure for synthesizing automatic control systems is demonstrated. This procedure has been programmed for the Ferranti Mercury and the IBM 7090 computers. Details of the programmes are given. The procedure uses the linearized set of equations which describe the plant to be controlled as the starting point. Subsequent computations determine the transfer functions between any desired variables. The programmes also compute the root and phase loci for any linear (and some non-linear) configurations in the complex plane, the open loop and closed loop frequency responses of a system, the residues of a function of the complex variable 's' and the time response corresponding to these residues. With these general programmes available the design of 'one point' automatic control systems becomes a routine scientific procedure. Also dynamic assessments of plant may be carried out. Certain classes of multipoint automatic control problems may also be solved with these procedures. Autonomous systems, invariant systems and orthogonal systems may also be studied. (author)

  14. Simplified sleep restriction for insomnia in general practice: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falloon, Karen; Elley, C Raina; Fernando, Antonio; Lee, Arier C; Arroll, Bruce

    2015-08-01

    Insomnia is common in primary care. Cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is effective but requires more time than is available in the general practice consultation. Sleep restriction is one behavioural component of CBT-I. To assess whether simplified sleep restriction (SSR) can be effective in improving sleep in primary insomnia. Randomised controlled trial of patients in urban general practice settings in Auckland, New Zealand. Adults with persistent primary insomnia and no mental health or significant comorbidity were eligible. Intervention patients received SSR instructions and sleep hygiene advice. Control patients received sleep hygiene advice alone. Primary outcomes included change in sleep quality at 6 months measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and sleep efficiency (SE%). The proportion of participants reaching a predefined 'insomnia remission' treatment response was calculated. Ninety-seven patients were randomised and 94 (97%) completed the study. At 6-month follow-up, SSR participants had improved PSQI scores (6.2 versus 8.4, Pinsomnia, the adjusted odds ratio for insomnia remission was 2.7 (95% CI = 1.1 to 6.5). There were no significant differences in other outcomes or adverse effects. SSR is an effective brief intervention in adults with primary insomnia and no comorbidities, suitable for use in general practice. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  15. BODY WORK MODELING AND GENERAL DESIGN FOR A RADIO CONTROLLED CAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DOROBANŢU Bogdan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the general design of a small radio controlled car with its main systems and also the process and phases of modeling the body work for this kind of car. The modeling started from the sketch of a real car, a Porsche 997, shaping the clay to its final form looking like a mixture of Nissan GTR and Porsche Cayenne but keeping the proportions of the 997 to a scale of 1:14.

  16. Generalized perturbation theory error control within PWR core-loading pattern optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbriani, J.S.; Turinsky, P.J.; Kropaczek, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The fuel management optimization code FORMOSA-P has been developed to determine the family of near-optimum loading patterns for PWR reactors. The code couples the optimization technique of simulated annealing (SA) with a generalized perturbation theory (GPT) model for evaluating core physics characteristics. To ensure the accuracy of the GPT predictions, as well as to maximize the efficient of the SA search, a GPT error control method has been developed

  17. 36 CFR 1211.605 - Compliance information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... GENERAL RULES NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL... regulations. (c) Access to sources of information. Each recipient shall permit access by the designated agency... sources of information, and its facilities as may be pertinent to ascertain compliance with these Title IX...

  18. 15 CFR 711.3 - Compliance review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance review. 711.3 Section 711.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS GENERAL INFORMATION...

  19. Analysis of Loss of Control Parameters for Aircraft Maneuvering in General Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Ud-Din

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid increase in the occurrence of loss of control in general aviation has raised concern in recent years. Loss of control (LOC pertains to unique characteristics in which external and internal events act in conjunction. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA has approved an Integrated Safety Assessment Model (ISAM for evaluating safety in the National Airspace System (NAS. ISAM consists of an event sequence diagram (ESD with fault trees containing numerous parameters, which is recognized as casual risk model. In this paper, we outline an integrated risk assessment framework to model maneuvering through cross-examining external and internal events. The maneuvering is in the critical flight phase with a high number of LOC occurrences in general aviation, where highly trained and qualified pilots failed to maintain aircraft control irrespective of the preventive nature of the events. Various metrics have been presented for evaluating the significance of these parameters to identify the most important ones. The proposed sensitivity analysis considers the accident, fatality, and risk reduction frequencies that assist in the decision-making process and foresees future risks from a general aviation perspective.

  20. Boron Stress Activates the General Amino Acid Control Mechanism and Inhibits Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluisik, Irem; Kaya, Alaattin; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS) of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance. PMID:22114689

  1. Boron stress activates the general amino acid control mechanism and inhibits protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irem Uluisik

    Full Text Available Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance.

  2. A randomised controlled trial to improve general practitioners' services in cancer rehabilitation: Effects on general practitioners' proactivity and on patients' participation in rehabilitation activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, SH; Søndergaard, J; Larsen, PV

    2013-01-01

    by their GP reported by the patients and GPs, respectively, and patients' participation in rehabilitation activities. Methods. Cluster randomised controlled trial. All general practices in Denmark were randomised to an intervention group or to a control group (usual procedures). Patients were subsequently...

  3. Effectiveness of oncogenetics training on general practitioners' consultation skills: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwink, Elisa J F; Muijtjens, Arno M M; van Teeffelen, Sarah R; Henneman, Lidewij; Rethans, Jan Joost; van der Jagt, Liesbeth E J; van Luijk, Scheltus J; Dinant, Geert Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees; Cornel, Martina C

    2014-01-01

    General practitioners are increasingly called upon to deliver genetic services and could play a key role in translating potentially life-saving advancements in oncogenetic technologies to patient care. If general practitioners are to make an effective contribution in this area, their genetics competencies need to be upgraded. The aim of this study was to investigate whether oncogenetics training for general practitioners improves their genetic consultation skills. In this pragmatic, blinded, randomized controlled trial, the intervention consisted of a 4-h training (December 2011 and April 2012), covering oncogenetic consultation skills (family history, familial risk assessment, and efficient referral), attitude (medical ethical issues), and clinical knowledge required in primary-care consultations. Outcomes were measured using observation checklists by unannounced standardized patients and self-reported questionnaires. Of 88 randomized general practitioners who initially agreed to participate, 56 completed all measurements. Key consultation skills significantly and substantially improved; regression coefficients after intervention were equivalent to 0.34 and 0.28 at 3-month follow-up, indicating a moderate effect size. Satisfaction and perceived applicability of newly learned skills were highly scored. The general practitioner-specific training proved to be a feasible, satisfactory, and clinically applicable method to improve oncogenetics consultation skills and could be used as an educational framework to inform future training activities with the ultimate aim of improving medical care.

  4. The effect of general and spinal anesthesia on balance control in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Alejo; Macadar, Omar

    2008-01-01

    Falls are a major problem in the elderly population, but few communications address the influence of anesthesia on balance control. This study reports how a general balanced anesthesia (GBA) and a spinal anesthesia (SA) affect balance control in the elderly. We divided into three groups, according to electronystagmography findings and type of anesthesia, 21 men older than 65 years (mean age, 72 years) who were scheduled for prostate adenectomy. One group, designated GBN, consisted of normal subjects who underwent surgery under GBA. In another group, designated GBP, were pathological subjects who had clinically compensated central vestibular disorders (CVDs) and underwent surgery under GBA. The third group, designated SP, contained CVD patients who underwent surgery under SA. We assessed balance control via static posturography preoperatively and 48 hours postoperatively. We observed no change in balance control parameters (center of pressure distribution area [COPa] or COP sway velocity [SV]) for those patients in the GBN group or for those in the SP group. We did observe a significant difference for the patients in the GBP group, with higher postoperative values of COPa and SV (Wilcoxon signed rank test). Our results showed that in subjects with clinically compensated underlying CVD prior to a GBA, balance control worsens after the procedure, whereas no change in balance control occurs after an SA. Balance control in subjects with normal vestibuloocular function did not change even after a GBA.

  5. Nuclear power plant control room ventilation system design for meeting general criterion 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, K.G.; Campe, K.M.

    1975-01-01

    The requirement for protection of control room personnel against radiation is specified in General Design Criterion 19 of Appendix A, 10 CFR Part 50. The evaluation of a control room design, especially its emergency ventilation system, with respect to radiation protection primarily consists of determining the radiation doses to control room personnel under accident conditions. The accident dose assessment involves modeling and evaluation of radiological source terms, atmospheric transport of airborne activity, and protection features of the control room ventilation system. Some of the assumptions and conservatisms used in the dose analyses are based on the technical review experience of existing or proposed control room designs. A review of over 50 control room designs has revealed a great variety of design concepts, not all of which seem to have been based on radiation protection criteria. A summary of the basic control room protection requirements, design features, dose acceptance criteria, and an outline of the methods used by the Regulatory staff for accident dose evaluation are presented. (U.S.)

  6. Controlled trial of pharmacist intervention in general practice: the effect on prescribing costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, S; Avery, A J; Meechan, D; Briant, S; Geraghty, M; Doran, K; Whynes, D K

    1999-09-01

    It has been suggested that the employment of pharmacists in general practice might moderate the growth in prescribing costs. However, empirical evidence for this proposition has been lacking. We report the results of a controlled trial of pharmacist intervention in United Kingdom general practice. To determine whether intervention practices made savings relative to controls. An evaluation of an initiative set up by Doncaster Health Authority. Eight practices agreed to take part and received intensive input from five pharmacists for one year (September 1996 to August 1997) at a cost of 163,000 Pounds. Changes in prescribing patterns were investigated by comparing these practices with eight individually matched controls for both the year of the intervention and the previous year. Prescribing data (PACTLINE) were used to assess these changes. The measures used to take account of differences in the populations of the practices included the ASTRO-PU for overall prescribing and the STAR-PU for prescribing in specific therapeutic areas. Differences between intervention and control practices were subjected to Wilcoxon matched-pairs, signed-ranks tests. The median (minimum to maximum) rise in prescribing costs per ASTRO-PU was 0.85 Pound (-1.95 Pounds to 2.05 Pounds) in the intervention practices compared with 2.55 Pounds (1.74 Pounds to 4.65 Pounds) in controls (P = 0.025). Had the cost growth of the intervention group been as high as that of the controls, their total prescribing expenditure would have been around 347,000 Pounds higher. This study suggests that the use of pharmacists did control prescribing expenditure sufficiently to offset their employment costs.

  7. Informal interpreting in general practice: Are interpreters' roles related to perceived control, trust, and satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendedel, Rena; Schouten, Barbara C; van Weert, Julia C M; van den Putte, Bas

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this observational study was twofold. First, we examined how often and which roles informal interpreters performed during consultations between Turkish-Dutch migrant patients and general practitioners (GPs). Second, relations between these roles and patients' and GPs' perceived control, trust in informal interpreters and satisfaction with the consultation were assessed. A coding instrument was developed to quantitatively code informal interpreters' roles from transcripts of 84 audio-recorded interpreter-mediated consultations in general practice. Patients' and GPs' perceived control, trust and satisfaction were assessed in a post consultation questionnaire. Informal interpreters most often performed the conduit role (almost 25% of all coded utterances), and also frequently acted as replacers and excluders of patients and GPs by asking and answering questions on their own behalf, and by ignoring and omitting patients' and GPs' utterances. The role of information source was negatively related to patients' trust and the role of GP excluder was negatively related to patients' perceived control. Patients and GPs are possibly insufficiently aware of the performed roles of informal interpreters, as these were barely related to patients' and GPs' perceived trust, control and satisfaction. Patients and GPs should be educated about the possible negative consequences of informal interpreting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Yoga for generalized anxiety disorder: design of a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Stefan G; Curtiss, Joshua; Khalsa, Sat Bir S; Hoge, Elizabeth; Rosenfield, David; Bui, Eric; Keshaviah, Aparna; Simon, Naomi

    2015-09-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a common disorder associated with significant distress and interference. Although cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to be the most effective form of psychotherapy, few patients receive or have access to this intervention. Yoga therapy offers another promising, yet under-researched, intervention that is gaining increasing popularity in the general public, as an anxiety reduction intervention. The purpose of this innovative clinical trial protocol is to investigate the efficacy of a Kundalini Yoga intervention, relative to CBT and a control condition. Kundalini yoga and CBT are compared with each other in a noninferiority test and both treatments are compared to stress education training, an attention control intervention, in superiority tests. The sample will consist of 230 individuals with a primary DSM-5 diagnosis of GAD. This randomized controlled trial will compare yoga (N=95) to both CBT for GAD (N=95) and stress education (N=40), a commonly used control condition. All three treatments will be administered by two instructors in a group format over 12 weekly sessions with four to six patients per group. Groups will be randomized using permuted block randomization, which will be stratified by site. Treatment outcome will be evaluated bi-weekly and at 6month follow-up. Furthermore, potential mediators of treatment outcome will be investigated. Given the individual and economic burden associated with GAD, identifying accessible alternative behavioral treatments will have substantive public health implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. General emotion processing in social anxiety disorder: neural issues of cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brühl, Annette Beatrix; Herwig, Uwe; Delsignore, Aba; Jäncke, Lutz; Rufer, Michael

    2013-05-30

    Anxiety disorders are characterized by deficient emotion regulation prior to and in anxiety-evoking situations. Patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) have increased brain activation also during the anticipation and perception of non-specific emotional stimuli pointing to biased general emotion processing. In the current study we addressed the neural correlates of emotion regulation by cognitive control during the anticipation and perception of non-specific emotional stimuli in patients with SAD. Thirty-two patients with SAD underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during the announced anticipation and perception of emotional stimuli. Half of them were trained and instructed to apply reality-checking as a control strategy, the others anticipated and perceived the stimuli. Reality checking significantly (pperception of negative emotional stimuli. The medial prefrontal cortex was comparably active in both groups (p>0.50). The results suggest that cognitive control in patients with SAD influences emotion processing structures, supporting the usefulness of emotion regulation training in the psychotherapy of SAD. In contrast to studies in healthy subjects, cognitive control was not associated with increased activation of prefrontal regions in SAD. This points to possibly disturbed general emotion regulating circuits in SAD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 40 CFR 61.12 - Compliance with standards and maintenance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Provisions § 61.12 Compliance with standards and maintenance requirements. (a) Compliance with numerical... otherwise specified in an individual subpart. (b) Compliance with design, equipment, work practice or... pollution control, in a manner consistent with good air pollution control practice for minimizing emissions...

  11. Generalized Momentum Control of the Spin-Stabilized Magnetospheric Multiscale Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Steven Z.; Shah, Neerav; Benegalrao, Suyog S.; Blackman, Kathie

    2015-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission consists of four identically instrumented, spin-stabilized observatories elliptically orbiting the Earth in a tetrahedron formation. The on-board attitude control system adjusts the angular momentum of the system using a generalized thruster-actuated control system that simultaneously manages precession, nutation and spin. Originally developed using Lyapunov control-theory with rate-feedback, a published algorithm has been augmented to provide a balanced attitude/rate response using a single weighting parameter. This approach overcomes an orientation sign-ambiguity in the existing formulation, and also allows for a smoothly tuned-response applicable to both a compact/agile spacecraft, as well as one with large articulating appendages.

  12. Opinion on the examination of the control-command general architecture of the Flamanville 3 EPR reactor and of its associated platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    This report first recalls the different technical and hardware elements and components discussed by the ISRN (Nuclear Radioprotection and Safety Institute) in front of the Expert Permanent Group for nuclear reactors. These elements and components are concerning the control-command architecture as a whole, and the technical ability of networks, computers, and robots. It outlines the main principles which the control-and-command must comply with: compliance of each component of the retained technological solution with the design requirements corresponding to the safety classification, robustness of the whole control-command architecture. Then, it comments and sometimes criticizes the status of the various components of the control-command platforms with respect to this compliance. Eight recommendations are given for the SPPA T2000 control-command platform and for the robustness of the control-command architecture

  13. Time of Arrival Estimation in Probability-Controlled Generalized CDMA Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagit Messer

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more and more wireless communications systems are required to provide also a positioning measurement. In code division multiple access (CDMA communication systems, the positioning accuracy is significantly degraded by the multiple access interference (MAI caused by other users in the system. This MAI is commonly managed by a power control mechanism, and yet, MAI has a major effect on positioning accuracy. Probability control is a recently introduced interference management mechanism. In this mechanism, a user with excess power chooses not to transmit some of its symbols. The information in the nontransmitted symbols is recovered by an error-correcting code (ECC, while all other users receive a more reliable data during these quiet periods. Previous research had shown that the implementation of a probability control mechanism can significantly reduce the MAI. In this paper, we show that probability control also improves the positioning accuracy. We focus on time-of-arrival (TOA based positioning systems. We analyze the TOA estimation performance in a generalized CDMA system, in which the probability control mechanism is employed, where the transmitted signal is noncontinuous with a symbol transmission probability smaller than 1. The accuracy of the TOA estimation is determined using appropriate modifications of the Cramer-Rao bound on the delay estimation. Keeping the average transmission power constant, we show that the TOA accuracy of each user does not depend on its transmission probability, while being a nondecreasing function of the transmission probability of any other user. Therefore, a generalized, noncontinuous CDMA system with a probability control mechanism can always achieve better positioning performance, for all users in the network, than a conventional, continuous, CDMA system.

  14. Maximum Principle for General Controlled Systems Driven by Fractional Brownian Motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yuecai; Hu Yaozhong; Song Jian

    2013-01-01

    We obtain a maximum principle for stochastic control problem of general controlled stochastic differential systems driven by fractional Brownian motions (of Hurst parameter H>1/2). This maximum principle specifies a system of equations that the optimal control must satisfy (necessary condition for the optimal control). This system of equations consists of a backward stochastic differential equation driven by both fractional Brownian motions and the corresponding underlying standard Brownian motions. In addition to this backward equation, the maximum principle also involves the Malliavin derivatives. Our approach is to use conditioning and Malliavin calculus. To arrive at our maximum principle we need to develop some new results of stochastic analysis of the controlled systems driven by fractional Brownian motions via fractional calculus. Our approach of conditioning and Malliavin calculus is also applied to classical system driven by standard Brownian motions while the controller has only partial information. As a straightforward consequence, the classical maximum principle is also deduced in this more natural and simpler way.

  15. Attention for speaking: domain-general control from the anterior cingulate cortex in spoken word production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitoria ePiai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that some degree of attentional control is required to regulate and monitor processes underlying speaking. Although progress has been made in delineating the neural substrates of the core language processes involved in speaking, substrates associated with regulatory and monitoring processes have remained relatively underspecified. We report the results of an fMRI study examining the neural substrates related to performance in three attention-demanding tasks varying in the amount of linguistic processing: vocal picture naming while ignoring distractors (picture-word interference, PWI; vocal colour naming while ignoring distractors (Stroop; and manual object discrimination while ignoring spatial position (Simon task. All three tasks had congruent and incongruent stimuli, while PWI and Stroop also had neutral stimuli. Analyses focusing on common activation across tasks identified a portion of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex that was active in incongruent trials for all three tasks, suggesting that this region subserves a domain-general attentional control function. In the language tasks, this area showed increased activity for incongruent relative to congruent stimuli, consistent with the involvement of domain-general mechanisms of attentional control in word production. The two language tasks also showed activity in anterior-superior temporal gyrus. Activity increased for neutral PWI stimuli (picture and word did not share the same semantic category relative to incongruent (categorically related and congruent stimuli. This finding is consistent with the involvement of language-specific areas in word production, possibly related to retrieval of lexical-semantic information from memory. The current results thus suggest that in addition to engaging language-specific areas for core linguistic processes, speaking also engages the anterior cingulate cortex, a region that is likely implementing domain-general

  16. ASVCP quality assurance guidelines: control of general analytical factors in veterinary laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatland, Bente; Freeman, Kathy P; Friedrichs, Kristen R; Vap, Linda M; Getzy, Karen M; Evans, Ellen W; Harr, Kendal E

    2010-09-01

    Owing to lack of governmental regulation of veterinary laboratory performance, veterinarians ideally should demonstrate a commitment to self-monitoring and regulation of laboratory performance from within the profession. In response to member concerns about quality management in veterinary laboratories, the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) formed a Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards (QAS) committee in 1996. This committee recently published updated and peer-reviewed Quality Assurance Guidelines on the ASVCP website. The Quality Assurance Guidelines are intended for use by veterinary diagnostic laboratories and veterinary research laboratories that are not covered by the US Food and Drug Administration Good Laboratory Practice standards (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, Chapter 58). The guidelines have been divided into 3 reports on 1) general analytic factors for veterinary laboratory performance and comparisons, 2) hematology and hemostasis, and 3) clinical chemistry, endocrine assessment, and urinalysis. This report documents recommendations for control of general analytical factors within veterinary clinical laboratories and is based on section 2.1 (Analytical Factors Important In Veterinary Clinical Pathology, General) of the newly revised ASVCP QAS Guidelines. These guidelines are not intended to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide minimum guidelines for quality assurance and quality control for veterinary laboratory testing. It is hoped that these guidelines will provide a basis for laboratories to assess their current practices, determine areas for improvement, and guide continuing professional development and education efforts. ©2010 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  17. 12 CFR 570.3 - Filing of safety and soundness compliance plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... compliance plan shall include a description of the steps the savings association will take to correct the deficiency and the time within which those steps will be taken. (c) Review of safety and soundness compliance... plan. (a) Schedule for filing compliance plan—(1) In general. A savings association shall file a...

  18. Quality Control Review of the Assistant General for Audits Office of the Inspector General, National Reconnaissance Office

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brannin, Patricia A

    2004-01-01

    ...) system of quality control to the extent considered appropriate. The tests included reviewing a judgmental sample of six of nine audit reports issued by the NRO OAIGA during the year ended July 31, 2003...

  19. Quality Control Review of Berenson & Company LLP and the Defense Contract Audit Agency Riverside Research Institute Fiscal Year Ended November 30, 1996

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smolenyak, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    .... We focused our review on the following qualitative aspects of the audit: due professional care, planning, supervision, independence, quality control, internal controls, substantive testing, general and specific compliance testing...

  20. 48 CFR 1.202 - Agency compliance with the FAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... compliance with the FAR (see 1.304) is the responsibility of the Secretary of Defense (for the military departments and defense agencies), the Administrator of General Services (for civilian agencies other than...

  1. 49 CFR 214.5 - Responsibility for compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY General § 214.5 Responsibility for compliance. Any... railroad; a manager, supervisor, official, or other employee or agent of a railroad; any owner...

  2. The Amsterdam Hip Protector Study: Compliance and determinants of compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schoor, N.M.; Asma, G.; Smit, J.H.; Bouter, L.M.; Lips, P.T.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Hip protectors appear to be effective in reducing the incidence of hip fractures. However, compliance is often poor. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the compliance and determinants of compliance with external hip protectors. A prospective study was performed in residents from

  3. Achievement of process control, safety, and regulatory compliance in a mixed waste evaporator system at the Hanford Site using data quality objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Bargen, B.H.

    1995-01-01

    The Data Quality Objectives (DQO) Process was applied to the operation of the 242-A Evaporator at the Hanford Site. A team consisting of representatives from process engineering, environmental engineering, regulatory compliance, analytical laboratories, and DOE utilized the step by step DQO process to define the issues, variables, and inputs necessary to develop the decision rules which govern plant operations. The sampling and analyses required to make these decisions was then optimized concerning factors such as sample number, total analyses, cost, radiation exposure, quality assurance, and deliverables

  4. Operation of general purpose stepping motor controllers at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1986-10-01

    A prototype and four copies of a general purpose subsystem for mechanical positioning of detectors, samples, and beam line optical elements which constitute experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory have been constructed and placed into operation. Construction of a sixth subsystem is nearing completion. The subsystems effect mechanical positioning by controlling a set of stepping motors and their associated position encoders. The units are general purpose in the sense that they receive commands over a standard 9600 baud asynchronous serial line compatible with the RS-232-C electrical signal standard, generate TTL-compatible streams of stepping pulses which can be used with a wide variety of stepping motors, and read back position values from a number of different types and models of position encoder. The basic structure of the motor controller subsystem will be briefly reviewed. Short descriptions of the positioning apparatus actuated at each of the test and experiment stations employing a motor control unit are given. Additions and enhancements to the subsystem made in response to problems indicated by actual operation of the four installed units are described in more detail

  5. Operation of general purpose stepping motor controllers at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A prototype and four copies of a general purpose subsystem for mechanical positioning of detectors, samples, and beam line optical elements which constitute experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory have been constructed and placed into operation. Construction of a sixth subsystem is nearing completion. The subsystems effect mechanical positioning by controlling a set of stepping motors and their associated position encoders. The units are general purpose in the sense that they receive commands over a standard 9600 baud asynchronous serial line compatible with the RS-232-C electrical signal standard, generate TTL-compatible streams of stepping pulses which can be used with a wide variety of stepping motors, and read back position values from a number of different types and models of position encoder. The basic structure of the motor controller subsystem is briefly reviewed. Short descriptions of the positioning apparatus actuated at each of the test and experiment stations employing a motor control unit are given. Additions and enhancements to the sub-system made in response to problems indicated by actual operation of the four installed units are described in more detail

  6. Rocky Flats Compliance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) (OTD) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November 1989. The primary objective of the Office of Technology Development, Rocky Flats Compliance Program (RFCP), is to develop altemative treatment technologies for mixed low-level waste (wastes containing both hazardous and radioactive components) to use in bringing the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) into compliance with Federal and state regulations and agreements. Approximately 48,000 cubic feet of untreated low-level mixed waste, for which treatment has not been specified, are stored at the RFP. The cleanup of the Rocky Flats site is driven by agreements between DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH). Under these agreements, a Comprehensive Treatment and Management Plan (CTMP) was drafted to outline the mechanisms by which RFP will achieve compliance with the regulations and agreements. This document describes DOE's strategy to treat low-level mixed waste to meet Land Disposal Restrictions and sets specific milestones related to the regulatory aspects of technology development. These milestones detail schedules for the development of technologies to treat all of the mixed wastes at the RFP. Under the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA), the CTMP has been incorporated into Rocky Flats Plant Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP). The CSTP will become the Rocky Flats Plant site Treatment Plan in 1995 and will supersede the CTMP

  7. Environmental compliance and cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the roles of the principal agencies, organizations, and public in environmental compliance and cleanup of the Hanford Site. Regulatory oversight, the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the role of Indian tribes, public participation, and CERCLA Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustee Activities are all discussed.

  8. Validating year 2000 compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Deursen (Arie); P. Klint (Paul); M.P.A. Sellink

    1997-01-01

    textabstractValidating year 2000 compliance involves the assessment of the correctness and quality of a year 2000 conversion. This entails inspecting both the quality of the conversion emph{process followed, and of the emph{result obtained, i.e., the converted system. This document provides an

  9. Strategisk compliance og regulering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kühn Pedersen, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    Denne artikel introducerer strategisk compliance og påpeger dens samspil med klassiske og nyere former for reguleringer i digital værdiskabelse. Konteksten er den digitale økonomi, som vokser frem imellem den materielle økonomis bærepiller: Virksomheder og markeder, men består af en helt ny...... materialitet, som er det digitale univers og dets modsvarighed i nye krav til compliance. Den nye materialitet stiller nye krav, hvad angår digitale processer og transaktioner. Klassisk regulering, som aktører ikke selv kan ændre, støder på egenregulering, hvor aktørerne selv opsætter regler for at skabe...... digital værdi. Dette kalder på strategisk compliance. Med digitalisering er strategisk compliance sat på dagsordnen i reguleringsdebatten. Vi hævder, at regulering og egenregulering kan komme til at virke komplementært i det post-industrielle, digitaliserede samfund....

  10. Environmental compliance and cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the roles of the principal agencies, organizations, and public in environmental compliance and cleanup of the Hanford Site. Regulatory oversight, the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the role of Indian tribes, public participation, and CERCLA Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustee Activities are all discussed

  11. Financial Markets and Compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, T.A.H.M.; Bleker, Sylvie; Houben, Raf

    2017-01-01

    This chapter will focus on the goals of financial market regulation through the rules of economics, the strategies financial regulation employs to achieve these goals and the insights this provides for the compliance profession. For an overview of the goals and strategies of financial regulation

  12. Year 2000 compliance issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-01

    This month, we continue our coverage of the year 2000 (Y2K) problem as it affects healthcare facilities and the professionals who work in them. We present the following articles: "Checking PCs for Y2K Compliance"--In this article, we describe the probable sources of Y2K-related errors in PCs and present simple procedures for testing the Y2K compliance of PCs and application software. "Y2K Assessment Equipment Expectations"--In this article, we review the Y2K compliance data from a small sampling of hospitals to help answer the question "What percentage of medical equipment will likely be susceptible to Y2K problems?" "Y2K Labeling of Medical Devices"--In this article, we discuss the pros and cons of instituting a program to label each medical device with its Y2K status. Also in this section, we present an updated list of organizations that support ECRI's Position Statement on the testing of medical devices for Y2K compliance, which we published in the December 1998 issue of Health Devices (27[12]). And we remind readers of the services ECRI can offer to help healthcare institutions cope with the Y2K problem.

  13. Compliance to medication among hypertensive patients in Murtala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compliance to medication among hypertensive patients in Murtala Mohammed Specialist Hospital, Kano, Nigeria. M Kabir, Z Iliyasu, LS Abubakar, M Jibril. Abstract. Background: Non-compliance to blood pressure-lowering medication is a major reason for poor control of hypertension worldwide. We assessed the level of ...

  14. On the dynamics of a generalized predator-prey system with Z-type control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacitignola, Deborah; Diele, Fasma; Marangi, Carmela; Provenzale, Antonello

    2016-10-01

    We apply the Z-control approach to a generalized predator-prey system and consider the specific case of indirect control of the prey population. We derive the associated Z-controlled model and investigate its properties from the point of view of the dynamical systems theory. The key role of the design parameter λ for the successful application of the method is stressed and related to specific dynamical properties of the Z-controlled model. Critical values of the design parameter are also found, delimiting the λ-range for the effectiveness of the Z-method. Analytical results are then numerically validated by the means of two ecological models: the classical Lotka-Volterra model and a model related to a case study of the wolf-wild boar dynamics in the Alta Murgia National Park. Investigations on these models also highlight how the Z-control method acts in respect to different dynamical regimes of the uncontrolled model. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Generalized Predictive Control of Dynamic Systems with Rigid-Body Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations to assess the effectiveness of Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) for active control of dynamic systems having rigid-body modes are presented. GPC is a linear, time-invariant, multi-input/multi-output predictive control method that uses an ARX model to characterize the system and to design the controller. Although the method can accommodate both embedded (implicit) and explicit feedforward paths for incorporation of disturbance effects, only the case of embedded feedforward in which the disturbances are assumed to be unknown is considered here. Results from numerical simulations using mathematical models of both a free-free three-degree-of-freedom mass-spring-dashpot system and the XV-15 tiltrotor research aircraft are presented. In regulation mode operation, which calls for zero system response in the presence of disturbances, the simulations showed reductions of nearly 100%. In tracking mode operations, where the system is commanded to follow a specified path, the GPC controllers produced the desired responses, even in the presence of disturbances.

  16. The USAID Environmental Compliance Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Environmental Compliance Database is a record of environmental compliance submissions with their outcomes. Documents in the database can be found by visiting the...

  17. An optimal general type-2 fuzzy controller for Urban Traffic Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khooban, Mohammad Hassan; Vafamand, Navid; Liaghat, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Urban traffic network model is illustrated by state-charts and object-diagram. However, they have limitations to show the behavioral perspective of the Traffic Information flow. Consequently, a state space model is used to calculate the half-value waiting time of vehicles. In this study......, a combination of the general type-2 fuzzy logic sets and the Modified Backtracking Search Algorithm (MBSA) techniques are used in order to control the traffic signal scheduling and phase succession so as to guarantee a smooth flow of traffic with the least wait times and average queue length. The parameters...

  18. Hybrid dislocated control and general hybrid projective dislocated synchronization for the modified Lue chaotic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yuhua; Zhou Wuneng; Fang Jianan

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a modified Lue chaotic system, and some basic dynamical properties are studied. Based on these properties, we present hybrid dislocated control method for stabilizing chaos to unstable equilibrium and limit cycle. In addition, based on the Lyapunov stability theorem, general hybrid projective dislocated synchronization (GHPDS) is proposed, which includes complete dislocated synchronization, dislocated anti-synchronization and projective dislocated synchronization as its special item. The drive and response systems discussed in this paper can be strictly different dynamical systems (including different dimensional systems). As examples, the modified Lue chaotic system, Chen chaotic system and hyperchaotic Chen system are discussed. Numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of these methods.

  19. Hybrid dislocated control and general hybrid projective dislocated synchronization for the modified Lue chaotic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yuhua [College of Information Science and Technology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China) and Department of Maths, Yunyang Teacher' s College, Hubei 442000 (China)], E-mail: yuhuaxu2004@163.com; Zhou Wuneng [College of Information Science and Technology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)], E-mail: wnzhou@163.com; Fang Jianan [College of Information Science and Technology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2009-11-15

    This paper introduces a modified Lue chaotic system, and some basic dynamical properties are studied. Based on these properties, we present hybrid dislocated control method for stabilizing chaos to unstable equilibrium and limit cycle. In addition, based on the Lyapunov stability theorem, general hybrid projective dislocated synchronization (GHPDS) is proposed, which includes complete dislocated synchronization, dislocated anti-synchronization and projective dislocated synchronization as its special item. The drive and response systems discussed in this paper can be strictly different dynamical systems (including different dimensional systems). As examples, the modified Lue chaotic system, Chen chaotic system and hyperchaotic Chen system are discussed. Numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of these methods.

  20. Synchronizing strict-feedback and general strict-feedback chaotic systems via a single controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shihua; Wang Feng; Wang Changping

    2004-01-01

    We present a systematic design procedure to synchronize a class of chaotic systems in a so-called strict-feedback form based on back-stepping procedure. This approach needs only a single controller to realize synchronization no matter how many dimensions the chaotic system contains. Furthermore, we point out that the method does not work for general strict-feedback chaotic systems, for instance, Lorenz system. Therefore, we propose three kinds of synchronization schemes for Lorenz system using the Lyapunov function method. All the three schemes avoid including divergence factor as in Ref. [Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 16 (2003) 37]. Especially in the last two schemes, we need only one state variable in controller, which has important significance in chaos synchronization used for communication purposes. Finally numerical simulations are provided to show the effectiveness and feasibility of the developed methods

  1. Compliance of the Savannah River Plant P-Reactor cooling system with environmental regulations. Demonstrations in accordance with Sections 316(a) and (b) of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, E.W.

    1985-12-01

    This document presents demonstrations under Sections 316(a) and (b) of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 for the P-Reactor cooling system at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The demonstrations were mandated when the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for the SRP was renewed and the compliance point for meeting South Carolina Class B water quality criteria in the P-Reactor cooling system was moved from below Par Pond to the reactor cooling water outfall, No. P-109. Extensive operating, environmental, and biological data, covering most of the current P-Reactor cooling system history from 1958 to the present are discussed. No significant adverse effects were attributed to the thermal effluent discharged to Par Pond or the pumping of cooling water from Par Pond to P Reactor. It was conluded that Par Pond, the principal reservoir in the cooling system for P Reactor, contains balanced indigenous biological communities that meet all criteria commonly used in defining such communities. Par Pond compares favorably with all types of reservoirs in South Carolina and with cooling lakes and reservoirs throughout the southeast in terms of balanced communities of phytoplankton, macrophytes, zooplankton, macroinvertebrates, fish, and other vertebrate wildlife. The report provides the basis for negotiations between the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the Department of Energy - Savannah River (DOE-SR) to identify a mixing zone which would relocate the present compliance point for Class B water quality criteria for the P-Reactor cooling system

  2. Generalized dynamic model and control of ambiguous mono axial vehicle robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantisek Duchon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the novel concept of ambiguous mono axial vehicle robot. Such robot is a combination of Segway and dicycle, which utilizes the advantages of each chassis. The advantage of dicycle is lower energy consumption during the movement and the higher safety of carried payload. The movable platform inside the ambiguous mono axial vehicle allows using the various sensors or devices. This will change the ambiguous mono axial vehicle to the Segway type robot. Both these modes are necessary to control in the stable mode to ensure the safety of the ambiguous mono axial vehicle’s movement. The main contents of the article contain description of generalized dynamic model of ambiguous mono axial vehicle and related control of ambiguous mono axial vehicle. The proposal is unique in that the same controller is used for both modes. Several simulations verify proposed control schemes and identified parameters. Moreover, the dicycle type of platform has never been used in robotics and that is another novelty.

  3. What distinguishes weight loss maintainers of the German Weight Control Registry from the general population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Silke; Müller, Astrid; Mayr, Andreas; Engeli, Stefan; Hilbert, Anja; de Zwaan, Martina

    2015-05-01

    Differences between successful long-term weight loss maintainers and the general population with regard to eating and weighing habits, non-normative eating behaviors, and eating-related and general psychopathological parameters are unknown. Self-identified weight loss maintainers from the German Weight Control Registry (GWCR, n = 494) were compared with a representative sample of the general German population (n = 2,129). The samples did not differ in current BMI. Using the same assessment instruments in both cohorts, a variety of eating-related and psychological variables were determined. The GWCR participants reported more self-weighing and higher eating frequency but less hot meal consumption and more eating-out-of-home. Binge eating, compensatory behaviors, and concerns about shape and weight were reported more often by successful weight loss maintainers. Scores of depression and worrying about health were slightly higher whereas severity of somatic symptoms was less pronounced in the GWCR participants. Overall, our data suggest that successful weight loss maintainers are characterized by more concerns about shape and weight, greater binge eating frequency, and higher use of compensatory behaviors. The latter suggests that weight loss maintenance might not only be achieved by healthy strategies but also by non-normative behaviors which might increase the vulnerability for weight regain. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  4. Specific efficacy expectations mediate exercise compliance in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, R M; Atkins, C J; Reinsch, S

    1984-01-01

    Social learning theory has generated two different approaches for the assessment of expectancies. Bandura argues that expectancies are specific and do not generalize. Therefore, he prefers measures of specific efficacy expectations. Others endorse the role of generalized expectancies measured by locus of control scales. The present study examines specific versus generalized expectancies as mediators of changes in exercise behavior among 60 older adult patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. The patients were given a prescription to increase exercise and randomly assigned to experimental groups or control groups. All groups received attention but only experimental groups received training to increase their exercise. After 3 months, groups given specific training for compliance with walking significantly increased their activity in comparison to the control group receiving only attention. These changes were mediated by changes in perceived efficacy for walking, with efficacy expectations for other behaviors changing as a function of their similarity to walking. A generalized health locus of control expectancy measure was less clearly associated with behavior change. The results are interpreted as supporting Bandura's version of social theory.

  5. Method for mapping population-based case-control studies: an application using generalized additive models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aschengrau Ann

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mapping spatial distributions of disease occurrence and risk can serve as a useful tool for identifying exposures of public health concern. Disease registry data are often mapped by town or county of diagnosis and contain limited data on covariates. These maps often possess poor spatial resolution, the potential for spatial confounding, and the inability to consider latency. Population-based case-control studies can provide detailed information on residential history and covariates. Results Generalized additive models (GAMs provide a useful framework for mapping point-based epidemiologic data. Smoothing on location while controlling for covariates produces adjusted maps. We generate maps of odds ratios using the entire study area as a reference. We smooth using a locally weighted regression smoother (loess, a method that combines the advantages of nearest neighbor and kernel methods. We choose an optimal degree of smoothing by minimizing Akaike's Information Criterion. We use a deviance-based test to assess the overall importance of location in the model and pointwise permutation tests to locate regions of significantly increased or decreased risk. The method is illustrated with synthetic data and data from a population-based case-control study, using S-Plus and ArcView software. Conclusion Our goal is to develop practical methods for mapping population-based case-control and cohort studies. The method described here performs well for our synthetic data, reproducing important features of the data and adequately controlling the covariate. When applied to the population-based case-control data set, the method suggests spatial confounding and identifies statistically significant areas of increased and decreased odds ratios.

  6. First and higher order, heuristically based generalized perturbation theory (HGPT) with optional control reset variable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandini, A.

    1996-01-01

    The heuristically based generalized perturbation theory (HGPT), to first and higher order, applied to the neutron field of a reactor system, is discussed in relation to the criticality reset procedure. This procedure is implicit within the GPT methodology, corresponding to the so called filtering of the importance function relevant to the neutron field from the fundamental mode contamination. It is common practice to use the so called ''lambda''-mode filter. In order to account for any possible reset option, a general definition is introduced of an intensive control variable (ρ) entering into the governing equations, and correspondingly a fundamental ρ-mode filtering of the importance function is defined, relevant to the real criticality reset (control) mechanism adopted. A simple example illustrates the need to take into account the correct filtering, so as to avoid significant inaccuracies in the sensitivity calculation results. The extension of this filtering technique to other functions entering into the GPT perturbative formulations at first and higher order is also discussed. (author)

  7. Use of Low Level of Continuous Heat as an Adjunct to Physical Therapy Improves Knee Pain Recovery and the Compliance for Home Exercise in Patients With Chronic Knee Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Laymon, Michael S; Alshammari, Faris S; Lee, Haneul

    2016-11-01

    Petrofsky, JS, Laymon, MS, Alshammari, FS, and Lee, H. Use of low level of continuous heat as an adjunct to physical therapy improves knee pain recovery and the compliance for home exercise in patients with chronic knee pain: a randomized controlled trial. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3107-3115, 2016-This study examined if the use of low level continuous heat (LLCH) wraps at home between physical therapy sessions at a clinic resulted in better therapy outcomes in patients with chronic knee pain. Fifty individuals with chronic nonspecific knee pain was randomly allocated to 2 groups: the LLCH group and the placebo group. All subjects underwent 1 hour of conventional physical therapy twice per week for 2 weeks at the outpatient clinic and they were asked to accomplish 1 hour of therapeutic exercise at home each day between sessions. The LLCH group applied LLCH knee wraps for 6 hours at home before home exercise while placebo group took a placebo ibuprofen. (This was done since placebo heat is impossible to use since subjects would notice that the wraps were cold) Before, during, and after intervention, pain intensity, active range of motion of the knee (AROM), knee strength, and home exercise compliance were measured. The LLCH group showed pain attenuation after 2 weeks of therapy sessions (p ≤ 0.05). AROM and strength of the knee significantly improved over time compared to the placebo group. Home exercise compliance was significantly higher in the LLCH group than placebo group (p ≤ 0.05). These results indicated that the use of LLCH as an adjunct to conventional physical therapy for chronic knee pain significantly improved pain attenuation and recovery of strength and movement in patients with chronic knee pain.

  8. A double-blind placebo-controlled study of controlled release fluvoxamine for the treatment of generalized social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenberg, Herman G M; Stein, Dan J; Yang, Haichen; Li, David; Barbato, Luigi M

    2004-02-01

    This was a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled multicenter study to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of fluvoxamine in a controlled release (CR) formulation for treatment of generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD). A total of 300 subjects with GSAD were randomly assigned to receive either fluvoxamine CR (N = 149) or placebo (N = 151) for 12 weeks. Mean changes from baseline to end point in Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), Clinical Global Impression Severity of Illness Scale (CGI-S), Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), as well as the mean end point scores in Clinical Global Impression Improvement Scale (CGI-I) and Patient Global Impression of Improvement Scale (PGI) were compared between the fluvoxamine CR and placebo treatment groups. Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX), adverse event, and other safety parameters were also assessed. The results demonstrated that fluvoxamine CR was significantly superior to placebo in decreasing LSAS total score (primary measure) starting at week 4. At end point, there was a mean change from baseline of -36.1 +/- 2.7 (37% reduction) in the LSAS total score in the fluvoxamine CR group compared with -27.3 +/- 2.4 (28% reduction) in the placebo group (P = 0.020 for mean change). Fluvoxamine CR was also significantly superior to placebo in SDS, CGI-S, CGI-I at end point (secondary measures). When compared with placebo, fluvoxamine CR did not cause any significant weight gain or clinically significant sexual dysfunction as measured by ASEX. In summary, fluvoxamine CR is an efficacious, safe, and well-tolerated treatment of generalized social anxiety disorder.

  9. Web-based consultation between general practitioners and nephrologists: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelder, Vincent A; Scherpbier-de Haan, Nynke D; van Berkel, Saskia; Akkermans, Reinier P; de Grauw, Inge S; Adang, Eddy M; Assendelft, Pim J; de Grauw, Wim J C; Biermans, Marion C J; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2017-08-01

    Consultation of a nephrologist is important in aligning care for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) at the primary-secondary care interface. However, current consultation methods come with practical difficulties that can lead to postponed consultation or patient referral instead. This study aimed to investigate whether a web-based consultation platform, telenephrology, led to a lower referral rate of indicated patients. Furthermore, we assessed consultation rate, quality of care, costs and general practitioner (GPs') experiences with telenephrology. Cluster randomized controlled trial with 47 general practices in the Netherlands was randomized to access to telenephrology or to enhanced usual care. A total of 3004 CKD patients aged 18 years or older who were under primary care were included (intervention group n = 1277, control group n = 1727) and 2693 completed the trial. All practices participated in a CKD management course and were given an overview of their CKD patients. The referral rates amounted to 2.3% (n = 29) in the intervention group and 3.0% (n = 52) in the control group, which was a non-significant difference, OR 0.61; 95% CI 0.31 to 1.23. The intervention group's consultation rate was 6.3% (n = 81) against 5.0% (n = 87) (OR 2.00; 95% CI 0.75-5.33). We found no difference in quality of care or costs. The majority of GPs had a positive opinion about telenephrology. The data in our study do not allow for conclusions on the effect of telenephrology on the rate of patient referrals and provider-to-provider consultations, compared to conventional methods. It was positively evaluated by GPs and was non-inferior in terms of quality of care and costs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Randomized controlled trial on promoting influenza vaccination in general practice waiting rooms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Berkhout

    Full Text Available Most of general practitioners (GPs use advertising in their waiting rooms for patient's education purposes. Patients vaccinated against seasonal influenza have been gradually lessening. The objective of this trial was to assess the effect of an advertising campaign for influenza vaccination using posters and pamphlets in GPs' waiting rooms.Registry based 2/1 cluster randomized controlled trial, a cluster gathering the enlisted patients of 75 GPs aged over 16 years. The trial, run during the 2014-2015 influenza vaccination campaign, compared patient's awareness from being in 50 GPs' standard waiting rooms (control group versus that of waiting in 25 rooms from GPs who had received and exposed pamphlets and one poster on influenza vaccine (intervention group, in addition to standard mandatory information. The main outcome was the number of vaccination units delivered in pharmacies. Data were extracted from the SIAM-ERASME claim database of the Health Insurance Fund of Lille-Douai (France. The association between the intervention (yes/no and the main outcome was assessed through a generalized estimating equation. Seventy-five GPs enrolled 10,597 patients over 65 years or suffering from long lasting diseases (intervention/control as of 3781/6816 patients from October 15, 2014 to February 28, 2015. No difference was found regarding the number of influenza vaccination units delivered (Relative Risk (RR = 1.01; 95% Confidence interval: 0.97 to 1.05; p = 0.561.Effects of the monothematic campaign promoting vaccination against influenza using a poster and pamphlets exposed in GPs' waiting rooms could not be demonstrated.

  11. Development of a Scale for Domain General Perceived Control Scale Primary School ChildrensAND#8217;

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Dereli

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY AIM: This study aimed to develop a scale to measure domain general perceived control scale for elementary age children. METHOD: Participants were a total of 341 primary school children, 4th and f4th grade for 152 students, 6th, 7th and 8th grade for 162 students aged between 10-14.Skinner (1996, perceived control based on the theory is created 12-item scale of perceived control of the general form of the trial for primary education children and this form, within the scope of the research subjects, are given in order to make the validity and reliability studies. In order to test the validity of the scale developed, Satisfaction with Life was used. This scale was developed by Diener et al. (1985 and adapted into Turkish by Yetim (1993. RESULTS:Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysises and certain reliability analyses were used in the study. As a result of the analysis, four Likert-type five items scale were obtained. The findings revealed one -dimensional scale, 46.35% of whose variance was explained. Cronbach’s coefficient alpha provided evidence for the internal consistency of the exploratory the Scale. The reliability of the scale was 0.70 and indicated that the 5 item scale had good internal consistency for the sample. CONCLUSION: The scale that resulted was given the title “Scale for Primary School Children’ Time Orientation during Classroom Disengagement”. This instrument may be used in various studies in the future, thus contributing to the development of the field. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(3.000: 331-338

  12. Multi-step resistive switching behavior of Li-doped ZnO resistance random access memory device controlled by compliance current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Cheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Mathematic and Physical Sciences, R.O.C. Air Force Academy, Kaohsiung 820, Taiwan (China); Tang, Jian-Fu; Su, Hsiu-Hsien [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hong, Cheng-Shong; Huang, Chih-Yu [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Kaohsiung 802, Taiwan (China); Chu, Sheng-Yuan, E-mail: chusy@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2016-06-28

    The multi-step resistive switching (RS) behavior of a unipolar Pt/Li{sub 0.06}Zn{sub 0.94}O/Pt resistive random access memory (RRAM) device is investigated. It is found that the RRAM device exhibits normal, 2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors under different compliance currents. The transport mechanism within the device is investigated by means of current-voltage curves, in-situ transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is shown that the ion transport mechanism is dominated by Ohmic behavior under low electric fields and the Poole-Frenkel emission effect (normal RS behavior) or Li{sup +} ion diffusion (2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors) under high electric fields.

  13. Multi-step resistive switching behavior of Li-doped ZnO resistance random access memory device controlled by compliance current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chun-Cheng; Tang, Jian-Fu; Su, Hsiu-Hsien; Hong, Cheng-Shong; Huang, Chih-Yu; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The multi-step resistive switching (RS) behavior of a unipolar Pt/Li 0.06 Zn 0.94 O/Pt resistive random access memory (RRAM) device is investigated. It is found that the RRAM device exhibits normal, 2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors under different compliance currents. The transport mechanism within the device is investigated by means of current-voltage curves, in-situ transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is shown that the ion transport mechanism is dominated by Ohmic behavior under low electric fields and the Poole-Frenkel emission effect (normal RS behavior) or Li + ion diffusion (2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors) under high electric fields.

  14. Agent Architectures for Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgemeestre, Brigitte; Hulstijn, Joris; Tan, Yao-Hua

    A Normative Multi-Agent System consists of autonomous agents who must comply with social norms. Different kinds of norms make different assumptions about the cognitive architecture of the agents. For example, a principle-based norm assumes that agents can reflect upon the consequences of their actions; a rule-based formulation only assumes that agents can avoid violations. In this paper we present several cognitive agent architectures for self-monitoring and compliance. We show how different assumptions about the cognitive architecture lead to different information needs when assessing compliance. The approach is validated with a case study of horizontal monitoring, an approach to corporate tax auditing recently introduced by the Dutch Customs and Tax Authority.

  15. Managing quality and compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Alice; Koppel, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Critical care nurses assume vital roles in maintaining patient care quality. There are distinct facets to the process including standard setting, regulatory compliance, and completion of reports associated with these endeavors. Typically, multiple niche software applications are required and user interfaces are varied and complex. Although there are distinct quality indicators that must be tracked as well as a list of serious or sentinel events that must be documented and reported, nurses may not know the precise steps to ensure that information is properly documented and actually reaches the proper authorities for further investigation and follow-up actions. Technology advances have permitted the evolution of a singular software platform, capable of monitoring quality indicators and managing all facets of reporting associated with regulatory compliance.

  16. Compliance demonstration: What can be reasonably expected from safety assessment for geological repositories?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuidema, P.; Smith, P.; Sumerling, T.

    1999-01-01

    When licensing a nuclear facility, it is important to demonstrate that it will comply with regulatory limits (e.g. individual dose limits) and also show that sufficient attention has been paid to optimisation of facility design and operation, such that any associated radiological impacts will be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). In general, in demonstrating compliance, experience can be drawn from the performance of existing and similar facilities, and monitoring plans can be specified that will confirm that actual radiological discharges during operations are within authorised limits for the facility. This is also true in respect of the operational period of a geological repository. For the post-closure phase of a repository, however, it is also necessary to show that possible releases will remain acceptably low even at long times in the future when, it is assumed, control of the facility has lapsed and there is no method of either monitoring releases or taking remedial action in the case of unexpected events or releases. In addition, within each country, a deep geological repository will be a first-of-a-kind development so that compliance arguments can be expected to be rigorously tested without any assistance from the precedent of licensing of similar facilities nationally. This puts heavy, and quite unusual, burdens on the long-term safety assessment for a geological repository to develop a case that is sufficiently strong to demonstrate compliance. This paper focuses on the problem of demonstrating compliance with long-term safety requirements for a geological repository, and explores: the overall aims and special difficulties of demonstrating compliance for a geological repository; the role of safety assessment in demonstrating compliance; the scope for optimisation of a geological repository and importance of robustness and lessons learnt from the application of safety assessment. In addition, some issues requiring further discussion and clarification

  17. Randomised controlled trial of local corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenier Klaas H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and leads to wrist pain and to impaired function of the wrist and hand. It can be treated by splinting, local corticosteroid injection and operation. In this study effectiveness of local corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis provided by general practitioners was assessed. Methods Participants with de Quervain's tenosynovitis were recruited by general practitioners. Short-term outcomes (one week after injections were assessed in a randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Long-term effectiveness was evaluated in an open prospective cohort-study of steroid responders during a follow-up period of 12 months. Participants were randomised to one or two local injections of 1 ml of triamcinolonacetonide (TCA or 1 ml of NaCl 0.9% (placebo. Non-responders to NaCl were treated with additional TCA injections. Main outcomes were immediate treatment response, severity of pain, improvement as perceived by participant and functional disability using sub items hand and finger function of the Dutch Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (Dutch AIMS-2-HFF. Results 11 general practitioners included 21 wrists in 21 patients. The TCA-group had better results for short-term outcomes treatment response (78% vs. 25%; p = 0.015, perceived improvement (78% vs. 33%; p = 0.047 and severity of pain (4.27 vs. 1.33; p = 0.031 but not for the Dutch-AIMS-HFF (2.71 vs. 1.92; p = 0.112. Absolute risk reduction for the main outcome short-term treatment response was 0.55 (95% CI: 0.34, 0.76 with a number needed to treat of 2 (95% CI: 1, 3. In the cohort of steroid responders (n = 12 the beneficial effects of steroid injections were sustained during the follow-up of 12 months regarding severity of pain (p = 0.67 and scores of Dutch AIMS-2-HFF (p = 0.36, but not for patient perceived improvement (p = 0.02. No adverse events were observed during the 12

  18. Executive functioning and general cognitive ability in pregnant women and matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyper, Serge V; Searleman, Alan; Thacher, Pamela V; Maine, Emily E; Johnson, Alicia G

    2010-11-01

    The current study compared the performances of pregnant women with education- and age-matched controls on a variety of measures that assessed perceptual speed, short-term and working memory capacity, subjective memory complaints, sleep quality, level of fatigue, executive functioning, episodic and prospective memory, and crystallized and fluid intelligence. A primary purpose was to test the hypothesis of Henry and Rendell (2007) that pregnancy-related declines in cognitive functioning would be especially evident in tasks that place a high demand on executive processes. We also investigated a parallel hypothesis: that the pregnant women would experience a broad-based reduction in cognitive capability. Very limited support was found for the executive functioning hypothesis. Pregnant women scored lower only on the measure of verbal fluency (Controlled Oral Word Association Test, COWAT) but not on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task or on any working memory measures. Furthermore, group differences in COWAT performance disappeared after controlling for verbal IQ (Shipley vocabulary). In addition, there was no support for the general decline hypothesis. We conclude that pregnancy-associated differences in performance observed in the current study were relatively mild and rarely reached either clinical or practical significance.

  19. 40 CFR 63.10420 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance with the management practice requirements? 63.10420 Section 63.10420 Protection of Environment... continuous compliance with the management practice requirements? For each sterilization unit not equipped with an air pollution control device, you must demonstrate continuous compliance with the management...

  20. Os impactos da implementação de controles internos, auditoria e compliance no combate e prevenção à lavagem de dinheiro no Brasil - doi: 10.4025/enfoque.v31i3.15616

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyse N. Chaves de Amorim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse estudo é verificar quais os impactos da implementação de controles internos, auditoria e compliance na prevenção e combate à lavagem de dinheiro no Brasil. Trata-se de uma pesquisa bibliográfica e documental, descritiva e exploratória com análise quantitativa quanto aos procedimentos efetuados e qualitativa com relação à análise dos resultados. Acredita-se que mais de U$ 1 trilhão são lavados por organizações criminosas por ano, e as instituições financeiras são apontadas como alvo desse crime. Desde então, a partir da Lei n. 9.613/98 diversos normativos foram emitidos pelos órgãos reguladores dos setores alvo, com vistas a implementar mecanismos de controles. Por estudar o ciclo anterior a prisão dos criminosos que praticam a lavagem de dinheiro, relacionou-se a evolução no número de investigados e condenados, após a implementação das práticas de controles internos, auditoria e compliance exigidas. Constatou-se que o COAF produziu desde a sua criação cerca de 6,8 mil Relatórios de Inteligência Financeira, com  mais de 112,2 mil comunicações vinculadas e cerca de 51,2 mil pessoas relacionadas. Ainda, como resultado da efetiva atuação do COAF realizada após as comunicações dos setores alvo, cita-se R$ 1,2 bilhões de valores bloqueados pela Justiça, a partir das informações de inteligência financeira, em 2009 e o aumento nas condenações que em alguns anos chegou a 503%. Dessa forma, verifica-se que tais números apontam os impactos da implementação de controles internos, auditoria e compliance pelos setores alvo.

  1. Women's evaluation of abuse and violence care in general practice: a cluster randomised controlled trial (weave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feder Gene

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner abuse (IPA is a major public health problem with serious implications for the physical and psychosocial wellbeing of women, particularly women of child-bearing age. It is a common, hidden problem in general practice and has been under-researched in this setting. Opportunities for early intervention and support in primary care need to be investigated given the frequency of contact women have with general practice. Despite the high prevalence and health consequences of abuse, there is insufficient evidence for screening in primary care settings. Furthermore, there is little rigorous evidence to guide general practitioners (GPs in responding to women identified as experiencing partner abuse. This paper describes the design of a trial of a general practice-based intervention consisting of screening for fear of partner with feedback to GPs, training for GPs, brief counselling for women and minimal practice organisational change. It examines the effect on women's quality of life, mental health and safety behaviours. Methods/Design weave is a cluster randomised controlled trial involving 40 general practices in Victoria, Australia. Approximately 500 women (16-50 years seen by the GP in the previous year are mailed a short lifestyle survey containing an item to screen for IPA. Women who indicate that they were afraid of a partner/ex-partner in the last year and provide contact details are invited to participate. Once baseline data are collected, GPs are randomly assigned to either a group involving healthy relationship and responding to IPA training plus inviting women for up to 6 sessions of counselling or to a group involving basic education and usual care for women. Outcomes will be evaluated by postal survey at 6 and 12 months following delivery of the intervention. There will be an economic evaluation, and process evaluation involving interviews with women and GPs, to inform understanding about implementation

  2. Collaborative care for depression in general practice: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinck-Claussen, Ursula Ødum; Curth, Nadja Kehler; Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Mikkelsen, John Hagel; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Lundsteen, Merete; Csillag, Claudio; Christensen, Kaj Sparle; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Nordentoft, Merete; Eplov, Lene Falgaard

    2017-07-21

    Depression is a common illness with great human costs and a significant burden on the public economy. Previous studies have indicated that collaborative care (CC) has a positive effect on symptoms when provided to people with depression, but CC has not yet been applied in a Danish context. We therefore developed a model for CC (the Collabri model) to treat people with depression in general practice in Denmark. Since systematic identification of patients is an "active ingredient" in CC and some literature suggests case finding as the best alternative to standard detection, the two detection methods are examined as part of the study. The aim is to investigate if treatment according to the Collabri model has an effect on depression symptoms when provided to people with depression in general practice in Denmark, and to examine if case finding is a better method to detect depression in general practice than standard detection. The trial is a cluster-randomised, clinical superiority trial investigating the effect of treatment according to the Collabri model for CC, compared to treatment as usual for 480 participants diagnosed with depression in general practice in the Capital Region of Denmark. The primary outcome is depression symptoms (Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II)) after 6 months. Secondary outcomes include depression symptoms (BDI-II) after 15 months, anxiety symptoms (Beck's Anxiety Inventory (BAI)), level of functioning (Global Assessment of Function (GAF)) and psychological stress (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R)). In addition, case finding (with the recommended screening tool Major Depression Inventory (MDI)) and standard detection of depression is examined in a cluster-randomized controlled design. Here, the primary outcome is the positive predictive value of referral diagnosis. If the Collabri model is shown to be superior to treatment as usual, the study will contribute with important knowledge on how to improve treatment of depression in

  3. Internal Controls and Compliance with Laws and Regulations for the FY 2000 Financial Statements for Other Defense Organizations-General Funds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    We performed the audit in response to the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990, as amended by the Federal Financial Management Act of 1994, which requires DoD and other Government agencies to prepare...

  4. PELAKSANAAN SHARIA COMPLIANCE PADA BANK SYARIAH (STUDI KASUS PADA BANK SYARIAH MANDIRI, JAKARTA)

    OpenAIRE

    Ade Sofyan Mulazid

    2016-01-01

    The Implementation of Sharia Compliance at Islamic Bank (Case Study on Mandiri Syariah Bank, Jakarta). This study is aimed at finding out the controlling system and the implementation of supervision of compliance of Bank Indonesia (BI) and Sharia Supervisory Board toward the Mandiri Syariah Bank; how is the implementation and its internal audit, what are the roles and responsibilities of the director of compliance for all stakeholders of compliance unit of Bank Syariah Mandiri. Th...

  5. Optimal Stochastic Control Problem for General Linear Dynamical Systems in Neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers a d-dimensional stochastic optimization problem in neuroscience. Suppose the arm’s movement trajectory is modeled by high-order linear stochastic differential dynamic system in d-dimensional space, the optimal trajectory, velocity, and variance are explicitly obtained by using stochastic control method, which allows us to analytically establish exact relationships between various quantities. Moreover, the optimal trajectory is almost a straight line for a reaching movement; the optimal velocity bell-shaped and the optimal variance are consistent with the experimental Fitts law; that is, the longer the time of a reaching movement, the higher the accuracy of arriving at the target position, and the results can be directly applied to designing a reaching movement performed by a robotic arm in a more general environment.

  6. An Improved Generalized Predictive Control in a Robust Dynamic Partial Least Square Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Xin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To tackle the sensitivity to outliers in system identification, a new robust dynamic partial least squares (PLS model based on an outliers detection method is proposed in this paper. An improved radial basis function network (RBFN is adopted to construct the predictive model from inputs and outputs dataset, and a hidden Markov model (HMM is applied to detect the outliers. After outliers are removed away, a more robust dynamic PLS model is obtained. In addition, an improved generalized predictive control (GPC with the tuning weights under dynamic PLS framework is proposed to deal with the interaction which is caused by the model mismatch. The results of two simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed method.

  7. Reporting quality of randomized controlled trial abstracts: survey of leading general dental journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Fang; Deng, Lijia; Kau, Chung How; Jiang, Han; He, Hong; Walsh, Tanya

    2015-09-01

    The authors conducted a study to assess the reporting quality of randomized controlled trial (RCT) abstracts published in leading general dental journals, investigate any improvement after the release of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) for Abstracts guidelines, and identify factors associated with better reporting quality. The authors searched PubMed for RCTs published in 10 leading general dental journals during the periods from 2005 to 2007 (pre-CONSORT period) and 2010 to 2012 (post-CONSORT period). The authors evaluated and scored the reporting quality of included abstracts by using the original 16-item CONSORT for Abstracts checklist. The authors used risk ratios and the t test to compare the adequate reporting rate of each item and the overall quality in the 2 periods. The authors used univariate and multivariate regressions to identify predictors of better reporting quality. The authors included and evaluated 276 RCT abstracts. Investigators reported significantly more checklist items during the post-CONSORT period (mean [standard deviation {SD}], 4.53 [1.69]) than during the pre-CONSORT period (mean [SD], 3.87 [1.10]; mean difference, -0.66 [95% confidence interval, -0.99 to -0.33]; P 80%). In contrast, the authors saw sufficient reporting of randomization, recruitment, outcome in the results section, and funding in none of the pre-CONSORT abstracts and less than 2% of the post-CONSORT abstracts. On the basis of the multivariate analysis, a higher impact factor (P general dental journals has improved significantly, but there is still room for improvement. Joint efforts by authors, reviewers, journal editors, and other stakeholders to improve the reporting of dental RCT abstracts are needed. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A general algorithm for flexible active power control of photovoltaic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tafti, H. Dehghani; Sangwongwanich, A.; Yang, Y.

    2018-01-01

    The maximum power point tracking (MPPT) is generally implemented in grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) power plants to maximize the energy yield. However, as the penetration level increases, challenging issues such as overloading and over-voltage arise in PV applications. Accordingly, a constant po...... dynamics and low-power oscillations can be obtained. The performance of the proposed strategy is evaluated through simulations and experiments under different irradiance and power reference profiles.......The maximum power point tracking (MPPT) is generally implemented in grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) power plants to maximize the energy yield. However, as the penetration level increases, challenging issues such as overloading and over-voltage arise in PV applications. Accordingly, a constant...... power generation (CPG) operation, in which the PV output power is limited to a specific value, has been imposed by some grid regulators to alleviate the integration challenges. In that case, the combined operation of MPPT and CPG is required, which increases the complexity of the controller design...

  9. Straight and chopped DC performance data for a General Electric 5BY436A1 DC shunt motor with a General Electric EV-1 controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edie, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    Both straight and chopped dc motor performance data for a General Electric 5BY436A1 motor with a General Electric EV-1 controller is presented in tabular and graphical formats. Effects of motor temperature and operating voltage are also shown. The maximum motor efficiency is approximately 85% at low operating temperatures in the straight dc mode. Chopper efficiency can be assumed to be 95% under all operating conditions. For equal speeds, the motor operated in the chopped mode develops slightly more torque and draws more current than it does in the straight mode.

  10. Intensive versus conventional blood pressure monitoring in a general practice population. The Blood Pressure Reduction in Danish General Practice trial: a randomized controlled parallel group trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Pia; Bang, Lia E; Schultz-Larsen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    To compare the effect of a conventional to an intensive blood pressure monitoring regimen on blood pressure in hypertensive patients in the general practice setting. Randomized controlled parallel group trial with 12-month follow-up. One hundred and ten general practices in all regions of Denmark....... One thousand forty-eight patients with essential hypertension. Conventional blood pressure monitoring ('usual group') continued usual ad hoc blood pressure monitoring by office blood pressure measurements, while intensive blood pressure monitoring ('intensive group') supplemented this with frequent...... a reduction of blood pressure. Clinical Trials NCT00244660....

  11. Compliance with building energy regulations for new-build dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Wei; Garmston, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasingly stringent building energy regulations worldwide, non-compliance exists in practice. This paper examines the profile of compliance with building energy regulations for new-build dwellings. In total 404 new-build dwellings completed in the UK from 2006 to 2009 were investigated. Only a third of these dwellings were evidenced as being compliant with Building Regulations Part L (England and Wales). Such low compliance casts a serious concern over the achievability of the UK Government's target for all new-build homes to be ‘zero carbon’ from 2016. Clearly evidenced was a lack of knowledge of Part L and its compliance requirements among the supply and building control sides of new-build dwellings. The results also indicate that the compliance profile was influenced by factors including Standard Assessment Procedure (UK Government's methodology for energy efficiency) calculation submissions, learning and experience of builders and building controls with Part L, use of Part L1A checklist, the introduction of energy performance certificate (EPC), build method, dwelling type, and project size. Better compliance was associated with flats over houses and timber frame over masonry. The use of EPC and Part L1A checklist should be encouraged. Key to addressing the lack of compliance with building energy regulations is training. -- Highlights: ► There exists a lack of compliance, worldwide, with building energy regulations. ► The implementation of England and Wales building energy regulations is problematic. ► Training, learning and experience of builders and building control are critical. ► Energy performance certificate and Part L 2006 checklist helped achieve compliance. ► Flats achieved better compliance over houses; and timber frame over masonry.

  12. 49 CFR 244.21 - Compliance and Enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS ON SAFETY INTEGRATION PLANS GOVERNING RAILROAD CONSOLIDATIONS, MERGERS, AND ACQUISITIONS OF CONTROL Safety Integration Plans § 244.21 Compliance and Enforcement. (a...

  13. Compliance to medication among hypertensive patients in Murtala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %). Patients ... A major factor accounting for inadequate ... counting the remaining pills or pill counting systems). ... Information obtained included socio- .... medication compliance on the control of hypertension. ... Archives of Internal Medicine.

  14. Control costs, enhance quality, and increase revenue in three top general public hospitals in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lue-Ping; Yu, Guo-Pei; Liu, Hui; Ma, Xie-Min; Wang, Jing; Kong, Gui-Lan; Li, Yi; Ma, Wen; Cui, Yong; Xu, Beibei; Yu, Na; Bao, Xiao-Yuan; Guo, Yu; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yan; Xie, Xue-Qin; Jiang, Bao-Guo; Ke, Yang

    2013-01-01

    With market-oriented economic and health-care reform, public hospitals in China have received unprecedented pressures from governmental regulations, public opinions, and financial demands. To adapt the changing environment and keep pace of modernizing healthcare delivery system, public hospitals in China are expanding clinical services and improving delivery efficiency, while controlling costs. Recent experiences are valuable lessons for guiding future healthcare reform. Here we carefully study three teaching hospitals, to exemplify their experiences during this period. We performed a systematic analysis on hospitalization costs, health-care quality and delivery efficiencies from 2006 to 2010 in three teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The analysis measured temporal changes of inpatient cost per stay (CPS), cost per day (CPD), inpatient mortality rate (IMR), and length of stay (LOS), using a generalized additive model. There were 651,559 hospitalizations during the period analyzed. Averaged CPS was stable over time, while averaged CPD steadily increased by 41.7% (Phospitalizations with higher costs, along with an overall stable CPS, reduced IMR, and shorter LOS, appear to be the major characteristics of these three hospitals at present. These three teaching hospitals have gained some success in controlling costs, improving cares, adopting modern medical technologies, and increasing hospital revenues. Effective hospital governance and physicians' professional capacity plus government regulations and supervisions may have played a role. However, purely market-oriented health-care reform could also misguide future healthcare reform.

  15. Pilot Quality Control Program for Brachytherapy of Low Dose Rate at the General Hospital of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez R., J. T.; Tovar M., V.; Salinas, B.; Hernández O., O.; Santillán B., L.; Molero M., C.; Montoya M., J.

    2004-09-01

    We describe the pilot quality control program for brachytherapy of low dose rate proposed to be used in the Radiotherapy Department at the General Hospital of Mexico. The program consists of three parts: a) development of calibration procedures, performed in terms of air-kerma strength for calibration of 137Cs and 192Ir brachytherapy sources, and for the calibration of well-type ionization chambers for 137Cs, b) performance of localisation and reconstruction techniques for radioactive sources with a Baltas' phantom. The results obtained for the media deviation , are in the optimum level, ± 0.5 mm hospital. It consists on the characterisation of a TLD-100 powder dosimetry system at SSDL: The calibration curves for powder response (nC or nC/ mg) vs Dw and the control charts for the Harshaw 3500 reader were obtained. The statistical validation of the calibration curve by normality of the residuals and the lack of fit tests were realised. In the other hand, TLD's were irradiated in the hospital to a nominal Dw = 2 Gy with sources of 137Cs. The percent deviations Δ%, between the Dw imparted by the Hospital and the determined by SSDL, are 1.2% Δ⩽ 6.5 % which are consistent with the expanded uncertainty U% for DW, 5.6 U% 10%.

  16. Pilot Quality Control Program for Brachytherapy of Low Dose Rate at the General Hospital of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Tovar M, V.; Salinas, B.; Hernandez O, O.; Santillan B, L.; Molero M, C.; Montoya M, J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the pilot quality control program for brachytherapy of low dose rate proposed to be used in the Radiotherapy Department at the General Hospital of Mexico. The program consists of three parts: a) development of calibration procedures, performed in terms of air-kerma strength for calibration of 137Cs and 192Ir brachytherapy sources, and for the calibration of well-type ionization chambers for 137Cs, b) performance of localisation and reconstruction techniques for radioactive sources with a Baltas' phantom. The results obtained for the media deviation , are in the optimum level, ± 0.5 mm < ± 1.0 mm; the confidence limit Δ, is in the emergency level, Δ=3.2 mm. c) verification of absorbed dose to water DW, given by the hospital. It consists on the characterisation of a TLD-100 powder dosimetry system at SSDL: The calibration curves for powder response (nC or nC/ mg) vs Dw and the control charts for the Harshaw 3500 reader were obtained. The statistical validation of the calibration curve by normality of the residuals and the lack of fit tests were realised. In the other hand, TLD's were irradiated in the hospital to a nominal Dw = 2 Gy with sources of 137Cs. The percent deviations Δ%, between the Dw imparted by the Hospital and the determined by SSDL, are 1.2% Δ≤ 6.5 % which are consistent with the expanded uncertainty U% for DW, 5.6 U% 10%

  17. Aircraft control surface failure detection and isolation using the OSGLR test. [orthogonal series generalized likelihood ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnice, W. F.; Motyka, P.; Wagner, E.; Hall, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of the orthogonal series generalized likelihood ratio (OSGLR) test in detecting and isolating commercial aircraft control surface and actuator failures is evaluated. A modification to incorporate age-weighting which significantly reduces the sensitivity of the algorithm to modeling errors is presented. The steady-state implementation of the algorithm based on a single linear model valid for a cruise flight condition is tested using a nonlinear aircraft simulation. A number of off-nominal no-failure flight conditions including maneuvers, nonzero flap deflections, different turbulence levels and steady winds were tested. Based on the no-failure decision functions produced by off-nominal flight conditions, the failure detection and isolation performance at the nominal flight condition was determined. The extension of the algorithm to a wider flight envelope by scheduling on dynamic pressure and flap deflection is examined. Based on this testing, the OSGLR algorithm should be capable of detecting control surface failures that would affect the safe operation of a commercial aircraft. Isolation may be difficult if there are several surfaces which produce similar effects on the aircraft. Extending the algorithm over the entire operating envelope of a commercial aircraft appears feasible.

  18. General MACOS Interface for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The General MACOS Interface (GMI) for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems (MACOS) enables the use of MATLAB as a front-end for JPL s critical optical modeling package, MACOS. MACOS is JPL s in-house optical modeling software, which has proven to be a superb tool for advanced systems engineering of optical systems. GMI, coupled with MACOS, allows for seamless interfacing with modeling tools from other disciplines to make possible integration of dynamics, structures, and thermal models with the addition of control systems for deformable optics and other actuated optics. This software package is designed as a tool for analysts to quickly and easily use MACOS without needing to be an expert at programming MACOS. The strength of MACOS is its ability to interface with various modeling/development platforms, allowing evaluation of system performance with thermal, mechanical, and optical modeling parameter variations. GMI provides an improved means for accessing selected key MACOS functionalities. The main objective of GMI is to marry the vast mathematical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB with the powerful optical analysis engine of MACOS, thereby providing a useful tool to anyone who can program in MATLAB. GMI also improves modeling efficiency by eliminating the need to write an interface function for each task/project, reducing error sources, speeding up user/modeling tasks, and making MACOS well suited for fast prototyping.

  19. Normal compliance contact models with finite interpenetration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eck, Ch.; Jarušek, Jiří; Stará, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 208, č. 1 (2013), s. 25-57 ISSN 0003-9527 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802; GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/12/0671 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compliance models * approximation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.022, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00205-012-0602-8#

  20. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain: a randomized, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Koes, B.W.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Mameren, H. van; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Scholten, R.J.P.M.; Bouter, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  1. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain. A randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Jan Lucas; Koes, Bart W.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; van der Windt, Danielle A. W. M.; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; van Mameren, Henk; Devillé, Walter L. J. M.; Pool, Jan J. M.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  2. Fusidic acid cream in the treatment of impetigo in general practice: double blind randomised placebo controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Koning (Sander); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); J.L. Nouwen (Jan); C.M. Verduin (Cees); R.M.D. Bernsen (Roos); A.P. Oranje (Arnold); S. Thomas (Siep); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that fusidic acid would not increase the treatment effect of disinfecting with povidone-iodine alone in children with impetigo. DESIGN: Randomised placebo controlled trial. SETTING: General practices in Greater Rotterdam.

  3. Evaluation of implementation, compliance and acceptance of partial smoking bans among hospitality workers before and after the Swiss Tobacco Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Sarah; Hoffmann, Susanne; Röösli, Martin; Bauer, Georg F

    2015-03-01

    The World Health Organization recommends uniform comprehensive smoking bans in public places. In Switzerland, regulations differ between various areas and are mostly incomplete for hospitality venues. As ambiguous regulations offer more leeway for implementation, we evaluated the Swiss regulations with respect to their effects on implementation, acceptance and compliance among hospitality workers. In our longitudinal study, a standardized, self-administered questionnaire was mailed to a sample of 185 hospitality workers before and 4-6 month after the smoking ban came into effect. The matched longitudinal sample comprised 71 participants (repeated response rate 38.4%). We developed a seven-item acceptance scale. Logistic regressions were performed to explore the factors associated with acceptance. Acceptance of smoking bans was influenced by smoking status and perceived annoyance with second-hand smoke in private. Although not statistically significant (P = 0.09), we found some indications that post-ban acceptance increased in an area with strict regulations, whereas it decreased in two areas with less stringent regulations. Tobacco bans in Swiss hospitality venues are still in a period of consolidation. The incomplete nature of the law may also have had a negative impact on the development of greater acceptance. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Bilingual Language Control and General Purpose Cognitive Control among Individuals with Bilingual Aphasia: Evidence Based on Negative Priming and Flanker Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Tanya; Kar, Bhoomika R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Bilingualism results in an added advantage with respect to cognitive control. The interaction between bilingual language control and general purpose cognitive control systems can also be understood by studying executive control among individuals with bilingual aphasia. Objectives. The current study examined the subcomponents of cognitive control in bilingual aphasia. A case study approach was used to investigate whether cognitive control and language control are two separate systems and how factors related to bilingualism interact with control processes. Methods. Four individuals with bilingual aphasia performed a language background questionnaire, picture description task, and two experimental tasks (nonlinguistic negative priming task and linguistic and nonlinguistic versions of flanker task). Results. A descriptive approach was used to analyse the data using reaction time and accuracy measures. The cumulative distribution function plots were used to visualize the variations in performance across conditions. The results highlight the distinction between general purpose cognitive control and bilingual language control mechanisms. Conclusion. All participants showed predominant use of the reactive control mechanism to compensate for the limited resources system. Independent yet interactive systems for bilingual language control and general purpose cognitive control were postulated based on the experimental data derived from individuals with bilingual aphasia. PMID:24982591

  5. Bilingual language control and general purpose cognitive control among individuals with bilingual aphasia: evidence based on negative priming and flanker tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Tanya; Kar, Bhoomika R

    2014-01-01

    Bilingualism results in an added advantage with respect to cognitive control. The interaction between bilingual language control and general purpose cognitive control systems can also be understood by studying executive control among individuals with bilingual aphasia. objectives: The current study examined the subcomponents of cognitive control in bilingual aphasia. A case study approach was used to investigate whether cognitive control and language control are two separate systems and how factors related to bilingualism interact with control processes. Four individuals with bilingual aphasia performed a language background questionnaire, picture description task, and two experimental tasks (nonlinguistic negative priming task and linguistic and nonlinguistic versions of flanker task). A descriptive approach was used to analyse the data using reaction time and accuracy measures. The cumulative distribution function plots were used to visualize the variations in performance across conditions. The results highlight the distinction between general purpose cognitive control and bilingual language control mechanisms. All participants showed predominant use of the reactive control mechanism to compensate for the limited resources system. Independent yet interactive systems for bilingual language control and general purpose cognitive control were postulated based on the experimental data derived from individuals with bilingual aphasia.

  6. Extrinsic incentives and tax compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Sour, Laura; Gutiérrez Andrade, Miguel Ángel

    2011-01-01

    This paper models the impact of extrinsic incentives in a tax compliance model. It also provides experimental evidence that confirms the existence of a positive relationship between rewards and tax compliance. If individuals are audited, rewards for honest taxpayers are effective in increasing the level of tax compliance. These results are particularly relevant in countries where there is little respect for tax law since rewards can contribute to crowding in the intrinsic motivation to comply.

  7. Managing compliance risk after Mifid

    OpenAIRE

    P. Musile Tanzi; G. Gabbi; D. Previati; P. Schwizer

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on changes in the compliance function within major European banks and other financial intermediaries and on the effects of Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (MiFID) implementation. Design/methodology/approach – The four areas of research seek to answer the following questions: Is the positioning of the compliance function “at the top” of the organizational structure? Are the roles attributed to the compliance function, th...

  8. Internet treatment for generalized anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial comparing clinician vs. technician assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Emma; Titov, Nickolai; Andrews, Gavin; McIntyre, Karen; Schwencke, Genevieve; Solley, Karen

    2010-06-03

    Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has been shown to be effective when guided by a clinician. The present study sought to replicate this finding, and determine whether support from a technician is as effective as guidance from a clinician. Randomized controlled non-inferiority trial comparing three groups: Clinician-assisted vs. technician-assisted vs. delayed treatment. Community-based volunteers applied to the VirtualClinic (www.virtualclinic.org.au) research program and 150 participants with GAD were randomized. Participants in the clinician- and technician-assisted groups received access to an iCBT program for GAD comprising six online lessons, weekly homework assignments, and weekly supportive contact over a treatment period of 10 weeks. Participants in the clinician-assisted group also received access to a moderated online discussion forum. The main outcome measures were the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 Item (GAD-7). Completion rates were high, and both treatment groups reduced scores on the PSWQ (ptechnician-assisted groups, respectively, and on the GAD-7 were 1.55 and 1.73, respectively. At 3 month follow-up participants in both treatment groups had sustained the gains made at post-treatment. Participants in the clinician-assisted group had made further gains on the PSWQ. Approximately 81 minutes of clinician time and 75 minutes of technician time were required per participant during the 10 week treatment program. Both clinician- and technician-assisted treatment resulted in large effect sizes and clinically significant improvements comparable to those associated with face-to-face treatment, while a delayed treatment/control group did not improve. These results provide support for large scale trials to determine the clinical effectiveness and acceptability of technician-assisted iCBT programs for GAD. This form of treatment has potential to increase the

  9. Laboratory analysis of phacoemulsifier compliance and capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejad, Mitra; Injev, Valentine P; Miller, Kevin M

    2012-11-01

    To compare the compliance and capacity of 7 fluidics modules used by 6 phacoemulsifiers from 3 manufacturers. Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California, USA. Experimental study. Previous-model and current-model phacoemulsifiers from 3 manufacturers were subjected to laboratory analysis of compliance and capacity. Previous-generation models tested included the Legacy Advantec, Whitestar Sovereign Phacoemulsification System, and Millennium Microsurgical System. Current models tested were the Infiniti Vision System with standard and Intrepid cassettes, Whitestar Signature Phacoemulsification System, and Stellaris Vision Enhancement System. To measure compliance, the aspiration line was connected to an electronic pressure transducer and small volumes of fluid were injected or aspirated. To measure capacity, the space between the distal end of the aspiration line and the pump was filled with methylene blue-dyed fluid. The Legacy was the most compliant phacoemulsifier. The old and new Whitestar systems, Millennium system, and Stellaris system showed similar midrange compliances. The Infiniti Vision System with the Intrepid fluidic management system was the least compliant. The Infiniti cassettes had the greatest capacity, which is a detriment from a surge-control perspective, and Signature cassettes had the least capacity. The Infiniti Intrepid system had the lowest compliance of the 6 units tested, which is optimum from a surge-control perspective. All other things being equal, the Infiniti should have the safest occlusion-break surge response. Mr. Injev is an employee of Alcon Laboratories. Dr. Miller is a consultant to and investigator for Alcon Laboratories. Ms. Nejad has no financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quality beyond compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centanni, N; Monroe, M; White, L; Larson, R

    1999-01-01

    The service sector within the biopharmaceutical industry has experienced phenomenal growth over the past decade. In the highly regulated Good Laboratory Practices environment, the need for timely, high-quality service, accurate results, and on-time deliverables becomes paramount for the success and profitability of biopharmaceutical companies. The quality assurance process is a vital component of this drug product-development cycle and ensures compliance to the highest domestic and international regulatory standards. Quality-assurance professionals historically have held the role of independent auditors of the processes, who certify that results meet current standards of practice. Covance, a contract research organization that includes Good Laboratory Practices laboratories, reorganized and expanded the functional responsibilities of its quality assurance team in 1997. Auditors and quality assurance professionals have assumed roles beyond traditional compliance auditing and are forging new leadership and mentoring roles as process-improvement specialists. The results have been tangible, measurable benefits for clients and the Covance organization. This article provides an overview of this cultural change and the processes put in place to improve efficiency, productivity, and customer and employee satisfaction.

  11. Proactive compliance report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) stipulates requirements to protect public safety, minimize environmental impacts, improve conservation, and ensure equity by promoting orderly and responsible energy development. Surveillance activities by the EUB, such as inspections and audits, ensures compliance with these requirements. This report presents statistical results of the enforcement ladder process (inspections, complaints, activities, major initiatives, and enforcement) for 2004 across ten EUB groups, including, Field Surveillance, Resources Applications Group, Operations Group, Environment Group, Utilities Branch, Facilities Applications Group, Corporate Compliance Group, Fort McMurray, Information and Dissemination Group, and Financial Management Group. When a noncompliance is identified, the EUB uses a process that has an established policy for EUB enforcement actions. Enforcement actions are determined by the severity of the noncompliance event and are escalated for subsequent noncompliance or failure to comply with the EUB's corrective order. Within the process, the EUB provides a grace period after an initial enforcement action. During this period, the EUB will take appropriate enforcement actions for subsequent noncompliances but will not escalate enforcement consequences. Enforcement consequences are escalated after the grace period has expired. 72 tabs

  12. Control costs, enhance quality, and increase revenue in three top general public hospitals in Beijing, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lue-Ping Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With market-oriented economic and health-care reform, public hospitals in China have received unprecedented pressures from governmental regulations, public opinions, and financial demands. To adapt the changing environment and keep pace of modernizing healthcare delivery system, public hospitals in China are expanding clinical services and improving delivery efficiency, while controlling costs. Recent experiences are valuable lessons for guiding future healthcare reform. Here we carefully study three teaching hospitals, to exemplify their experiences during this period. METHODS: We performed a systematic analysis on hospitalization costs, health-care quality and delivery efficiencies from 2006 to 2010 in three teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The analysis measured temporal changes of inpatient cost per stay (CPS, cost per day (CPD, inpatient mortality rate (IMR, and length of stay (LOS, using a generalized additive model. FINDINGS: There were 651,559 hospitalizations during the period analyzed. Averaged CPS was stable over time, while averaged CPD steadily increased by 41.7% (P<0.001, from CNY 1,531 in 2006 to CNY 2,169 in 2010. The increasing CPD seemed synchronous with the steady rising of the national annual income per capita. Surgical cost was the main contributor to the temporal change of CPD, while medicine and examination costs tended to be stable over time. From 2006 and 2010, IMR decreased by 36%, while LOS reduced by 25%. Increasing hospitalizations with higher costs, along with an overall stable CPS, reduced IMR, and shorter LOS, appear to be the major characteristics of these three hospitals at present. INTERPRETATIONS: These three teaching hospitals have gained some success in controlling costs, improving cares, adopting modern medical technologies, and increasing hospital revenues. Effective hospital governance and physicians' professional capacity plus government regulations and supervisions may have played a role

  13. Formalizing and appling compliance patterns for business process compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgammal, A.; Turetken, O.; van den Heuvel, W.; Papazoglou, M.

    2016-01-01

    Today’s enterprises demand a high degree of compliance of business processes to meet diverse regulations and legislations. Several industrial studies have shown that compliance management is a daunting task, and organizations are still struggling and spending billions of dollars annually to ensure

  14. Formalizing and applying compliance patterns for business process compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgammal, A.F.S.A.; Türetken, O.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.M.; Papazoglou, M.

    Today’s enterprises demand a high degree of compliance of business processes to meet diverse regulations and legislations. Several industrial studies have shown that compliance management is a daunting task, and organizations are still struggling and spending billions of dollars annually to ensure

  15. General anaesthesia does not improve outcome in opioid antagonist detoxification treatment: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.J. de; Laheij, R.J.F.; Krabbe, P.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    Aim  Opioid detoxification by administering opioid-antagonists under general anaesthesia has caused considerable controversy. This study is conducted to determine whether rapid detoxification under general anaesthesia results in higher levels of opioid abstinence than rapid detoxification without

  16. General anaesthesia does not improve outcome in opioid antagonist detoxification treatment : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Cor A J; Laheij, Robert J F; Krabbe, Paul F M

    AIM: Opioid detoxification by administering opioid-antagonists under general anaesthesia has caused considerable controversy. This study is conducted to determine whether rapid detoxification under general anaesthesia results in higher levels of opioid abstinence than rapid detoxification without

  17. General anaesthesia does not improve outcome in opioid antagonist detoxification treatment: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.J. de; Laheij, R.J.F.; Krabbe, P.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Opioid detoxification by administering opioid-antagonists under general anaesthesia has caused considerable controversy. This study is conducted to determine whether rapid detoxification under general anaesthesia results in higher levels of opioid abstinence than rapid detoxification without

  18. Vigilancia y Control en el Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud (SGSSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Carrasquilla

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available

    En nombre de la Academia Nacional de Medicina quiero agradecer la invitación a participar en este importante foro de discusión sobre un aspecto especialmente relevante del Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud. La Academia se ha caracterizado, en especial en los últimos años, por haber tenido una posición crítica pero constructiva frente al desarrollo del Sistema, pero también se ha destacado por su capacidad de convocatoria y ha abierto sus puertas para que se discuta de manera abierta, se genere la controversia y se planteen soluciones a los principales problemas del SGSSS.

    Por todo ello, la Academia mira con optimismo y espera con certeza que los resultados de este foro redunden en beneficio de la salud de los colombianos que es, en última instancia, el verdadero objetivo de un Sistema de Salud con un adecuado componente de vigilancia y control (V y C. Quizá uno de los aspectos mas relevantes que señala la Academia de Medicina en la concepción de la vigilancia y control del SGSSS es la de que se ha orientado a hacerlo desde la perspectiva de la salud como un concepto de mercado, vigilando que se cumplan sus leyes como lo hacen en las transacciones de mercado y la misma academia ya se ha manifestado, con suficiente claridad y universalmente, que la salud no cumple, no puede cumplir con esos principios. Por ello creemos que, desde sus comienzos, el componente de vigilancia y control se ha orientado erróneamente porque ha olvidado el objetivo verdadero de un Sistema de Salud que es, precisamente, la salud de la población

    La Medicina como Profesión y como Ciencia:

    Consistentemente la Academia de Medicina ha manifestado su preocupación porque en el actual SGSSS se ha perdido la concepción de la medicina como profesión y como ciencia. La salud de la población depende, en buena parte, de la idoneidad del profesional y de su capacidad para prevenir, para curar y para rehabilitar. No

  19. A Comparison of Item Selection Techniques and Exposure Control Mechanisms in CATs Using the Generalized Partial Credit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Dena A.; Dodd, Barbara G.; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2002-01-01

    Studied the impact of using five different exposure control algorithms in two sizes of item pool calibrated using the generalized partial credit model. Simulation results show that the a-stratified design, in comparison to a no-exposure control condition, could be used to reduce item exposure and overlap and increase pool use, while degrading…

  20. Self-Control, Social Factors, and Delinquency: A Test of the General Theory of Crime among Adolescents in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nicole W. T.; Cheung, Yuet W.

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the predictive power of self-control theory for delinquency in a Chinese context, and to explore if social factors as predicted in social bonding theory, differential association theory, general strain theory, and labeling theory have effects on delinquency in the presence of self-control. Self-report data…

  1. Repeated Strains, Social Control, Social Learning, and Delinquency: Testing an Integrated Model of General Strain Theory in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Wan-Ning; Haas, Ain; Chen, Xiaojin; Pi, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    In Agnew's general strain theory, repeated strains can generate crime and delinquency by reducing social control and fostering social learning of crime. Using a sample of 615 middle-and high-school students in China, this study examines how social control and social learning variables mediate the effect of repeated strains in school and at home on…

  2. [Effects of the renal blood flow at different levels by transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation combined general anesthesia induced controlled hypotension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Le-Le; Shao, Xiao-Mei

    2012-11-01

    To observe the intervention of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) on the renal blood flow at different levels of mean arterial pressure (MAP) in controlled hypotension. Forty-two male beagle dogs were randomly divided into seven groups, i. e., the general anesthesia group, the 50% controlled group, the 40% controlled group, the 30% controlled group, the 50% experimental group, the 40% experimental group, and the 30% experimental group, 6 in each group. Beagles in the general anesthesia group were not treated with controlled hypotension, and the target MAP was achieved in those of the rest groups and maintained for 60 min. In the experimental groups, TEAS was applied to bilateral Hegu (LI4), Zusanli (ST36), Sanyinjiao (SP6), and Quchi (LI11) at 2/100 Hz with the stimulation strength of (4 +/- 1) mA starting from the stability of their physiological conditions to 60 min of maintaining the target MAP level. The changes of the renal blood flow were monitored at different time points using laser Doppler. From starting pressure control to the target MAP level, the renal blood flow was significantly lower in the 30% controlled group than in the general anesthesia group and the basic level of the same group (P blood pressure, the renal blood flow was significantly lower in the 50% controlled group, the 40% controlled group, the 30% controlled group, and the 30% experimental group than in the general anesthesia group (P blood pressure recovery, the renal blood flow restored to the basic level in the 50% controlled group, the 50% experimental group, and the 40% experimental group (P > 0.05), while it was not restored to the basic level in the 40% controlled group, the 30% controlled group, and the 30% experimental group (P renal blood flow, thus protecting the kidney.

  3. Generalized algorithm for control of numerical dispersion in explicit time-domain electromagnetic simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M. Cowan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a modification to the finite-difference time-domain algorithm for electromagnetics on a Cartesian grid which eliminates numerical dispersion error in vacuum for waves propagating along a grid axis. We provide details of the algorithm, which generalizes previous work by allowing 3D operation with a wide choice of aspect ratio, and give conditions to eliminate dispersive errors along one or more of the coordinate axes. We discuss the algorithm in the context of laser-plasma acceleration simulation, showing significant reduction—up to a factor of 280, at a plasma density of 10^{23}  m^{-3}—of the dispersion error of a linear laser pulse in a plasma channel. We then compare the new algorithm with the standard electromagnetic update for laser-plasma accelerator stage simulations, demonstrating that by controlling numerical dispersion, the new algorithm allows more accurate simulation than is otherwise obtained. We also show that the algorithm can be used to overcome the critical but difficult challenge of consistent initialization of a relativistic particle beam and its fields in an accelerator simulation.

  4. Internal Controls and Compliance With Laws and Regulations for the Defense Finance and Accounting Service Working Capital Fund Financial Statements for FY 1998

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    The Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990, as amended by the Government Management Reform Act of 1994, requires financial statement audits by the Inspectors General and prescribes the responsibilities...

  5. Improving general flexibility with a mind-body approach: a randomized, controlled trial using neuro emotional Technique®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Anne M; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Hall, Michael W

    2012-08-01

    General flexibility is a key component of health, well-being, and general physical conditioning. Reduced flexibility has both physical and mental/emotional etiologies and can lead to musculoskeletal injuries and athletic underperformance. Few studies have tested the effectiveness of a mind-body therapy on general flexibility. The aim of this study was to investigate if Neuro Emotional Technique® (NET), a mind-body technique shown to be effective in reducing stress, can also improve general flexibility. The sit-and-reach test (SR) score was used as a measure of general flexibility. Forty-five healthy participants were recruited from the general population and assessed for their initial SR score before being randomly allocated to receive (a) two 20-minute sessions of NET (experimental group); (b) two 20-minute sessions of stretching instruction (active control group); or (c) no intervention or instruction (passive control group). After intervention, the participants were reassessed in a similar manner by the same blind assessor. The participants also answered questions about demographics, usual water and caffeine consumption, and activity level, and they completed an anxiety/mood psychometric preintervention and postintervention. The mean (SD) change in the SR score was +3.1 cm (2.5) in the NET group, +1.2 cm (2.3) in the active control group and +1.0 cm (2.6) in the passive control group. Although all the 3 groups showed some improvement, the improvement in the NET group was statistically significant when compared with that of either the passive controls (p = 0.015) or the active controls (p = 0.021). This study suggests that NET could provide an effective treatment in improving general flexibility. A larger study is required to confirm these findings and also to assess longer term effectiveness of this therapy on general flexibility.

  6. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and dyspepsia in general practice – a prospective, controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Skok

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of dyspeptic patients is a diagnostic and therapeutic problem frequently encountered by general and family practitioners, by internists and gastroenterologists.Aims: In our study we attempted to assess the prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms in patients over 60 who are regular users of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.Patients and methods: This is a prospective cohort study based on an interview during examination in the OPC, the results obtained by the diagnostic procedures and follow-up. It was carried out between 1999 and 2003 at a family practitioner’s and a gastroenterologic OPC. In patients who were regular users of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, we established the prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms, the most often used drugs and the type of diagnostic procedure applied to define the cause of dyspepsia. The control group was composed of patients over 60 who were also exhibiting dyspeptic symptoms but not using any NSAID.Results: The study comprised 50 patients, 27 women and 23 men, the mean age was 67.3 years, the range 60–80 years. The control group comprised 50 patients, 28 women and 22 men, the mean age was 66.6 years, the range 61–80 years. All patients of the study group had used NSAR or preparations of acetylsalicylic acid during the past 3 months. There were no statistically significant differences between the patients of both groups as regards the number and use of other drugs, p = 0.65. The average score of dyspeptic complaints in our study group was 3.02, SD ± 0.6, and 70% of patients wished to use H2 antagonists or proton pump inhibitors for these complaints. In patients of the control group, the average score of complaints was 2.72, SD ± 0.7, and they also took drugs for the alleviation of their complaints more rarely.Conclusions: Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs belong among the important causes of dyspepsia in the elderly. When making decisions about the various diagnostic procedures for

  7. The effect of a dietary supplement (N-oleyl-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and epigallocatechin gallate on dietary compliance and body fat loss in adults who are overweight: A double-blind, randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangine Gerald T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A dietary supplement containing a blend of 170 mg of N-oleyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (NOPE and 100 mg of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG has been shown to improve compliance to low caloric diets. Considering the cost of dietary ingredients, many manufacturers attempt to determine the lowest efficacious dose. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of 8-weeks of supplementation with a daily intake of 120 mg of NOPE and 105 mg of EGCG in conjunction with a low caloric diet and regular, moderate exercise on dietary compliance in healthy, overweight adults. An additional purpose was to examine the effect of this supplement/diet/exercise paradigm on changes in body composition, sensation of appetite, mood and severity of binge eating. Methods Fifty healthy, overweight (BMI > 25 m·kg2 men (15 and women (35 (SUP; n = 25; 32.7 ± 13.75 y; BMI = 33.4 ± 6.2; PLA; n = 25, 34.3 ± 12.7 years; BMI = 33.2 ± 6.8 were recruited for a double-blind, placebo controlled study. Each volunteer was randomly assigned to either the supplement (SUP; n = 25 or placebo group (PLA; n = 25. Based upon a self-reported 3-day dietary recall all volunteers were recommended a 500 kcal or 30% (maximum of 1000 kcal reduction in caloric intake. Volunteers were also encouraged to exercise 30 minutes per day, three times per week. Results Subjects in SUP were significantly more compliant (x2 = 3.86, p = 0.049 in maintaining a low caloric diet at week 4, but this was not able to be maintained through the 8-week study. In addition, a significant difference in mood, feelings of fatigue and confusion were noted between the groups at week 4, but again not maintained by week 8 where only feelings of tension were improved. No differences between groups (p > 0.05 were observed for body mass, body composition, feelings of hunger, and binge eating after eight weeks. Conclusion

  8. Radiation practices and regulatory control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The general principles to be observed in the regulatory control of ionizing radiation use and practices are specified in the guide. It also takes into account of additions and alterations needed for for compliance with the European Union (EU) directives that have not been mentioned in other STUK/ST-guides. (6 refs.)

  9. Radiation practices and regulatory control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The general principles to be observed in the regulatory control of ionizing radiation use and practices are specified in the guide. It also takes into account of additions and alterations needed for for compliance with the European Union (EU) directives that have not been mentioned in other STUK/ST-guides. (6 refs.).

  10. Explicit Generalized Predictive Control of Speed and Position of PMSM Drives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Belda, Květoslav; Vošmik, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 6 (2016), s. 3889-3896 ISSN 0278-0046 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : current limitation * field weakening * motion control * permanent magnet synchronous motors * position control * predictive control * speed control Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 7.168, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/AS/belda-0457259.pdf

  11. Environmental compliance considerations for the management of cultural resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, S.A.; Whitfield, S.; McGinnis, K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines three key considerations underlying the programmatic management of cultural resources that may be affected by a large federal project. These considerations are statutory background and the compliance process, cultural resource compliance tasks, and quality assurance. The first consideration addresses the legal requirements and steps that must be met and taken for federal agencies to fulfill their cultural resource compliance responsibilities. The second consideration focuses on the tasks that must be performed by technical specialists to facilitate related federal and state compliance actions. The third consideration ensures that compliance requirements are being properly fulfilled. In the technical literature and compliance planning, archaeological and historic sites and Native American cultural resources are grouped under the general heading of cultural resources. Also included under this heading are the traditions and resources of Folk societies. Cultural resources encompass both material and nonmaterial aspects of our cultural heritage and include buildings, structures, objects, sites, districts, archaeological resources, places of religious importance, and unique, distinctive, or unusual lifeways. For compliance purposes, it is useful to treat these resources within four roughly chronological culture-historical periods: prehistoric, ethnohistoric, historic, and contemporary. 6 refs., 6 tabs

  12. The impact of an electronic monitoring and reminder device on patient compliance with antihypertensive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Arne; Christrup, Lona Louring; Fabricius, Paul Erik

    2010-01-01

    . In the first half of the study, patients using the device reported 91% compliance versus 85% in the control group. This difference diminished after crossover (88 versus 86%). BP was not affected. Electronic monitoring data on compliance revealed taking, dosing and timing compliance between 45 and 52% in study...... to be effective in improving patient compliance to some extent, but the combined effect has not been documented. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of an electronic reminder and monitoring device on patient compliance and BP control. METHODS: All patients received medical treatment with telmisartan once daily...... and were randomized to either electronic compliance monitoring with a reminder and monitoring device or standard therapy for 6 months. Both groups were crossed over after 6 months. Intervention effectiveness was assessed using self-reported compliance and BP. RESULTS: Data from 398 patients were analysed...

  13. Attitudes, norms and controls influencing lifestyle risk factor management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampt, Amanda J; Amoroso, Cheryl; Harris, Mark F; McKenzie, Suzanne H; Rose, Vanessa K; Taggart, Jane R

    2009-08-26

    services to patients. General practitioner attitudes, normative influences from both patients and the profession, and perceived external control factors (time, cost, availability and practice capacity) all influence management of behavioural risk factors. Provider education, community awareness raising, support and capacity building may improve the uptake of lifestyle modification interventions.

  14. Attitudes, norms and controls influencing lifestyle risk factor management in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenzie Suzanne H

    2009-08-01

    patient's motivation, and cost and accessibility of services to patients. Conclusion General practitioner attitudes, normative influences from both patients and the profession, and perceived external control factors (time, cost, availability and practice capacity all influence management of behavioural risk factors. Provider education, community awareness raising, support and capacity building may improve the uptake of lifestyle modification interventions.

  15. Environmental compliance assessment review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliday, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    During the period 1972-1991, The United States Congress passed stringent environmental statues which the Environment Protection Agency implemented via regulations. The statues and regulations contain severe civil and criminal penalties. Civil violations resulted in fines, typically payable by the company. The act of willfully and knowingly violating the permit conditions or regulations can result in criminal charges being imposed upon the responsible part, i.e., either the company or individual. Criminal charges can include fines, lawyer fees, court costs and incarceration. This paper describes steps necessary to form an effective Environmental Compliance Assessment Review [CAR] program, train field and engineering personnel and perform a CAR audit. Additionally, the paper discusses the findings of a number of Exploration and Production [E and P] field audits

  16. 28 CFR 55.2 - Purpose; standards for measuring compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the satisfaction of the Attorney General or to the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia...; standards for measuring compliance. (a) The purpose of this part is to set forth the Attorney General's... to conduct elections in the language of certain “language minority groups” in addition to English. (b...

  17. Iowa Commercial Pesticide Applicator Manual, Category 7A: General and Household Pest Control. CS-19. Category 7B: Termite Control, CS-20. Category 7C: Food Industry Pest Control, CS-21. Category 7D: Community Insect Control, CS-22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Harold J., Ed.; And Others

    This manual provides information needed to meet specific standards for certification as a pesticide applicator. The first section discusses general and household pest control and is concerned with parasitic pests and man, stored product pests, and irritating vertebrates. Section two is devoted to identifying and controlling structural pests such…

  18. Analysis of time to event outcomes in randomized controlled trials by generalized additive models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Argyropoulos

    Full Text Available Randomized Controlled Trials almost invariably utilize the hazard ratio calculated with a Cox proportional hazard model as a treatment efficacy measure. Despite the widespread adoption of HRs, these provide a limited understanding of the treatment effect and may even provide a biased estimate when the assumption of proportional hazards in the Cox model is not verified by the trial data. Additional treatment effect measures on the survival probability or the time scale may be used to supplement HRs but a framework for the simultaneous generation of these measures is lacking.By splitting follow-up time at the nodes of a Gauss Lobatto numerical quadrature rule, techniques for Poisson Generalized Additive Models (PGAM can be adopted for flexible hazard modeling. Straightforward simulation post-estimation transforms PGAM estimates for the log hazard into estimates of the survival function. These in turn were used to calculate relative and absolute risks or even differences in restricted mean survival time between treatment arms. We illustrate our approach with extensive simulations and in two trials: IPASS (in which the proportionality of hazards was violated and HEMO a long duration study conducted under evolving standards of care on a heterogeneous patient population.PGAM can generate estimates of the survival function and the hazard ratio that are essentially identical to those obtained by Kaplan Meier curve analysis and the Cox model. PGAMs can simultaneously provide multiple measures of treatment efficacy after a single data pass. Furthermore, supported unadjusted (overall treatment effect but also subgroup and adjusted analyses, while incorporating multiple time scales and accounting for non-proportional hazards in survival data.By augmenting the HR conventionally reported, PGAMs have the potential to support the inferential goals of multiple stakeholders involved in the evaluation and appraisal of clinical trial results under proportional and

  19. Compliance uncertainty of diameter characteristic in the next-generation geometrical product specifications and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W L; Jiang, X; Liu, X J; Xu, Z G

    2008-01-01

    Compliance uncertainty is one of the most important elements in the next-generation geometrical product specifications and verification (GPS). It consists of specification uncertainty, method uncertainty and implementation uncertainty, which are three of the four fundamental uncertainties in the next-generation GPS. This paper analyzes the key factors that influence compliance uncertainty and then proposes a procedure to manage the compliance uncertainty. A general model on evaluation of compliance uncertainty has been devised and a specific formula for diameter characteristic has been derived based on this general model. The case study was conducted and it revealed that the completeness of currently dominant diameter characteristic specification needs to be improved

  20. Generalized Momentum Control of the Spin-Stabilized Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benegalrao, Suyog; Queen, Steven; Shah, Neerav; Blackman, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Angular momentum control maneuvers required to keep spin-axis in science box. Traditional approach uses de-coupled modes for pointing, spin, nutation Impractical for MMS Frequency and Number of maneuvers (Orbit Control, Pointing, Nutation, Spin, four observatories, every 2-4 weeks). Difficult to implement de-coupled open-loop control with flexible wire booms. Desire a unified angular momentum controller. Comprehensively control pointing, spin, and nutation.

  1. Compliance with Environmental Regulations through Complex Geo-Event Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Federico Herrera; Laura González; Daniel Calegari; Bruno Rienzi

    2017-01-01

    In a context of e-government, there are usually regulatory compliance requirements that support systems must monitor, control and enforce. These requirements may come from environmental laws and regulations that aim to protect the natural environment and mitigate the effects of pollution on human health and ecosystems. Monitoring compliance with these requirements involves processing a large volume of data from different sources, which is a major challenge. This volume is also increased with ...

  2. Balancing compliance and cost when implementing a Quality Assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, S.Y.

    1997-12-01

    When implementing a Quality Assurance (QA) program, compliance and cost must be balanced. A QA program must be developed that hits the mark in terms of adequate control and documentation, but does not unnecessarily expand resources. As the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has moved towards certification, Sandia National Laboratories has learned much about balancing compliance and costs. Some of these lessons are summarized here

  3. Mirtazapine in generalized social anxiety disorder: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutters, Sara I. J.; van Megen, Harold J. G. M.; van Veen, Jantien Frederieke; Denys, Damiaan A. J. P.; Westenberg, Herman G. M.

    2010-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the efficacy and tolerability of mirtazapine in a generalized social anxiety disorder. Sixty patients with generalized social anxiety disorder were randomly allocated to receive mirtazapine (30-45 mg/day) (n = 30) or placebo (n = 30) for 12 weeks in a

  4. Effectiveness of oncogenetics training on general practitioners' consultation skills: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, E.J.; Muijtjens, A.M.M.; Teeffelen, S.R. van; Henneman, L.; Rethans, J.J.; Jagt, L.E. van der; Luijk, S.J. van; Dinant, G.J.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Cornel, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: General practitioners are increasingly called upon to deliver genetic services and could play a key role in translating potentially life-saving advancements in oncogenetic technologies to patient care. If general practitioners are to make an effective contribution in this area, their

  5. Effectiveness of oncogenetics training on general practitioners' consultation skills: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, E.J.F.; Muijtjens, A.M.M.; van Teeffelen, S.R.; Henneman, L.; Rethans, J.J.; van der Jagt, L.E.J.; van Luijk, S.J.; Dinant, G.J.; van der Vleuten, C.; Cornel, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:General practitioners are increasingly called upon to deliver genetic services and could play a key role in translating potentially life-saving advancements in oncogenetic technologies to patient care. If general practitioners are to make an effective contribution in this area, their

  6. Internal Controls and Compliance With Laws and Regulations for the Defense Finance and Accounting Service Working Capital Fund Financial Statements for FY 1998

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    .... The Director, Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS), who is the fund manager of the DFAS Working Capital Fund, is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal controls and for complying with applicable laws and regulations...

  7. An educational intervention to improve hand hygiene compliance in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Hang Thi; Tran, Hang Thi Thuy; Tran, Hanh Thi My; Dinh, Anh Pham Phuong; Ngo, Ha Thanh; Theorell-Haglow, Jenny; Gordon, Christopher J

    2018-03-07

    Hand hygiene compliance is the basis of infection control programs. In developing countries models to improve hand hygiene compliance to reduce healthcare acquired infections are required. The aim of this study was to determine hand hygiene compliance following an educational program in an obstetric and gynecological hospital in Vietnam. Health care workers from neonatal intensive care, delivery suite and a surgical ward from Hung Vuong Hospital, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam undertook a 4-h educational program targeting hand hygiene. Compliance was monitored monthly for six months following the intervention. Hand hygiene knowledge was assessed at baseline and after six months of the study. There were 7124 opportunities over 370 hand hygiene recording sessions with 1531 opportunities at baseline and 1620 at 6 months following the intervention. Hand hygiene compliance increased significantly from baseline across all sites (43.6% [95% Confidence interval CI: 41.1-46.1] to 63% [95% CI: 60.6-65.3]; p hygiene compliance increased significantly after intervention (p hygiene compliance for an extended period of time. Hand hygiene knowledge increased during the intervention. This hand hygiene model could be used in developing countries were resources are limited.

  8. General general game AI

    OpenAIRE

    Togelius, Julian; Yannakakis, Georgios N.; 2016 IEEE Conference on Computational Intelligence and Games (CIG)

    2016-01-01

    Arguably the grand goal of artificial intelligence research is to produce machines with general intelligence: the capacity to solve multiple problems, not just one. Artificial intelligence (AI) has investigated the general intelligence capacity of machines within the domain of games more than any other domain given the ideal properties of games for that purpose: controlled yet interesting and computationally hard problems. This line of research, however, has so far focuse...

  9. Compliance with public dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, G.C.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation, in various forms, is ubiquitous in the environment. Natural background radiation leads to an average radiation exposure for the general population of about 2 mSv per year. The mining and milling of radioactive ores - uranium and mineral sands - may cause a small increase in radiation exposure for some members of the public. Because any such increment in exposure is small compared with a natural exposure that is variable and difficult to quantify accurately, it is not easy to determine what proportion of the total dose received by a member of the public can be attributed to mining and milling activities. Consequently, because public dose limits apply and to those doses caused by human activity, such as mining and milling, the task of demonstrating compliance can be hampered by uncertainty. Some strategies for handling this situation are discussed. While the discussion concentrates on public dose limits, much of it may also be applicable, or adaptable, to occupational exposure. 4 refs., 2 figs

  10. Implementing telephone triage in general practice: a process evaluation of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Jamie; Varley, Anna; Fletcher, Emily; Britten, Nicky; Price, Linnie; Calitri, Raff; Green, Colin; Lattimer, Valerie; Richards, Suzanne H; Richards, David A; Salisbury, Chris; Taylor, Rod S; Campbell, John L

    2015-04-10

    Telephone triage represents one strategy to manage demand for face-to-face GP appointments in primary care. However, limited evidence exists of the challenges GP practices face in implementing telephone triage. We conducted a qualitative process evaluation alongside a UK-based cluster randomised trial (ESTEEM) which compared the impact of GP-led and nurse-led telephone triage with usual care on primary care workload, cost, patient experience, and safety for patients requesting a same-day GP consultation. The aim of the process study was to provide insights into the observed effects of the ESTEEM trial from the perspectives of staff and patients, and to specify the circumstances under which triage is likely to be successfully implemented. Here we report perspectives of staff. The intervention comprised implementation of either GP-led or nurse-led telephone triage for a period of 2-3 months. A qualitative evaluation was conducted using staff interviews recruited from eight general practices (4 GP triage, 4 Nurse triage) in the UK, implementing triage as part of the ESTEEM trial. Qualitative interviews were undertaken with 44 staff members in GP triage and nurse triage practices (16 GPs, 8 nurses, 7 practice managers, 13 administrative staff). Staff reported diverse experiences and perceptions regarding the implementation of telephone triage, its effects on workload, and on the benefits of triage. Such diversity were explained by the different ways triage was organised, the staffing models used to support triage, how the introduction of triage was communicated across practice staff, and by how staff roles were reconfigured as a result of implementing triage. The findings from the process evaluation offer insight into the range of ways GP practices participating in ESTEEM implemented telephone triage, and the circumstances under which telephone triage can be successfully implemented beyond the context of a clinical trial. Staff experiences and perceptions of telephone

  11. The Australian general public's perceptions of having a personally controlled electronic health record (PCEHR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lynda; Gajanayake, Randike; Sahama, Tony

    2014-12-01

    The move internationally by Governments and other health providers to encourage patients to have their own electronic personal health record (e-PHRs) is growing exponentially. In Australia the initiative for a personally controlled electronic health record (known as PCEHR) is directed towards the public at large. The first objective of this study then, is to examine how individuals in the general population perceive the promoted idea of having a PCEHR. The second objective is to extend research on applying a theoretically derived consumer technology acceptance model to guide the research. An online survey was conducted to capture the perceptions and beliefs about having a PCEHR identified from technology acceptance models and extant literature. The survey was completed by 750 Queensland respondents, 97% of whom did not have a PCEHR at that time. The model was examined using exploratory factor analysis, regressions and mediation tests. Findings support eight of the 11 hypothesised relationships in the model. Perceived value and perceived risk were the two most important variables explaining attitude, with perceived usefulness and compatibility being weak but significant. The perception of risk was reduced through partial mediation from trust and privacy concerns. Additionally, web-self efficacy and ease of use partially mediate the relationship between attitude and intentions. The findings represent a snapshot of the early stages of implementing this Australian initiative and capture the perceptions of Queenslanders who at present do not have a PCEHR. Findings show that while individuals appreciate the value of having this record, they do not appear to regard it as particularly useful at present, nor is it particularly compatible with their current engagement with e-services. Moreover, they will need to have any concerns about the risks alleviated, particularly through an increased sense of trust and reduction of privacy concerns. It is noted that although the

  12. 40 CFR 60.39e - Compliance times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Hospital/Medical... site preparation for installation of the air pollution control device(s); (7) Date for initiation of installation of the air pollution control device(s); (8) Date for initial startup of the air pollution control...

  13. General administrative regulation relating to the Integrated Monitoring and Information System (IMIS) and its application in compliance with the Preventive Radiation Protection Act (StrlSchVG), (AVV-IMIS). As of 27 September 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This general administrative regulation applies to the measuring, communication, compilation, processing, and documentation of data recorded within the IMIS system for the purpose of environmental radioactivity monitoring. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Randomised controlled trial of a general practice programme of home based exercise to prevent falls in elderly women.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, A. J.; Robertson, M. C.; Gardner, M. M.; Norton, R. N.; Tilyard, M. W.; Buchner, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of a home exercise programme of strength and balance retraining exercises in reducing falls and injuries in elderly women. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial of an individually tailored programme of physical therapy in the home (exercise group, n = 116) compared with the usual care and an equal number of social visits (control group, n = 117). SETTING: 17 general practices in Dunedin, New Zealand. SUBJECTS: Women aged 80 years and older living in the co...

  15. Do alcohol compliance checks decrease underage sales at neighboring establishments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Darin J; Smolenski, Derek J; Toomey, Traci L; Carlin, Bradley P; Wagenaar, Alexander C

    2013-11-01

    Underage alcohol compliance checks conducted by law enforcement agencies can reduce the likelihood of illegal alcohol sales at checked alcohol establishments, and theory suggests that an alcohol establishment that is checked may warn nearby establishments that compliance checks are being conducted in the area. In this study, we examined whether the effects of compliance checks diffuse to neighboring establishments. We used data from the Complying with the Minimum Drinking Age trial, which included more than 2,000 compliance checks conducted at more than 900 alcohol establishments. The primary outcome was the sale of alcohol to a pseudo-underage buyer without the need for age identification. A multilevel logistic regression was used to model the effect of a compliance check at each establishment as well as the effect of compliance checks at neighboring establishments within 500 m (stratified into four equal-radius concentric rings), after buyer, license, establishment, and community-level variables were controlled for. We observed a decrease in the likelihood of establishments selling alcohol to underage youth after they had been checked by law enforcement, but these effects quickly decayed over time. Establishments that had a close neighbor (within 125 m) checked in the past 90 days were also less likely to sell alcohol to young-appearing buyers. The spatial effect of compliance checks on other establishments decayed rapidly with increasing distance. Results confirm the hypothesis that the effects of police compliance checks do spill over to neighboring establishments. These findings have implications for the development of an optimal schedule of police compliance checks.

  16. High compliance randomized controlled field trial of solar disinfection of drinking water and its impact on childhood diarrhea in rural Cambodia

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McGuigan, KG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available of a 1 year randomized controlled trial investigating the effect of SODIS of drinking water on the incidence of dysentery and nondysentery diarrhea among children of age 6 months to 5 years living in rural communities in Cambodia. They compared 426...

  17. Oil Mist Compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, Lloyd

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes activities at the KCP related to evaluating and modifying machine tools in order to be in compliance with Section 23 of DOE 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program. Section 851.23 (a) states that 'Contractors must comply with the following safety and health standards that are applicable to the hazards in their covered workplace', and subsection 9 contains the following applicable standard: 'American Congress of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), 'Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices,' (2005) (incorporated by reference, see (section)851.27) when the ACGIH Threshold Limit Values are lower (more protective) than permissible exposure limits in 29 CFR 1910'. In the 2005 ACGIH Threshold Limit Value book a Notice of Change was issued for exposure to mineral oil mist used in metalworking fluids (MWFs). The effects of planning for the new facility and which machine tools would be making the transition to the new facility affected which machine tools were modified

  18. Oil Mist Compliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, Lloyd

    2009-02-02

    This report summarizes activities at the KCP related to evaluating and modifying machine tools in order to be in compliance with Section 23 of DOE 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program. Section 851.23 (a) states that “Contractors must comply with the following safety and health standards that are applicable to the hazards in their covered workplace”, and subsection 9 contains the following applicable standard: “American Congress of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), ‘Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices,’ (2005) (incorporated by reference, see §851.27) when the ACGIH Threshold Limit Values are lower (more protective) than permissible exposure limits in 29 CFR 1910.” In the 2005 ACGIH – Threshold Limit Value book a Notice of Change was issued for exposure to mineral oil mist used in metalworking fluids (MWFs). The effects of planning for the new facility and which machine tools would be making the transition to the new facility affected which machine tools were modified.

  19. Environmental Compliance Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownson, L.W.; Krsul, T.; Peralta, R.A.; Knudson, D.A.; Rosignolo, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing the Environmental Compliance Management System (ECMS) as a comprehensive, cost-effective tool to ensure (1) that the Laboratory complies with all applicable federal and state environmental laws and regulations, (2) that environmental issues and concerns are recognized and considered in the early phases of projects; and (3) that Laboratory personnel conduct Laboratory operations in the most environmentally acceptable manner. The ECMS is an expert computer system which is designed to allow project engineers to perform an environmental evaluation of their projects. The system includes a Master Program which collects basic project information, provide utility functions, and access the environmental expert modules, environmental expert system modules for each federal and state environmental law which allows the user to obtain specific information on how an individual law may affect his project; and site-specific databases which contain information necessary for effective management of the site under environmental regulations. The ECMS will have the capability to complete and print many of the necessary environmental forms required by federal and state agencies, including the Department of Energy

  20. [Theoretical and practical assessment of Lille general practice and pharmacy students' knowledge about use of inhaler devices for asthma control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veylon, P; Rochoy, M; Gautier, S; Wallaert, B; Berkhout, C

    2018-04-01

    Asthma is a potentially serious chronic respiratory disease impacting patients quality of life. Satisfactory control requires proper use of inhaled devices. This study assesses general medical residents and pharmacy students knowledge about proper use of inhaled asthma devices. We evaluated knowledge of 43 general practice students and 43 pharmacy students in Lille for three inhaler devices (metered-dose inhaler, Turbuhaler ® and Diskus ® ) during individual interviews. Students were assessed on 8 proper use criterias for each device. General practice and pharmacy students are unfamiliar with proper use of inhaler devices. However, pharmacy students get better average scores than general practice students for all devices included in this study: 6.3/8 respected criterias against 5/8 for metered-dose inhaler; 5.3/8 against 3.2/8 for Turbuhaler ® ; and 6/8 against 4.3/8 for Diskus ® . Pharmacy students more frequently perform a demonstration of proper use to patients when a device is first prescribed or when a prescription is renewed; general practice students more frequently ask patients themselves to perform a demonstration of proper use. Introducing trainings workshops for inhaler devices to pharmacy and general practice students appears appropriate in order to promote therapeutic patient education, to increase asthma control and better patients life quality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Cost effectiveness of physiotherapy, manual therapy, and general practitioner care for neck pain: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthals-de Bos, Ingeborg B. C.; Hoving, Jan L.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P. M. H.; Adèr, Herman J.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Koes, Bart W.; Vondeling, Hindrik; Bouter, Lex M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost effectiveness of physiotherapy, manual therapy, and care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain. DESIGN: Economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Primary care. PARTICIPANTS: 183 patients with neck pain for at least two weeks

  2. A preliminary evaluation of the generalized likelihood ratio for detecting and identifying control element failures in a transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundick, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the Generalized Likelihood Ratio technique to the detection and identification of aircraft control element failures has been evaluated in a linear digital simulation of the longitudinal dynamics of a B-737 aircraft. Simulation results show that the technique has potential but that the effects of wind turbulence and Kalman filter model errors are problems which must be overcome.

  3. Effects of health education for migrant females with psychosomatic complaints treated by general practitioners. A randomised controlled evaluation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocken, P.L.; Zwanenburg, E.J.-v.; Hoop, T.de

    2008-01-01

    Objective: : The effectiveness of use of migrant health educators in the general practitioners' care for female migrants with psychosomatic problems was evaluated to contribute to the improvement of the care for these patients. Methods: : A randomised controlled trial (RCT) design was used. A total

  4. Impact of the Flipped Classroom on Student Performance and Retention: A Parallel Controlled Study in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michael D.; Reid, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite much recent interest in the flipped classroom, quantitative studies are slowly emerging, particularly in the sciences. We report a year-long parallel controlled study of the flipped classroom in a second-term general chemistry course. The flipped course was piloted in the off-semester course in Fall 2014, and the availability of the…

  5. General concepts of the NG-3 goniometer design and coupled electronic control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizarov, O.I.; Zhukov, G.P.; Ondrejchka, K.; Salamatin, I.M.; Khrykin, A.S.; Erzhabek, Ya.; Shimane, Ch.; Shul'ts, V.

    1984-01-01

    The system of adjustment and control by goniometer used in spectrometer for investigating neutron diffractography is briefly described. The two-stage system of angle adjustment is accepted by which the goniometer circle position is determined by the 15-bit word. It the first stage the angle is adjusted by pitches, the accuracy of which is ensured by amplying more gearing (8 bits). At the second stage the angle is adjusted in the limits of a pitch by the system of micrometer screw up to hundredth fraction of the pitch (7 bits). From the viewpoint of control the goniometer can be considered as a totality of circle rotation control systems. Each system has its own address and storage for specifying the ordinal number of a pitch and location of the microscuew. The block-diagram of the control system, the block-diagram of the goniometer coupling with controlling microprocessor and those of control program are presented

  6. A New Approach to HVDC Grid Voltage Control Based on Generalized State Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beerten, Jef; Eriksson, Robert; Van Hertem, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    in the system hamper a straight-forward definition of the power sharing. The use of a common DC voltage signal for the control can solve some of the problems. However, it disregards some of the benefits that are associated with the use of a local voltage control, such as the tendency of a controller using local...... by combining the local voltage signal available at the converter terminals with remote voltage signals at different locations in the DC system by means of communication. The local voltage feedback control is used for a fast, reliable system response. The introduction of the remote voltage signals...... in the control allows to differentiate the system response for different converter outages. Simulation results show the validity of the proposed control scheme....

  7. Q-S synchronization in 3D Henon-like map and generalized Henon map via a scalar controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zhenya

    2005-01-01

    In this Letter, a generalized, systematic and automatic backstepping scheme is developed to investigate the Q-S synchronization of two identical 3a discrete-time dynamical systems and two different 3D discrete-time dynamical systems. With the aid of symbolic-numeric computation, we use the proposed scheme to illustrate chaos synchronization between two identical 3D generalized Henon map and Q-S synchronization between two different 3D generalized Henon map and Henon-like map via a scalar controller, respectively. Moreover numerical simulations are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. In addition, the scheme can be also applied to investigate the tracking problem in the discrete-time systems and to generate automatically the scalar controller in computer with the aid of symbolic-numeric computation

  8. Y2K compliance countdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlotto, P W

    1999-01-01

    The new century brings unique challenges--especially Y2K compliance. This article presents nurse managers and executives with an overview of the issues and action steps to keep their organizations on track.

  9. Air Compliance Complaint Database (ACCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — THIS DATA ASSET NO LONGER ACTIVE: This is metadata documentation for the Region 7 Air Compliance Complaint Database (ACCD) which logs all air pollution complaints...

  10. The Italian compliance assurance programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelloni, S.

    1999-01-01

    An overview is given of the compliance assurance programme that is applied in Italy and the role of the different competent authorities that have responsibilities for the transport of radioactive materials is described. (author)

  11. Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The purpose of ICIS is to meet evolving Enforcement and Compliance business needs for EPA and State users by integrating information into a single integrated data...

  12. The Strategic Nature of Compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Thomas; Mäder, Lars Kai

    2014-01-01

    by the anticipated enforcement decision of the monitoring agency and whether this agency is responsive to the probability of enforcement success and the potential sanctioning costs produced by noncomplying implementers. Compared to other monitoring systems, the centralized monitoring system of the European Union (EU......This compliance study models correct and timely implementation of policies in a multilevel system as a strategic game between a central monitoring agency and multiple implementers and evaluates statistically the empirical implications of this model. We test whether compliance is determined......) is praised for exemplary effectiveness, but our findings reveal that the monitoring agency refrains from enforcing compliance when the probability of success is low, and the sanctioning costs are high. This results in a compliance deficit, even though the selective enforcement activities of the monitoring...

  13. A quality project to improve compliance with AAP guidelines for inpatient management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Kimberly M; Campbell, Jessica; Shaniuk, Paul; McClead, Richard E

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to improve compliance with published guidelines regarding management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in infants admitted to a general pediatric hospital ward and to improve support for their breastfeeding mothers. This quality improvement project was conducted by using Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles and statistical process control methods. Study subjects were infants > 35 weeks' gestation admitted for hyperbilirubinemia to the general inpatient ward of a large, freestanding pediatric hospital. We developed and implemented a guideline for the inpatient management of jaundiced neonates, with ongoing feedback given to the faculty on group performance. Outcome measures included monthly compliance scores based on American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines for management of neonates > 35 weeks' gestation and the percentage of admitted jaundiced, breastfeeding infants whose mothers received lactation consultation during hospitalization. To determine the AAP compliance score, we reviewed and assigned points to each patient admission for completion of a standard evaluation, avoidance of unnecessary intravenous (IV) fluids and peripheral IV line placement, avoidance of rebound bilirubin checks while in the hospital, and the bilirubin level at discharge. Mean monthly AAP compliance scores increased from 60.5% of total possible points during the baseline period (January 2010-December 2010) to 90.4% during the intervention period (January 2011-December 2011). Lactation consultations increased from 48% during our baseline period to 63% during our early intervention period and to 90% during the last 5 months of our intervention. Length of stay was unchanged during the baseline and intervention periods. Interprofessional collaboration between nurses and physicians combined with a thoughtful campaign to increase awareness of published guidelines were successful in improving the care of infants admitted with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia.

  14. General overview of the APS low-level rf control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepp, J.D.; Bridges, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed low-level rf system of the positron accumulator ring (PAR), the injector synchrotron, and the storage ring of the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source. Four rf systems are described since the PAR consists of a fundamental frequency system at 9.8 MHz and a harmonic system at 117 MHz. A block diagram of an accelerating unit is shown and descriptions of various control loops are made (including amplitude control, phase control, and cavity tuning control). Also, a brief overview of the computer interface is given

  15. General Attitude Control Algorithm for Spacecraft Equipped with Star Camera and Reaction Wheels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Kulczycki, P.

    A configuration consisting of a star camera, four reaction wheels and magnetorquers for momentum unloading has become standard for many spacecraft missions. This popularity has motivated numerous agencies and private companies to initiate work on the design of an imbedded attitude control system...... realized on an integrated circuit. This paper considers two issues: slew maneuver with a feature of avoiding direct exposure of the camera's CCD chip to the Sun %, three-axis attitude control and optimal control torque distribution in a reaction wheel assembly. The attitude controller is synthesized...

  16. Robust Adaptive Sliding Mode Control for Generalized Function Projective Synchronization of Different Chaotic Systems with Unknown Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuchun Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When the parameters of both drive and response systems are all unknown, an adaptive sliding mode controller, strongly robust to exotic perturbations, is designed for realizing generalized function projective synchronization. Sliding mode surface is given and the controlled system is asymptotically stable on this surface with the passage of time. Based on the adaptation laws and Lyapunov stability theory, an adaptive sliding controller is designed to ensure the occurrence of the sliding motion. Finally, numerical simulations are presented to verify the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method even when both drive and response systems are perturbed with external disturbances.

  17. Active vibration control of vehicle suspension systems using sliding modes, differential flatness and generalized proportional-integral control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Chávez Conde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta un enfoque de diseño de esquemas de control activo robusto para sistemas de suspensión de vehículos, usando técnicas de control Proporcional-Integral Generalizado, modos deslizantes y planitud diferencial, para atenuar vibraciones indeseables inducidas por perturbaciones de terreno irregular. Se proponen dos esquemas de control: uno de ellos emplea mediciones de posición y de velocidad y el otro requiere únicamente mediciones de posición. Se propone la reconstrucción integral de las derivadas de la salida plana para evitar el uso de sensores de velocidad y de aceleración, así como la información de perturbaciones de terreno desconocidas.

  18. The H2 control problem: a general transfer-function solution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 5 (2007), s. 800-815 ISSN 0020-7179 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : linear system * polynomial design methods * H_2 control problem Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 0.861, year: 2007

  19. Comparing attentional control and intrusive thoughts in obsessive-compulsive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and non clinical population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Moradi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Attention is an important factor in information processing; obsessive- compulsive disorder (OCD and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD are two main emotional disorders with a chronic course. This research examined the relationship among attentional control and intrusive thoughts (worry, rumination and obsession in these disorders. It was hypothesized that attentional control is a common factor in OCD and GAD. In addition, we compared worry, rumination and obsession among OCD, GAD and non- clinical participants.The research sample included three groups: OCD (n = 25, GAD (n = 30 and non- clinical samples (n = 56. Data were collected using the Attentional Control Scale (ACS, Rumination Response Scale (RRS, Pennsylvania State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28. Data were analyzed using MANOVA and MANCOVA by SPSS-17.Multivariate Analysis of Variance revealed that the OCD and GAD groups reported greater deficits in attentional control, higher obsessive-compulsive symptoms, rumination, worry, anxiety and depression compared to the control group.This research indicated a great attentional deficit in obsessive- compulsive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. However, no significant difference was found between these two disorders.

  20. Selective Short-Term Memory Deficits Arise from Impaired Domain-General Semantic Control Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Paul; Jefferies, Elizabeth; Ehsan, Sheeba; Hopper, Samantha; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2009-01-01

    Semantic short-term memory (STM) patients have a reduced ability to retain semantic information over brief delays but perform well on other semantic tasks; this pattern suggests damage to a dedicated buffer for semantic information. Alternatively, these difficulties may arise from mild disruption to domain-general semantic processes that have…