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Sample records for controls g1 transcription

  1. Evolutionarily conserved transcription factor Apontic controls the G1/S progression by inducing cyclin e during eye development

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Qingxin

    2014-06-16

    During Drosophila eye development, differentiation initiates in the posterior region of the eye disk and progresses anteriorly as a wave marked by the morphogenetic furrow (MF), which demarcates the boundary between anterior undifferentiated cells and posterior differentiated photoreceptors. However, the mechanism underlying the regulation of gene expression immediately before the onset of differentiation remains unclear. Here, we show that Apontic (Apt), which is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor, is expressed in the differentiating cells posterior to the MF. Moreover, it directly induces the expression of cyclin E and is also required for the G1-to-S phase transition, which is known to be essential for the initiation of cell differentiation at the MF. These observations identify a pathway crucial for eye development, governed by a mechanism in which Cyclin E promotes the G1-to-S phase transition when regulated by Apt.

  2. Cdk phosphorylation of the Ste11 transcription factor constrains differentiation-specific transcription to G1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, Søren; Andersen, Nicoline Resen; Borup, Mia Trolle;

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells normally differentiate from G(1); here we investigate the mechanism preventing expression of differentiation-specific genes outside G(1). In fission yeast, induction of the transcription factor Ste11 triggers sexual differentiation. We find that Ste11 is only active in G(1) when...... S phase. When we mutated T82 to aspartic acid, mimicking constant phosphorylation, cells no longer underwent differentiation. Conversely, changing T82 to alanine rendered Ste11-controlled transcription constitutive through the cell cycle, and allowed mating from S phase with increased frequency...

  3. Tolerance of Deregulated G1/S Transcription Depends on Critical G1/S Regulon Genes to Prevent Catastrophic Genome Instability

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    Catia Caetano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Expression of a G1/S regulon of genes that are required for DNA replication is a ubiquitous mechanism for controlling cell proliferation; moreover, the pathological deregulated expression of E2F-regulated G1/S genes is found in every type of cancer. Cellular tolerance of deregulated G1/S transcription is surprising because this regulon includes many dosage-sensitive proteins. Here, we used the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe to investigate this issue. We report that deregulating the MBF G1/S regulon by eliminating the Nrm1 corepressor increases replication errors. Homology-directed repair proteins, including MBF-regulated Ctp1CtIP, are essential to prevent catastrophic genome instability. Surprisingly, the normally inconsequential MBF-regulated S-phase cyclin Cig2 also becomes essential in the absence of Nrm1. This requirement was traced to cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition of the MBF-regulated Cdc18Cdc6 replication origin-licensing factor. Collectively, these results establish that, although deregulation of G1/S transcription is well tolerated by cells, nonessential G1/S target genes become crucial for preventing catastrophic genome instability.

  4. A hyperactive transcriptional state marks genome reactivation at the mitosis-G1 transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Chris C-S; Bartman, Caroline R; Huang, Peng; Ginart, Paul; Stonestrom, Aaron J; Keller, Cheryl A; Face, Carolyne; Jahn, Kristen S; Evans, Perry; Sankaranarayanan, Laavanya; Giardine, Belinda; Hardison, Ross C; Raj, Arjun; Blobel, Gerd A

    2016-06-15

    During mitosis, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and many transcription factors dissociate from chromatin, and transcription ceases globally. Transcription is known to restart in bulk by telophase, but whether de novo transcription at the mitosis-G1 transition is in any way distinct from later in interphase remains unknown. We tracked Pol II occupancy genome-wide in mammalian cells progressing from mitosis through late G1. Unexpectedly, during the earliest rounds of transcription at the mitosis-G1 transition, ∼50% of active genes and distal enhancers exhibit a spike in transcription, exceeding levels observed later in G1 phase. Enhancer-promoter chromatin contacts are depleted during mitosis and restored rapidly upon G1 entry but do not spike. Of the chromatin-associated features examined, histone H3 Lys27 acetylation levels at individual loci in mitosis best predict the mitosis-G1 transcriptional spike. Single-molecule RNA imaging supports that the mitosis-G1 transcriptional spike can constitute the maximum transcriptional activity per DNA copy throughout the cell division cycle. The transcriptional spike occurs heterogeneously and propagates to cell-to-cell differences in mature mRNA expression. Our results raise the possibility that passage through the mitosis-G1 transition might predispose cells to diverge in gene expression states.

  5. PAI-1 transcriptional regulation during the G0 --> G1 transition in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Li; Allen, Rosalie R; Lu, Qi; Higgins, Craig E; Garone, Rosemarie; Staiano-Coico, Lisa; Higgins, Paul J

    2006-10-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) is the major negative regulator of the plasmin-dependent pericellular proteolytic cascade. PAI-1 gene expression is normally growth state regulated but frequently elevated in chronic fibroproliferative and neoplastic diseases affecting both stromal restructuring and cellular migratory activities. Kinetic modeling of cell cycle transit in synchronized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) indicated that PAI-1 transcription occurred early after serum stimulation of quiescent (G0) cells and prior to entry into a cycling G1 condition. PAI-1 repression (in G0) was associated with upstream stimulatory factor-1 (USF-1) occupancy of two consensus E box motifs (5'-CACGTG-3') at the PE1 and PE2 domains in the PF1 region (nucleotides -794 to -532) of the PAI-1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis established that the PE1 and PE2 site E boxes were occupied by USF-1 in quiescent cells and by USF-2 in serum-activated, PAI-1-expressing keratinocytes. This reciprocal and growth state-dependent residence of USF family members (USF-1 vs. USF-2) at PE1/PE2 region chromatin characterized the G0 --> G1 transition period and the transcriptional status of the PAI-1 gene. A consensus E box motif was required for USF/E box interactions, as a CG --> AT substitution at the two central nucleotides inhibited formation of USF/probe complexes. The 5' flanking sites (AAT or AGAC) in the PE2 segment were not necessary for USF binding. USF recognition of the PE1/PE2 region E box sites required phosphorylation with several potential involved residues, including T153, maping to the USF-specific region (USR). A T153A substitution in USF-1 did not repress serum-induced PAI-1 expression whereas the T153D mutant was an effective suppressor. As anticipated from the ChIP results, transfection of wild-type USF-2 failed to inhibit PAI-1 induction. Collectively, these data suggest that USF family members are important regulators of PAI-1 gene

  6. Msa1 and Msa2 Modulate G1-Specific Transcription to Promote G1 Arrest and the Transition to Quiescence in Budding Yeast.

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    Shawna Miles

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Yeast that naturally exhaust their glucose source can enter a quiescent state that is characterized by reduced cell size, and high cell density, stress tolerance and longevity. The transition to quiescence involves highly asymmetric cell divisions, dramatic reprogramming of transcription and global changes in chromatin structure and chromosome topology. Cells enter quiescence from G1 and we find that there is a positive correlation between the length of G1 and the yield of quiescent cells. The Swi4 and Swi6 transcription factors, which form the SBF transcription complex and promote the G1 to S transition in cycling cells, are also critical for the transition to quiescence. Swi6 forms a second complex with Mbp1 (MBF, which is not required for quiescence. These are the functional analogues of the E2F complexes of higher eukaryotes. Loss of the RB analogue, Whi5, and the related protein Srl3/Whi7, delays G1 arrest, but it also delays recovery from quiescence. Two MBF- and SBF-Associated proteins have been identified that have little effect on SBF or MBF activity in cycling cells. We show that these two related proteins, Msa1 and Msa2, are specifically required for the transition to quiescence. Like the E2F complexes that are quiescence-specific, Msa1 and Msa2 are required to repress the transcription of many SBF target genes, including SWI4, the CLN2 cyclin and histones, specifically after glucose is exhausted from the media. They also activate transcription of many MBF target genes. msa1msa2 cells fail to G1 arrest and rapidly lose viability upon glucose exhaustion. msa1msa2 mutants that survive this transition are very large, but they attain the same thermo-tolerance and longevity of wild type quiescent cells. This indicates that Msa1 and Msa2 are required for successful transition to quiescence, but not for the maintenance of that state.

  7. A Whi7-anchored loop controls the G1 Cdk-cyclin complex at start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Galal; Parisi, Eva; Flores, Alba; Gallego, Carme; Aldea, Martí

    2014-01-09

    Cells commit to a new cell cycle at Start by activation of the G1 Cdk-cyclin complex which, in turn, triggers a genome-wide transcriptional wave that executes the G1/S transition. In budding yeast, the Cdc28-Cln3 complex is regulated by an ER-retention mechanism that is important for proper cell size control. We have isolated small-cell-size CDC28 mutants showing impaired retention at the ER and premature accumulation of the Cln3 cyclin in the nucleus. The differential interactome of a quintuple Cdc28(wee) mutant pinpointed Whi7, a Whi5 paralog targeted by Cdc28 that associates to the ER in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that the Cln3 cyclin and Whi7 act in a positive feedback loop to release the G1 Cdk-cyclin complex and trigger Start once a critical size has been reached, thus uncovering a key nonlinear mechanism at the earliest known events of cell-cycle entry.

  8. CDK1-Cyclin B1 Activates RNMT, Coordinating mRNA Cap Methylation with G1 Phase Transcription.

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    Aregger, Michael; Kaskar, Aneesa; Varshney, Dhaval; Fernandez-Sanchez, Maria Elena; Inesta-Vaquera, Francisco A; Weidlich, Simone; Cowling, Victoria H

    2016-03-03

    The creation of translation-competent mRNA is dependent on RNA polymerase II transcripts being modified by addition of the 7-methylguanosine (m7G) cap. The factors that mediate splicing, nuclear export, and translation initiation are recruited to the transcript via the cap. The cap structure is formed by several activities and completed by RNMT (RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase), which catalyzes N7 methylation of the cap guanosine. We report that CDK1-cyclin B1 phosphorylates the RNMT regulatory domain on T77 during G2/M phase of the cell cycle. RNMT T77 phosphorylation activates the enzyme both directly and indirectly by inhibiting interaction with KPNA2, an RNMT inhibitor. RNMT T77 phosphorylation results in elevated m7G cap methyltransferase activity at the beginning of G1 phase, coordinating mRNA capping with the burst of transcription that occurs following nuclear envelope reformation. RNMT T77 phosphorylation is required for the production of cohort of proteins, and inhibiting T77 phosphorylation reduces the cell proliferation rate. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Api5 contributes to E2F1 control of the G1/S cell cycle phase transition.

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    Marina Garcia-Jove Navarro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The E2f transcription factor family has a pivotal role in controlling the cell fate in general, and in particular cancer development, by regulating the expression of several genes required for S phase entry and progression through the cell cycle. It has become clear that the transcriptional activation of at least one member of the family, E2F1, can also induce apoptosis. An appropriate balance of positive and negative regulators appears to be necessary to modulate E2F1 transcriptional activity, and thus cell fate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, we show that Api5, already known as a regulator of E2F1 induced-apoptosis, is required for the E2F1 transcriptional activation of G1/S transition genes, and consequently, for cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. Api5 appears to be a cell cycle regulated protein. Removal of Api5 reduces cyclin E, cyclin A, cyclin D1 and Cdk2 levels, causing G1 cell cycle arrest and cell cycle delay. Luciferase assays established that Api5 directly regulates the expression of several G1/S genes under E2F1 control. Using protein/protein and protein/DNA immunoprecipitation studies, we demonstrate that Api5, even if not physically interacting with E2F1, contributes positively to E2F1 transcriptional activity by increasing E2F1 binding to its target promoters, through an indirect mechanism. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The results described here support the pivotal role of cell cycle related proteins, that like E2F1, may act as tumor suppressors or as proto-oncogenes during cancer development, depending on the behavior of their positive and negative regulators. According to our findings, Api5 contributes to E2F1 transcriptional activation of cell cycle-associated genes by facilitating E2F1 recruitment onto its target promoters and thus E2F1 target gene transcription.

  10. UVB-induced cell death signaling is associated with G1-S progression and transcription inhibition in primary human fibroblasts.

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    Tatiana Grohmann Ortolan

    Full Text Available DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV radiation can be removed by nucleotide excision repair through two sub-pathways, one general (GGR and the other specific for transcribed DNA (TCR, and the processing of unrepaired lesions trigger signals that may lead to cell death. These signals involve the tumor suppressor p53 protein, a central regulator of cell responses to DNA damage, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, that forms a feedback regulatory loop with p53. The involvement of cell cycle and transcription on the signaling to apoptosis was investigated in UVB-irradiated synchronized, DNA repair proficient, CS-B (TCR-deficient and XP-C (GGR-deficient primary human fibroblasts. Cells were irradiated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, with two doses with equivalent levels of apoptosis (low and high, defined for each cell line. In the three cell lines, the low doses of UVB caused only a transient delay in progression to the S phase, whereas the high doses induced permanent cell cycle arrest. However, while accumulation of Mdm2 correlated well with the recovery from transcription inhibition at the low doses for normal and CS-B fibroblasts, for XP-C cells this protein was shown to be accumulated even at UVB doses that induced high levels of apoptosis. Thus, UVB-induced accumulation of Mdm2 is critical for counteracting p53 activation and apoptosis avoidance, but its effect is limited due to transcription inhibition. However, in the case of XP-C cells, an excess of unrepaired DNA damage would be sufficient to block S phase progression, which would signal to apoptosis, independent of Mdm2 accumulation. The data clearly discriminate DNA damage signals that lead to cell death, depending on the presence of UVB-induced DNA damage in replicating or transcribing regions.

  11. Gene duplication and co-evolution of G1/S transcription factor specificity in fungi are essential for optimizing cell fitness.

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    Adi Hendler

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulatory networks play a central role in optimizing cell survival. How DNA binding domains and cis-regulatory DNA binding sequences have co-evolved to allow the expansion of transcriptional networks and how this contributes to cellular fitness remains unclear. Here we experimentally explore how the complex G1/S transcriptional network evolved in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by examining different chimeric transcription factor (TF complexes. Over 200 G1/S genes are regulated by either one of the two TF complexes, SBF and MBF, which bind to specific DNA binding sequences, SCB and MCB, respectively. The difference in size and complexity of the G1/S transcriptional network across yeast species makes it well suited to investigate how TF paralogs (SBF and MBF and DNA binding sequences (SCB and MCB co-evolved after gene duplication to rewire and expand the network of G1/S target genes. Our data suggests that whilst SBF is the likely ancestral regulatory complex, the ancestral DNA binding element is more MCB-like. G1/S network expansion took place by both cis- and trans- co-evolutionary changes in closely related but distinct regulatory sequences. Replacement of the endogenous SBF DNA-binding domain (DBD with that from more distantly related fungi leads to a contraction of the SBF-regulated G1/S network in budding yeast, which also correlates with increased defects in cell growth, cell size, and proliferation.

  12. OPTIMAL CONTROL OF AN M/G/1 RETRIAL QUEUE WITH VACATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arnar AISSANI

    2008-01-01

    In this note, we consider an M/G/1 retrial queue with server vacations, when retrial times, servicetimes and vacation times are arbitrary distributed. The distribution of the number of customers in the system in stationary regime is obtained in terms of generating function. Next, we give heavy traffic approximation of such distribution. We show that the system size can be decomposed into two random variables, one of which corresponds to the system size of the ordinary M/G/1 FIFO queue without vacation. Such a stochastic decomposition property is useful for the computation of performance measures of interest. Finally, we solve simple problems of optimal control of vacation and retrial policies.

  13. Effect of PKC pathway on G1/S progression control in HeLa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effect of PKC activity on G1/S progression in HeLa cells has been studied.The result shows that (ⅰ) PKC activity alteration in G1 phase affects G1/S progression in HeLa cells.It has been observed that G1/S progression is stimulated by PKC agonist TPA and inhibited by PKC inhibitor GF-109203X.(ⅱ) The expression of c-myc and c-jun is stimulated by TPA and inhibited by GF-109203X treatment in early G1 phase.(ⅲ) During G1/S progression,the expression of CyclinD1 is stimulated by TPA treatment and inhibited by GF-109203X treatment.There is no effect on the expression of CDK4.It is likely that PKC pathway regulates G1/S progression through regulating the expression of some early response genes and engine molecules in HeLa cells.

  14. The regulators of yeast PHO system participate in the transcriptional regulation of G1 cyclin under alkaline stress conditions.

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    Nishizawa, Masafumi

    2015-03-01

    The yeast Pho85 kinase oversees whether environmental conditions are favourable for cell growth and enables yeast cells to express only genes that are appropriate for the conditions. Alkaline stress perturbs transport of molecules across the plasma membrane that is vital for cell survival. Progression through the cell cycle is halted until the cells can adapt to the stress conditions. I found that Pho85 is required for CLN2 expression and that overproduction of the transcription factors Pho4, Rim101 and Crz1, all targets of Pho85, inhibited CLN2 expression. CLN2 expression in the absence of Pho85 could be recovered only when all the three transcription factors were deleted. Whi5, a functional homologue of the mammalian Rb protein, represses CLN2 expression and is inactivated when phosphorylated by either of the CDK-cyclin complexes, Cdc28-Cln3 or Pho85-Pcl9. Under alkaline conditions, the absence of Whi5 caused an increase in CLN2 expression but failed to do so when Pho85 was also absent, or when Pho4 was overproduced. The expression level of CLN2 in a Δpho85 Δpho4 Δrim101 Δcrz1 quadruple mutant was stimulated when the Whi5 activity was repressed by overproduction of Pho85-Pcl9. These results indicate that Whi5 is also under control of alkaline stress. The inhibitory function of Whi5 on CLN2 is dependent on Rpd3 HDAC, and the absence of Rpd3 could also suppress the inhibitory effect of Pho4 overproduction. Based on these findings, a model is presented in which Pho85 and Pho4 functions in CLN2 regulation under alkaline conditions.

  15. Translation initiation factor eIF4G1 preferentially binds yeast transcript leaders containing conserved oligo-uridine motifs.

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    Zinshteyn, Boris; Rojas-Duran, Maria F; Gilbert, Wendy V

    2017-09-01

    Translational control of gene expression plays essential roles in cellular stress responses and organismal development by enabling rapid, selective, and localized control of protein production. Translational regulation depends on context-dependent differences in the protein output of mRNAs, but the key mRNA features that distinguish efficiently translated mRNAs are largely unknown. Here, we comprehensively determined the RNA-binding preferences of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) to assess whether this core translation initiation factor has intrinsic sequence preferences that may contribute to preferential translation of specific mRNAs. We identified a simple RNA sequence motif-oligo-uridine-that mediates high-affinity binding to eIF4G in vitro. Oligo(U) motifs occur naturally in the transcript leader (TL) of hundreds of yeast genes, and mRNAs with unstructured oligo(U) motifs were enriched in immunoprecipitations against eIF4G. Ribosome profiling following depletion of eIF4G in vivo showed preferentially reduced translation of mRNAs with long TLs, including those that contain oligo(U). Finally, TL oligo(U) elements are enriched in genes with regulatory roles and are conserved between yeast species, consistent with an important cellular function. Taken together, our results demonstrate RNA sequence preferences for a general initiation factor, which cells potentially exploit for translational control of specific mRNAs. © 2017 Zinshteyn et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  16. Repression of the transcription factor Bach2 contributes to predisposition of IgG1 memory B cells toward plasma cell differentiation.

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    Kometani, Kohei; Nakagawa, Rinako; Shinnakasu, Ryo; Kaji, Tomohiro; Rybouchkin, Andrei; Moriyama, Saya; Furukawa, Koji; Koseki, Haruhiko; Takemori, Toshitada; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2013-07-25

    Memory B cells are essential for generating rapid and robust secondary antibody responses. It has been thought that the unique cytoplasmic domain of IgG causes the prompt activation of antigen-experienced IgG memory B cells. To assess this model, we have generated a mouse containing IgG1 B cells that have never encountered antigen. We found that, upon challenge, antigen-experienced IgG1 memory B cells rapidly differentiated into plasma cells, whereas nonexperienced IgG1 B cells did not, suggesting the importance of the stimulation history. In addition, our results suggest that repression of the Bach2 transcription factor, which results from antigen experience, contributes to predisposition of IgG1 memory B cells to differentiate into plasma cells.

  17. First passage times in M2[X ]|G |1 |R queue with hysteretic overload control policy

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    Pechinkin, Alexander V.; Razumchik, Rostislav R.; Zaryadov, Ivan S.

    2016-06-01

    One of the reported approaches towards the solution of overload problem in networks of SIP servers is the implementation of multi-level hysteretic control of arrivals in SIP servers. Each level, being the parameter of the policy, specifies operation mode of SIP server i.e. it implicitly indicates what SIP server must do with the arriving packets. The choice of parameters' values is not guided by standards and is usually left for the network owner. In general, all operation modes of the considered policy can be grouped into two groups: normal mode (when all arriving packets are accepted) and congested mode (when part or all arriving packets are being dropped). Such grouping may serve as the criteria for choosing parameters' values of the policy: pick those values which minimize SIP server sojourn time in congested mode. In this short note we propose some analytical results which facilitate the solution of stated minimization problem. The considered mathematical model of SIP server is the queueing system M2[X ]|G |1 |R with batch arrivals and bi-level hysteretic control policy, which specifies three operation modes: normal (customers both flows are accepted), overload (only customers from one flow are accepted), discard (customers from both flows are blocked/lost)). The switching between modes can occur only on service completions. Analytical method allowing computation of stationary sojourn times in different operation modes (as well as first passage times between modes) is presented in brief. Numerical example is given.

  18. Singularity-conquering ZG controllers of z2g1 type for tracking control of the IPC system

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    Zhang, Yunong; Yu, Xiaotian; Yin, Yonghua; Peng, Chen; Fan, Zhengping

    2014-09-01

    With wider investigations and applications of autonomous robotics and intelligent vehicles, the inverted pendulum on a cart (IPC) system has become more attractive for numerous researchers due to its concise and representative structure. In this article, the tracking-control problem of the IPC system is considered and investigated. Based on Zhang dynamics (ZD) and gradient dynamics (GD), a novel kind of ZG controllers are developed and investigated for achieving the tracking-control purpose, which contains controllers of z2g0 and z2g1 types according to the number of times of using the ZD and GD methods. Besides, theoretical analyses are presented to guarantee the global and exponential convergence performance of both z2g0 and z2g1 controllers. Computer simulations are further performed to substantiate the feasibility and effectiveness of ZG controllers. More importantly, comparative simulation results demonstrate that controllers of z2g1 type can conquer the singularity problem (i.e. the division-by-zero problem).

  19. Post-transcriptional regulation of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 and proliferation of human cancer cells depend on IMP-3 nuclear localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Vargas, T; Boudoukha, S; Simon, A; Souidi, M; Cuvellier, S; Pinna, G; Polesskaya, A

    2014-05-29

    RNA-binding proteins of the IMP family (insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) mRNA-binding proteins 1-3) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Multiple studies have linked high expression of IMP proteins, and especially of IMP-3, to an unfavorable prognosis in numerous types of cancer. The specific importance of IMP-3 for cancer transformation remains poorly understood. We here show that all three IMPs can directly bind the mRNAs of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 (CCND1, D3 and G1) in vivo and in vitro, and yet only IMP-3 regulates the expression of these cyclins in a significant manner in six human cancer cell lines of different origins. In the absence of IMP-3, the levels of CCND1, D3 and G1 proteins fall dramatically, and the cells accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, leading to almost complete proliferation arrest. Our results show that, compared with IMP-1 and IMP-2, IMP-3 is enriched in the nucleus, where it binds the transcripts of CCND1, D3 and G1. The nuclear localization of IMP-3 depends on its protein partner HNRNPM and is indispensable for the post-transcriptional regulation of expression of the cyclins. Cytoplasmic retention of IMP-3 and HNRNPM in human cancer cells leads to significant drop in proliferation. In conclusion, a nuclear IMP-3-HNRNPM complex is important for the efficient synthesis of CCND1, D3 and G1 and for the proliferation of human cancer cells.

  20. A general G1/S-phase cell-cycle control module in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Xin'Ai Zhao

    Full Text Available The decision to replicate its DNA is of crucial importance for every cell and, in many organisms, is decisive for the progression through the entire cell cycle. A comparison of animals versus yeast has shown that, although most of the involved cell-cycle regulators are divergent in both clades, they fulfill a similar role and the overall network topology of G1/S regulation is highly conserved. Using germline development as a model system, we identified a regulatory cascade controlling entry into S phase in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which, as a member of the Plantae supergroup, is phylogenetically only distantly related to Opisthokonts such as yeast and animals. This module comprises the Arabidopsis homologs of the animal transcription factor E2F, the plant homolog of the animal transcriptional repressor Retinoblastoma (Rb-related 1 (RBR1, the plant-specific F-box protein F-BOX-LIKE 17 (FBL17, the plant specific cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitors KRPs, as well as CDKA;1, the plant homolog of the yeast and animal Cdc2⁺/Cdk1 kinases. Our data show that the principle of a double negative wiring of Rb proteins is highly conserved, likely representing a universal mechanism in eukaryotic cell-cycle control. However, this negative feedback of Rb proteins is differently implemented in plants as it is brought about through a quadruple negative regulation centered around the F-box protein FBL17 that mediates the degradation of CDK inhibitors but is itself directly repressed by Rb. Biomathematical simulations and subsequent experimental confirmation of computational predictions revealed that this regulatory circuit can give rise to hysteresis highlighting the here identified dosage sensitivity of CDK inhibitors in this network.

  1. Optimal Control of the D-Policy M/G/1 Queueing System with Server Breakdowns

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    Kuo-Hsiung Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with a single server in the D-policy M/G/1 queueing system in which the server is turned off at the end of each complete period and is activated again only when the cumulative completion times of the customers in the system exceeds a given level D. While the server is working, he is subject to breakdowns according to a Poisson process. When the server breaks down, he requires repair at a repair facility, where the repair time obeys a general distribution. We have demonstrated that the probability that the server is busy in the steady-state is equal to the traffic intensity. The total expected cost function per customer per unit time is constructed to determine the optimal operating D-policy at a minimum cost. We use the steady-state analytic results and apply an efficient Matlab computer program to calculate the optimal value of D. Based on three different service distributions: exponential, 3-stage Erlang and deterministic, we provide extensive numerical computation for illustration purpose. Sensitivity analysis is also investigated.

  2. Conserved homeodomain proteins interact with MADS box protein Mcm1 to restrict ECB-dependent transcription to the M/G1 phase of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramila, Tata; Miles, Shawna; GuhaThakurta, Debraj; Jemiolo, Dave; Breeden, Linda L

    2002-12-01

    Two homeodomain proteins, Yox1 and Yhp1, act as repressors at early cell cycle boxes (ECBs) to restrict their activity to the M/G1 phase of the cell cycle in budding yeast. These proteins bind to Mcm1 and to a typical homeodomain binding site. The expression of Yox1 is periodic and directly correlated with its binding to, and repression of, ECB activity. The absence of Yox1 and Yhp1 or the constitutive expression of Yox1 leads to the loss of cell-cycle regulation of ECB activity. Therefore, the cell-cycle-regulated expression of these repressors defines the interval of ECB-dependent transcription. Twenty-eight genes, including MCM2-7, CDC6, SWI4, CLN3, and a number of genes required during late M phase have been identified that are coordinately regulated by this pathway.

  3. Gomisin A enhances tumor necrosis factor-α-induced G1 cell cycle arrest via signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-mediated phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein.

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    Waiwut, Pornthip; Shin, Myoung-Sook; Yokoyama, Satoru; Saiki, Ikuo; Sakurai, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    Gomisin A, a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignan isolated from the fruit of Schisandra chinensis, has been reported as an anti-cancer substance. In this study, we investigated the effects of gomisin A on cancer cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. Gomisin A significantly inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner after 72 h treatment, especially in the presence of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), due to cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase with the downregulation of cyclin D1 expression and Retinoblastoma (RB) phosphorylation. In addition, gomisin A in combination with TNF-α strongly suppressed the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Inhibition of STAT1 pathways by a small-interfering RNA against STAT1 and AG490 Janus kinase (JAK) kinase inhibitor AG490 reduced the cyclin D1 expression and RB phosphorylation, indicating that JAK-mediated STAT1 activation is involved in gomisin A-induced G1 cell cycle arrest.

  4. Characterization of the ECB binding complex responsible for the M/G(1)-specific transcription of CLN3 and SWI4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Bernard; Miles, Shawna; Breeden, Linda L

    2002-01-01

    The transcription factor Mcm1 is regulated by adjacent binding of a variety of different factors regulating the expression of cell-type-specific, cell cycle-specific, and metabolic genes. In this work, we investigate a new class of Mcm1-regulated promoters that are cell cycle regulated and peak in late M-early G(1) phase of the cell cycle via a promoter element referred to as an early cell cycle box (ECB). Gel filtration experiments indicate that the ECB-specific DNA binding complex is over 200 kDa in size and includes Mcm1 and at least one additional protein. Using DNase I footprinting in vitro, we have observed protection of the ECB elements from the CLN3, SWI4, CDC6, and CDC47 promoters, which includes protection of the 16-bp palindrome to which Mcm1 dimers are known to bind as well as protection of extended flanking sequences. These flanking sequences influence the stability and the variety of complexes that form on the ECB elements, and base substitutions in the protected flank affect transcriptional activity of the element. Chromatin immunoprecipitations show that Mcm1 binds in vivo to ECB elements throughout the cell cycle and that binding is sensitive to carbon source changes.

  5. Physiological electric fields control the G1/S phase cell cycle checkpoint to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Entong; Yin, Yili; Zhao, Min; Forrester, John V; McCaig, Colin D

    2003-03-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (VEC) proliferation is a key event in angiogenesis and is tightly regulated. Electric potential differences exist around the vascular endothelium and give rise to endogenous electric fields (EFs), whether these EFs influence VEC proliferation is unclear. We exposed cultured VECs to applied EFs of physiological strengths for up to 72 h. EF at 50 or 100 mV/mm did not influence cell proliferation, but at 200 mV/mm, cell density, cell growth rate, and mitosis index decreased significantly. EF-induced reduction in VEC proliferation was not due to increased apoptosis, because caspase apoptosis inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK (20 microM), had no effect on this response. Rather, EF responses were mediated via decreased entry of cells into S phase from G1 phase, as shown by flow cytometry. Western blot showed that EFs decreased G1-specific cyclin E expression and increased cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complex inhibitor p27kipl expression. Thus EFs controlled VEC proliferation through induction of cell cycle arrest at G1 by down-regulation of cyclin E expression and up-regulation of p27kipl expression, rather than by promoting apoptosis. If control of the cell cycle by endogenous EFs extends beyond VECs, this would be of widespread biological significance in vivo.

  6. Transcription Factors Synergistically Activated at the Crossing of the Restriction Point between G1 and S Cell Cycle Phases. Pathologic Gate Opening during Multi-Hit Malignant Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Castagnino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs represent key regulators of gene-expression patterns controlling cell behavior. TFs are active at nuclear – chromatin levels. TFs do not act in isolation; small sets of TFs cooperate toward the transcription of sets of mRNAs and consequently the translation of new proteins (the molecular phenotypes of a cell. Most TFs are activated through a cascade of biochemical reactions mediated by receptors expressed on the target cell surface. Nuclear Receptors (NRs are transcription factors activated instead by small hydrophobic molecules capable of crossing the plasma membrane. The convergence of different pathways on TFs and their posttranslational modifications ensure that the external stimuli generate appropriate and integrated responses. The reconstruction of the molecular anatomy of these pathways through Molecular Interactions Maps (MIMs can depict these intricate interactions. A mathematical modeling approach simulates/mimics their mechanism of action in normal and pathological conditions. We can simulate the effect of virtual hits in neoplastic transformation as mutations/alterations in these pathways. We can also simulate the effect of targeted inhibitors on these deregulated pathways. This strategy can help to guide an appropriate combination of targeted drugs in the treatment of a cancer patient, a major innovative perspective of incoming years.

  7. TAF7: traffic controller in transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegonne, Anne; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Singer, Dinah S

    2013-01-01

    TAF7, a component of the TFIID complex, controls the first steps of transcription. It interacts with and regulates the enzymatic activities of transcription factors that regulate RNA polymerase II progression. Its diverse functions in transcription initiation are consistent with its essential role in cell proliferation.

  8. Transcriptional networks controlling adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, R; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is regulated by a complex cascade of signals that drive the transcriptional reprogramming of the fibroblastic precursors. Genome-wide analyses of chromatin accessibility and binding of adipogenic transcription factors make it possible to generate "snapshots" of the trans...

  9. Control and signal processing by transcriptional interference

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A transcriptional activator can suppress gene expression by interfering with transcription initiated by another activator. Transcriptional interference has been increasingly recognized as a regulatory mechanism of gene expression. The signals received by the two antagonistically acting activators are combined by the polymerase trafficking along the DNA. We have designed a dual-control genetic system in yeast to explore this antagonism systematically. Antagonism by an upstream activator bears ...

  10. G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 controls adipose triglyceride lipase activity and lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurens, Claire; Badin, Pierre-Marie; Louche, Katie; Mairal, Aline; Tavernier, Geneviève; Marette, André; Tremblay, Angelo; Weisnagel, S John; Joanisse, Denis R; Langin, Dominique; Bourlier, Virginie; Moro, Cedric

    2016-07-01

    Recent data suggest that adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) plays a key role in providing energy substrate from triglyceride pools and that alterations of its expression/activity relate to metabolic disturbances in skeletal muscle. Yet little is known about its regulation. We here investigated the role of the protein G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 (G0S2), recently described as an inhibitor of ATGL in white adipose tissue, in the regulation of lipolysis and oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. We first examined G0S2 protein expression in relation to metabolic status and muscle characteristics in humans. We next overexpressed and knocked down G0S2 in human primary myotubes to assess its impact on ATGL activity, lipid turnover and oxidative metabolism, and further knocked down G0S2 in vivo in mouse skeletal muscle. G0S2 protein is increased in skeletal muscle of endurance-trained individuals and correlates with markers of oxidative capacity and lipid content. Recombinant G0S2 protein inhibits ATGL activity by about 40% in lysates of mouse and human skeletal muscle. G0S2 overexpression augments (+49%, p lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation in a strictly ATGL-dependent manner. These metabolic adaptations mediated by G0S2 are paralleled by concomitant changes in glucose metabolism through the modulation of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4 (PDK4) expression (5.4 fold, p < 0.001). Importantly, downregulation of G0S2 in vivo in mouse skeletal muscle recapitulates changes in lipid metabolism observed in vitro. Collectively, these data indicate that G0S2 plays a key role in the regulation of skeletal muscle ATGL activity, lipid content and oxidative metabolism.

  11. Optogenetic control of transcription in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Liu

    Full Text Available Light inducible protein-protein interactions are powerful tools to manipulate biological processes. Genetically encoded light-gated proteins for controlling precise cellular behavior are a new and promising technology, called optogenetics. Here we exploited the blue light-induced transcription system in yeast and zebrafish, based on the blue light dependent interaction between two plant proteins, blue light photoreceptor Cryptochrome 2 (CRY2 and the bHLH transcription factor CIB1 (CRY-interacting bHLH 1. We demonstrate the utility of this system by inducing rapid transcription suppression and activation in zebrafish.

  12. Contributions of nuclear architecture to transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, G S; van Wijnen, A J; Stein, J; Lian, J B; Montecino, M

    1995-01-01

    Three parameters of nuclear structure contribute to transcriptional control. The linear representation of promoter elements provides competency for physiological responsiveness within the contexts of development as well as cycle- and phenotype-dependent regulation. Chromatin structure and nucleosome organization reduce distances between independent regulatory elements providing a basis for integrating components of transcriptional control. The nuclear matrix supports gene expression by imposing physical constraints on chromatin related to three-dimensional genomic organization. In addition, the nuclear matrix facilitates gene localization as well as the concentration and targeting of transcription factors. Several lines of evidence are presented that are consistent with involvement of multiple levels of nuclear architecture in cell growth and tissue-specific gene expression during differentiation. Growth factor and steroid hormone responsive modifications in chromatin structure, nucleosome organization, and the nuclear matrix that influence transcription of the cell cycle-regulated histone gene and the bone tissue-specific osteocalcin gene during progressive expression of the osteoblast phenotype are considered.

  13. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is the most committed type of regulation in living cells where transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of their target genes and TF expression is controlled by other TFs forming complex transcriptional regulatory networks that can be highly interconnected. Here...... we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network...... as a measure of the organization and interconnectivity of the network. We find that the number of driver nodes n(D) needed to control the whole network is 64% of the TFs in the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to only 17% for the yeast network, 4% for the mouse network and 8...

  14. Regulated assembly of transcription factors and control of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, D

    2001-11-30

    Proteins that function in regulation of transcription initiation are typically homo or hetero-oligomeric. Results of recent biophysical studies of transcription regulators indicate that the assembly of these proteins is often subject to regulation. This regulation of assembly dictates the frequency of transcription initiation via its influence on the affinity of a transcription regulator for DNA and its affect on target site selection. Factors that modulate transcription factor assembly include binding of small molecules, post-translational modification, DNA binding and interactions with other proteins. Here, the results of recent structural and/or thermodynamic studies of a number of transcription regulators that are subject to regulated assembly are reviewed. The accumulated data indicate that this phenomenon is ubiquitous and that mechanisms utilized in eukaryotes and prokaryotes share common features. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  15. Control and signal processing by transcriptional interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; Ungricht, Rosemarie; Kelemen, János Z; Shetty, Chetak; Ratna, Prasuna; Becskei, Attila

    2009-01-01

    A transcriptional activator can suppress gene expression by interfering with transcription initiated by another activator. Transcriptional interference has been increasingly recognized as a regulatory mechanism of gene expression. The signals received by the two antagonistically acting activators are combined by the polymerase trafficking along the DNA. We have designed a dual-control genetic system in yeast to explore this antagonism systematically. Antagonism by an upstream activator bears the hallmarks of competitive inhibition, whereas a downstream activator inhibits gene expression non-competitively. When gene expression is induced weakly, the antagonistic activator can have a positive effect and can even trigger paradoxical activation. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium models of transcription shed light on the mechanism by which interference converts signals, and reveals that self-antagonism of activators imitates the behavior of feed-forward loops. Indeed, a synthetic circuit generates a bell-shaped response, so that the induction of expression is limited to a narrow range of the input signal. The identification of conserved regulatory principles of interference will help to predict the transcriptional response of genes in their genomic context. PMID:19690569

  16. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-05-01

    Transcriptional regulation is the most committed type of regulation in living cells where transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of their target genes and TF expression is controlled by other TFs forming complex transcriptional regulatory networks that can be highly interconnected. Here we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network as a measure of the organization and interconnectivity of the network. We find that the number of driver nodes nD needed to control the whole network is 64% of the TFs in the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to only 17% for the yeast network, 4% for the mouse network and 8% for the human network. The high controllability (low number of drivers needed to control the system) in yeast, mouse and human is due to the presence of internal loops in their regulatory networks where the TFs regulate each other in a circular fashion. We refer to these internal loops as circular control motifs (CCM). The E. coli transcriptional regulatory network, which does not have any CCMs, shows a hierarchical structure of the transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to the eukaryal networks. The presence of CCMs also has influence on the stability of these networks, as the presence of cycles can be associated with potential unstable steady-states where even small changes in binding affinities can cause dramatic rearrangements of the state of the network.

  17. Transcriptional programs controlling perinatal lung maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    Full Text Available The timing of lung maturation is controlled precisely by complex genetic and cellular programs. Lung immaturity following preterm birth frequently results in Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS and Broncho-Pulmonary Dysplasia (BPD, which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. Mechanisms synchronizing gestational length and lung maturation remain to be elucidated. In this study, we designed a genome-wide mRNA expression time-course study from E15.5 to Postnatal Day 0 (PN0 using lung RNAs from C57BL/6J (B6 and A/J mice that differ in gestational length by ∼30 hr (B6transcriptional networks controlling lung maturation. We identified both temporal and strain dependent gene expression patterns during lung maturation. For time dependent changes, cell adhesion, vasculature development, and lipid metabolism/transport were major bioprocesses induced during the saccular stage of lung development at E16.5-E17.5. CEBPA, PPARG, VEGFA, CAV1 and CDH1 were found to be key signaling and transcriptional regulators of these processes. Innate defense/immune responses were induced at later gestational ages (E18.5-20.5, STAT1, AP1, and EGFR being important regulators of these responses. Expression of RNAs associated with the cell cycle and chromatin assembly was repressed during prenatal lung maturation and was regulated by FOXM1, PLK1, chromobox, and high mobility group families of transcription factors. Strain dependent lung mRNA expression differences peaked at E18.5. At this time, mRNAs regulating surfactant and innate immunity were more abundantly expressed in lungs of B6 (short gestation than in A/J (long gestation mice, while expression of genes involved in chromatin assembly and histone modification were expressed at lower levels in B6 than in A/J mice. The present study systemically mapped key regulators

  18. Mutation analysis of genes that control the G1/S cell cycle in melanoma: TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Nevot Miguel

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of genes involved in the control of progression from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle in melanoma tumors in not fully known. The aim of our study was to analyse mutations in TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B genes in melanoma tumors and melanoma cell lines Methods We analysed 39 primary and metastatic melanomas and 9 melanoma cell lines by single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP. Results The single-stranded technique showed heterozygous defects in the TP53 gene in 8 of 39 (20.5% melanoma tumors: three new single point mutations in intronic sequences (introns 1 and 2 and exon 10, and three new single nucleotide polymorphisms located in introns 1 and 2 (C to T transition at position 11701 in intron 1; C insertion at position 11818 in intron 2; and C insertion at position 11875 in intron 2. One melanoma tumor exhibited two heterozygous alterations in the CDKN2A exon 1 one of which was novel (stop codon, and missense mutation. No defects were found in the remaining genes. Conclusion These results suggest that these genes are involved in melanoma tumorigenesis, although they may be not the major targets. Other suppressor genes that may be informative of the mechanism of tumorigenesis in skin melanomas should be studied.

  19. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  20. Transcriptional control of mammalian pancreas organogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, David A; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Francisco; Rojas, Anabel

    2014-07-01

    The field of pancreas development has markedly expanded over the last decade, significantly advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control pancreas organogenesis. This growth has been fueled, in part, by the need to generate new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of diabetes. The creation of sophisticated genetic tools in mice has been instrumental in this progress. Genetic manipulation involving activation or inactivation of genes within specific cell types has allowed the identification of many transcription factors (TFs) that play critical roles in the organogenesis of the pancreas. Interestingly, many of these TFs act at multiple stages of pancreatic development, and adult organ function or repair. Interaction with other TFs, extrinsic signals, and epigenetic regulation are among the mechanisms by which TFs may play context-dependent roles during pancreas organogenesis. Many of the pancreatic TFs directly regulate each other and their own expression. These combinatorial interactions generate very specific gene regulatory networks that can define the different cell lineages and types in the developing pancreas. Here, we review recent progress made in understanding the role of pancreatic TFs in mouse pancreas formation. We also summarize our current knowledge of human pancreas development and discuss developmental pancreatic TFs that have been associated with human pancreatic diseases.

  1. Transcription-dependent degradation controls the stability of the SREBP family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Anders; Ericsson, Johan

    2003-11-25

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly controlled by members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors. Here we demonstrate that the ubiquitination and degradation of SREBPs depend on their transcriptional activity. Mutations in the transactivation or DNA-binding domains of SREBPs inhibit their transcriptional activity and stabilize the proteins. The transcriptional activity and degradation of these mutants are restored when fused to heterologous transactivation or DNA-binding domains. When SREBP1a was fused to the DBD of Gal4, the ubiquitination and degradation of the fusion protein depended on coexpression of a promoter-reporter gene containing Gal4-binding sites. In addition, disruption of the interaction between WT SREBP and endogenous p300/CBP resulted in inhibition of SREBP-dependent transcription and stabilization of SREBP. Chemical inhibitors of transcription reduced the degradation of transcriptionally active SREBP1a, whereas they had no effect on the stability of transcriptionally inactive mutants, demonstrating that transcriptional activation plays an important role in the degradation of SREBPs. Thus, transcription-dependent degradation of SREBP constitutes a feedback mechanism to regulate the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and may represent a general mechanism to regulate the duration of transcriptional responses.

  2. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications...

  3. Control of transcription by cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yung Wu

    Full Text Available Cell size increases significantly with increasing ploidy. Differences in cell size and ploidy are associated with alterations in gene expression, although no direct connection has been made between cell size and transcription. Here we show that ploidy-associated changes in gene expression reflect transcriptional adjustment to a larger cell size, implicating cellular geometry as a key parameter in gene regulation. Using RNA-seq, we identified genes whose expression was altered in a tetraploid as compared with the isogenic haploid. A significant fraction of these genes encode cell surface proteins, suggesting an effect of the enlarged cell size on the differential regulation of these genes. To test this hypothesis, we examined expression of these genes in haploid mutants that also produce enlarged size. Surprisingly, many genes differentially regulated in the tetraploid are identically regulated in the enlarged haploids, and the magnitude of change in gene expression correlates with the degree of size enlargement. These results indicate a causal relationship between cell size and transcription, with a size-sensing mechanism that alters transcription in response to size. The genes responding to cell size are enriched for those regulated by two mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and components in those pathways were found to mediate size-dependent gene regulation. Transcriptional adjustment to enlarged cell size could underlie other cellular changes associated with polyploidy. The causal relationship between cell size and transcription suggests that cell size homeostasis serves a regulatory role in transcriptome maintenance.

  4. Reduced hepatic tumor incidence in cyclin G1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Rugaard; Factor, Valentina M; Fantozzi, Anna

    2003-01-01

    Cyclin G1 is a transcriptional target of the tumor suppressor p53, and its expression is increased after DNA damage. Recent data show that cyclin G1 can regulate the levels of p53 by a mechanism that involves dephosphorylation of Mdm2 by protein phosphatase 2A. To understand the biologic role of ...

  5. Genetic and epigenetic control of RKIP transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datar, Ila; Tegegne, Hanna; Qin, Kevin; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bitar, Milad S; Trumbly, Robert J; Yeung, Kam C

    2014-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) is known to modulate key signaling cascades and regulate normal physiological processes such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The expression of RKIP is found to be downregulated in several cancer metastases and the repressed RKIP expression can be reactivated on treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. RKIP is a proven tumor metastasis suppressor gene and investigating the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of RKIP is therefore of immense clinical importance. In this review, we discuss the basal expression of RKIP in various tissues and the genetic aspects of the RKIP chromosomal locus including the structure of the RKIP promoter as well as gene regulatory elements such as enhancers. We also review the genetic and epigenetic modulation of RKIP transcription through EZH2, a component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and sequence specific transcription factors (TFs) BACH1 and Snail. Emerging experimental evidence supports a unifying model in which both these TFs repress RKIP transcription in cancers by recruiting the EZH2 containing repressive complex to the proximal RKIP promoter. Finally, we review the known mechanisms employed by different types of chemotherapeutic agents to activate RKIP expression in cancer cells.

  6. Transcriptional control of hepatocanalicular transporter gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M

    2000-01-01

    Transport processes for larger organic solutes at the canalicular membrane are mainly driven by members of the superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The funct ions of these transporters range from bile component secretion to xenobiotica and phase II-conjugate export. The transcript

  7. Transcription-associated quality control of mRNP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Manfred; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2013-01-01

    synthesis process so as to discard, retain or transcriptionally silence unwanted molecules. In this review we discuss the somewhat paradoxical circumstance that the retention or turnover of RNA is often linked to its synthesis. This occurs via the association of chromatin, or the transcription elongation...... complex, with RNA degradation (co)factors. Although our main focus is on protein-coding genes, we also discuss mechanisms of transcription-connected turnover of non-protein-coding RNA from where important general principles are derived......Although a prime purpose of transcription is to produce RNA, a substantial amount of transcript is nevertheless turned over very early in its lifetime. During transcription RNAs are matured by nucleases from longer precursors and activities are also employed to exert quality control over the RNA...

  8. Conjugação e validação de controle isotípico IgG1-FITC para uso em citometria de fluxo Conjugation and validation of IgG1-FITC isotype control to be used in flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márjorie A. Golim

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Em meados da década de 50 iniciou-se o desenvolvimento da citometria de fluxo, tecnologia que permite verificar características físico-químicas de células ou partículas suspensas em meio fluido. Esta tecnologia utiliza anticorpos monoclonais marcados com fluorocromos como ferramenta de investigação em diversas análises e necessita de controles isotípicos para definição da região negativa (background. Estes controles são constituídos por imunoglobulinas de mesmo isotipo e fluorocromo dos anticorpos testes, sendo o isotiocianato de fluoresceína (FITC o marcador fluorescente mais utilizado na conjugação de anticorpos. Os controles isotípicos têm como função definir a fluorescência inespecífica (células negativas e as regiões fluorescentes (células positivas. No presente estudo foi selecionado anticorpo monoclonal murino (AcMm dirigido contra antígeno eritrocitário canino, produzido no Laboratório de Anticorpos Monoclonais do Hemocentro de Botucatu, o qual reage positivamente com hemácias de cães, mas nunca com leucócitos humanos, tendo, portanto, potencial utilidade como controle negativo em citometria de fluxo. A purificação do AcMm da subclasse IgG1 foi feita por cromatografia de afinidade em Proteína-A Sepharose, e o controle da purificação realizado por eletroforese em géis de ágarose e poliacrilamida (SDS-PAGE. A imunoglobulina purificada foi conjugada ao FITC e filtrado em coluna de Sephadex G-25 para separação das proteínas marcadas e não-marcadas. O AcMm conjugado foi testado contra hemácias de cães, e o êxito da conjugação comprovado por testes de fluorescência, sendo a mediana de positividade de 94,70. Frente a leucócitos humanos a mediana de positividade foi 0,03 contra 0,50 dos reagentes comerciais. Os testes estatísticos não-paramétricos de Wilcoxon e correlação de Spearman comprovaram a eficiência e validam o controle isotípico produzido em comparação aos reagentes comerciais

  9. Tuning the orchestra: transcriptional pathways controlling axon regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eTedeschi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma in the adult mammalian central nervous system leads to irreversible structural and functional impairment due to failed regeneration attempts. In contrast, neurons in the peripheral nervous system exhibit a greater regenerative ability. It has been proposed that an orchestrated sequence of transcriptional events controlling the expression of specific sets of genes may be the underlying basis of an early cell-autonomous regenerative response. Understanding whether transcriptional fine tuning, in parallel with strategies aimed at counteracting extrinsic impediments promotes axon re-growth following central nervous system injuries represents an exciting challenge for future studies. Transcriptional pathways controlling axon regeneration are presented and discussed in this review.

  10. How salicylic acid takes transcriptional control over jasmonic acid signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte eCaarls

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulation is a central process in plant immunity. The induction or repression of defense genes is orchestrated by signaling networks that are directed by plant hormones of which salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA are the major players. Extensive cross-communication between the hormone signaling pathways allows for fine tuning of transcriptional programs, determining resistance to invaders and trade-offs with plant development. Here, we give an overview of how SA can control transcriptional reprogramming of JA-induced genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. SA can influence activity and/or localization of transcriptional regulators by post-translational modifications of transcription factors and co-regulators. SA-induced redox changes, mediated by thioredoxins and glutaredoxins, modify transcriptional regulators that are involved in suppression of JA-dependent genes, such as NPR1 and TGA transcription factors, which affects their localization or DNA binding activity. Furthermore, SA can mediate sequestering of JA-responsive transcription factors away from their target genes by stalling them in the cytosol or in complexes with repressor proteins in the nucleus. SA also affects JA-induced transcription by inducing degradation of transcription factors with an activating role in JA signaling, as was shown for the ERF transcription factor ORA59. Additionally, SA can induce negative regulators, among which WRKY transcription factors, that can directly or indirectly inhibit JA-responsive gene expression. Finally, at the DNA level, modification of histones by SA-dependent factors can result in repression of JA-responsive genes. These diverse and complex regulatory mechanisms affect important signaling hubs in the integration of hormone signaling networks. Some pathogens have evolved effectors that highjack hormone crosstalk mechanisms for their own good, which are described in this review as well.

  11. Ranges of control in the transcriptional regulation of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoyan Helga

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The positioning of genes in the genome is an important evolutionary degree of freedom for organizing gene regulation. Statistical properties of these distributions have been studied particularly in relation to the transcriptional regulatory network. The systematics of gene-gene distances then become important sources of information on the control, which different biological mechanisms exert on gene expression. Results Here we study a set of categories, which has to our knowledge not been analyzed before. We distinguish between genes that do not participate in the transcriptional regulatory network (i.e. that are according to current knowledge not producing transcription factors and do not possess binding sites for transcription factors in their regulatory region, and genes that via transcription factors either are regulated by or regulate other genes. We find that the two types of genes ("isolated" and "regulatory" genes show a clear statistical repulsion and have different ranges of correlations. In particular we find that isolated genes have a preference for shorter intergenic distances. Conclusions These findings support previous evidence from gene expression patterns for two distinct logical types of control, namely digital control (i.e. network-based control mediated by dedicated transcription factors and analog control (i.e. control based on genome structure and mediated by neighborhood on the genome.

  12. Combinatorial Gene Regulation through Kinetic Control of the Transcription Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholes, Clarissa; DePace, Angela H; Sánchez, Álvaro

    2017-01-25

    Cells decide when, where, and to what level to express their genes by "computing" information from transcription factors (TFs) binding to regulatory DNA. How is the information contained in multiple TF-binding sites integrated to dictate the rate of transcription? The dominant conceptual and quantitative model is that TFs combinatorially recruit one another and RNA polymerase to the promoter by direct physical interactions. Here, we develop a quantitative framework to explore kinetic control, an alternative model in which combinatorial gene regulation can result from TFs working on different kinetic steps of the transcription cycle. Kinetic control can generate a wide range of analog and Boolean computations without requiring the input TFs to be simultaneously bound to regulatory DNA. We propose experiments that will illuminate the role of kinetic control in transcription and discuss implications for deciphering the cis-regulatory "code."

  13. Genetic control of human brain transcript expression in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Jennifer A; Gibbs, J Raphael; Clarke, Jennifer; Ray, Monika; Zhang, Weixiong; Holmans, Peter; Rohrer, Kristen; Zhao, Alice; Marlowe, Lauren; Kaleem, Mona; McCorquodale, Donald S; Cuello, Cindy; Leung, Doris; Bryden, Leslie; Nath, Priti; Zismann, Victoria L; Joshipura, Keta; Huentelman, Matthew J; Hu-Lince, Diane; Coon, Keith D; Craig, David W; Pearson, John V; Heward, Christopher B; Reiman, Eric M; Stephan, Dietrich; Hardy, John; Myers, Amanda J

    2009-04-01

    We recently surveyed the relationship between the human brain transcriptome and genome in a series of neuropathologically normal postmortem samples. We have now analyzed additional samples with a confirmed pathologic diagnosis of late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD; final n = 188 controls, 176 cases). Nine percent of the cortical transcripts that we analyzed had expression profiles correlated with their genotypes in the combined cohort, and approximately 5% of transcripts had SNP-transcript relationships that could distinguish LOAD samples. Two of these transcripts have been previously implicated in LOAD candidate-gene SNP-expression screens. This study shows how the relationship between common inherited genetic variants and brain transcript expression can be used in the study of human brain disorders. We suggest that studying the transcriptome as a quantitative endo-phenotype has greater power for discovering risk SNPs influencing expression than the use of discrete diagnostic categories such as presence or absence of disease.

  14. Functional overlap among distinct G1/S inhibitory pathways allows robust G1 arrest by yeast mating pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Patricia A; Pryciak, Peter M

    2013-12-01

    In budding yeast, mating pheromones arrest the cell cycle in G1 phase via a pheromone-activated Cdk-inhibitor (CKI) protein, Far1. Alternate pathways must also exist, however, because deleting the cyclin CLN2 restores pheromone arrest to far1 cells. Here we probe whether these alternate pathways require the G1/S transcriptional repressors Whi5 and Stb1 or the CKI protein Sic1, whose metazoan analogues (Rb or p27) antagonize cell cycle entry. Removing Whi5 and Stb1 allows partial escape from G1 arrest in far1 cln2 cells, along with partial derepression of G1/S genes, which implies a repressor-independent route for inhibiting G1/S transcription. This route likely involves pheromone-induced degradation of Tec1, a transcriptional activator of the cyclin CLN1, because Tec1 stabilization also causes partial G1 escape in far1 cln2 cells, and this is additive with Whi5/Stb1 removal. Deleting SIC1 alone strongly disrupts Far1-independent G1 arrest, revealing that inhibition of B-type cyclin-Cdk activity can empower weak arrest pathways. Of interest, although far1 cln2 sic1 cells escaped G1 arrest, they lost viability during pheromone exposure, indicating that G1 exit is deleterious if the arrest signal remains active. Overall our findings illustrate how multiple distinct G1/S-braking mechanisms help to prevent premature cell cycle commitment and ensure a robust signal-induced G1 arrest.

  15. Riboswitch control of Rho-dependent transcription termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Kerry; Proshkin, Sergey; Sklyarova, Svetlana; Epshtein, Vitaly; Mironov, Alexander; Nudler, Evgeny; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2012-04-03

    Riboswitches are RNA sensors that regulate gene expression upon binding specific metabolites or ions. Bacterial riboswitches control gene expression primarily by promoting intrinsic transcription termination or by inhibiting translation initiation. We now report a third general mechanism of riboswitch action: governing the ability of the RNA-dependent helicase Rho to terminate transcription. We establish that Rho promotes transcription termination in the Mg(2+)-sensing mgtA riboswitch from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and the flavin mononucleotide-sensing ribB riboswitch from Escherichia coli when the corresponding riboswitch ligands are present. The Rho-specific inhibitor bicyclomycin enabled transcription of the coding regions at these two loci in bacteria experiencing repressing concentrations of the riboswitch ligands in vivo. A mutation in the mgtA leader that favors the "high Mg(2+)" conformation of the riboswitch promoted Rho-dependent transcription termination in vivo and in vitro and enhanced the ability of the RNA to stimulate Rho's ATPase activity in vitro. These effects were overcome by mutations in a C-rich region of the mRNA that is alternately folded at high and low Mg(2+), suggesting a role for this region in regulating the activity of Rho. Our results reveal a potentially widespread mode of gene regulation whereby riboswitches dictate whether a protein effector can interact with the transcription machinery to prematurely terminate transcription.

  16. The periodic down regulation of Cyclin E gene expression from exit of mitosis to end of G(1) is controlled by a deacetylase- and E2F-associated bipartite repressor element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanowska, J; Fabbrizio, E; Le Cam, L; Trouche, D; Emiliani, S; Herrera, R; Sardet, C

    2001-07-12

    The expression of cyclin E and that of a few other bona fide cell cycle regulatory genes periodically oscillates every cycle in proliferating cells. Although numerous experiments have documented the role of E2F sites and E2F activities in the control of these genes as cells exit from G(0) to move through the initial G(1)/S phase transition, almost nothing is known on the role of E2Fs during the subsequent cell cycles. Here we show that a variant E2F-site that is part of the Cyclin E Repressor Module (CERM) (Le Cam et al., 1999b) accounts for the periodic down regulation of the cyclin E promoter observed between the exit from mitosis until the mid/late G(1) phase in exponentially cycling cells. This cell cycle-dependent repression correlates with the periodic binding of an atypical G(1)-specific high molecular weight p107-E2F complex (Cyclin E Repressor Complex: CERC2) that differs in both size and DNA binding behaviors from known p107-E2F complexes. Notably, affinity purified CERC2 displays a TSA-sensitive histone deacetylase activity and, consistent with this, derepression of the cyclin E promoter by trichostatin A depends on the CERM element. Altogether, this shows that the cell cycle-dependent control of cyclin E promoter in cycling cells is embroiled in acetylation pathways via the CERM-like E2F element.

  17. Transcriptional control of DNA replication licensing by Myc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovka, Taras; Schönfeld, Manuela; Raffeiner, Philipp; Breuker, Kathrin; Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Hartl, Markus; Bister, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    The c-myc protooncogene encodes the Myc transcription factor, a global regulator of fundamental cellular processes. Deregulation of c-myc leads to tumorigenesis, and c-myc is an important driver in human cancer. Myc and its dimerization partner Max are bHLH-Zip DNA binding proteins involved in transcriptional regulation of target genes. Non-transcriptional functions have also been attributed to the Myc protein, notably direct interaction with the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) controlling the initiation of DNA replication. A key component of the pre-RC is the Cdt1 protein, an essential factor in origin licensing. Here we present data suggesting that the CDT1 gene is a transcriptional target of the Myc-Max complex. Expression of the CDT1 gene in v-myc-transformed cells directly correlates with myc expression. Also, human tumor cells with elevated c-myc expression display increased CDT1 expression. Occupation of the CDT1 promoter by Myc-Max is demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and transactivation by Myc-Max is shown in reporter assays. Ectopic expression of CDT1 leads to cell transformation. Our results provide a possible direct mechanistic link of Myc's canonical function as a transcription factor to DNA replication. Furthermore, we suggest that aberrant transcriptional activation of CDT1 by deregulated myc alleles contributes to the genomic instabilities observed in tumor cells.

  18. eIF4F-like complexes formed by cap-binding homolog TbEIF4E5 with TbEIF4G1 or TbEIF4G2 are implicated in post-transcriptional regulation in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Eden R; Vashisht, Ajay A; Malvezzi, Amaranta M; Zuberek, Joanna; Langousis, Gerasimos; Saada, Edwin A; Nascimento, Janaína De F; Stepinski, Janusz; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Hill, Kent; De Melo Neto, Osvaldo P; Wohlschlegel, James A; Sturm, Nancy R; Campbell, David A

    2014-08-01

    Members of the eIF4E mRNA cap-binding family are involved in translation and the modulation of transcript availability in other systems as part of a three-component complex including eIF4G and eIF4A. The kinetoplastids possess four described eIF4E and five eIF4G homologs. We have identified two new eIF4E family proteins in Trypanosoma brucei, and define distinct complexes associated with the fifth member, TbEIF4E5. The cytosolic TbEIF4E5 protein binds cap 0 in vitro. TbEIF4E5 was found in association with two of the five TbEIF4Gs. TbIF4EG1 bound TbEIF4E5, a 47.5-kDa protein with two RNA-binding domains, and either the regulatory protein 14-3-3 II or a 117.5-kDa protein with guanylyltransferase and methyltransferase domains in a potentially dynamic interaction. The TbEIF4G2/TbEIF4E5 complex was associated with a 17.9-kDa hypothetical protein and both 14-3-3 variants I and II. Knockdown of TbEIF4E5 resulted in the loss of productive cell movement, as evidenced by the inability of the cells to remain in suspension in liquid culture and the loss of social motility on semisolid plating medium, as well as a minor reduction of translation. Cells appeared lethargic, as opposed to compromised in flagellar function per se. The minimal use of transcriptional control in kinetoplastids requires these organisms to implement downstream mechanisms to regulate gene expression, and the TbEIF4E5/TbEIF4G1/117.5-kDa complex in particular may be a key player in that process. We suggest that a pathway involved in cell motility is affected, directly or indirectly, by one of the TbEIF4E5 complexes. © 2014 Freire et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  19. Complexity of the transcriptional network controlling secondary wall biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2014-12-01

    Secondary walls in the form of wood and fibers are the most abundant biomass produced by vascular plants, and are important raw materials for many industrial uses. Understanding how secondary walls are constructed is of significance in basic plant biology and also has far-reaching implications in genetic engineering of plant biomass better suited for various end uses, such as biofuel production. Secondary walls are composed of three major biopolymers, i.e., cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin, the biosynthesis of which requires the coordinated transcriptional regulation of all their biosynthesis genes. Genomic and molecular studies have identified a number of transcription factors, whose expression is associated with secondary wall biosynthesis. We comprehensively review how these secondary wall-associated transcription factors function together to turn on the secondary wall biosynthetic program, which leads to secondary wall deposition in vascular plants. The transcriptional network regulating secondary wall biosynthesis employs a multi-leveled feed-forward loop regulatory structure, in which the top-level secondary wall NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2 and CUC2) master switches activate the second-level MYB master switches and they together induce the expression of downstream transcription factors and secondary wall biosynthesis genes. Secondary wall NAC master switches and secondary wall MYB master switches bind to and activate the SNBE (secondary wall NAC binding element) and SMRE (secondary wall MYB-responsive element) sites, respectively, in their target gene promoters. Further investigation of what and how developmental signals trigger the transcriptional network to regulate secondary wall biosynthesis and how different secondary wall-associated transcription factors function cooperatively in activating secondary wall biosynthetic pathways will lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the transcriptional control of secondary wall biosynthesis.

  20. Transcription Factor Zbtb20 Controls Regional Specification of Mammalian Archicortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenthal, Eva Helga

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial expression of sets of transcription factors (TFs) along the mammalian cortex controls its subdivision into functional areas. Unlike neocortex, only few recent data suggest genetic mechanisms controlling the regionalization of the archicortex. TF Emx2 plays a crucial role in patterning...... later on becoming restricted exclusively to postmitotic neurons of hippocampus (Hi) proper, dentate gyrus (DG), and two transitory zones, subiculum (S) and retrosplenial cortex (Rsp). Analysis of Zbtb20-/- mice revealed altered cortical patterning at the border between neocortex and archicortex...

  1. Sequential logic model deciphers dynamic transcriptional control of gene expressions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Xuan Yeo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular signaling involves a sequence of events from ligand binding to membrane receptors through transcription factors activation and the induction of mRNA expression. The transcriptional-regulatory system plays a pivotal role in the control of gene expression. A novel computational approach to the study of gene regulation circuits is presented here. METHODOLOGY: Based on the concept of finite state machine, which provides a discrete view of gene regulation, a novel sequential logic model (SLM is developed to decipher control mechanisms of dynamic transcriptional regulation of gene expressions. The SLM technique is also used to systematically analyze the dynamic function of transcriptional inputs, the dependency and cooperativity, such as synergy effect, among the binding sites with respect to when, how much and how fast the gene of interest is expressed. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SLM is verified by a set of well studied expression data on endo16 of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (sea urchin during the embryonic midgut development. A dynamic regulatory mechanism for endo16 expression controlled by three binding sites, UI, R and Otx is identified and demonstrated to be consistent with experimental findings. Furthermore, we show that during transition from specification to differentiation in wild type endo16 expression profile, SLM reveals three binary activities are not sufficient to explain the transcriptional regulation of endo16 expression and additional activities of binding sites are required. Further analyses suggest detailed mechanism of R switch activity where indirect dependency occurs in between UI activity and R switch during specification to differentiation stage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The sequential logic formalism allows for a simplification of regulation network dynamics going from a continuous to a discrete representation of gene activation in time. In effect our SLM is non-parametric and model-independent, yet

  2. Finite Set Control Transcription for Optimal Control Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    local eigenstructure of the linear system. Along with Hsiao,46 they developed a stabilizing control law intended for a low-thrust ion engine. Gurfil...asymptotically stabilizing control to track to an arbitrary trajectory from any epoch position and velocity. Of course, when the epoch values are along the...propul- sion suite like this, a spacecraft attitude can be in any orientation and still implement a stabilizing control law. Unfortunately, it may not be

  3. Transcription termination controls prophage maintenance in Escherichia coli genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menouni, Rachid; Champ, Stéphanie; Espinosa, Leon; Boudvillain, Marc; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2013-08-27

    Prophages represent a large fraction of prokaryotic genomes and often provide new functions to their hosts, in particular virulence and fitness. How prokaryotic cells maintain such gene providers is central for understanding bacterial genome evolution by horizontal transfer. Prophage excision occurs through site-specific recombination mediated by a prophage-encoded integrase. In addition, a recombination directionality factor (or excisionase) directs the reaction toward excision and prevents the phage genome from being reintegrated. In this work, we describe the role of the transcription termination factor Rho in prophage maintenance through control of the synthesis of transcripts that mediate recombination directionality factor expression and, thus, excisive recombination. We show that Rho inhibition by bicyclomycin allows for the expression of prophage genes that lead to excisive recombination. Thus, besides its role in the silencing of horizontally acquired genes, Rho also maintains lysogeny of defective and functional prophages.

  4. Immunoglobulin genes and their transcriptional control in teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikima, Jun-ichi; Jung, Tae-Sung; Aoki, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig), which exists only in jawed vertebrates, is one of the most important molecules in adaptive immunity. In the last two decades, many teleost Ig genes have been identified by in silico data mining from the enormous gene and EST databases of many fish species. In this review, the organization of Ig gene segments, the expressed Ig isotypes and their transcriptional controls are discussed. The Ig heavy chain (IgH) locus in teleosts encodes the variable (V), the diversity (D), the joining (J) segments and three different isotypic constant (C) regions including Cμ, Cδ, and Cζ/τ genes, and is organized as a "translocon" type like the IgH loci of higher vertebrates. In contrast, the Ig light (L) chain locus is arranged in a "multicluster" or repeating set of VL, JL, and CL segments. The IgL chains have four isotypes; two κ L1/G and L3/F), σ (L2) and λ. The transcription of IgH genes in teleosts is regulated by a VH promoter and the Eμ3' enhancer, which both function in a B cell-specific manner. The location of the IgH locus, structure and transcriptional function of the Eμ3' enhancer are important to our understanding of the evolutional changes that have occurred in the IgH gene locus.

  5. A systems approach to mapping transcriptional networks controlling surfactant homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Vrushank

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary surfactant is required for lung function at birth and throughout life. Lung lipid and surfactant homeostasis requires regulation among multi-tiered processes, coordinating the synthesis of surfactant proteins and lipids, their assembly, trafficking, and storage in type II cells of the lung. The mechanisms regulating these interrelated processes are largely unknown. Results We integrated mRNA microarray data with array independent knowledge using Gene Ontology (GO similarity analysis, promoter motif searching, protein interaction and literature mining to elucidate genetic networks regulating lipid related biological processes in lung. A Transcription factor (TF - target gene (TG similarity matrix was generated by integrating data from different analytic methods. A scoring function was built to rank the likely TF-TG pairs. Using this strategy, we identified and verified critical components of a transcriptional network directing lipogenesis, lipid trafficking and surfactant homeostasis in the mouse lung. Conclusions Within the transcriptional network, SREBP, CEBPA, FOXA2, ETSF, GATA6 and IRF1 were identified as regulatory hubs displaying high connectivity. SREBP, FOXA2 and CEBPA together form a common core regulatory module that controls surfactant lipid homeostasis. The core module cooperates with other factors to regulate lipid metabolism and transport, cell growth and development, cell death and cell mediated immune response. Coordinated interactions of the TFs influence surfactant homeostasis and regulate lung function at birth.

  6. Transcriptional control in the segmentation gene network of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Schroeder

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The segmentation gene network of Drosophila consists of maternal and zygotic factors that generate, by transcriptional (cross- regulation, expression patterns of increasing complexity along the anterior-posterior axis of the embryo. Using known binding site information for maternal and zygotic gap transcription factors, the computer algorithm Ahab recovers known segmentation control elements (modules with excellent success and predicts many novel modules within the network and genome-wide. We show that novel module predictions are highly enriched in the network and typically clustered proximal to the promoter, not only upstream, but also in intronic space and downstream. When placed upstream of a reporter gene, they consistently drive patterned blastoderm expression, in most cases faithfully producing one or more pattern elements of the endogenous gene. Moreover, we demonstrate for the entire set of known and newly validated modules that Ahab's prediction of binding sites correlates well with the expression patterns produced by the modules, revealing basic rules governing their composition. Specifically, we show that maternal factors consistently act as activators and that gap factors act as repressors, except for the bimodal factor Hunchback. Our data suggest a simple context-dependent rule for its switch from repressive to activating function. Overall, the composition of modules appears well fitted to the spatiotemporal distribution of their positive and negative input factors. Finally, by comparing Ahab predictions with different categories of transcription factor input, we confirm the global regulatory structure of the segmentation gene network, but find odd skipped behaving like a primary pair-rule gene. The study expands our knowledge of the segmentation gene network by increasing the number of experimentally tested modules by 50%. For the first time, the entire set of validated modules is analyzed for binding site composition under a

  7. The other side of cardiac Ca2+ signaling: transcriptional control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro eDomínguez-Rodríquez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+ is probably the most versatile signal transduction element used by all cell types. In the heart, it is essential to activate cellular contraction in each heartbeat. Nevertheless Ca2+ is not only a key element in excitation-contraction coupling (EC coupling, but it is also a pivotal second messenger in cardiac signal transduction, being able to control processes such as excitability, metabolism, and transcriptional regulation. Regarding the latter, Ca2+ activates Ca2+-dependent transcription factors by a process called excitation-transcription coupling (ET coupling. ET coupling is an integrated process by which the common signaling pathways that regulate EC coupling activate transcription factors. Although ET coupling has been extensively studied in neurons and other cell types, less is known in cardiac muscle. Some hints have been found in studies on the development of cardiac hypertrophy, where two Ca2+-dependent enzymes are key actors: Ca2+/Calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII and phosphatase calcineurin, both of which are activated by the complex Ca2+/ /Calmodulin. The question now is how ET coupling occurs in cardiomyocytes, where intracellular Ca2+ is continuously oscillating. In this focused review, we will draw attention to location of Ca2+ signaling: intranuclear ([Ca2+]n or cytoplasmic ([Ca2+]c, and the specific ionic channels involved in the activation of cardiac ET coupling. Specifically, we will highlight the role of the 1,4,5 inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs in the elevation of [Ca2+]n levels, which are important to locally activate CaMKII, and the role of transient receptor potential channels canonical (TRPCs in [Ca2+]c, needed to activate calcineurin.

  8. Transcription regulation by CHD proteins to control plant development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng eHu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available CHD (Chromodomain-Helicase-DNA binding proteins have been characterized in various species as important transcription regulators by their chromatin remodeling activity. However, in plant the function of these proteins has hardly been analyzed before except that Arabidopsis PICKLE and rice CHR729 are identified to play critical roles in the regulation of series of genes involved in developmental or stress responding process. In this review we focus on how plant CHD proteins regulate gene expression and the role of these proteins in controlling plant development and stress response.

  9. RNA polymerase II transcriptional fidelity control and its functional interplay with DNA modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Chong, Jenny; Shin, Ji Hyun; Xu, Jun; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate genetic information transfer is essential for life. As a key enzyme involved in the first step of gene expression, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) must maintain high transcriptional fidelity while it reads along DNA template and synthesizes RNA transcript in a stepwise manner during transcription elongation. DNA lesions or modifications may lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity or transcription elongation dynamics. In this review, we will summarize recent progress towards understanding the molecular basis of RNA Pol II transcriptional fidelity control and impacts of DNA lesions and modifications on Pol II transcription elongation. PMID:26392149

  10. Phosphate-Activated Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Stabilizes G1 Cyclin To Trigger Cell Cycle Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoyo, S.; Ricco, N.; Bru, S.; Hernández-Ortega, S.; Escoté, X.; Aldea, M.

    2013-01-01

    G1 cyclins, in association with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), are universal activators of the transcriptional G1-S machinery during entry into the cell cycle. Regulation of cyclin degradation is crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle, but the mechanisms that modulate cyclin stability to control cell cycle entry are still unknown. Here, we show that a lack of phosphate downregulates Cln3 cyclin and leads to G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stability of Cln3 protein is diminished in strains with low activity of Pho85, a phosphate-sensing CDK. Cln3 is an in vitro substrate of Pho85, and both proteins interact in vivo. More interestingly, cells that carry a CLN3 allele encoding aspartic acid substitutions at the sites of Pho85 phosphorylation maintain high levels of Cln3 independently of Pho85 activity. Moreover, these cells do not properly arrest in G1 in the absence of phosphate and they die prematurely. Finally, the activity of Pho85 is essential for accumulating Cln3 and for reentering the cell cycle after phosphate refeeding. Taken together, our data indicate that Cln3 is a molecular target of the Pho85 kinase that is required to modulate cell cycle entry in response to environmental changes in nutrient availability. PMID:23339867

  11. Genes Acting on Transcriptional Control during Abiotic Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glacy Jaqueline da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses are the major cause of yield loss in crops around the world. Greater genetic gains are possible by combining the classical genetic improvement with advanced molecular biology techniques. The understanding of mechanisms triggered by plants to meet conditions of stress is of fundamental importance for the elucidation of these processes. Current genetically modified crops help to mitigate the effects of these stresses, increasing genetic gains in order to supply the agricultural market and the demand for better quality food throughout the world. To obtain safe genetic modified organisms for planting and consumption, a thorough grasp of the routes and genes that act in response to these stresses is necessary. This work was developed in order to collect important information about essential TF gene families for transcriptional control under abiotic stress responses.

  12. Timing of transcriptional quiescence during gametogenesis is controlled by global histone H3K4 demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengshu; Soloveychik, Maria; Ranger, Mathieu; Schertzberg, Michael; Shah, Zarna; Raisner, Ryan; Venkatasubrahmanyan, Shivkumar; Tsui, Kyle; Gebbia, Marinella; Hughes, Tim; van Bakel, Harm; Nislow, Corey; Madhani, Hiten D; Meneghini, Marc D

    2012-11-13

    Gametes are among the most highly specialized cells produced during development. Although gametogenesis culminates in transcriptional quiescence in plants and animals, regulatory mechanisms controlling this are unknown. Here, we confirm that gamete differentiation in the single-celled yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is accompanied by global transcriptional shutoff following the completion of meiosis. We show that Jhd2, a highly conserved JARID1-family histone H3K4 demethylase, activates protein-coding gene transcription in opposition to this programmed transcriptional shutoff, sustaining the period of productive transcription during spore differentiation. Moreover, using genome-wide nucleosome, H3K4me, and transcript mapping experiments, we demonstrate that JHD2 globally represses intergenic noncoding transcription during this period. The widespread transcriptional defects of JHD2 mutants are associated with precocious differentiation and the production of stress-sensitive spores, demonstrating that Jhd2 regulation of the global postmeiotic transcriptional program is critical for the production of healthy meiotic progeny.

  13. Transcriptional control in Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and associated genes, proteins, and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brady D.; Thompson, David N.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Reed, David W.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.

    2015-11-17

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods of modulating transcription or transcription or transcriptional control using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  14. Transcriptional control in alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and associated genes, proteins, and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brady D; Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2016-11-22

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods of modulating transcription or transcription or transcriptional control using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  15. Transcriptional control in Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and associated genes, proteins, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brady Deneys; Thompson, David N; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki Slavchev; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods of modulating transcription or transcription or transcriptional control using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  16. Transcriptional network control of normal and leukaemic haematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sive, Jonathan I; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-12-10

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a key role in determining the gene expression profiles of stem/progenitor cells, and defining their potential to differentiate into mature cell lineages. TF interactions within gene-regulatory networks are vital to these processes, and dysregulation of these networks by TF overexpression, deletion or abnormal gene fusions have been shown to cause malignancy. While investigation of these processes remains a challenge, advances in genome-wide technologies and growing interactions between laboratory and computational science are starting to produce increasingly accurate network models. The haematopoietic system provides an attractive experimental system to elucidate gene regulatory mechanisms, and allows experimental investigation of both normal and dysregulated networks. In this review we examine the principles of TF-controlled gene regulatory networks and the key experimental techniques used to investigate them. We look in detail at examples of how these approaches can be used to dissect out the regulatory mechanisms controlling normal haematopoiesis, as well as the dysregulated networks associated with haematological malignancies.

  17. FACT prevents the accumulation of free histones evicted from transcribed chromatin and a subsequent cell cycle delay in G1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Morillo-Huesca

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The FACT complex participates in chromatin assembly and disassembly during transcription elongation. The yeast mutants affected in the SPT16 gene, which encodes one of the FACT subunits, alter the expression of G1 cyclins and exhibit defects in the G1/S transition. Here we show that the dysfunction of chromatin reassembly factors, like FACT or Spt6, down-regulates the expression of the gene encoding the cyclin that modulates the G1 length (CLN3 in START by specifically triggering the repression of its promoter. The G1 delay undergone by spt16 mutants is not mediated by the DNA-damage checkpoint, although the mutation of RAD53, which is otherwise involved in histone degradation, enhances the cell-cycle defects of spt16-197. We reveal how FACT dysfunction triggers an accumulation of free histones evicted from transcribed chromatin. This accumulation is enhanced in a rad53 background and leads to a delay in G1. Consistently, we show that the overexpression of histones in wild-type cells down-regulates CLN3 in START and causes a delay in G1. Our work shows that chromatin reassembly factors are essential players in controlling the free histones potentially released from transcribed chromatin and describes a new cell cycle phenomenon that allows cells to respond to excess histones before starting DNA replication.

  18. FACT prevents the accumulation of free histones evicted from transcribed chromatin and a subsequent cell cycle delay in G1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Morillo-Huesca

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The FACT complex participates in chromatin assembly and disassembly during transcription elongation. The yeast mutants affected in the SPT16 gene, which encodes one of the FACT subunits, alter the expression of G1 cyclins and exhibit defects in the G1/S transition. Here we show that the dysfunction of chromatin reassembly factors, like FACT or Spt6, down-regulates the expression of the gene encoding the cyclin that modulates the G1 length (CLN3 in START by specifically triggering the repression of its promoter. The G1 delay undergone by spt16 mutants is not mediated by the DNA-damage checkpoint, although the mutation of RAD53, which is otherwise involved in histone degradation, enhances the cell-cycle defects of spt16-197. We reveal how FACT dysfunction triggers an accumulation of free histones evicted from transcribed chromatin. This accumulation is enhanced in a rad53 background and leads to a delay in G1. Consistently, we show that the overexpression of histones in wild-type cells down-regulates CLN3 in START and causes a delay in G1. Our work shows that chromatin reassembly factors are essential players in controlling the free histones potentially released from transcribed chromatin and describes a new cell cycle phenomenon that allows cells to respond to excess histones before starting DNA replication.

  19. Strategic cell-cycle regulatory features that provide mammalian cells with tunable G1 length and reversible G1 arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Pfeuty

    Full Text Available Transitions between consecutive phases of the eukaryotic cell cycle are driven by the catalytic activity of selected sets of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks. Yet, their occurrence and precise timing is tightly scheduled by a variety of means including Cdk association with inhibitory/adaptor proteins (CKIs. Here we focus on the regulation of G1-phase duration by the end of which cells of multicelled organisms must decide whether to enter S phase or halt, and eventually then, differentiate, senesce or die to obey the homeostatic rules of their host. In mammalian cells, entry in and progression through G1 phase involve sequential phosphorylation and inactivation of the retinoblastoma Rb proteins, first, by cyclin D-Cdk4,6 with the help of CKIs of the Cip/Kip family and, next, by the cyclin E-Cdk2 complexes that are negatively regulated by Cip/Kip proteins. Using a dynamical modeling approach, we show that the very way how the Rb and Cip/Kip regulatory modules interact differentially with cyclin D-Cdk4,6 and cyclin E-Cdk2 provides to mammalian cells a powerful means to achieve an exquisitely-sensitive control of G1-phase duration and fully reversible G1 arrests. Consistently, corruption of either one of these two modules precludes G1 phase elongation and is able to convert G1 arrests from reversible to irreversible. This study unveils fundamental design principles of mammalian G1-phase regulation that are likely to confer to mammalian cells the ability to faithfully control the occurrence and timing of their division process in various conditions.

  20. Transcription factor PIF4 controls the thermosensory activation of flowering

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S. Vinod

    2012-03-21

    Plant growth and development are strongly affected by small differences in temperature. Current climate change has already altered global plant phenology and distribution, and projected increases in temperature pose a significant challenge to agriculture. Despite the important role of temperature on plant development, the underlying pathways are unknown. It has previously been shown that thermal acceleration of flowering is dependent on the florigen, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). How this occurs is, however, not understood, because the major pathway known to upregulate FT, the photoperiod pathway, is not required for thermal acceleration of flowering. Here we demonstrate a direct mechanism by which increasing temperature causes the bHLH transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) to activate FT. Our findings provide a new understanding of how plants control their timing of reproduction in response to temperature. Flowering time is an important trait in crops as well as affecting the life cycles of pollinator species. A molecular understanding of how temperature affects flowering will be important for mitigating the effects of climate change. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  1. First Exon Length Controls Active Chromatin Signatures and Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole I. Bieberstein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we explore the role of splicing in transcription, employing both genome-wide analysis of human ChIP-seq data and experimental manipulation of exon-intron organization in transgenic cell lines. We show that the activating histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K9ac map specifically to first exon-intron boundaries. This is surprising, because these marks help recruit general transcription factors (GTFs to promoters. In genes with long first exons, promoter-proximal levels of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac are greatly reduced; consequently, GTFs and RNA polymerase II are low at transcription start sites (TSSs and exhibit a second, promoter-distal peak from which transcription also initiates. In contrast, short first exons lead to increased H3K4me3 and H3K9ac at promoters, higher expression levels, accuracy in TSS usage, and a lower frequency of antisense transcription. Therefore, first exon length is predictive for gene activity. Finally, splicing inhibition and intron deletion reduce H3K4me3 levels and transcriptional output. Thus, gene architecture and splicing determines transcription quantity and quality as well as chromatin signatures.

  2. 7SK-BAF axis controls pervasive transcription at enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Ryan A; Do, Brian T; Rubin, Adam J; Calo, Eliezer; Lee, Byron; Kuchelmeister, Hannes; Rale, Michael; Chu, Ci; Kool, Eric T; Wysocka, Joanna; Khavari, Paul A; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-03-01

    RNA functions at enhancers remain mysterious. Here we show that the 7SK small nuclear RNA (snRNA) inhibits enhancer transcription by modulating nucleosome position. 7SK occupies enhancers and super enhancers genome wide in mouse and human cells, and it is required to limit enhancer-RNA initiation and synthesis in a manner distinct from promoter pausing. Clustered elements at super enhancers uniquely require 7SK to prevent convergent transcription and DNA-damage signaling. 7SK physically interacts with the BAF chromatin-remodeling complex, recruits BAF to enhancers and inhibits enhancer transcription by modulating chromatin structure. In turn, 7SK occupancy at enhancers coincides with that of Brd4 and is exquisitely sensitive to the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. Thus, 7SK uses distinct mechanisms to counteract the diverse consequences of pervasive transcription that distinguish super enhancers, enhancers and promoters.

  3. The transcription factor SOX17 is involved in the transcriptional control of the uteroglobin gene in rabbit endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carlos; Calvo, Enrique; Nieto, Antonio

    2007-10-15

    The transcription of the uteroglobin gene (ug) is induced by progesterone in the rabbit endometrium, primarily through the binding of the progesterone receptor to the distal region of the ug promoter. However, other transcription factors participate in the progesterone action. The proximal ug promoter contains several putative consensus sequences for the binding of various progesterone-dependent endometrial nuclear factors (Perez Martinez et al. [1996] Arch Biochem Biophys 333: 12-18), suggesting that several transcription factors might be implicated in the hormonal induction of ug. We report here that one of these progesterone-dependent factors specifically binds to the sequence CACAATG (-183/-177) of the rabbit ug promoter. This sequence (hereafter called element G') is very similar to the consensus sequence for binding of the SOX family of transcription factors. Mutation of the element G' reduced transcription from the ug promoter in transient expression experiments. The endometrial factor was purified and analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography and ion trap coupled mass spectrometry yielding two partial amino acid sequences corresponding to a region of SOX17 that is highly conserved inter-species. This identification was confirmed by immunological techniques using a specific anti-SOX17 antibody. In agreement with the above findings, overexpression of SOX17 in transfected endometrial cells increased transcription from the ug promoter. SOX17 gradually accumulated in the nucleus in vivo concomitant with the induction of ug expression by progesterone in the endometrium. Thus, these findings implicate, for the first time, SOX17 in the transcriptional control of rabbit ug.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase in the control of ketogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegardt, F G

    1998-10-01

    Mitochondrial and cytosolic HMG-CoA synthases are encoded by two different genes. Control of ketogenesis is exerted by transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase. Fasting, cAMP, and fatty acids increase its transcriptional rate, while refeeding and insulin repress it. Fatty acids increase transcription through peroxisomal proliferator regulatory element (PPRE), to which peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) can bind. Other transcription factors such as chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) compete for the PPRE site, modulating the response of PPAR.

  5. Dux4 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through upregulation of p21 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jin, Suqin; Hao, Hongjun [Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Zheng, Lemin [The Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences of Education Ministry, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Molecular Biology and Regulatory Peptides of Health Ministry, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhou, Boda [The Department of Cardiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Wei; Lv, He [Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Yuan, Yun, E-mail: yuanyun2002@sohu.com [Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Dux4 induced TE671 cell proliferation defect and G1 phase arrest. • Dux4 upregulated p21 expression without activating p53. • Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. • Sp1 binding site was required for Dux4-induced p21 promoter activation. - Abstract: It has been implicated that Dux4 plays crucial roles in development of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. But the underlying myopathic mechanisms and related down-stream events of this retrogene were far from clear. Here, we reported that overexpression of Dux4 in a cell model TE671 reduced cell proliferation rate, and increased G1 phase accumulation. We also determined the impact of Dux4 on p53/p21 signal pathway, which controls the checkpoint in cell cycle progression. Overexpression of Dux4 increased p21 mRNA and protein level, while expression of p53, phospho-p53 remained unchanged. Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we demonstrated that enhanced Dux4 expression increased p21 promoter activity and elevated expression of Sp1 transcription factor. Mutation of Sp1 binding site decreased dux4 induced p21 promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the Dux4-induced binding of Sp1 to p21 promoter in vivo. These results suggest that Dux4 might induce proliferation inhibition and G1 phase arrest through upregulation of p21.

  6. Transcriptional control of fleshy fruit development and ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlova, Rumyana; Chapman, Natalie; David, Karine; Angenent, Gerco C; Seymour, Graham B; de Maagd, Ruud A

    2014-08-01

    Fleshy fruits have evolved to be attractive to frugivores in order to enhance seed dispersal, and have become an indispensable part of the human diet. Here we review the recent advances in the understanding of transcriptional regulation of fleshy fruit development and ripening with a focus on tomato. While aspects of fruit development are probably conserved throughout the angiosperms, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, it is shown that the likely orthologues of Arabidopsis genes have distinct functions in fleshy fruits. The model for the study of fleshy fruit development is tomato, because of the availability of single gene mutants and transgenic knock-down lines. In other species, our knowledge is often incomplete or absent. Tomato fruit size and shape are co-determined by transcription factors acting during formation of the ovary. Other transcription factors play a role in fruit chloroplast formation, and upon ripening impact quality aspects such as secondary metabolite content. In tomato, the transcription factors NON-RIPENING (NOR), COLORLESS NON-RIPENING (CNR), and RIPENING INHIBITOR (MADS-RIN) in concert with ethylene signalling regulate ripening, possibly in response to a developmental switch. Additional components include TOMATO AGAMOUS-LIKE1 (TAGL1), APETALA2a (AP2a), and FRUITFULL (FUL1 and FUL2). The links between this highly connected regulatory network and downstream effectors modulating colour, texture, and flavour are still relatively poorly understood. Intertwined with this network is post-transcriptional regulation by fruit-expressed microRNAs targeting several of these transcription factors. This important developmental process is also governed by changes in DNA methylation levels and possibly chromatin remodelling.

  7. Constrained transcription factor spacing is prevalent and important for transcriptional control of mouse blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Felicia S L; Schütte, Judith; Ruau, David; Diamanti, Evangelia; Hannah, Rebecca; Kinston, Sarah J; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-12-16

    Combinatorial transcription factor (TF) binding is essential for cell-type-specific gene regulation. However, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms of TF interactions, including to what extent constrained spacing and orientation of interacting TFs are critical for regulatory element activity. To examine the relative prevalence of the 'enhanceosome' versus the 'TF collective' model of combinatorial TF binding, a comprehensive analysis of TF binding site sequences in large scale datasets is necessary. We developed a motif-pair discovery pipeline to identify motif co-occurrences with preferential distance(s) between motifs in TF-bound regions. Utilizing a compendium of 289 mouse haematopoietic TF ChIP-seq datasets, we demonstrate that haematopoietic-related motif-pairs commonly occur with highly conserved constrained spacing and orientation between motifs. Furthermore, motif clustering revealed specific associations for both heterotypic and homotypic motif-pairs with particular haematopoietic cell types. We also showed that disrupting the spacing between motif-pairs significantly affects transcriptional activity in a well-known motif-pair-E-box and GATA, and in two previously unknown motif-pairs with constrained spacing-Ets and Homeobox as well as Ets and E-box. In this study, we provide evidence for widespread sequence-specific TF pair interaction with DNA that conforms to the 'enhanceosome' model, and furthermore identify associations between specific haematopoietic cell-types and motif-pairs. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Transcriptional control of fleshy fruit development and ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karlova, R.B.; Chapman, N.; David, K.; Angenent, G.C.; Seymour, G.B.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Fleshy fruits have evolved to be attractive to frugivores in order to enhance seed dispersal, and have become an indispensable part of the human diet. Here we review the recent advances in the understanding of transcriptional regulation of fleshy fruit development and ripening with a focus on tomato

  9. Glucocorticoid control of gene transcription in neural tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, Maarten Christian

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones exert modulatory effects on neural function in a delayed genomic fashion. The two receptor types that can bind glucocorticoids, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), are ligand-inducible transcription factors. Therefore, changes in gene exp

  10. Global transcriptional profiling reveals Streptococcus agalactiae genes controlled by the MtaR transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvek Urska

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus; GBS is a significant bacterial pathogen of neonates and an emerging pathogen of adults. Though transcriptional regulators are abundantly encoded on the GBS genome, their role in GBS pathogenesis is poorly understood. The mtaR gene encodes a putative LysR-type transcriptional regulator that is critical for the full virulence of GBS. Previous studies have shown that an mtaR- mutant transports methionine at reduced rates and grows poorly in normal human plasma not supplemented with methionine. The decreased virulence of the mtaR mutant was correlated with a methionine transport defect; however, no MtaR-regulated genes were identified. Results Microarray analysis of wild-type GBS and an mtaR mutant revealed differential expression of 12 genes, including 1 upregulated and 11 downregulated genes in the mtaR mutant. Among the downregulated genes, we identified a cluster of cotranscribed genes encoding a putative methionine transporter (metQ1NP and peptidase (pdsM. The expression of four genes potentially involved in arginine transport (artPQ and arginine biosynthesis (argGH was downregulated and these genes localized to two transcriptional units. The virulence factor cspA, which encodes an extracellular protease, was downregulated. Additionally, the SAN_1255 locus, which putatively encodes a protein displaying similarity to plasminogen activators, was downregulated. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to describe the global influence of MtaR on GBS gene expression. This study implicates the metQ1NP genes as encoding the MtaR-regulated methionine transporter, which may provide a mechanistic explanation for the methionine-dependent growth defect of the mtaR mutant. In addition to modulating the expression of genes involved in metabolism and amino acid transport, inactivation of mtaR affected the expression of other GBS genes implicated in pathogenesis. These findings

  11. Engineering transcriptional regulation to control Pdu microcompartment formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward Y; Jakobson, Christopher M; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) show great promise for the organization of engineered metabolic pathways within the bacterial cytoplasm. This subcellular organelle is composed of a protein shell of 100-200 nm diameter that natively encapsulates multi-enzyme pathways. The high energy cost of synthesizing the thousands of protein subunits required for each MCP demands precise regulation of MCP formation for both native and engineered systems. Here, we study the regulation of the propanediol utilization (Pdu) MCP, for which growth on 1,2-propanediol induces expression of the Pdu operon for the catabolism of 1,2-propanediol. We construct a fluorescence-based transcriptional reporter to investigate the activation of the Ppdu promoter, which drives the transcription of 21 pdu genes. Guided by this reporter, we find that MCPs can be expressed in strains grown in rich media, provided that glucose is not present. We also characterize the response of the Ppdu promoter to a transcriptional activator of the pdu operon, PocR, and find PocR to be a necessary component of Pdu MCP formation. Furthermore, we find that MCPs form normally upon the heterologous expression of PocR even in the absence of the natural inducer 1,2-propanediol and in the presence of glucose, and that Pdu MCPs formed in response to heterologous PocR expression can metabolize 1,2-propanediol in vivo. We anticipate that this technique of overexpressing a key transcription factor may be used to study and engineer the formation, size, and/or number of MCPs for the Pdu and related MCP systems.

  12. Engineering transcriptional regulation to control Pdu microcompartment formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Y Kim

    Full Text Available Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs show great promise for the organization of engineered metabolic pathways within the bacterial cytoplasm. This subcellular organelle is composed of a protein shell of 100-200 nm diameter that natively encapsulates multi-enzyme pathways. The high energy cost of synthesizing the thousands of protein subunits required for each MCP demands precise regulation of MCP formation for both native and engineered systems. Here, we study the regulation of the propanediol utilization (Pdu MCP, for which growth on 1,2-propanediol induces expression of the Pdu operon for the catabolism of 1,2-propanediol. We construct a fluorescence-based transcriptional reporter to investigate the activation of the Ppdu promoter, which drives the transcription of 21 pdu genes. Guided by this reporter, we find that MCPs can be expressed in strains grown in rich media, provided that glucose is not present. We also characterize the response of the Ppdu promoter to a transcriptional activator of the pdu operon, PocR, and find PocR to be a necessary component of Pdu MCP formation. Furthermore, we find that MCPs form normally upon the heterologous expression of PocR even in the absence of the natural inducer 1,2-propanediol and in the presence of glucose, and that Pdu MCPs formed in response to heterologous PocR expression can metabolize 1,2-propanediol in vivo. We anticipate that this technique of overexpressing a key transcription factor may be used to study and engineer the formation, size, and/or number of MCPs for the Pdu and related MCP systems.

  13. Expression liver-directed genes by employing synthetic transcriptional control units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie-Luise Lemken; Wolfgang A. Wybranietz; Ulrike Schmidt; Florian Graepler; Sorin Armeanu; Michael Bitzer; Ulrich M. Lauer

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To generate and characterize the synthetic transcriptional control units for transcriptional targeting of the liver,thereby compensating for the lack of specificity of currently available gene therapeutic vector systems.METHODS: Synthetic transcriptional control unit constructs were generated and analyzed for transcriptional activities in different cell types by FACS quantification, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and Western blotting. RESULTS: A new bifunctionally-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)/neor fusion gene cassette was generated,and could flexibly be used both for transcript quantification and for selection of stable cell clones. Then, numerous synthetic transcriptional control units consisting of a minimal promoter linked to "naturally" derived composite enhancer elements from liver-specific expressed genes or binding sites of liver-specific transcription factors were inserted upstream of this reporter cassette. Following liposome-mediated transfection, EGFP reporter protein quantification by FACS analysis identified constructs encoding multimerized composite elements of the apolipoprotein B100 (ApoB) promoter or the ornithin transcarbamoylase (OTC) enhancer to exhibit maximum transcriptional activities in liver originating cell lines, but only background levels in non-liver originating cell lines. In contrast, constructs encoding only singular binding sites of liver-specific transcription factors, namely hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)1, HNF3, HNF4, HNF5, or CAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) only achieved background levels of EGFP expression. Finally, both semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis of Hep3B cells demonstrated maximum transcriptional activities for a multimeric 4xApoB cassette construct, which fully complied with the data obtained by initial FACS analysis.CONCLUSION: Synthetic transcriptional control unit constructs not only exhibit a superb degree of structural compactness, but also provide new means for liver

  14. The control of HIV transcription: keeping RNA polymerase II on track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Melanie; Geyer, Matthias; Zhou, Qiang

    2011-11-17

    Thirteen years ago, human cyclin T1 was identified as part of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) and the long-sought host cofactor for the HIV-1 transactivator Tat. Recent years have brought new insights into the intricate regulation of P-TEFb function and its relationship with Tat, revealing novel mechanisms for controlling HIV transcription and fueling new efforts to overcome the barrier of transcriptional latency in eradicating HIV. Moreover, the improved understanding of HIV and Tat forms a basis for studying transcription elongation control in general. Here, we review advances in HIV transcription research with a focus on the growing family of cellular P-TEFb complexes, structural insights into the interactions between Tat, P-TEFb, and TAR RNA, and the multifaceted regulation of these interactions by posttranscriptional modifications of Tat. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Okawa, Hiroko; Kamano, Yuya; Niibe, Kunimichi; Kayashima, Hiroki; Osathanon, Thanaphum; Pavasant, Prasit; Saeki, Makio; Yatani, Hirofumi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet)-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR) expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR). Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx) cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx). MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional activation

  16. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Wang

    Full Text Available Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR. Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx. MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP, osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional

  17. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Okawa, Hiroko; Kamano, Yuya; Niibe, Kunimichi; Kayashima, Hiroki; Osathanon, Thanaphum; Pavasant, Prasit; Saeki, Makio; Yatani, Hirofumi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet)-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR) expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR). Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx) cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx). MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional activation

  18. C. elegans BED domain transcription factor BED-3 controls lineage-specific cell proliferation during organogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Takao; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    The control of cell division is critical to organogenesis, but how this control is achieved is not fully understood. We found that mutations in bed-3, encoding a BED Zn-finger domain transcription factor, confer a phenotype where a specific set of cell divisions during vulval organogenesis is lost. Unlike general cell cycle regulators in Caenorhabditis elegans, the function of bed-3 is restricted to specific lineages. Transcriptional reporters suggest that bed-3 is expressed in a limited numb...

  19. Transcriptional Control During Hematopoietic Development : Transcription factor binding and chromatin conformation dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van den Heuvel (Anita)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractA cell’s identity is primarily determined by the proteins it produces and therefore by the genes it expresses. During development, correct cell fate specification and determination therefore requires a strictly controlled upregulation or downregulation of lineage-specific gene expres

  20. Termination factor Rho: From the control of pervasive transcription to cell fate determination in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidnenko, Vladimir; Nicolas, Pierre; Grylak-Mielnicka, Aleksandra; Delumeau, Olivier; Auger, Sandrine; Aucouturier, Anne; Guerin, Cyprien; Repoila, Francis; Bardowski, Jacek; Aymerich, Stéphane; Bidnenko, Elena

    2017-07-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA species originating from pervasive transcription are regulators of various cellular processes, from the expression of individual genes to the control of cellular development and oncogenesis. In prokaryotes, the function of pervasive transcription and its output on cell physiology is still unknown. Most bacteria possess termination factor Rho, which represses pervasive, mostly antisense, transcription. Here, we investigate the biological significance of Rho-controlled transcription in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Rho inactivation strongly affected gene expression in B. subtilis, as assessed by transcriptome and proteome analysis of a rho-null mutant during exponential growth in rich medium. Subsequent physiological analyses demonstrated that a considerable part of Rho-controlled transcription is connected to balanced regulation of three mutually exclusive differentiation programs: cell motility, biofilm formation, and sporulation. In the absence of Rho, several up-regulated sense and antisense transcripts affect key structural and regulatory elements of these differentiation programs, thereby suppressing motility and biofilm formation and stimulating sporulation. We dissected how Rho is involved in the activity of the cell fate decision-making network, centered on the master regulator Spo0A. We also revealed a novel regulatory mechanism of Spo0A activation through Rho-dependent intragenic transcription termination of the protein kinase kinB gene. Altogether, our findings indicate that distinct Rho-controlled transcripts are functional and constitute a previously unknown built-in module for the control of cell differentiation in B. subtilis. In a broader context, our results highlight the recruitment of the termination factor Rho, for which the conserved biological role is probably to repress pervasive transcription, in highly integrated, bacterium-specific, regulatory networks.

  1. Termination factor Rho: From the control of pervasive transcription to cell fate determination in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Bidnenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, RNA species originating from pervasive transcription are regulators of various cellular processes, from the expression of individual genes to the control of cellular development and oncogenesis. In prokaryotes, the function of pervasive transcription and its output on cell physiology is still unknown. Most bacteria possess termination factor Rho, which represses pervasive, mostly antisense, transcription. Here, we investigate the biological significance of Rho-controlled transcription in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Rho inactivation strongly affected gene expression in B. subtilis, as assessed by transcriptome and proteome analysis of a rho-null mutant during exponential growth in rich medium. Subsequent physiological analyses demonstrated that a considerable part of Rho-controlled transcription is connected to balanced regulation of three mutually exclusive differentiation programs: cell motility, biofilm formation, and sporulation. In the absence of Rho, several up-regulated sense and antisense transcripts affect key structural and regulatory elements of these differentiation programs, thereby suppressing motility and biofilm formation and stimulating sporulation. We dissected how Rho is involved in the activity of the cell fate decision-making network, centered on the master regulator Spo0A. We also revealed a novel regulatory mechanism of Spo0A activation through Rho-dependent intragenic transcription termination of the protein kinase kinB gene. Altogether, our findings indicate that distinct Rho-controlled transcripts are functional and constitute a previously unknown built-in module for the control of cell differentiation in B. subtilis. In a broader context, our results highlight the recruitment of the termination factor Rho, for which the conserved biological role is probably to repress pervasive transcription, in highly integrated, bacterium-specific, regulatory networks.

  2. Tunable signal processing through modular control of transcription factor translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Budnik, Bogdan A.; Gunawardena, Jeremy; O’Shea, Erin K.

    2013-01-01

    Signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation. We explored how TFs process signaling inputs to generate diverse dynamic responses. The budding yeast general stress responsive TF Msn2 acted as a tunable signal processor that could track, filter, or integrate signals in an input dependent manner. This tunable signal processing appears to originate from dual regulation of both nuclear import and export by phosphorylation, as mutants with one form of regulation sustained only one signal processing function. Versatile signal processing by Msn2 is crucial for generating distinct dynamic responses to different natural stresses. Our findings reveal how complex signal processing functions are integrated into a single molecule and provide a guide for the design of TFs with “programmable” signal processing functions. PMID:23349292

  3. Tunable signal processing through modular control of transcription factor translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Budnik, Bogdan A; Gunawardena, Jeremy; O'Shea, Erin K

    2013-01-25

    Signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation. We explored how TFs process signaling inputs to generate diverse dynamic responses. The budding yeast general stress-responsive TF Msn2 acted as a tunable signal processor that could track, filter, or integrate signals in an input-dependent manner. This tunable signal processing appears to originate from dual regulation of both nuclear import and export by phosphorylation, as mutants with one form of regulation sustained only one signal-processing function. Versatile signal processing by Msn2 is crucial for generating distinct dynamic responses to different natural stresses. Our findings reveal how complex signal-processing functions are integrated into a single molecule and provide a guide for the design of TFs with "programmable" signal-processing functions.

  4. Transcriptional regulation is a major controller of cell cycle transition dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanel, Alessandro; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Cardelli, Luca

    2012-01-01

    in various organisms showed the importance of positive feedbacks in other transitions as well. Here we investigate if a universal control system with transcriptional regulation(s) and post-translational positive feedback(s) can be proposed for the regulation of all cell cycle transitions. Through...... computational modeling, we analyze the transition dynamics in all possible combinations of transcriptional and post-translational regulations. We find that some combinations lead to 'sloppy' transitions, while others give very precise control. The periodic transcriptional regulation through the activator...... or the inhibitor leads to radically different dynamics. Experimental evidence shows that in cell cycle transitions of organisms investigated for cell cycle dependent periodic transcription, only the inhibitor OR the activator is under cyclic control and never both of them. Based on these observations, we propose...

  5. Honing the message: post-transcriptional and post-translational control in attaching and effacing pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Shantanu; Romeo, Tony; Kalman, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Bacteria evolve their capacity to cause disease by acquiring virulence genes that are usually clustered in discrete genetic modules termed pathogenicity islands (PAI). Stable integration of PAIs into pre-existing transcriptional networks coordinates expression from PAIs with ancestral genes in response to diverse environmental cues. Such transcriptional controls are evident in the regulation of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), a PAI of enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. However, recent reports indicate that global post-transcriptional and post-translational regulators, including CsrA, Hfq and ClpXP, fine-tune the transcriptional output from the LEE. In this opinion article, we highlight recent advances in the understanding of post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation in attaching and effacing pathogens.

  6. YAP/TEAD-mediated transcription controls cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qi; Chen, Jing; Feng, Han; Peng, Shengyi; Adams, Ursula; Bai, Yujie; Huang, Li; Li, Ji; Huang, Junjian; Meng, Songshu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2013-06-15

    Transcription coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP) plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we identify a new role of YAP in the regulation of cellular senescence. We find that the expression levels of YAP proteins decrease following the replication-induced cellular senescence in IMR90 cells. Silencing of YAP inhibits cell proliferation and induces premature senescence. In additional experiments, we observe that cellular senescence induced by YAP deficiency is TEAD- and Rb/p16/p53-dependent. Furthermore, we show that Cdk6 is a direct downstream target gene of YAP in the regulation of cellular senescence, and the expression of Cdk6 is through the YAP-TEAD complex. Ectopic expression of Cdk6 rescued YAP knockdown-induced senescence. Finally, we find that downregulation of YAP in tumor cells increases senescence in response to chemotherapeutic agents, and YAP or Cdk6 expression rescues cellular senescence. Taken together, our findings define the critical role of YAP in the regulation of cellular senescence and provide a novel insight into a potential chemotherapeutic avenue for tumor suppression. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Retinoic acid receptor agonists regulate expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaori, Makoto; Yakushiji, Emi; Ogura, Masatsune; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Terao, Yoshio; Sasaki, Makoto; Komatsu, Tomohiro; Iizuka, Maki; Yogo, Makiko; Uehara, Yoshinari; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2012-04-01

    ABC transporter G1 (ABCG1) plays a pivotal role in HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux and atherogenesis. We investigated whether, and how, retinoic acid receptors (RARs) regulate ABCG1 expression in macrophages. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), an RAR ligand, increased ABCG1 protein levels and apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages. Both ATRA and other RAR agonists, TTNPB and Am580, increased major transcripts driven by promoter B upstream of exon 5, though minor transcripts driven by promoter A upstream of exon 1 were only increased by ATRA. The stimulatory effects of ATRA on ABCG1 expression were completely abolished in the presence of RAR/RXR antagonists but were only partially canceled in the presence of an LXR antagonist. Adenovirus with overexpressed oxysterol sulfotransferase abolished the LXR pathway, as previously reported, and ATRA-responsiveness in ABCA1/ABCG1 expressions were respectively attenuated by 38 and 22% compared to the control virus. Promoter assays revealed that ABCG1 levels were regulated more by promoter B than promoter A, and ATRA activated promoter B in a liver X receptor-responsive element (LXRE)-dependent manner. Further, LXRE-B in intron 7, but not LXRE-A in intron 5, enhanced ATRA responsiveness under overexpression of all RAR isoforms-RARα/β/γ. In contrast, the activation of promoter B by TTNPB depended on LXRE-B and RARα, but not on RARβ/γ. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel-shift assays revealed a specific and direct repeat 4-dependent binding of RARα to LXRE-B. In conclusion, RAR ligands increase ABCA1/G1 expression and apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages, and modulate ABCG1 promoter activity via LXRE-dependent mechanisms.

  8. Deciphering the Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning the Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression by Master Transcriptional Regulators in Arabidopsis Seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Sébastien; Kelemen, Zsolt; Thévenin, Johanne; Boulard, Céline; Blanchet, Sandrine; To, Alexandra; Payre, Manon; Berger, Nathalie; Effroy-Cuzzi, Delphine; Franco-Zorrilla, Jose Manuel; Godoy, Marta; Solano, Roberto; Thevenon, Emmanuel; Parcy, François; Lepiniec, Loïc; Dubreucq, Bertrand

    2016-06-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), transcriptional control of seed maturation involves three related regulators with a B3 domain, namely LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2), ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3), and FUSCA3 (ABI3/FUS3/LEC2 [AFLs]). Although genetic analyses have demonstrated partially overlapping functions of these regulators, the underlying molecular mechanisms remained elusive. The results presented here confirmed that the three proteins bind RY DNA elements (with a 5'-CATG-3' core sequence) but with different specificities for flanking nucleotides. In planta as in the moss Physcomitrella patens protoplasts, the presence of RY-like (RYL) elements is necessary but not sufficient for the regulation of the OLEOSIN1 (OLE1) promoter by the B3 AFLs. G box-like domains, located in the vicinity of the RYL elements, also are required for proper activation of the promoter, suggesting that several proteins are involved. Consistent with this idea, LEC2 and ABI3 showed synergistic effects on the activation of the OLE1 promoter. What is more, LEC1 (a homolog of the NF-YB subunit of the CCAAT-binding complex) further enhanced the activation of this target promoter in the presence of LEC2 and ABI3. Finally, recombinant LEC1 and LEC2 proteins produced in Arabidopsis protoplasts could form a ternary complex with NF-YC2 in vitro, providing a molecular explanation for their functional interactions. Taken together, these results allow us to propose a molecular model for the transcriptional regulation of seed genes by the L-AFL proteins, based on the formation of regulatory multiprotein complexes between NF-YBs, which carry a specific aspartate-55 residue, and B3 transcription factors.

  9. Copy number variation and transposable elements feature in recent, ongoing adaptation at the Cyp6g1 locus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmidt, Joshua M; Good, Robert T; Appleton, Belinda; Sherrard, Jayne; Raymant, Greta C; Bogwitz, Michael R; Martin, Jon; Daborn, Phillip J; Goddard, Mike E; Batterham, Philip; Robin, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The increased transcription of the Cyp6g1 gene of Drosophila melanogaster, and consequent resistance to insecticides such as DDT, is a widely cited example of adaptation mediated by cis-regulatory change...

  10. Dia2 controls transcription by mediating assembly of the RSC complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Andress

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dia2 is an F-box protein found in the budding yeast, S. cerevisiae. Together with Skp1 and Cul1, Dia2 forms the substrate-determining part of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, otherwise known as the SCF. Dia2 has previously been implicated in the control of replication and genome stability via its interaction with the replisome progression complex. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified components of the RSC chromatin remodelling complex as genetic interactors with Dia2, suggesting an additional role for Dia2 in the regulation of transcription. We show that Dia2 is involved in controlling assembly of the RSC complex. RSC belongs to a group of ATP-dependent nucleosome-remodelling complexes that controls the repositioning of nucleosomes. The RSC complex is expressed abundantly and its 17 subunits are recruited to chromatin in response to both transcription activation and repression. In the absence of Dia2, RSC-mediated transcription regulation was impaired, with concomitant abnormalities in nucleosome positioning. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings imply that Dia2 is required for the correct assembly and function of the RSC complex. Dia2, by controlling the RSC chromatin remodeller, fine-tunes transcription by controlling nucleosome positioning during transcriptional activation and repression.

  11. Cryptic Transcription and Early Termination in the Control of Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Colin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on yeast transcriptome have revealed the presence of a large set of RNA polymerase II transcripts mapping to intergenic and antisense regions or overlapping canonical genes. Most of these ncRNAs (ncRNAs are subject to termination by the Nrd1-dependent pathway and rapid degradation by the nuclear exosome and have been dubbed cryptic unstable transcripts (CUTs. CUTs are often considered as by-products of transcriptional noise, but in an increasing number of cases they play a central role in the control of gene expression. Regulatory mechanisms involving expression of a CUT are diverse and include attenuation, transcriptional interference, and alternative transcription start site choice. This review focuses on the impact of cryptic transcription on gene expression, describes the role of the Nrd1-complex as the main actor in preventing nonfunctional and potentially harmful transcription, and details a few systems where expression of a CUT has an essential regulatory function. We also summarize the most recent studies concerning other types of ncRNAs and their possible role in regulation.

  12. Pseudospectral Collocation Methods for the Direct Transcription of Optimal Control Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    solving optimal control problems for trajectory optimization, spacecraft attitude control, jet thruster control, missile guidance and many other... optimal control problems using a pseudospectral direct transcription method. These problems are stated here so that they may be referred to elsewhere...e.g., [7]. 2.3 Prototypical Examples Throughout this thesis two example problems are used to demonstrate various prop- erties associated with solving

  13. Senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew S; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana M; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A T; Feagins, Alicia R; Basler, Christopher F; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J; Lavin, Martin F; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) has been linked to the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here we identified a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells that had undergone depletion of SETX and SETX-deficient cells derived from patients with AOA2 had higher expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection than did wild-type cells. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates the activity of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) at genes stimulated after a virus is sensed and thus controls the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of various RNA viruses (e.g., influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link among inborn errors in SETX, susceptibility to infection and the development of neurologic disorders.

  14. Design principles of the yeast G1/S switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Yang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of the G1/S transition in budding yeast cell cycle is the proteolytic degradation of the B-type cyclin-Cdk stoichiometric inhibitor Sic1. Deleting SIC1 or altering Sic1 degradation dynamics increases genomic instability. Certain key facts about the parts of the G1/S circuitry are established: phosphorylation of Sic1 on multiple sites is necessary for its destruction, and both the upstream kinase Cln1/2-Cdk1 and the downstream kinase Clb5/6-Cdk1 can phosphorylate Sic1 in vitro with varied specificity, cooperativity, and processivity. However, how the system works as a whole is still controversial due to discrepancies between in vitro, in vivo, and theoretical studies. Here, by monitoring Sic1 destruction in real time in individual cells under various perturbations to the system, we provide a clear picture of how the circuitry functions as a switch in vivo. We show that Cln1/2-Cdk1 sets the proper timing of Sic1 destruction, but does not contribute to its destruction speed; thus, it acts only as a trigger. Sic1's inhibition target Clb5/6-Cdk1 controls the speed of Sic1 destruction through a double-negative feedback loop, ensuring a robust all-or-none transition for Clb5/6-Cdk1 activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the degradation of a single-phosphosite mutant of Sic1 is rapid and switch-like, just as the wild-type form. Our mathematical model confirms our understanding of the circuit and demonstrates that the substrate sharing between the two kinases is not a redundancy but a part of the design to overcome the trade-off between the timing and sharpness of Sic1 degradation. Our study provides direct mechanistic insight into the design features underlying the yeast G1/S switch.

  15. NLP is a novel transcription regulator involved in VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Kushwaha, Manish; Ersfeld, Klaus; Fullbrook, Alexander; Stanne, Tara M; Rudenko, Gloria

    2011-03-01

    Trypanosoma brucei mono-allelically expresses one of approximately 1500 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes while multiplying in the mammalian bloodstream. The active VSG is transcribed by RNA polymerase I in one of approximately 15 telomeric VSG expression sites (ESs). T. brucei is unusual in controlling gene expression predominantly post-transcriptionally, and how ESs are mono-allelically controlled remains a mystery. Here we identify a novel transcription regulator, which resembles a nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP) with an AT-hook motif. NLP is key for ES control in bloodstream form T. brucei, as NLP knockdown results in 45- to 65-fold derepression of the silent VSG221 ES. NLP is also involved in repression of transcription in the inactive VSG Basic Copy arrays, minichromosomes and procyclin loci. NLP is shown to be enriched on the 177- and 50-bp simple sequence repeats, the non-transcribed regions around rDNA and procyclin, and both active and silent ESs. Blocking NLP synthesis leads to downregulation of the active ES, indicating that NLP plays a role in regulating appropriate levels of transcription of ESs in both their active and silent state. Discovery of the unusual transcription regulator NLP provides new insight into the factors that are critical for ES control.

  16. The TEAD/TEF family of transcription factor Scalloped mediates Hippo signaling in organ size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Ren, Fangfang; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Yongbin; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2008-03-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) signaling pathway governs cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis by controlling key regulatory genes that execute these processes; however, the transcription factor of the pathway has remained elusive. Here we provide evidence that the TEAD/TEF family transcription factor Scalloped (Sd) acts together with the coactivator Yorkie (Yki) to regulate Hpo pathway-responsive genes. Sd and Yki form a transcriptional complex whose activity is inhibited by Hpo signaling. Sd overexpression enhances, whereas its inactivation suppresses, tissue overgrowth caused by Yki overexpression or tumor suppressor mutations in the Hpo pathway. Inactivation of Sd diminishes Hpo target gene expression and reduces organ size, whereas a constitutively active Sd promotes tissue overgrowth. Sd promotes Yki nuclear localization, whereas Hpo signaling retains Yki in the cytoplasm by phosphorylating Yki at S168. Finally, Sd recruits Yki to the enhancer of the pathway-responsive gene diap1, suggesting that diap1 is a direct transcriptional target of the Hpo pathway.

  17. 26 CFR 1.149(g)-1 - Hedge bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hedge bonds. 1.149(g)-1 Section 1.149(g)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.149(g)-1 Hedge bonds... of replacement proceeds (other than amounts in a bona fide debt service fund or a reasonably...

  18. 26 CFR 1.475(g)-1 - Effective dates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effective dates. 1.475(g)-1 Section 1.475(g)-1...) INCOME TAXES Inventories § 1.475(g)-1 Effective dates. (a)-(b) (c) Section 1.475(a)-3 (concerning... to apply to the security solely because of the effective dates in this paragraph (d) (rather...

  19. Control of progesterone receptor transcriptional synergy by SUMOylation and deSUMOylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Hafiz Hany A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Covalent modification of nuclear receptors by the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO is dynamically regulated by competing conjugation/deconjugation steps that modulate their overall transcriptional activity. SUMO conjugation of progesterone receptors (PRs at the N-terminal lysine (K 388 residue of PR-B is hormone-dependent and suppresses PR-dependent transcription. Mutation of the SUMOylation motif promotes transcriptional synergy. Results The present studies address mechanisms underlying this transcriptional synergy by using SUMOylation deficient PR mutants and PR specifically deSUMOylated by Sentrin-specific proteases (SENPs. We show that deSUMOylation of a small pool of receptors by catalytically competent SENPs globally modulates the cooperativity-driven transcriptional synergy between PR observed on exogenous promoters containing at least two progesterone-response elements (PRE2. This occurs in part by raising PR sensitivity to ligands. The C-terminal ligand binding domain of PR is required for the transcriptional stimulatory effects of N-terminal deSUMOylation, but neither a functional PR dimerization interface, nor a DNA binding domain exhibiting PR specificity, are required. Conclusion We conclude that direct and reversible SUMOylation of a minor PR protein subpopulation tightly controls the overall transcriptional activity of the receptors at complex synthetic promoters. Transcriptional synergism controlled by SENP-dependent PR deSUMOylation is dissociable from MAPK-catalyzed receptor phosphorylation, from SRC-1 coactivation and from recruitment of histone deacetylases to promoters. This will provide more information for targeting PR as a part of hormonal therapy of breast cancer. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the SUMOylation/deSUMOylation pathway is an interesting target for therapeutic treatment of breast cancer.

  20. Control of Candida albicans morphology and pathogenicity by post-transcriptional mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadosh, David

    2016-11-01

    Candida albicans is a major human fungal pathogen responsible for both systemic and mucosal infections in a wide variety of immunocompromised individuals. Because the ability of C. albicans to undergo a reversible morphological transition from yeast to filaments is important for virulence, significant research efforts have focused on mechanisms that control this transition. While transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms have been well-studied, considerably less is known about the role of post-transcriptional mechanisms. However, in recent years several discoveries have begun to shed light on this important, but understudied, area. Here, I will review a variety of post-transcriptional mechanisms that have recently been shown to control C. albicans morphology, virulence and/or virulence-related processes, including those involving alternative transcript localization, mRNA stability and translation. I will also discuss the role that these mechanisms play in other pathogens as well as the potential they may hold to serve as targets for new antifungal strategies. Ultimately, gaining a better understanding of C. albicans post-transcriptional mechanisms will significantly improve our knowledge of how morphogenesis and virulence are controlled in fungal pathogens and open new avenues for the development of novel and more effective antifungals.

  1. Transcriptional Networks Controlled by NKX2-1 in the Development of Forebrain GABAergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Magnus; Flandin, Pierre; Silberberg, Shanni; Su-Feher, Linda; Price, James D; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kim, Carol; Visel, Axel; Nord, Alex S; Rubenstein, John L R

    2016-09-21

    The embryonic basal ganglia generates multiple projection neurons and interneuron subtypes from distinct progenitor domains. Combinatorial interactions of transcription factors and chromatin are thought to regulate gene expression. In the medial ganglionic eminence, the NKX2-1 transcription factor controls regional identity and, with LHX6, is necessary to specify pallidal projection neurons and forebrain interneurons. Here, we dissected the molecular functions of NKX2-1 by defining its chromosomal binding, regulation of gene expression, and epigenetic state. NKX2-1 binding at distal regulatory elements led to a repressed epigenetic state and transcriptional repression in the ventricular zone. Conversely, NKX2-1 is required to establish a permissive chromatin state and transcriptional activation in the sub-ventricular and mantle zones. Moreover, combinatorial binding of NKX2-1 and LHX6 promotes transcriptionally permissive chromatin and activates genes expressed in cortical migrating interneurons. Our integrated approach provides a foundation for elucidating transcriptional networks guiding the development of the MGE and its descendants.

  2. Nutritional conditions regulate transcriptional activity of SF-1 by controlling sumoylation and ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiwon; Yang, Dong Joo; Lee, Syann; Hammer, Gary D; Kim, Ki Woo; Elmquist, Joel K

    2016-01-11

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a transcription factor expressed in the ventral medial nucleus of the hypothalamus that regulates energy homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms of SF-1 in the control of energy balance are largely unknown. Here, we show that nutritional conditions, such as the presence or absence of serum, affect SF-1 action. Serum starvation significantly decreased hypothalamic SF-1 levels by promoting ubiquitin-dependent degradation, and sumoylation was required for this process. SF-1 transcriptional activity was also differentially regulated by nutritional status. Under normal conditions, the transcriptional activity of hypothalamic SF-1 was activated by SUMO, but this was attenuated during starvation. Taken together, these results indicate that sumoylation and ubiquitination play crucial roles in the regulation of SF-1 function and that these effects are dependent on nutritional conditions, further supporting the importance of SF-1 in the control of energy homeostasis.

  3. Transcriptional control of GABAergic neuron development in the dorsal spinal cord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Jing; Wu Shengxi

    2008-01-01

    GABAergic neurons are the major inhibitory interneurons that powerfully control the function of spinal neuronalnet works. In recent years, tremendous progresses have been made in understanding the transcriptional control of GABAergic neuron development in the dorsal spinal cord. New experimental approaches provide a relatively high throughput way to study the molecular regulation of subgroup fate determination. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms on GABAergic neuron development in the dorsal spinal cord is rapidly expanding. Recent studies have defined several transcription factors that play essential roles in GABAergic neuron development in the spinal dorsal horn. Here, we review results of very recent analyses of the mechanisms that specify the GABAergic neuron development in the dorsal spinal cord, especially the progresses in the homeodomain (HD) and basic-helix-loop-helix(bHLH) containing transcription factors.

  4. A Systematic Approach to Identify Candidate Transcription Factors that Control Cell Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. D’Alessio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of transcription factors (TFs are expressed in each cell type, but cell identity can be induced through the activity of just a small number of core TFs. Systematic identification of these core TFs for a wide variety of cell types is currently lacking and would establish a foundation for understanding the transcriptional control of cell identity in development, disease, and cell-based therapy. Here, we describe a computational approach that generates an atlas of candidate core TFs for a broad spectrum of human cells. The potential impact of the atlas was demonstrated via cellular reprogramming efforts where candidate core TFs proved capable of converting human fibroblasts to retinal pigment epithelial-like cells. These results suggest that candidate core TFs from the atlas will prove a useful starting point for studying transcriptional control of cell identity and reprogramming in many human cell types.

  5. Nuclear mRNA quality control in yeast is mediated by Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment, as revealed by the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorine, Romy; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Libri, Domenico; Rahmouni, A. Rachid

    2011-01-01

    The production of mature export-competent transcripts is under the surveillance of quality control steps where aberrant mRNP molecules resulting from inappropriate or inefficient processing and packaging reactions are subject to exosome-mediated degradation. Previously, we have shown that the heterologous expression of bacterial Rho factor in yeast interferes in normal mRNP biogenesis leading to the production of full-length yet aberrant transcripts that are degraded by the nuclear exosome with ensuing growth defect. Here, we took advantage of this new tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which an integrated system recognizes aberrancies at each step of mRNP biogenesis and targets the defective molecules for destruction. We show that the targeting and degradation of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts is associated with a large increase of Nrd1 recruitment to the transcription complex via its CID and RRM domains and a concomitant enrichment of exosome component Rrp6 association. The targeting and degradation of the aberrant transcripts is suppressed by the overproduction of Pcf11 or its isolated CID domain, through a competition with Nrd1 for recruitment by the transcription complex. Altogether, our results support a model in which a stimulation of Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment coordinates the recognition and removal of aberrant transcripts by promoting the attachment of the nuclear mRNA degradation machinery. PMID:21113025

  6. The transcription factor relish controls anaplasma marginale infection in the bovine tick rhipicephalus microplus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhipicephalus microplus is an important biological vector of Anaplasma marginale, the etiological agent of bovine anaplasmosis. The knowledge of tick immune responses to control bacterial infections remains limited. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription factor Relish from the Imd signalin...

  7. Unraveling transcriptional and translational control in plant energy homeostasis : a bioinformatic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peviani, A.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their sessile nature, plants require a tight regulation of energy homeostasis in order to survive and reproduce in changing environmental conditions. Regulation of gene expression is controlled at several levels, from transcription to translation and beyond. Sugars themselves can act directly

  8. The ETS-5 transcription factor regulates activity states in Caenorhabditis elegans by controlling satiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juozaityte, Vaida; Pladevall-Morera, David; Podolska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Animal behavior is shaped through interplay among genes, the environment, and previous experience. As in mammals, satiety signals induce quiescence in Caenorhabditis elegans Here we report that the C. elegans transcription factor ETS-5, an ortholog of mammalian FEV/Pet1, controls satiety-induced ...

  9. Shared control of gene expression in bacteria by transcription factors and global physiology of the cell.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berthoumieux, S.; Jong, H. de; Baptist, G.; Pinel, C.; Ranquet, C.; Ropers, D.; Geiselmann, J.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled by the joint effect of (i) the global physiological state of the cell, in particular the activity of the gene expression machinery, and (ii) DNA-binding transcription factors and other specific regulators. We present a model-based approach to distinguish between these t

  10. mRNA quality control is bypassed for immediate export of stress-responsive transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Gesa; Hackmann, Alexandra; Bender, Lysann; Becker, Daniel; Lingner, Thomas; Salinas, Gabriela; Krebber, Heike

    2016-12-12

    Cells grow well only in a narrow range of physiological conditions. Surviving extreme conditions requires the instantaneous expression of chaperones that help to overcome stressful situations. To ensure the preferential synthesis of these heat-shock proteins, cells inhibit transcription, pre-mRNA processing and nuclear export of non-heat-shock transcripts, while stress-specific mRNAs are exclusively exported and translated. How cells manage the selective retention of regular transcripts and the simultaneous rapid export of heat-shock mRNAs is largely unknown. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the shuttling RNA adaptor proteins Npl3, Gbp2, Hrb1 and Nab2 are loaded co-transcriptionally onto growing pre-mRNAs. For nuclear export, they recruit the export-receptor heterodimer Mex67-Mtr2 (TAP-p15 in humans). Here we show that cellular stress induces the dissociation of Mex67 and its adaptor proteins from regular mRNAs to prevent general mRNA export. At the same time, heat-shock mRNAs are rapidly exported in association with Mex67, without the need for adapters. The immediate co-transcriptional loading of Mex67 onto heat-shock mRNAs involves Hsf1, a heat-shock transcription factor that binds to heat-shock-promoter elements in stress-responsive genes. An important difference between the export modes is that adaptor-protein-bound mRNAs undergo quality control, whereas stress-specific transcripts do not. In fact, regular mRNAs are converted into uncontrolled stress-responsive transcripts if expressed under the control of a heat-shock promoter, suggesting that whether an mRNA undergoes quality control is encrypted therein. Under normal conditions, Mex67 adaptor proteins are recruited for RNA surveillance, with only quality-controlled mRNAs allowed to associate with Mex67 and leave the nucleus. Thus, at the cost of error-free mRNA formation, heat-shock mRNAs are exported and translated without delay, allowing cells to survive extreme situations.

  11. G1 Continuity Conditions of B-spline Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车翔玖; 梁学章

    2002-01-01

    According to the B-spline theory and Boehm algorithm,this paper presents several necessary and sufficient G1 continuity conditions betwwen two adjacent B-spline surfaces,In Order to meet the need of application,a kind of sufficient conditions of G1 continuity are developed,and a kind of sufficient conditions of G1 continuity among N(N>2) patch B-shline surfaces meeting at a common corner are given at the end.

  12. Dectin-1 agonist selectively induces IgG1 class switching by LPS-activated mouse B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Beom-Seok; Park, Ha-Yan; Yoon, Hee-Kyung; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Park, Seok-Rae

    2016-10-01

    Heat-killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae (HKSC) is an agonist for Dectin-1, a major fungal cell wall β-glucan receptor. We previously reported that HKSC selectively enhances IgG1 production by LPS-activated mouse B cells. To determine if this IgG1 selectivity is caused by selective IgG1 class switching, we performed RT-PCRs for measuring germline transcripts (GLTs), flow cytometric analyses for detecting Ig-expressing cells, and ELISPOT assays for measuring the number of Ig-secreting cells in HKSC/LPS-stimulated mouse B cell cultures. HKSC selectively enhanced expression of GLTγ1, the number of IgG1-expressing cells, and the number of IgG1-secreting B cells in the presence of LPS stimulation. In addition, HKSC induced the expression of CD69, an activation marker for B lymphocytes, and the expression of surface Dectin-1. Two Dectin-1 antagonists, laminarin and a neutralizing Dectin-1 antibody, selectively diminished HKSC-reinforced IgG1 production by LPS-stimulated B cells. Furthermore, depleted zymosan (dzn), a Dectin-1 agonist with increased selectivity, also selectively enhanced GLTγ1 transcription. The Dectin-1 antagonists blocked dzn-induced IgG1 production by LPS-activated B cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Dectin-1 agonists selectively induce IgG1 class switching by direct stimulation of Dectin-1 on LPS-activated B cells resulting in selective production of IgG1.

  13. Fluctuations in spo0A transcription control rare developmental transitions in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Mirouze

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylated Spo0A is a master regulator of stationary phase development in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis, controlling the formation of spores, biofilms, and cells competent for transformation. We have monitored the rate of transcription of the spo0A gene during growth in sporulation medium using promoter fusions to firefly luciferase. This rate increases sharply during transient diauxie-like pauses in growth rate and then declines as growth resumes. In contrast, the rate of transcription of an rRNA gene decreases and increases in parallel with the growth rate, as expected for stable RNA synthesis. The growth pause-dependent bursts of spo0A transcription, which reflect the activity of the spo0A vegetative promoter, are largely independent of all known regulators of spo0A transcription. Evidence is offered in support of a "passive regulation" model in which RNA polymerase stops transcribing rRNA genes during growth pauses, thus becoming available for the transcription of spo0A. We show that the bursts are followed by the production of phosphorylated Spo0A, and we propose that they represent initial responses to stress that bring the average cell closer to the thresholds for transition to bimodally expressed developmental responses. Measurement of the numbers of cells expressing a competence marker before and after the bursts supports this hypothesis. In the absence of ppGpp, the increase in spo0A transcription that accompanies the entrance to stationary phase is delayed and sporulation is markedly diminished. In spite of this, our data contradicts the hypothesis that sporulation is initiated when a ppGpp-induced depression of the GTP pool relieves repression by CodY. We suggest that, while the programmed induction of sporulation that occurs in stationary phase is apparently provoked by increased flux through the phosphorelay, bet-hedging stochastic transitions to at least competence are induced by bursts in transcription.

  14. Precision control of recombinant gene transcription for CHO cell synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adam J; James, David C

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of mammalian cell factories for biopharmaceutical production will be genetically engineered to possess both generic and product-specific manufacturing capabilities that may not exist naturally. Introduction of entirely new combinations of synthetic functions (e.g. novel metabolic or stress-response pathways), and retro-engineering of existing functional cell modules will drive disruptive change in cellular manufacturing performance. However, before we can apply the core concepts underpinning synthetic biology (design, build, test) to CHO cell engineering we must first develop practical and robust enabling technologies. Fundamentally, we will require the ability to precisely control the relative stoichiometry of numerous functional components we simultaneously introduce into the host cell factory. In this review we discuss how this can be achieved by design of engineered promoters that enable concerted control of recombinant gene transcription. We describe the specific mechanisms of transcriptional regulation that affect promoter function during bioproduction processes, and detail the highly-specific promoter design criteria that are required in the context of CHO cell engineering. The relative applicability of diverse promoter development strategies are discussed, including re-engineering of natural sequences, design of synthetic transcription factor-based systems, and construction of synthetic promoters. This review highlights the potential of promoter engineering to achieve precision transcriptional control for CHO cell synthetic biology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Occludin controls HIV transcription in brain pericytes via regulation of SIRT-1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Victor; Bertrand, Luc; Luethen, Mareen; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Lombardi, Jorge; Morgan, Laura; Sharova, Natalia; Stevenson, Mario; Blasig, Ingolf E; Toborek, Michal

    2016-03-01

    HIV invades the brain early after infection; however, its interactions with the cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remain poorly understood. Our goal was to evaluate the role of occludin, one of the tight junction proteins that regulate BBB functions in HIV infection of BBB pericytes. We provide evidence that occludin levels largely control the metabolic responses of human pericytes to HIV. Occludin in BBB pericytes decreased by 10% during the first 48 h after HIV infection, correlating with increased nuclear translocation of the gene repressor C-terminal-binding protein (CtBP)-1 and NFκB-p65 activation. These changes were associated with decreased expression and activation of the class III histone deacetylase sirtuin (SIRT)-1. Occludin levels recovered 96 h after infection, restoring SIRT-1 and reducing HIV transcription to 20% of its highest values. We characterized occludin biochemically as a novel NADH oxidase that controls the expression and activation of SIRT-1. The inverse correlation between occludin and HIV transcription was then replicated in human primary macrophages and differentiated monocytic U937 cells, in which occludin silencing resulted in 75 and 250% increased viral transcription, respectively. Our work shows that occludin has previously unsuspected metabolic properties and is a target of HIV infection, opening the possibility of designing novel pharmacological approaches to control HIV transcription.

  16. Cabut/dTIEG associates with the transcription factor Yorkie for growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Blanco, Enrique; Paricio, Nuria; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat

    2015-03-01

    The Drosophila transcription factor Cabut/dTIEG (Cbt) is a growth regulator, whose expression is modulated by different stimuli. Here, we determine Cbt association with chromatin and identify Yorkie (Yki), the transcriptional co-activator of the Hippo (Hpo) pathway as its partner. Cbt and Yki co-localize on common gene promoters, and the expression of target genes varies according to changes in Cbt levels. Down-regulation of Cbt suppresses the overgrowth phenotypes caused by mutations in expanded (ex) and yki overexpression, whereas its up-regulation promotes cell proliferation. Our results imply that Cbt is a novel partner of Yki that is required as a transcriptional co-activator in growth control.

  17. Cabut/dTIEG associates with the transcription factor Yorkie for growth control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Blanco, Enrique; Paricio, Nuria; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila transcription factor Cabut/dTIEG (Cbt) is a growth regulator, whose expression is modulated by different stimuli. Here, we determine Cbt association with chromatin and identify Yorkie (Yki), the transcriptional co-activator of the Hippo (Hpo) pathway as its partner. Cbt and Yki co-localize on common gene promoters, and the expression of target genes varies according to changes in Cbt levels. Down-regulation of Cbt suppresses the overgrowth phenotypes caused by mutations in expanded (ex) and yki overexpression, whereas its up-regulation promotes cell proliferation. Our results imply that Cbt is a novel partner of Yki that is required as a transcriptional co-activator in growth control. PMID:25572844

  18. Translational control by the DEAD Box RNA helicase belle regulates ecdysone-triggered transcriptional cascades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Ihry

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones act, through their respective nuclear receptors, to regulate target gene expression. Despite their critical role in development, physiology, and disease, however, it is still unclear how these systemic cues are refined into tissue-specific responses. We identified a mutation in the evolutionarily conserved DEAD box RNA helicase belle/DDX3 that disrupts a subset of responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone during Drosophila melanogaster metamorphosis. We demonstrate that belle directly regulates translation of E74A, an ets transcription factor and critical component of the ecdysone-induced transcriptional cascade. Although E74A mRNA accumulates to abnormally high levels in belle mutant tissues, no E74A protein is detectable, resulting in misregulation of E74A-dependent ecdysone response genes. The accumulation of E74A mRNA in belle mutant salivary glands is a result of auto-regulation, fulfilling a prediction made by Ashburner nearly 40 years ago. In this model, Ashburner postulates that, in addition to regulating secondary response genes, protein products of primary response genes like E74A also inhibit their own ecdysone-induced transcription. Moreover, although ecdysone-triggered transcription of E74A appears to be ubiquitous during metamorphosis, belle-dependent translation of E74A mRNA is spatially restricted. These results demonstrate that translational control plays a critical, and previously unknown, role in refining transcriptional responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone.

  19. Transcription of the non-coding RNA upperhand controls Hand2 expression and heart development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kelly M.; Anderson, Douglas M.; McAnally, John R.; Shelton, John M.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2017-01-01

    HAND2 is an ancestral regulator of heart development and one of four transcription factors that control the reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes1–4. Deletion of Hand2 in mice results in right ventricle hypoplasia and embryonic lethality1,5. Hand2 expression is tightly regulated by upstream enhancers6,7 that reside within a super-enhancer delineated by histone H3 acetyl Lys27 (H3K27ac) modifications8. Here we show that transcription of a Hand2-associated long non-coding RNA, which we named upperhand (Uph), is required to maintain the super-enhancer signature and elongation of RNA polymerase II through the Hand2 enhancer locus. Blockade of Uph transcription, but not knockdown of the mature transcript, abolished Hand2 expression, causing right ventricular hypoplasia and embryonic lethality in mice. Given the substantial number of uncharacterized promoter-associated long non-coding RNAs encoded by the mammalian genome9, the Uph–Hand2 regulatory partnership offers a mechanism by which divergent non-coding transcription can establish a permissive chromatin environment. PMID:27783597

  20. Translational control by the DEAD Box RNA helicase belle regulates ecdysone-triggered transcriptional cascades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Ihry

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones act, through their respective nuclear receptors, to regulate target gene expression. Despite their critical role in development, physiology, and disease, however, it is still unclear how these systemic cues are refined into tissue-specific responses. We identified a mutation in the evolutionarily conserved DEAD box RNA helicase belle/DDX3 that disrupts a subset of responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone during Drosophila melanogaster metamorphosis. We demonstrate that belle directly regulates translation of E74A, an ets transcription factor and critical component of the ecdysone-induced transcriptional cascade. Although E74A mRNA accumulates to abnormally high levels in belle mutant tissues, no E74A protein is detectable, resulting in misregulation of E74A-dependent ecdysone response genes. The accumulation of E74A mRNA in belle mutant salivary glands is a result of auto-regulation, fulfilling a prediction made by Ashburner nearly 40 years ago. In this model, Ashburner postulates that, in addition to regulating secondary response genes, protein products of primary response genes like E74A also inhibit their own ecdysone-induced transcription. Moreover, although ecdysone-triggered transcription of E74A appears to be ubiquitous during metamorphosis, belle-dependent translation of E74A mRNA is spatially restricted. These results demonstrate that translational control plays a critical, and previously unknown, role in refining transcriptional responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone.

  1. Transcription of the non-coding RNA upperhand controls Hand2 expression and heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kelly M; Anderson, Douglas M; McAnally, John R; Shelton, John M; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2016-11-17

    HAND2 is an ancestral regulator of heart development and one of four transcription factors that control the reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes. Deletion of Hand2 in mice results in right ventricle hypoplasia and embryonic lethality. Hand2 expression is tightly regulated by upstream enhancers that reside within a super-enhancer delineated by histone H3 acetyl Lys27 (H3K27ac) modifications. Here we show that transcription of a Hand2-associated long non-coding RNA, which we named upperhand (Uph), is required to maintain the super-enhancer signature and elongation of RNA polymerase II through the Hand2 enhancer locus. Blockade of Uph transcription, but not knockdown of the mature transcript, abolished Hand2 expression, causing right ventricular hypoplasia and embryonic lethality in mice. Given the substantial number of uncharacterized promoter-associated long non-coding RNAs encoded by the mammalian genome, the Uph-Hand2 regulatory partnership offers a mechanism by which divergent non-coding transcription can establish a permissive chromatin environment.

  2. Regulatory elements and transcriptional control of chicken vasa homologue (CVH) promoter in chicken primordial germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, So Dam; Lee, Bo Ram; Hwang, Young Sun; Lee, Hong Jo; Rim, Jong Seop; Han, Jae Yong

    2017-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs), the precursors of functional gametes, have distinct characteristics and exhibit several unique molecular mechanisms to maintain pluripotency and germness in comparison to somatic cells. They express germ cell-specific RNA binding proteins (RBPs) by modulating tissue-specific cis- and trans-regulatory elements. Studies on gene structures of chicken vasa homologue (CVH), a chicken RNA binding protein, involved in temporal and spatial regulation are thus important not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate germ cell fate, but also for practical applications of primordial germ cells. However, very limited studies are available on regulatory elements that control germ cell-specific expression in chicken. Therefore, we investigated the intricate regulatory mechanism(s) that governs transcriptional control of CVH. We constructed green fluorescence protein (GFP) or luciferase reporter vectors containing the various 5' flanking regions of CVH gene. From the 5' deletion and fragmented assays in chicken PGCs, we have identified a CVH promoter that locates at -316 to +275 base pair fragment with the highest luciferase activity. Additionally, we confirmed for the first time that the 5' untranslated region (UTR) containing intron 1 is required for promoter activity of the CVH gene in chicken PGCs. Furthermore, using a transcription factor binding prediction, transcriptome analysis and siRNA-mediated knockdown, we have identified that a set of transcription factors play a role in the PGC-specific CVH gene expression. These results demonstrate that cis-elements and transcription factors localizing in the 5' flanking region including the 5' UTR and an intron are important for transcriptional regulation of the CVH gene in chicken PGCs. Finally, this information will contribute to research studies in areas of reproductive biology, constructing of germ cell-specific synthetic promoter for tracing primordial germ cells as well as

  3. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovaleva Galina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. Results To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. Multiple variations in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR, numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. PsrA for fatty acid degradation and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp. Conclusions We tentatively defined the first reference collection of ~100 transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The resulting regulatory network contains ~600 regulated genes per genome that are mostly involved in metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, metals, and stress responses. Several reconstructed regulons including NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism were experimentally validated in S

  4. Transcriptional Mechanisms Controlling miR-375 Gene Expression in the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tali Avnit-Sagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that play an important role in mediating a broad and expanding range of biological activities. miR-375 is expressed selectively in the pancreas. We have previously shown that selective expression of miR-375 in pancreatic beta cells is controlled by transcriptional mechanisms operating through a TATA box-containing promoter. Expression of miR-375 has been reported in non-beta cells within the endocrine pancreas, and indeed inactivation of miR-375 leads to perturbation in cell mass and number of both alpha and beta cells. Consistent with its expression throughout the endocrine pancreas, we now show that the promoter of the miR-375 gene shows selective activity in pancreatic endocrine alpha cells, comparable to that observed in beta cells. We previously identified a novel negative regulatory element located downstream of the miR-375 gene transcription start site. By generating luciferase reporter genes, we now show that the sequence is functional also when positioned upstream of a heterologous promoter, thus proving that the repressor effect is mediated at least in part at the level of transcription. Further characterization of the transcriptional control mechanism regulating expression of miR-375 and other pancreatic miRNAs will contribute to a better understanding of pancreas development and function.

  5. Integration of the Transcription Factor-Regulated and Epigenetic Mechanisms in the Control of Keratinocyte Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A.

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal differentiation program is regulated at several levels including signaling pathways, lineage-specific transcription factors, and epigenetic regulators that establish well-coordinated process of terminal differentiation resulting in formation of the epidermal barrier. The epigenetic regulatory machinery operates at several levels including modulation of covalent DNA/histone modifications, as well as through higher-order chromatin remodeling to establish long-range topological interactions between the genes and their enhancer elements. Epigenetic regulators exhibit both activating and repressive effects on chromatin in keratinocytes (KCs): whereas some of them promote terminal differentiation, the others stimulate proliferation of progenitor cells, as well as inhibit premature activation of terminal differentiation-associated genes. Transcription factor-regulated and epigenetic mechanisms are highly connected, and the p63 transcription factor has an important role in the higher-order chromatin remodeling of the KC-specific gene loci via direct control of the genome organizer Satb1 and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler Brg1. However, additional efforts are required to fully understand the complexity of interactions between distinct transcription factors and epigenetic regulators in the control of KC differentiation. Further understanding of these interactions and their alterations in different pathological skin conditions will help to progress toward the development of novel approaches for the treatment of skin disorders by targeting epigenetic regulators and modulating chromatin organization in KCs. PMID:26551942

  6. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Novichkov, Pavel; Stavrovskaya, Elena D.; Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing; Kazanov, Marat D.; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Kovaleva, Galina Y.; Permina, Elizabeth A.; Laikova, Olga N.; Overbeek, Ross; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arkin, Adam P.; Dubchak, Inna; Osterman, Andrei L.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2011-06-15

    Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. Despite the growing number of genome-scale gene expression studies, our abilities to convert the results of these studies into accurate regulatory annotations and to project them from model to other organisms are extremely limited. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. However, even orthologous regulators with conserved DNA-binding motifs may control substantially different gene sets, revealing striking differences in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli. Multiple examples of regulatory network rewiring include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR), and numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism and PsrA for fatty acid degradation) and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp).

  7. Rapid biodegradation of organophosphorus pesticides by Stenotrophomonas sp. G1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Shuyan; Chen, Yao [Key Laboratory of Agri-food Safety of Anhui Province, Lab of Quality & Safety and Risk Assessment for Agro-products on Storage and Preservation (Hefei), Ministry of Agriculture, School of Resource and Environment, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Wang, Daosheng [School of Life Science, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Shi, Taozhong; Wu, Xiangwei; Ma, Xin; Li, Xiangqiong [Key Laboratory of Agri-food Safety of Anhui Province, Lab of Quality & Safety and Risk Assessment for Agro-products on Storage and Preservation (Hefei), Ministry of Agriculture, School of Resource and Environment, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Hua, Rimao, E-mail: rimaohua@ahau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Agri-food Safety of Anhui Province, Lab of Quality & Safety and Risk Assessment for Agro-products on Storage and Preservation (Hefei), Ministry of Agriculture, School of Resource and Environment, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Tang, Xinyun [School of Life Science, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Li, Qing X. [Department of Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1955 East–West Road, Honolulu, HI 957822 (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Stenotrophomonas sp. G1 was isolated from chlorpyrifos contaminated sludge. • Strain G1 is closest to Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila. • Strain G1 can efficiently degrade 8 organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). • Intracellular methyl parathion hydrolase is responsible for the OP degradation. • Three factors were orthogonally optimized for degradation of methyl parathion. - Abstract: Organophosphorus insecticides have been widely used, which are highly poisonous and cause serious concerns over food safety and environmental pollution. A bacterial strain being capable of degrading O,O-dialkyl phosphorothioate and O,O-dialkyl phosphate insecticides, designated as G1, was isolated from sludge collected at the drain outlet of a chlorpyrifos manufacture plant. Physiological and biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis suggested that strain G1 belongs to the genus Stenotrophomonas. At an initial concentration of 50 mg/L, strain G1 degraded 100% of methyl parathion, methyl paraoxon, diazinon, and phoxim, 95% of parathion, 63% of chlorpyrifos, 38% of profenofos, and 34% of triazophos in 24 h. Orthogonal experiments showed that the optimum conditions were an inoculum volume of 20% (v/v), a substrate concentration of 50 mg/L, and an incubation temperature in 40 °C. p-Nitrophenol was detected as the metabolite of methyl parathion, for which intracellular methyl parathion hydrolase was responsible. Strain G1 can efficiently degrade eight organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and is a very excellent candidate for applications in OP pollution remediation.

  8. Transcription-independent function of Polycomb group protein PSC in cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Sarip, Adone; Lagarou, Anna; Doyen, Cecile M; van der Knaap, Jan A; Aslan, Ülkü; Bezstarosti, Karel; Yassin, Yasmin; Brock, Hugh W; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Verrijzer, C Peter

    2012-05-11

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins control development and cell proliferation through chromatin-mediated transcriptional repression. We describe a transcription-independent function for PcG protein Posterior sex combs (PSC) in regulating the destruction of cyclin B (CYC-B). A substantial portion of PSC was found outside canonical PcG complexes, instead associated with CYC-B and the anaphase-promoting complex (APC). Cell-based experiments and reconstituted reactions established that PSC and Lemming (LMG, also called APC11) associate and ubiquitylate CYC-B cooperatively, marking it for proteosomal degradation. Thus, PSC appears to mediate both developmental gene silencing and posttranslational control of mitosis. Direct regulation of cell cycle progression might be a crucial part of the PcG system's function in development and cancer.

  9. Precise integration of inducible transcriptional elements (PrIITE) enables absolute control of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, Rita; Hansen, Lars; Hintze, John Birger Hjalmar

    2017-01-01

    Tetracycline-based inducible systems provide powerful methods for functional studies where gene expression can be controlled. However, the lack of tight control of the inducible system, leading to leakiness and adverse effects caused by undesirable tetracycline dosage requirements, has proven...... to be a limitation. Here, we report that the combined use of genome editing tools and last generation Tet-On systems can resolve these issues. Our principle is based on precise integration of inducible transcriptional elements (coined PrIITE) targeted to: (i) exons of an endogenous gene of interest (GOI) and (ii......) a safe harbor locus. Using PrIITE cells harboring a GFP reporter or CDX2 transcription factor, we demonstrate discrete inducibility of gene expression with complete abrogation of leakiness. CDX2 PrIITE cells generated by this approach uncovered novel CDX2 downstream effector genes. Our results provide...

  10. Estrogen-related receptor α, the molecular clock, and transcriptional control of metabolic outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, V; Dufour, C R; Eichner, L J; Deblois, G; Cermakian, N

    2011-01-01

    Metabolism and circadian rhythms must be closely integrated to support the energetic needs of the organism linked to the daily timing of physiological and behavioral processes. Although components of the molecular clock can directly target some metabolic genes, the control of metabolic clock output is believed to be mediated mostly through the action of transcription factors whose patterns of expression are rhythmic in metabolic tissues. Our recent work has identified the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), a potent effector of metabolic gene networks, as a direct regulator of the molecular clock. Thus, by acting both upstream of and downstream from the molecular clock, ERRα serves as a key transcription factor linking the clock with metabolic control.

  11. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C -C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1–4 (EGR1–4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27187237

  12. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C-C; Cole, S W

    2016-05-24

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1-4 (EGR1-4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators.

  13. Krüppel-like transcription factors and control of pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourillot Pierre-Yves

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent papers have demonstrated a role for Krüppel-like transcription factors 2, 4 and 5 in the control of mouse embryonic stem cell pluripotency. However, it is not clear whether each factor has a unique role or whether they are functionally redundant. A paper by Parisi and colleagues in BMC Biology now sheds light on the mechanism by which Klf5 regulates pluripotency. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/128

  14. Control of microRNA biogenesis and transcription by cell signaling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    A limited set of cell-cell signaling pathways presides over the vast majority of animal developmental events. The typical raison d'etre for signal transduction is to control the transcription of protein-coding genes. However, with the recent appreciation of microRNAs, growing attention has been paid towards understanding how signaling pathways intertwine with microRNA-mediated regulation. This review highlights recent studies that uncover unexpected modes of microRNA regulation by cell signal...

  15. A protein thermometer controls temperature-dependent transcription of flagellar motility genes in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather D Kamp

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Facultative bacterial pathogens must adapt to multiple stimuli to persist in the environment or establish infection within a host. Temperature is often utilized as a signal to control expression of virulence genes necessary for infection or genes required for persistence in the environment. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that allow bacteria to adapt and respond to temperature fluctuations. Listeria monocytogenes (Lm is a food-borne, facultative intracellular pathogen that uses flagellar motility to survive in the extracellular environment and to enhance initial invasion of host cells during infection. Upon entering the host, Lm represses transcription of flagellar motility genes in response to mammalian physiological temperature (37°C with a concomitant temperature-dependent up-regulation of virulence genes. We previously determined that down-regulation of flagellar motility is required for virulence and is governed by the reciprocal activities of the MogR transcriptional repressor and the bifunctional flagellar anti-repressor/glycosyltransferase, GmaR. In this study, we determined that GmaR is also a protein thermometer that controls temperature-dependent transcription of flagellar motility genes. Two-hybrid and gel mobility shift analyses indicated that the interaction between MogR and GmaR is temperature sensitive. Using circular dichroism and limited proteolysis, we determined that GmaR undergoes a temperature-dependent conformational change as temperature is elevated. Quantitative analysis of GmaR in Lm revealed that GmaR is degraded in the absence of MogR and at 37°C (when the MogR:GmaR complex is less stable. Since MogR represses transcription of all flagellar motility genes, including transcription of gmaR, changes in the stability of the MogR:GmaR anti-repression complex, due to conformational changes in GmaR, mediates repression or de-repression of flagellar motility genes in Lm. Thus, GmaR functions as

  16. A double-ratchet mechanism of transcription elongation and its control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckenstein, Andrei

    2005-03-01

    Transcription, the process by which the genetic information encoded in DNA is transferred into RNA, is the first step in gene expression and it is the step at which most regulation occurs. A detailed understanding of the structural and mechanistic aspects of each step of transcription (initiation, elongation, termination and regulation) is one of the holy grails of biology. Here we characterize the motion of RNA polymerase (RNAP), the multi-subunit molecular motor that carries out the transcription process, during the elongation stage. We argue that during elongation RNAP moves by a complex Brownian ratchet mechanism in which the translocation along DNA and the binding of nucleotides into RNAP's catalytic center are coupled to a fluctuating internal degree of freedom associated with a protein sub-unit (the F-bridge) of RNAP. More precisely, the model is defined by a set of kinetic equations^ describing the competition for the catalytic site between an incoming nucleotide, the 3'-end of RNA, and the F-bridge which in its bent conformation blocks the active center. An important aspect of the model is the incorporation of the three ``active'' processes describing (i) the ejection of bound nucleotides from the active center through steric clashes with either the F-bridge in its bent conformation or with the 3'-end of RNA; and (ii) the forward translocation induced by bending of the F-bridge pushing against the 3'-end of RNA. The ``active'' processes do not imply a ``power stroke'' mechanism since the energy driving them is purely thermal. Indeed the model displays a route by which the system uses thermal fluctuations to control the rate, processivity and fidelity of transcription already before the irreversible chemical incorporation step. Moreover, the model qualitatively explains many aspects of both bio-chemicalootnotetextBar-Nahum, G., Epshtein, V., Ruckenstein, A.E., Rafikov, R., Mustaev, A., and Nudler, E. A ratchet mechanism of transcription elongation and its

  17. A PBX1 transcriptional network controls dopaminergic neuron development and is impaired in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaescusa, J Carlos; Li, Bingsi; Toledo, Enrique M; Rivetti di Val Cervo, Pia; Yang, Shanzheng; Stott, Simon Rw; Kaiser, Karol; Islam, Saiful; Gyllborg, Daniel; Laguna-Goya, Rocio; Landreh, Michael; Lönnerberg, Peter; Falk, Anna; Bergman, Tomas; Barker, Roger A; Linnarsson, Sten; Selleri, Licia; Arenas, Ernest

    2016-09-15

    Pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox (PBX) transcription factors are known to regulate organogenesis, but their molecular targets and function in midbrain dopaminergic neurons (mDAn) as well as their role in neurodegenerative diseases are unknown. Here, we show that PBX1 controls a novel transcriptional network required for mDAn specification and survival, which is sufficient to generate mDAn from human stem cells. Mechanistically, PBX1 plays a dual role in transcription by directly repressing or activating genes, such as Onecut2 to inhibit lateral fates during embryogenesis, Pitx3 to promote mDAn development, and Nfe2l1 to protect from oxidative stress. Notably, PBX1 and NFE2L1 levels are severely reduced in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and decreased NFE2L1 levels increases damage by oxidative stress in human midbrain cells. Thus, our results reveal novel roles for PBX1 and its transcriptional network in mDAn development and PD, opening the door for new therapeutic interventions.

  18. Serum response factor controls transcriptional network regulating epidermal function and hair follicle morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Congxing; Hindes, Anna; Burns, Carole J; Koppel, Aaron C; Kiss, Alexi; Yin, Yan; Ma, Liang; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Khnykin, Denis; Jahnsen, Frode L; Crosby, Seth D; Ramanan, Narendrakumar; Efimova, Tatiana

    2013-03-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of growth-related immediate-early, cytoskeletal, and muscle-specific genes to control growth, differentiation, and cytoskeletal integrity in different cell types. To investigate the role for SRF in epidermal development and homeostasis, we conditionally knocked out SRF in epidermal keratinocytes. We report that SRF deletion disrupted epidermal barrier function leading to early postnatal lethality. Mice lacking SRF in epidermis displayed morphogenetic defects, including an eye-open-at-birth phenotype and lack of whiskers. SRF-null skin exhibited abnormal morphology, hyperplasia, aberrant expression of differentiation markers and transcriptional regulators, anomalous actin organization, enhanced inflammation, and retarded hair follicle (HF) development. Transcriptional profiling experiments uncovered profound molecular changes in SRF-null E17.5 epidermis and revealed that many previously identified SRF target CArG box-containing genes were markedly upregulated in SRF-null epidermis, indicating that SRF may function to repress transcription of a subset of its target genes in epidermis. Remarkably, when transplanted onto nude mice, engrafted SRF-null skin lacked hair but displayed normal epidermal architecture with proper expression of differentiation markers, suggesting that although keratinocyte SRF is essential for HF development, a cross-talk between SRF-null keratinocytes and the surrounding microenvironment is likely responsible for the barrier-deficient mutant epidermal phenotype.

  19. Characterization of human mitochondrial ferritin promoter: identification of transcription factors and evidences of epigenetic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldo, Michela; Santambrogio, Paolo; Rovelli, Elisabetta; di Savino, Augusta; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cittaro, Davide; Roetto, Antonella; Levi, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is an iron storage protein belonging to the ferritin family but, unlike the cytosolic ferritin, it has an iron-unrelated restricted tissue expression. FtMt appears to be preferentially expressed in cell types characterized by high metabolic activity and oxygen consumption, suggesting a role in protecting mitochondria from iron-dependent oxidative damage. The human gene (FTMT) is intronless and its promoter region has not been described yet. To analyze the regulatory mechanisms controlling FTMT expression, we characterized the 5‧ flanking region upstream the transcriptional starting site of FTMT by in silico enquiry of sequences conservation, DNA deletion analysis, and ChIP assay. The data revealed a minimal promoter region and identified the presence of SP1, CREB and YY1 as positive regulators, and GATA2, FoxA1 and C/EBPβ as inhibitors of the transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, the FTMT transcription is increased by acetylating and de-methylating agent treatments in K562 and HeLa cells. These treatments up-regulate FtMt expression even in fibroblasts derived from a Friedreich ataxia patient, where it might exert a beneficial effect against mitochondrial oxidative damage. The expression of FTMT appears regulated by a complex mechanism involving epigenetic events and interplay between transcription factors.

  20. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasov Valery

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F and lrpA1 (OE2621R, were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. Results It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. Conclusion The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3.

  1. Bacteriophage Nf DNA region controlling late transcription: structural and functional homology with bacteriophage phi 29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Salas, M

    1993-06-25

    The putative region for the control of late transcription of the Bacillus subtilis phage Nf has been identified by DNA sequence homology with the equivalent region of the evolutionary related phage phi 29. A similar arrangement of early and late promoters has been detected in the two phages, suggesting that viral transcription could be regulated in a similar way at late times of the infection. Transcription of late genes requires the presence of a viral early protein, gpF in phage Nf and p4 in phage phi 29, being the latter known to bind to a DNA region located upstream from the phage phi 29 late promoter. We have identified a DNA region located upstream from the putative late promoter of phage Nf that is probably involved in binding protein gpF. Furthermore, we show that the phage phi 29 protein p4 is able to bind to this region and activate transcription from the phage Nf putative late promoter. Sequence alignment has also revealed the existence of significant internal homology between the two early promoters contained in this region of each phage.

  2. YAP1 Exerts Its Transcriptional Control via TEAD-Mediated Activation of Enhancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Stein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available YAP1 is a major effector of the Hippo pathway and a well-established oncogene. Elevated YAP1 activity due to mutations in Hippo pathway components or YAP1 amplification is observed in several types of human cancers. Here we investigated its genomic binding landscape in YAP1-activated cancer cells, as well as in non-transformed cells. We demonstrate that TEAD transcription factors mediate YAP1 chromatin-binding genome-wide, further explaining their dominant role as primary mediators of YAP1-transcriptional activity. Moreover, we show that YAP1 largely exerts its transcriptional control via distal enhancers that are marked by H3K27 acetylation and that YAP1 is necessary for this chromatin mark at bound enhancers and the activity of the associated genes. This work establishes YAP1-mediated transcriptional regulation at distal enhancers and provides an expanded set of target genes resulting in a fundamental source to study YAP1 function in a normal and cancer setting.

  3. YAP1 Exerts Its Transcriptional Control via TEAD-Mediated Activation of Enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Claudia; Bardet, Anaïs Flore; Roma, Guglielmo; Bergling, Sebastian; Clay, Ieuan; Ruchti, Alexandra; Agarinis, Claudia; Schmelzle, Tobias; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Schübeler, Dirk; Bauer, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    YAP1 is a major effector of the Hippo pathway and a well-established oncogene. Elevated YAP1 activity due to mutations in Hippo pathway components or YAP1 amplification is observed in several types of human cancers. Here we investigated its genomic binding landscape in YAP1-activated cancer cells, as well as in non-transformed cells. We demonstrate that TEAD transcription factors mediate YAP1 chromatin-binding genome-wide, further explaining their dominant role as primary mediators of YAP1-transcriptional activity. Moreover, we show that YAP1 largely exerts its transcriptional control via distal enhancers that are marked by H3K27 acetylation and that YAP1 is necessary for this chromatin mark at bound enhancers and the activity of the associated genes. This work establishes YAP1-mediated transcriptional regulation at distal enhancers and provides an expanded set of target genes resulting in a fundamental source to study YAP1 function in a normal and cancer setting.

  4. G-quadruplexes as novel cis-elements controlling transcription during embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Aldana P; Margarit, Ezequiel; Domizi, Pablo; Banchio, Claudia; Armas, Pablo; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2016-05-19

    G-quadruplexes are dynamic structures folded in G-rich single-stranded DNA regions. These structures have been recognized as a potential nucleic acid based mechanism for regulating multiple cellular processes such as replication, transcription and genomic maintenance. So far, their transcriptional role in vivo during vertebrate embryonic development has not yet been addressed. Here, we performed an in silico search to find conserved putative G-quadruplex sequences (PQSs) within proximal promoter regions of human, mouse and zebrafish developmental genes. Among the PQSs able to fold in vitro as G-quadruplex, those present in nog3, col2a1 and fzd5 promoters were selected for further studies. In cellulo studies revealed that the selected G-quadruplexes affected the transcription of luciferase controlled by the SV40 nonrelated promoter. G-quadruplex disruption in vivo by microinjection in zebrafish embryos of either small ligands or DNA oligonucleotides complementary to the selected PQSs resulted in lower transcription of the targeted genes. Moreover, zebrafish embryos and larvae phenotypes caused by the presence of complementary oligonucleotides fully resembled those ones reported for nog3, col2a1 and fzd5 morphants. To our knowledge, this is the first work revealing in vivo the role of conserved G-quadruplexes in the embryonic development, one of the most regulated processes of the vertebrates biology.

  5. A transcriptional network controlling glial development in the Drosophila visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauke, Ann-Christin; Sasse, Sofia; Matzat, Till; Klämbt, Christian

    2015-06-15

    In the nervous system, glial cells need to be specified from a set of progenitor cells. In the developing Drosophila eye, perineurial glia proliferate and differentiate as wrapping glia in response to a neuronal signal conveyed by the FGF receptor pathway. To unravel the underlying transcriptional network we silenced all genes encoding predicted DNA-binding proteins in glial cells using RNAi. Dref and other factors of the TATA box-binding protein-related factor 2 (TRF2) complex were previously predicted to be involved in cellular metabolism and cell growth. Silencing of these genes impaired early glia proliferation and subsequent differentiation. Dref controls proliferation via activation of the Pdm3 transcription factor, whereas glial differentiation is regulated via Dref and the homeodomain protein Cut. Cut expression is controlled independently of Dref by FGF receptor activity. Loss- and gain-of-function studies show that Cut is required for glial differentiation and is sufficient to instruct the formation of membrane protrusions, a hallmark of wrapping glial morphology. Our work discloses a network of transcriptional regulators controlling the progression of a naïve perineurial glia towards the fully differentiated wrapping glia.

  6. Control of trichome formation in Arabidopsis by poplar single-repeat R3 MYB transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei eZhou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis, trichome formation is regulated by the interplay of R3 MYBs and several others transcription factors including the WD40-repeat protein TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1, the R2R3 MYB transcription factor GLABRA1 (GL1, the bHLH transcription factor GLABRA3 (GL3 or ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 (EGL3, and the homeodomain protein GLABRA2 (GL2. R3 MYBs including TRICHOMELESS1 (TCL1, TRYPTICHON (TRY, CAPRICE (CPC, ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC1 (ETC1, ETC2 and ETC3 negatively regulate trichome formation by competing with GL1 for binding GL3 or EGL3, thus blocking the formation of TTG1-GL3/EGL3-GL1, an activator complex required for the activation of the trichome positive regulator gene GL2. However, it is largely unknown if R3 MYBs in other plant species especially woody plants have similar functions. By BLASTing the Populus trichocarpa protein database using the entire amino acid sequence of TCL1, an Arabidopsis R3 MYB transcription factor, we identified a total of eight R3 MYB transcription factor genes in poplar, namely Populus trichocarpa TRICHOMELESS1through 8 (PtrTCL1-PtrTCL8. The amino acid signature required for interacting with bHLH transcription factors and the amino acids required for cell-to-cell movement of R3 MYBs are not fully conserved in all PtrTCLs. When tested in Arabidopsis protoplasts, however, all PtrTCL interacted with GL3. Expressing each of the eight PtrTCLs genes in Arabidopsis resulted in either glabrous phenotypes or plants with reduced trichome numbers, and expression levels of GL2 in all transgenic plants tested were greatly reduced. Expression of PtrTCL1 under the control of TCL1 native promoter almost completely complemented the mutant phenotype of tcl. In contrast, expression of PtrTCL1 under the control of TRY native promoter in the try mutant, or under the control of CPC native promoter in the cpc mutant resulted in glabrous phenotypes, suggesting that PtrTCL1 functions similarly to TCL1, but not TRY and CPC.

  7. E2F Transcription Factors Control the Roller Coaster Ride of Cell Cycle Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlings, Ingrid; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Initially, the E2F transcription factor was discovered as a factor able to bind the adenovirus E2 promoter and activate viral genes. Afterwards it was shown that E2F also binds to promoters of nonviral genes such as C-MYC and DHFR, which were already known at that time to be important for cell growth and DNA metabolism, respectively. These findings provided the first clues that the E2F transcription factor might be an important regulator of the cell cycle. Since this initial discovery in 1987, several additional E2F family members have been identified, and more than 100 targets genes have been shown to be directly regulated by E2Fs, the majority of these are important for controlling the cell cycle. The progression of a cell through the cell cycle is accompanied with the increased expression of a specific set of genes during one phase of the cell cycle and the decrease of the same set of genes during a later phase of the cell cycle. This roller coaster ride, or oscillation, of gene expression is essential for the proper progression through the cell cycle to allow accurate DNA replication and cell division. The E2F transcription factors have been shown to be critical for the temporal expression of the oscillating cell cycle genes. This review will focus on how the oscillation of E2Fs and their targets is regulated by transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanism in mammals, yeast, flies, and worms. Furthermore, we will discuss the functional impact of E2Fs on the cell cycle progression and outline the consequences when E2F expression is disturbed.

  8. HERMES Precision Results on g1p, g1d and g1n and the First Measurement of the Tensor Structure Function b1d

    CERN Document Server

    Riedl, C; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Ammosov, V V; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Baturin, V; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V V; Capitani, G P; Chiang, H C; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E G; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G M; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Ely, J; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Garutti, E; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Greeniaus, L G; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Königsmann, K C; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V A; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Lindemann, T; Lipka, K; Lorenzon, W; Lü, J; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaev, M A; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Orlandi, G; Pickert, N; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Rith, K; Airapetian, A; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Yu I; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R G; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Sinram, K; Stancari, M D; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Tkabladze, A V; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Vogel, C; Vogt, M; Volmer, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Ybeles-Smit, G V; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zohrabyan, H G; Zupranski, P; Riedl, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    Final HERMES results on the proton, deuteron and neutron structure function g1 are presented in the kinematic range 0.0021

  9. The identification of novel PMADS3 interacting proteins indicates a role in post-transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Ning, Guogui; Han, Xueping; Liu, Caixian; Bao, Manzhu

    2015-06-10

    PMADS3, a known MADS-box transcriptional factor and a C-class gene for floral development, plays dual roles in controlling the identity of inner floral organs and the termination of flower meristems in petunia. In this study, it was confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays that the PMADS3 protein can interact individually with E-class proteins FBP2, FBP5, FBP9 and PMADS12. A yeast two-hybrid cDNA library was screened using the entire PMADS3 as bait, and this identified further potential interaction candidates. Two novel genes, PheIF3f and PhAGO10, were isolated, and suggested to regulate mRNA and translational processes according to the analysis of protein functional domains and subcellular localization predictions. Notably, the PhAGO10 protein belongs to the Argonaute family, members of which are major players in small-RNA-guided gene silencing processes via mRNA cleavage or translational inhibition. The results of yeast two-hybrid and BiFC assays indicated that PheIF3f and PhAGO10 could interact with PMADS3. Our findings indicate that the C-class gene PMADS3 potentially participates in post-transcriptional control, as well as transcriptional regulation.

  10. A recently evolved transcriptional network controls biofilm development in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Clarissa J; Fox, Emily P; Nett, Jeniel E; Sorrells, Trevor R; Mitrovich, Quinn M; Hernday, Aaron D; Tuch, Brian B; Andes, David R; Johnson, Alexander D

    2012-01-20

    A biofilm is an organized, resilient group of microbes in which individual cells acquire properties, such as drug resistance, that are distinct from those observed in suspension cultures. Here, we describe and analyze the transcriptional network controlling biofilm formation in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, whose biofilms are a major source of medical device-associated infections. We have combined genetic screens, genome-wide approaches, and two in vivo animal models to describe a master circuit controlling biofilm formation, composed of six transcription regulators that form a tightly woven network with ∼1,000 target genes. Evolutionary analysis indicates that the biofilm network has rapidly evolved: genes in the biofilm circuit are significantly weighted toward genes that arose relatively recently with ancient genes being underrepresented. This circuit provides a framework for understanding many aspects of biofilm formation by C. albicans in a mammalian host. It also provides insights into how complex cell behaviors can arise from the evolution of transcription circuits.

  11. Argonaute-1 binds transcriptional enhancers and controls constitutive and alternative splicing in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alló, Mariano; Agirre, Eneritz; Bessonov, Sergey; Bertucci, Paola; Gómez Acuña, Luciana; Buggiano, Valeria; Bellora, Nicolás; Singh, Babita; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Blaustein, Matías; Miñana, Belén; Dujardin, Gwendal; Pozzi, Berta; Pelisch, Federico; Bechara, Elías; Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Srebrow, Anabella; Lührmann, Reinhard; Valcárcel, Juan; Eyras, Eduardo; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of Argonaute proteins in cytoplasmic microRNA and RNAi pathways are well established. However, their implication in small RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing in the mammalian cell nucleus is less understood. We have recently shown that intronic siRNAs cause chromatin modifications that inhibit RNA polymerase II elongation and modulate alternative splicing in an Argonaute-1 (AGO1)-dependent manner. Here we used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) to investigate the genome-wide distribution of AGO1 nuclear targets. Unexpectedly, we found that about 80% of AGO1 clusters are associated with cell-type-specific transcriptional enhancers, most of them (73%) overlapping active enhancers. This association seems to be mediated by long, rather than short, enhancer RNAs and to be more prominent in intragenic, rather than intergenic, enhancers. Paradoxically, crossing ChIP-seq with RNA-seq data upon AGO1 depletion revealed that enhancer-bound AGO1 is not linked to the global regulation of gene transcription but to the control of constitutive and alternative splicing, which was confirmed by an individual gene analysis explaining how AGO1 controls inclusion levels of the cassette exon 107 in the SYNE2 gene. PMID:25313066

  12. C. elegans BED domain transcription factor BED-3 controls lineage-specific cell proliferation during organogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takao; Sternberg, Paul W

    2010-02-15

    The control of cell division is critical to organogenesis, but how this control is achieved is not fully understood. We found that mutations in bed-3, encoding a BED Zn-finger domain transcription factor, confer a phenotype where a specific set of cell divisions during vulval organogenesis is lost. Unlike general cell cycle regulators in Caenorhabditis elegans, the function of bed-3 is restricted to specific lineages. Transcriptional reporters suggest that bed-3 is expressed in a limited number of cell types including vulval cells whose divisions are affected in bed-3 mutants. A bed-3 mutation also affects the expression pattern of the cdh-3 cadherin gene in the vulva. The phenotype of bed-3 mutants is similar to the phenotype caused by mutations in cog-1 (Nkx6), a component of a gene regulatory network controlling cell type specific gene expression in the vulval lineage. These results suggest that bed-3 is a key component linking the gene regulatory network controlling cell-type specification to control of cell division during vulval organogenesis.

  13. p21 as a transcriptional co-repressor of S-phase and mitotic control genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Ferrándiz

    Full Text Available It has been previously described that p21 functions not only as a CDK inhibitor but also as a transcriptional co-repressor in some systems. To investigate the roles of p21 in transcriptional control, we studied the gene expression changes in two human cell systems. Using a human leukemia cell line (K562 with inducible p21 expression and human primary keratinocytes with adenoviral-mediated p21 expression, we carried out microarray-based gene expression profiling. We found that p21 rapidly and strongly repressed the mRNA levels of a number of genes involved in cell cycle and mitosis. One of the most strongly down-regulated genes was CCNE2 (cyclin E2 gene. Mutational analysis in K562 cells showed that the N-terminal region of p21 is required for repression of gene expression of CCNE2 and other genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that p21 was bound to human CCNE2 and other p21-repressed genes gene in the vicinity of the transcription start site. Moreover, p21 repressed human CCNE2 promoter-luciferase constructs in K562 cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the CDE motif is present in most of the promoters of the p21-regulated genes. Altogether, the results suggest that p21 exerts a repressive effect on a relevant number of genes controlling S phase and mitosis. Thus, p21 activity as inhibitor of cell cycle progression would be mediated not only by the inhibition of CDKs but also by the transcriptional down-regulation of key genes.

  14. Post-transcriptional control of NLRP3 inflammasome activation in colonic macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filardy, Alessandra A.; He, Jianping; Bennink, Jack; Yewdell, Jonathan; Kelsall, Brian L.

    2016-01-01

    Colonic macrophages (cMPs) are important for intestinal homeostasis as they kill microbes yet produce regulatory cytokines. Activity of the NLRP3 inflammasome, a major sensor of stress and microorganisms that results in pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cell death must be tightly controlled in the intestine. We demonstrate that resident cMPs are hyporesponsive to NLRP3 inflammasome activation due to a remarkable level of post-transcriptional control of NLRP3 and proIL-1β protein expression, which was also seen for TNF-α and IL-6, but lost during experimental colitis. Resident cMPs rapidly degraded NLRP3 and proIL-1β proteins by the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Finally, blocking IL-10R-signaling in vivo enhanced NLRP3 and proIL-1β protein, but not mRNA levels in resident cMPs implicating a role for IL-10 in environmental conditioning of cMPs. These data are the first to show dramatic post-transcriptional control of inflammatory cytokine production by a relevant tissue-derived macrophage population and proteasomal degradation of proIL-1β and NLRP3 as a mechanism to control inflammasome activation; findings which have broad implications for our understanding of intestinal and systemic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26627461

  15. An APC/C-Cdh1 Biosensor Reveals the Dynamics of Cdh1 Inactivation at the G1/S Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondracka, Andrej; Robbins, Jonathan A; Cross, Frederick R

    2016-01-01

    B-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity must be turned off for mitotic exit and G1 stabilization. B-type cyclin degradation is mediated by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C); during and after mitotic exit, APC/C is dependent on Cdh1. Cdh1 is in turn phosphorylated and inactivated by cyclin-CDK at the Start transition of the new cell cycle. We developed a biosensor to assess the cell cycle dynamics of APC/C-Cdh1. Nuclear exit of the G1 transcriptional repressor Whi5 is a known marker of Start; APC/C-Cdh1 is inactivated 12 min after Whi5 nuclear exit with little measurable cell-to-cell timing variability. Multiple phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 act in a redundant manner to repress its activity. Reducing the number of phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 can to some extent be tolerated for cell viability, but it increases variability in timing of APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation. Mutants with minimal subsets of phosphorylation sites required for viability exhibit striking stochasticity in multiple responses including budding, nuclear division, and APC/C-Cdh1 activity itself. Multiple cyclin-CDK complexes, as well as the stoichiometric inhibitor Acm1, contribute to APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation; this redundant control is likely to promote rapid and reliable APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation immediately following the Start transition.

  16. An APC/C-Cdh1 Biosensor Reveals the Dynamics of Cdh1 Inactivation at the G1/S Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondracka, Andrej; Robbins, Jonathan A.; Cross, Frederick R.

    2016-01-01

    B-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity must be turned off for mitotic exit and G1 stabilization. B-type cyclin degradation is mediated by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C); during and after mitotic exit, APC/C is dependent on Cdh1. Cdh1 is in turn phosphorylated and inactivated by cyclin-CDK at the Start transition of the new cell cycle. We developed a biosensor to assess the cell cycle dynamics of APC/C-Cdh1. Nuclear exit of the G1 transcriptional repressor Whi5 is a known marker of Start; APC/C-Cdh1 is inactivated 12 min after Whi5 nuclear exit with little measurable cell-to-cell timing variability. Multiple phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 act in a redundant manner to repress its activity. Reducing the number of phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 can to some extent be tolerated for cell viability, but it increases variability in timing of APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation. Mutants with minimal subsets of phosphorylation sites required for viability exhibit striking stochasticity in multiple responses including budding, nuclear division, and APC/C-Cdh1 activity itself. Multiple cyclin-CDK complexes, as well as the stoichiometric inhibitor Acm1, contribute to APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation; this redundant control is likely to promote rapid and reliable APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation immediately following the Start transition. PMID:27410035

  17. The HY5-PIF regulatory module coordinates light and temperature control of photosynthetic gene transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Toledo-Ortiz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to interpret daily and seasonal alterations in light and temperature signals is essential for plant survival. This is particularly important during seedling establishment when the phytochrome photoreceptors activate photosynthetic pigment production for photoautotrophic growth. Phytochromes accomplish this partly through the suppression of phytochrome interacting factors (PIFs, negative regulators of chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis. While the bZIP transcription factor long hypocotyl 5 (HY5, a potent PIF antagonist, promotes photosynthetic pigment accumulation in response to light. Here we demonstrate that by directly targeting a common promoter cis-element (G-box, HY5 and PIFs form a dynamic activation-suppression transcriptional module responsive to light and temperature cues. This antagonistic regulatory module provides a simple, direct mechanism through which environmental change can redirect transcriptional control of genes required for photosynthesis and photoprotection. In the regulation of photopigment biosynthesis genes, HY5 and PIFs do not operate alone, but with the circadian clock. However, sudden changes in light or temperature conditions can trigger changes in HY5 and PIFs abundance that adjust the expression of common target genes to optimise photosynthetic performance and growth.

  18. Transcriptional control of an essential ribozyme in Drosophila reveals an ancient evolutionary divide in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Sathiya N; Lai, Lien B; Gopalan, Venkat; Simcox, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is an essential enzyme required for 5'-maturation of tRNA. While an RNA-free, protein-based form of RNase P exists in eukaryotes, the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) form is found in all domains of life. The catalytic component of the RNP is an RNA known as RNase P RNA (RPR). Eukaryotic RPR genes are typically transcribed by RNA polymerase III (pol III). Here we showed that the RPR gene in Drosophila, which is annotated in the intron of a pol II-transcribed protein-coding gene, lacks signals for transcription by pol III. Using reporter gene constructs that include the RPR-coding intron from Drosophila, we found that the intron contains all the sequences necessary for production of mature RPR but is dependent on the promoter of the recipient gene for expression. We also demonstrated that the intron-coded RPR copurifies with RNase P and is required for its activity. Analysis of RPR genes in various animal genomes revealed a striking divide in the animal kingdom that separates insects and crustaceans into a single group in which RPR genes lack signals for independent transcription and are embedded in different protein-coding genes. Our findings provide evidence for a genetic event that occurred approximately 500 million years ago in the arthropod lineage, which switched the control of the transcription of RPR from pol III to pol II.

  19. Transcriptional control of an essential ribozyme in Drosophila reveals an ancient evolutionary divide in animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathiya N Manivannan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribonuclease P (RNase P is an essential enzyme required for 5'-maturation of tRNA. While an RNA-free, protein-based form of RNase P exists in eukaryotes, the ribonucleoprotein (RNP form is found in all domains of life. The catalytic component of the RNP is an RNA known as RNase P RNA (RPR. Eukaryotic RPR genes are typically transcribed by RNA polymerase III (pol III. Here we showed that the RPR gene in Drosophila, which is annotated in the intron of a pol II-transcribed protein-coding gene, lacks signals for transcription by pol III. Using reporter gene constructs that include the RPR-coding intron from Drosophila, we found that the intron contains all the sequences necessary for production of mature RPR but is dependent on the promoter of the recipient gene for expression. We also demonstrated that the intron-coded RPR copurifies with RNase P and is required for its activity. Analysis of RPR genes in various animal genomes revealed a striking divide in the animal kingdom that separates insects and crustaceans into a single group in which RPR genes lack signals for independent transcription and are embedded in different protein-coding genes. Our findings provide evidence for a genetic event that occurred approximately 500 million years ago in the arthropod lineage, which switched the control of the transcription of RPR from pol III to pol II.

  20. Two distinct promoter architectures centered on dynamic nucleosomes control ribosomal protein gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Britta; Kubik, Slawomir; Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Victoria; Dénervaud, Nicolas; Jacquet, Philippe; Ozkan, Burak; Rougemont, Jacques; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Naef, Félix; Shore, David

    2014-08-01

    In yeast, ribosome production is controlled transcriptionally by tight coregulation of the 138 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). RPG promoters display limited sequence homology, and the molecular basis for their coregulation remains largely unknown. Here we identify two prevalent RPG promoter types, both characterized by upstream binding of the general transcription factor (TF) Rap1 followed by the RPG-specific Fhl1/Ifh1 pair, with one type also binding the HMG-B protein Hmo1. We show that the regulatory properties of the two promoter types are remarkably similar, suggesting that they are determined to a large extent by Rap1 and the Fhl1/Ifh1 pair. Rapid depletion experiments allowed us to define a hierarchy of TF binding in which Rap1 acts as a pioneer factor required for binding of all other TFs. We also uncovered unexpected features underlying recruitment of Fhl1, whose forkhead DNA-binding domain is not required for binding at most promoters, and Hmo1, whose binding is supported by repeated motifs. Finally, we describe unusually micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-sensitive nucleosomes at all RPG promoters, located between the canonical +1 and -1 nucleosomes, which coincide with sites of Fhl1/Ifh1 and Hmo1 binding. We speculate that these "fragile" nucleosomes play an important role in regulating RPG transcriptional output.

  1. The DNA damage- and transcription-associated protein paxip1 controls thymocyte development and emigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Elsa; Faryabi, Robert B; Luckey, Megan; Hao, Bingtao; Daniel, Jeremy A; Yang, Wenjing; Sun, Hong-Wei; Dressler, Greg; Peng, Weiqun; Chi, Hongbo; Ge, Kai; Krangel, Michael S; Park, Jung-Hyun; Nussenzweig, André

    2012-12-14

    Histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is associated with promoters of active genes and found at hot spots for DNA recombination. Here we have shown that PAXIP1 (also known as PTIP), a protein associated with MLL3 and MLL4 methyltransferase and the DNA damage response, regulates RAG-mediated cleavage and repair during V(D)J recombination in CD4(+) CD8(+) DP thymocytes. Loss of PAXIP1 in developing thymocytes diminished Jα H3K4me3 and germline transcription, suppressed double strand break formation at 3' Jα segments, but resulted in accumulation of unresolved T cell receptor α-chain gene (Tcra) breaks. Moreover, PAXIP1 was essential for release of mature single positive (SP) αβ T cells from the thymus through transcriptional activation of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor S1pr1 as well as for natural killer T cell development. Thus, in addition to maintaining genome integrity during Tcra rearrangements, PAXIP1 controls distinct transcriptional programs during DP differentiation necessary for Tcra locus accessibility, licensing mature thymocytes for trafficking and natural killer T cell development.

  2. Transcriptional control of the autophagy-lysosome system in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Rushika M.; Stoykova, Svetlana; Nicolay, Brandon N.; Ross, Kenneth N.; Fitamant, Julien; Boukhali, Myriam; Lengrand, Justine; Deshpande, Vikram; Selig, Martin K.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Settleman, Jeff; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Dyson, Nicholas J.; Zoncu, Roberto; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Haas, Wilhelm; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2016-01-01

    Activation of cellular stress response pathways to maintain metabolic homeostasis is emerging as a critical growth and survival mechanism in many cancers1. The pathogenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) requires high levels of autophagy2–4, a conserved self-degradative process5. However, the regulatory circuits that activate autophagy and reprogram PDA cell metabolism are unknown. We now show that autophagy induction in PDA occurs as part of a broader transcriptional program that coordinates activation of lysosome biogenesis and function, and nutrient scavenging, mediated by the MiT/TFE family transcription factors. In PDA cells, the MiT/TFE proteins6 – MITF, TFE3 and TFEB – are decoupled from regulatory mechanisms that control their cytoplasmic retention. Increased nuclear import in turn drives the expression of a coherent network of genes that induce high levels of lysosomal catabolic function essential for PDA growth. Unbiased global metabolite profiling reveals that MiT/TFE-dependent autophagy-lysosomal activation is specifically required to maintain intracellular amino acid (AA) pools. These results identify the MiT/TFE transcription factors as master regulators of metabolic reprogramming in pancreatic cancer and demonstrate activation of clearance pathways converging on the lysosome as a novel hallmark of aggressive malignancy. PMID:26168401

  3. Control of stomach smooth muscle development and intestinal rotation by transcription factor BARX1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayewickreme, Chenura D; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2015-09-01

    Diverse functions of the homeodomain transcription factor BARX1 include Wnt-dependent, non-cell autonomous specification of the stomach epithelium, tracheo-bronchial septation, and Wnt-independent expansion of the spleen primordium. Tight spatio-temporal regulation of Barx1 levels in the mesentery and stomach mesenchyme suggests additional roles. To determine these functions, we forced constitutive BARX1 expression in the Bapx1 expression domain, which includes the mesentery and intestinal mesenchyme, and also examined Barx1(-/)(-) embryos in further detail. Transgenic embryos invariably showed intestinal truncation and malrotation, in part reflecting abnormal left-right patterning. Ectopic BARX1 expression did not affect intestinal epithelium, but intestinal smooth muscle developed with features typical of the stomach wall. BARX1, which is normally restricted to the developing stomach, drives robust smooth muscle expansion in this organ by promoting proliferation of myogenic progenitors at the expense of other sub-epithelial cells. Undifferentiated embryonic stomach and intestinal mesenchyme showed modest differences in mRNA expression and BARX1 was sufficient to induce much of the stomach profile in intestinal cells. However, limited binding at cis-regulatory sites implies that BARX1 may act principally through other transcription factors. Genes expressed ectopically in BARX1(+) intestinal mesenchyme and reduced in Barx1(-/-) stomach mesenchyme include Isl1, Pitx1, Six2 and Pitx2, transcription factors known to control left-right patterning and influence smooth muscle development. The sum of evidence suggests that potent BARX1 functions in intestinal rotation and stomach myogenesis occur through this small group of intermediary transcription factors.

  4. Fkh1 and Fkh2 associate with Sir2 to control CLB2 transcription under normal and oxidative stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eLinke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Forkhead box family of transcription factors is evolutionary conserved from yeast to higher eukaryotes and its members are involved in many physiological processes including metabolism, DNA repair, cell cycle, stress resistance, apoptosis and aging. In budding yeast, four Forkhead transcription factors were identified, namely Fkh1, Fkh2, Fhl1, and Hcm1, which are implicated in chromatin silencing, cell cycle regulation and stress response. These factors impinge transcriptional regulation during cell cycle progression, and histone deacetylases play an essential role in this process, e.g. the nuclear localisation of Hcm1 depends on Sir2 activity, whereas Sin3/Rpd3 silence cell cycle specific gene transcription in G2/M phase. However, a direct involvement of Sir2 in Fkh1/Fkh2-dependent regulation of target genes is at present unknown. Here, we show that Fkh1 and Fkh2 associate with Sir2 in G1 and M phase, and that Fkh1/Fkh2-mediated activation of reporter genes is antagonized by Sir2. We further report that Sir2 overexpression strongly affects cell growth in an Fkh1/Fkh2-dependent manner. In addition, Sir2 regulates the expression of the mitotic cyclin Clb2 through Fkh1/Fkh2-mediated binding to the CLB2 promoter in G1 and M phase. We finally demonstrate that Sir2 is also enriched at the CLB2 promoter under stress conditions, and that the nuclear localization of Sir2 is dependent on Fkh1 and Fkh2. Taken together, our results show a functional interplay between Fkh1/Fkh2 and Sir2 suggesting a novel mechanism of cell cycle repression. Thus, in budding yeast, not only the regulation of G2/M gene expression but also the protective response against stress could be directly coordinated by Fkh1 and Fkh2.

  5. Identification of a ZEB2-MITF-ZEB1 transcriptional network that controls melanogenesis and melanoma progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Denecker (Geertrui); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); E. Akay (Ela); D. Koludrovic (D.); J. Taminau (J.); K. Lemeire (K.); A. Gheldof (A.); B. de Craene (B.); M. van Gele (M.); L. Brochez (L.); G.M. Udupi (G.); S.M. Rafferty; B. Balint (B.); W.M. Gallagher (W.); M.A.I. Ghanem (Mazen); D. Huylebroeck (Danny); K. Haigh (Katharina); J.J. van den Oord (Joost); L. Larue; I. Davidson (Irwin); J.-C. Marine (J.); G. Berx (Geert)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractDeregulation of signaling pathways that control differentiation, expansion and migration of neural crest-derived melanoblasts during normal development contributes also to melanoma progression and metastasis. Although several epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) transcription factors, such as

  6. The bZIP transcription factor PERIANTHIA: A multifunctional hub for meristem control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eLohmann

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to extreme variations in environmental conditions over the course of their lives. Since plants grow and initiate new organs continuously, they have to modulate the underlying developmental program accordingly to cope with this challenge. At the heart of this extraordinary developmental plasticity are pluripotent stem cells, which are maintained during the entire life-cycle of the plant and that are embedded within dynamic stem cell niches. While the complex regulatory principles of plant stem cell control under artificial constant growth conditions begin to emerge, virtually nothing is known about how this circuit adapts to variations in the environment. In addition to the local feedback system constituted by the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS and the CLAVATA signaling cascade in the center of the shoot apical meristem (SAM, the bZIP transcription factor PERIANTHIA (PAN not only has a broader expression domain in SAM and flowers, but also carries out more diverse functions in meristem maintenance: pan mutants show alterations in environmental response, shoot meristem size, floral organ number and exhibit severe defects in termination of floral stem cells in an environment dependent fashion. Genetic and genomic analyses indicate that PAN interacts with a plethora of developmental pathways including light, plant hormone and meristem control systems, suggesting that PAN is as an important regulatory node in the network of plant stem cell control.

  7. Connections between transcription, mRNP assembly and quality control in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Heick

    in the context of THO and rna14-3 mutants improves mRNP quality by acting upstream of transcription-site retention and nuclear degradation of the transcripts. As Rad3p mutant effects can be phenocopied by other mutations known to affect transcription and by the addition of transcription elongation drugs, our...

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) generates soluble HLA-G1 by cell surface proteolytic shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Trentini, Alessandro; Bortolotti, Daria; Manfrinato, Maria C; Rotola, Antonella; Castellazzi, Massimiliano; Melchiorri, Loredana; Di Luca, Dario; Dallocchio, Franco; Fainardi, Enrico; Bellini, Tiziana

    2013-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) molecules are non-classical HLA class I antigens with an important role in pregnancy immune regulation and inflammation control. Soluble HLA-G proteins can be generated through two mechanisms: alternative splicing and proteolytic release, which is known to be metalloprotease mediated. Among this class of enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) might be involved in the HLA-G1 membrane cleavage. Of particular interest are MMP-2 and MMP-9, which regulate the inflammatory process by cytokine and chemokine modulation. We evaluated the effect of MMP-9 and MMP-2 on HLA-G1 membrane shedding. In particular, we analyzed the in vitro effect of these two gelatinases on the secretion of HLA-G1 via proteolytic cleavage in 221-G1-transfected cell line, in JEG3 cell line, and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results obtained by both cell lines showed the role of MMP-2 in HLA-G1 shedding. On the contrary, MMP-9 was not involved in this process. In addition, we identified three possible highly specific cleavage sites for MMP-2, whereas none were detected for MMP-9. This study suggests an effective link between MMP-2 and HLA-G1 shedding, increasing our knowledge on the regulatory machinery beyond HLA-G regulation in physiological and pathological conditions.

  9. Spin-Dependent Structure Function $g_1$ at Small x

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2004-01-01

    Accounting for double-logarithms of x and running QCD coupling leads to expressions for both the non-singlet and singlet components of $g_1$. These expressions manifest the Regge asymptotics when x ->0 and differ considerably from the DGLAP expressions at small values of x.

  10. 26 CFR 1.514(g)-1 - Business lease indebtedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Business lease indebtedness. 1.514(g)-1 Section 1... Business lease indebtedness. (a) Definition. The term business lease indebtedness means, with respect to... subsidiary corporations. (b) Examples. The rules of section 514(g) respecting business leases also...

  11. SNAILs promote G1 phase in selected cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Lan; Xue, Jian-Xin; Zhou, Lin; Deng, Lei; Shang, Yan-Na; Liu, Fang; Mo, Xian-Ming; Lu, You

    2015-11-01

    Cells can acquire a stem-like cell phenotype through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, it is not known which of the stem-like cancer cells are generated by these phenotype transitions. We studied the EMT-inducing roles of SNAILs (the key inducers for the onset of EMT) in selected cancer cells (lung cancer cell line with relatively stable genome), in order to provide more implications for the investigation of EMT-related phenotype transitions in cancer. However, SNAILs fail to induce completed EMT. In addition, we proved that Snail accelerates the early G1 phase whereas Slug accelerates the late G1 phase. Blocking G1 phase is one of the basic conditions for the onset of EMT-related phenotype transitions (e.g., metastasis, acquiring stemness). The discovery of this unexpected phenomenon (promoting G1 phase) typically reveals the heterogeneity of cancer cells. The onset of EMT-related phenotype transitions in cancer needs not only the induction and activation of SNAILs, but also some particular heredity alterations (genetic or epigenetic alterations, which cause heterogeneity). The new connection between heredity alteration (heterogeneity) and phenotype transition suggests a novel treatment strategy, the heredity alteration-directed specific target therapy. Further investigations need to be conducted to study the relevant heredity alterations.

  12. Nonparametric inference from the M/G/1 workload

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Bøgsted; Pitts, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    Consider an M/G/1 queue with unknown service-time distribution and unknown traffic intensity ρ. Given systematically sampled observations of the workload, we construct estimators of ρ and of the service-time distribution function, and we study asymptotoic properties of these estimators....

  13. Rapid biodegradation of organophosphorus pesticides by Stenotrophomonas sp. G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shuyan; Chen, Yao; Wang, Daosheng; Shi, Taozhong; Wu, Xiangwei; Ma, Xin; Li, Xiangqiong; Hua, Rimao; Tang, Xinyun; Li, Qing X

    2015-10-30

    Organophosphorus insecticides have been widely used, which are highly poisonous and cause serious concerns over food safety and environmental pollution. A bacterial strain being capable of degrading O,O-dialkyl phosphorothioate and O,O-dialkyl phosphate insecticides, designated as G1, was isolated from sludge collected at the drain outlet of a chlorpyrifos manufacture plant. Physiological and biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis suggested that strain G1 belongs to the genus Stenotrophomonas. At an initial concentration of 50 mg/L, strain G1 degraded 100% of methyl parathion, methyl paraoxon, diazinon, and phoxim, 95% of parathion, 63% of chlorpyrifos, 38% of profenofos, and 34% of triazophos in 24 h. Orthogonal experiments showed that the optimum conditions were an inoculum volume of 20% (v/v), a substrate concentration of 50 mg/L, and an incubation temperature in 40 °C. p-Nitrophenol was detected as the metabolite of methyl parathion, for which intracellular methyl parathion hydrolase was responsible. Strain G1 can efficiently degrade eight organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and is a very excellent candidate for applications in OP pollution remediation.

  14. 26 CFR 1.167(g)-1 - Basis for depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Basis for depreciation. 1.167(g)-1 Section 1.167... for depreciation. The basis upon which the allowance for depreciation is to be computed with respect... property at that time, is the basis for computing depreciation....

  15. Human pancreatic β-cell G1/S molecule cell cycle atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M; Kleinberger, Jeffrey W; Salim, Fatimah G; Troxell, Ronnie; Wills, Rachel; Tanwir, Mansoor; Casinelli, Gabriella; Cox, Amy E; Takane, Karen K; Scott, Donald K; Stewart, Andrew F

    2013-07-01

    Expansion of pancreatic β-cells is a key goal of diabetes research, yet induction of adult human β-cell replication has proven frustratingly difficult. In part, this reflects a lack of understanding of cell cycle control in the human β-cell. Here, we provide a comprehensive immunocytochemical "atlas" of G1/S control molecules in the human β-cell. This atlas reveals that the majority of these molecules, previously known to be present in islets, are actually present in the β-cell. More importantly, and in contrast to anticipated results, the human β-cell G1/S atlas reveals that almost all of the critical G1/S cell cycle control molecules are located in the cytoplasm of the quiescent human β-cell. Indeed, the only nuclear G1/S molecules are the cell cycle inhibitors, pRb, p57, and variably, p21: none of the cyclins or cdks necessary to drive human β-cell proliferation are present in the nuclear compartment. This observation may provide an explanation for the refractoriness of human β-cells to proliferation. Thus, in addition to known obstacles to human β-cell proliferation, restriction of G1/S molecules to the cytoplasm of the human β-cell represents an unanticipated obstacle to therapeutic human β-cell expansion.

  16. ETS transcription factors control transcription of EZH2 and epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Kunderfranco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ETS transcription factors regulate important signaling pathways involved in cell differentiation and development in many tissues and have emerged as important players in prostate cancer. However, the biological impact of ETS factors in prostate tumorigenesis is still debated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed an analysis of the ETS gene family using microarray data and real-time PCR in normal and tumor tissues along with functional studies in normal and cancer cell lines to understand the impact in prostate tumorigenesis and identify key targets of these transcription factors. We found frequent dysregulation of ETS genes with oncogenic (i.e., ERG and ESE1 and tumor suppressor (i.e., ESE3 properties in prostate tumors compared to normal prostate. Tumor subgroups (i.e., ERG(high, ESE1(high, ESE3(low and NoETS tumors were identified on the basis of their ETS expression status and showed distinct transcriptional and biological features. ERG(high and ESE3(low tumors had the most robust gene signatures with both distinct and overlapping features. Integrating genomic data with functional studies in multiple cell lines, we demonstrated that ERG and ESE3 controlled in opposite direction transcription of the Polycomb Group protein EZH2, a key gene in development, differentiation, stem cell biology and tumorigenesis. We further demonstrated that the prostate-specific tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 was controlled by ERG and ESE3 both directly and through induction of EZH2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings provide new insights into the role of the ETS transcriptional network in prostate tumorigenesis and uncover previously unrecognized links between aberrant expression of ETS factors, deregulation of epigenetic effectors and silencing of tumor suppressor genes. The link between aberrant ETS activity and epigenetic gene silencing may be relevant for the clinical management of prostate cancer and design of new therapeutic

  17. Control of methionine metabolism by the SahR transcriptional regulator in Proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichkov, Pavel S; Li, Xiaoqing; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Price, Morgan N; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2014-01-01

    Sulphur is an essential element in the metabolism. The sulphur-containing amino acid methionine is a metabolic precursor for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which serves as a coenzyme for ubiquitous methyltrtansferases. Recycling of organic sulphur compounds, e.g. via the SAM cycle, is an important metabolic process that needs to be tightly regulated. Knowledge about transcriptional regulation of these processes is still limited for many free-living bacteria. We identified a novel transcription factor SahR from the ArsR family that controls the SAM cycle genes in diverse microorganisms from soil and aquatic ecosystems. By using comparative genomics, we predicted SahR-binding DNA motifs and reconstructed SahR regulons in the genomes of 62 Proteobacteria. The conserved core of SahR regulons includes all enzymes required for the SAM cycle: the SAH hydrolase AhcY, the methionine biosynthesis enzymes MetE/MetH and MetF, and the SAM synthetase MetK. By using a combination of experimental techniques, we validated the SahR regulon in the sulphate-reducing Deltaproteobacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis. SahR functions as a negative regulator that responds to the S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). The elevated SAH level in the cell dissociates SahR from its DNA operators and induces the expression of SAM cycle genes. The effector-sensing domain in SahR is related to SAM-dependent methylases that are able to tightly bind SAH. SahR represents a novel type of transcriptional regulators for the control of sulphur amino acid metabolism.

  18. OpaR controls a network of downstream transcription factors in Vibrio parahaemolyticus BB22OP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Kernell Burke

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an emerging world-wide human pathogen that is associated with food-borne gastroenteritis when raw or undercooked seafood is consumed. Expression of virulence factors in this organism is modulated by the phenomenon known as quorum sensing, which permits differential gene regulation at low versus high cell density. The master regulator of quorum sensing in V. parahaemolyticus is OpaR. OpaR not only controls virulence factor gene expression, but also the colony and cellular morphology associated with growth on a surface and biofilm formation. Whole transcriptome Next Generation sequencing (RNA-Seq was utilized to determine the OpaR regulon by comparing strains BB22OP (opaR+, LM5312 and BB22TR (∆opaR1, LM5674. This work, using the published V. parahaemolyticus BB22OP genome sequence, confirms and expands upon a previous microarray analysis for these two strains that used an Affymetrix GeneChip designed from the closely related V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633 genome sequence. Overall there was excellent correlation between the microarray and RNA-Seq data. Eleven transcription factors under OpaR control were identified by both methods and further confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR analysis. Nine of these transcription factors were demonstrated to be direct OpaR targets via in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified hexahistidine-tagged OpaR. Identification of the direct and indirect targets of OpaR, including small RNAs, will enable the construction of a network map of regulatory interactions important for the switch between the nonpathogenic and pathogenic states.

  19. Transcriptional regulators in the Hippo signaling pathway control organ growth in Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Ochi, Haruki; Ogino, Hajime; Kawasumi, Aiko; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Koji; Yokoyama, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    The size and shape of tissues are tightly controlled by synchronized processes among cells and tissues to produce an integrated organ. The Hippo signaling pathway controls both cell proliferation and apoptosis by dual signal-transduction states regulated through a repressive kinase cascade. Yap1 and Tead, transcriptional regulators that act downstream of the Hippo signaling kinase cascade, have essential roles in regulating cell proliferation. In amphibian limb or tail regeneration, the local tissue outgrowth terminates when the correct size is reached, suggesting that organ size is strictly controlled during epimorphic organ-level regeneration. We recently demonstrated that Yap1 is required for the regeneration of Xenopus tadpole limb buds (Hayashi et al., 2014, Dev. Biol. 388, 57-67), but the molecular link between the Hippo pathway and organ size control in vertebrate epimorphic regeneration is not fully understood. To examine the requirement of Hippo pathway transcriptional regulators in epimorphic regeneration, including organ size control, we inhibited these regulators during Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration by overexpressing a dominant-negative form of Yap (dnYap) or Tead4 (dnTead4) under a heat-shock promoter in transgenic animal lines. Each inhibition resulted in regeneration defects accompanied by reduced cell mitosis and increased apoptosis. Single-cell gene manipulation experiments indicated that Tead4 cell-autonomously regulates the survival of neural progenitor cells in the regenerating tail. In amphibians, amputation at the proximal level of the tail (deep amputation) results in faster regeneration than that at the distal level (shallow amputation), to restore the original-sized tail with similar timing. However, dnTead4 overexpression abolished the position-dependent differential growth rate of tail regeneration. These results suggest that the transcriptional regulators in the Hippo pathway, Tead4 and Yap1, are required for general vertebrate

  20. Identification of waiting time distribution of M/G/1, Mx/G/1, GIr/M/1 queueing systems

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    A. Ghosal

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper brings out relations among the moments of various orders of the waiting time of the 1st customer and a randomly selected customer of an arrival group for bulk arrivals queueing models, and as well as moments of the waiting time (in queue for M/G/1 queueing system. A numerical study of these relations has been developed in order to find the (β1,β2 measures of waiting time distribution in a comutable form. On the basis of these measures one can look into the nature of waiting time distribution of bulk arrival queues and the single server M/G/1 queue.

  1. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of DNA methyltransferase 3B is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/Akt pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Chuanzhong; Sun, Lidong; Liu, Yonglei; Yang, Yong; Cai, Xiumei; Liu, Mingzhu; Yao, Wantong; Wang, Can; Li, Xin; Wang, Liying; Li, Zengxia; Shi, Yinghong; Qiu, Shuangjian; Fan, Jia; Zha, Xiliang

    2010-09-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) are essential for maintenance of aberrant methylation in cancer cells and play important roles in the development of cancers. Unregulated activation of PI3K/Akt pathway is a prominent feature of many human cancers including human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In present study, we found that DNMT3B mRNA and protein levels were decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HCC cell lines with LY294002 treatment. However, we detected that LY294002 treatment did not induce increase of the degradation of DNMT3B protein using protein decay assay. Moreover we found that Akt induced alteration of the expression of DNMT3B in cells transfected with myristylated variants of Akt2 or cells transfected with small interfering RNA respectively. Based on DNMT3B promoter dual-luciferase reporter assay, we found PI3K pathway regulates DNMT3B expression at transcriptional level. And DNMT3B mRNA decay analysis suggested that down-regulation of DNMT3B by LY294002 is also post-transcriptional control. Furthermore, we demonstrated that LY294002 down-regulated HuR expression in a time-dependent manner in BEL-7404. In summary, we have, for the first time, demonstrate that PI3K/Akt pathway regulates the expression of DNMT3B at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, which is particularly important to understand the effects of PI3K/Akt and DNMT3B on hepatocarcinogenesis.

  2. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields cause G1 phase arrest through the activation of the ATM-Chk2-p21 pathway.

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    Chao-Ying Huang

    Full Text Available In daily life, humans are exposed to the extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs generated by electric appliances, and public concern is increasing regarding the biological effects of such exposure. Numerous studies have yielded inconsistent results regarding the biological effects of ELF-EMF exposure. Here we show that ELF-EMFs activate the ATM-Chk2-p21 pathway in HaCaT cells, inhibiting cell proliferation. To present well-founded results, we comprehensively evaluated the biological effects of ELF-EMFs at the transcriptional, protein, and cellular levels. Human HaCaT cells from an immortalized epidermal keratinocyte cell line were exposed to a 1.5 mT, 60 Hz ELF-EMF for 144 h. The ELF-EMF could cause G1 arrest and decrease colony formation. Protein expression experiments revealed that ELF-EMFs induced the activation of the ATM/Chk2 signaling cascades. In addition, the p21 protein, a regulator of cell cycle progression at G1 and G2/M, exhibited a higher level of expression in exposed HaCaT cells compared with the expression of sham-exposed cells. The ELF-EMF-induced G1 arrest was diminished when the CHK2 gene expression (which encodes checkpoint kinase 2; Chk2 was suppressed by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA. These findings indicate that ELF-EMFs activate the ATM-Chk2-p21 pathway in HaCaT cells, resulting in cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Based on the precise control of the ELF-EMF exposure and rigorous sham-exposure experiments, all transcriptional, protein, and cellular level experiments consistently supported the conclusion. This is the first study to confirm that a specific pathway is triggered by ELF-EMF exposure.

  3. 1Novel MEFV transcripts in Familial Mediterranean fever patients and controls

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    Jalkh Nadine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial Mediterranean fever is a recessive autoinflammatory disease frequently encountered in Armenians, Jews, Arabs and Turks. The MEFV gene is responsible for the disease. It encodes a protein called pyrin/marenostrin involved in the innate immune system. A large number of clinically diagnosed FMF patients carry only one MEFV mutation. This study aims at studying the MEFV gene splicing pattern in heterozygous FMF patients and healthy individuals, in an attempt to understand the mechanism underlying the disease in these patients. Methods RNA was extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes of 41 FMF patients and 34 healthy individuals. RT-PCR was then performed, and the amplified products were migrated on a polyacrylamide electrophoresis gel, characterized by gel extraction of the corresponding bands followed by sequencing. Results Five novel splicing events were observed in both patients and controls deleting either exons 3, 4 (del34, or exons 2, 3, 4 (del234, or exons 2, 3, 4, 5 (del2345 or exon7 (del7 or exons 7 and 8 (del78. Conclusions The observation of such qualitative variability in the expression of the MEFV gene suggests a complex transcriptional regulation. However, the expression of these novel transcripts in both patients and controls is not in favour of a severe pathogenic effect.

  4. A regulatory framework for shoot stem cell control integrating metabolic, transcriptional, and phytohormone signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Christoph; Gaillochet, Christophe; Medzihradszky, Anna; Busch, Wolfgang; Daum, Gabor; Krebs, Melanie; Kehle, Andreas; Lohmann, Jan U

    2014-02-24

    Plants continuously maintain pluripotent stem cells embedded in specialized tissues called meristems, which drive long-term growth and organogenesis. Stem cell fate in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) is controlled by the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) expressed in the niche adjacent to the stem cells. Here, we demonstrate that the bHLH transcription factor HECATE1 (HEC1) is a target of WUS and that it contributes to SAM function by promoting stem cell proliferation, while antagonizing niche cell activity. HEC1 represses the stem cell regulators WUS and CLAVATA3 (CLV3) and, like WUS, controls genes with functions in metabolism and hormone signaling. Among the targets shared by HEC1 and WUS are phytohormone response regulators, which we show to act as mobile signals in a universal feedback system. Thus, our work sheds light on the mechanisms guiding meristem function and suggests that the underlying regulatory system is far more complex than previously anticipated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Standardized positive controls for detection of norovirus by reverse transcription PCR

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    Oh SeHwan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Norovirus is one of the most common causes of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in humans. Rapid spread by contaminated food and person-to-person transmission through the fecal-oral route are characteristics of norovirus epidemiology and result in high morbidity in vulnerable patient populations. Therefore, detection of norovirus is a major public health concern. Currently, the most common method for detecting and differentiating among norovirus strains in clinical and environmental samples is reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR. Standardized positive controls used in RT-PCR assays to detect norovirus are designed to overcome the problem of false-negative results due to PCR inhibitors and suboptimal reaction conditions. Results In the current study, four types of RNA transcripts were produced from plasmids: norovirus GI-5 and GII-4 capsid regions with human rotavirus (VP7 gene derived fragment insertions, and norovirus GI-6 and GII-4 capsid regions with hepatitis A virus (VP1/P2A gene derived fragment insertions. These size-distinguishable products were used as positive controls under the RT-PCR assay conditions used to detect NoV in stool and groundwater samples. Their reliability and reproducibility was confirmed by multiple sets of experiments. Conclusions These standardized products may contribute to the reliable and accurate diagnosis by RT-PCR of norovirus outbreaks, when conducted by laboratories located in different regions.

  6. Reactor G1: high power experiments; Experiences a forte puissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laage, F. de; Teste du Baillet, A.; Veyssiere, A.; Wanner, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Retel, H. [Societe Rateau, D.E.A. (France)

    1957-07-01

    The experiments carried out in the starting-up programme of the reactor G1 comprised a series of tests at high power, which allowed the following points to be studied: 1- Effect of poisoning by Xenon (absolute value, evolution). 2- Temperature coefficients of the uranium and graphite for a temperature distribution corresponding to heating by fission. 3- Effect of the pressure (due to the coiling system) on the reactivity. 4- Calibration of the security rods as a function of their position in the pile (1). 5- Temperature distribution of the graphite, the sheathing, the uranium and the air leaving the canals, in a pile running normally at high power. 6- Neutron flux distribution in a pile running normally at high power. 7- Determination of the power by nuclear and thermodynamic methods. These experiments have been carried out under two very different pile conditions. From the 1. to the 15. of August 1956, a series of power increases, followed by periods of stabilisation, were induced in a pile containing uranium only, in 457 canals, amounting to about 34 tons of fuel. A knowledge of the efficiency of the control rods in such a pile has made it possible to measure with good accuracy the principal effects at high temperatures, that is, to deal with points 1, 2, 3, 5. Flux charts giving information on the variations of the material Laplacian and extrapolation lengths in the reflector have been drawn up. Finally the thermodynamic power has been measured under good conditions, in spite of some installation difficulties. On September 16, the pile had its final charge of 100 tons. All the canals were loaded, 1,234 with uranium and 53 (i.e. exactly 4 per cent of the total number) with thorium uniformly distributed in a square lattice of 100 cm side. Since technical difficulties prevented the calibration of the control rods, the measurements were limited to the determination of the thermodynamic power and the temperature distributions (points 5 and 7). This report will

  7. KLF4 transcriptionally activates non-canonical WNT5A to control epithelial stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetreault, Marie-Pier; Weinblatt, Daniel; Shaverdashvili, Khvaramze; Yang, Yizeng; Katz, Jonathan P

    2016-05-17

    Epithelial differentiation and stratification are essential for normal homeostasis, and disruption of these processes leads to both injury and cancer. The zinc-finger transciption factor KLF4 is a key driver of epithelial differentiation, yet the mechanisms and targets by which KLF4 controls differentiation are not well understood. Here, we define WNT5A, a non-canonical Wnt ligand implicated in epithelial differentiation, repair, and cancer, as a direct transcriptional target that is activated by KLF4 in squamous epithelial cells. Further, we demonstrate functionally that WNT5A mediates KLF4 control of epithelial differentiation and stratification, as treatment of keratinocytes with WNT5A rescues defective epithelial stratification resulting from KLF4 loss. Finally, we show that the small GTPase CDC42 is regulated by KLF4 in a WNT5A dependent manner. As such, we delineate a novel pathway for epithelial differentiation and stratification and define potential therapeutic targets for epithelial diseases.

  8. Transcriptional control in embryonic Drosophila midline guidance assessed through a whole genome approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomancak Pavel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the development of the Drosophila central nervous system the process of midline crossing is orchestrated by a number of guidance receptors and ligands. Many key axon guidance molecules have been identified in both invertebrates and vertebrates, but the transcriptional regulation of growth cone guidance remains largely unknown. It is established that translational regulation plays a role in midline crossing, and there are indications that transcriptional regulation is also involved. To investigate this issue, we conducted a genome-wide study of transcription in Drosophila embryos using wild type and a number of well-characterized Drosophila guidance mutants and transgenics. We also analyzed a previously published microarray time course of Drosophila embryonic development with an axon guidance focus. Results Using hopach, a novel clustering method which is well suited to microarray data analysis, we identified groups of genes with similar expression patterns across guidance mutants and transgenics. We then systematically characterized the resulting clusters with respect to their relevance to axon guidance using two complementary controlled vocabularies: the Gene Ontology (GO and anatomical annotations of the Atlas of Pattern of Gene Expression (APoGE in situ hybridization database. The analysis indicates that regulation of gene expression does play a role in the process of axon guidance in Drosophila. We also find a strong link between axon guidance and hemocyte migration, a result that agrees with mounting evidence that axon guidance molecules are co-opted in vertebrate vascularization. Cell cyclin activity in the context of axon guidance is also suggested from our array data. RNA and protein expression patterns of cell cyclins in axon guidance mutants and transgenics support this possible link. Conclusion This study provides important insights into the regulation of axon guidance in vivo.

  9. Evaluating suitable internal control genes for transcriptional studies in heat-stressed mammary explants of buffaloes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, M; Kishore, A; Khate, K; Kapila, N; Mishra, B P; Kataria, R S; Mohanty, A K; Varshney, N; Mukesh, M

    2013-04-01

    It is now a well-accepted notion that each new experimental design requires proper evaluation of internal control genes (ICGs) for accurate normalization of expression data. In riverine buffaloes, till date no appropriate ICG has been reported for studying transcriptional response under any of the physiological stressful condition. The objective here was to test 16 well-known reference genes from different functional categories that could serve as suitable ICG during heat stress studies in buffalo mammary tissue. Briefly, the mammary explants were exposed to 45°C for 1 h and subsequently allowed to recover at 37°C for different time points (2-24 h). Three software programs, geNorm, Normfinder and BestKeeper, were used to measure gene transcript stability. RPL22 was excluded because of weak amplification and unacceptable PCR efficiency. Except GAPDH, all other genes showed expression stability within the acceptable range (<1.5). RPL4, B2M, RPS23 and EEF1A1 genes were found to be most stably expressed while GAPDH and ACTB showed least stability. The BestKeeper analysis identified high correlation for RPL4 (r=0.953) and EEF1A1 (r=0.914) with BestKeeper index. Based on the present findings, it could be suggested that geometric average of RPL4, B2M, RPS23 and EEF1A1 would provide accurate normalization to transcriptional data of buffalo mammary explant in response to heat stress. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. β-amylase-like proteins function as transcription factors in Arabidopsis, controlling shoot growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Heike; Soyk, Sebastian; Simková, Klára; Hostettler, Carmen; Marafino, John; Mainiero, Samantha; Vaughan, Cara K; Monroe, Jonathan D; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2011-04-01

    Plants contain β-amylase-like proteins (BAMs; enzymes usually associated with starch breakdown) present in the nucleus rather than targeted to the chloroplast. They possess BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT1 (BZR1)-type DNA binding domains--also found in transcription factors mediating brassinosteroid (BR) responses. The two Arabidopsis thaliana BZR1-BAM proteins (BAM7 and BAM8) bind a cis-regulatory element that both contains a G box and resembles a BR-responsive element. In protoplast transactivation assays, these BZR1-BAMs activate gene expression. Structural modeling suggests that the BAM domain's glucan binding cleft is intact, but the recombinant proteins are at least 1000 times less active than chloroplastic β-amylases. Deregulation of BZR1-BAMs (the bam7bam8 double mutant and BAM8-overexpressing plants) causes altered leaf growth and development. Of the genes upregulated in plants overexpressing BAM8 and downregulated in bam7bam8 plants, many carry the cis-regulatory element in their promoters. Many genes that respond to BRs are inversely regulated by BZR1-BAMs. We propose a role for BZR1-BAMs in controlling plant growth and development through crosstalk with BR signaling. Furthermore, we speculate that BZR1-BAMs may transmit metabolic signals by binding a ligand in their BAM domain, although diurnal changes in the concentration of maltose, a candidate ligand produced by chloroplastic β-amylases, do not influence their transcription factor function.

  11. Simplet controls cell proliferation and gene transcription during zebrafish caudal fin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizil, Caghan; Otto, Georg W; Geisler, Robert; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Antos, Christopher L

    2009-01-15

    Two hallmarks of vertebrate epimorphic regeneration are a significant increase in the proliferation of normally quiescent cells and a re-activation of genes that are active during embryonic development. It is unclear what the molecular determinants are that regulate these events and how they are coordinated. Zebrafish have the ability to regenerate several compound structures by regulating cell proliferation and gene transcription. We report that fam53b/simplet (smp) regulates both cell proliferation and the transcription of specific genes. In situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that amputation of zebrafish hearts and fins resulted in strong up-regulation of the smp gene. In regenerating adult fin, smp expression remained strong in the distal mesenchyme which later expanded to the basal layers of the distal epidermis and distal tip epithelium. Morpholino knockdown of smp reduced regenerative outgrowth by decreasing cell proliferation as measured by BrdU incorporation and histone H3 phosphorylation. In addition, smp knockdown increased the expression of msxb, msxc, and shh, as well as the later formation of ectopic bone. Taken together, these data indicate a requirement for smp in fin regeneration through control of cell proliferation, the regulation of specific genes and proper bone patterning.

  12. Transcription factor TLX1 controls retinoic acid signaling to ensure spleen development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenti, Elisa; Farinello, Diego; Penkov, Dmitry; Castagnaro, Laura; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Wuputra, Kenly; Tjaden, Naomi E. Butler; Bernassola, Francesca; Caridi, Nicoletta; Wagner, Michael; Kozinc, Katja; Niederreither, Karen; Blasi, Francesco; Pasini, Diego; Trainor, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie spleen development and congenital asplenia, a condition linked to increased risk of overwhelming infections, remain largely unknown. The transcription factor TLX1 controls cell fate specification and organ expansion during spleen development, and Tlx1 deletion causes asplenia in mice. Deregulation of TLX1 expression has recently been proposed in the pathogenesis of congenital asplenia in patients carrying mutations of the gene-encoding transcription factor SF-1. Herein, we have shown that TLX1-dependent regulation of retinoic acid (RA) metabolism is critical for spleen organogenesis. In a murine model, loss of Tlx1 during formation of the splenic anlage increased RA signaling by regulating several genes involved in RA metabolism. Uncontrolled RA activity resulted in premature differentiation of mesenchymal cells and reduced vasculogenesis of the splenic primordium. Pharmacological inhibition of RA signaling in Tlx1-deficient animals partially rescued the spleen defect. Finally, spleen growth was impaired in mice lacking either cytochrome P450 26B1 (Cyp26b1), which results in excess RA, or retinol dehydrogenase 10 (Rdh10), which results in RA deficiency. Together, these findings establish TLX1 as a critical regulator of RA metabolism and provide mechanistic insights into the molecular determinants of human congenital asplenia. PMID:27214556

  13. Novel lncRNAs in myogenesis: a miR-31 overlapping transcript controls myoblast differentiation.

    KAUST Repository

    Ballarino, Monica

    2014-12-15

    Transcriptome analysis allowed the identification of new long noncoding RNAs differentially expressed during murine myoblast differentiation. These transcripts were classified on the basis of their expression under proliferating versus differentiated conditions, muscle-restricted activation, and subcellular localization. Several species displayed preferential expression in dystrophic (mdx) versus wild-type muscles, indicating their possible link with regenerative processes. One of the identified transcripts, lnc-31, even if originating from the same nuclear precursor of miR-31, is produced by a pathway mutually exclusive. We show that lnc-31 and its human homologue hsa-lnc-31 are expressed in proliferating myoblasts, where they counteract differentiation. In line with this, both species are more abundant in mdx muscles and in human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) myoblasts, than in their normal counterparts. Altogether, these data suggest a crucial role for lnc-31 in controlling the differentiation commitment of precursor myoblasts and indicate that its function is maintained in evolution despite the poor sequence conservation with the human counterpart.

  14. Transcript levels, alternative splicing and proteolytic cleavage of TFIIIA control 5S rRNA accumulation during Arabidopsis thaliana development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layat, Elodie; Cotterell, Sylviane; Vaillant, Isabelle; Yukawa, Yasushi; Tutois, Sylvie; Tourmente, Sylvette

    2012-07-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is critical for eukaryotic cells and requires coordinated synthesis of the protein and rRNA moieties of the ribosome, which are therefore highly regulated. 5S ribosomal RNA, an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and specifically requires transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA). To obtain insight into the regulation of 5S rRNA transcription, we have investigated the expression of 5S rRNA and the exon-skipped (ES) and exon-including (EI) TFIIIA transcripts, two transcript isoforms that result from alternative splicing of the TFIIIA gene, and TFIIIA protein amounts with respect to requirements for 5S rRNA during development. We show that 5S rRNA quantities are regulated through distinct but complementary mechanisms operating through transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of TFIIIA transcripts as well as at the post-translational level through proteolytic cleavage of the TFIIIA protein. During the reproductive phase, high expression of the TFIIIA gene together with low proteolytic cleavage contributes to accumulation of functional, full-length TFIIIA protein, and results in 5S rRNA accumulation in the seed. In contrast, just after germination, the levels of TFIIIA-encoding transcripts are low and stable. Full-length TFIIIA protein is undetectable, and the level of 5S rRNA stored in the embryo progressively decreases. After day 4, in correlation with the reorganization of 5S rDNA chromatin to a mature state, full-length TFIIIA protein with transcriptional activity accumulates and permits de novo transcription of 5S rRNA. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. The ETS-5 transcription factor regulates activity states in Caenorhabditis elegans by controlling satiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juozaityte, Vaida; Pladevall-Morera, David; Podolska, Agnieszka; Nørgaard, Steffen; Pocock, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Animal behavior is shaped through interplay among genes, the environment, and previous experience. As in mammals, satiety signals induce quiescence in Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we report that the C. elegans transcription factor ETS-5, an ortholog of mammalian FEV/Pet1, controls satiety-induced quiescence. Nutritional status has a major influence on C. elegans behavior. When foraging, food availability controls behavioral state switching between active (roaming) and sedentary (dwelling) states; however, when provided with high-quality food, C. elegans become sated and enter quiescence. We show that ETS-5 acts to promote roaming and inhibit quiescence by setting the internal “satiety quotient” through fat regulation. Acting from the ASG and BAG sensory neurons, we show that ETS-5 functions in a complex network with serotonergic and neuropeptide signaling pathways to control food-regulated behavioral state switching. Taken together, our results identify a neuronal mechanism for controlling intestinal fat stores and organismal behavioral states in C. elegans, and establish a paradigm for the elucidation of obesity-relevant mechanisms. PMID:28193866

  16. Hormones and Sex-Specific Transcription Factors Jointly Control Yolk Protein Synthesis in Musca domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Siegenthaler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the housefly Musca domestica, synthesis of yolk proteins (YPs depends on the level of circulating ecdysteroid hormones. In female houseflies, the ecdysterone concentration in the hemolymph oscillates and, at high levels, is followed by expression of YP. In male houseflies, the ecdysterone titre is constantly low and no YP is produced. In some strains, which are mutant in key components of the sex-determining pathway, males express YP even though their ecdysterone titre is not significantly elevated. However, we find that these males express a substantial amount of the female variant of the Musca doublesex homologue, Md-dsx. The dsx gene is known to sex-specifically control transcription of yp genes in the fat body of Drosophila melanogaster. Our data suggest that Md-dsx also contributes to the regulation of YP expression in the housefly by modulating the responsiveness of YP-producing cells to hormonal stimuli.

  17. Altered Transcriptional Control Networks with Trans-Differentiation of Isogenic Mutant KRas NSCLC Models

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    John A Haley

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe capacity of cancer cells to undergo epithelial mesenchymal trans-differentiation has been implicated as a factor driving metastasis, through the acquisition of enhanced migratory/invasive cell programs and the engagement of anti-apoptotic mechanisms promoting drug and radiation resistance. Our aim was to define molecular signaling changes associated with mesenchymal trans-differentiation in two KRas mutant NSCLC models. We focused on central transcription and epigenetic regulators predicted to be important for mesenchymal cell survival.Experimental designWe have modeled trans-differentiation and cancer stemness in inducible isogenic mutant KRas H358 and A549 non-small cell lung cell backgrounds. We employed large-scale quantitative phospho-proteomic, proteomic, protein-protein interaction, RNA-Seq and network function prediction approaches to dissect the molecular events associated with the establishment and maintenance of the mesenchymal state.ResultsGene set enrichment and pathway prediction indicated BMI1, KDM5B, RUNX2, MYC/MAX, NFkB, LEF1, and HIF1 target networks were significantly enriched in the trans-differentiation of H358 and A549 NSCLC models. Physical overlaps between multiple networks implicate NR4A1 as an overlapping control between TCF and NFkB pathways. Enrichment correlations also indicated marked decrease in cell cycling, which occurred early in the EMT process. RNA abundance time course studies also indicated early expression of epigenetic and chromatin regulators, including CITED4, RUNX3, CMBX1 and SIRT4. ConclusionsMultiple transcription and epigenetic pathways where altered between epithelial and mesenchymal tumor cell states, notably the polycomb repressive complex-1, HP1g and BAF/Swi-Snf. Network analysis suggests redundancy in the activation and inhibition of pathway regulators, notably factors controlling epithelial cell state.

  18. Differential control of Notch1 gene transcription by Klf4 and Sp3 transcription factors in normal versus cancer-derived keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Lambertini

    Full Text Available In specific cell types like keratinocytes, Notch signaling plays an important pro-differentiation and tumor suppressing function, with down-modulation of the Notch1 gene being associated with cancer development. Besides being controlled by p53, little else is known on regulation of Notch1 gene expression in this context. We report here that transcription of this gene is driven by a TATA-less "sharp peak" promoter and that the minimal functional region of this promoter, which extends from the -342 bp position to the initiation codon, is differentially active in normal versus cancer cells. This GC rich region lacks p53 binding sites, but binds Klf4 and Sp3. This finding is likely to be of biological significance, as Klf4 and, to a lesser extent, Sp3 are up-regulated in a number of cancer cells where Notch1 expression is down-modulated, and Klf4 over-expression in normal cells is sufficient to down-modulate Notch1 gene transcription. The combined knock-down of Klf4 and Sp3 was necessary for the reverse effect of increasing Notch1 transcription, consistent with the two factors exerting an overlapping repressor function through their binding to the Notch1 promoter.

  19. Mechanical regulation of transcription controls Polycomb-mediated gene silencing during lineage commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Huy Quang; Ghatak, Sushmita; Yeung, Ching-Yan Chloé; Tellkamp, Frederik; Günschmann, Christian; Dieterich, Christoph; Yeroslaviz, Assa; Habermann, Bianca; Pombo, Ana; Niessen, Carien M; Wickström, Sara A

    2016-08-01

    Tissue mechanics drive morphogenesis, but how forces are sensed and transmitted to control stem cell fate and self-organization remains unclear. We show that a mechanosensory complex of emerin (Emd), non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA) and actin controls gene silencing and chromatin compaction, thereby regulating lineage commitment. Force-driven enrichment of Emd at the outer nuclear membrane of epidermal stem cells leads to defective heterochromatin anchoring to the nuclear lamina and a switch from H3K9me2,3 to H3K27me3 occupancy at constitutive heterochromatin. Emd enrichment is accompanied by the recruitment of NMIIA to promote local actin polymerization that reduces nuclear actin levels, resulting in attenuation of transcription and subsequent accumulation of H3K27me3 at facultative heterochromatin. Perturbing this mechanosensory pathway by deleting NMIIA in mouse epidermis leads to attenuated H3K27me3-mediated silencing and precocious lineage commitment, abrogating morphogenesis. Our results reveal how mechanics integrate nuclear architecture and chromatin organization to control lineage commitment and tissue morphogenesis.

  20. Activin/Nodal signaling controls divergent transcriptional networks in human embryonic stem cells and in endoderm progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephanie; Teo, Adrian; Pauklin, Siim; Hannan, Nicholas; Cho, Candy H-H; Lim, Bing; Vardy, Leah; Dunn, N Ray; Trotter, Matthew; Pedersen, Roger; Vallier, Ludovic

    2011-08-01

    Activin/Nodal signaling is necessary to maintain pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and to induce their differentiation toward endoderm. However, the mechanisms by which Activin/Nodal signaling achieves these opposite functions remain unclear. To unravel these mechanisms, we examined the transcriptional network controlled in hESCs by Smad2 and Smad3, which represent the direct effectors of Activin/Nodal signaling. These analyses reveal that Smad2/3 participate in the control of the core transcriptional network characterizing pluripotency, which includes Oct-4, Nanog, FoxD3, Dppa4, Tert, Myc, and UTF1. In addition, similar experiments performed on endoderm cells confirm that a broad part of the transcriptional network directing differentiation is downstream of Smad2/3. Therefore, Activin/Nodal signaling appears to control divergent transcriptional networks in hESCs and in endoderm. Importantly, we observed an overlap between the transcriptional network downstream of Nanog and Smad2/3 in hESCs; whereas, functional studies showed that both factors cooperate to control the expression of pluripotency genes. Therefore, the effect of Activin/Nodal signaling on pluripotency and differentiation could be dictated by tissue specific Smad2/3 partners such as Nanog, explaining the mechanisms by which signaling pathways can orchestrate divergent cell fate decisions.

  1. Robustness and backbone motif of a cancer network regulated by miR-17-92 cluster during the G1/S transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijian Yang

    Full Text Available Based on interactions among transcription factors, oncogenes, tumor suppressors and microRNAs, a Boolean model of cancer network regulated by miR-17-92 cluster is constructed, and the network is associated with the control of G1/S transition in the mammalian cell cycle. The robustness properties of this regulatory network are investigated by virtue of the Boolean network theory. It is found that, during G1/S transition in the cell cycle process, the regulatory networks are robustly constructed, and the robustness property is largely preserved with respect to small perturbations to the network. By using the unique process-based approach, the structure of this network is analyzed. It is shown that the network can be decomposed into a backbone motif which provides the main biological functions, and a remaining motif which makes the regulatory system more stable. The critical role of miR-17-92 in suppressing the G1/S cell cycle checkpoint and increasing the uncontrolled proliferation of the cancer cells by targeting a genetic network of interacting proteins is displayed with our model.

  2. Orc1 Binding to Mitotic Chromosomes Precedes Spatial Patterning during G1 Phase and Assembly of the Origin Recognition Complex in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Nihan; Hossain, Manzar; Prasanth, Supriya G; Stillman, Bruce

    2015-05-08

    Replication of eukaryotic chromosomes occurs once every cell division cycle in normal cells and is a tightly controlled process that ensures complete genome duplication. The origin recognition complex (ORC) plays a key role during the initiation of DNA replication. In human cells, the level of Orc1, the largest subunit of ORC, is regulated during the cell division cycle, and thus ORC is a dynamic complex. Upon S phase entry, Orc1 is ubiquitinated and targeted for destruction, with subsequent dissociation of ORC from chromosomes. Time lapse and live cell images of human cells expressing fluorescently tagged Orc1 show that Orc1 re-localizes to condensing chromatin during early mitosis and then displays different nuclear localization patterns at different times during G1 phase, remaining associated with late replicating regions of the genome in late G1 phase. The initial binding of Orc1 to mitotic chromosomes requires C-terminal amino acid sequences that are similar to mitotic chromosome-binding sequences in the transcriptional pioneer protein FOXA1. Depletion of Orc1 causes concomitant loss of the mini-chromosome maintenance (Mcm2-7) helicase proteins on chromatin. The data suggest that Orc1 acts as a nucleating center for ORC assembly and then pre-replication complex assembly by binding to mitotic chromosomes, followed by gradual removal from chromatin during the G1 phase.

  3. Developmentally regulated promoter-switch transcriptionally controls Runx1 function during embryonic hematopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozner, Amir; Lotem, Joseph; Xiao, Cuiying; Goldenberg, Dalia; Brenner, Ori; Negreanu, Varda; Levanon, Ditsa; Groner, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    Background Alternative promoters usage is an important paradigm in transcriptional control of mammalian gene expression. However, despite the growing interest in alternative promoters and their role in genome diversification, very little is known about how and on what occasions those promoters are differentially regulated. Runx1 transcription factor is a key regulator of early hematopoiesis and a frequent target of chromosomal translocations in acute leukemias. Mice deficient in Runx1 lack definitive hematopoiesis and die in mid-gestation. Expression of Runx1 is regulated by two functionally distinct promoters designated P1 and P2. Differential usage of these two promoters creates diversity in distribution and protein-coding potential of the mRNA transcripts. While the alternative usage of P1 and P2 likely plays an important role in Runx1 biology, very little is known about the function of the P1/P2 switch in mediating tissue and stage specific expression of Runx1 during development. Results We employed mice bearing a hypomorphic Runx1 allele, with a largely diminished P2 activity, to investigate the biological role of alternative P1/P2 usage. Mice homozygous for the hypomorphic allele developed to term, but died within a few days after birth. During embryogenesis the P1/P2 activity is spatially and temporally modulated. P2 activity is required in early hematopoiesis and when attenuated, development of liver hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) was impaired. Early thymus development and thymopoiesis were also abrogated as reflected by thymic hypocellularity and loss of corticomedullary demarcation. Differentiation of CD4/CD8 thymocytes was impaired and their apoptosis was enhanced due to altered expression of T-cell receptors. Conclusion The data delineate the activity of P1 and P2 in embryogenesis and describe previously unknown functions of Runx1. The findings show unequivocally that the role of P1/P2 during development is non redundant and underscore the

  4. Developmentally regulated promoter-switch transcriptionally controls Runx1 function during embryonic hematopoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldenberg Dalia

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative promoters usage is an important paradigm in transcriptional control of mammalian gene expression. However, despite the growing interest in alternative promoters and their role in genome diversification, very little is known about how and on what occasions those promoters are differentially regulated. Runx1 transcription factor is a key regulator of early hematopoiesis and a frequent target of chromosomal translocations in acute leukemias. Mice deficient in Runx1 lack definitive hematopoiesis and die in mid-gestation. Expression of Runx1 is regulated by two functionally distinct promoters designated P1 and P2. Differential usage of these two promoters creates diversity in distribution and protein-coding potential of the mRNA transcripts. While the alternative usage of P1 and P2 likely plays an important role in Runx1 biology, very little is known about the function of the P1/P2 switch in mediating tissue and stage specific expression of Runx1 during development. Results We employed mice bearing a hypomorphic Runx1 allele, with a largely diminished P2 activity, to investigate the biological role of alternative P1/P2 usage. Mice homozygous for the hypomorphic allele developed to term, but died within a few days after birth. During embryogenesis the P1/P2 activity is spatially and temporally modulated. P2 activity is required in early hematopoiesis and when attenuated, development of liver hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC was impaired. Early thymus development and thymopoiesis were also abrogated as reflected by thymic hypocellularity and loss of corticomedullary demarcation. Differentiation of CD4/CD8 thymocytes was impaired and their apoptosis was enhanced due to altered expression of T-cell receptors. Conclusion The data delineate the activity of P1 and P2 in embryogenesis and describe previously unknown functions of Runx1. The findings show unequivocally that the role of P1/P2 during development is non

  5. Circadian regulation of chloroplastic f and m thioredoxins through control of the CCA1 transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-López, Juan de Dios; Serrato, Antonio Jesus; Cazalis, Roland; Meyer, Yves; Chueca, Ana; Reichheld, Jean Philippe; Sahrawy, Mariam

    2011-03-01

    Chloroplastic thioredoxins f and m (TRX f and TRX m) mediate light regulation of carbon metabolism through the activation of Calvin cycle enzymes. The role of TRX f and m in the activation of Calvin cycle enzymes is best known among the TRX family. However, the discoveries of new potential targets extend the functions of chloroplastic TRXs to other processes in non-photosynthetic tissues. As occurs with numerous chloroplast proteins, their expression comes under light regulation. Here, the focus is on the light regulation of TRX f and TRX m in pea and Arabidopsis during the day/night cycle that is maintained during the subjective night. In pea (Pisum sativum), TRX f and TRX m1 expression is shown to be governed by a circadian oscillation exerted at both the transcriptional and protein levels. Binding shift assays indicate that this control probably involves the interaction of the CCA1 transcription factor and an evening element (EE) located in the PsTRX f and PsTRX m1 promoters. In Arabidopsis, among the multigene family of TRX f and TRX m, AtTRX f2 and AtTRX m2 mRNA showed similar circadian oscillatory regulation, suggesting that such regulation is conserved in plants. However, this oscillation was disrupted in plants overexpressing CCA1 (cca1-ox) or repressing CCA1 and LHY (cca1-lhy). The physiological role of the oscillatory regulation of chloroplastic TRX f and TRX m in plants during the day/night cycle is discussed.

  6. Transcriptional Control of Steroid Biosynthesis Genes in the Drosophila Prothoracic Gland by Ventral Veins Lacking and Knirps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorry, Elad; Komura-Kawa, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Yoshinori; Troelsen, Jesper T.; Herder, Rachel; O'Connor, Michael B.; Niwa, Ryusuke; Rewitz, Kim F.

    2014-01-01

    Specialized endocrine cells produce and release steroid hormones that govern development, metabolism and reproduction. In order to synthesize steroids, all the genes in the biosynthetic pathway must be coordinately turned on in steroidogenic cells. In Drosophila, the steroid producing endocrine cells are located in the prothoracic gland (PG) that releases the steroid hormone ecdysone. The transcriptional regulatory network that specifies the unique PG specific expression pattern of the ecdysone biosynthetic genes remains unknown. Here, we show that two transcription factors, the POU-domain Ventral veins lacking (Vvl) and the nuclear receptor Knirps (Kni), have essential roles in the PG during larval development. Vvl is highly expressed in the PG during embryogenesis and is enriched in the gland during larval development, suggesting that Vvl might function as a master transcriptional regulator in this tissue. Vvl and Kni bind to PG specific cis-regulatory elements that are required for expression of the ecdysone biosynthetic genes. Knock down of either vvl or kni in the PG results in a larval developmental arrest due to failure in ecdysone production. Furthermore, Vvl and Kni are also required for maintenance of TOR/S6K and prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) signaling in the PG, two major pathways that control ecdysone biosynthesis and PG cell growth. We also show that the transcriptional regulator, Molting defective (Mld), controls early biosynthetic pathway steps. Our data show that Vvl and Kni directly regulate ecdysone biosynthesis by transcriptional control of biosynthetic gene expression and indirectly by affecting PTTH and TOR/S6K signaling. This provides new insight into the regulatory network of transcription factors involved in the coordinated regulation of steroidogenic cell specific transcription, and identifies a new function of Vvl and Knirps in endocrine cells during post-embryonic development. PMID:24945799

  7. Transcriptional control of steroid biosynthesis genes in the Drosophila prothoracic gland by ventral veins lacking and knirps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Thomas Danielsen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Specialized endocrine cells produce and release steroid hormones that govern development, metabolism and reproduction. In order to synthesize steroids, all the genes in the biosynthetic pathway must be coordinately turned on in steroidogenic cells. In Drosophila, the steroid producing endocrine cells are located in the prothoracic gland (PG that releases the steroid hormone ecdysone. The transcriptional regulatory network that specifies the unique PG specific expression pattern of the ecdysone biosynthetic genes remains unknown. Here, we show that two transcription factors, the POU-domain Ventral veins lacking (Vvl and the nuclear receptor Knirps (Kni, have essential roles in the PG during larval development. Vvl is highly expressed in the PG during embryogenesis and is enriched in the gland during larval development, suggesting that Vvl might function as a master transcriptional regulator in this tissue. Vvl and Kni bind to PG specific cis-regulatory elements that are required for expression of the ecdysone biosynthetic genes. Knock down of either vvl or kni in the PG results in a larval developmental arrest due to failure in ecdysone production. Furthermore, Vvl and Kni are also required for maintenance of TOR/S6K and prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH signaling in the PG, two major pathways that control ecdysone biosynthesis and PG cell growth. We also show that the transcriptional regulator, Molting defective (Mld, controls early biosynthetic pathway steps. Our data show that Vvl and Kni directly regulate ecdysone biosynthesis by transcriptional control of biosynthetic gene expression and indirectly by affecting PTTH and TOR/S6K signaling. This provides new insight into the regulatory network of transcription factors involved in the coordinated regulation of steroidogenic cell specific transcription, and identifies a new function of Vvl and Knirps in endocrine cells during post-embryonic development.

  8. Control of Floral Meristem Determinacy in Petunia by MADS-Box Transcription Factors1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Silvia; Shchennikova, Anna V.; Franken, John; Immink, Richard G.H.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2006-01-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM), a small group of undifferentiated dividing cells, is responsible for the continuous growth of plants. Several genes have been identified that control the development and maintenance of the SAM. Among these, WUSCHEL (WUS) from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is thought to be required for maintenance of a stem cell pool in the SAM. The MADS-box gene AGAMOUS, in combination with an unknown factor, has been proposed as a possible negative regulator of WUS, leading to the termination of meristematic activity within the floral meristem. Transgenic petunia (Petunia hybrida) plants were produced in which the E-type and D-type MADS-box genes FLORAL BINDING PROTEIN2 (FBP2) and FBP11, respectively, are simultaneously overexpressed. These plants show an early arrest in development at the cotyledon stage. Molecular analysis of these transgenic plants revealed a possible combined action of FBP2 and FBP11 in repressing the petunia WUS homolog, TERMINATOR. Furthermore, the ectopic up-regulation of the C-type and D-type homeotic genes FBP6 and FBP7, respectively, suggests that they may also participate in a complex, which causes the determinacy in transgenic plants. These data support the model that a transcription factor complex consisting of C-, D-, and E-type MADS-box proteins controls the stem cell population in the floral meristem. PMID:16428599

  9. Dendrite architecture organized by transcriptional control of the F-actin nucleator Spire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tiago; Ou, Yimiao; Li, Sally; Giniger, Edward; van Meyel, Donald J

    2014-02-01

    The architectures of dendritic trees are crucial for the wiring and function of neuronal circuits because they determine coverage of receptive territories, as well as the nature and strength of sensory or synaptic inputs. Here, we describe a cell-intrinsic pathway sculpting dendritic arborization (da) neurons in Drosophila that requires Longitudinals Lacking (Lola), a BTB/POZ transcription factor, and its control of the F-actin cytoskeleton through Spire (Spir), an actin nucleation protein. Loss of Lola from da neurons reduced the overall length of dendritic arbors, increased the expression of Spir, and produced inappropriate F-actin-rich dendrites at positions too near the cell soma. Selective removal of Lola from only class IV da neurons decreased the evasive responses of larvae to nociception. The increased Spir expression contributed to the abnormal F-actin-rich dendrites and the decreased nocifensive responses because both were suppressed by reduced dose of Spir. Thus, an important role of Lola is to limit expression of Spir to appropriate levels within da neurons. We found Spir to be expressed in dendritic arbors and to be important for their development. Removal of Spir from class IV da neurons reduced F-actin levels and total branch number, shifted the position of greatest branch density away from the cell soma, and compromised nocifensive behavior. We conclude that the Lola-Spir pathway is crucial for the spatial arrangement of branches within dendritic trees and for neural circuit function because it provides balanced control of the F-actin cytoskeleton.

  10. Loss of control over the ethanol consumption: differential transcriptional regulation in prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva Lima, Carolina; da Silva E Silva, Daniel Almeida; Damasceno, Samara; Ribeiro, Andrea Frozino; Rocha, Cristiane S; Berenguer de Matos, Alexandre H; Correia, Diego; Boerngen-Lacerda, Roseli; Brunialti Godard, Ana Lúcia

    2017-09-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a complex multifactorial disease with heritability of ∼50% and corresponds to the state in which the body triggers a reinforcement or reward compulsive behavior due to ethanol consumption, even when faced with negative consequences. Although several studies have shown the impact of high ethanol intake on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) gene expression, few have addressed the relationship between the patterns of gene expression underlying the compulsive behaviour associated with relapsing. In this study, we used a chronic three-bottle free-choice mouse model to investigate the PFC transcriptome in three different groups of mice drinkers: 'Light drinkers' (preference for water throughout the experiment); 'Heavy drinkers' (preference for ethanol with a non-compulsive intake), and 'Inflexible drinkers' (preference for ethanol with a compulsive drinking component). Our aim was to correlate the intake patterns observed in this model with gene expression changes in the PFC, a brain region critical for the development and maintenance of alcohol addiction. We found that the Camk2a gene showed a downregulated profile only in the Inflexible when compared to the Light drinkers group, the Camk2n1 and Pkp2 genes showed an upregulated profile only in the Inflexible drinkers when compared to the Control group, and the Gja1 gene showed an upregulated profile in the Light and Inflexible drinkers when compared to the Control group. These different transcription patterns have been associated to the presence of alcohol, in the Camk2n1 and Gja1 genes; to the amount of ethanol consumed, in the Camk2a gene; and to the loss of control in the alcohol consumption, in the Pkp2 gene. Here, we provide, for the first time, the potential involvement of the Pkp2 gene in the compulsivity and loss of control over the voluntary ethanol consumption.

  11. ATP6V1G1 — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATP6V1G1 is a subunit of vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), a multisubunit enzyme. V-ATPase is an enzyme transporter that functions to acidify intracellular compartments in eukaryotic cells. This acidification process is necessary for such intracellular processes as protein sorting, zymogen activation, receptor-mediated endocytosis, and synaptic vesicle proton gradient generation. V-ATPase is ubiquitously expressed and is present in endomembrane organelles such as vacuoles, lysosomes, endosomes, the Golgi apparatus, chromaffin granules and coated vesicles, as well as in the plasma membrane. V-ATPase is composed of a cytosolic V1 domain and a transmembrane V0 domain. The V1 domain consists of three A, three B, and two G subunits, as well as a C, D, E, F, and H subunit. The V1 domain contains the ATP catalytic site.

  12. ATF-2 controls transcription of Maspin and GADD45 alpha genes independently from p53 to suppress mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, T; Sano, Y; Shinagawa, T; Rahman, Z; Sakuma, T; Nomura, S; Licht, J D; Ishii, S

    2008-02-14

    The activating transcription factor, ATF-2, is a target of p38 and JNK that are involved in stress-induced apoptosis. Heterozygous Atf-2 mutant (Atf-2+/-) mice are highly prone to mammary tumors. The apoptosis-regulated gene GADD45alpha and the breast cancer suppressor gene Maspin, both of which are known to be p53 target genes, are downregulated in the mammary tumors arisen in Atf-2+/- mice. Here, we have analysed how ATF-2 controls the transcription of GADD45alpha and Maspin. ATF-2 and p53 independently activate the GADD45alpha transcription. ATF-2 does not directly bind to the GADD45alpha promoter; instead, it is recruited via Oct-1 and NF-I. ATF-2 simultaneously binds to Oct-1, NF-I and breast cancer suppressor BRCA1 to activate transcription. With regard to Maspin, ATF-2 and p53 directly bind to different sites in the Maspin promoter to independently activate its transcription. Consistent with the observation that ATF-2 and p53 independently activate the transcription of Maspin and GADD45alpha is that the loss of one copy of p53 shortened the period required for mammary tumor development in Atf-2+/- mice. These studies suggest the functional link between the ATF-2 and the two tumor suppressors BRCA1 and p53.

  13. Step out of the groove : Epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, Pernette J.; Visser, Astrid E.; Rots, Marianne G.; Hall, JC; Dunlap, JC; Friedmann, T; VanHeyningen,

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  14. Step out of the groove : epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, P.J.; Visser, A.E.; Rots, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  15. Mechanisms of developmental control of transcription in the murine alpha- and beta-globin loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Trimborn (Tolleiv); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); P.J. Fraser (Peter); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe have characterized mRNA expression and transcription of the mouse alpha- and beta-globin loci during development. S1 nuclease and primary transcript in situ hybridization analyses demonstrate that all seven murine globin genes (zeta, alpha1, alpha2, epsil

  16. Step out of the groove : Epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, Pernette J.; Visser, Astrid E.; Rots, Marianne G.; Hall, JC; Dunlap, JC; Friedmann, T; VanHeyningen,

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  17. Zinc-dependent global transcriptional control, transcriptional deregulation, and higher gene copy number for genes in metal homeostasis of the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talke, Ina N; Hanikenne, Marc; Krämer, Ute

    2006-09-01

    The metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri exhibits naturally selected zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hypertolerance and accumulates extraordinarily high Zn concentrations in its leaves. With these extreme physiological traits, A. halleri phylogenetically belongs to the sister clade of Arabidopsis thaliana. Using a combination of genome-wide cross species microarray analysis and real-time reverse transcription-PCR, a set of candidate genes is identified for Zn hyperaccumulation, Zn and Cd hypertolerance, and the adjustment of micronutrient homeostasis in A. halleri. Eighteen putative metal homeostasis genes are newly identified to be more highly expressed in A. halleri than in A. thaliana, and 11 previously identified candidate genes are confirmed. The encoded proteins include HMA4, known to contribute to root-shoot transport of Zn in A. thaliana. Expression of either AtHMA4 or AhHMA4 confers cellular Zn and Cd tolerance to yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Among further newly implicated proteins are IRT3 and ZIP10, which have been proposed to contribute to cytoplasmic Zn influx, and FRD3 required for iron partitioning in A. thaliana. In A. halleri, the presence of more than a single genomic copy is a hallmark of several highly expressed candidate genes with possible roles in metal hyperaccumulation and metal hypertolerance. Both A. halleri and A. thaliana exert tight regulatory control over Zn homeostasis at the transcript level. Zn hyperaccumulation in A. halleri involves enhanced partitioning of Zn from roots into shoots. The transcriptional regulation of marker genes suggests that in the steady state, A. halleri roots, but not the shoots, act as physiologically Zn deficient under conditions of moderate Zn supply.

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitors SAHA and sodium butyrate block G1-to-S cell cycle progression in neurosphere formation by adult subventricular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doughty Martin L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone deacetylases (HDACs are enzymes that modulate gene expression and cellular processes by deacetylating histones and non-histone proteins. While small molecule inhibitors of HDAC activity (HDACi are used clinically in the treatment of cancer, pre-clinical treatment models suggest they also exert neuroprotective effects and stimulate neurogenesis in neuropathological conditions. However, the direct effects of HDACi on cell cycle progression and proliferation, two properties required for continued neurogenesis, have not been fully characterized in adult neural stem cells (NSCs. In this study, we examined the effects of two broad class I and class II HDACi on adult mouse NSCs, the hydroxamate-based HDACi suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (vorinostat, SAHA and the short chain fatty acid HDACi sodium butyrate. Results We show that both HDACi suppress the formation of neurospheres by adult mouse NSCs grown in proliferation culture conditions in vitro. DNA synthesis is significantly inhibited in adult mouse NSCs exposed to either SAHA or sodium butyrate and inhibition is associated with an arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. HDACi exposure also resulted in transcriptional changes in adult mouse NSCs. Cdk inhibitor genes p21 and p27 transcript levels are increased and associated with elevated H3K9 acetylation levels at proximal promoter regions of p21 and p27. mRNA levels for notch effector Hes genes and Spry-box stem cell transcription factors are downregulated, whereas pro-neural transcription factors Neurog1 and Neurod1 are upregulated. Lastly, we show HDAC inhibition under proliferation culture conditions leads to long-term changes in cell fate in adult mouse NSCs induced to differentiate in vitro. Conclusion SAHA and sodium butyrate directly regulate cdk inhibitor transcription to control cell cycle progression in adult mouse NSCs. HDAC inhibition results in G1 arrest in adult mouse NSCs and transcriptional changes

  19. Identification and selection of normalization controls for quantitative transcript analysis in Blumeria graminis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Helen G; Li, Linhan; Spanu, Pietro D

    2016-05-01

    The investigation of obligate biotrophic pathogens, for example Blumeria graminis, presents a number of challenges. The sensitivity of many assays is reduced because of the presence of host material. Furthermore, the fungal structures inside and outside of the plant possess very different characteristics. Normalization genes are used in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to compensate for changes as a result of the quantity and quality of template material. Such genes are used as references against which genes of interest are compared, enabling true quantification. Here, we identified six potential B. graminis and five barley genes for qPCR normalization. The relative changes in abundance of the transcripts were assayed across an infection time course in barley epidermis, in B. graminis epiphytic structures and haustoria. The B. graminis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), actin (ACT) and histone 3 (H3) genes and the barley GAPDH, ubiquitin (UBI) and α-tubulin 2B (TUBA2B) genes were optimal normalization controls for qPCR during the infection cycle. These genes were then used for normalization in the quantification of the members of a Candidate Secreted Effector Protein (CSEP) family 21, a conidia-specific gene and barley genes encoding putative interactors of CSEP0064. The analysis demonstrates the importance of identifying which reference genes are appropriate for each investigation.

  20. Transcriptional control of stem cell fate by E2Fs and Pocket Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Marie Julian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available E2F transcription factors and their regulatory partners, the pocket proteins (PPs, have emerged as essential regulators of stem cell fate control in a number of lineages. In mammals, this role extends from both pluripotent stem cells to those encompassing all embryonic germ layers, as well as extra-embryonic lineages. E2F/PP-mediated regulation of stem cell decisions is highly evolutionarily conserved, and is likely a pivotal biological mechanism underlying stem cell homeostasis. This has immense implications for organismal development, tissue maintenance and regeneration. In this article, we discuss the roles of E2F factors and PPs in stem cell populations, focusing on mammalian systems. We discuss emerging findings that position the E2F and PP families as widespread and dynamic epigenetic regulators of cell fate decisions. Additionally, we focus on the ever expanding landscape of E2F/PP target genes, and explore the possibility that E2Fs are not simply regulators of general ‘multi-purpose’ cell fate genes but can execute tissue- and cell type-specific gene regulatory programs.

  1. The Transcription Factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 Controls Border-Like Cell Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karve, Rucha; Suárez-Román, Frank; Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali S

    2016-07-01

    The root cap covers the tip of the root and functions to protect the root from environmental stress. Cells in the last layer of the root cap are known as border cells, or border-like cells (BLCs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These cells separate from the rest of the root cap and are released from its edge as a layer of living cells. BLC release is developmentally regulated, but the mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we show that the transcription factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 (NLP7) is required for the proper release of BLCs in Arabidopsis. Mutations in NLP7 lead to BLCs that are released as single cells instead of an entire layer. NLP7 is highly expressed in BLCs and is activated by exposure to low pH, a condition that causes BLCs to be released as single cells. Mutations in NLP7 lead to decreased levels of cellulose and pectin. Cell wall-loosening enzymes such as CELLULASE5 (CEL5) and a pectin lyase-like gene, as well as the root cap regulators SOMBRERO and BEARSKIN1/2, are activated in nlp7-1 seedlings. Double mutant analysis revealed that the nlp7-1 phenotype depends on the expression level of CEL5 Mutations in NLP7 lead to an increase in susceptibility to a root-infecting fungal pathogen. Together, these data suggest that NLP7 controls the release of BLCs by acting through the cell wall-loosening enzyme CEL5.

  2. Polycomb mediates Myc autorepression and its transcriptional control of many loci in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodliffe, Julie M.; Wieschaus, Eric; Cole, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Aberrant accumulation of the Myc oncoprotein propels proliferation and induces carcinogenesis. In normal cells, however, an abundance of Myc protein represses transcription at the c-myc locus. Cancer cells often lose this autorepression. We examined the control of myc in Drosophila and show here that the Drosophila ortholog, dmyc, also undergoes autorepression. We find that the developmental repressor Polycomb (Pc) is required for dmyc autorepression, and that this Pc-dMyc-mediated repression spreads across an 875-kb region encompassing the dmyc gene. To further investigate the relationship between Myc and Polycomb, we used microarrays to identify genes regulated by each, and identify a striking relationship between the two: A large set of dMyc activation targets is normally repressed by Pc, and 73% of dMyc repression targets require Pc for this repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed that many dMyc-Pc-repressed loci have an epigenetic mark recognized by Pc. Our results suggest a novel relationship between Myc and Polycomb, wherein Myc enhances Polycomb repression in order to repress targets, and Myc suppresses Polycomb repression in order to activate targets. PMID:16357214

  3. Transcription factors, transcriptional coregulators, and epigenetic modulation in the control of pulmonary vascular cell phenotype: therapeutic implications for pulmonary hypertension (2015 Grover Conference series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullamsetti, Soni S; Perros, Frédéric; Chelladurai, Prakash; Yuan, Jason; Stenmark, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a complex and multifactorial disease involving genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Numerous stimuli and pathological conditions facilitate severe vascular remodeling in PH by activation of a complex cascade of signaling pathways involving vascular cell proliferation, differentiation, and inflammation. Multiple signaling cascades modulate the activity of certain sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) and coregulators that are critical for the transcriptional regulation of gene expression that facilitates PH-associated vascular cell phenotypes, as demonstrated by several studies summarized in this review. Past studies have largely focused on the role of the genetic component in the development of PH, while the presence of epigenetic alterations such as microRNAs, DNA methylation, histone levels, and histone deacetylases in PH is now also receiving increasing attention. Epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure is also recognized to influence gene expression in development or disease states. Therefore, a complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in altered gene expression in diseased cells is vital for the design of novel therapeutic strategies. Recent technological advances in DNA sequencing will provide a comprehensive improvement in our understanding of mechanisms involved in the development of PH. This review summarizes current concepts in TF and epigenetic control of cell phenotype in pulmonary vascular disease and discusses the current issues and possibilities in employing potential epigenetic or TF-based therapies for achieving complete reversal of PH.

  4. Cell size at S phase initiation: an emergent property of the G1/S network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Barberis

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic cell cycle is the repeated sequence of events that enable the division of a cell into two daughter cells. It is divided into four phases: G1, S, G2, and M. Passage through the cell cycle is strictly regulated by a molecular interaction network, which involves the periodic synthesis and destruction of cyclins that bind and activate cyclin-dependent kinases that are present in nonlimiting amounts. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors contribute to cell cycle control. Budding yeast is an established model organism for cell cycle studies, and several mathematical models have been proposed for its cell cycle. An area of major relevance in cell cycle control is the G1 to S transition. In any given growth condition, it is characterized by the requirement of a specific, critical cell size, PS, to enter S phase. The molecular basis of this control is still under discussion. The authors report a mathematical model of the G1 to S network that newly takes into account nucleo/cytoplasmic localization, the role of the cyclin-dependent kinase Sic1 in facilitating nuclear import of its cognate Cdk1-Clb5, Whi5 control, and carbon source regulation of Sic1 and Sic1-containing complexes. The model was implemented by a set of ordinary differential equations that describe the temporal change of the concentration of the involved proteins and protein complexes. The model was tested by simulation in several genetic and nutritional setups and was found to be neatly consistent with experimental data. To estimate PS, the authors developed a hybrid model including a probabilistic component for firing of DNA replication origins. Sensitivity analysis of PS provides a novel relevant conclusion: PS is an emergent property of the G1 to S network that strongly depends on growth rate.

  5. Kinematical analysis of 5-axis corner smoothing for transitions between linear (G1) blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Beudaert, Xavier; Lavernhe, Sylvain; Tournier, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    5-axis high speed machine tools are widely used in industry. The axis movements are generated by the Computer Numerical Controller (CNC) which has to transform the part program into a sequence of axis setpoints. Most of the time, the tool path is described with linear segments (G1) which lead to tangency discontinuities between blocks. With acceleration and jerk limitations, these discontinuities will induce a zero feedrate and thus surface marks and an increase in machining time. The aim of ...

  6. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantasalo, Anssi; Czeizler, Elena; Virtanen, Riitta; Rousu, Juho; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Penttilä, Merja

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF) onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1) the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2) the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3) the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications. PMID:26901642

  7. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anssi Rantasalo

    Full Text Available This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1 the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2 the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3 the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications.

  8. Multiple phosphorylation events control mitotic degradation of the muscle transcription factor Myf5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorca Thierry

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The two myogenic regulatory factors Myf5 and MyoD are basic helix-loop-helix muscle transcription factors undergoing differential cell cycle dependent proteolysis in proliferating myoblasts. This regulated degradation results in the striking expression of these two factors at distinct phases of the cell cycle, and suggests that their precise and alternated disappearance is an important feature of myoblasts, maybe connected to the maintenance of the proliferative status and/or commitment to the myogenic lineage of these cells. One way to understand the biological function(s of the cyclic expression of these proteins is to specifically alter their degradation, and to analyze the effects of their stabilization on cells. To this aim, we undertook the biochemical analysis of the mechanisms governing Myf5 mitotic degradation, using heterologous systems. Results We show here that mitotic degradation of Myf5 is conserved in non-myogenic cells, and is thus strictly under the control of the cell cycle apparatus. Using Xenopus egg extracts as an in vitro system to dissect the main steps of Myf5 mitotic proteolysis, we show that (1 Myf5 stability is regulated by a complex interplay of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, probably involving various kinases and phosphatases, (2 Myf5 is ubiquitylated in mitotic extracts, and this is a prerequisite to its degradation by the proteasome and (3 at least in the Xenopus system, the E3 responsible for its mitotic degradation is not the APC/C (the major E3 during mitosis. Conclusion Altogether, our data strongly suggest that the mitotic degradation of Myf5 by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is precisely controlled by multiple phosphorylation of the protein, and that the APC/C is not involved in this process.

  9. The sae locus of Staphylococcus aureus controls exoprotein synthesis at the transcriptional level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudo, A T; Cheung, A L; Nagel, R

    1997-07-01

    Agr and sar are known regulatory loci of Staphylococcus aureus that control the production of several extracellular and cell-wall-associated proteins. A pleiotropic insertional mutation in S. aureus, designated sae, that leads to the production of drastically diminished levels of alpha- and beta-hemolysins and coagulase and slightly reduced levels of protein A has been described. The study of the expression of the genes coding for these exoproteins in the sae::Tn551 mutant (carried out in this work by Northern blot analyses) revealed that the genes for alpha- and beta-hemolysins (hla and hlb) and coagulase (coa) are not transcribed and that the gene for protein A (spa) is transcribed at a somewhat reduced level. These results indicate that the sae locus regulates these exoprotein genes at the transcriptional level. Northern blot analyses also show that the sae mutation does not affect the expression of agr or sar regulatory loci. An sae::Tn551 agr::tetM double mutant has been phenotypically characterized as producing reduced or null levels of alpha-, beta-, and delta-hemolysins, coagulase, and high levels of protein A. Northern blot analyses carried out in this work with the double mutant revealed that hla, hlb, hld, and coa genes are not transcribed, while spa is transcribed at high levels. The fact that coa is not expressed in the sae agr mutant, as in the sae parental strain, while spa is expressed at the high levels characteristic of the agr parental strain, suggests that sae and agr interact in a complex way in the control of the expression of the genes of several exoproteins.

  10. Early evolution of disrupted asteroid P/2016 G1 (PANSTARRS)

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno, Fernando; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Pozuelos, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    We present deep imaging observations of activated asteroid P/2016 G1 (PANSTARRS) using the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) from late April to early June 2016. The images are best interpreted as the result of a relatively short-duration event with onset about $\\mathop{350}_{-30}^{+10}$ days before perihelion (i.e., around 10th February, 2016), starting sharply and decreasing with a $\\mathop{24}_{-7}^{+10}$ days (Half-width at half-maximum, HWHM). The results of the modeling imply the emission of $\\sim$1.7$\\times$10$^7$ kg of dust, if composed of particles of 1 micrometer to 1 cm in radius, distributed following a power-law of index --3, and having a geometric albedo of 0.15. A detailed fitting of a conspicuous westward feature in the head of the comet-like object indicates that a significant fraction of the dust was ejected along a privileged direction right at the beginning of the event, which suggests that the parent body has possibly suffered an impact followed by a partial or total disruption. From th...

  11. Sox transcription in sarcosine utilization is controlled by Sigma(54) and SoxR in Bacillus thuringiensis HD73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qi; Liu, Chunxia; Wang, Bo; Yang, Min; Wu, Jianbo; Zhang, Jie; Song, Fuping

    2016-07-12

    Sarcosine oxidase catalyzes the oxidative demethylation of sarcosine to yield glycine, formaldehyde, and hydrogen peroxide. In this study, we analyzed the transcription and regulation of the sox locus, including the sarcosine oxidase-encoding genes in Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). RT-PCR analysis revealed that the sox locus forms two opposing transcriptional units: soxB (soxB/E/F/G/H/I) and soxR (soxR/C/D/A). The typical -12/-24 consensus sequence was located 15 bp and 12 bp from the transcriptional start site (TSS) of soxB and soxC, respectively. Promoter-lacZ fusion assays showed that the soxB promoter is controlled by the Sigma(54) factor and is activated by the Sigma(54)-dependent transcriptional regulator SoxR. SoxR also inhibits its own expression. Expression from the PsoxCR promoter, which is responsible for the transcription of soxC, soxD, and soxA, is Sigma(54)-dependent and requires SoxR. An 11-bp inverted repeat sequence was identified as SoxR binding site upstream of the soxB TSS. Purified SoxR specifically bound a DNA fragment containing this region. Mutation or deletion of this sequence abolished the transcriptional activities of soxB and soxC. Thus, SoxR binds to the same sequence to activate the transcription of soxB and soxC. Sarcosine utilization was abolished in soxB and soxR mutants, suggesting that the sox locus is essential for sarcosine utilization.

  12. Sox transcription in sarcosine utilization is controlled by Sigma54 and SoxR in Bacillus thuringiensis HD73

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qi; Liu, Chunxia; Wang, Bo; Yang, Min; Wu, Jianbo; Zhang, Jie; Song, Fuping

    2016-01-01

    Sarcosine oxidase catalyzes the oxidative demethylation of sarcosine to yield glycine, formaldehyde, and hydrogen peroxide. In this study, we analyzed the transcription and regulation of the sox locus, including the sarcosine oxidase-encoding genes in Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). RT-PCR analysis revealed that the sox locus forms two opposing transcriptional units: soxB (soxB/E/F/G/H/I) and soxR (soxR/C/D/A). The typical −12/−24 consensus sequence was located 15 bp and 12 bp from the transcriptional start site (TSS) of soxB and soxC, respectively. Promoter-lacZ fusion assays showed that the soxB promoter is controlled by the Sigma54 factor and is activated by the Sigma54-dependent transcriptional regulator SoxR. SoxR also inhibits its own expression. Expression from the PsoxCR promoter, which is responsible for the transcription of soxC, soxD, and soxA, is Sigma54-dependent and requires SoxR. An 11-bp inverted repeat sequence was identified as SoxR binding site upstream of the soxB TSS. Purified SoxR specifically bound a DNA fragment containing this region. Mutation or deletion of this sequence abolished the transcriptional activities of soxB and soxC. Thus, SoxR binds to the same sequence to activate the transcription of soxB and soxC. Sarcosine utilization was abolished in soxB and soxR mutants, suggesting that the sox locus is essential for sarcosine utilization. PMID:27404799

  13. Transcriptional control of drug resistance, virulence and immune system evasion in pathogenic fungi: a cross-species comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pais

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are key players in the control of the activation or repression of gene expression programs in response to environmental stimuli. The study of regulatory networks taking place in fungal pathogens is a promising research topic that can help in the fight against these pathogens by targeting specific fungal pathways as a whole, instead of targeting more specific effectors of virulence or drug resistance. This review is focused on the analysis of regulatory networks playing a central role in the referred mechanisms in the human fungal pathogens Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis. Current knowledge on the activity of the transcription factors characterized in each of these pathogenic fungal species will be addressed. Particular focus is given to their mechanisms of activation, regulatory targets and phenotypic outcome. The review further provides an evaluation on the conservation of transcriptional circuits among different fungal pathogens, highlighting the pathways that translate common or divergent traits among these species in what concerns their drug resistance, virulence and host immune evasion features. It becomes evident that the regulation of transcriptional networks is complex and presents significant variations among different fungal pathogens. Only the oxidative stress regulators Yap1 and Skn7 are conserved among all studied species; while some transcription factors, involved in nutrient homeostasis, pH adaptation, drug resistance and morphological switching are present in several, though not all species. Interestingly, in some cases not very homologous transcription factors display orthologous functions, whereas some homologous proteins have diverged in terms of their function in different species. A few cases of species specific transcription factors are also observed.

  14. The transcription factor Rbf1 is the master regulator for b-mating type controlled pathogenic development in Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Heimel

    Full Text Available In the phytopathogenic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis, sexual and pathogenic development are tightly connected and controlled by the heterodimeric bE/bW transcription factor complex encoded by the b-mating type locus. The formation of the active bE/bW heterodimer leads to the formation of filaments, induces a G2 cell cycle arrest, and triggers pathogenicity. Here, we identify a set of 345 bE/bW responsive genes which show altered expression during these developmental changes; several of these genes are associated with cell cycle coordination, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. 90% of the genes that show altered expression upon bE/bW-activation require the zinc finger transcription factor Rbf1, one of the few factors directly regulated by the bE/bW heterodimer. Rbf1 is a novel master regulator in a multilayered network of transcription factors that facilitates the complex regulatory traits of sexual and pathogenic development.

  15. OTX2 Transcription Factor Controls Regional Patterning within the Medial Ganglionic Eminence and Regional Identity of the Septum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée V. Hoch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Otx2 homeodomain transcription factor is essential for gastrulation and early neural development. We generated Otx2 conditional knockout (cKO mice to investigate its roles in telencephalon development after neurulation (approximately embryonic day 9.0. We conducted transcriptional profiling and in situ hybridization to identify genes de-regulated in Otx2 cKO ventral forebrain. In parallel, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing to identify enhancer elements, the OTX2 binding motif, and de-regulated genes that are likely direct targets of OTX2 transcriptional regulation. We found that Otx2 was essential in septum specification, regulation of Fgf signaling in the rostral telencephalon, and medial ganglionic eminence (MGE patterning, neurogenesis, and oligodendrogenesis. Within the MGE, Otx2 was required for ventral, but not dorsal, identity, thus controlling the production of specific MGE derivatives.

  16. The transcription factor Rbf1 is the master regulator for b-mating type controlled pathogenic development in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimel, Kai; Scherer, Mario; Vranes, Miroslav; Wahl, Ramon; Pothiratana, Chetsada; Schuler, David; Vincon, Volker; Finkernagel, Florian; Flor-Parra, Ignacio; Kämper, Jörg

    2010-08-05

    In the phytopathogenic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis, sexual and pathogenic development are tightly connected and controlled by the heterodimeric bE/bW transcription factor complex encoded by the b-mating type locus. The formation of the active bE/bW heterodimer leads to the formation of filaments, induces a G2 cell cycle arrest, and triggers pathogenicity. Here, we identify a set of 345 bE/bW responsive genes which show altered expression during these developmental changes; several of these genes are associated with cell cycle coordination, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. 90% of the genes that show altered expression upon bE/bW-activation require the zinc finger transcription factor Rbf1, one of the few factors directly regulated by the bE/bW heterodimer. Rbf1 is a novel master regulator in a multilayered network of transcription factors that facilitates the complex regulatory traits of sexual and pathogenic development.

  17. Inhibition of G1P3 expression found in the differential display study on respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the leading viral pathogen associated with bronchiolitis and lower respiratory tract disease in infants and young children worldwide. The respiratory epithelium is the primary initiator of pulmonary inflammation in RSV infections, which cause significant perturbations of global gene expression controlling multiple cellular processes. In this study, differential display reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed to examine mRNA expression in a human alveolar cell line (SPC-A1 infected with RSV. Results Of the 2,500 interpretable bands on denaturing polyacrylamide gels, 40 (1.6% cDNA bands were differentially regulated by RSV, in which 28 (70% appeared to be upregulated and another 12 (30% appeared to be downregulated. Forty of the expressed sequence tags (EST were isolated, and 20 matched homologs in GenBank. RSV infection upregulated the mRNA expression of chemokines CC and CXC and interfered with type α/β interferon-inducible gene expression by upregulation of MG11 and downregulation of G1P3. Conclusion RSV replication could induce widespread changes in gene expression including both positive and negative regulation and play a different role in the down-regulation of IFN-α and up-regulation of IFN-γ inducible gene expression, which suggests that RSV interferes with the innate antiviral response of epithelial cells by multiple mechanisms.

  18. Posttranslational Modifications of the Master Transcriptional Regulator NPR1 Enable Dynamic but Tight Control of Plant Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Abdelaty; Withers, John; Mohan, Rajinikanth; Marqués, Jorge; Gu, Yangnan; Yan, Shunping; Zavaliev, Raul; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-01-01

    Summary NPR1, a master regulator of basal and systemic acquired resistance in plants, confers immunity through a transcriptional cascade, which includes transcription activators (e.g., TGA3) and repressors (e.g., WRKY70), leading to the massive induction of antimicrobial genes. How this single protein orchestrates genome-wide transcriptional reprogramming in response to immune stimulus remains a major question. Paradoxically, while NPR1 is essential for defense gene induction, its turnover appears to be required for this function, suggesting that NPR1 activity and degradation are dynamically regulated. Here we show that sumoylation of NPR1 by SUMO3 activates defense gene expression by switching NPR1's association with the WRKY transcription repressors to TGA transcription activators. Sumoylation also triggers NPR1 degradation, rendering the immune induction transient. SUMO modification of NPR1 is inhibited by phosphorylation at Ser55/Ser59, which keeps NPR1 stable and quiescent. Thus, posttranslational modifications enable dynamic but tight and precise control of plant immune responses. PMID:26269953

  19. A genetic assay for transcription errors reveals multilayer control of RNA polymerase II fidelity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan D Irvin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We developed a highly sensitive assay to detect transcription errors in vivo. The assay is based on suppression of a missense mutation in the active site tyrosine in the Cre recombinase. Because Cre acts as tetramer, background from translation errors are negligible. Functional Cre resulting from rare transcription errors that restore the tyrosine codon can be detected by Cre-dependent rearrangement of reporter genes. Hence, transient transcription errors are captured as stable genetic changes. We used this Cre-based reporter to screen for mutations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPB1 (RPO21 that increase the level of misincorporation during transcription. The mutations are in three domains of Rpb1, the trigger loop, the bridge helix, and in sites involved in binding to TFIIS. Biochemical characterization demonstrates that these variants have elevated misincorporation, and/or ability to extend mispaired bases, or defects in TFIIS mediated editing.

  20. A genetic assay for transcription errors reveals multilayer control of RNA polymerase II fidelity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan D Irvin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We developed a highly sensitive assay to detect transcription errors in vivo. The assay is based on suppression of a missense mutation in the active site tyrosine in the Cre recombinase. Because Cre acts as tetramer, background from translation errors are negligible. Functional Cre resulting from rare transcription errors that restore the tyrosine codon can be detected by Cre-dependent rearrangement of reporter genes. Hence, transient transcription errors are captured as stable genetic changes. We used this Cre-based reporter to screen for mutations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPB1 (RPO21 that increase the level of misincorporation during transcription. The mutations are in three domains of Rpb1, the trigger loop, the bridge helix, and in sites involved in binding to TFIIS. Biochemical characterization demonstrates that these variants have elevated misincorporation, and/or ability to extend mispaired bases, or defects in TFIIS mediated editing.

  1. A genetic assay for transcription errors reveals multilayer control of RNA polymerase II fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvin, Jordan D; Kireeva, Maria L; Gotte, Deanna R; Shafer, Brenda K; Huang, Ingold; Kashlev, Mikhail; Strathern, Jeffrey N

    2014-09-01

    We developed a highly sensitive assay to detect transcription errors in vivo. The assay is based on suppression of a missense mutation in the active site tyrosine in the Cre recombinase. Because Cre acts as tetramer, background from translation errors are negligible. Functional Cre resulting from rare transcription errors that restore the tyrosine codon can be detected by Cre-dependent rearrangement of reporter genes. Hence, transient transcription errors are captured as stable genetic changes. We used this Cre-based reporter to screen for mutations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPB1 (RPO21) that increase the level of misincorporation during transcription. The mutations are in three domains of Rpb1, the trigger loop, the bridge helix, and in sites involved in binding to TFIIS. Biochemical characterization demonstrates that these variants have elevated misincorporation, and/or ability to extend mispaired bases, or defects in TFIIS mediated editing.

  2. Messenger RNA Interferase RelE Controls relBE Transcription by Conditional Cooperativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Borch, Jonas; Jørgensen, Mikkel G;

    2008-01-01

    Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin (TA) loci consist of two genes in an operon that encodes a metabolically stable toxin and an unstable antitoxin. The antitoxin neutralises its cognate toxin by forming a tight complex with it. In all cases known, the antitoxin autoregulates TA operon transcription...... by binding to one or more operators in the promoter region while the toxin functions as a co-repressor of transcription. Interestingly, the toxin can also stimulate TA operon transcription. Here we analyse mechanistic aspects of how RelE of Escherichia coli can function both as a co-repressor and derepressor...... of relBE transcription. When RelB was in excess to RelE, two trimeric RelB(2)*RelE complexes bound cooperatively to two adjacent operator-sites in the relBE promoter region and repressed transcription. By contrast, RelE in excess stimulated relBE transcription and released the RelB(2)*RelE complex from...

  3. An aromatic residue switch in enhancer-dependent bacterial RNA polymerase controls transcription intermediate complex activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesler, Simone C.; Weinzierl, Robert O. J.; Buck, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the open promoter complex (RPo) in which the melted DNA containing the transcription start site is located at the RNA polymerase (RNAP) catalytic centre is an obligatory step in the transcription of DNA into RNA catalyzed by RNAP. In the RPo, an extensive network of interactions is established between DNA, RNAP and the σ-factor and the formation of functional RPo occurs via a series of transcriptional intermediates (collectively ‘RPi’). A single tryptophan is ideally positioned to directly engage with the flipped out base of the non-template strand at the +1 site. Evidence suggests that this tryptophan (i) is involved in either forward translocation or DNA scrunching and (ii) in σ54-regulated promoters limits the transcription activity of at least one intermediate complex (RPi) before the formation of a fully functional RPo. Limiting RPi activity may be important in preventing the premature synthesis of abortive transcripts, suggesting its involvement in a general mechanism driving the RPi to RPo transition for transcription initiation. PMID:23609536

  4. Control of Transcriptional Fidelity by Active Center Tuning as Derived from RNA Polymerase Endonuclease Reaction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosunova, Ekaterina; Sosunov, Vasily; Epshtein, Vitaly; Nikiforov, Vadim; Mustaev, Arkady

    2013-01-01

    Precise transcription by cellular RNA polymerase requires the efficient removal of noncognate nucleotide residues that are occasionally incorporated. Mis-incorporation causes the transcription elongation complex to backtrack, releasing a single strand 3′-RNA segment bearing a noncognate residue, which is hydrolyzed by the active center that carries two Mg2+ ions. However, in most x-ray structures only one Mg2+ is present. This Mg2+ is tightly bound to the active center aspartates, creating an inactive stable state. The first residue of the single strand RNA segment in the backtracked transcription elongation complex strongly promotes transcript hydrolytic cleavage by establishing a network of interactions that force a shift of stably bound Mg2+ to release some of its aspartate coordination valences for binding to the second Mg2+ thus enabling catalysis. Such a rearrangement that we call active center tuning (ACT) occurs when all recognition contacts of the active center-bound RNA segment are established and verified by tolerance to stress. Transcription factor Gre builds on the ACT mechanism in the same reaction by increasing the retention of the second Mg2+ and by activating the attacking water, causing 3000–4000-fold reaction acceleration and strongly reinforcing proofreading. The unified mechanism for RNA synthesis and degradation by RNA polymerase predicts that ACT also executes NTP selection thereby contributing to high transcription fidelity. PMID:23283976

  5. An NAC transcription factor controls ethylene-regulated cell expansion in flower petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Haixia; Ma, Nan; Tian, Ji; Luo, Jing; Chen, Jiwei; Li, Jing; Zheng, Yi; Chen, Xiang; Fei, Zhangjun; Gao, Junping

    2013-10-01

    Cell expansion is crucial for plant growth. It is well known that the phytohormone ethylene functions in plant development as a key modulator of cell expansion. However, the role of ethylene in the regulation of this process remains unclear. In this study, 2,189 ethylene-responsive transcripts were identified in rose (Rosa hybrida) petals using transcriptome sequencing and microarray analysis. Among these transcripts, an NAC (for no apical meristem [NAM], Arabidopsis transcription activation factor [ATAF], and cup-shaped cotyledon [CUC])-domain transcription factor gene, RhNAC100, was rapidly and dramatically induced by ethylene in the petals. Interestingly, accumulation of the RhNAC100 transcript was modulated by ethylene via microRNA164-dependent posttranscriptional regulation. Overexpression of RhNAC100 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) substantially reduced the petal size by repressing petal cell expansion. By contrast, silencing of RhNAC100 in rose petals using virus-induced gene silencing significantly increased petal size and promoted cell expansion in the petal abaxial subepidermis (P cellulose synthase and two aquaporin genes (Rosa hybrida Cellulose Synthase2 and R. hybrida Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Protein1;1/2;1) were identified as targets of RhNAC100. Our results suggest that ethylene regulates cell expansion by fine-tuning the microRNA164/RhNAC100 module and also provide new insights into the function of NAC transcription factors.

  6. Control of transferrin expression by β-amyloid through the CP2 transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sang-Min; Kim, Jung-Woong; Kim, Chul-Hong; An, Joo-Hee; Kang, Eun-Jin; Kim, Chul Geun; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2010-10-01

    Accumulation of β-amyloid protein (Aβ) is one of the most important pathological features of Alzheimer's disease. Although Aβ induces neurodegeneration in the cortex and hippocampus through several molecular mechanisms, few studies have evaluated the modulation of transcription factors during Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the transcriptional activity of transcription factor CP2 in neuronal damage mediated by Aβ (Aβ(1-42) and Aβ(25-35) ). An unbiased motif search of the transferrin promoter region showed that CP2 binds to the transferrin promoter, an iron-regulating protein, and regulates transferrin transcription. Ectopic expression of CP2 led to increased transferrin expression at both the mRNA and protein levels, whereas knockdown of CP2 down-regulated transferrin mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, CP2 trans-activated transcription of a transferrin reporter gene. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that CP2 binds to the transferrin promoter region. Furthermore, the binding affinity of CP2 to the transferrin promoter was regulated by Aβ, as Aβ (Aβ(1-42) and Aβ(25-35) ) markedly increased the binding affinity of CP2 for the transferrin promoter. Taken together, these results suggest that CP2 contributes to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease by inducing transferrin expression via up-regulating its transcription.

  7. Transcription Factor Networks derived from Breast Cancer Stem Cells control the immune response in the Basal subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silveira, W A; Palma, P V B; Sicchieri, R D

    2017-01-01

    from putative bCSC and reverse engineering of transcription control networks, we identified two networks associated with this phenotype. One controlled by SNAI2, TWIST1, BNC2, PRRX1 and TBX5 drives a mesenchymal or CSC-like phenotype. The second network is controlled by the SCML4, ZNF831, SP140...... and IKZF3 transcription factors which correspond to immune response modulators. Immune response network expression is correlated with pathological response to chemotherapy, and in the Basal subtype is related to better recurrence-free survival. In patient-derived xenografts, the expression...... of these networks in patient tumours is predictive of engraftment success. Our findings point out a potential molecular mechanism underlying the balance between immune surveillance and EMT activation in breast cancer. This molecular mechanism may be useful to the development of new target therapies....

  8. Wound-associated macrophages control collagen 1α2 transcription during the early stages of skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Legrand, Julien M D; Bou-Gharios, George; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2013-02-01

    Wound-associated fibrosis is important to provide tensile strength upon wound healing but at the same time is detrimental to proper tissue regeneration. To date, there is no clear evidence of the role of macrophages and their subpopulations in the control of the kinetics of collagen production during wound healing. To evaluate in vivo the contribution of macrophages in collagen transcription, we depleted macrophages after wounding luciferase reporter mice of the collagen 1 alpha 2 (Col 1α2) promoter activity. Our data reveal that Col 1α2 starts to be transcribed at D2 after wounding, reaching a plateau after 7 days. Sustained macrophage depletion significantly reduced collagen 1α2 transcription from D4, indicating that the control of fibrosis by macrophages occurs during the early stages of the wound healing process. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an important role of wound macrophages in the control of collagen production during wound healing.

  9. Conserved archetypal configuration of the transcriptional control region during the course of BK polyomavirus evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, Yoshiaki; Zhong, Shan; Xu, Yawei; Zhu, Mengyun; Chao, Yuegen; Sugimoto, Chie; Ikegaya, Hiroshi; Shibuya, Ayako; Kitamura, Tadaichi

    2008-08-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) is widespread among humans, asymptomatically infecting children and then persisting in renal tissue. The transcriptional control region (TCR) of the BKV genome is variable among clinical isolates. Thus, archetypal TCRs with a common basic configuration generally occur in BKV isolates from the urine of immunocompromised patients, but rearranged TCRs that possibly arise from the archetypal configuration have also been detected in clinical specimens. To examine the hypothesis that archetypal strains represent wild-type strains circulating in the human population (the archetype hypothesis), we analysed 145 complete viral genomes amplified directly from the urine of non-immunocompromised individuals worldwide. These genomes included 82, three, two and 58 sequences classified as belonging to subtypes I, II, III and IV, respectively. Rearranged TCRs with long duplications or deletions were detected from two subtype I and two subtype IV genomes, but not from the other 141 genomes (thus, the TCRs of these genomes were judged to be archetypal). The variations in the archetypal TCRs were nucleotide substitutions and single-nucleotide deletions, most of which were unique to particular subtypes or subgroups. We confirmed that the four complete BKV genomes with rearranged TCRs did not form a unique lineage on a phylogenetic tree. Collectively, the findings demonstrate that the archetypal TCR configuration has been conserved during the evolution of BKV, providing support for the archetype hypothesis. Additionally, we suggest that 'archetype' should be used as a conceptual term that denotes a prototypical structure that can generate various rearranged TCRs during viral growth in vivo and in vitro.

  10. The existence of inflection points for generalized log-aesthetic curves satisfying G1 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpagavalli, R.; Gobithaasan, R. U.; Miura, K. T.; Shanmugavel, Madhavan

    2015-12-01

    Log-Aesthetic (LA) curves have been implemented in a CAD/CAM system for various design feats. LA curves possess linear Logarithmic Curvature Graph (LCG) with gradient (shape parameter) denoted as α. In 2009, a generalized form of LA curves called Generalized Log-Aesthetic Curves (GLAC) has been proposed which has an extra shape parameter as ν compared to LA curves. Recently, G1 continuous GLAC algorithm has been proposed which utilizes the extra shape parameter using four control points. This paper discusses on the existence of inflection points in a GLAC segment satisfying G1 Hermite data and the effect of inflection point on convex hull property. It is found that the existence of inflection point can be avoided by manipulating the value of α. Numerical experiments show that the increase of α may remove the inflection point (if any) in a GLAC segment.

  11. Identification of a ZEB2-MITF-ZEB1 transcriptional network that controls melanogenesis and melanoma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecker, G; Vandamme, N; Akay, O; Koludrovic, D; Taminau, J; Lemeire, K; Gheldof, A; De Craene, B; Van Gele, M; Brochez, L; Udupi, G M; Rafferty, M; Balint, B; Gallagher, W M; Ghanem, G; Huylebroeck, D; Haigh, J; van den Oord, J; Larue, L; Davidson, I; Marine, J-C; Berx, G

    2014-08-01

    Deregulation of signaling pathways that control differentiation, expansion and migration of neural crest-derived melanoblasts during normal development contributes also to melanoma progression and metastasis. Although several epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) transcription factors, such as zinc finger E-box binding protein 1 (ZEB1) and ZEB2, have been implicated in neural crest cell biology, little is known about their role in melanocyte homeostasis and melanoma. Here we show that mice lacking Zeb2 in the melanocyte lineage exhibit a melanoblast migration defect and, unexpectedly, a severe melanocyte differentiation defect. Loss of Zeb2 in the melanocyte lineage results in a downregulation of the Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) and melanocyte differentiation markers concomitant with an upregulation of Zeb1. We identify a transcriptional signaling network in which the EMT transcription factor ZEB2 regulates MITF levels to control melanocyte differentiation. Moreover, our data are also relevant for human melanomagenesis as loss of ZEB2 expression is associated with reduced patient survival.

  12. Genetic networks controlled by the bacterial replication initiator and transcription factor DnaA in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Tracy A; Smith, Janet L; Grossman, Alan D

    2017-10-01

    DnaA is the widely conserved bacterial AAA+ ATPase that functions as both the replication initiator and a transcription factor. In many organisms, DnaA controls expression of its own gene and likely several others during growth and in response to replication stress. To evaluate the effects of DnaA on gene expression, separate from its role in replication initiation, we analyzed changes in mRNA levels in Bacillus subtilis cells with and without dnaA, using engineered strains in which dnaA is not essential. We found that dnaA was required for many of the changes in gene expression in response to replication stress. We also found that dnaA indirectly affected expression of several regulons during growth, including those controlled by the transcription factors Spo0A, AbrB, PhoP, SinR, RemA, Rok and YvrH. These effects were largely mediated by the effects of DnaA on expression of sda. DnaA activates transcription of sda, and Sda inhibits histidine protein kinases required for activation of the transcription factor Spo0A. We also found that loss of dnaA caused a decrease in the development of genetic competence. Together, our results indicate that DnaA plays an important role in modulating cell physiology, separate from its role in replication initiation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Self-consistent theory of transcriptional control in complex regulatory architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Robert C.; Weinert, Franz M.; Phillips, Rob; Kegel, Willem K.

    2017-01-01

    Individual regulatory proteins are typically charged with the simultaneous regulation of a battery of different genes. As a result, when one of these proteins is limiting, competitive effects have a significant impact on the transcriptional response of the regulated genes. Here we present a general framework for the analysis of any generic regulatory architecture that accounts for the competitive effects of the regulatory environment by isolating these effects into an effective concentration parameter. These predictions are formulated using the grand-canonical ensemble of statistical mechanics and the fold-change in gene expression is predicted as a function of the number of transcription factors, the strength of interactions between the transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, and the effective concentration of the transcription factor. The effective concentration is set by the transcription factor interactions with competing binding sites within the cell and is determined self-consistently. Using this approach, we analyze regulatory architectures in the grand-canonical ensemble ranging from simple repression and simple activation to scenarios that include repression mediated by DNA looping of distal regulatory sites. It is demonstrated that all the canonical expressions previously derived in the case of an isolated, non-competing gene, can be generalised by a simple substitution to their grand canonical counterpart, which allows for simple intuitive incorporation of the influence of multiple competing transcription factor binding sites. As an example of the strength of this approach, we build on these results to present an analytical description of transcriptional regulation of the lac operon. PMID:28686609

  14. Elk3 from hamster-a ternary complex factor with strong transcriptional repressor activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortoe, G.M.; Weilguny, D.; Willumsen, Berthe Marie

    2005-01-01

    the transcription of genes that are activated during entry into G1. We have isolated the Cricetulus griseus Elk3 gene from the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line and investigated the transcriptional potential of this factor. Transient transfections revealed that, in addition to its regulation of the c......-fos promoter, Elk3 from CHO cells seems to inhibit other promoters controlling expression of proteins involved in G1/S phase progression; Cyclin D1 and DHFR. As has been described for the Elk3 homologs Net (Mouse) and Sap-2 (Human), the results of the present study further indicate that hamster Elk3...

  15. A global transcriptional regulator in Thermococcus kodakaraensis controls the expression levels of both glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzyme-encoding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Tamotsu; Akerboom, Jasper; Takedomi, Shogo; van de Werken, Harmen J G; Blombach, Fabian; van der Oost, John; Murakami, Taira; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2007-11-16

    We identified a novel regulator, Thermococcales glycolytic regulator (Tgr), functioning as both an activator and a repressor of transcription in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. Tgr (TK1769) displays similarity (28% identical) to Pyrococcus furiosus TrmB (PF1743), a transcriptional repressor regulating the trehalose/maltose ATP-binding cassette transporter genes, but is more closely related (67%) to a TrmB paralog in P. furiosus (PF0124). Growth of a tgr disruption strain (Deltatgr) displayed a significant decrease in growth rate under gluconeogenic conditions compared with the wild-type strain, whereas comparable growth rates were observed under glycolytic conditions. A whole genome microarray analysis revealed that transcript levels of almost all genes related to glycolysis and maltodextrin metabolism were at relatively high levels in the Deltatgr mutant even under gluconeogenic conditions. The Deltatgr mutant also displayed defects in the transcriptional activation of gluconeogenic genes under these conditions, indicating that Tgr functions as both an activator and a repressor. Genes regulated by Tgr contain a previously identified sequence motif, the Thermococcales glycolytic motif (TGM). The TGM was positioned upstream of the Transcription factor B-responsive element (BRE)/TATA sequence in gluconeogenic promoters and downstream of it in glycolytic promoters. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that recombinant Tgr protein specifically binds to promoter regions containing a TGM. Tgr was released from the DNA when maltotriose was added, suggesting that this sugar is most likely the physiological effector. Our results strongly suggest that Tgr is a global transcriptional regulator that simultaneously controls, in response to sugar availability, both glycolytic and gluconeogenic metabolism in T. kodakaraensis via its direct binding to the TGM.

  16. The phytohormone auxin induces G1 cell-cycle arrest of human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ester, Katja; Curković-Perica, Mirna; Kralj, Marijeta

    2009-10-01

    The plant hormone auxin is the key regulator of plant growth and development. Auxin regulates transcription of plant genes by targeting degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins Aux/IAA. While there are many reports describing its potential to modulate human cell functions, the majority are based on auxin action following enzymatic activation. A study focused on auxin alone and its antiproliferative potential, with emphasis on modulation of the cell cycle, has not been performed. Therefore, we analyzed tumor growth inhibitory effects and the cell-cycle perturbations of natural (IAA, IBA) and synthetic (NAA, 2,4-D) auxins. All derivatives showed cytostatic effects on selected human tumor cell lines. The cell-cycle analysis revealed that IAA and 2,4-D induce strong G1 arrest, along with a drastic decrease in the percentage of S-phase cells in MCF-7 cell line. This phenomenon demonstrates that auxins may have novel, unexploited antitumor potential and should be further investigated. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  17. The post-transcriptional regulatory system CSR controls the balance of metabolic pools in upper glycolysis of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Manon; Ropers, Delphine; Letisse, Fabien; Laguerre, Sandrine; Portais, Jean-Charles; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Enjalbert, Brice

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic control in Escherichia coli is a complex process involving multilevel regulatory systems but the involvement of post-transcriptional regulation is uncertain. The post-transcriptional factor CsrA is stated as being the only regulator essential for the use of glycolytic substrates. A dozen enzymes in the central carbon metabolism (CCM) have been reported as potentially controlled by CsrA, but its impact on the CCM functioning has not been demonstrated. Here, a multiscale analysis was performed in a wild-type strain and its isogenic mutant attenuated for CsrA (including growth parameters, gene expression levels, metabolite pools, abundance of enzymes and fluxes). Data integration and regulation analysis showed a coordinated control of the expression of glycolytic enzymes. This also revealed the imbalance of metabolite pools in the csrA mutant upper glycolysis, before the phosphofructokinase PfkA step. This imbalance is associated with a glucose-phosphate stress. Restoring PfkA activity in the csrA mutant strain suppressed this stress and increased the mutant growth rate on glucose. Thus, the carbon storage regulator system is essential for the effective functioning of the upper glycolysis mainly through its control of PfkA. This work demonstrates the pivotal role of post-transcriptional regulation to shape the carbon metabolism.

  18. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A three factor design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Characterization of cellular growth is central to understanding living systems. Here, we applied a three-factor design to study the relationship between specific growth rate and genome-wide gene expression in 36 steady-state chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The three...... factors we considered were specific growth rate, nutrient limitation, and oxygen availability. Results: We identified 268 growth rate dependent genes, independent of nutrient limitation and oxygen availability. The transcriptional response was used to identify key areas in metabolism around which m...... transcription factor target sets, transcription factors that coordinate balanced growth were also identified. Our analysis shows that FhII, Rap1, and Sfp1, regulating protein biosynthesis, have significantly enriched target sets for genes up-regulated with increasing growth rate. Cell cycle regulators...

  19. Transcriptional programs that control expression of the autoimmune regulator gene Aire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, Yonatan; Nevo, Shir; Bornstein, Chamutal; Brezis, Miriam R; Ben-Hur, Sharon; Shkedy, Aya; Eisenberg-Bord, Michal; Levi, Ben; Delacher, Michael; Goldfarb, Yael; David, Eyal; Weinberger, Leehee; Viukov, Sergey; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Giraud, Matthieu; Hanna, Jacob H; Breiling, Achim; Lyko, Frank; Amit, Ido; Feuerer, Markus; Abramson, Jakub

    2017-02-01

    Aire is a transcriptional regulator that induces promiscuous expression of thousands of genes encoding tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). While the target genes of Aire are well characterized, the transcriptional programs that regulate its own expression have remained elusive. Here we comprehensively analyzed both cis-acting and trans-acting regulatory mechanisms and found that the Aire locus was insulated by the global chromatin organizer CTCF and was hypermethylated in cells and tissues that did not express Aire. In mTECs, however, Aire expression was facilitated by concurrent eviction of CTCF, specific demethylation of exon 2 and the proximal promoter, and the coordinated action of several transcription activators, including Irf4, Irf8, Tbx21, Tcf7 and Ctcfl, which acted on mTEC-specific accessible regions in the Aire locus.

  20. NFIA co-localizes with PPARγ and transcriptionally controls the brown fat gene program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiraike, Yuta; Waki, Hironori; Yu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    . NFIA and the master transcriptional regulator of adipogenesis, PPARγ, co-localize at the brown-fat-specific enhancers. Moreover, the binding of NFIA precedes and facilitates the binding of PPARγ, leading to increased chromatin accessibility and active transcription. Introduction of NFIA into myoblasts...... results in brown adipocyte differentiation. Conversely, the brown fat of NFIA-knockout mice displays impaired expression of the brown-fat-specific genes and reciprocal elevation of muscle genes. Finally, expression of NFIA and the brown-fat-specific genes is positively correlated in human brown fat......Brown fat dissipates energy as heat and protects against obesity. Here, we identified nuclear factor I-A (NFIA) as a transcriptional regulator of brown fat by a genome-wide open chromatin analysis of murine brown and white fat followed by motif analysis of brown-fat-specific open chromatin regions...

  1. Protein Kinase B Controls Transcriptional Programs that Direct Cytotoxic T Cell Fate but Is Dispensable for T Cell Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintyre, Andrew N.; Finlay, David; Preston, Gavin; Sinclair, Linda V.; Waugh, Caryll M.; Tamas, Peter; Feijoo, Carmen; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Cantrell, Doreen A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary In cytotoxic T cells (CTL), Akt, also known as protein kinase B, is activated by the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and the cytokine interleukin 2 (IL-2). Akt can control cell metabolism in many cell types but whether this role is important for CTL function has not been determined. Here we have shown that Akt does not mediate IL-2- or TCR-induced cell metabolic responses; rather, this role is assumed by other Akt-related kinases. There is, however, a nonredundant role for sustained and strong activation of Akt in CTL to coordinate the TCR- and IL-2-induced transcriptional programs that control expression of key cytolytic effector molecules, adhesion molecules, and cytokine and chemokine receptors that distinguish effector versus memory and naive T cells. Akt is thus dispensable for metabolism, but the strength and duration of Akt activity dictates the CTL transcriptional program and determines CTL fate. PMID:21295499

  2. Mechanical control of cyclic AMP signalling and gene transcription through integrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C. J.; Alenghat, F. J.; Rim, P.; Fong, J. H.; Fabry, B.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    This study was carried out to discriminate between two alternative hypotheses as to how cells sense mechanical forces and transduce them into changes in gene transcription. Do cells sense mechanical signals through generalized membrane distortion or through specific transmembrane receptors, such as integrins? Here we show that mechanical stresses applied to the cell surface alter the cyclic AMP signalling cascade and downstream gene transcription by modulating local release of signals generated by activated integrin receptors in a G-protein-dependent manner, whereas distortion of integrins in the absence of receptor occupancy has no effect.

  3. Bacterial sigma factors as targets for engineered or synthetic transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Lakshmi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Zhanglin

    2014-01-01

    Sigma (σ) factors are the predominant constituents of transcription regulation in bacteria. σ Factors recruit the core RNA polymerase to recognize promoters with specific DNA sequences. Recently, engineering of transcriptional regulators has become a significant tool for strain engineering. The present review summarizes the recent advances in σ factor based engineering or synthetic design. The manipulation of σ factors presents insights into the bacterial stress tolerance and metabolite productivity. We envision more synthetic design based on σ factors that can be used to tune the regulatory network of bacteria.

  4. Bacterial sigma factors as targets for engineered or synthetic transcriptional control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi eTripathi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sigma (σ factors are the predominant constituents of transcription regulation in bacteria. σ factors recruit the core RNA polymerase (RNAP to recognize promoters with specific DNA sequences. Recently engineering of transcriptional regulators has become a significant tool for strain engineering. The present review summarizes the recent advances in σ factor based engineering or synthetic design. The manipulation of σ factors presents insights into the bacterial stress tolerance and metabolite productivity. We envision more synthetic design based on σ factors that can be used to tune the regulatory network of bacteria.

  5. Functional characterization of NAC-domain transcription factors implicated in control of vascular cell differentiation in Arabidopsis and Populus

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Emily H.

    2008-01-01

    Wood has a wide variety of uses and is arguably the most important renewable raw material. The composition of xylem cell types in wood determines the utility of different types of wood for distinct commercial applications. Using expression profiling and phylogenetic analysis, we identified many xylem-associated regulatory genes that may control the differentiation of cells involved in wood formation in Arabidopsis and poplar. Prominent among these are NAC-domain transcription factors (NACs). ...

  6. Transcriptional control of drug resistance, virulence and immune system evasion in pathogenic fungi: a cross-species comparison.

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Pais; Catarina Costa; Mafalda Cavalheiro; Daniela Romão; Miguel Cacho Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors are key players in the control of the activation or repression of gene expression programs in response to environmental stimuli. The study of regulatory networks taking place in fungal pathogens is a promising research topic that can help in the fight against these pathogens by targeting specific fungal pathways as a whole, instead of targeting more specific effectors of virulence or drug resistance. This review is focused on the analysis of regulatory networks playing a...

  7. Transcriptional Control of Drug Resistance, Virulence and Immune System Evasion in Pathogenic Fungi: A Cross-Species Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Pais, Pedro; Costa, Catarina; Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Romão, Daniela; Teixeira, Miguel C.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors are key players in the control of the activation or repression of gene expression programs in response to environmental stimuli. The study of regulatory networks taking place in fungal pathogens is a promising research topic that can help in the fight against these pathogens by targeting specific fungal pathways as a whole, instead of targeting more specific effectors of virulence or drug resistance. This review is focused on the analysis of regulatory networks playing a...

  8. Optimized culture condition for enhancing lytic performance of waste activated sludge by Geobacillus sp. G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunxue; Zhou, Aijuan; Hou, Yanan; Zhang, Xu; Guo, Zechong; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Wenzong

    2014-01-01

    Hydrolysis is known as the rate-limiting step during waste activated sludge (WAS) digestion. The optimization of the culture conditions of Geobacillus sp. G1 for enhancing WAS hydrolysis was conducted in this study with uniform design and response surface methodology. Taking the lysis rate of Escherichia coli as the response, the Plackett-Burman design was used to screen the most important variables. Experimental results showed that the maximum predicted lysis rate of E. coli was 50.9% for 4 h treatment time with concentrations of skim milk, NaCl and NH4SO4 at 10.78, 4.36 and 11.28 g/L, respectively. The optimized dosage ratio of Geobacillus sp. G1 to WAS was 35%:65% (VG1:VWAS). Under this condition, soluble protein was increased to 695 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L, which was 5.0 times higher than that obtained in the control (140 mg COD/L). The corresponding protease activity reached 1.1 Eu/mL. Scanning electron microscopy showed that abundant cells were apparently lysed with treatment of Geobacillus sp. G1.

  9. 26 CFR 1.904(g)-1 - Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... loss account. 1.904(g)-1 Section 1.904(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... States § 1.904(g)-1 Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account. For further guidance, see § 1.904(g)-1T....

  10. SigmoID: a user-friendly tool for improving bacterial genome annotation through analysis of transcription control signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeny Nikolaichik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The majority of bacterial genome annotations are currently automated and based on a ‘gene by gene’ approach. Regulatory signals and operon structures are rarely taken into account which often results in incomplete and even incorrect gene function assignments. Here we present SigmoID, a cross-platform (OS X, Linux and Windows open-source application aiming at simplifying the identification of transcription regulatory sites (promoters, transcription factor binding sites and terminators in bacterial genomes and providing assistance in correcting annotations in accordance with regulatory information. SigmoID combines a user-friendly graphical interface to well known command line tools with a genome browser for visualising regulatory elements in genomic context. Integrated access to online databases with regulatory information (RegPrecise and RegulonDB and web-based search engines speeds up genome analysis and simplifies correction of genome annotation. We demonstrate some features of SigmoID by constructing a series of regulatory protein binding site profiles for two groups of bacteria: Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium and Dickeya spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, we inferred over 900 transcription factor binding sites and alternative sigma factor promoters in the annotated genome of Pectobacterium atrosepticum. These regulatory signals control putative transcription units covering about 40% of the P. atrosepticum chromosome. Reviewing the annotation in cases where it didn’t fit with regulatory information allowed us to correct product and gene names for over 300 loci.

  11. Binding of TFIIIC to sine elements controls the relocation of activity-dependent neuronal genes to transcription factories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Crepaldi

    Full Text Available In neurons, the timely and accurate expression of genes in response to synaptic activity relies on the interplay between epigenetic modifications of histones, recruitment of regulatory proteins to chromatin and changes to nuclear structure. To identify genes and regulatory elements responsive to synaptic activation in vivo, we performed a genome-wide ChIPseq analysis of acetylated histone H3 using somatosensory cortex of mice exposed to novel enriched environmental (NEE conditions. We discovered that Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs located distal to promoters of activity-dependent genes became acetylated following exposure to NEE and were bound by the general transcription factor TFIIIC. Importantly, under depolarizing conditions, inducible genes relocated to transcription factories (TFs, and this event was controlled by TFIIIC. Silencing of the TFIIIC subunit Gtf3c5 in non-stimulated neurons induced uncontrolled relocation to TFs and transcription of activity-dependent genes. Remarkably, in cortical neurons, silencing of Gtf3c5 mimicked the effects of chronic depolarization, inducing a dramatic increase of both dendritic length and branching. These findings reveal a novel and essential regulatory function of both SINEs and TFIIIC in mediating gene relocation and transcription. They also suggest that TFIIIC may regulate the rearrangement of nuclear architecture, allowing the coordinated expression of activity-dependent neuronal genes.

  12. Binding of TFIIIC to sine elements controls the relocation of activity-dependent neuronal genes to transcription factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaldi, Luca; Policarpi, Cristina; Coatti, Alessandro; Sherlock, William T; Jongbloets, Bart C; Down, Thomas A; Riccio, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, the timely and accurate expression of genes in response to synaptic activity relies on the interplay between epigenetic modifications of histones, recruitment of regulatory proteins to chromatin and changes to nuclear structure. To identify genes and regulatory elements responsive to synaptic activation in vivo, we performed a genome-wide ChIPseq analysis of acetylated histone H3 using somatosensory cortex of mice exposed to novel enriched environmental (NEE) conditions. We discovered that Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs) located distal to promoters of activity-dependent genes became acetylated following exposure to NEE and were bound by the general transcription factor TFIIIC. Importantly, under depolarizing conditions, inducible genes relocated to transcription factories (TFs), and this event was controlled by TFIIIC. Silencing of the TFIIIC subunit Gtf3c5 in non-stimulated neurons induced uncontrolled relocation to TFs and transcription of activity-dependent genes. Remarkably, in cortical neurons, silencing of Gtf3c5 mimicked the effects of chronic depolarization, inducing a dramatic increase of both dendritic length and branching. These findings reveal a novel and essential regulatory function of both SINEs and TFIIIC in mediating gene relocation and transcription. They also suggest that TFIIIC may regulate the rearrangement of nuclear architecture, allowing the coordinated expression of activity-dependent neuronal genes.

  13. SigmoID: a user-friendly tool for improving bacterial genome annotation through analysis of transcription control signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaichik, Yevgeny; Damienikan, Aliaksandr U

    2016-01-01

    The majority of bacterial genome annotations are currently automated and based on a 'gene by gene' approach. Regulatory signals and operon structures are rarely taken into account which often results in incomplete and even incorrect gene function assignments. Here we present SigmoID, a cross-platform (OS X, Linux and Windows) open-source application aiming at simplifying the identification of transcription regulatory sites (promoters, transcription factor binding sites and terminators) in bacterial genomes and providing assistance in correcting annotations in accordance with regulatory information. SigmoID combines a user-friendly graphical interface to well known command line tools with a genome browser for visualising regulatory elements in genomic context. Integrated access to online databases with regulatory information (RegPrecise and RegulonDB) and web-based search engines speeds up genome analysis and simplifies correction of genome annotation. We demonstrate some features of SigmoID by constructing a series of regulatory protein binding site profiles for two groups of bacteria: Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium and Dickeya spp.) and Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, we inferred over 900 transcription factor binding sites and alternative sigma factor promoters in the annotated genome of Pectobacterium atrosepticum. These regulatory signals control putative transcription units covering about 40% of the P. atrosepticum chromosome. Reviewing the annotation in cases where it didn't fit with regulatory information allowed us to correct product and gene names for over 300 loci.

  14. The homeodomain-containing transcription factors Arx and Pax4 control enteroendocrine subtype specification in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Beucher

    Full Text Available Intestinal hormones are key regulators of digestion and energy homeostasis secreted by rare enteroendocrine cells. These cells produce over ten different hormones including GLP-1 and GIP peptides known to promote insulin secretion. To date, the molecular mechanisms controlling the specification of the various enteroendocrine subtypes from multipotent Neurog3(+ endocrine progenitor cells, as well as their number, remain largely unknown. In contrast, in the embryonic pancreas, the opposite activities of Arx and Pax4 homeodomain transcription factors promote islet progenitor cells towards the different endocrine cell fates. In this study, we thus investigated the role of Arx and Pax4 in enteroendocrine subtype specification. The small intestine and colon of Arx- and Pax4-deficient mice were analyzed using histological, molecular, and lineage tracing approaches. We show that Arx is expressed in endocrine progenitors (Neurog3(+ and in early differentiating (ChromograninA(- GLP-1-, GIP-, CCK-, Sct- Gastrin- and Ghrelin-producing cells. We noted a dramatic reduction or a complete loss of all these enteroendocrine cell types in Arx mutants. Serotonin- and Somatostatin-secreting cells do not express Arx and, accordingly, the differentiation of Serotonin cells was not affected in Arx mutants. However, the number of Somatostatin-expressing D-cells is increased as Arx-deficient progenitor cells are redirected to the D-cell lineage. In Pax4-deficient mice, the differentiation of Serotonin and Somatostatin cells is impaired, as well as of GIP and Gastrin cells. In contrast, the number of GLP-1 producing L-cells is increased concomitantly with an upregulation of Arx. Thus, while Arx and Pax4 are necessary for the development of L- and D-cells respectively, they conversely restrict D- and L-cells fates suggesting antagonistic functions in D/L cell allocation. In conclusion, these finding demonstrate that, downstream of Neurog3, the specification of a subset of

  15. Identification of a Transcription Factor Controlling pH-Dependent Organic Acid Response in Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Lantz, Anna Eliasson

    2012-01-01

    Acid formation in Aspergillus niger is known to be subjected to tight regulation, and the acid production profiles are fine-tuned to respond to the ambient pH. Based on transcriptome data, putative trans-acting pH responding transcription factors were listed and through knock out studies, mutants...

  16. Self-consistent theory of transcriptional control in complex regulatory architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landman, Jasper; Brewster, Robert C; Weinert, Franz M; Phillips, Rob; Kegel, Willem K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113729464

    2017-01-01

    Individual regulatory proteins are typically charged with the simultaneous regulation of a battery of different genes. As a result, when one of these proteins is limiting, competitive effects have a significant impact on the transcriptional response of the regulated genes. Here we present a general

  17. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome breakage elicits transient silencing of ribosomal RNA synthesis, but the mechanisms involved remained elusive. Here we discover an in trans signalling mechanism that triggers pan-nuclear silencing of rRNA transcription in response to DNA damage. This is associated with transient...

  18. The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suzuki, Harukazu; Forrest, Alistair R R; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Using deep sequencing (deepCAGE), the FANTOM4 study measured the genome-wide dynamics of transcription-start-site usage in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 throughout a time course of growth arrest and differentiation. Modeling the expression dynamics in terms of predicted cis-regulatory sites...

  19. The Drosophila Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Ouija Board Controls Ecdysteroid Biosynthesis through Specific Regulation of spookier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Komura-Kawa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones are crucial for many biological events in multicellular organisms. In insects, the principal steroid hormones are ecdysteroids, which play essential roles in regulating molting and metamorphosis. During larval and pupal development, ecdysteroids are synthesized in the prothoracic gland (PG from dietary cholesterol via a series of hydroxylation and oxidation steps. The expression of all but one of the known ecdysteroid biosynthetic enzymes is restricted to the PG, but the transcriptional regulatory networks responsible for generating such exquisite tissue-specific regulation is only beginning to be elucidated. Here, we report identification and characterization of the C2H2-type zinc finger transcription factor Ouija board (Ouib necessary for ecdysteroid production in the PG in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of ouib is predominantly limited to the PG, and genetic null mutants of ouib result in larval developmental arrest that can be rescued by administrating an active ecdysteroid. Interestingly, ouib mutant animals exhibit a strong reduction in the expression of one ecdysteroid biosynthetic enzyme, spookier. Using a cell culture-based luciferase reporter assay, Ouib protein stimulates transcription of spok by binding to a specific ~15 bp response element in the spok PG enhancer element. Most remarkable, the developmental arrest phenotype of ouib mutants is rescued by over-expression of a functionally-equivalent paralog of spookier. These observations imply that the main biological function of Ouib is to specifically regulate spookier transcription during Drosophila development.

  20. E2F Transcription Factors Control the Roller Coaster Ride of Cell Cycle Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, Ingrid; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Initially, the E2F transcription factor was discovered as a factor able to bind the adenovirus E2 promoter and activate viral genes. Afterwards it was shown that E2F also binds to promoters of nonviral genes such as C-MYC and DHFR, which were already known at that time to be important for cell growt

  1. BMP signaling orchestrates a transcriptional network to control the fate of mesenchymal stem cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jifan; Jing, Junjun; Li, Jingyuan; Zhao, Hu; Punj, Vasu; Zhang, Tingwei; Xu, Jian; Chai, Yang

    2017-07-15

    Signaling pathways are used reiteratively in different developmental processes yet produce distinct cell fates through specific downstream transcription factors. In this study, we used tooth root development as a model with which to investigate how the BMP signaling pathway regulates transcriptional complexes to direct the fate determination of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We first identified the MSC population supporting mouse molar root growth as Gli1(+) cells. Using a Gli1-driven Cre-mediated recombination system, our results provide the first in vivo evidence that BMP signaling activity is required for the odontogenic differentiation of MSCs. Specifically, we identified the transcription factors Pax9, Klf4, Satb2 and Lhx8 as being downstream of BMP signaling and expressed in a spatially restricted pattern that is potentially involved in determining distinct cellular identities within the dental mesenchyme. Finally, we found that overactivation of one key transcription factor, Klf4, which is associated with the odontogenic region, promotes odontogenic differentiation of MSCs. Collectively, our results demonstrate the functional significance of BMP signaling in regulating MSC fate during root development and shed light on how BMP signaling can achieve functional specificity in regulating diverse organ development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Control of the C. albicans cell wall damage response by transcriptional regulator Cas5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent M Bruno

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The fungal cell wall is vital for growth, development, and interaction of cells with their environment. The response to cell wall damage is well understood from studies in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where numerous cell wall integrity (CWI genes are activated by transcription factor ScRlm1. Prior evidence suggests the hypothesis that both response and regulation may be conserved in the major fungal pathogen Candida albicans. We have tested this hypothesis by using a new C. albicans genetic resource: we have screened mutants defective in putative transcription factor genes for sensitivity to the cell wall biosynthesis inhibitor caspofungin. We find that the zinc finger protein CaCas5, which lacks a unique ortholog in S. cerevisiae, governs expression of many CWI genes. CaRlm1 has a modest role in this response. The transcriptional coactivator CaAda2 is also required for expression of many CaCas5-dependent genes, as expected if CaCas5 recruits CaAda2 to activate target gene transcription. Many caspofungin-induced C. albicans genes specify endoplasmic reticulum and secretion functions. Such genes are not induced in S. cerevisiae, but promote its growth in caspofungin. We have used a new resource to identify a key C. albicans transcriptional regulator of CWI genes and antifungal sensitivity. Our gene expression findings indicate that both divergent and conserved response genes may have significant functional roles. Our strategy may be broadly useful for identification of pathogen-specific regulatory pathways and critical response genes.

  3. Identification of a transcription factor controlling pH-dependent organic acid response in Aspergillus niger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Poulsen

    Full Text Available Acid formation in Aspergillus niger is known to be subjected to tight regulation, and the acid production profiles are fine-tuned to respond to the ambient pH. Based on transcriptome data, putative trans-acting pH responding transcription factors were listed and through knock out studies, mutants exhibiting an oxalate overproducing phenotype were identified. The yield of oxalate was increased up to 158% compared to the wild type and the corresponding transcription factor was therefore entitled Oxalic Acid repression Factor, OafA. Detailed physiological characterization of one of the ΔoafA mutants, compared to the wild type, showed that both strains produced substantial amounts of gluconic acid, but the mutant strain was more efficient in re-uptake of gluconic acid and converting it to oxalic acid, particularly at high pH (pH 5.0. Transcriptional profiles showed that 241 genes were differentially expressed due to the deletion of oafA and this supported the argument of OafA being a trans-acting transcription factor. Furthermore, expression of two phosphoketolases was down-regulated in the ΔoafA mutant, one of which has not previously been described in fungi. It was argued that the observed oxalate overproducing phenotype was a consequence of the efficient re-uptake of gluconic acid and thereby a higher flux through glycolysis. This results in a lower flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, demonstrated by the down-regulation of the phosphoketolases. Finally, the physiological data, in terms of the specific oxygen consumption, indicated a connection between the oxidative phosphorylation and oxalate production and this was further substantiated through transcription analysis.

  4. A stable transcription factor complex nucleated by oligomeric AML1–ETO controls leukaemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Zhanxin; Wang, Lan; Jiang, Yanwen; Kost, Nils; Soong, T. David; Chen, Wei-Yi; Tang, Zhanyun; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Elemento, Olivier; Fischle, Wolfgang; Melnick, Ari; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Nimer, Stephen D.; Roeder, Robert G.

    2013-06-30

    Transcription factors are frequently altered in leukaemia through chromosomal translocation, mutation or aberrant expression. AML1–ETO, a fusion protein generated by the t(8;21) translocation in acute myeloid leukaemia, is a transcription factor implicated in both gene repression and activation. AML1–ETO oligomerization, mediated by the NHR2 domain, is critical for leukaemogenesis, making it important to identify co-regulatory factors that ‘read’ the NHR2 oligomerization and contribute to leukaemogenesis. Here we show that, in human leukaemic cells, AML1–ETO resides in and functions through a stable AML1–ETO-containing transcription factor complex (AETFC) that contains several haematopoietic transcription (co)factors. These AETFC components stabilize the complex through multivalent interactions, provide multiple DNA-binding domains for diverse target genes, co-localize genome wide, cooperatively regulate gene expression, and contribute to leukaemogenesis. Within the AETFC complex, AML1–ETO oligomerization is required for a specific interaction between the oligomerized NHR2 domain and a novel NHR2-binding (N2B) motif in E proteins. Crystallographic analysis of the NHR2–N2B complex reveals a unique interaction pattern in which an N2B peptide makes direct contact with side chains of two NHR2 domains as a dimer, providing a novel model of how dimeric/oligomeric transcription factors create a new protein-binding interface through dimerization/oligomerization. Intriguingly, disruption of this interaction by point mutations abrogates AML1–ETO-induced haematopoietic stem/progenitor cell self-renewal and leukaemogenesis. These results reveal new mechanisms of action of AML1–ETO, and provide a potential therapeutic target in t(8;21)-positive acute myeloid leukaemia.

  5. A novel single virus infection system reveals that influenza virus preferentially infects cells in g1 phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Ueda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza virus attaches to sialic acid residues on the surface of host cells via the hemagglutinin (HA, a glycoprotein expressed on the viral envelope, and enters into the cytoplasm by receptor-mediated endocytosis. The viral genome is released and transported in to the nucleus, where transcription and replication take place. However, cellular factors affecting the influenza virus infection such as the cell cycle remain uncharacterized. METHODS/RESULTS: To resolve the influence of cell cycle on influenza virus infection, we performed a single-virus infection analysis using optical tweezers. Using this newly developed single-virus infection system, the fluorescence-labeled influenza virus was trapped on a microchip using a laser (1064 nm at 0.6 W, transported, and released onto individual H292 human lung epithelial cells. Interestingly, the influenza virus attached selectively to cells in the G1-phase. To clarify the molecular differences between cells in G1- and S/G2/M-phase, we performed several physical and chemical assays. Results indicated that: 1 the membranes of cells in G1-phase contained greater amounts of sialic acids (glycoproteins than the membranes of cells in S/G2/M-phase; 2 the membrane stiffness of cells in S/G2/M-phase is more rigid than those in G1-phase by measurement using optical tweezers; and 3 S/G2/M-phase cells contained higher content of Gb3, Gb4 and GlcCer than G1-phase cells by an assay for lipid composition. CONCLUSIONS: A novel single-virus infection system was developed to characterize the difference in influenza virus susceptibility between G1- and S/G2/M-phase cells. Differences in virus binding specificity were associated with alterations in the lipid composition, sialic acid content, and membrane stiffness. This single-virus infection system will be useful for studying the infection mechanisms of other viruses.

  6. Divergent Evolution of the Transcriptional Network Controlled by Snf1-Interacting Protein Sip4 in Budding Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlgarten, Constance; Krijger, Jorrit-Jan; Lemnian, Ioana; Gohr, André; Kasper, Lydia; Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Grosse, Ivo; Breunig, Karin D

    2015-01-01

    Cellular responses to starvation are of ancient origin since nutrient limitation has always been a common challenge to the stability of living systems. Hence, signaling molecules involved in sensing or transducing information about limiting metabolites are highly conserved, whereas transcription factors and the genes they regulate have diverged. In eukaryotes the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) functions as a central regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. The yeast AMPK ortholog SNF1 controls the transcriptional network that counteracts carbon starvation conditions by regulating a set of transcription factors. Among those Cat8 and Sip4 have overlapping DNA-binding specificity for so-called carbon source responsive elements and induce target genes upon SNF1 activation. To analyze the evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 controlled transcriptional network we have compared the response to carbon limitation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to that of Kluyveromyces lactis. In high glucose, S. cerevisiae displays tumor cell-like aerobic fermentation and repression of respiration (Crabtree-positive) while K. lactis has a respiratory-fermentative life-style, respiration being regulated by oxygen availability (Crabtree-negative), which is typical for many yeasts and for differentiated higher cells. We demonstrate divergent evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 network and present evidence that a role of Sip4 in controlling anabolic metabolism has been lost in the Saccharomyces lineage. We find that in K. lactis, but not in S. cerevisiae, the Sip4 protein plays an essential role in C2 carbon assimilation including induction of the glyoxylate cycle and the carnitine shuttle genes. Induction of KlSIP4 gene expression by KlCat8 is essential under these growth conditions and a primary function of KlCat8. Both KlCat8 and KlSip4 are involved in the regulation of lactose metabolism in K. lactis. In chromatin-immunoprecipitation experiments we demonstrate binding of both, KlSip4 and KlCat8, to

  7. Divergent Evolution of the Transcriptional Network Controlled by Snf1-Interacting Protein Sip4 in Budding Yeasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Mehlgarten

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to starvation are of ancient origin since nutrient limitation has always been a common challenge to the stability of living systems. Hence, signaling molecules involved in sensing or transducing information about limiting metabolites are highly conserved, whereas transcription factors and the genes they regulate have diverged. In eukaryotes the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK functions as a central regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. The yeast AMPK ortholog SNF1 controls the transcriptional network that counteracts carbon starvation conditions by regulating a set of transcription factors. Among those Cat8 and Sip4 have overlapping DNA-binding specificity for so-called carbon source responsive elements and induce target genes upon SNF1 activation. To analyze the evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 controlled transcriptional network we have compared the response to carbon limitation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to that of Kluyveromyces lactis. In high glucose, S. cerevisiae displays tumor cell-like aerobic fermentation and repression of respiration (Crabtree-positive while K. lactis has a respiratory-fermentative life-style, respiration being regulated by oxygen availability (Crabtree-negative, which is typical for many yeasts and for differentiated higher cells. We demonstrate divergent evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 network and present evidence that a role of Sip4 in controlling anabolic metabolism has been lost in the Saccharomyces lineage. We find that in K. lactis, but not in S. cerevisiae, the Sip4 protein plays an essential role in C2 carbon assimilation including induction of the glyoxylate cycle and the carnitine shuttle genes. Induction of KlSIP4 gene expression by KlCat8 is essential under these growth conditions and a primary function of KlCat8. Both KlCat8 and KlSip4 are involved in the regulation of lactose metabolism in K. lactis. In chromatin-immunoprecipitation experiments we demonstrate binding of both, KlSip4 and

  8. G1 Continuity Conditions of B-spline Surfaces%B样条曲面间的G1连续条件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车翔玖; 梁学章

    2002-01-01

    According to the B-spline theory and Boehm algorithm, this paper presents severalnecessary and sufficient G1 continuity conditions between two adjacent B-spline surfaces. In orderto meet the need of application, a kind of sufficient conditions of G1 continuity are developed, anda kind of sufficient conditions of G1 continuity among N(N > 2) patch B-spline surfaces meetingat a common corner are given at the end.

  9. ADAM10 regulates transcription factor expression required for plasma cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia S Chaimowitz

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10 is a key regulator of cellular processes by shedding extracellular domains of transmembrane proteins. We have previously demonstrated that deletion of B cell expressed ADAM10 results in changes in lymphoid tissue architecture and impaired germinal center (GC formation. In this study, mice were generated in which ADAM10 is deleted in B cells following class switch recombination (ADAM10(Δ/ΔIgG1-cre(+/- mice. Despite normal GC formation, antibody responses were impaired in ADAM10(Δ/ΔIgG1-cre(+/- mice, implicating ADAM10 in post-GC and extrafollicular B cell terminal differentiation. Surprisingly, plasma cell (PC numbers were normal in ADAM10(Δ/ΔIgG1-cre(+/- mice when compared to controls. However, PCs isolated from ADAM10(Δ/ΔIgG1-cre(+/- mice exhibited decreased expression of transcription factors important for PC function: Prdm1, Xbp1 and Irf4. Bcl6 is a GC transcriptional repressor that inhibits the PC transcriptional program and thus must be downregulated for PC differentiation to occur. Bcl6 expression was increased in PCs isolated from ADAM10(Δ/ΔIgG1-cre(+/- mice at both the mRNA and protein level. These results demonstrate that ADAM10 is required for proper transcription factor expression in PCs and thus, for normal PC function.

  10. Dynamic FoxG1 expression coordinates the integration of multipolar pyramidal neuron precursors into the cortical plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Goichi; Fishell, Gord

    2012-06-21

    Pyramidal cells of the cerebral cortex are born in the ventricular zone and migrate through the intermediate zone to enter into the cortical plate. In the intermediate zone, these migrating precursors move tangentially and initiate the extension of their axons by transiently adopting a characteristic multipolar morphology. We observe that expression of the forkhead transcription factor FoxG1 is dynamically regulated during this transitional period. By utilizing conditional genetic strategies, we show that the downregulation of FoxG1 at the beginning of the multipolar cell phase induces Unc5D expression, the timing of which ultimately determines the laminar identity of pyramidal neurons. In addition, we demonstrate that the re-expression of FoxG1 is required for cells to transit out of the multipolar cell phase and to enter into the cortical plate. Thus, the dynamic expression of FoxG1 during migration within the intermediate zone is essential for the proper assembly of the cerebral cortex.

  11. LIN28 phosphorylation by MAPK/ERK couples signalling to the post-transcriptional control of pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsanov, Kaloyan M; Pearson, Daniel S; Wu, Zhaoting; Han, Areum; Triboulet, Robinson; Seligson, Marc T; Powers, John T; Osborne, Jihan K; Kane, Susan; Gygi, Steven P; Gregory, Richard I; Daley, George Q

    2017-01-01

    Signalling and post-transcriptional gene control are both critical for the regulation of pluripotency, yet how they are integrated to influence cell identity remains poorly understood. LIN28 (also known as LIN28A), a highly conserved RNA-binding protein, has emerged as a central post-transcriptional regulator of cell fate through blockade of let-7 microRNA biogenesis and direct modulation of mRNA translation. Here we show that LIN28 is phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK in pluripotent stem cells, which increases its levels via post-translational stabilization. LIN28 phosphorylation had little impact on let-7 but enhanced the effect of LIN28 on its direct mRNA targets, revealing a mechanism that uncouples LIN28's let-7-dependent and -independent activities. We have linked this mechanism to the induction of pluripotency by somatic cell reprogramming and the transition from naive to primed pluripotency. Collectively, our findings indicate that MAPK/ERK directly impacts LIN28, defining an axis that connects signalling, post-transcriptional gene control, and cell fate regulation.

  12. Complex Coordination of Cell Plasticity by a PGC-1α-controlled Transcriptional Network in Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupr, Barbara; Handschin, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle cells exhibit an enormous plastic capacity in order to adapt to external stimuli. Even though our overall understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic changes in skeletal muscle cells remains poor, several factors involved in the regulation and coordination of relevant transcriptional programs have been identified in recent years. For example, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is a central regulatory nexus in the adaptation of muscle to endurance training. Intriguingly, PGC-1α integrates numerous signaling pathways and translates their activity into various transcriptional programs. This selectivity is in part controlled by differential expression of PGC-1α variants and post-translational modifications of the PGC-1α protein. PGC-1α-controlled activation of transcriptional networks subsequently enables a spatio-temporal specification and hence allows a complex coordination of changes in metabolic and contractile properties, protein synthesis and degradation rates and other features of trained muscle. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of PGC-1α-regulated skeletal muscle cell plasticity in health and disease.

  13. Characterization of a putative cis-regulatory element that controls transcriptional activity of the pig uroplakin II gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Mi-Ryung; Park, Jong-Yi; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Oh, Jae-Wook; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2011-07-01

    Uroplakin II (UPII) is a one of the integral membrane proteins synthesized as a major differentiation product of mammalian urothelium. UPII gene expression is bladder specific and differentiation dependent, but little is known about its transcription response elements and molecular mechanism. To identify the cis-regulatory elements in the pig UPII (pUPII) gene promoter region, we constructed pUPII 5' upstream region deletion mutants and demonstrated that each of the deletion mutants participates in controlling the expression of the pUPII gene in human bladder carcinoma RT4 cells. We also identified a new core promoter region and putative negative cis-regulatory element within a minimal promoter region. In addition, we showed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter (5F-1) region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. Transient cotransfection experiments showed that HNF4 positively regulates pUPII gene promoter activity. Thus, the binding element and its binding protein, HNF4 transcription factor, may be involved in the mechanism that specifically regulates pUPII gene transcription.

  14. Complex coordination of cell plasticity by a PGC-1α-controlled transcriptional network in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eKupr

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle cells exhibit an enormous plastic capacity in order to adapt to external stimuli. Even though our overall understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic changes in skeletal muscle cells remains poor, several factors involved in the regulation and coordination of relevant transcriptional programs have been identified in recent years. For example, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α is a central regulatory nexus in the adaptation of muscle to endurance training. Intriguingly, PGC-1α integrates numerous signaling pathways and translates their activity into various transcriptional programs. This selectivity is in part controlled by differential expression of PGC-1α variants and post-translational modifications of the PGC-1α protein. PGC-1α-controlled activation of transcriptional networks subsequently enables a spatio-temporal specification and hence allows a complex coordination of changes in metabolic and contractile properties, protein synthesis and degradation rates and other features of trained muscle. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of PGC-1α-regulated skeletal muscle cell plasticity in health and disease.

  15. Early programming of the oocyte epigenome temporally controls late prophase I transcription and chromatin remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Costa, Paulo; McCarthy, Alicia; Prudêncio, Pedro; Greer, Christina; Guilgur, Leonardo G; Becker, Jörg D; Secombe, Julie; Rangan, Prashanth; Martinho, Rui G

    2016-08-10

    Oocytes are arrested for long periods of time in the prophase of the first meiotic division (prophase I). As chromosome condensation poses significant constraints to gene expression, the mechanisms regulating transcriptional activity in the prophase I-arrested oocyte are still not entirely understood. We hypothesized that gene expression during the prophase I arrest is primarily epigenetically regulated. Here we comprehensively define the Drosophila female germ line epigenome throughout oogenesis and show that the oocyte has a unique, dynamic and remarkably diversified epigenome characterized by the presence of both euchromatic and heterochromatic marks. We observed that the perturbation of the oocyte's epigenome in early oogenesis, through depletion of the dKDM5 histone demethylase, results in the temporal deregulation of meiotic transcription and affects female fertility. Taken together, our results indicate that the early programming of the oocyte epigenome primes meiotic chromatin for subsequent functions in late prophase I.

  16. Regulation of Torpor in the Gray Mouse Lemur:Transcriptional and Translational Controls and Role of AMPK Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Zhang; Shannon N Tessier; Kyle K Biggar; Cheng-Wei Wu; Fabien Pifferi; Martine Perret; Kenneth B Storey

    2015-01-01

    The gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) is one of few primate species that is able to enter daily torpor or prolonged hibernation in response to environmental stresses. With an emerg-ing significance to human health research, lemurs present an optimal model for exploring molecular adaptations that regulate primate hypometabolism. A fundamental challenge is how to effectively regulate energy expensive cellular processes (e.g., transcription and translation) during transitions to/from torpor without disrupting cellular homeostasis. One such regulatory mechanism is reversi-ble posttranslational modification of selected protein targets that offers fine cellular control without the energetic burden. This study investigates the role of phosphorylation and/or acetylation in reg-ulating key factors involved in energy homeostasis (AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK, sig-naling pathway), mRNA translation (eukaryotic initiation factor 2a or eIF2a, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E or eIF4E, and initiation factor 4E binding protein or 4EBP), and gene transcription (his-tone H3) in six tissues of torpid and aroused gray mouse lemurs. Our results indicated selective tissue-specific changes of these regulatory proteins. The relative level of Thr172-phosphorylated AMPKa was significantly elevated in the heart but reduced in brown adipose tissue during daily torpor, as compared to the aroused lemurs, implicating the regulation of AMPK activity during daily torpor in these tissues. Interestingly, the levels of the phosphorylated eIFs were largely unal-tered between aroused and torpid animals. Phosphorylation and acetylation of histone H3 were examined as a marker for transcriptional regulation. Compared to the aroused lemurs, level of Ser10-phosphorylated histone H3 decreased significantly in white adipose tissue during torpor, sug-gesting global suppression of gene transcription. However, a significant increase in acetyl-histone H3 in the heart of torpid lemurs indicated a

  17. The Roles of the Stem Cell-Controlling Sox2 Transcription Factor: from Neuroectoderm Development to Alzheimer's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlak, Golmaryam; Vincent, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Sox2 is a component of the core transcriptional regulatory network which maintains the totipotency of the cells during embryonic preimplantation period, the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells, and the multipotency of neural stem cells. This maintenance is controlled by internal loops between Sox2 and other transcription factors of the core such as Oct4, Nanog, Dax1, and Klf4, downstream proteins of extracellular ligands, epigenetic modifiers, and miRNAs. As Sox2 plays an important role in the balance between stem cells maintenance and commitment to differentiated lineages throughout the lifetime, it is supposed that Sox2 could regulate stem cells aging processes. In this review, we provide an update concerning the involvement of Sox2 in neurogenesis during normal aging and discuss its possible role in Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Transcription of the 5S rRNA heterochromatic genes is epigenetically controlled in Arabidopsis thaliana and Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douet, J; Tourmente, S

    2007-07-01

    5S ribosomal DNA is a highly conserved tandemly repeated multigenic family. As suggested for a long time, we have shown that only a fraction of the 5S rRNA genes are expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Xenopus laevis, there is a developmental control of the expression of the 5S rRNA genes with only one of the two 5S rDNA families expressed during oogenesis. For both Arabidopsis and Xenopus, the strongest transcription of 5S rRNA, respectively in the seed and during oogenesis is correlated with heterogeneity in the transcribed 5S rRNAs. Epigenetic mechanisms such as modification of the chromatin structure are involved in the transcriptional regulation of the 5S rRNA genes in both organisms. In Arabidopsis, two silencing pathways, methylation-dependent (RNAi) and methylation-independent (MOM pathway), are involved in the silencing of a 5S rDNA fraction.

  19. PAS-LuxR transcriptional control of filipin biosynthesis in S. avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Cláudia M; Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Payero, Tamara D; Barreales, Eva G; de Pedro, Antonio; Aparicio, Jesús F

    2014-11-01

    The DNA region encoding the filipin gene cluster in Streptomyces avermitilis (pte) contains a PAS-LuxR regulatory gene, pteF, orthologue to pimM, the final pathway-specific positive regulatory protein of pimaricin biosynthesis in Streptomyces natalensis. Gene replacement of the gene from S. avermitilis chromosome resulted in a severe loss of filipin production and delayed spore formation in comparison to that of the wild-type strain, suggesting that it acts as a positive regulator of filipin biosynthesis and that it may also have a role in sporulation. Complementation of the mutant with a single copy of the gene integrated into the chromosome restored wild-type phenotypes. Heterologous complementation with the regulatory counterpart from S. natalensis also restored parental phenotypes. Gene expression analyses in S. avermitilis wild-type and the mutant by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction of the filipin gene cluster suggested the targets for the regulatory protein. Transcription start points of all the genes of the cluster were studied by 5'-rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends. Transcription start point analysis of the pteF gene revealed that the annotated sequence in the databases is incorrect. Confirmation of target promoters was performed by in silico search of binding sites among identified promoters and the binding of the orthologous regulator for pimaricin biosynthesis PimM to gene promoters by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Precise binding regions were investigated by DNAse I protection studies. Our results indicate that PteF activates the transcription from two promoters of polyketide synthase genes directly, and indirectly of other genes of the cluster.

  20. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene PA5507 controls PQS concentration in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Tipton, Kyle A.; Coleman, James P.; Pesci, Everett C.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can sense and respond to a myriad of environmental signals and utilizes a system of small molecules to communicate through intercellular signaling. The small molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal [PQS]) is one of these signals and its synthesis is important for virulence. Previously, we identified an RpiR-type transcriptional regulator, QapR, that positively affects PQS production by repressing the qapR operon. An in-frame deletion of thi...

  1. Rates of gyrase supercoiling and transcription elongation control supercoil density in a bacterial chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Rovinskiy

    Full Text Available Gyrase catalyzes negative supercoiling of DNA in an ATP-dependent reaction that helps condense bacterial chromosomes into a compact interwound "nucleoid." The supercoil density (σ of prokaryotic DNA occurs in two forms. Diffusible supercoil density (σ(D moves freely around the chromosome in 10 kb domains, and constrained supercoil density (σ(C results from binding abundant proteins that bend, loop, or unwind DNA at many sites. Diffusible and constrained supercoils contribute roughly equally to the total in vivo negative supercoil density of WT cells, so σ = σ(C+σ(D. Unexpectedly, Escherichia coli chromosomes have a 15% higher level of σ compared to Salmonella enterica. To decipher critical mechanisms that can change diffusible supercoil density of chromosomes, we analyzed strains of Salmonella using a 9 kb "supercoil sensor" inserted at ten positions around the genome. The sensor contains a complete Lac operon flanked by directly repeated resolvase binding sites, and the sensor can monitor both supercoil density and transcription elongation rates in WT and mutant strains. RNA transcription caused (- supercoiling to increase upstream and decrease downstream of highly expressed genes. Excess upstream supercoiling was relaxed by Topo I, and gyrase replenished downstream supercoil losses to maintain an equilibrium state. Strains with TS gyrase mutations growing at permissive temperature exhibited significant supercoil losses varying from 30% of WT levels to a total loss of σ(D at most chromosome locations. Supercoil losses were influenced by transcription because addition of rifampicin (Rif caused supercoil density to rebound throughout the chromosome. Gyrase mutants that caused dramatic supercoil losses also reduced the transcription elongation rates throughout the genome. The observed link between RNA polymerase elongation speed and gyrase turnover suggests that bacteria with fast growth rates may generate higher supercoil densities

  2. Zinc finger artificial transcription factor-based nearest inactive analogue/nearest active analogue strategy used for the identification of plant genes controlling homologous recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, Qi; van Verk, Marcel C.; Pinas, Johan E.; Lindhout, Beatrice I.; Hooykaas, Paul J.J.; Van der Zaal, Bert J.

    2013-01-01

    In previous work, we selected a particular transcription factor, designated VP16-HRU, from a pool of zinc finger artificial transcription factors (ZF-ATFs) used for genome interrogation. When expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana under control of the ribosomal protein S5A promoter, the RPS5A::VP16-HRU c

  3. A transcription factor network controls cell migration and fate decisions in the developing zebrafish pineal complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanton, Joshua A.; Dean, Benjamin J.; Gamse, Joshua T.

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish pineal complex consists of four cell types (rod and cone photoreceptors, projection neurons and parapineal neurons) that are derived from a single pineal complex anlage. After specification, parapineal neurons migrate unilaterally away from the rest of the pineal complex whereas rods, cones and projection neurons are non-migratory. The transcription factor Tbx2b is important for both the correct number and migration of parapineal neurons. We find that two additional transcription factors, Flh and Nr2e3, negatively regulate parapineal formation. Flh induces non-migratory neuron fates and limits the extent of parapineal specification, in part by activation of Nr2e3 expression. Tbx2b is positively regulated by Flh, but opposes Flh action during specification of parapineal neurons. Loss of parapineal neuron specification in Tbx2b-deficient embryos can be partially rescued by loss of Nr2e3 or Flh function; however, parapineal migration absolutely requires Tbx2b activity. We conclude that cell specification and migration in the pineal complex are regulated by a network of at least three transcription factors. PMID:27317804

  4. Transcriptional control of vertebrate neurogenesis by the proneural factor Ascl1

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    Francisca eVasconcelos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Proneural transcription factors such as Ascl1 function as master regulators of neurogenesis in vertebrates, being both necessary and sufficient for the activation of a full program of neuronal differentiation. Novel insights into the dynamics of Ascl1 expression at the cellular level, combined with the progressive characterization of its transcriptional program, have expanded the classical view of Ascl1 as a differentiation factor in neurogenesis. These advances resulted in a new model, whereby Ascl1 promotes sequentially the proliferation and differentiation of neural/stem progenitor cells. The multiple activities of Ascl1 are associated with the activation of distinct direct targets at progressive stages along the neuronal lineage. How this temporal pattern is established is poorly understood. Two modes of Ascl1 expression recently described (oscillatory versus sustained are likely to be of importance, together with additional mechanistic determinants such as the chromatin landscape and other transcriptional pathways. Here we revise these latest findings, and discuss their implications to the gene regulatory functions of Ascl1 during neurogenesis.

  5. ΔNp63 transcriptionally regulates ATM to control p53 Serine-15 phosphorylation

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    Smith Graeme

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ΔNp63α is an epithelial progenitor cell marker that maintains epidermal stem cell self-renewal capacity. Previous studies revealed that UV-damage induced p53 phosphorylation is confined to ΔNp63α-positive cells in the basal layer of human epithelium. Results We now report that phosphorylation of the p53 tumour suppressor is positively regulated by ΔNp63α in immortalised human keratinocytes. ΔNp63α depletion by RNAi reduces steady-state ATM mRNA and protein levels, and attenuates p53 Serine-15 phosphorylation. Conversely, ectopic expression of ΔNp63α in p63-null tumour cells stimulates ATM transcription and p53 Serine-15 phosphorylation. We show that ATM is a direct ΔNp63α transcriptional target and that the ΔNp63α response element localizes to the ATM promoter CCAAT sequence. Structure-function analysis revealed that the ΔNp63-specific TA2 transactivation domain mediates ATM transcription in coordination with the DNA binding and SAM domains. Conclusions Germline p63 point mutations are associated with a range of ectodermal developmental disorders, and targeted p63 deletion in the skin causes premature ageing. The ΔNp63α-ATM-p53 damage-response pathway may therefore function in epithelial development, carcinogenesis and the ageing processes.

  6. Srebf1a is a key regulator of transcriptional control for adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge-Tonatiuh; Velez-Delvalle, Cristina; Beltrán-Langarica, Alicia; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Cerbón-Solorzano, Jorge; Kuri-Harcuch, Walid

    2011-01-01

    Adipogenesis is regulated by a complex cascade of transcriptional factors, but little is known about the early events that regulate the adipogenic program. Here, we report the role of the srebf1a gene in the differentiation of fibroblastic 3T3-F442A cells. We found that expression of srebf1a depended on GSK3β activity and that GSK3β activity was necessary for C/EBPβ phosphorylation at Thr188. Knockdown of srebf1a inhibited the adipogenic program because it blocked the expression of genes encoding PPARγ2, C/EBPα, SREBP1c and even FABP4, demonstrating that SREBP1a activation is upstream of these three essential adipogenic transcription factors. Kinetic analysis during differentiation illustrated that the order of expression of adipogenic genes was the following: cebpb, srebf1a, pparg2, cebpa, srebp1c and fabp4. Our data suggest that srebf1a acts as an essential link between the GSK3β-C/EBPβ signaling axis and the beginning of the adipogenic transcriptional cascade.

  7. Domain-specific c-Myc ubiquitylation controls c-Myc transcriptional and apoptotic activity

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    Zhang, Qin; Spears, Erick; Boone, David N.; Li, Zhaoliang; Gregory, Mark A.; Hann, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor c-Myc causes transformation and tumorigenesis, but it can also induce apoptotic cell death. Although tumor suppressors are necessary for c-Myc to induce apoptosis, the pathways and mechanisms are unclear. To further understand how c-Myc switches from an oncogenic protein to an apoptotic protein, we examined the mechanism of p53-independent c-Myc–induced apoptosis. We show that the tumor suppressor protein ARF mediates this switch by inhibiting ubiquitylation of the c-Myc transcriptional domain (TD). Whereas TD ubiquitylation is critical for c-Myc canonical transcriptional activity and transformation, inhibition of ubiquitylation leads to the induction of the noncanonical c-Myc target gene, Egr1, which is essential for efficient c-Myc–induced p53-independent apoptosis. ARF inhibits the interaction of c-Myc with the E3 ubiquitin ligase Skp2. Overexpression of Skp2, which occurs in many human tumors, inhibits the recruitment of ARF to the Egr1 promoter, leading to inhibition of c-Myc–induced apoptosis. Therapeutic strategies could be developed to activate this intrinsic apoptotic activity of c-Myc to inhibit tumorigenesis. PMID:23277542

  8. CS-20TRANSCRIPTIONAL CONTROL OF THE OSMOTIC ENGINE BY TEAD4 POTENTIATES INVASION AND CONFERS POOR PROGNOSIS IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Gutierrez, Juan Carlos; Shah, Sagar R.; Ruiz-Valls, Alejandro; Tippens, Nathaniel D.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas are characterized by their ability to disseminate into the local brain parenchyma; thus, confounding surgical excision and radiotherapy. Hence, it is imperative to identify and decipher the signaling networks that drive invasion. Glioblastoma cells utilize molecular transporters at both their leading (inward facing) and lagging (outward facing) edge to modulate cell volume and invade the confined microenvironment of the brain. These transporters include solute transporters as well as the aquaporins, and collectively behave as an osmotic engine for cellular invasion. However, the transcriptional regulators of these transporters have not been fully identified. Here, we report that TEAD4, a transcription factor implicated in neural development, is a potent regulator of the osmotic engine through transcriptional control of solute and water transporters. In particular, our data demonstrates that loss of TEAD4 decreases glioblastoma cells ability to migrate and invade through small pores (Boyden chamber and Matrigel transwell, respectively) mimicking the confined microenvironment of the brain (p < 0.05). Additionally, we uncover the role of TEAD4 in regulating members of the Na + /H+ exchanger, chloride co-transporter and aquaporin families, as well as the volume regulated anion channel to enable water permeation (p < 0.05). Apart from regulating cell dispersal, our data also shows that TEAD4 regulates glioblastoma proliferation (p < 0.05). Using the TCGA and REMBRANDT datasets, we observed TEAD4 is selectively overexpressed and hyperactive in glioblastomas compared to non-cancer cortex and lower grade gliomas (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that patients with elevated TEAD4 expression have a significantly shorter progression free survival and overall survival (p < 0.05). Taken together, our results show that TEAD4 is a potent regulator of cell dispersal through transcriptional control of the osmotic engine and has relevance to clinical outcomes of

  9. Translationally-controlled tumor protein activates the transcription of Oct-4 in kidney-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ying; He, Liang-Liang; Mei, Chang-Lin

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying translationally-controlled tumor protein (TCTP) in the activation of octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct-4) in kidney-derived stem cells have not been characterized. The aim of the present study was to identify the transcriptional activation of Oct-4 by TCTP in kidney-derived stem cells. Homology-directed repair cDNA inserted into Fisher 344 transgenic (Tg) rats and the mouse strain 129/Svj were used for the experiments. Diphtheria toxin (DT; 10 ng/kg) injected into the Tg rats created the kidney injury, which was rapidly restored by the activation of kidney-derived stem cells. Kidney-derived stem cells were isolated from the DT-injured Tg rats using cell culture techniques. The co-expression of Oct-4 and TCTP were observed in the isolated kidney-derived stem cells. Immunoblotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of TCTP null mutant (TCTP(-)/(-)) embryos at day 9.5 (E9.5) demonstrated the absence of co-expression of Oct-4 and TCTP, but expression of paired box-2 was detected. This was in contrast with the E9.5 control embryos, which expressed all three proteins. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that TCTP activates the transcription of Oct-4 in kidney-derived stem cells, as TCTP(-)/(-) embryos exhibited knock down of TCTP and Oct-4 without disturbing the expression of Pax-2 The characteristics and functional nature of TCTP in association with Oct-4 in kidney-derived stem cells was identified.

  10. Transcriptional control of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in extreme phenotypes for berry pigmentation of naturally occurring grapevines

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    Castellarin Simone D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fruit coloration of red-skinned grapevines is mainly due to anthocyanin pigments. We analysed a panel of nine cultivars that included extreme phenotypes for berry colour, ranging from green (absence of anthocyanins to red, purple, violet and blue. Expression of six genes of the anthocyanin pathway coding for flavanone-hydroxylase (F3H, flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H, flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H, UDP-glucose:flavonoid-3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, O-methyltransferase (OMT and four transcription factors (MybA, MybB, MybC, MybD was analysed by quantitative RT-PCR at four developmental stages from before the onset of ripening until full maturity and compared to anthocyanin metabolites. Results Total anthocyanin content at full maturity correlated well with the cumulative expression of F3H, UFGT and GST throughout ripening. Transcripts of the last two genes were absent in the green-skinned cultivar 'Sauvignonasse', also known as 'Tocai friulano', and were at least 10-fold less abundant in pale red cultivars, such as 'Pinot gris' and 'Gewürztraminer', compared to fully coloured cultivars. Predominance of tri-hydroxylated anthocyanins (delphinidin, petunidin and malvidin in cultivars bearing dark berries with violet and blue hue was associated with higher ratios of F3'5'H/F3'H transcription, compared to red-skinned cultivars. Higher levels of OMT transcripts were observed in berries of cultivars that accumulated methoxylated forms of anthocyanins more abundantly than non-methoxylated forms. Conclusion Colour variation of the grape berry conforms to a peculiar pattern of genotype-specific expression of the whole set of anthocyanin genes in a direct transcript-metabolite-phenotype relationship. Cumulative mRNA levels of the structural genes and their relative abundance throughout ripening explained per se the final phenotype for anthocyanin content, anthocyanin composition, colour intensity

  11. Murine germinal center B cells require functional Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 signaling for IgG1 class-switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Mattias N D; Andersson, Karin M E; Wasén, Caroline; Erlandsson, Malin C; Nurkkala-Karlsson, Merja; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Brisslert, Mikael; Bemark, Mats; Bokarewa, Maria I

    2015-12-01

    Switched antibody classes are important for efficient immune responses. Aberrant antibody production to otherwise harmless antigens may result in autoimmunity. The protein kinase fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 receptor (Flt3) has an important role during early B-cell development, but the role of Flt3 in peripheral B cells has not been assessed before. Herein we describe a previously unappreciated role for Flt3 in IgG1 class-switch recombination (CSR) and production. We show that Flt3 is reexpressed on B-cell lymphoma 6(+) germinal center B cells in vivo and following LPS activation of peripheral B cells in vitro. Absence of Flt3 signaling in Flt3 ligand-deficient mice results in impaired IgG1 CSR and accumulation of IgM-secreting plasma cells. On activated B cells, Flt3 is coexpressed and functions in synergy with the common-gamma chain receptor family. B cells from Flt3 ligand-deficient mice have impaired IL-4R signaling, with reduced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 6, and demonstrate a failure to initiate CSR to IgG1 with low expression of γ1 germ-line transcripts, resulting in impaired IgG1 production. Thus, functional synergy between Flt3 and IL-4R signaling is critical for Stat-mediated regulation of sterile γ1 germ-line transcripts and CSR to IgG1.

  12. Isolation and characterization of csbB, a gene controlled by Bacillus subtilis general stress transcription factor sigma B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, S; Price, C W

    1996-10-24

    In the bacterium Bacillus subtilis (Bs), the alternative transcription factor sigma B is activated by environmental stresses to control the expression of a large set of unlinked genes. However, the range of physiological functions mediated by these sigma B-controlled genes is presently unknown. We report here that the newly identified gene csbB is under the dual control of a sigma B-dependent and a sigma B-independent promoter. The predicted product of csbB is a 329 residue protein containing two potential membrane-spanning segments in its C-terminal region, leading us to speculate that one class of sigma B-controlled genes acts to modify the cell envelope as part of the general stress response.

  13. Regulation of protein quality control by UBE4B and LSD1 through p53-mediated transcription.

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    Goran Periz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein quality control is essential for clearing misfolded and aggregated proteins from the cell, and its failure is associated with many neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we identify two genes, ufd-2 and spr-5, that when inactivated, synergistically and robustly suppress neurotoxicity associated with misfolded proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans. Loss of human orthologs ubiquitination factor E4 B (UBE4B and lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, respectively encoding a ubiquitin ligase and a lysine-specific demethylase, promotes the clearance of misfolded proteins in mammalian cells by activating both proteasomal and autophagic degradation machineries. An unbiased search in this pathway reveals a downstream effector as the transcription factor p53, a shared substrate of UBE4B and LSD1 that functions as a key regulator of protein quality control to protect against proteotoxicity. These studies identify a new protein quality control pathway via regulation of transcription factors and point to the augmentation of protein quality control as a wide-spectrum antiproteotoxicity strategy.

  14. Quercetin reduces cyclin D1 activity and induces G1 phase arrest in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Li, L U; Fang, L I; Xie, Hua; Yao, Wenxiu; Zhou, Xiang; Xiong, Zhujuan; Wang, L I; Li, Zhixi; Luo, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Quercetin is able to inhibit proliferation of malignant tumor cells; however, the exact mechanism involved in this biological process remains unclear. The current study utilized a quantitative proteomic analysis to explore the antitumor mechanisms of quercetin. The leucine of HepG2 cells treated with quercetin was labeled as d3 by stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). The isotope peaks of control HepG2 cells were compared with the d3-labeled HepG2 cells by mass spectrometry (MS) to identify significantly altered proteins. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were subsequently employed to verify the results of the MS analysis. A flow cytometry assay was designed to observe the influence of various quercetin treatment concentrations on the cell cycle distribution of HepG2 cells. The results indicated that quercetin is able to substantially inhibit proliferation of HepG2 cells and induce an obvious morphological alteration of cells. According to the MS results, the 70 credibly-changed proteins that were identified may play important roles in multiple cellular processes, including protein synthesis, signaling, cytoskeletal processes and metabolism. Among these functional proteins, the expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1) was found to be significantly decreased. RT-PCR and western blot analyses verified the SILAC-MS results of decreased CCND1 expression. In summary, flow cytometry revealed that quercetin is able to induce G1 phase arrest in HepG2 cells. Based on the aforementioned observations, it is suggested that quercetin exerts antitumor activity in HepG2 cells through multiple pathways, including interfering with CCND1 gene expression to disrupt the cell cycle and proliferation of HepG2 cells. In the future, we aim to explore this effect in vivo.

  15. The Ets-1 transcription factor controls the development and function of natural regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouly, Enguerran; Chemin, Karine; Nguyen, Hai Vu; Chopin, Martine; Mesnard, Laurent; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Burlen-defranoux, Odile; Bandeira, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (T reg cells) constitute a population of CD4+ T cells that limits immune responses. The transcription factor Foxp3 is important for determining the development and function of T reg cells; however, the molecular mechanisms that trigger and maintain its expression remain incompletely understood. In this study, we show that mice deficient for the Ets-1 transcription factor (Ets-1−/−) developed T cell–mediated splenomegaly and systemic autoimmunity that can be blocked by functional wild-type T reg cells. Spleens of Ets-1−/− mice contained mostly activated T cells, including Th2-polarized CD4+ cells and had reduced percentages of T reg cells. Splenic and thymic Ets-1−/− T reg cells expressed low levels of Foxp3 and displayed the CD103 marker that characterizes antigen-experienced T reg cells. Thymic development of Ets-1−/− T reg cells appeared intrinsically altered as Foxp3-expressing cells differentiate poorly in mixed fetal liver reconstituted chimera and fetal thymic organ culture. Ets-1−/− T reg cells showed decreased in vitro suppression activity and did not protect Rag2−/− hosts from naive T cell–induced inflammatory bowel disease. Furthermore, in T reg cells, Ets-1 interacted with the Foxp3 intronic enhancer and was required for demethylation of this regulatory sequence. These data demonstrate that Ets-1 is required for the development of natural T reg cells and suggest a role for this transcription factor in the regulation of Foxp3 expression. PMID:20855499

  16. Temperature Exerts Control of Bacillus cereus Emetic Toxin Production on Post-transcriptional Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzler, Markus; Stollewerk, Katharina; Rouzeau-Szynalski, Katia; Blayo, Laurence; Sulyok, Michael; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the emetic toxin cereulide, produced by Bacillus cereus, has gained high relevance in food production and food safety. Cereulide is synthesized non-ribosomal by the multi-enzyme complex Ces-NRPS, which is encoded on a megaplasmid that shares its backbone with the Bacillus anthracis pX01 toxin plasmid. Due to its resistance against heat, proteolysis and extreme pH conditions, the formation of this highly potent depsipeptide toxin is of serious concern in food processing procedures including slow cooling procedures and/or storage of intermediate products at ambient temperatures. So far, systematic data on the effect of extrinsic factors on cereulide synthesis has been lacking. Thus, we investigated the influence of temperature, a central extrinsic parameter in food processing, on the regulation of cereulide synthesis on transcriptional, translational and post-translational levels over the growth temperature range of emetic B. cereus. Bacteria were grown in 3°C interval steps from 12 to 46°C and cereulide synthesis was followed from ces gene transcription to cereulide toxin production. This systematic study revealed that temperature is a cardinal parameter, which primarily impacts cereulide synthesis on post-transcriptional levels, thereby altering the composition of cereulide isoforms. Our work also highlights that the risk of cereulide production could not be predicted from growth parameters or sole cell numbers. Furthermore, for the first time we could show that the formation of the recently identified cereulide isoforms is highly temperature dependent, which may have great importance in terms of food safety and predictive microbiology. Notably the production of isocereulide A, which is about 10-fold more cytotoxic than cereulide, was specifically supported at low temperatures.

  17. Positive Control Mutations in the MyoD Basic Region Fail to Show Cooperative DNA Binding and Transcriptional Activation in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengal, Eyal; Flores, Osvaldo; Rangarajan, Pundi N.; Chen, Amy; Weintraub, Harold; Verma, Inder M.

    1994-06-01

    An in vitro transcription system from HeLa cells has been established in which MyoD and E47 proteins activate transcription both as homodimers and heterodimers. However, heterodimers activate transcription more efficiently than homodimers, and function synergistically from multiple binding sites. Positive control mutants in the basic region of MyoD that have previously been shown to be defective in initiating the myogenic program, can bind DNA but have lost their ability to function as transcriptional activators in vitro. Additionally, positive control mutants, unlike wild-type MyoD, fail to bind cooperatively to DNA. We propose that binding of MyoD complexes to high affinity MyoD binding sites induces conformational changes that facilitate cooperative binding to multiple sites and promote transcriptional activation.

  18. Post-Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression in Mouse Early Embryo Development: A View from the Tip of the Iceberg

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    Claudio Sette

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization is a very complex biological process that requires the perfect cooperation between two highly specialized cells: the male and female gametes. The oocyte provides the physical space where this process takes place, most of the energetic need, and half of the genetic contribution. The spermatozoon mostly contributes the other half of the chromosomes and it is specialized to reach and to penetrate the oocyte. Notably, the mouse oocyte and early embryo are transcriptionally inactive. Hence, they fully depend on the maternal mRNAs and proteins stored during oocyte maturation to drive the onset of development. The new embryo develops autonomously around the four-cell stage, when maternal supplies are exhausted and the zygotic genome is activated in mice. This oocyte-to-embryo transition needs an efficient and tightly regulated translation of the maternally-inherited mRNAs, which likely contributes to embryonic genome activation. Full understanding of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in early embryos is crucial to understand the reprogramming of the embryonic genome, it might help driving reprogramming of stem cells in vitro and will likely improve in vitro culturing of mammalian embryos for assisted reproduction. Nevertheless, the knowledge of the mechanism(s underlying this fundamental step in embryogenesis is still scarce, especially if compared to other model organisms. We will review here the current knowledge on the post-transcriptional control of gene expression in mouse early embryos and discuss some of the unanswered questions concerning this fascinating field of biology.

  19. Myocardin-related transcription factor-A controls myofibroblast activation and fibrosis in response to myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Eric M.; Thatcher, Jeffrey E.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Gerard, Robert D.; Richardson, James A.; DiMaio, J. Michael; Sadek, Hesham; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Olson, Eric N.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Myocardial infarction (MI) results in loss of cardiac myocytes in the ischemic zone of the heart followed by fibrosis and scar formation, which diminish cardiac contractility and impede angiogenesis and repair. Myofibroblasts, a specialized cell type that switches from a fibroblast-like state to a contractile, smooth muscle-like state, are believed to be primarily responsible for fibrosis of the injured heart and other tissues, although the transcriptional mediators of fibrosis and myofibroblast activation remain poorly defined. Myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs) are SRF co-factors that promote a smooth muscle phenotype and are emerging as components of stress-responsive signaling. Objective We aimed to examine the effect of MRTF-A on cardiac remodeling and fibrosis. Methods and Results Here we show that MRTF-A controls the expression of a fibrotic gene program that includes genes involved in extracellular matrix production and smooth muscle cell differentiation in the heart. In MRTF-A null mice, fibrosis and scar formation following MI or Angiotensin (Ang) II treatment are dramatically diminished compared with wild-type littermates. This protective effect of MRTF-A deletion is associated with a reduction in expression of fibrosis-associated genes, including collagen 1a2, a direct transcriptional target of SRF/MRTF-A. Conclusions We conclude that MRTF-A regulates myofibroblast activation and fibrosis in response to the renin-angiotensin system and post-MI remodeling. PMID:20558820

  20. Deregulation of sucrose-controlled translation of a bZIP-type transcription factor results in sucrose accumulation in leaves.

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    Sunil Kumar Thalor

    Full Text Available Sucrose is known to repress the translation of Arabidopsis thaliana AtbZIP11 transcript which encodes a protein belonging to the group of S (S--stands for small basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP-type transcription factor. This repression is called sucrose-induced repression of translation (SIRT. It is mediated through the sucrose-controlled upstream open reading frame (SC-uORF found in the AtbZIP11 transcript. The SIRT is reported for 4 other genes belonging to the group of S bZIP in Arabidopsis. Tobacco tbz17 is phylogenetically closely related to AtbZIP11 and carries a putative SC-uORF in its 5'-leader region. Here we demonstrate that tbz17 exhibits SIRT mediated by its SC-uORF in a manner similar to genes belonging to the S bZIP group of the Arabidopsis genus. Furthermore, constitutive transgenic expression of tbz17 lacking its 5'-leader region containing the SC-uORF leads to production of tobacco plants with thicker leaves composed of enlarged cells with 3-4 times higher sucrose content compared to wild type plants. Our finding provides a novel strategy to generate plants with high sucrose content.

  1. Antisense RNA controls LRP1 Sense transcript expression through interaction with a chromatin-associated protein, HMGB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yasunari; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Magistri, Marco; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Lotz, Martin; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2015-05-12

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), including natural antisense transcripts (NATs), are expressed more extensively than previously anticipated and have widespread roles in regulating gene expression. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of action of the majority of NATs remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a NAT of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1), referred to as Lrp1-AS, that negatively regulates Lrp1 expression. We show that Lrp1-AS directly binds to high-mobility group box 2 (Hmgb2) and inhibits the activity of Hmgb2 to enhance Srebp1a-dependent transcription of Lrp1. Short oligonucleotides targeting Lrp1-AS inhibit the interaction of antisense transcript and Hmgb2 protein and increase Lrp1 expression by enhancing Hmgb2 activity. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of brain tissue samples from Alzheimer's disease patients and aged-matched controls revealed upregulation of LRP1-AS and downregulation of LRP1. Our data suggest a regulatory mechanism whereby a NAT interacts with a ubiquitous chromatin-associated protein to modulate its activity in a locus-specific fashion.

  2. Antisense RNA Controls LRP1 Sense Transcript Expression through Interaction with a Chromatin-Associated Protein, HMGB2

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    Yasunari Yamanaka

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, including natural antisense transcripts (NATs, are expressed more extensively than previously anticipated and have widespread roles in regulating gene expression. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of action of the majority of NATs remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a NAT of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1, referred to as Lrp1-AS, that negatively regulates Lrp1 expression. We show that Lrp1-AS directly binds to high-mobility group box 2 (Hmgb2 and inhibits the activity of Hmgb2 to enhance Srebp1a-dependent transcription of Lrp1. Short oligonucleotides targeting Lrp1-AS inhibit the interaction of antisense transcript and Hmgb2 protein and increase Lrp1 expression by enhancing Hmgb2 activity. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of brain tissue samples from Alzheimer’s disease patients and aged-matched controls revealed upregulation of LRP1-AS and downregulation of LRP1. Our data suggest a regulatory mechanism whereby a NAT interacts with a ubiquitous chromatin-associated protein to modulate its activity in a locus-specific fashion.

  3. The DNA damage- and transcription-associated protein Paxip1 controls thymocyte development and emigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, E.; Faryabi, R.B.; Daniel, Jeremy Austin

    2012-01-01

    Histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is associated with promoters of active genes and found at hot spots for DNA recombination. Here we have shown that PAXIP1 (also known as PTIP), a protein associated with MLL3 and MLL4 methyltransferase and the DNA damage response, regulates RAG......-mediated cleavage and repair during V(D)J recombination in CD4 CD8 DP thymocytes. Loss of PAXIP1 in developing thymocytes diminished Jα H3K4me3 and germline transcription, suppressed double strand break formation at 3' Jα segments, but resulted in accumulation of unresolved T cell receptor α-chain gene (Tcra...

  4. Increasing the dynamic control space of mammalian transcription devices by combinatorial assembly of homologous regulatory elements from different bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchus, William; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory elements are widely utilized building blocks for constructing regulatory genetic circuits adapted for mammalian cells and have found their way into a broad range of biotechnological applications. Prokaryotic transcriptional repressors, fused to eukaryotic transactivation or repression domains, compose the transcription factor, which binds and adjusts transcription from chimeric promoters containing the repressor-specific operator sequence. Escherichia coli and Chlamydia trachomatis share common features in the regulatory mechanism of the biosynthesis of l-tryptophan. The repressor protein TrpR of C. trachomatis regulates the trpRBA operon and the TrpR of E. coli regulates the trpEDCBA operon, both requiring l-tryptophan as a co-repressor. Fusion of these bacterial repressors to the VP16 transactivation domain of Herpes simplex virus creates synthetic transactivators that could bind and activate chimeric promoters, assembled by placing repressor-specific operator modules adjacent to a minimal promoter, in an l-tryptophan-adjustable manner. Combinations of different transactivator and promoter variants from the same or different bacterial species resulted in a multitude of regulatory systems where l-tryptophan regulation properties, background noise, and maximal gene expression levels were significantly diverse. Different l-tryptophan analogues showed diverse regulatory capacity depending on the promoter/transactivator combination. We believe the systems approach to rationally choose promoters, transactivators and inducer molecules, to obtain desired and predefined genetic expression dynamics and control profiles, will significantly advance the design of new regulatory circuits as well as improving already existing ones. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cooperation of p300 and PCAF in the control of microRNA 200c/141 transcription and epithelial characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Mizuguchi

    Full Text Available Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT not only occurs during embryonic development and in response to injury, but is an important element in cancer progression. EMT and its reverse process, mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET is controlled by a network of transcriptional regulators and can be influenced by posttranscriptional and posttranslational modifications. EMT/MET involves many effectors that can activate and repress these transitions, often yielding a spectrum of cell phenotypes. Recent studies have shown that the miR-200 family and the transcriptional suppressor ZEB1 are important contributors to EMT. Our previous data showed that forced expression of SPRR2a was a powerful inducer of EMT and supports the findings by others that SPRR gene members are highly upregulated during epithelial remodeling in a variety of organs. Here, using SPRR2a cells, we characterize the role of acetyltransferases on the microRNA-200c/141 promoter and their effect on the epithelial/mesenchymal status of the cells. We show that the deacetylase inhibitor TSA as well as P300 and PCAF can cause a shift towards epithelial characteristics in HUCCT-1-SPRR2a cells. We demonstrate that both P300 and PCAF act as cofactors for ZEB1, forming a P300/PCAF/ZEB1 complex on the miR200c/141 promoter. This binding results in lysine acetylation of ZEB1 and a release of ZEB1 suppression on miR-200c/141 transcription. Furthermore, disruption of P300 and PCAF interactions dramatically down regulates miR-200c/141 promoter activity, indicating a PCAF/P300 cooperative function in regulating the transcriptional suppressor/activator role of ZEB1. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism of miRNA regulation in mediating cell phenotype.

  6. Transcript levels of major interleukins in relation to the clinicopathological profile of patients with tuberculous intervertebral discs and healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Liu

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to simultaneously examine the transcript levels of a large number of interleukins (ILs; IL-9, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-16, IL-17, IL-18, IL-26, and IL-27 and investigate their correlation with the clinicopathological profiles of patients with tuberculous intervertebral discs.Clinical data were collected from 150 patients participating in the study from January 2013 to December 2013. mRNA expression levels in 70 tuberculous, 70 herniated, and 10 control intervertebral disc specimens were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction.IL-10, IL-16, IL-17, IL-18, and IL-27 displayed stronger expression in tuberculous spinal disc tissue than in normal intervertebral disc tissue (P<0.05. Our results illustrated multiple correlations among IL-10, IL-16, IL-17, IL-18, and IL-27 mRNA expression in tuberculous samples. Smoking habits were found to have a positive correlation with IL-17 transcript levels and a negative correlation with IL-10 transcript levels (P<0.05. Pain intensity, symptom duration, C-reactive protein levels, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate exhibited multiple correlations with the transcript levels of several ILs (P<0.05.The experimental data imply a double-sided effect on the activity of ILs in tuberculous spinal intervertebral discs, suggesting that they may be involved in intervertebral discs destruction. Our findings also suggest that smoking may affect the intervertebral discs destruction process of spinal tuberculosis. However, further studies are necessary to elucidate the exact role of ILs in the intervertebral discs destruction process of spinal tuberculosis.

  7. Two enhancers control transcription of Drosophila muscleblind in the embryonic somatic musculature and in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargiela, Ariadna; Llamusi, Beatriz; Cerro-Herreros, Estefanía; Artero, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    The phylogenetically conserved family of Muscleblind proteins are RNA-binding factors involved in a variety of gene expression processes including alternative splicing regulation, RNA stability and subcellular localization, and miRNA biogenesis, which typically contribute to cell-type specific differentiation. In humans, sequestration of Muscleblind-like proteins MBNL1 and MBNL2 has been implicated in degenerative disorders, particularly expansion diseases such as myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 2. Drosophila muscleblind was previously shown to be expressed in embryonic somatic and visceral muscle subtypes, and in the central nervous system, and to depend on Mef2 for transcriptional activation. Genomic approaches have pointed out candidate gene promoters and tissue-specific enhancers, but experimental confirmation of their regulatory roles was lacking. In our study, luciferase reporter assays in S2 cells confirmed that regions P1 (515 bp) and P2 (573 bp), involving the beginning of exon 1 and exon 2, respectively, were able to initiate RNA transcription. Similarly, transgenic Drosophila embryos carrying enhancer reporter constructs supported the existence of two regulatory regions which control embryonic expression of muscleblind in the central nerve cord (NE, neural enhancer; 830 bp) and somatic (skeletal) musculature (ME, muscle enhancer; 3.3 kb). Both NE and ME were able to boost expression from the Hsp70 heterologous promoter. In S2 cell assays most of the ME enhancer activation could be further narrowed down to a 1200 bp subregion (ME.3), which contains predicted binding sites for the Mef2 transcription factor. The present study constitutes the first characterization of muscleblind enhancers and will contribute to a deeper understanding of the transcriptional regulation of the gene.

  8. Two enhancers control transcription of Drosophila muscleblind in the embryonic somatic musculature and in the central nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Bargiela

    Full Text Available The phylogenetically conserved family of Muscleblind proteins are RNA-binding factors involved in a variety of gene expression processes including alternative splicing regulation, RNA stability and subcellular localization, and miRNA biogenesis, which typically contribute to cell-type specific differentiation. In humans, sequestration of Muscleblind-like proteins MBNL1 and MBNL2 has been implicated in degenerative disorders, particularly expansion diseases such as myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 2. Drosophila muscleblind was previously shown to be expressed in embryonic somatic and visceral muscle subtypes, and in the central nervous system, and to depend on Mef2 for transcriptional activation. Genomic approaches have pointed out candidate gene promoters and tissue-specific enhancers, but experimental confirmation of their regulatory roles was lacking. In our study, luciferase reporter assays in S2 cells confirmed that regions P1 (515 bp and P2 (573 bp, involving the beginning of exon 1 and exon 2, respectively, were able to initiate RNA transcription. Similarly, transgenic Drosophila embryos carrying enhancer reporter constructs supported the existence of two regulatory regions which control embryonic expression of muscleblind in the central nerve cord (NE, neural enhancer; 830 bp and somatic (skeletal musculature (ME, muscle enhancer; 3.3 kb. Both NE and ME were able to boost expression from the Hsp70 heterologous promoter. In S2 cell assays most of the ME enhancer activation could be further narrowed down to a 1200 bp subregion (ME.3, which contains predicted binding sites for the Mef2 transcription factor. The present study constitutes the first characterization of muscleblind enhancers and will contribute to a deeper understanding of the transcriptional regulation of the gene.

  9. Tiam1/Rac1 complex controls Il17a transcription and autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdi, Ahmed T.; Bassil, Ribal; Olah, Marta; Wu, Chuan; Xiao, Sheng; Taga, Mariko; Frangieh, Michael; Buttrick, Thomas; Orent, William; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M.; Khoury, Samia J.; Elyaman, Wassim

    2016-01-01

    RORγt is a master transcription factor of Th17 cells and considered as a promising drug target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Here, we show the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Tiam1, and its cognate Rho-family G protein, Rac1, regulate interleukin (IL)17A transcription and autoimmunity. Whereas Tiam1 genetic deficiency weakens IL-17A expression partially and inhibits the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), deletion of Rac1 in T cells exhibits more robust effects on Th17 cells and EAE. We demonstrate Tiam1 and Rac1 form a complex with RORγt in the nuclear compartment of Th17 cells, and together bind and activate the Il17 promoter. The clinical relevance of these findings is emphasized by pharmacological targeting of Rac1 that suppresses both murine and human Th17 cells as well as EAE. Thus, our findings highlight a regulatory pathway of Tiam1/Rac1 in Th17 cells and suggest that it may be a therapeutic target in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27725632

  10. RNA exosome-regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N; Bradner, James E; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-05-01

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function.

  11. Identification of the transcriptional activator controlling the butanediol fermentation pathway in Klebsiella terrigena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, D; Schlensog, V; Böck, A

    1995-09-01

    The gene budR, whose product is responsible for induction of the butanediol formation pathway under fermentative growth conditions in Klebsiella terrigena, has been cloned and sequenced. This gene is separated from the budABC operon by a nontranslated region of 106 bp and transcribed in the opposite direction. budR codes for a protein of molecular weight 32,124, the sequence of which exhibits characteristics of regulators belonging to the LysR family. When transferred into the heterologous host Escherichia coli, budR activates expression of budA'-lacZ transcriptional and translational fusions with a regulatory pattern identical to that in K. terrigena, namely, induction by acetate, low pH, and anaerobiosis. Induction by acetate was specific, indicating that it is the physiological inducer. Primer extension analysis located the start site of transcription to two positions, 23 and 24 bp upstream of the budR initiation codon, and also showed that BudR strongly autoregulates its own expression. The products of fhlA, arcA, hip, ntrA, and katF did not influence expression of the bud operon. A mutation in fnr, however, led to a threefold increase in expression, indicating that Fnr acts as a repressor. The results support the notion that BudR coordinates the activity of the energy-conserving, nonreductive, but acidifying acetate formation pathway with the expression of the non-energy-conserving, reductive, but nonacidifying butanediol pathway.

  12. Transcriptional control of Shh/Ptc1 signaling in embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-Lung; Chang, Shin-Ju E; Ying, Shao-Yao

    2006-02-15

    In vivo profiling of signal-directed gene expression patterns is a major bottleneck in studying developmental biology. A signal molecule initiates its specific gene expression pattern through the activation of certain transcription factor (TF); however, tissue heterogeneity often masks this pattern due to intercellular complexity of other signal transduction pathways. To decipher the synergistic regulation of signal-directed gene expression in the tissue level, we report here a unique transcriptional responsive element (TRE) existing in the 5'-upstream promoter regions (5'-UPR) of the genes responding to the Shh/Ptc1 signal transduction pathway during feather placode development in chicken embryos. By locating the TRE homologue and its interactive TF, we were able to reveal the gene expression pattern of the Shh/Ptc1 signaling. We firstly demonstrated that homology profiling of the 5'-UPR of the genes, Gli1, TGF-beta2 and Msx2, responding to the Shh/Ptc1 signaling showed a more than 70% conserved region. Computer alignment of the consensus sequences in the conserved region revealed a 37-nucleotide TRE sequence, containing two regulatory elements homologous to human and mouse Gli-binding sites. Activation of this newly identified Shh/Ptc1-responsive TRE by active Smo signaling in chicken hepatoepithelial carcinoma cells elicited a strong synergistic expression of the Shh/Ptc1-downstream genes. Based on previous bioinformatics and the present experimental findings, we successfully established an in vivo signaling model for the Shh/Ptc1-directed embryonic feather morphogenesis.

  13. Structure of the transcriptional network controlling white-opaque switching in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernday, Aaron D; Lohse, Matthew B; Fordyce, Polly M; Nobile, Clarissa J; DeRisi, Joseph L; Johnson, Alexander D

    2013-10-01

    The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can switch between two phenotypic cell types, termed 'white' and 'opaque'. Both cell types are heritable for many generations, and the switch between the two types occurs epigenetically, that is, without a change in the primary DNA sequence of the genome. Previous work identified six key transcriptional regulators important for white-opaque switching: Wor1, Wor2, Wor3, Czf1, Efg1, and Ahr1. In this work, we describe the structure of the transcriptional network that specifies the white and opaque cell types and governs the ability to switch between them. In particular, we use a combination of genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, gene expression profiling, and microfluidics-based DNA binding experiments to determine the direct and indirect regulatory interactions that form the switch network. The six regulators are arranged together in a complex, interlocking network with many seemingly redundant and overlapping connections. We propose that the structure (or topology) of this network is responsible for the epigenetic maintenance of the white and opaque states, the switching between them, and the specialized properties of each state.

  14. Transcriptional control of ADH genes in the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J.Y.; Jeffries, T.W. [Forest Service, Madison, WI (United States). Forest Products Lab.]|[Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Bacteriology

    1999-06-01

    The authors studied the expression of the genes encoding group 1 alcohol dehydrogenases (PsADH1 and PsADH2) in the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis CBS 6054. The cells expressed PsADH1 approximately 10 times higher under oxygen-limited conditions than under fully aerobic conditions when cultivated on xylose. Transcripts of PsADH2 were not detectable under either aeration condition. The authors used a PsADH1::lacZ fusion to monitor PsADH1 expression and found that expression increased as oxygen decreased. The level of PsADH1 transcript was expressed about 10-fold in cells grown in the presence of heme under oxygen-limited conditions. Concomitantly with the induction of PsADH1, PsCYC1 expression was regressed. These results indicate that oxygen availability regulates PsADH1 expression and that regulation may be mediated by heme. The regulation of PsADH2 expression was also examined in other genetic backgrounds. Disruption of PsADH1 dramatically increased PsADH2 expression on nonfermentable carbon sources under fully aerobic conditions, indicating that the expression of PsADH2 is subject to feedback regulation under these conditions.

  15. Transcriptional Control of ADH Genes in the Xylose-Fermenting Yeast Pichia stipitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae-Yong; Jeffries, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    We studied the expression of the genes encoding group I alcohol dehydrogenases (PsADH1 and PsADH2) in the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis CBS 6054. The cells expressed PsADH1 approximately 10 times higher under oxygen-limited conditions than under fully aerobic conditions when cultivated on xylose. Transcripts of PsADH2 were not detectable under either aeration condition. We used a PsADH1::lacZ fusion to monitor PsADH1 expression and found that expression increased as oxygen decreased. The level of PsADH1 transcript was repressed about 10-fold in cells grown in the presence of heme under oxygen-limited conditions. Concomitantly with the induction of PsADH1, PsCYC1 expression was repressed. These results indicate that oxygen availability regulates PsADH1 expression and that regulation may be mediated by heme. The regulation of PsADH2 expression was also examined in other genetic backgrounds. Disruption of PsADH1 dramatically increased PsADH2 expression on nonfermentable carbon sources under fully aerobic conditions, indicating that the expression of PsADH2 is subject to feedback regulation under these conditions. PMID:10347014

  16. Structural hierarchy controlling dimerization and target DNA recognition in the AHR transcriptional complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Lee, Woojong; Jiang, Li; Molugu, Kaivalya; Zheng, Aiping; Li, Yitong; Park, Sanghyun; Bradfield, Christopher A.; Xing, Yongna (UW)

    2017-04-10

    he aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) belongs to the PAS (PER-ARNT-SIM) family transcription factors and mediates broad responses to numerous environmental pollutants and cellular metabolites, modulating diverse biological processes from adaptive metabolism, acute toxicity, to normal physiology of vascular and immune systems. The AHR forms a transcriptionally active heterodimer with ARNT (AHR nuclear translocator), which recognizes the dioxin response element (DRE) in the promoter of downstream genes. We determined the crystal structure of the mammalian AHR–ARNT heterodimer in complex with the DRE, in which ARNT curls around AHR into a highly intertwined asymmetric architecture, with extensive heterodimerization interfaces and AHR interdomain interactions. Specific recognition of the DRE is determined locally by the DNA-binding residues, which discriminates it from the closely related hypoxia response element (HRE), and is globally affected by the dimerization interfaces and interdomain interactions. Changes at the interdomain interactions caused either AHR constitutive nuclear localization or failure to translocate to nucleus, underlying an allosteric structural pathway for mediating ligand-induced exposure of nuclear localization signal. These observations, together with the global higher flexibility of the AHR PAS-A and its loosely packed structural elements, suggest a dynamic structural hierarchy for complex scenarios of AHR activation induced by its diverse ligands.

  17. Epigenetic control of Epstein Barr Virus transcription – relevance to viral life cycle?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison J. Sinclair

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA-methylation normally leads to silencing of gene expression but Epstein-Barr virus (EBV provides an exception to the epigenetic paradigm. DNA-methylation is absolutely required for the expression of many viral genes. Although the viral genome is initially unmethylated in newly infected cells, it becomes extensively methylated during the establishment of viral latency. One of the major regulators of EBV gene expression is a viral transcription factor called Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, Z that resembles the cellular AP1 transcription factor. Zta recognizes at least 32 variants of a 7-nucleotide DNA sequence element, the Zta-response element (ZRE, some of which contain a CpG motif. Zta only binds to the latter class of ZREs in their DNA-methylated form, whether they occur in viral or cellular promoters and is functionally relevant for the activity of these promoters. The ability of Zta to interpret the differential DNA-methylation of the viral genome is paramount for both the establishment of viral latency and the release from latency to intiate viral replication.

  18. Rethinking the clockwork: redox cycles and non-transcriptional control of circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lisa; Reddy, Akhilesh B

    2014-02-01

    Circadian rhythms are a hallmark of living organisms, observable in all walks of life from primitive bacteria to highly complex humans. They are believed to have evolved to co-ordinate the timing of biological and behavioural processes to the changing environmental needs brought on by the progression of day and night through the 24-h cycle. Most of the modern study of circadian rhythms has centred on so-called TTFLs (transcription-translation feedback loops), wherein a core group of 'clock' genes, capable of negatively regulating themselves, produce oscillations with a period of approximately 24 h. Recently, however, the prevalence of the TTFL paradigm has been challenged by a series of findings wherein circadian rhythms, in the form of redox reactions, persist in the absence of transcriptional cycles. We have found that circadian cycles of oxidation and reduction are conserved across all domains of life, strongly suggesting that non-TTFL mechanisms work in parallel with the canonical genetic processes of timekeeping to generate the cyclical cellular and behavioural phenotypes that we commonly recognize as circadian rhythms.

  19. Characterization of molecular mechanisms controlling fabAB transcription in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert P Schweizer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The FabAB pathway is one of the unsaturated fatty acid (UFA synthesis pathways for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It was previously noted that this operon was upregulated in biofilms and repressed by exogenous UFAs. Deletion of a 30 nt fabA upstream sequence, which is conserved in P. aeruginosa, P. putida, and P. syringae, led to a significant decrease in fabA transcription, suggesting positive regulation by an unknown positive regulatory mechanism. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, genetic and biochemical approaches were employed to identify a potential fabAB activator. Deletion of candidate genes such as PA1611 or PA1627 was performed to determine if any of these gene products act as a fabAB activator. However, none of these genes were involved in the regulation of fabAB transcription. Use of mariner-based random mutagenesis to screen for fabA activator(s showed that several genes encoding unknown functions, rpoN and DesA may be involved in fabA regulation, but probably via indirect mechanisms. Biochemical attempts performed did fail to isolate an activator of fabAB operon. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The data suggest that fabA expression might not be regulated by protein-binding, but by a distinct mechanism such as a regulatory RNA-based mechanism.

  20. The G1 restriction point as critical regulator of neocortical neuronogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviness, V. S. Jr; Takahashi, T.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    1999-01-01

    Neuronogenesis in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium is the initial process in a succession of histogenetic events which give rise to the laminate neocortex. Here we review experimental findings in mouse which support the thesis that the restriction point of the G1 phase of the cell cycle is the critical point of regulation of the overall neuronogenetic process. The neuronogenetic interval in mouse spans 6 days. In the course of these 6 days the founder population and its progeny execute 11 cell cycles. With each successive cycle there is an increase in the fraction of postmitotic cells which leaves the cycle (the Q fraction) and also an increase in the length of the cell cycle due to an increase in the length of the G1 phase of the cycle. Q corresponds to the probability that postmitotic cells will exit the cycle at the restriction point of the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Q increases non-linearly, but the rate of change of Q with cycle (i.e., the first derivative) over the course of the neuronogenetic interval is a constant, k, which appears to be set principally by cell internal mechanisms which are species specific. Q also seems to be modulated, but at low amplitude, by a balance of mitogenic and antimitogenic influences acting from without the cell. We suggest that intracellular signal transduction systems control a general advance of Q during development and thereby determine the general developmental plan (i.e., cell number and laminar composition) of the neocortex and that external mitogens and anti-mitogens modulate this advance regionally and temporally and thereby produce regional modifications of the general plan.

  1. Running coupling effects for the singlet structure function g_1 at small x

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2004-01-01

    The running of the QCD coupling is incorporated into the infrared evolution equations for the flavour singlet component, g_1^S of g_1. The explicit expressions for g_1^S including the total resummation of the double-logarithmic contributions and accounting for the running coupling are obtained. We predict that asymptotically g_1^S ~ x^{- \\Delta_S}, with the intercept \\Delta_S = 0.8, which is a factor of 2 larger than the non-singlet intercept.

  2. Purinergic P2Y2 Receptor Control of Tissue Factor Transcription in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells: NEW AP-1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR SITE AND NEGATIVE REGULATOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwei; Zhang, Lingxin; Wang, Chuan; Roy, Shama; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that the P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) is the predominant nucleotide receptor expressed in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) and that P2Y2R activation by ATP or UTP induces dramatic up-regulation of tissue factor (TF), a key initiator of the coagulation cascade. However, the molecular mechanism of this P2Y2R-TF axis remains unclear. Here, we report the role of a newly identified AP-1 consensus sequence in the TF gene promoter and its original binding components in P2Y2R regulation of TF transcription. Using bioinformatics tools, we found that a novel AP-1 site at -1363 bp of the human TF promoter region is highly conserved across multiple species. Activation of P2Y2R increased TF promoter activity and mRNA expression in HCAEC. Truncation, deletion, and mutation of this distal AP-1 site all significantly suppressed TF promoter activity in response to P2Y2R activation. EMSA and ChIP assays further confirmed that upon P2Y2R activation, c-Jun, ATF-2, and Fra-1, but not the typical c-Fos, bound to the new AP-1 site. In addition, loss-of-function studies using siRNAs confirmed a positive transactivation role of c-Jun and ATF-2 but unexpectedly revealed a strong negative role of Fra-1 in P2Y2R-induced TF up-regulation. Furthermore, we found that P2Y2R activation promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation through Src, leading to Fra-1 activation, whereas Rho/JNK mediated P2Y2R-induced activation of c-Jun and ATF-2. These findings reveal the molecular basis for P2Y G protein-coupled receptor control of endothelial TF expression and indicate that targeting the P2Y2R-Fra-1-TF pathway may be an attractive new strategy for controlling vascular inflammation and thrombogenicity associated with endothelial dysfunction.

  3. RWP-RK domain-containing transcription factors control cell differentiation during female gametophyte development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Francesca; Rizzo, Paride; Rutten, Twan; Altschmied, Lothar; Bäumlein, Helmut

    2017-03-01

    The formation of gametes is a prerequisite for any sexually reproducing organism in order to complete its life cycle. In plants, female gametes are formed in a multicellular tissue, the female gametophyte or embryo sac. Although the events leading to the formation of the female gametophyte have been morphologically characterized, the molecular control of embryo sac development remains elusive. We used single and double mutants as well as cell-specific marker lines to characterize a novel class of gene regulators in Arabidopsis thaliana, the RWP-RK domain-containing (RKD) transcription factors. Morphological and histological analyses were conducted using confocal laser scanning and differential interference contrast microscopy. Gene expression and transcriptome analyses were performed using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and RNA sequencing, respectively. Our results showed that RKD genes are expressed during distinct stages of embryo sac development. Morphological analysis of the mutants revealed severe distortions in gametophyte polarity and cell differentiation. Transcriptome analysis revealed changes in the expression of several gametophyte-specific gene families (RKD2 and RKD3) and ovule development-specific genes (RKD3), and identified pleiotropic effects on phytohormone pathways (RKD5). Our data provide novel insight into the regulatory control of female gametophyte development. RKDs are involved in the control of cell differentiation and are required for normal gametophytic development. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Recruitment of Cdc28 by Whi3 restricts nuclear accumulation of the G1 cyclin-Cdk complex to late G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyin; Garí, Eloi; Vergés, Emili; Gallego, Carme; Aldea, Martí

    2004-01-14

    The G1 cyclin Cln3 is a key activator of cell-cycle entry in budding yeast. Here we show that Whi3, a negative G1 regulator of Cln3, interacts in vivo with the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28 and regulates its localization in the cell. Efficient interaction with Cdc28 depends on an N-terminal domain of Whi3 that is also required for cytoplasmic localization of Cdc28, and for proper regulation of G1 length and filamentous growth. On the other hand, nuclear accumulation of Cdc28 requires the nuclear localization signal of Cln3, which is also found in Whi3 complexes. Both Cln3 and Cdc28 are mainly cytoplasmic during early G1, and become nuclear in late G1. However, Whi3-deficient cells show a distinct nuclear accumulation of Cln3 and Cdc28 already in early G1. We propose that Whi3 constitutes a cytoplasmic retention device for Cln3-Cdc28 complexes, thus defining a key G1 event in yeast cells.

  5. Histone Arginine Methylation by PRMT7 Controls Germinal Center Formation via Regulating Bcl6 Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Zhengzhou; Mei, Mei; Zhang, Peizhun; Liu, Chunyi; He, Huacheng; Gao, Fei; Bao, Shilai

    2015-08-15

    B cells are the center of humoral immunity and produce Abs to protect against foreign Ags. B cell defects lead to diseases such as leukemia and lymphomas. Histone arginine methylation is important for regulating gene activation and silencing in cells. Although the process commonly exists in mammalian cells, its roles in B cells are unknown. To explore the effects of aberrant histone arginine methylation on B cells, we generated mice with a B cell-specific knockout of PRMT7, a member of the methyltransferases that mediate arginine methylation of histones. In this article, we showed that the loss of PRMT7 led to decreased mature marginal zone B cells and increased follicular B cells and promoted germinal center formation after immunization. Furthermore, mice lacking PRMT7 expression in B cells secreted low levels of IgG1 and IgA. Abnormal expression of germinal center genes (i.e., Bcl6, Prdm1, and Irf4) was detected in conditional knockout mice. By overexpressing PRMT7 in the Raji and A20 cell lines derived from B cell lymphomas, we validated the fact that PRMT7 negatively regulated Bcl6 expression. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR, we found that PRMT7 could recruit H4R3me1 and symmetric H4R3me2 to the Bcl6 promoter. These results provide evidence for the important roles played by PRMT7 in germinal center formation.

  6. A p53-like transcription factor similar to Ndt80 controls the response to nutrient stress in the filamentous fungus, Aspergillus nidulans [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/y2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E Katz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Aspergillus nidulans xprG gene encodes a putative transcriptional activator that is a member of the Ndt80 family in the p53-like superfamily of proteins. Previous studies have shown that XprG controls the production of extracellular proteases in response to starvation. We undertook transcriptional profiling to investigate whether XprG has a wider role as a global regulator of the carbon nutrient stress response. Our microarray data showed that the expression of a large number of genes, including genes involved in secondary metabolism, development, high-affinity glucose uptake and autolysis, were altered in an xprGΔ null mutant. Many of these genes are known to be regulated in response to carbon starvation. We confirmed that sterigmatocystin and penicillin production is reduced in xprG- mutants. The loss of fungal mass and secretion of pigments that accompanies fungal autolysis in response to nutrient depletion was accelerated in an xprG1 gain-of-function mutant and decreased or absent in an xprG- mutant. The results support the hypothesis that XprG plays a major role in the response to carbon limitation and that nutrient sensing may represent one of the ancestral roles for the p53-like superfamily. Disruption of the AN6015 gene, which encodes a second Ndt80-like protein, showed that it is required for sexual reproduction in A. nidulans.

  7. Inducible nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the cell cycle of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: evidence that inducible NER is confined to the G1 phase of the mitotic cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A D; Waters, R

    1997-03-18

    We previously reported on an inducible component of nucleotide excision repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is controlled by the RAD16 gene. Here we describe a study of this event at the MAT alpha and HML alpha mating-type loci and on the transcribed (TS) and nontranscribed (NTS) strands of the RAD16 gene. Events were examined at various stages of the mitotic cycle in cells synchronised by centrifugal elutriation. Repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) following a single UV dose does not vary significantly in different stages of the mitotic cell cycle. CPDs are removed more rapidly from the transcriptionally active MAT alpha locus than from the silent HML alpha locus, and the TS of RAD16 is repaired faster than the NTS in all stages of the cycle following a single UV irradiation. Enhanced excision of CPDs at MAT alpha and HML alpha can be induced only in the G1 and early S stages of the cell cycle. Here prior irradiation of cells with 25 J/m2 enhances the removal of CPDs following a second UV dose of 70 J/m2. The level of enhancement of repair does not differ significantly between MAT alpha and HML alpha in G1. Enhanced removal of CPDs is absent when cells receive the inducing dose in late S or G2/M. Repair of CPDs in both strands of RAD16 is similarly enhanced only if cells receive the initial irradiation in G1 and early S. The level of enhanced removal of CPDs is not significantly different in the TS and NTS of RAD16 either in asynchronous cells or in cells preirradiated in G1 and early S. It has been shown by others that UV-induced expression of RAD16 remains at high levels if cells are held in G1 by treatment with alpha factor. Therefore the increase in RAD16 transcript levels in G1 may be responsible for the ability to enhance NER solely in this stage of the cell cycle.

  8. Staurosporine is chemoprotective by inducing G1 arrest in a Chk1- and pRb-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Mollianne McGahren; Bui, Tuyen; Smith, Michelle; Bagheri-Yarmand, Rozita; Wingate, Hannah; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2013-10-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents have been the mainstay of cancer therapy for years. However, their effectiveness has been limited by toxicities they impart on normal cells. Staurosporine (ST) has been shown to arrest normal, but not breast cancer, cells in G1. Therefore, ST may become a chemoprotective agent, arresting normal cells while allowing tumor cells to enter cell cycle phases where they are sensitive to chemotherapeutic agents. Understanding the mechanism of ST-mediated G1 arrest may allow for a beneficial chemoprotective treatment strategy for patients. We utilized 76NE6 (pRb+/p53-), 76NF2V (pRb+/p53+) and 76NE7 (pRb-/P53+) non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cell lines to understand the role of the Rb and p53 pathways in ST-directed G1 arrest. CDK4 was downregulated by ST in Rb+ cells, but its presence could not reverse the arrest, neither did its stable downregulation alter ST-mediated cellular response. ST-mediated G1 arrest required pRb, which in turn initiated a cascade of events leading to inhibition of CDK4. Further assessment of this pathway revealed that Chk1 expression and activity were required for the Rb-dependent arrest. For example, pRb+ cells with small interfering RNA to Chk1 had approximately 60% less cells in G1 phase compared with controls and pRb- cells do not arrest upon ST. Furthermore, Chk1 expression facilitates the release of the Rb+ cells from G1 arrest. Collectively, our data suggest that pRb cooperates with Chk1 to mediate a G1 arrest only in pRb+ cells. The elucidation of this pathway can help identify novel agents to protect cancer patients against the debilitating effects of chemotherapy.

  9. Ethylene Control of Fruit Ripening: Revisiting the Complex Network of Transcriptional Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingchun; Pirrello, Julien; Chervin, Christian; Roustan, Jean-Paul; Bouzayen, Mondher

    2015-12-01

    The plant hormone ethylene plays a key role in climacteric fruit ripening. Studies on components of ethylene signaling have revealed a linear transduction pathway leading to the activation of ethylene response factors. However, the means by which ethylene selects the ripening-related genes and interacts with other signaling pathways to regulate the ripening process are still to be elucidated. Using tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) as a reference species, the present review aims to revisit the mechanisms by which ethylene regulates fruit ripening by taking advantage of new tools available to perform in silico studies at the genome-wide scale, leading to a global view on the expression pattern of ethylene biosynthesis and response genes throughout ripening. Overall, it provides new insights on the transcriptional network by which this hormone coordinates the ripening process and emphasizes the interplay between ethylene and ripening-associated developmental factors and the link between epigenetic regulation and ethylene during fruit ripening.

  10. A sticky situation: untangling the transcriptional network controlling biofilm development in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Emily P; Nobile, Clarissa J

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal microorganism of the human microbiome; it is also the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans. Many infections caused by C. albicans are a direct consequence of its proclivity to form biofilms--resilient, surface-associated communities of cells where individual cells acquire specialized properties that are distinct from those observed in suspension cultures. We recently identified the transcriptional network that orchestrates the formation of biofilms in C. albicans. These results set the stage for understanding how biofilms are formed and, once formed, how the specialized properties of biofilms are elaborated. This information will provide new insight for understanding biofilms in more detail and may lead to improvements in preventing and treating biofilm-based infections in the future.

  11. Transcriptional control of yeast ribosome biogenesis: A multifaceted role for general regulatory factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosio, Maria Cristina; Fermi, Beatrice; Dieci, Giorgio

    2017-08-08

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a group of more than 200 co-regulated genes (Ribi genes) is involved in ribosome biogenesis. This regulon has recently been shown to rely on a small set of transcriptional regulators (mainly Abf1, but also Reb1, Tbf1 and Rap1) previously referred to as general regulatory factors (GRFs) because of their widespread binding and action at many promoters and other specialized genomic regions. Intriguingly, Abf1 binding to Ribi genes is differentially modulated in response to distinct nutrition signaling pathways. Such a dynamic promoter association has the potential to orchestrate both activation and repression of Ribi genes in synergy with neighboring regulatory sites and through the functional interplay of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases.

  12. WIP modulates dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton by transcriptional control of lipid metabolic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Villanueva, Ana; Fernández-López, Estefanía; Gabandé-Rodríguez, Enrique; Bañón-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Esteban, Jose Antonio; Antón, Inés M; Ledesma, María Dolores

    2014-08-15

    We identify Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP)-interacting protein (WIP) as a novel component of neuronal synapses whose absence increases dendritic spine size and filamentous actin levels in an N-WASP/Arp2/3-independent, RhoA/ROCK/profilinIIa-dependent manner. These effects depend on the reduction of membrane sphingomyelin (SM) due to transcriptional upregulation of neutral sphingomyelinase (NSM) through active RhoA; this enhances RhoA binding to the membrane, raft partitioning and activation in steady state but prevents RhoA changes in response to stimulus. Inhibition of NSM or SM addition reverses RhoA, filamentous actin and functional anomalies in synapses lacking WIP. Our findings characterize WIP as a link between membrane lipid composition and actin cytoskeleton at dendritic spines. They also contribute to explain cognitive deficits shared by individuals bearing mutations in the region assigned to the gene encoding for WIP.

  13. Iron assimilation and transcription factor controlled synthesis of riboflavin in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorwieger, A; Gryczka, C; Czihal, A; Douchkov, D; Tiedemann, J; Mock, H-P; Jakoby, M; Weisshaar, B; Saalbach, I; Bäumlein, H

    2007-06-01

    Iron homeostasis is vital for many cellular processes and requires a precise regulation. Several iron efficient plants respond to iron starvation with the excretion of riboflavin and other flavins. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors (TF) are involved in the regulation of many developmental processes, including iron assimilation. Here we describe the isolation and characterisation of two Arabidopsis bHLH TF genes, which are strongly induced under iron starvation. Their heterologous ectopic expression causes constitutive, iron starvation independent excretion of riboflavin. The results show that both bHLH TFs represent an essential component of the regulatory pathway connecting iron deficiency perception and riboflavin excretion and might act as integrators of various stress reactions.

  14. An LHX1-Regulated Transcriptional Network Controls Sleep/Wake Coupling and Thermal Resistance of the Central Circadian Clockworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedont, Joseph L; LeGates, Tara A; Buhr, Ethan; Bathini, Abhijith; Ling, Jonathan P; Bell, Benjamin; Wu, Mark N; Wong, Philip C; Van Gelder, Russell N; Mongrain, Valerie; Hattar, Samer; Blackshaw, Seth

    2017-01-09

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the central circadian clock in mammals. It is entrained by light but resistant to temperature shifts that entrain peripheral clocks [1-5]. The SCN expresses many functionally important neuropeptides, including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), which drives light entrainment, synchrony, and amplitude of SCN cellular clocks and organizes circadian behavior [5-16]. The transcription factor LHX1 drives SCN Vip expression, and cellular desynchrony in Lhx1-deficient SCN largely results from Vip loss [17, 18]. LHX1 regulates many genes other than Vip, yet activity rhythms in Lhx1-deficient mice are similar to Vip(-/-) mice under light-dark cycles and only somewhat worse in constant conditions. We suspected that LHX1 targets other than Vip have circadian functions overlooked in previous studies. In this study, we compared circadian sleep and temperature rhythms of Lhx1- and Vip-deficient mice and found loss of acute light control of sleep in Lhx1 but not Vip mutants. We also found loss of circadian resistance to fever in Lhx1 but not Vip mice, which was partially recapitulated by heat application to cultured Lhx1-deficient SCN. Having identified VIP-independent functions of LHX1, we mapped the VIP-independent transcriptional network downstream of LHX1 and a largely separable VIP-dependent transcriptional network. The VIP-independent network does not affect core clock amplitude and synchrony, unlike the VIP-dependent network. These studies identify Lhx1 as the first gene required for temperature resistance of the SCN clockworks and demonstrate that acute light control of sleep is routed through the SCN and its immediate output regions.

  15. Collaborative regulation of development but independent control of metabolism by two epidermis-specific transcription factors in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiaofang; He, Kan; Wang, Hao; Ho, Wing Sze; Ren, Xiaoliang; An, Xiaomeng; Wong, Ming Kin; Yan, Bin; Xie, Dongying; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Zhao, Zhongying

    2013-11-15

    Cell fate specification is typically initiated by a master regulator, which is relayed by tissue-specific regulatory proteins (usually transcription factors) for further enforcement of cell identities, but how the factors are coordinated among each other to "finish up" the specification remains poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans epidermis specification is initiated by a master regulator, ELT-1, that activates its targets, NHR-25 and ELT-3, two epidermis-specific transcription factors that are important for development but not for initial specification of epidermis, thus providing a unique paradigm for illustrating how the tissue-specific regulatory proteins work together to enforce cell fate specification. Here we addressed the question through contrasting genome-wide in vivo binding targets between NHR-25 and ELT-3. We demonstrate that the two factors bind discrete but conserved DNA motifs, most of which remain in proximity, suggesting formation of a complex between the two. In agreement with this, gene ontology analysis of putative target genes suggested differential regulation of metabolism but coordinated control of epidermal development between the two factors, which is supported by quantitative analysis of expression of their specific or common targets in the presence or absence of either protein. Functional validation of a subset of the target genes showed both activating and inhibitory roles of NHR-25 and ELT-3 in regulating their targets. We further demonstrated differential control of specification of AB and C lineage-derived epidermis. The results allow us to assemble a comprehensive gene network underlying C. elegans epidermis development that is likely to be widely used across species and provides insights into how tissue-specific transcription factors coordinate with one another to enforce cell fate specification initiated by its master regulator.

  16. The transcription factor NR4A3 controls CD103+ dendritic cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Goo-Young; Andreyev, Aleksander Y.; Marcovecchio, Paola; Blatchley, Amy; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor NR4A3 (also known as NOR-1) is a member of the Nr4a family of nuclear receptors and is expressed in myeloid and lymphoid cells. Here, we have shown that Nr4a3 is essential for the migration of CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs) to lymph nodes (LNs). Nr4a3-deficient mice had very few CD103+ migratory DCs (mDCs) present in LNs, and mixed-chimera studies revealed that this migratory defect was cell intrinsic. We further found that CD103+ DCs from Nr4a3-deficient mice displayed a marked loss of surface expression of the chemokine CCR7. This defect in CCR7 expression was confined to CD103+ DCs, as CCR7 expression on T lymphocytes was unaffected. Moreover, CCR7 was not induced on CD103+ DCs from Nr4a3-deficient mice in response to either administration of the TLR7 agonist R848 or infection with Citrobacter rodentium in vivo. The transcription factor FOXO1 has been shown to regulate CCR7 expression. We found that FOXO1 protein was reduced in Nr4a3-deficient DCs through an AKT-dependent mechanism. Further, we found a requirement for NR4A3 in the maintenance of homeostatic mitochondrial function in CD103+ DCs, although this is likely independent of the NR4A3/FOXO1/CCR7 axis in the regulation of DC migration. Thus, NR4A3 plays an important role in the regulation of CD103+ mDCs by regulating CCR7-dependent cell migration. PMID:27820700

  17. Epigenetic control of viral life-cycle by a DNA-methylation dependent transcription factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Flower

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encoded transcription factor Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1 is the prototype of a class of transcription factor (including C/EBPalpha that interact with CpG-containing DNA response elements in a methylation-dependent manner. The EBV genome undergoes a biphasic methylation cycle; it is extensively methylated during viral latency but is reset to an unmethylated state following viral lytic replication. Zta is expressed transiently following infection and again during the switch between latency and lytic replication. The requirement for CpG-methylation at critical Zta response elements (ZREs has been proposed to regulate EBV replication, specifically it could aid the activation of viral lytic gene expression from silenced promoters on the methylated genome during latency in addition to preventing full lytic reactivation from the non-methylated EBV genome immediately following infection. We developed a computational approach to predict the location of ZREs which we experimentally assessed using in vitro and in vivo DNA association assays. A remarkably different binding motif is apparent for the CpG and non-CpG ZREs. Computational prediction of the location of these binding motifs in EBV revealed that the majority of lytic cycle genes have at least one and many have multiple copies of methylation-dependent CpG ZREs within their promoters. This suggests that the abundance of Zta protein coupled with the methylation status of the EBV genome act together to co-ordinate the expression of lytic cycle genes at the majority of EBV promoters.

  18. Differential control of seed primary dormancy in Arabidopsis ecotypes by the transcription factor SPATULA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaistij, Fabián E; Gan, Yinbo; Penfield, Steven; Gilday, Alison D; Dave, Anuja; He, Zhesi; Josse, Eve-Marie; Choi, Giltsu; Halliday, Karen J; Graham, Ian A

    2013-06-25

    Freshly matured seeds exhibit primary dormancy, which prevents germination until environmental conditions are favorable. The establishment of dormancy occurs during seed development and involves both genetic and environmental factors that impact on the ratio of two antagonistic phytohormones: abscisic acid (ABA), which promotes dormancy, and gibberellic acid, which promotes germination. Although our understanding of dormancy breakage in mature seeds is well advanced, relatively little is known about the mechanisms involved in establishing dormancy during seed maturation. We previously showed that the SPATULA (SPT) transcription factor plays a key role in regulating seed germination. Here we investigate its role during seed development and find that, surprisingly, it has opposite roles in setting dormancy in Landsberg erecta and Columbia Arabidopsis ecotypes. We also find that SPT regulates expression of five transcription factor encoding genes: ABA-INSENSITIVE4 (ABI4) and ABI5, which mediate ABA signaling; REPRESSOR-OF-GA (RGA) and RGA-LIKE3 involved in gibberellic acid signaling; and MOTHER-OF-FT-AND-TFL1 (MFT) that we show here promotes Arabidopsis seed dormancy. Although ABI4, RGA, and MFT are repressed by SPT, ABI5 and RGL3 are induced. Furthermore, we show that RGA, MFT, and ABI5 are direct targets of SPT in vivo. We present a model in which SPT drives two antagonistic "dormancy-repressing" and "dormancy-promoting" routes that operate simultaneously in freshly matured seeds. Each of these routes has different impacts and this in turn explains the opposite effect of SPT on seed dormancy of the two ecotypes analyzed here.

  19. Post-translational Regulation of Cas9 during G1 Enhances Homology-Directed Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Gutschner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 induces DNA double-strand breaks that are repaired by cell-autonomous repair pathways, namely, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ, or homology-directed repair (HDR. While HDR is absent in G1, NHEJ is active throughout the cell cycle and, thus, is largely favored over HDR. We devised a strategy to increase HDR by directly synchronizing the expression of Cas9 with cell-cycle progression. Fusion of Cas9 to the N-terminal region of human Geminin converted this gene-editing protein into a substrate for the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex APC/Cdh1, resulting in a cell-cycle-tailored expression with low levels in G1 but high expression in S/G2/M. Importantly, Cas9-hGem(1/110 increased the rate of HDR by up to 87% compared to wild-type Cas9. Future developments may enable high-resolution expression of genome engineering proteins, which might increase HDR rates further, and may contribute to a better understanding of DNA repair pathways due to spatiotemporal control of DNA damage induction.

  20. Berberine inhibits growth and induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in human cholangiocarcinoma QBC939 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Wang, Bin; Zhuang, Yun; Shao, Dong; Sun, Kewen; Chen, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic approach using non-toxic natural products may be one of the strategies for the management of the cholangiocarcinoma. Here we report that in vitro treatment of human cholangiocarcinoma QBC939 cells with berberine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid, decreased cell viability and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, which was associated with an increase in G1 arrest. Our western blot analysis showed that berberine-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was mediated through the increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (Cdki) proteins (Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27); a simultaneous decrease in Cdk2 and Cdk4 and cyclins D1, and reduced activity of the Cyclins-Cdk complex. In additional studies, treatment of QBC939 cells with different concentrations (10, 40, 80 μM) of berberine for 48 h resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase in apoptosis compared to the non-berberine-treated control, which was associated with an increased expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Together, this study for the first time identified berberine as a chemotherapeutic agent against human cholangiocarcinoma cells QBC939 cells in vitro. Further in vivo studies are required to determine whether berberine could be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the management of cholangiocarcinoma.

  1. Transcriptional control of monolignol biosynthesis in Pinus taeda: factors affecting monolignol ratios and carbon allocation in phenylpropanoid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anterola, Aldwin M.; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Pinus taeda cell suspension cultures was carried out using quantitative real time PCR analyses of all known genes involved in the biosynthesis of the two monolignols, p-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols (lignin/lignan precursors). When the cells were transferred to a medium containing 8% sucrose and 20 mm potassium iodide, the monolignol/phenylpropanoid pathway was induced, and transcript levels for phenylalanine ammonia lyase, cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase were coordinately up-regulated. Provision of increasing levels of exogenously supplied Phe to saturating levels (40 mm) to the induction medium resulted in further up-regulation of their transcript levels in the P. taeda cell cultures; this in turn was accompanied by considerable increases in both p-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohol formation and excretion. By contrast, transcript levels for both cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase were only slightly up-regulated. These data, when considered together with metabolic profiling results and genetic manipulation of various plant species, reveal that carbon allocation to the pathway and its differential distribution into the two monolignols is controlled by Phe supply and differential modulation of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase activities, respectively. The coordinated up-regulation of phenylalanine ammonia lyase, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase in the presence of increasing concentrations of Phe also indicates that these steps are not truly rate-limiting, because they are modulated according to metabolic demand. Finally, the transcript profile of a putative acid/ester O-methyltransferase, proposed as an alternative catalyst for O-methylation leading

  2. Measurements of the $Q^{2}$-Dependence of the Proton and Neutron Spin Structure Functions g1p and g1n

    CERN Document Server

    Anthony, P L; Averett, T; Band, H R; Berisso, M C; Borel, H; Bosted, P E; Bültmann, S; Buénerd, M; Chupp, T E; Churchwell, S; Court, G R; Crabb, D; Day, D; Decowski, P; De Pietro, P; Erbacher, R D; Erickson, R; Feltham, A; Fonvieille, H; Frlez, E; Gearhart, R A; Ghazikhanian, V; Gómez, J; Griffioen, K A; Harris, C; Houlden, M A; Hughes, E W; Hyde-Wright, C E; Igo, G; Incerti, S; Jensen, J; Johnson, J R; King, P M; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kuhn, S E; Lindgren, R; Lombard-Nelsen, R M; Marroncle, J; McCarthy, J; McKee, P M; Meyer, Werner T; Mitchell, G S; Mitchell, J; Olson, M N; Penttilä, S; Peterson, G A; Petratos, G G; Pitthan, R; Pocanic, D; Prepost, R; Prescott, C; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Reyna, D; Rochester, L S; Rock, S E; Rondon-Aramayo, O A; Sabatié, F; Sick, I; Smith, T; Sorrell, L; Staley, F; Saint-Lorant, S; Stuart, L M; Szalata, Z M; Terrien, Y; Tobias, A; Todor, L; Toole, T; Trentalange, S; Walz, D; Welsh, R C; Wesselmann, F R; Wright, T R; Young, C C; Zeier, M; Zhu, H; Zihlmann, B

    2000-01-01

    The structure functions g1p and g1n have been measured over the range 0.014 < x < 0.9 and 1 < Q2 < 40 GeV2 using deep-inelastic scattering of 48 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons from polarized protons and deuterons. We find that the Q2 dependence of g1p (g1n) at fixed x is very similar to that of the spin-averaged structure function F1p (F1n). From a NLO QCD fit to all available data we find $\\Gamma_1^p - \\Gamma_1^n =0.176 \\pm 0.003 \\pm 0.007$ at Q2=5 GeV2, in agreement with the Bjorken sum rule prediction of 0.182 \\pm 0.005.

  3. Synthetic dual-input mammalian genetic circuits enable tunable and stringent transcription control by chemical and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianjun; Li, Ting; Wang, Xue; Du, Zengmin; Liu, Renmei; Yang, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Programmable transcription factors can enable precise control of gene expression triggered by a chemical inducer or light. To obtain versatile transgene system with combined benefits of a chemical inducer and light inducer, we created various chimeric promoters through the assembly of different copies of the tet operator and Gal4 operator module, which simultaneously responded to a tetracycline-responsive transcription factor and a light-switchable transactivator. The activities of these chimeric promoters can be regulated by tetracycline and blue light synergistically or antagonistically. Further studies of the antagonistic genetic circuit exhibited high spatiotemporal resolution and extremely low leaky expression, which therefore could be used to spatially and stringently control the expression of highly toxic protein Diphtheria toxin A for light regulated gene therapy. When transferring plasmids engineered for the gene switch-driven expression of a firefly luciferase (Fluc) into mice, the Fluc expression levels of the treated animals directly correlated with the tetracycline and light input program. We suggest that dual-input genetic circuits using TET and light that serve as triggers to achieve expression profiles may enable the design of robust therapeutic gene circuits for gene- and cell-based therapies.

  4. Mos in the Oocyte: How to Use MAPK Independently of Growth Factors and Transcription to Control Meiotic Divisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude Dupré

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In many cell types, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK also named extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK is activated in response to a variety of extracellular growth factor-receptor interactions and leads to the transcriptional activation of immediate early genes, hereby influencing a number of tissue-specific biological activities, as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. In one specific cell type however, the female germ cell, MAPK does not follow this canonical scheme. In oocytes, MAPK is activated independently of growth factors and tyrosine kinase receptors, acts independently of transcriptional regulation, plays a crucial role in controlling meiotic divisions, and is under the control of a peculiar upstream regulator, the kinase Mos. Mos was originally identified as the transforming gene of Moloney murine sarcoma virus and its cellular homologue was the first proto-oncogene to be molecularly cloned. What could be the specific roles of Mos that render it necessary for meiosis? Which unique functions could explain the evolutionary cost to have selected one gene to only serve for few hours in one very specific cell type? This review discusses the original features of MAPK activation by Mos and the roles of this module in oocytes.

  5. Cytometry of chromatin bound Mcm6 and PCNA identifies two states in G1 that are separated functionally by the G1 restriction point1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobberger James W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytometric measurements of DNA content and chromatin-bound Mcm2 have demonstrated bimodal patterns of expression in G1. These patterns, the replication licensing function of Mcm proteins, and a correlation between Mcm loading and cell cycle commitment for cells re-entering the cell cycle, led us to test the idea that cells expressing a defined high level of chromatin-bound Mcm6 in G1 are committed - i.e., past the G1 restriction point. We developed a cell-based assay for tightly-bound PCNA (PCNA* and Mcm6 (Mcm6*, DNA content, and a mitotic marker to clearly define G1, S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle. hTERT-BJ1, hTERT-RPE-1, and Molt4 cells were extracted with Triton X-100 followed by methanol fixation, stained with antibodies and DAPI, then measured by cytometry. Results Bivariate analysis of cytometric data demonstrated complex patterns with distinct clustering for all combinations of the 4 variables. In G1, cells clustered in two groups characterized by low and high Mcm6* expression. Serum starvation and release experiments showed that residence in the high group was in late G1, just prior to S phase. Kinetic experiments, employing serum withdrawal, and stathmokinetic analysis with aphidicolin, mimosine or nocodazole demonstrated that cells with high levels of Mcm6* cycled with the committed phases of the cell cycle (S, G2, and M. Conclusions A multivariate assay for Mcm6*, PCNA*, DNA content, and a mitotic marker provides analysis capable of estimating the fraction of pre and post-restriction point G1 cells and supports the idea that there are at least two states in G1 defined by levels of chromatin bound Mcm proteins.

  6. Light-harvesting complex gene expression is controlled by both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms during photoacclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    CERN Document Server

    Durnford Dion, G; McKim, Sarah M; Sarchfield, Michelle L

    2003-01-01

    To compensate for increases in photon flux density (PFD), photosynthetic organisms possess mechanisms for reversibly modulating their photosynthetic apparatus to minimize photodamage. The photoacclimation response in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was assessed following a 10-fold increase in PFD over 24h. In addition to a 50% reduction in the amount of chlorophyll and light-harvesting complexes (LHC) per cell, the expression of genes encoding polypeptides of the light-harvesting antenna were also affected. The abundance of Lhcb (a LHCH gene), Lhcb4 (a CP29-like gene), and Lhca (a LHCI gene) transcripts were reduced by 65 to 80%, within 1-2 h; however, the RNA levels of all three genes recovered to their low-light (LL) concentrations within 6-8 h. To determine the role of transcript turnover in this transient decline in abundance, the stability of all transcripts was measured. Although there was no change in the Lhcb or Lhca transcript turnover time, the Lhcb4 mRNA stability decreased 2.5-fold immediately following...

  7. Ligand-regulated association of ErbB-4 to the transcriptional co-activator YAP65 controls transcription at the nuclear level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omerovic, Jasminka; Puggioni, Eleonora M R; Napoletano, Silvia; Visco, Vincenzo; Fraioli, Rocco; Frati, Luigi; Gulino, Alberto; Alimandi, Maurizio

    2004-04-01

    It has been proposed that ligand-dependent Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis (RIP) of ErbB-4 receptors generates 80 kDa Intra-Cellular Domains (E4.ICDs) that relocate to the nuclear compartments where they implement the signaling abilities of the ErbB-4 receptors. The E4.ICD may directly regulate gene transcription or, in an alternative scenario, the tyrosine kinase activity of E4.ICDs may target proteins involved in transcriptional regulation upon its relocation into the nucleus. We have identified the transcriptional coactivator YAP65, here referred as YAP (Yes Associated Protein), as binding partner of ErbB-4 in a two hybrid screening in yeast. Interaction between YAP and ErbB-4 occurs via the WW domain of YAP and the PPPPY at positions 1297-1301 and the PPPAY at positions 1052-1056 of the amino acid sequence of the Cyt-1 isoform of ErbB-4. Stechiometry of binding is regulated by the ligand-dependent phosphorylation of Tyr 1056 in the PPPAYTPM module that function as "biochemical switch" to decrease the association of YAP to ErbB-4. In principle, this novel interaction highlights new mechanisms of signaling propagation from the ErbB-4 receptors, offering supporting evidences that the E4.ICDs forms released following ligand-receptor engagement may recruit YAP and relocate to the nucleus to implement or regulate transcription.

  8. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP1) can regulate E2F1 transcription factor-mediated control of cyclin transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Jessy; Berthelet, Jean; Marivin, Arthur; Gemble, Simon; Edmond, Valérie; Plenchette, Stéphanie; Lagrange, Brice; Hammann, Arlette; Dupoux, Alban; Delva, Laurent; Eymin, Béatrice; Solary, Eric; Dubrez, Laurence

    2011-07-29

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1) is a potent regulator of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family and NF-κB signaling pathways in the cytoplasm. However, in some primary cells and tumor cell lines, cIAP1 is expressed in the nucleus, and its nuclear function remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the N-terminal part of cIAP1 directly interacts with the DNA binding domain of the E2F1 transcription factor. cIAP1 dramatically increases the transcriptional activity of E2F1 on synthetic and CCNE promoters. This function is not conserved for cIAP2 and XIAP, which are cytoplasmic proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that cIAP1 is recruited on E2F binding sites of the CCNE and CCNA promoters in a cell cycle- and differentiation-dependent manner. cIAP1 silencing inhibits E2F1 DNA binding and E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation of the CCNE gene. In cells that express a nuclear cIAP1 such as HeLa, THP1 cells and primary human mammary epithelial cells, down-regulation of cIAP1 inhibits cyclin E and A expression and cell proliferation. We conclude that one of the functions of cIAP1 when localized in the nucleus is to regulate E2F1 transcriptional activity.

  9. Molecular basis for vulnerability to mitochondrial and oxidative stress in a neuroendocrine CRI-G1 cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Chandiramani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many age-associated disorders (including diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases are linked to mitochondrial dysfunction, which leads to impaired cellular bioenergetics and increased oxidative stress. However, it is not known what genetic and molecular pathways underlie differential vulnerability to mitochondrial dysfunction observed among different cell types. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Starting with an insulinoma cell line as a model for a neuronal/endocrine cell type, we isolated a novel subclonal line (named CRI-G1-RS that was more susceptible to cell death induced by mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors than the parental CRI-G1 line (renamed CRI-G1-RR for clarity. Compared to parental RR cells, RS cells were also more vulnerable to direct oxidative stress, but equally vulnerable to mitochondrial uncoupling and less vulnerable to protein kinase inhibition-induced apoptosis. Thus, differential vulnerability to mitochondrial toxins between these two cell types likely reflects differences in their ability to handle metabolically generated reactive oxygen species rather than differences in ATP production/utilization or in downstream apoptotic machinery. Genome-wide gene expression analysis and follow-up biochemical studies revealed that, in this experimental system, increased vulnerability to mitochondrial and oxidative stress was associated with (1 inhibition of ARE/Nrf2/Keap1 antioxidant pathway; (2 decreased expression of antioxidant and phase I/II conjugation enzymes, most of which are Nrf2 transcriptional targets; (3 increased expression of molecular chaperones, many of which are also considered Nrf2 transcriptional targets; (4 increased expression of β cell-specific genes and transcription factors that specify/maintain β cell fate; and (5 reconstitution of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The molecular profile presented here will enable identification of individual genes or

  10. Deficiency of G1 regulators P53, P21Cip1 and/or pRb decreases hepatocyte sensitivity to TGFβ cell cycle arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison David J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGFβ is critical to control hepatocyte proliferation by inducing G1-growth arrest through multiple pathways leading to inhibition of E2F transcription activity. The retinoblastoma protein pRb is a key controller of E2F activity and G1/S transition which can be inhibited in viral hepatitis. It is not known whether the impairment of pRb would alter the growth inhibitory potential of TGFβ in disease. We asked how Rb-deficiency would affect responses to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest. Results Primary hepatocytes isolated from Rb-floxed mice were infected with an adenovirus expressing CRE-recombinase to delete the Rb gene. In control cells treatment with TGFβ prevented cells to enter S phase via decreased cMYC activity, activation of P16INK4A and P21Cip and reduction of E2F activity. In Rb-null hepatocytes, cMYC activity decreased slightly but P16INK4A was not activated and the great majority of cells continued cycling. Rb is therefore central to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest in hepatocytes. However some Rb-null hepatocytes remained sensitive to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest. As these hepatocytes expressed very high levels of P21Cip1 and P53 we investigated whether these proteins regulate pRb-independent signaling to cell cycle arrest by evaluating the consequences of disruption of p53 and p21Cip1. Hepatocytes deficient in p53 or p21Cip1 showed diminished growth inhibition by TGFβ. Double deficiency had a similar impact showing that in cells containing functional pRb; P21Cip and P53 work through the same pathway to regulate G1/S in response to TGFβ. In Rb-deficient cells however, p53 but not p21Cip deficiency had an additive effect highlighting a pRb-independent-P53-dependent effector pathway of inhibition of E2F activity. Conclusion The present results show that otherwise genetically normal hepatocytes with disabled p53, p21Cip1 or Rb genes respond less well to the antiproliferative effects of TGFβ. As the function of

  11. The Cln3 cyclin is down-regulated by translational repression and degradation during the G1 arrest caused by nitrogen deprivation in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, C; Garí, E; Colomina, N; Herrero, E; Aldea, M

    1997-12-01

    Nutrients are among the most important trophic factors in all organisms. When deprived of essential nutrients, yeast cells use accumulated reserves to complete the current cycle and arrest in the following G1 phase. We show here that the Cln3 cyclin, which has a key role in the timely activation of SBF (Swi4-Swi6)- and MBF (Mbp1-Swi6)-dependent promoters in late G1, is down-regulated rapidly at a post-transcriptional level in cells deprived of the nitrogen source. In addition to the fact that Cln3 is degraded faster by ubiquitin-dependent mechanisms, we have found that translation of the CLN3 mRNA is repressed approximately 8-fold under nitrogen deprivation conditions. As a consequence, both SBF- and MBF-dependent expression is strongly down-regulated. Mainly because of their transcriptional dependence on SBF, and perhaps with the contribution of similar post-transcriptional mechanisms to those found for Cln3, the G1 cyclins Cln1 and 2 become undetectable in starved cells. The complete loss of Cln cyclins and the sustained presence of the Clb-cyclin kinase inhibitor Sic1 in starved cells may provide the molecular basis for the G1 arrest caused by nitrogen deprivation.

  12. Setdb2 controls convergence and extension movements during zebrafish gastrulation by transcriptional regulation of dvr1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ting-Ting; Xu, Peng-Fei; Dong, Zhi-Wei; Fan, Hong-Bo; Jin, Yi; Dong, Mei; Chen, Yi; Pan, Wei-Jun; Ren, Rui-Bao; Liu, Ting-Xi; Deng, Min; Huang, Qiu-Hua

    2014-08-15

    As the primary driving forces of gastrulation, convergence and extension (C&E) movements lead to a medio-lateral narrowing and an anterior-posterior elongation of the embryonic body axis. Histone methylation as a post-translational modification plays a critical role in early embryonic development, but its functions in C&E movements remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the setdb2-dvr1 transcriptional cascade plays a critical role in C&E movements during zebrafish gastrulation. Knockdown of Setdb2, a SET domain-containing protein possessing a potential histone H3K9 methyltransferase activity, induced abnormal C&E movements, resulting in anterior-posterior shortening and medio-lateral expansion of the embryonic axis, as well as abnormal notochord cell polarity. Furthermore, we found that Setdb2 functions through fine-tuning the expression of dvr1, a ligand of the TGF-β superfamily, to an appropriate level to ensure proper C&E movements in a non-cell-autonomous manner. In addition, both overexpression and knockdown of Dvr1 at the one-cell stage resulted in defects at epiboly and C&E. These data demonstrate that Setdb2 is a novel regulator for C&E movements and acts by modulating the expression level of dvr1, suggesting that Dvr1 acts as a direct and essential mediator for C&E cell movements.

  13. A sex-specific transcription factor controls male identity in a simultaneous hermaphrodite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Tracy; Collins, James J; Brubacher, John L; Zarkower, David; Newmark, Phillip A

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary transitions between hermaphroditic and dioecious reproductive states are found in many groups of animals. To understand such transitions, it is important to characterize diverse modes of sex determination utilized by metazoans. Currently, little is known about how simultaneous hermaphrodites specify and maintain male and female organs in a single individual. Here we show that a sex-specific gene, Smed-dmd-1 encoding a predicted doublesex/male-abnormal-3 (DM) domain transcription factor, is required for specification of male germ cells in a simultaneous hermaphrodite, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. dmd-1 has a male-specific role in the maintenance and regeneration of the testes and male accessory reproductive organs. In addition, a homologue of dmd-1 exhibits male-specific expression in Schistosoma mansoni, a derived, dioecious flatworm. These results demonstrate conservation of the role of DM domain genes in sexual development in lophotrochozoans and suggest one means by which modulation of sex-specific pathways can drive the transition from hermaphroditism to dioecy.

  14. Post-transcriptional control of DGCR8 expression by the Microprocessor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triboulet, Robinson; Chang, Hao-Ming; Lapierre, Robert J; Gregory, Richard I

    2009-06-01

    The Microprocessor, comprising the RNase III Drosha and the double-stranded RNA binding protein DGCR8, is essential for microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis. In the miRNA processing pathway certain hairpin structures within primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts are specifically cleaved by the Microprocessor to release approximately 60-70-nucleotide precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA) intermediates. Although both Drosha and DGCR8 are required for Microprocessor activity, the mechanisms regulating the expression of these proteins are unknown. Here we report that the Microprocessor negatively regulates DGCR8 expression. Using in vitro reconstitution and in vivo studies, we demonstrate that a hairpin, localized in the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of DGCR8 mRNA, is cleaved by the Microprocessor. Accordingly, knockdown of Drosha leads to an increase in DGCR8 mRNA and protein levels in cells. Furthermore, we found that the DGCR8 5'UTR confers Microprocessor-dependent repression of a luciferase reporter gene in vivo. Our results uncover a novel feedback loop that regulates DGCR8 levels.

  15. The maternally expressed WRKY transcription factor TTG2 controls lethality in interploidy crosses of Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P Dilkes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying lethality of F1 hybrids between diverged parents are one target of speciation research. Crosses between diploid and tetraploid individuals of the same genotype can result in F1 lethality, and this dosage-sensitive incompatibility plays a role in polyploid speciation. We have identified variation in F1 lethality in interploidy crosses of Arabidopsis thaliana and determined the genetic architecture of the maternally expressed variation via QTL mapping. A single large-effect QTL, DR. STRANGELOVE 1 (DSL1, was identified as well as two QTL with epistatic relationships to DSL1. DSL1 affects the rate of postzygotic lethality via expression in the maternal sporophyte. Fine mapping placed DSL1 in an interval encoding the maternal effect transcription factor TTG2. Maternal parents carrying loss-of-function mutations in TTG2 suppressed the F1 lethality caused by paternal excess interploidy crosses. The frequency of cellularization in the endosperm was similarly affected by both natural variation and ttg2 loss-of-function mutants. The simple genetic basis of the natural variation and effects of single-gene mutations suggests that F1 lethality in polyploids could evolve rapidly. Furthermore, the role of the sporophytically active TTG2 gene in interploidy crosses indicates that the developmental programming of the mother regulates the viability of interploidy hybrid offspring.

  16. Post-Transcriptional Controls by Ribonucleoprotein Complexes in the Acquisition of Drug Resistance

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    Eun Kyung Lee

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of drug resistance leads to failure of anti-cancer treatments and therapies. Although several successive chemotherapies are available, along with efforts towards clinical applications of new anti-cancer drugs, it is generally realized that there is a long way to go to treat cancers. Resistance to anti-cancer drugs results from various factors, including genetic as well as epigenetic differences in tumors. Determining the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the acquisition of drug resistance may be a helpful approach for the development of new therapeutic strategies to overcome treatment failure. Several studies have shown that the acquisition of drug resistance is tightly regulated by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA binding proteins (RBPs and microRNAs (miRNAs, which change the stability and translation of mRNAs encoding factors involved in cell survival, proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and drug metabolism. Here, we review our current understanding of ribonucleoprotein complexes, including RBPs and miRNAs, which play critical roles in the acquisition of drug resistance and have potential clinical implications for cancer.

  17. Post-transcriptional controls by ribonucleoprotein complexes in the acquisition of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hoin; Kim, Chongtae; Lee, Heejin; Kim, Wook; Lee, Eun Kyung

    2013-08-20

    Acquisition of drug resistance leads to failure of anti-cancer treatments and therapies. Although several successive chemotherapies are available, along with efforts towards clinical applications of new anti-cancer drugs, it is generally realized that there is a long way to go to treat cancers. Resistance to anti-cancer drugs results from various factors, including genetic as well as epigenetic differences in tumors. Determining the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the acquisition of drug resistance may be a helpful approach for the development of new therapeutic strategies to overcome treatment failure. Several studies have shown that the acquisition of drug resistance is tightly regulated by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), which change the stability and translation of mRNAs encoding factors involved in cell survival, proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and drug metabolism. Here, we review our current understanding of ribonucleoprotein complexes, including RBPs and miRNAs, which play critical roles in the acquisition of drug resistance and have potential clinical implications for cancer.

  18. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter Mcu controls excitotoxicity and is transcriptionally repressed by neuroprotective nuclear calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jing; Tan, Yan-Wei; Hagenston, Anna M; Martel, Marc-Andre; Kneisel, Niclas; Skehel, Paul A; Wyllie, David J A; Bading, Hilmar; Hardingham, Giles E

    2013-01-01

    The recent identification of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter gene (Mcu/Ccdc109a) has enabled us to address its role, and that of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, in neuronal excitotoxicity. Here we show that exogenously expressed Mcu is mitochondrially localized and increases mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels following NMDA receptor activation, leading to increased mitochondrial membrane depolarization and excitotoxic cell death. Knockdown of endogenous Mcu expression reduces NMDA-induced increases in mitochondrial Ca(2+), resulting in lower levels of mitochondrial depolarization and resistance to excitotoxicity. Mcu is subject to dynamic regulation as part of an activity-dependent adaptive mechanism that limits mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload when cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels are high. Specifically, synaptic activity transcriptionally represses Mcu, via a mechanism involving the nuclear Ca(2+) and CaM kinase-mediated induction of Npas4, resulting in the inhibition of NMDA receptor-induced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and preventing excitotoxic death. This establishes Mcu and the pathways regulating its expression as important determinants of excitotoxicity, which may represent therapeutic targets for excitotoxic disorders.

  19. Sexually Dimorphic Differentiation of a C. elegans Hub Neuron Is Cell Autonomously Controlled by a Conserved Transcription Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Saiz, Esther; Oren-Suissa, Meital; Bayer, Emily A; Hobert, Oliver

    2017-01-23

    Functional and anatomical sexual dimorphisms in the brain are either the result of cells that are generated only in one sex or a manifestation of sex-specific differentiation of neurons present in both sexes. The PHC neuron pair of the nematode C. elegans differentiates in a strikingly sex-specific manner. In hermaphrodites the PHC neurons display a canonical pattern of synaptic connectivity similar to that of other sensory neurons, but in males PHC differentiates into a densely connected hub sensory neuron/interneuron, integrating a large number of male-specific synaptic inputs and conveying them to both male-specific and sex-shared circuitry. We show that the differentiation into such a hub neuron involves the sex-specific scaling of several components of the synaptic vesicle machinery, including the vesicular glutamate transporter eat-4/VGLUT, induction of neuropeptide expression, changes in axonal projection morphology, and a switch in neuronal function. We demonstrate that these molecular and anatomical remodeling events are controlled cell autonomously by the phylogenetically conserved Doublesex homolog dmd-3, which is both required and sufficient for sex-specific PHC differentiation. Cellular specificity of dmd-3 action is ensured by its collaboration with non-sex-specific terminal selector-type transcription factors, whereas the sex specificity of dmd-3 action is ensured by the hermaphrodite-specific transcriptional master regulator of hermaphroditic cell identity tra-1, which represses the transcription of dmd-3 in hermaphrodite PHC. Taken together, our studies provide mechanistic insights into how neurons are specified in a sexually dimorphic manner.

  20. Power training and postmenopausal hormone therapy affect transcriptional control of specific co-regulated gene clusters in skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, Vidal; Törmäkangas, Timo; Ronkainen, Paula H. A.; Taaffe, Dennis R.; Takala, Timo; Koskinen, Satu; Cheng, Sulin; Puolakka, Jukka; Kujala, Urho M.; Suominen, Harri; Sipilä, Sarianna; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2010-01-01

    At the moment, there is no clear molecular explanation for the steeper decline in muscle performance after menopause or the mechanisms of counteractive treatments. The goal of this genome-wide study was to identify the genes and gene clusters through which power training (PT) comprising jumping activities or estrogen containing hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may affect skeletal muscle properties after menopause. We used musculus vastus lateralis samples from early stage postmenopausal (50–57 years old) women participating in a yearlong randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial with PT and HRT interventions. Using microarray platform with over 24,000 probes, we identified 665 differentially expressed genes. The hierarchical clustering method was used to assort the genes. Additionally, enrichment analysis of gene ontology (GO) terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways was carried out to clarify whether assorted gene clusters are enriched with particular functional categories. The analysis revealed transcriptional regulation of 49 GO/KEGG categories. PT upregulated transcription in “response to contraction”—category revealing novel candidate genes for contraction-related regulation of muscle function while HRT upregulated gene expression related to functionality of mitochondria. Moreover, several functional categories tightly related to muscle energy metabolism, development, and function were affected regardless of the treatment. Our results emphasize that during the early stages of the postmenopause, muscle properties are under transcriptional modulation, which both PT and HRT partially counteract leading to preservation of muscle power and potentially reducing the risk for aging-related muscle weakness. More specifically, PT and HRT may function through improving energy metabolism, response to contraction as well as by preserving functionality of the mitochondria. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this

  1. RUNX super-enhancer control through the Notch pathway by Epstein-Barr virus transcription factors regulates B cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnell, Andrea; Webb, Helen M; Wood, C David; McClellan, Michael J; Wichaidit, Billy; Kempkes, Bettina; Jenner, Richard G; Osborne, Cameron; Farrell, Paul J; West, Michelle J

    2016-06-02

    In B cells infected by the cancer-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), RUNX3 and RUNX1 transcription is manipulated to control cell growth. The EBV-encoded EBNA2 transcription factor (TF) activates RUNX3 transcription leading to RUNX3-mediated repression of the RUNX1 promoter and the relief of RUNX1-directed growth repression. We show that EBNA2 activates RUNX3 through a specific element within a -97 kb super-enhancer in a manner dependent on the expression of the Notch DNA-binding partner RBP-J. We also reveal that the EBV TFs EBNA3B and EBNA3C contribute to RUNX3 activation in EBV-infected cells by targeting the same element. Uncovering a counter-regulatory feed-forward step, we demonstrate EBNA2 activation of a RUNX1 super-enhancer (-139 to -250 kb) that results in low-level RUNX1 expression in cells refractory to RUNX1-mediated growth inhibition. EBNA2 activation of the RUNX1 super-enhancer is also dependent on RBP-J. Consistent with the context-dependent roles of EBNA3B and EBNA3C as activators or repressors, we find that these proteins negatively regulate the RUNX1 super-enhancer, curbing EBNA2 activation. Taken together our results reveal cell-type-specific exploitation of RUNX gene super-enhancers by multiple EBV TFs via the Notch pathway to fine tune RUNX3 and RUNX1 expression and manipulate B-cell growth.

  2. Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor A and Yes-Associated Protein Exert Dual Control in G Protein-Coupled Receptor- and RhoA-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation and Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Olivia M; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Brown, Joan Heller

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a subset of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to activate RhoA endows them with unique growth-regulatory properties. Two transcriptional pathways are activated through GPCRs and RhoA, one utilizing the transcriptional coactivator myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A) and serum response factor (SRF) and the other using the transcriptional coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP) and TEA domain family members (TEAD). These pathways have not been compared for their relative levels of importance and potential interactions in RhoA target gene expression. GPCRs for thrombin and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) on human glioblastoma cells robustly couple to RhoA and induce the matricelluar protein CCN1. Knockdown of either MRTF-A or YAP abrogates S1P-stimulated CCN1 expression, demonstrating that both coactivators are required. MRTF-A and YAP are also both required for transcriptional control of other S1P-regulated genes in various cell types and for S1P-stimulated glioblastoma cell proliferation. Interactions between MRTF-A and YAP are suggested by their synergistic effects on SRE.L- and TEAD-luciferase expression. Moreover, MRTF-A and YAP associate in coimmunoprecipitations from S1P-stimulated cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis of the CCN1 gene promoter demonstrated that S1P increases coactivator binding at the canonical transcription factor sequences. Unexpectedly, S1P also enhances MRTF-A binding at TEA sites. Our findings reveal that GPCR- and RhoA-regulated gene expression requires dual input and integration of two distinct transcriptional pathways. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Optimization on bicriterion policies for M/G/1 system with second optional service

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jau-chuan KE; Yunn-kuang CHU

    2008-01-01

    We compare the optimal operating cost of the two bicriterion policies, p,T and p,N, for an M/G/1 queueing system with second optional service, in which the length of the vacation period is randomly controlled either by the number of arrivals during the idle period or by a timer. After all the customers are served in the queue exhaustively, the server immediately takes a vacation and may operate p, T policy or p,N policy. For the two bicriterion policies, the total average cost function per unit time is developed to search the optimal stationary operating policies at a minimum cost. Based upon the optimal cost the explicit forms for joint optimum threshold values of (p,T) and (p,N) are obtained.

  4. Tissue-specific transcription profile of cytokine and chemokine genes associated with flavivirus control and non-lethal neuropathogenesis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Willy W; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Prow, Natalie A; Bowen, Richard A; Hall, Roy A; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2016-07-01

    We previously showed that New Zealand White (NZWRs) and cottontail rabbits (CTRs) are a suitable model for studying immune mechanisms behind virus control and non-lethal neuropathogenesis associated with West Nile virus (WNV) and Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV) infections. In the current study, we observed that MVEV infection induced high IFNα, TNFα, IL6, and CXCL10 transcript levels in the brains of weanling NZWRs, unlike infection with the less virulent WNVNSW2011. These transcript levels also correlated with encephalitis severity. Widespread STAT1 protein expression in brain with moderate neuropathology suggests that IFN-I signaling is crucial for limiting neural infection and mediating non-lethal neuropathogenesis. Unlike NZWRs, CTRs limit neuroinvasion without upregulation of many cytokine/chemokine transcripts, suggesting a species-dependent virus control mechanism. However, the common IFNγ, TNFα and IL6 transcript upregulation in specific lymphoid organs suggest some conserved elements in the response against flaviviruses, unique to all rabbits.

  5. MKP1 phosphatase mediates G1-specific dephosphorylation of H3Serine10P in response to DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ajit K.; Khan, Shafqat A.; Sharda, Asmita; Reddy, Divya V; Gupta, Sanjay, E-mail: sgupta@actrec.gov.in

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Reversible reduction of H3S10 phosphorylation after DNA damage is G1 phase specific. • Dynamic balance between MAP kinases, MKP1 and MSK1 regulate H3S10P during DDR. • MKP1 associates with chromatin bearing γH2AX in response to DNA damage. • Inhibition of MKP1 activity with specific inhibitor promotes radiation-induced cell death. - Abstract: Histone mark, H3S10 phosphorylation plays a dual role in a cell by maintaining relaxed chromatin for active transcription in interphase and condensed chromatin state in mitosis. The level of H3S10P has also been shown to alter on DNA damage; however, its cell cycle specific behavior and regulation during DNA damage response is largely unexplored. In the present study, we demonstrate G1 cell cycle phase specific reversible loss of H3S10P in response to IR-induced DNA damage is mediated by opposing activities of phosphatase, MKP1 and kinase, MSK1 of the MAP kinase pathway. We also show that the MKP1 recruits to the chromatin in response to DNA damage and correlates with the decrease of H3S10P, whereas MKP1 is released from chromatin during recovery phase of DDR. Furthermore, blocking of H3S10 dephosphorylation by MKP1 inhibition impairs DNA repair process and results in poor survival of WRL68 cells. Collectively, our data proposes a pathway regulating G1 cell cycle phase specific reversible reduction of H3S10P on IR induced DNA damage and also raises the possibility of combinatorial modulation of H3S10P with specific inhibitors to target the cancer cells in G1-phase of cell cycle.

  6. Host plant peptides elicit a transcriptional response to control the Sinorhizobium meliloti cell cycle during symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penterman, Jon; Abo, Ryan P; De Nisco, Nicole J; Arnold, Markus F F; Longhi, Renato; Zanda, Matteo; Walker, Graham C

    2014-03-04

    The α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti establishes a chronic intracellular infection during the symbiosis with its legume hosts. Within specialized host cells, S. meliloti differentiates into highly polyploid, enlarged nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. This differentiation is driven by host cells through the production of defensin-like peptides called "nodule-specific cysteine-rich" (NCR) peptides. Recent research has shown that synthesized NCR peptides exhibit antimicrobial activity at high concentrations but cause bacterial endoreduplication at sublethal concentrations. We leveraged synchronized S. meliloti populations to determine how treatment with a sublethal NCR peptide affects the cell cycle and physiology of bacteria at the molecular level. We found that at sublethal levels a representative NCR peptide specifically blocks cell division and antagonizes Z-ring function. Gene-expression profiling revealed that the cell division block was produced, in part, through the substantial transcriptional response elicited by sublethal NCR treatment that affected ∼15% of the genome. Expression of critical cell-cycle regulators, including ctrA, and cell division genes, including genes required for Z-ring function, were greatly attenuated in NCR-treated cells. In addition, our experiments identified important symbiosis functions and stress responses that are induced by sublethal levels of NCR peptides and other antimicrobial peptides. Several of these stress-response pathways also are found in related α-proteobacterial pathogens and might be used by S. meliloti to sense host cues during infection. Our data suggest a model in which, in addition to provoking stress responses, NCR peptides target intracellular regulatory pathways to drive S. meliloti endoreduplication and differentiation during symbiosis.

  7. Electrostatic control of DNA intersegmental translocation by the ETS transcription factor ETV6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Tam; Wang, Shuo; Poon, Gregory M K; Wilson, W David

    2017-08-11

    To find their DNA target sites in complex solution environments containing excess heterogeneous DNA, sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins execute various translocation mechanisms known collectively as facilitated diffusion. For proteins harboring a single DNA contact surface, long-range translocation occurs by jumping between widely spaced DNA segments. We have configured biosensor-based surface plasmon resonance to directly measure the affinity and kinetics of this intersegmental jumping by the ETS-family transcription factor ETS variant 6 (ETV6). To isolate intersegmental target binding in a functionally defined manner, we pre-equilibrated ETV6 with excess salmon sperm DNA, a heterogeneous polymer, before exposing the nonspecifically bound protein to immobilized oligomeric DNA harboring a high-affinity ETV6 site. In this way, the mechanism of ETV6-target association could be toggled electrostatically through varying NaCl concentration in the bulk solution. Direct measurements of association and dissociation kinetics of the site-specific complex indicated that 1) freely diffusive binding by ETV6 proceeds through a nonspecific-like intermediate, 2) intersegmental jumping is rate-limited by dissociation from the nonspecific polymer, and 3) dissociation of the specific complex is independent of the history of complex formation. These results show that target searches by proteins with an ETS domain, such as ETV6, whose single DNA-binding domain cannot contact both source and destination sites simultaneously, are nonetheless strongly modulated by intersegmental jumping in heterogeneous site environments. Our findings establish biosensors as a general technique for directly and specifically measuring target site search by DNA-binding proteins via intersegmental translocation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. A novel TetR family transcriptional regulator, SAV576, negatively controls avermectin biosynthesis in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia; Zhang, Xuan; Luo, Shuai; He, Fei; Chen, Zhi; Wen, Ying; Li, Jilun

    2013-01-01

    Avermectins produced by Streptomyces avermitilis are potent anti-parasitic agents that are useful in animal health care, agriculture, and the treatment of human infections. In a search for novel regulators that affect avermectin biosynthesis, comparative transcriptome analysis was performed between wild-type strain ATCC31267 and avermectin overproducing strain 76-02-e, revealing some differentially expressed genes. SAV576, which is downregulated in 76-02-e and encodes a TetR family transcriptional regulator (TFR), was shown to inhibit avermectin production by indirectly affecting the expression of ave genes. SAV576 directly repressed the transcription of its gene SAV576 and of adjacent genes SAV575 (encodes cytochrome P450/NADPH-ferrihemoprotein reductase) and SAV574. The SAV576-binding sites within the bidirectional SAV575-SAV576 promoter region were determined by DNase I footprinting assays. A consensus 15-bp palindromic sequence CCRTACRVYGTATGS was found in these binding sites and shown to be important for SAV576-binding activity. SAV575, an important target gene of SAV576, was shown to exert a positive effect on avermectin production. The study findings extend our limited knowledge of the complex regulation of avermectin biosynthesis and provide a basis for rational genetic manipulation of S. avermitilis to improve avermectin production through control of SAV576 and its target gene.

  9. A novel TetR family transcriptional regulator, SAV576, negatively controls avermectin biosynthesis in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Guo

    Full Text Available Avermectins produced by Streptomyces avermitilis are potent anti-parasitic agents that are useful in animal health care, agriculture, and the treatment of human infections. In a search for novel regulators that affect avermectin biosynthesis, comparative transcriptome analysis was performed between wild-type strain ATCC31267 and avermectin overproducing strain 76-02-e, revealing some differentially expressed genes. SAV576, which is downregulated in 76-02-e and encodes a TetR family transcriptional regulator (TFR, was shown to inhibit avermectin production by indirectly affecting the expression of ave genes. SAV576 directly repressed the transcription of its gene SAV576 and of adjacent genes SAV575 (encodes cytochrome P450/NADPH-ferrihemoprotein reductase and SAV574. The SAV576-binding sites within the bidirectional SAV575-SAV576 promoter region were determined by DNase I footprinting assays. A consensus 15-bp palindromic sequence CCRTACRVYGTATGS was found in these binding sites and shown to be important for SAV576-binding activity. SAV575, an important target gene of SAV576, was shown to exert a positive effect on avermectin production. The study findings extend our limited knowledge of the complex regulation of avermectin biosynthesis and provide a basis for rational genetic manipulation of S. avermitilis to improve avermectin production through control of SAV576 and its target gene.

  10. Transcription factor Ctip2 controls epidermal lipid metabolism and regulates expression of genes involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis during skin development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhixing; Kirkwood, Jay S.; Taylor, Alan W.; Stevens, Jan F.; Leid, Mark; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup K.

    2012-01-01

    The stratum corneum is composed of protein-enriched corneocytes embedded in an intercellular matrix of nonpolar lipids organized as lamellar layers and give rise to epidermal permeability barrier (EPB). EPB defects play an important role in the pathophysiology of skin diseases such as eczema. The transcriptional control of skin lipid metabolism is poorly understood. We have discovered that mouse lacking a transcription factor COUP-TF interacting protein 2 (Ctip2) exhibit EPB defects including altered keratinocyte terminal differentiation, delayed skin barrier development and interrupted neutral lipid distribution in the epidermis. We adapted herein a targeted lipidomic approach using mass spectrometry, and have determined that Ctip2−/− mice (germline deletion of Ctip2 gene) display altered composition of major epidermal lipids such as ceramides and sphingomyelins compared to wildtype at different stages of skin development. Interestingly, expressions of several genes involved in skin sphingolipid biosynthesis and metabolism were altered in mutant skin. Ctip2 was found to be recruited to the promoter region of a subset of those genes, suggesting their possible direct regulation by Ctip2. Our results confirm an important role of Ctip2 in regulating skin lipid metabolism and indicate that profiling of epidermal sphingolipid could be useful for designing effective strategies to improve barrier dysfunctions. PMID:23096701

  11. GRK2 Fine-Tunes Circadian Clock Speed and Entrainment via Transcriptional and Post-translational Control of PERIOD Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neel Mehta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The pacemaker properties of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN circadian clock are shaped by mechanisms that influence the expression and behavior of clock proteins. Here, we reveal that G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2 modulates the period, amplitude, and entrainment characteristics of the SCN. Grk2-deficient mice show phase-dependent alterations in light-induced entrainment, slower recovery from jetlag, and longer behavioral rhythms. Grk2 ablation perturbs intrinsic rhythmic properties of the SCN, increasing amplitude and decreasing period. At the cellular level, GRK2 suppresses the transcription of the mPeriod1 gene and the trafficking of PERIOD1 and PERIOD2 proteins to the nucleus. Moreover, GRK2 can physically interact with PERIOD1/2 and promote PERIOD2 phosphorylation at Ser545, effects that may underlie its ability to regulate PERIOD1/2 trafficking. Together, our findings identify GRK2 as an important modulator of circadian clock speed, amplitude, and entrainment by controlling PERIOD at the transcriptional and post-translational levels.

  12. A distal intergenic region controls pancreatic endocrine differentiation by acting as a transcriptional enhancer and as a polycomb response element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardanaud-Glavieux, Corinne; García-Hurtado, Javier; Sauty, Claire; Guerci, Aline; Ferrer, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Lineage-selective expression of developmental genes is dependent on the interplay between activating and repressive mechanisms. Gene activation is dependent on cell-specific transcription factors that recognize transcriptional enhancer sequences. Gene repression often depends on the recruitment of Polycomb group (PcG) proteins, although the sequences that underlie the recruitment of PcG proteins, also known as Polycomb response elements (PREs), remain poorly understood in vertebrates. While distal PREs have been identified in mammals, a role for positive-acting enhancers in PcG-mediated repression has not been described. Here we have used a highly efficient procedure based on lentiviral-mediated transgenesis to carry out in vivo fine-mapping of, cis-regulatory sequences that control lineage-specific activation of Neurog3, a master regulator of pancreatic endocrine differentiation. Our findings reveal an enhancer region that is sufficient to drive correct spacio-temporal expression of Neurog3 and demonstrate that this same region serves as a PRE in alternative lineages where Neurog3 is inactive. PMID:28225770

  13. Cytoplasmic and nuclear quality control and turnover of single-stranded RNA modulate post-transcriptional gene silencing in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Ana Beatriz; Martínez de Alba, Angel Emilio; Bardou, Florian; Crespi, Martin D.; Vaucheret, Hervé; Maizel, Alexis; Mallory, Allison C.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA quality control (RQC) uses both endonucleolytic and exonucleolytic degradation to eliminate dysfunctional RNAs. In addition, endogenous and exogenous RNAs are degraded through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), which is triggered by the production of double-stranded (ds)RNAs and proceeds through short-interfering (si)RNA-directed ARGONAUTE-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage. Compromising cytoplasmic or nuclear 5′–3′ exoribonuclease function enhances sense-transgene (S)-PTGS in Arabidopsis, suggesting that these pathways compete for similar RNA substrates. Here, we show that impairing nonsense-mediated decay, deadenylation or exosome activity enhanced S-PTGS, which requires host RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6/SGS2/SDE1) and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING 3 (SGS3) for the transformation of single-stranded RNA into dsRNA to trigger PTGS. However, these RQC mutations had no effect on inverted-repeat–PTGS, which directly produces hairpin dsRNA through transcription. Moreover, we show that these RQC factors are nuclear and cytoplasmic and are found in two RNA degradation foci in the cytoplasm: siRNA-bodies and processing-bodies. We propose a model of single-stranded RNA tug-of-war between RQC and S-PTGS that ensures the correct partitioning of RNA substrates among these RNA degradation pathways. PMID:23482394

  14. Hepatic HNF1 transcription factors control the induction of PCSK9 mediated by rosuvastatin in normolipidemic hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bin; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Shende, Vikram Ravindra; Liu, Jingwen

    2017-03-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) impedes low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR)-mediated LDL-cholesterol uptake and has hence emerged as a critical regulator of serum cholesterol levels and a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Statins have been shown to elevate circulating PCSK9 levels by stimulating PCSK9 gene transcription, which reduces the clinical efficacy of statin in LDL‑cholesterol reduction. The transcription of PCSK9 is partially controlled by the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF1) binding site embedded in the proximal region of its promoter. In this study, we utilized adenoviral shRNA delivery vectors to generate liver-specific knockdown of HNF1α (Ad‑shHNF1α) or HNF1β (Ad‑shHNF1β) in hamsters to examine the impact of reduced hepatic expression of HNF1 transcription factors on statin‑induced elevation of PCSK9 expression and serum cholesterol levels. We showed that the administration of rosuvastatin (RSV) to normolipidemic hamsters significantly augmented hepatic PCSK9 expression and serum PCSK9 levels. In addition, RSV treatment increased hepatic HNF1α protein levels without a clear effect on HNF1α mRNA expression. Injection of Ad-shHNF1α or Ad‑shHNF1β into hamsters both blunted RSV‑induced elevation of PCSK9 serum concentration and hepatic mRNA and protein levels, which led to significant increases in liver LDLR protein abundance. Furthermore, hepatic depletion of HNF1 factors lowered circulating total cholesterol and non‑high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in RSV‑treated hamsters. Our study demonstrates that both HNF1α and HNF1β are positive regulators of hepatic PCSK9 transcription in hamster species and that transient, liver-specific knockdown of either HNF1α or HNF1β could antagonize the RSV‑induced elevation of serum PCSK9 and reduce circulating cholesterol levels.

  15. Diversity of VP7 genes of G1 rotaviruses isolated in Iran, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilvand, Somayeh; Afchangi, Atefeh; Mohajel, Nasir; Roohvand, Farzin; Shoja, Zabihollah

    2016-01-01

    Genotype G1 of rotaviruses (RVs) is the most prevalent strain in human RV infections around the world. The present study evaluated genetic variations in the VP7 gene of RV G1 genotype isolates from Iran. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses indicated that RV strains from Iran clustered with G1 lineages IA, IC, and IIC, showing highest average of similarity versus reference sequences of the G1 lineages I and II. This study highlights the genetic pattern of G1 RV on the basis of distinct lineages and sublineages and indicates the importance of continuous monitoring on genetic variation and evolution pattern of G1 RV strains across the Iranian population for the final aim of RV vaccine introduction.

  16. The Drosophila Translational Control Element (TCE) is required for high-level transcription of many genes that are specifically expressed in testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Rach, Elizabeth A; Anderson, Ashley K; Ohler, Uwe; Wassarman, David A

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the importance of core promoter elements for tissue-specific transcription of RNA polymerase II genes, we examined testis-specific transcription in Drosophila melanogaster. Bioinformatic analyses of core promoter sequences from 190 genes that are specifically expressed in testes identified a 10 bp A/T-rich motif that is identical to the translational control element (TCE). The TCE functions in the 5' untranslated region of Mst(3)CGP mRNAs to repress translation, and it also functions in a heterologous gene to regulate transcription. We found that among genes with focused initiation patterns, the TCE is significantly enriched in core promoters of genes that are specifically expressed in testes but not in core promoters of genes that are specifically expressed in other tissues. The TCE is variably located in core promoters and is conserved in melanogaster subgroup species, but conservation dramatically drops in more distant species. In transgenic flies, short (300-400 bp) genomic regions containing a TCE directed testis-specific transcription of a reporter gene. Mutation of the TCE significantly reduced but did not abolish reporter gene transcription indicating that the TCE is important but not essential for transcription activation. Finally, mutation of testis-specific TFIID (tTFIID) subunits significantly reduced the transcription of a subset of endogenous TCE-containing but not TCE-lacking genes, suggesting that tTFIID activity is limited to TCE-containing genes but that tTFIID is not an obligatory regulator of TCE-containing genes. Thus, the TCE is a core promoter element in a subset of genes that are specifically expressed in testes. Furthermore, the TCE regulates transcription in the context of short genomic regions, from variable locations in the core promoter, and both dependently and independently of tTFIID. These findings set the stage for determining the mechanism by which the TCE regulates testis-specific transcription and understanding the

  17. Nucleotide mismatches between the VP7 gene and the primer are associated with genotyping failure of a specific lineage from G1 rotavirus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espinola Emilio E

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years it was reported that the accumulation of point mutations in VP4 and VP7 genes of rotavirus strains was the main cause of the failure of the G or P-typing. Failures in the correct genotyping of G1, G2, G8, G9 and G10 rotavirus strains were reported in the most commonly used reverse transcription (RT-PCR strategies. Collecting VP7 gene sequences of G1 rotavirus strains from databases we found that 74 (61.2 % out of 121 G1 strains from lineage I showed the four specific mismatches at the 5' end of the 9T1-1 primer, previously associated with the failure of G1-typing. Thus, a great percentage of the G1 strains from lineage I worldwide reported could not have been typed if the Das's RT-PCR strategy were used. This analysis shows that the failure on the detection of the G1 strains could be due to the diversification of rotavirus strains in phylogenetic lineages. Therefore, the use of different RT-PCR strategies with different primer binding locations on the VP7 gene or new typing methodologies -like microarrays procedures- could be a better option to avoid the failure of the G-typing of rotavirus strains detected during surveillance programs.

  18. Nucleosome positioning and kinetics near transcription-start-site barriers are controlled by interplay between active remodeling and DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Jyotsana J; Marko, John F; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2014-01-01

    We investigate how DNA sequence, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and nucleosome-depleted 'barriers' co-operate to determine the kinetics of nucleosome organization, in a stochastic model of nucleosome positioning and dynamics. We find that 'statistical' positioning of nucleosomes against 'barriers', hypothesized to control chromatin structure near transcription start sites, requires active remodeling and therefore cannot be described using equilibrium statistical mechanics. We show that, unlike steady-state occupancy, DNA site exposure kinetics near a barrier is dominated by DNA sequence rather than by proximity to the barrier itself. The timescale for formation of positioning patterns near barriers is proportional to the timescale for active nucleosome eviction. We also show that there are strong gene-to-gene variations in nucleosome positioning near barriers, which are eliminated by averaging over many genes. Our results suggest that measurement of nucleosome kinetics can reveal information about sequence-dependent regulation that is not apparent in steady-state nucleosome occupancy.

  19. The Fungal bZIP Transcription Factor AtfB Controls Virulence-Associated Processes in Aspergillus parasiticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Wee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fungal basic leucine zipper (bZIP transcription factors mediate responses to oxidative stress. The ability to regulate stress response pathways in Aspergillus spp. was postulated to be an important virulence-associated cellular process, because it helps establish infection in humans, plants, and animals. Previous studies have demonstrated that the fungal transcription factor AtfB encodes a protein that is associated with resistance to oxidative stress in asexual conidiospores, and AtfB binds to the promoters of several stress response genes. Here, we conducted a gene silencing of AtfB in Aspergillus parasiticus, a well-characterized fungal pathogen of plants, animals, and humans that produces the secondary metabolite and carcinogen aflatoxin, in order to determine the mechanisms by which AtfB contributes to virulence. We show that AtfB silencing results in a decrease in aflatoxin enzyme levels, the down-regulation of aflatoxin accumulation, and impaired conidiospore development in AtfB-silenced strains. This observation is supported by a decrease of AtfB protein levels, and the down-regulation of many genes in the aflatoxin cluster, as well as genes involved in secondary metabolism and conidiospore development. Global expression analysis (RNA Seq demonstrated that AtfB functionally links oxidative stress response pathways to a broader and novel subset of target genes involved in cellular defense, as well as in actin and cytoskeleton arrangement/transport. Thus, AtfB regulates the genes involved in development, stress response, and secondary metabolism in A. parasiticus. We propose that the bZIP regulatory circuit controlled by AtfB provides a large number of excellent cellular targets to reduce fungal virulence. More importantly, understanding key players that are crucial to initiate the cellular response to oxidative stress will enable better control over its detrimental impacts on humans.

  20. The transcriptional coactivators p/CIP and SRC-1 control insulin resistance through IRS1 in obesity models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Wang

    Full Text Available Three p160 family members, p/CIP, SRC1, and TIF2, have been identified as transcriptional coactivators for nuclear hormone receptors and other transcription factors in vitro. In a previous study, we reported initial characterization of the obesity-resistant phenotypes of p/CIP and SRC-1 double knockout (DKO mice, which exhibit increased energy expenditure, and suggested that nuclear hormone receptor target genes were involved in these phenotypes. In this study, we demonstrate that p/CIP and SRC1 control insulin signaling in a cell-autonomous manner both in vitro and in vivo. Genetic deletion of p/CIP and SRC-1 increases glucose uptake and enhances insulin sensitivity in both regular chow- and high fat diet-fed DKO mice despite increased food intake. Interestingly, we discover that loss of p/CIP and SRC-1 results in resistance to age-related obesity and glucose intolerance. We show that expression levels of a key insulin signaling component, insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1, are significantly increased in two cell lines representing fat and muscle lineages with p/CIP and SRC-1 deletions and in white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of DKO mice; this may account for increased glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. This is the first evidence that the p160 coactivators control insulin signaling and glucose metabolism through IRS1. Therefore, our studies indicate that p/CIP and SRC-1 are potential therapeutic targets not only for obesity but also for diabetes.

  1. Expression profiling of the maize flavonoid pathway genes controlled by estradiol-inducible transcription factors CRC and P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, W; Folkerts, O; Garnaat, C; Crasta, O; Roth, B; Bowen, B

    2000-01-01

    To determine the scope of gene expression controlled by the maize transcription factors C1/R and P, which are responsible for activating flavonoid synthesis, we used GeneCalling, an open-ended, gel-based, mRNA-profiling technology, to analyze cell suspension lines of the maize inbred Black Mexican Sweet (BMS) that harbored estradiol-inducible versions of these factors. BMS cells were transformed with a continually expressed estrogen receptor/maize C1 activator domain fusion gene (ER-C1) and either a fusion of C1 and R (CRC), P, or luciferase genes regulated by a promoter containing four repeats of an estrogen receptor binding site. Increasing amounts of luciferase activity, anthocyanins, and flavan-4-ols were detected in the respective cell lines after the addition of estradiol. The expression of both known and novel genes was detected simultaneously in these BMS lines by profiling the mRNA isolated from replicate samples at 0, 6, and 24 hr after estradiol treatment. Numerous cDNA fragments were identified that showed a twofold or greater difference in abundance at 6 and 24 hr than at 0 hr. The cDNA fragments from the known flavonoid genes, except chalcone isomerase (chi1), were induced in the CRC-expressing line after hormone induction, whereas only the chalcone synthase (c2) and flavanone/dihydroflavonol reductase (a1) genes were induced in the P-expressing line, as was expected. Many novel cDNA fragments were also induced or repressed by lines expressing CRC alone, P alone, or both transcription factors in unique temporal patterns. The temporal differences and the evidence of repression indicate a more diverse set of regulatory controls by CRC or P than originally expected. GeneCalling analysis was successful in detecting members of complex metabolic pathways and uncovering novel genes that were either coincidentally regulated or directly involved in such pathways.

  2. Control of Proteobacterial Central Carbon Metabolism by the HexR Transcriptional Regulator. A Case Study in Shewanella oneidensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyn, Semen; Li, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Qijing; Novichkov, Pavel; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2011-08-17

    Bacteria exploit multiple mechanisms for controlling central carbon metabolism (CCM). Thus, a bioinformatic analysis together with some experimental data implicated HexR transcriptional factor as a global CCM regulator in some lineages of Gammaproteobacteria operating as a functional replacement of Cra regulator characteristic of Enterobacteriales. In this study we combined a large-scale comparative genomic reconstruction of HexRcontrolled regulons in 87 species of Proteobacteria with the detailed experimental analysis of HexR regulatory network in Shewanella oneidensis model system. Although nearly all of the HexR-controlled genes are associated with CCM, remarkable variations were revealed in the scale (from 1-2 target operons in Enterobacteriales up to 20 operons in Aeromonadales) and gene content of HexR regulons between 11 compared lineages. A predicted 17-bp pseudo-palindrome with a consensus tTGTAATwwwATTACa, was confirmed as HexR-binding motif for 15 target operons (comprising 30 genes) by in vitro binding assays. The negative effect of the key CCM intermediate, 2-keto-3-deoxy-6- phosphogluconate, on the DNA-regulator complex formation was verified. A dual mode of HexR action on various target promoters, repression of genes involved in catabolic pathways and activation of gluconeogenic genes, was for the first time predicted by the bioinformatc analysis and experimentally verified by changed gene expression pattern in S. oneidensis AhexR mutant. Phenotypic profiling revealed the inability of this mutant to grow on lactate or pyruvate as a single carbon source. A comparative metabolic flux analysis of wild-type and mutant strains of S. oneidensis using 13Clactate labeling and GC-MS analysis confirmed the hypothesized HexR role as a master regulator of gluconeogenic flux from pyruvate via the transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA).

  3. Post-transcriptional control by bacteriophage T4: mRNA decay and inhibition of translation initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Eric S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over 50 years of biological research with bacteriophage T4 includes notable discoveries in post-transcriptional control, including the genetic code, mRNA, and tRNA; the very foundations of molecular biology. In this review we compile the past 10 - 15 year literature on RNA-protein interactions with T4 and some of its related phages, with particular focus on advances in mRNA decay and processing, and on translational repression. Binding of T4 proteins RegB, RegA, gp32 and gp43 to their cognate target RNAs has been characterized. For several of these, further study is needed for an atomic-level perspective, where resolved structures of RNA-protein complexes are awaiting investigation. Other features of post-transcriptional control are also summarized. These include: RNA structure at translation initiation regions that either inhibit or promote translation initiation; programmed translational bypassing, where T4 orchestrates ribosome bypass of a 50 nucleotide mRNA sequence; phage exclusion systems that involve T4-mediated activation of a latent endoribonuclease (PrrC and cofactor-assisted activation of EF-Tu proteolysis (Gol-Lit; and potentially important findings on ADP-ribosylation (by Alt and Mod enzymes of ribosome-associated proteins that might broadly impact protein synthesis in the infected cell. Many of these problems can continue to be addressed with T4, whereas the growing database of T4-related phage genome sequences provides new resources and potentially new phage-host systems to extend the work into a broader biological, evolutionary context.

  4. Involvement of TORC2, a CREB co-activator, in the in vivo-specific transcriptional control of HTLV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furuta Rika A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 causes adult T -cell leukemia (ATL but the expression of HTLV-1 is strongly suppressed in the peripheral blood of infected people. However, such suppression, which may explain the long latency in the development of ATL, is readily reversible, and viral expression resumes quickly with ex vivo culture of infected T -cells. To investigate the mechanism of in vivo -specific transcriptional suppression, we established a mouse model in which mice were intraperitoneally administered syngeneic EL4 T -lymphoma cells transduced with a recombinant retrovirus expressing a GFP-Tax fusion protein, Gax, under the control of the HTLV-1 enhancer (EL4-Gax. Results Gax gene transcription was silenced in vivo but quickly up-regulated in ex vivo culture. Analysis of integrated Gax reporter gene demonstrated that neither CpG methylation of the promoter DNA nor histone modification was associated with the reversible suppression. ChIP-analysis of LTR under suppression revealed reduced promoter binding of TFIIB and Pol-II, but no change in the binding of CREB or CBP/p300 to the viral enhancer sequence. However, the expression of TORC2, a co-activator of CREB, decreased substantially in the EL4-Gax cells in vivo, and this returned to normal levels in ex vivo culture. The reduced expression of TORC2 was associated with translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. A knock-down experiment with siRNA confirmed that TORC2 was the major functional protein of the three TORC-family proteins (TORC1, 2, 3 in EL4-Gax cells. Conclusion These results suggest that the TORC2 may play an important role in the in vivo -specific transcriptional control of HTLV-1. This study provides a new model for the reversible mechanism that suppresses HTLV-1 expression in vivo without the DNA methylation or hypoacetylated histones that is observed in the primary cells of most HTLV-1 -infected carriers and a substantial number of ATL

  5. The helicase senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew S.; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P.; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A. T.; Feagins, Alicia R.; Basler, Christopher; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J.; Lavin, Martin F.; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) is implicated in the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here, we reveal a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells depleted for SETX and AOA2 patient-derived SETX-deficient cells exhibit increased expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) activity at genes stimulated upon viral sensing, thus controlling the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of numerous RNA viruses (e. g. Influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link between SETX inborn errors, susceptibility to infection and development of neurologic disorders. PMID:25822250

  6. Predicting epistasis: an experimental test of metabolic control theory with bacterial transcription and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, R C

    2010-03-01

    Epistatic interactions between mutations are thought to play a crucial role in a number of evolutionary processes, including adaptation and sex. Evidence for epistasis is abundant, but tests of general theoretical models that can predict epistasis are lacking. In this study, I test the ability of metabolic control theory to predict epistasis using a novel experimental approach that combines phenotypic and genetic perturbations of enzymes involved in gene expression and protein synthesis in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These experiments provide experimental support for two key predictions of metabolic control theory: (i) epistasis between genes involved in the same pathway is antagonistic; (ii) epistasis becomes increasingly antagonistic as mutational severity increases. Metabolic control theory is a general theory that applies to any set of genes that are involved in the same linear processing chain, not just metabolic pathways, and I argue that this theory is likely to have important implications for predicting epistasis between functionally coupled genes, such as those involved in antibiotic resistance. Finally, this study highlights the fact that phenotypic manipulations of gene activity provide a powerful method for studying epistasis that complements existing genetic methods.

  7. Tetracycline-controlled transcriptional regulation systems:countermeasures to eliminate basal transgene leaks in Tet-based systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Dong; SUN Yan; GU Weiwang; CHEN Xigu

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the function of any given transgene(s) accurately in transgenic mice, and to produce credible transgenic animal models of various human diseases (precisely and realistically mimicking disease states), it is critical to be able to control gene expression in the animals conditionally. The ability to switch gene expression "on" or "off" in the restricted cells or tissue(s) at specific time(s)allows unprecedented flexibility for exploring gene function(s) in both the health and the disease. Pioneering work on inducible transgene expression has led to the development of a wide variety of controlled gene expression systems that meet this criterion. Among them, the tetracycline-inducible systems (e. g. Tet-off and Tet-on) have been widely, frequently and successfully employed in vitro and in vivo.These systems, however, are not always tight but leaky; sometimes the leakage is significant. In some circumstances, the resulting leak is acceptable, but in others, it is more problematic. Though these systems face this disadvantage, i.e. basal transgene leakage in vitro and in vivo, several approaches, including using improved versions (e. g. rtTA2S-M2 and rtTA2S-S2) of rtTA, tetracycline-controlled transcriptional silencer (tTS), an "ideal" minimal promoter in responsive components or combinations thereof, have been developed to avoid this limitation effectively. In this review we discuss the countermeasures available to eliminate basal transgene leakage from Tet-based systems.

  8. Linking chloroplast antioxidant defense to carbohydrate availability: the transcript abundance of stromal ascorbate peroxidase is sugar-controlled via ascorbate biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiber, Isabelle; Cai, Wenguo; Baier, Margarete

    2014-01-01

    All genes encoding chloroplast antioxidant enzymes are nuclear-encoded and posttranscriptionally targeted to chloroplasts. The transcript levels of most of them decreased upon sucrose feeding like the transcript levels of many genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain. However, the transcript abundance of stromal ascorbate peroxidase (s-APX; At4g08390) increased. Due to mild sugar application conditions, the plants kept the phosphorylation status of the ADP+ATP pool and the redox states of the NADPH+NADP+ and the ascorbate pools under control, which excludes them as signals in s-APX regulation. Correlation with ascorbate pool size regulation and comparison of transcript abundance regulation in the starch-biosynthetic mutant adg1, the ascorbate biosynthesis mutant vtc1, and the abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthetic mutant aba2 showed a link between sugar induction of s-APX and ascorbate biosynthesis.

  9. Antigenic differences between the EG95-related proteins from Echinococcus granulosus G1 and G6 genotypes: implications for vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Rojas, C A; Gauci, C G; Lightowlers, M W

    2013-02-01

    Cystic echinococcosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus remains an important and neglected issue in public health. The study of the likely efficacy of the currently available EG95 vaccine against other genotypes of the parasite is important to improve the vaccine as a potential tool to be used in control programmes. The recombinant vaccine EG95-1G1 was developed based on the G1 genotype of E. granulosus. Characterization of the eg95 gene family in the G6 genotype by genomic DNA cloning previously produced the first unequivocal information about the composition of the gene family in a different genotype. The information was used in this study to predict and express two EG95-related proteins from the G6 genotype as recombinants, for assessment of their capacity to bind antibodies raised in sheep vaccinated with the EG95-1G1 vaccine. The proteins (EG95-1G6 and EG95-5G6) from the G6 genotype of E. granulosus were unable to bind all the antibodies raised by sheep vaccinated with EG95-1G1. Differences in the amino acid sequence of EG95-related proteins from G6 and likely the differences in the encoded FnIII domain may be responsible for changes in the conformation of these epitopes.

  10. Beta1 integrins regulate chondrocyte rotation, G1 progression, and cytokinesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aszodi, Attila; Hunziker, Ernst B; Brakebusch, Cord;

    2003-01-01

    -actin organization. In addition, mutant chondrocytes show decreased proliferation caused by a defect in G1/S transition and cytokinesis. The G1/S defect is, at least partially, caused by overexpression of Fgfr3, nuclear translocation of Stat1/Stat5a, and up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitors p16 and p21...

  11. 16 CFR Appendix G1 to Part 305 - Furnaces-Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Furnaces-Gas G1 Appendix G1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Furnaces—Gas Manufacturer's rated heating capacities (Btu's/hr.) Range of annual fuel...

  12. Asymptotical small-x behaviour of the spin structure functions $g_1$ and $g_2$

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I

    1997-01-01

    We show that for small x and in the double logarithmic approximation (DLA) g_2 can be expressed through derivative of g_1 with respect to logarithm of the QCD coupling. Therefore the small-x behavior of the both structure functions is similar. The analytical expression for flavor nonsinglet structure function g_1 is presented and its asymptotical behaviour is calculated.

  13. 26 CFR 1.45G-1 - Railroad track maintenance credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Railroad track maintenance credit. 1.45G-1... TAXES Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.45G-1 Railroad track maintenance credit. (a) In general. For purposes of section 38, the railroad track maintenance credit (RTMC...

  14. Enhanced HIV-1 neutralization by a CD4-VH3-IgG1 fusion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyuhas, Ronit; Noy, Hava; Fishman, Sigal [Laboratory of Immunology, MIGAL, P.O. Box 831, Kiryat Shmona 11016 (Israel); Margalit, Alon [Laboratory of Immunology, MIGAL, P.O. Box 831, Kiryat Shmona 11016 (Israel); Department of Biotechnology, Tel-Hai Academic College, Upper Galilee 12210 (Israel); Montefiori, David C. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Gross, Gideon, E-mail: gidi@migal.org.il [Laboratory of Immunology, MIGAL, P.O. Box 831, Kiryat Shmona 11016 (Israel); Department of Biotechnology, Tel-Hai Academic College, Upper Galilee 12210 (Israel)

    2009-08-21

    HIV-1 gp120 is an alleged B cell superantigen, binding certain VH3+ human antibodies. We reasoned that a CD4-VH3 fusion protein could possess higher affinity for gp120 and improved HIV-1 inhibitory capacity. To test this we produced several human IgG1 immunoligands harboring VH3. Unlike VH3-IgG1 or VH3-CD4-IgG1, CD4-VH3-IgG1 bound gp120 considerably stronger than CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 exhibited {approx}1.5-2.5-fold increase in neutralization of two T-cell laboratory-adapted strains when compared to CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 improved neutralization of 7/10 clade B primary isolates or pseudoviruses, exceeding 20-fold for JR-FL and 13-fold for Ba-L. It enhanced neutralization of 4/8 clade C viruses, and had negligible effect on 1/4 clade A pseudoviruses. We attribute this improvement to possible pairing of VH3 with CD4 D1 and stabilization of an Ig Fv-like structure, rather than to superantigen interactions. These novel findings support the current notion that CD4 fusion proteins can act as better HIV-1 entry inhibitors with potential clinical implications.

  15. Acrocentric Chromosomes in Cultured Leukocytes from Mothers of Children Affected With the G1- Trisomy Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Cotton, James E.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of venous blood samples from 24 mothers of G1-trisomy-affected (Down's Syndrome) children and 23 mothers of chromosomally normal children indicated that mothers of G1-trisomy-affected children had a greater than expected involvement of the G-chromosomes in associations of acrocentric satellited (chromosome configuration) chromosomes.…

  16. 26 CFR 1.665(g)-1A - Capital gain distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Capital gain distribution. 1.665(g)-1A Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning on Or After January 1, 1969 § 1.665(g)-1A Capital gain distribution. For any taxable year of a...

  17. Selective control of primer usage in multiplex one-step reverse transcription PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Natasha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiplex RT-PCR is a valuable technique used for pathogen identification, disease detection and relative quantification of gene expression. The simplification of this protocol into a one-step procedure saves time and reagents. However, intensive PCR optimization is often required to overcome competing undesired PCR primer extension during the RT step. Results Herein, we report multiplex one-step RT-PCR experiments in which the PCR primers contain thermolabile phosphotriester modification groups. The presence of these groups minimizes PCR primer extension during the RT step and allows for control of PCR primer extension until the more stringent, elevated temperatures of PCR are reached. Results reveal that the use of primers whose extension can be controlled in a temperature-mediated way provides improved one-step RT-PCR specificity in both singleplex and multiplex reaction formats. Conclusions The need for an accurate and sensitive technique to quantify mRNA expression levels makes the described modified primer technology a promising tool for use in multiplex one-step RT-PCR. A more accurate representation of the abundances in initial template sample is feasible with modified primers, as artifacts of biased PCR are reduced because of greater improvements in reaction specificity.

  18. Transcriptomic Insight in the Control of Legume Root Secondary Infection by the Sinorhizobium meliloti Transcriptional Regulator Clr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The cAMP-dependent transcriptional regulator Clr of Sinorhizobium meliloti regulates the overall number of infection events on Medicago roots by a so-far unknown mechanism requiring smc02178, a Clr-target gene of unknown function. In order to shed light on the mode of action of Clr on infection and potentially reveal additional biological functions for Clr, we inventoried genomic Clr target genes by transcriptome profiling. We have found that Clr positively controls the synthesis of cAMP-dependent succinoglycan as well as the expression of genes involved in the synthesis of a so-far unknown polysaccharide compound. In addition, Clr activated expression of 24 genes of unknown function in addition to smc02178. Genes negatively controlled by Clr were mainly involved in swimming motility and chemotaxis. Functional characterization of two novel Clr-activated genes of unknown function, smb20495 and smc02177, showed that their expression was activated by the same plant signal as smc02178 ex planta. In planta, however, symbiotic expression of smc02177 proved independent of clr. Both smc02177 and smb20495 genes were strictly required for the control of secondary infection on M. sativa. None of the three smc02177, smc02178 and smb20495 genes were needed for plant signal perception. Altogether this work provides a refined view of the cAMP-dependent Clr regulon of S. meliloti. We specifically discuss the possible roles of smc02177, smc02178, smb20495 genes and other Clr-controlled genes in the control of secondary infection of Medicago roots.

  19. Nucleon spin structure II: Spin structure function $g_1^p$ at small $x$

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The spin structure function $g_1^p$ of the proton is studied in a two component framework, where the perturbative evolution of parton distributions and nonperturbative vector meson dominance model are used. We predict the $g_1^p$ asymmetric behavior at small $x$ from lower $Q^2$ to higher $Q^2$. We find that the contribution of the large gluon helicity dominates $g_1^p$ at $x>10^{-3}$ but mixed with nonperturbative component which complicates the asymptomatic behavior of $g_1^p$ at $x<10^{-3}$. The results are compatible with the data including the HERA early estimations and COMPASS new results. The predicted strong $Q^2$- and $x$-dependence of $g_1^p$ at $0.01

  20. FoxO1 regulates myocardial glucose oxidation rates via transcriptional control of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Keshav; Saleme, Bruno; Al Batran, Rami; Aburasayn, Hanin; Eshreif, Amina; Ho, Kim L; Ma, Wayne K; Almutairi, Malak; Eaton, Farah; Gandhi, Manoj; Park, Edwards A; Sutendra, Gopinath; Ussher, John R

    2017-09-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for glucose oxidation and a critical regulator of metabolic flexibility during the fasting to feeding transition. PDH is regulated via both PDH kinases (PDHK) and PDH phosphatases, which phosphorylate/inactivate and dephosphorylate/activate PDH, respectively. Our goal was to determine whether the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) regulates PDH activity and glucose oxidation in the heart via increasing the expression of Pdk4, the gene encoding PDHK4. To address this question, we differentiated H9c2 myoblasts into cardiac myocytes and modulated FoxO1 activity, after which Pdk4/PDHK4 expression and PDH phosphorylation/activity were assessed. We assessed binding of FoxO1 to the Pdk4 promoter in cardiac myocytes in conjunction with measuring the role of FoxO1 on glucose oxidation in the isolated working heart. Both pharmacological (1 µM AS1842856) and genetic (siRNA mediated) inhibition of FoxO1 decreased Pdk4/PDHK4 expression and subsequent PDH phosphorylation in H9c2 cardiac myocytes, whereas 10 µM dexamethasone-induced Pdk4/PDHK4 expression was abolished via pretreatment with 1 µM AS1842856. Furthermore, transfection of H9c2 cardiac myocytes with a vector expressing FoxO1 increased luciferase activity driven by a Pdk4 promoter construct containing the FoxO1 DNA-binding element region, but not in a Pdk4 promoter construct lacking this region. Finally, AS1842856 treatment in fasted mice enhanced glucose oxidation rates during aerobic isolated working heart perfusions. Taken together, FoxO1 directly regulates Pdk4 transcription in the heart, thereby controlling PDH activity and subsequent glucose oxidation rates.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Although studies have shown an association between FoxO1 activity and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 expression, our study demonstrated that pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 is a direct transcriptional target of FoxO1 (but not FoxO3/FoxO4) in the heart. Furthermore, we report

  1. Role of HLA-G1 in trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Feng, E-mail: jiangfeng1161@163.com [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 569 Xinsi Road, Baqiao District, Xi' an 710038 (China); Zhao, Hongxi [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 569 Xinsi Road, Baqiao District, Xi' an 710038 (China); Wang, Li [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Guo, Xinyu [Assisted Reproductive Center, General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou 510010 (China); Wang, Xiaohong; Yin, Guowu [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 569 Xinsi Road, Baqiao District, Xi' an 710038 (China); Hu, Yunsheng [Department of Orthopedics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Li, Yi [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 569 Xinsi Road, Baqiao District, Xi' an 710038 (China); Yao, Yuanqing, E-mail: yuanqingyaoxa@163.com [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2015-02-27

    Trophoblast cells are important in embryo implantation and fetomaternal tolerance. HLA-G is specifically expressed at the maternal–fetal interface and is a regulator in pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to detect the effect of HLA-G1 on trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. Human trophoblast cell lines (JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells) were infected with HLA-G1-expressing lentivirus. After infection, HLA-G1 expression of the cells was detected by western blotting. Cell proliferation was detected by the BrdU assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The invasion of the cells under different conditions was detected by the transwell invasion chamber assay. HLA-G1 didn't show any significant influence on the proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and invasion of trophocytes in normal culture conditions. However, HLA-G1 inhibited JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells invasion induced by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) under normal oxygen conditions. In conditions of hypoxia, HLA-G1 couldn't inhibit the induction of cell invasion by HGF. HLA-G1 is not an independent factor for regulating the trophocytes. It may play an indirect role in embryo implantation and formation of the placenta. - Highlights: • HLA-G1 could not influence trophocytes under normal conditions. • HLA-G1 inhibited cell invasion induced by HGF under normal oxygen condition. • HLA-G1 could not influence cell invasion under hypoxia conditions.

  2. Multivariate analyses of peripheral blood leukocyte transcripts distinguish Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, control, and those at risk for developing Alzheimer's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvaux, Elaine; Mastroeni, Diego; Nolz, Jennifer; Chow, Nienwen; Sabbagh, Marwan; Caselli, Richard J; Reiman, Eric M; Marshall, Frederick J; Coleman, Paul D

    2017-10-01

    The need for a reliable, simple, and inexpensive blood test for Alzheimer's disease (AD) suitable for use in a primary care setting is widely recognized. This has led to a large number of publications describing blood tests for AD, which have, for the most part, not been replicable. We have chosen to examine transcripts expressed by the cellular, leukocyte compartment of blood. We have used hypothesis-based cDNA arrays and quantitative PCR to quantify the expression of selected sets of genes followed by multivariate analyses in multiple independent samples. Rather than a single study with no replicates, we chose an experimental design in which there were multiple replicates using different platforms and different sample populations. We have divided 177 blood samples and 27 brain samples into multiple replicates to demonstrate the ability to distinguish early clinical AD (Clinical Dementia Rating scale 0.5), Parkinson's disease (PD), and cognitively unimpaired APOE4 homozygotes, as well as to determine persons at risk for future cognitive impairment with significant accuracy. We assess our methods in a training/test set and also show that the variables we use distinguish AD, PD, and control brain. Importantly, we describe the variability of the weights assigned to individual transcripts in multivariate analyses in repeated studies and suggest that the variability we describe may be the cause of inability to repeat many earlier studies. Our data constitute a proof of principle that multivariate analysis of the transcriptome related to cell stress and inflammation of peripheral blood leukocytes has significant potential as a minimally invasive and inexpensive diagnostic tool for diagnosis and early detection of risk for AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fruit-surface flavonoid accumulation in tomato is controlled by a SlMYB12-regulated transcriptional network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital Adato

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The cuticle covering plants' aerial surfaces is a unique structure that plays a key role in organ development and protection against diverse stress conditions. A detailed analysis of the tomato colorless-peel y mutant was carried out in the framework of studying the outer surface of reproductive organs. The y mutant peel lacks the yellow flavonoid pigment naringenin chalcone, which has been suggested to influence the characteristics and function of the cuticular layer. Large-scale metabolic and transcript profiling revealed broad effects on both primary and secondary metabolism, related mostly to the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids, particularly flavonoids. These were not restricted to the fruit or to a specific stage of its development and indicated that the y mutant phenotype is due to a mutation in a regulatory gene. Indeed, expression analyses specified three R2R3-MYB-type transcription factors that were significantly down-regulated in the y mutant fruit peel. One of these, SlMYB12, was mapped to the genomic region on tomato chromosome 1 previously shown to harbor the y mutation. Identification of an additional mutant allele that co-segregates with the colorless-peel trait, specific down-regulation of SlMYB12 and rescue of the y phenotype by overexpression of SlMYB12 on the mutant background, confirmed that a lesion in this regulator underlies the y phenotype. Hence, this work provides novel insight to the study of fleshy fruit cuticular structure and paves the way for the elucidation of the regulatory network that controls flavonoid accumulation in tomato fruit cuticle.

  4. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face....

  5. G protein-coupled receptor 30 ligand G-1 increases aryl hydrocarbon receptor signalling by inhibition of tubulin assembly and cell cycle arrest in human MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnow, Patrick; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory crosstalk between the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and oestrogen receptor α (ERα) is well established. Apart from the nuclear receptors ERα and ERβ, oestrogen signalling further involves an unrelated G protein-coupled receptor termed GPR30. In order to investigate potential regulatory crosstalk, this study investigated the influence of G-1 as one of the few GPR30-specific ligands on the AHR regulon in MCF-7 cells. As a well-characterised model system, these human mammary carcinoma cells co-express all three receptors (AHR, ERα and GPR30) and are thus ideally suited to study corresponding regulatory pathway interactions on transcript level. Indeed, treatment with micromolar concentrations of the GPR30-specific agonist G-1 resulted in up-regulation of AHR as well as the transcripts for cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1B1, two well-known targets of the AHR regulon. While this was partly attributable to G-1-mediated inhibition of tubulin assembly and subsequent cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, the effects nevertheless required functional AHR. However, G-1-induced up-regulation of CYP 1A1 was not mediated by GPR30, as G15 antagonist treatment as well as a knockdown of GPR30 and AHR failed to inhibit this effect.

  6. Nfib Regulates Transcriptional Networks That Control the Development of Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, Magdalena M; Kelly, Stephen M; Reese, Amy L; Cates, Justin M; Case, Tom C; Zhang, Jianghong; DeGraff, David J; Strand, Douglas W; Miller, Nicole L; Clark, Peter E; Hayward, Simon W; Gronostajski, Richard M; Anderson, Philip D; Matusik, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    A functional complex consisting of androgen receptor (AR) and forkhead box A1 (FOXA1) proteins supports prostatic development, differentiation, and disease. In addition, the interaction of FOXA1 with cofactors such as nuclear factor I (NFI) family members modulates AR target gene expression. However, the global role of specific NFI family members has yet to be described in the prostate. In these studies, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing in androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells demonstrated that 64.3% of NFIB binding sites are associated with AR and FOXA1 binding sites. Interrogation of published data revealed that genes associated with NFIB binding sites are predominantly induced after dihydrotestosterone treatment of LNCaP cells, whereas NFIB knockdown studies demonstrated that loss of NFIB drives increased AR expression and superinduction of a subset of AR target genes. Notably, genes bound by NFIB only are associated with cell division and cell cycle. To define the role of NFIB in vivo, mouse Nfib knockout prostatic tissue was rescued via renal capsule engraftment. Loss of Nfib expression resulted in prostatic hyperplasia, which did not resolve in response to castration, and an expansion of an intermediate cell population in a small subset of grafts. In human benign prostatic hyperplasia, luminal NFIB loss correlated with more severe disease. Finally, some areas of intermediate cell expansion were also associated with NFIB loss. Taken together, these results show a fundamental role for NFIB as a coregulator of AR action in the prostate and in controlling prostatic hyperplasia.

  7. The bHLH transcription factor SPATULA regulates root growth by controlling the size of the root meristem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makkena Srilakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Arabidopsis thaliana gene SPATULA (SPT, encoding a bHLH transcription factor, was originally identified for its role in pistil development. SPT is necessary for the growth and development of all carpel margin tissues including the style, stigma, septum and transmitting tract. Since then, it has been shown to have pleiotropic roles during development, including restricting the meristematic region of the leaf primordia and cotyledon expansion. Although SPT is expressed in roots, its role in this organ has not been investigated. Results An analysis of embryo and root development showed that loss of SPT function causes an increase in quiescent center size in both the embryonic and postembryonic stem cell niches. In addition, root meristem size is larger due to increased division, which leads to a longer primary root. spt mutants exhibit other pleiotropic developmental phenotypes, including more flowers, shorter internodes and an extended flowering period. Genetic and molecular analysis suggests that SPT regulates cell proliferation in parallel to gibberellic acid as well as affecting auxin accumulation or transport. Conclusions Our data suggest that SPT functions in growth control throughout sporophytic growth of Arabidopsis, but is not necessary for cell fate decisions except during carpel development. SPT functions independently of gibberellic acid during root development, but may play a role in regulating auxin transport or accumulation. Our data suggests that SPT plays a role in control of root growth, similar to its roles in above ground tissues.

  8. Combinatorial control of diverse metabolic and physiological functions by transcriptional regulators of the yeast sulfur assimilation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Allegra A; McIsaac, R Scott; Ho-Shing, Olivia; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Botstein, David

    2012-08-01

    Methionine abundance affects diverse cellular functions, including cell division, redox homeostasis, survival under starvation, and oxidative stress response. Regulation of the methionine biosynthetic pathway involves three DNA-binding proteins-Met31p, Met32p, and Cbf1p. We hypothesized that there exists a "division of labor" among these proteins that facilitates coordination of methionine biosynthesis with diverse biological processes. To explore combinatorial control in this regulatory circuit, we deleted CBF1, MET31, and MET32 individually and in combination in a strain lacking methionine synthase. We followed genome-wide gene expression as these strains were starved for methionine. Using a combination of bioinformatic methods, we found that these regulators control genes involved in biological processes downstream of sulfur assimilation; many of these processes had not previously been documented as methionine dependent. We also found that the different factors have overlapping but distinct functions. In particular, Met31p and Met32p are important in regulating methionine metabolism, whereas p functions as a "generalist" transcription factor that is not specific to methionine metabolism. In addition, Met31p and Met32p appear to regulate iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis through direct and indirect mechanisms and have distinguishable target specificities. Finally, CBF1 deletion sometimes has the opposite effect on gene expression from MET31 and MET32 deletion.

  9. Non-coding transcripts in the H19 imprinting control region mediate gene silencing in transgenic Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Smits, Guillaume; Fraser, Peter; Reik, Wolf; Paro, Renato

    2007-11-01

    The imprinting control region (ICR) upstream of H19 is the key regulatory element conferring monoallelic expression on H19 and Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2). Epigenetic marks in the ICR regulate its interaction with the chromatin protein CCCTC-binding factor and with other control factors to coordinate gene silencing in the imprinting cluster. Here, we show that the H19 ICR is biallelically transcribed, producing both sense and antisense RNAs. We analyse the function of the non-coding transcripts in a Drosophila transgenic system in which the H19 upstream region silences the expression of a reporter gene. We show that knockdown of H19 ICR non-coding RNA (ncRNA) by RNA interference leads to the loss of reporter gene silencing. Our results are, to the best of our knowledge, the first to show that ncRNAs in the H19 ICR are functionally significant, and also indicate that they have a role in regulating gene expression and perhaps epigenetic marks at the H19/Igf2 locus.

  10. Roles of Forkhead-box Transcription Factors in Controlling Development, Pathogenicity, and Stress Response in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaejin Park

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although multiple transcription factors (TFs have been characterized via mutagenesis to understand their roles in controlling pathogenicity and infection-related development in Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast, if and how forkhead-box (FOX TFs contribute to these processes remain to be characterized. Four putative FOX TF genes were identified in the genome of M. oryzae, and phylogenetic analysis suggested that two of them (MoFKH1 and MoHCM1 correspond to Ascomycota-specific members of the FOX TF family while the others (MoFOX1 and MoFOX2 are Pezizomycotina-specific members. Deletion of MoFKH1 (ΔMofkh1 resulted in reduced mycelial growth and conidial germination, abnormal septation and stress response, and reduced virulence. Similarly, ΔMohcm1 exhibited reduced mycelial growth and conidial germination. Conidia of ΔMofkh1 and ΔMohcm1 were more sensitive to one or both of the cell cycle inhibitors hydroxyurea and benomyl, suggesting their role in cell cycle control. On the other hand, loss of MoFOX1 (ΔMofox1 did not show any noticeable changes in development, pathogenicity, and stress response. Deletion of MoFOX2 was not successful even after repeated attempts. Taken together, these results suggested that MoFKH1 and Mo-HCM1 are important in fungal development and that MoFKH1 is further implicated in pathogenicity and stress response in M. oryzae.

  11. Transformation abrogates an early G1-phase arrest point required for specification of the Chinese hamster DHFR replication origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J R; Keezer, S M; Gilbert, D M

    1998-03-16

    The origin decision point (ODP) was originally identified as a distinct point during G1-phase when Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell nuclei experience a transition that is required for specific recognition of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) origin locus by Xenopus egg extracts. Passage of cells through the ODP requires a mitogen-independent protein kinase that is activated prior to restriction point control. Here we show that inhibition of an early G1-phase protein kinase pathway by the addition of 2-aminopurine (2-AP) prior to the ODP arrests CHO cells in G1-phase. Transformation with simian virus 40 (SV40) abrogated this arrest point, resulting in the entry of cultured cells into S-phase in the presence of 2-AP and a disruption of the normal pattern of initiation sites at the DHFR locus. Cells treated with 2-AP after the ODP initiated replication specifically within the DHFR origin locus. Transient exposure of transformed cells to 2-AP during the ODP transition also disrupted origin choice, whereas non-transformed cells arrested in G1-phase and then passed through a delayed ODP after removal of 2-AP from the medium. We conclude that mammalian cells have many potential sites at which they can initiate replication. Normally, events occurring during the early G1-phase ODP transition determine which of these sites will be the preferred initiation site. However, if chromatin is exposed to S-phase-promoting factors prior to this transition, mammalian cells, like Xenopus and Drosophila embryos, can initiate replication without origin specification.

  12. Selective translational control of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein transcript by iron regulatory protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Hee; Cahill, Catherine M; Vanderburg, Charles R; Scherzer, Clemens R; Wang, Bin; Huang, Xudong; Rogers, Jack T

    2010-10-08

    Iron influx increases the translation of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) via an iron-responsive element (IRE) RNA stem loop in its 5'-untranslated region. Equal modulated interaction of the iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) with canonical IREs controls iron-dependent translation of the ferritin subunits. However, our immunoprecipitation RT-PCR and RNA binding experiments demonstrated that IRP1, but not IRP2, selectively bound the APP IRE in human neural cells. This selective IRP1 interaction pattern was evident in human brain and blood tissue from normal and Alzheimer disease patients. We computer-predicted an optimal novel RNA stem loop structure for the human, rhesus monkey, and mouse APP IREs with reference to the canonical ferritin IREs but also the IREs encoded by erythroid heme biosynthetic aminolevulinate synthase and Hif-2α mRNAs, which preferentially bind IRP1. Selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension analysis was consistent with a 13-base single-stranded terminal loop and a conserved GC-rich stem. Biotinylated RNA probes deleted of the conserved CAGA motif in the terminal loop did not bind to IRP1 relative to wild type probes and could no longer base pair to form a predicted AGA triloop. An AGU pseudo-triloop is key for IRP1 binding to the canonical ferritin IREs. RNA probes encoding the APP IRE stem loop exhibited the same high affinity binding to rhIRP1 as occurs for the H-ferritin IRE (35 pm). Intracellular iron chelation increased binding of IRP1 to the APP IRE, decreasing intracellular APP expression in SH-SY5Y cells. Functionally, shRNA knockdown of IRP1 caused increased expression of neural APP consistent with IRP1-APP IRE-driven translation.

  13. Human RAD6 Promotes G1-S Transition and Cell Proliferation through Upregulation of Cyclin D1 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskup, Ewelina; Liu, Yan; Chen, Pei-Chao; Chang, Jian-Feng; Jiang, Wenjie; Jing, Yuanya; Chen, Youwei; Jin, Hui; Chen, Su

    2014-01-01

    Protein ubiquitinylation regulates protein stability and activity. RAD6, an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which that has been substantially biochemically characterized, functions in a number of biologically relevant pathways, including cell cycle progression. In this study, we show that RAD6 promotes the G1-S transition and cell proliferation by regulating the expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1) in human cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that RAD6 influences the transcription of CCND1 by increasing monoubiquitinylation of histone H2B and trimethylation of H3K4 in the CCND1 promoter region. Our study presents, for the first time, an evidence for the function of RAD6 in cell cycle progression and cell proliferation in human cells, raising the possibility that RAD6 could be a new target for molecular diagnosis and prognosis in cancer therapeutics. PMID:25409181

  14. Human RAD6 promotes G1-S transition and cell proliferation through upregulation of cyclin D1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengfeng Cai

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitinylation regulates protein stability and activity. RAD6, an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which that has been substantially biochemically characterized, functions in a number of biologically relevant pathways, including cell cycle progression. In this study, we show that RAD6 promotes the G1-S transition and cell proliferation by regulating the expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1 in human cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that RAD6 influences the transcription of CCND1 by increasing monoubiquitinylation of histone H2B and trimethylation of H3K4 in the CCND1 promoter region. Our study presents, for the first time, an evidence for the function of RAD6 in cell cycle progression and cell proliferation in human cells, raising the possibility that RAD6 could be a new target for molecular diagnosis and prognosis in cancer therapeutics.

  15. Replication-Independent Histone Variant H3.3 Controls Animal Lifespan through the Regulation of Pro-longevity Transcriptional Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Piazzesi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure orchestrates the accessibility to the genetic material. Replication-independent histone variants control transcriptional plasticity in postmitotic cells. The life-long accumulation of these histones has been described, yet the implications on organismal aging remain elusive. Here, we study the importance of the histone variant H3.3 in Caenorhabditis elegans longevity pathways. We show that H3.3-deficient nematodes have negligible lifespan differences compared to wild-type animals. However, H3.3 is essential for the lifespan extension of C. elegans mutants in which pronounced transcriptional changes control longevity programs. Notably, H3.3 loss critically affects the expression of a very large number of genes in long-lived nematodes, resulting in transcriptional profiles similar to wild-type animals. We conclude that H3.3 positively contributes to diverse lifespan-extending signaling pathways, with potential implications on age-related processes in multicellular organisms.

  16. Quarter variation and correlations of colostrum albumin, immunoglobulin G1 and G2 in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarütel, Jaak; Baumrucker, Craig R; Gross, Josef J; Dechow, Chad D; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2016-05-01

    A high variation in immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) concentration in first milked quarter colostrum has been reported, but BSA quarter colostrum variation is not known. The occurrence of serum albumin in milk has been attributed to increased blood-milk barrier penetration. Reports of serum albumin binding to the Fc Receptor of the neonate, the receptor thought to be responsible for IgG1 transcytosis, suggested that a correlation with the appearance of IgG1 in colostrum of dairy cows was likely. The objective of the study was to establish the quarter colostrum concentration and mass of immunoglobulins and serum albumin. First colostrum was quarter collected within 4 h of parturition from healthy udders of 31 multiparous dairy cows. Individual quarter colostrum weight was determined and a sample of each was frozen for subsequent analysis. Concentrations of immunoglobulin G1, G2, and BSA were measured by ELISA and total mass of components was calculated. In addition, colostrum was also analysed for L-lactate dehydrogenase activity. Analysis of concentration and mass of BSA, immunoglobulin G1, G2 established that the quarter variations were different by cow, quarter and quarter within cow. Partial correlations corrected for colostrum weight indicated that BSA and IgG2 concentration and mass are closely correlated while that of BSA and IgG1 concentration and mass exhibited no correlation suggesting that BSA and IgG1 may have different transport mechanisms. Interestingly, immunoglobulin G1 and G2 concentration and mass exhibited strong correlations suggesting that also some unknown mechanism of immunoglobulin G2 appearance in colostrum is occurring. Finally, no measured protein exhibited any correlation with the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in colostrum.

  17. Transcriptional control of Flt3 ligand targeted by fluorouracil-induced Egr-1 promoter in hematopoietic damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ionizing radiation (IR activate the early growth response-1 (Egr-1 promoter by production of radical oxygen intermediates (ROIs. Egr-EF, an expression vector pCIneo containing Egr-1 promoter cloned upstream of the cDNA for Flt3 ligand, was used to treat hematopoietic damage. 5-fluorouracil, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, cause tumor cell death by producing DNA damage and generating ROIs. We therefore hypothesized that clinically employed chemotherapeutic agents that increase ROIs could also be employed to activate Egr-EF in a chemoinducible gene therapy strategy. The goal of this study was to explore the effect of Flt3 Ligand gene transcription regulated by fluorouracil-induced Egr-1 promoter on hematopoietic recovery. Methods Human Flt3 Ligand (FL cDNA and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP cDNA were linked together with IRES and inserted into the expression vector pCI-neo under control of the Egr-1 promoter (Egr-EF. The vector was transfected into the HFCL human bone marrow stromal cell line, and these cells were exposed to 5-FU, a chemotherapeutic drug. Expression of FL by HFCL/EF cells after 5-FU treatment was determined with ELISA, western blot and RT-PCR assays. In addition, the effect of FL from HFCL/EF cell culture supernatants on growth of CD34+ cells from cord blood was also studied. HFCL/EF cells were injected into CB-17 combined immunodeficient (SCID mice with B16 melanoma. 5-FU was given three days after injection of the HFCL/EF cells. In the recipient mice, white blood cell levels in peripheral blood and expression of EGFP and FL in human stromal cells were measured. Tumor volumes in tumor-bearing mice were also measured. Results 5-FU treatment increased EGFP levels and secreted FL levels in HFCL/EF cells. Supernatants from HFCL/EF cell cultures treated with 5-FU increased CD34+ cell growth significantly. HFCL/EF exhibited an increase in the number of white blood cells after chemotherapy

  18. Identification of stable endogenous control genes for transcriptional profiling of photon, proton and carbon-ion irradiated cells

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    Sharungbam Geeta D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative analysis of transcriptional regulation of genes is a prerequisite for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of action of different radiation qualities such as photon, proton or carbon ion irradiation. Microarrays and real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR are considered the two cornerstones of gene expression analysis. In interpreting these results it is critical to normalize the expression levels of the target genes by that of appropriately selected endogenous control genes (ECGs or housekeeping genes. We sought to systematically investigate common ECG candidates for their stability after different radiation modalities in different human cell lines by qRT-PCR. We aimed to identify the most robust set of ECGs or housekeeping genes for transcriptional analysis in irradiation studies. Methods We tested the expression stability of 32 ECGs in three human cancer cell lines. The epidermoid carcinoma cells (A431, the non small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549 and the pancreatic adenocarincoma cells (BxPC3 were irradiated with photon, proton and carbon ions. Expression Heat maps, clustering and statistic algorithms were employed using SUMO software package. The expression stability was evaluated by computing: mean, standard deviation, ANOVA, coefficient of variation and the stability measure (M given by the geNorm algorithm. Results Expression analysis revealed significant cell type specific regulation of 18 out of 32 ECGs (p 18S, one of the most frequently used ECG, was differentially regulated as the function of different radiation qualities (p ≤ 0.01. A comprehensive search for the most stable ECGs using the geNorm algorithm identified 3 ECGs for A431 and BxPC3 to be sufficient for normalization. In contrast, 6 ECGs were required to properly normalize expression data in the more variable A549 cells. Considering both variables tested, i.e. cell type and radiation qualities, 5 genes-- RPLP0, UBC

  19. Identification of stable endogenous control genes for transcriptional profiling of photon, proton and carbon-ion irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharungbam, Geeta D; Schwager, Christian; Chiblak, Sara; Brons, Stephan; Hlatky, Lynn; Haberer, Thomas; Debus, Jürgen; Abdollahi, Amir

    2012-05-17

    Quantitative analysis of transcriptional regulation of genes is a prerequisite for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of action of different radiation qualities such as photon, proton or carbon ion irradiation. Microarrays and real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) are considered the two cornerstones of gene expression analysis. In interpreting these results it is critical to normalize the expression levels of the target genes by that of appropriately selected endogenous control genes (ECGs) or housekeeping genes. We sought to systematically investigate common ECG candidates for their stability after different radiation modalities in different human cell lines by qRT-PCR. We aimed to identify the most robust set of ECGs or housekeeping genes for transcriptional analysis in irradiation studies. We tested the expression stability of 32 ECGs in three human cancer cell lines. The epidermoid carcinoma cells (A431), the non small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549) and the pancreatic adenocarincoma cells (BxPC3) were irradiated with photon, proton and carbon ions. Expression Heat maps, clustering and statistic algorithms were employed using SUMO software package. The expression stability was evaluated by computing: mean, standard deviation, ANOVA, coefficient of variation and the stability measure (M) given by the geNorm algorithm. Expression analysis revealed significant cell type specific regulation of 18 out of 32 ECGs (p BxPC3. Of note, the ribosomal protein 18S, one of the most frequently used ECG, was differentially regulated as the function of different radiation qualities (p ≤ 0.01). A comprehensive search for the most stable ECGs using the geNorm algorithm identified 3 ECGs for A431 and BxPC3 to be sufficient for normalization. In contrast, 6 ECGs were required to properly normalize expression data in the more variable A549 cells. Considering both variables tested, i.e. cell type and radiation qualities, 5 genes-- RPLP0, UBC, PPIA, TBP and

  20. Description of the spin structure function g_1 at arbitrary $x$ and arbitrary Q^2

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2007-01-01

    The explicit expressions describing the structure function g_1 at arbitrary x and Q^2 are obtained. In the first place, they combine the well-known DGLAP expressions for g_1 with the total resummation of leading logarithms of x, which makes possible to cover the kinematic region of arbitrary x and large Q^2. In order to cover the small-Q^2 region the shift Q^2 -> Q^2 + mu^2 in the large-Q^2 expressions for g_1 is suggested and values of mu are estimated. The expressions obtained do not require singular factors x^{-a} in the fits for initial parton densities.

  1. Singlet structure function g_1 at small x and small Q^2

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2006-01-01

    Explicit expressions for the singlet g_1 at small x and small Q^2 are obtained with the total resummation of the leading logarithmic contributions. It is shown that g_1 practically does not depend on Q^2 in this kinematic region. In contrast, it would be interesting to investigate its dependence on the invariant energy 2pq because, being g_1 positive at small 2pq, it can turn negative at greater values of this variable. The position of the turning point is sensitive to the ratio between the initial quark and gluon densities, so its experimental detection would enable to estimate this ratio

  2. Small -x behavior of the non-singlet and singlet structure functions g_1

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2003-01-01

    Explicit expressions for the non-singlet and singlet structure functions g_1 at the small $x$-region are obtained. They include the total resummation of double-logarithmic contributions and accounting for the running QCD coupling effects. We predict that both the non-singlet and singlet g_1 asymptotically ~ x^{- \\Delta}, with the singlet intercept = 0.86 and being more than twice larger than the non-singlet intercept = 0.4. The impact of the initial quark and gluon densities on the sign of g_1 at x << 1 is discussed.

  3. M/G/1 Subject to an Initial Quorum of Customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-01

    is the maximal queue size (and system size) while the server idles or vacations. The modified model is designated as M/G/I1(m). When m=O we have the... designate this model as M/G/1/(m). Thus, when m = 0 we have the regular M/G/1. In a prior report (Krakowski, 1986) we dealt with the process "queue...size" for : i M/G/1(m). (Note: In that prior report m stands for the current m+1. The change simplifies somewhat the typography of many formulas.) We

  4. Synthesis and characterization of supramolecule self-assembly polyami-doamine (PAMAM G1-G1 NH2, CO2H end group Megamer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Louie

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecule self-assembly polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer refers to the chemical sys-tems made up of a discrete number of assembled molecular subunits or components. These strat-egies involve the covalent assembly of hierarchical components reactive monomers, branch cells or dendrons around atomic or molecular cores according to divergent/convergent dendritic branching principles, systematic filling of space around a core with shells (layers of branch cells. The polydispersity index (PDI for the supramolecule megamer are pretty closed to one, are in agreement with the Poisson probability distribution. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM den-drimer G1-G1 that it was PAMAM Megamer NH2, COOH end groupsynthesized and character-ized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMRspectra and GelPermeation Chromatography (GPC.

  5. Renal proximal tubule Na,K-ATPase is controlled by CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivators as well as salt-inducible kinase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Mary; Garimella, Sudha; Kim, Dongwook; Rajkhowa, Trivikram; Cutuli, Facundo

    2015-12-01

    Sodium reabsorption by the kidney is regulated by locally produced natriuretic and anti-natriuretic factors, including dopamine and norepinephrine, respectively. Previous studies indicated that signaling events initiated by these natriuretic and anti-natriuretic factors achieve their effects by altering the phosphorylation of Na,K-ATPase in the renal proximal tubule, and that protein kinase A (PKA) and calcium-mediated signaling pathways are involved. The same signaling pathways also control the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase β subunit gene atp1b1 in renal proximal tubule cells. In this report, evidence is presented that (1) both the recently discovered cAMP-regulated transcriptional coactivators (CRTCs) and salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) contribute to the transcriptional regulation of atp1b1 in renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells and (2) renal effectors, including norepinephrine, dopamine, prostaglandins, and sodium, play a role. Exogenously expressed CRTCs stimulate atp1b1 transcription. Evidence for a role of endogenous CRTCs includes the loss of transcriptional regulation of atp1b1 by a dominant-negative CRTC, as well as by a CREB mutant, with an altered CRTC binding site. In a number of experimental systems, SIK phosphorylates CRTCs, which are then sequestered in the cytoplasm, preventing their nuclear effects. Consistent with such a role of SIK in primary RPT cells, atp1b1 transcription increased in the presence of a dominant-negative SIK1, and in addition, regulation by dopamine, norepinephrine, and monensin was disrupted by a dominant-negative SIK1. These latter observations can be explained if SIK1 is phosphorylated and inactivated in the presence of these renal effectors. Our results support the hypothesis that Na,K-ATPase in the renal proximal tubule is regulated at the transcriptional level via SIK1 and CRTCs by renal effectors, in addition to the previously reported control of the phosphorylation of Na,K-ATPase.

  6. Nucleus-Independent Control of the Rubisco Operon by the Plastid-Encoded Transcription Factor Ycf30 in the Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoda, Ayumi; Weber, Andreas P.M.; Tanaka, Kan; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2010-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated from a cyanobacterium, which was engulfed by a primitive eukaryotic host cell. During evolution, chloroplasts have largely lost their autonomy due to the loss of many genes from their own genomes. Consequently, expression of genes encoded in the chloroplast genome is mainly controlled by the factors transferred from the cytosol to chloroplasts. However, chloroplast genomes of glaucophytes and red algae have retained some transcription factors (hypothetical chloroplast open reading frame 27 to 30 [Ycf27–Ycf30]) that are absent from green algae and land plants. Here, we show that the red algal chloroplast up-regulates transcription of the Rubisco operon rbcLS-cbbX via Ycf30 independently of nuclear control. Light-induced transcriptional activation of the Rubisco operon was observed in chloroplasts isolated from the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. The activation was suppressed by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. These results suggest that chloroplast autonomously regulates transcription of the Rubisco operon in response to the activation of photosynthesis driven by the light. Transcriptional activation of the Rubisco operon was specifically repressed by the addition of anti-Ycf30 antibodies. Furthermore, reduced NADP, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate, and 3-phosphoglyceric acid triggered the up-regulation of Rubisco transcription in the dark, and the activation was dependent on Ycf30. Thus, red algal chloroplasts have retained a nucleus-independent transcriptional regulation of the Rubisco operon to respond to environmental changes. The autonomous system would have been necessary for the initial fixation of cyanobacterial photosynthesis in the ancient nonphotosynthetic eukaryotic host. It has remained functional in the red algal chloroplast over evolutionary time. PMID:20813908

  7. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, Maël; Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Rípodas, Carolina; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Crespi, Martin; Gamas, Pascal; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Zanetti, Maria Eugenia; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Niebel, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants.

  8. Moments of the Spin Structure Functions g_1^p and g_1^d for 0.05 < Q^2 < 3.0 GeV^2

    CERN Document Server

    Prok, Y; Burkert, V D; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dodge, G E; Griffioen, K A; Kuhn, S E; Minehart, R; Adams, G; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Casey, L; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Credé, V; Cummings, J P; Dale, D; Dashyan, N; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Dhuga, K S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feldman, G; Fersh, R G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Huertas, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnstone, J R; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Keith, C D; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kühn, J; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Lachniet, J; Lag