WorldWideScience

Sample records for controls division progress

  1. Instrumentation and Controls Division annual progress report for period ending September 1, 1973

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, G.S. (comp.)

    1976-08-01

    Research progress is described under the following topics: (1) pulse counting and analysis; (2) support for the thermonuclear division ORMAK project; (3) miscellaneous electronics development; (4) detectors of ionizing particles and radiation; (5) radiation monitoring; (6) support for the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; (7) automatic control and data acquisition; (8) process instrumentation and control; (9) reactor instrumentation and controls; (10) instrumentation for reactor division experiments and test loops; (11) maintenance and service; and (12) ecological science studies. (WHK)

  2. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report for the period July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klobe, L.E. (ed.)

    1990-12-01

    The format of this Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report is a major departure from previous reports. This report has been published in two volumes instead of one, and the description of individual activities have been shortened considerably to make it easier document to scan and to read. Volume 1 of this report presents brief descriptions of a few highly significant programmatic and technological efforts representative of Instrumentation and Controls Division activities over the past two years. This volume contains information concerning the publications, presentations, and other professional activities and achievements of I C Division staff members.

  3. Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    The Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) Division serves a national laboratory, and as such has an expansive domain: science, industry, and national defense. The core mission is to support the scientific apparatus of the Laboratory and all of the systems that protect the safety and health of people and the environment. Progress is reported for the five sections: photonics and measurements systems, electronic systems, signal processing, controls and systems integration, and technical support.

  4. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1992. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the following information from the Instrumentation and Controls Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory: supplementary activities; seminars; publications and presentations; scientific and professional activities, achievements, and awards; and division organization charts.

  5. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the following information from the Instrumentation and Controls Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory: supplementary activities; seminars; publications and presentations; scientific and professional activities, achievements, and awards; and division organization charts.

  6. Instrumentation and Controls Division biennial progress report, September 1, 1978-September 1, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, G.S. (comp.)

    1981-06-01

    Brief summaries of research work are presented in the following section: overview of the ORNL Instrumentation and Controls Division activities; new developments and methods; reactor instrumentation and controls; measurement and control engineering; electronic engineering; maintenance; studies; services; and development; and division achievements.

  7. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report for the period July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1990. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klobe, L.E. [ed.

    1990-12-01

    The format of this Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report is a major departure from previous reports. This report has been published in two volumes instead of one, and the description of individual activities have been shortened considerably to make it easier document to scan and to read. Volume 1 of this report presents brief descriptions of a few highly significant programmatic and technological efforts representative of Instrumentation and Controls Division activities over the past two years. This volume contains information concerning the publications, presentations, and other professional activities and achievements of I&C Division staff members.

  8. Instrumentation and Controls Division biennial progress report, September 1, 1974--September 1, 1976. Non-LMFBR programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, G.S. (comp.)

    1976-11-01

    Research progress and developments are reported in the areas of basic electronics, instruments, radiation monitoring, pulse counting and analysis, electronic engineering support for research facilities, automatic control and data acquisition, reactor instrumentation and controls, fuel reprocessing and shipping, process systems and instrumentation development, thermometry, instrumentation for reactor division experiments and test loops, environmental science studies, miscellaneous engineering studies, services, and developments, and maintenance. (WHK)

  9. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report for the period July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klobe, L.E. (ed.)

    1988-12-01

    The Instrumentation and Controls (IandC) Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performs basic and applied instrumentation and controls research, development and design engineering, specialized instrument design and fabrication, and maintenance services for instruments, electronics, and computers. The IandC Division is one of the largest RandD organizations of its type among government laboratories, and it exists as the result of an organizational strategy to integrate ORNL's instrumentation and controls-related disciplines into one dedicated functional organization to increase the Laboratory's expertise and capabilities in these rapidly expanding, innovative areas of technology. The Division participates in the programs and projects of ORNL by applying its expertise and capabilities in concert with other divisions to perform basic research and mission-oriented technology development. Many of the Division's RandD tasks that are a part of a larger ORNL program are of sufficient scope that the IandC effort constitutes a separate program element with direct funding and management responsibility within the Division. The activities of IandC include performance of an RandD task in IandC facilities, the participation of from one of many IandC engineers and scientists in a multidisciplinary team working in a specific research area or development project, design and fabrication of a special instrument or instrumentation system, or a few hours of maintenance service. In its support and maintenance work, the role of the IandC Division is to provide a level of expertise appropriate to complete a job successfully at minimum overall cost and time schedule---a role which involves IandC in almost all ORNL activities.

  10. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report, September 1, 1980-July 1, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klobe, L.E.E. (ed.)

    1982-12-01

    Activities are reported by the Reactor Systems Section, Research Instrument Section, and the Measurement and Controls Engineering Section. Reactor system activities include dynamic analysis, survillanc and diagnostic methods, design and evaluation, detectors, facilities support, process instrumentation development, and special assignments. Activities in the Research Instrument Section include the Navy-ORNL RADIAC development program, advanced ..gamma.. and x ray detector systems, neutron detection and subcriticality measurements, circuit development, position-sensitive detectors, stand-alone computers, environmental monitoring-detectors and systems, plant security, engineering support for fusion energy division, engineering support for accelerator physics, and communications: radio, closed-circuit tv, and computer. Activities in the Measurement and Controls Engineering Section include the AVLIS program; gas centrifuge enrichment technology support; Advanced Instrumentation for Reflood Studies (AIDRS) program; instrumentation development support for fuel reprocessing; in-core experiments and reactor systems; energy, conservation, and electric power systems; computer systems; measurements research; and fossil energy studies Publications are listed. (WHK)

  11. Instrumentation and Controls Division biennial progress report, September 1, 1976--September 1, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, G.S. (ed.)

    1978-11-01

    Progress is summarized in the following research and development areas: electronic circuits;instruments; radiation monitoring; process systems and instrumentation; thermometry; instrumentation for engineering experiments and test loops; HTGR fuel recycle development; reactor measurements and analysis; automatic control and data acquisition; electronic engineering support for research facilities; miscellaneous engineering services, studies, and developments; maintenance; and environmental science studies.

  12. Instrumentation and Controls Division annual progress report for period ending September 1, 1974. Non-LMFBR program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, G.S. (comp.)

    1976-09-01

    Research projects are summarized under the following categories: (1) basic electronics development; (2) engineering support for research facilities; (3) pulse counting and analysis; (4) radiation detection and monitoring; (5) instrument development; (6) automatic control and data acquisition; (7) process systems and instrumentation development; (8) reactor instrumentation and controls; (9) fuel reprocessing and shipping; (10) standards laboratory; (11) instrumentation for reactor division experiments and test loops; (12) maintenance and service; (13) ecological science studies; and (14) administration and training. (WHK)

  13. Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period of July 1, 1994 to December 31, 1997: Publications, Presentations, Activities, and Awards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, D.W.

    1998-04-01

    This report contains a record of publishing and other activities in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) Division for the period of July 1, 1994, to December31, 1997. It is a companion volume to Working Together on New Horizons: Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period of July 1, 1994, to December 31, 1997 (OR.NLA4-6530). Working Together on New Horizons contains illustrated summaries of some of the projects under way in I&C Division. Both books can be obtained by contacting C. R. Brittain (brittain@ornl. gov), P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6005. l&C Division Mission and Vision I&C Division develops and maintains techniques, instruments, and systems that lead to a better understanding of nature and harnessing of natural phenomena for the benefit of humankind. We have dedicated ourselves to accelerating the advancement of science and the transfer of those advancements into products and processes that benefit U.S. industry and enhance the security of our citizens.

  14. Division 1137 property control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastor, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    An automated data processing property control system was developed by Mobile and Remote Range Division 1137. This report describes the operation of the system and examines ways of using it in operational planning and control.

  15. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, F.C.; Cook, J.S.

    1993-10-01

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report.

  16. Physics division. Progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, M.; Bacon, D.S.; Aine, C.J.; Bartsch, R.R. [eds.] [comps.] [and others

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Physics Division Progress Report describes progress and achievements in Physics Division research during the period January 1, 1995-December 31, 1996. The report covers the five main areas of experimental research and development in which Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in applied and basic sciences: (1) biophysics, (2) hydrodynamic physics, (3) neutron science and technology, (4) plasma physics, and (5) subatomic physics. Included in this report are a message from the Division Director, the Physics Division mission statement, an organizational chart, descriptions of the research areas of the five groups in the Division, selected research highlights, project descriptions, the Division staffing and funding levels for FY95-FY97, and a list of publications and presentations.

  17. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1995. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report. Attention is focused on the following research activities: molecular, cellular, and cancer biology; mammalian genetics and development; genome mapping program; and educational activities.

  18. Developmental control of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxem, M. (Mike)

    2002-01-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, cell divisions need to be coordinated with the developmental program of the entire organism. Although the mechanisms that drive cells through the division cycle are well understood, very little is known about the pathways that link extracellular signals

  19. Developmental control of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxem, M. (Mike)

    2002-01-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, cell divisions need to be coordinated with the developmental program of the entire organism. Although the mechanisms that drive cells through the division cycle are well understood, very little is known about the pathways that link extracellular signals

  20. Applied Physics Division 1998 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchini, M.; Crescentini, L; Ghezzi, L.; Kent, C.; Bottomei, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy). Applied physics Division

    1999-07-01

    This report outlines the 1998 research activities carried out by the Applied Physics Division of the Innovation Department of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment). The fields addressed and discussed include: optical and electro-optical technologies (chaps. 1 and 2); accelerator technologies (chap. 3); diagnostic systems for science and engineering (chaps. 4 and 5); theory, modelling and computational methods (chaps. 6 and 7). The aim of the Applied Physics Division is to develop technologies and systems that can be directly applied by internal (ENEA) and external users in research (high-resolution spectroscopy, laser-generated soft-x-ray sources), production processes (laser material photoproduction, structural analysis), social, cultural and environmental sciences (laser remote sensing, modelling of ecosystems and population dynamics) and medicine (particle accelerator for radiotherapy). Most of the work in 1998 was performed by the division's laboratories at the Frascati, Casaccia and Bologna Research Centres of ENEA; some was done elsewhere in collaboration with other ENEA units, external laboratories and industries. A good share of the activities was carried out for international projects; in particular, the IV European Union Framework Program.

  1. Energy Division progress report, fiscal years 1994--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, C.I. [ed.

    1996-06-01

    At ORNL, the Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this progress report for FY 1994 and FY 1995. The Division`s expenditures in FY 1995 totaled 44.9 million. Sixty percent of the divisions work was supported by the US DOE. Other significant sponsors include the US DOT, the US DOD, other federal agencies, and some private organizations. The Division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation systems, and (3) energy use and delivery technologies. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries, and transportation analysis. Transportation systems research seeks to improve the quality of both civilian and military transportation efforts. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on building equipment, building envelopes, (walls, roofs, attics, and materials), improvement of energy efficiency in buildings, and electric power systems.

  2. Biology Division. Progress report, August 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The Biology Division is the component of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that investigates the potential adverse health effects of energy-related substances. The body of this report provides summaries of the aims, scope and progress of the research of groups of investigators in the Division during the period of August 1, 1982, through September 30, 1983. At the end of each summary is a list of publications covering the same period (published or accepted for publication). For convenience, the summaries are assembled under Sections in accordance with the current organizational structure of the Biology Division; each Section begins with an overview. It will be apparent, however, that currents run throughout the Division and that the various programs support and interact with each other.

  3. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The body of this report provides summaries of the aims, scope and progress of the research by groups of investigators in the Division during the period of October 1, 1984, through September 30, 1985. At the end of each summary is a list of publications covering the same period. For convenience, the summaries are assembled under Sections in accordance with the current organizational structure of the Biology Division; each Section begins with an overview. It will be apparent, however, tha crosscurrents run throughout the Division and that the various programs support and interact with each other. In addition, this report includes information on the Division's educational activities, Advisory Committee, seminar program, and international interactions, as well as extramural activities of staff members, abstracts for technical meetings, and funding and personnel levels.

  4. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-07-01

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; Defense Free-Electron Lasers; AXY Programs; A Next Generation High-Power Neutron-Scattering Facility; JAERI OMEGA Project and Intense Neutron Sources for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Supercollider; The High-Power Microwave (HPM) Program; Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Power Systems Highlights; Industrial Partnering; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Theory and Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  5. Environmental Research Division technical progress report, January 1984-December 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    Technical progress in the various research and assessment activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1984 to 1985. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Environmental Impacts, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Waste Management Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter.

  6. Control of apoptosis by asymmetric cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hatzold

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric cell division and apoptosis (programmed cell death are two fundamental processes that are important for the development and function of multicellular organisms. We have found that the processes of asymmetric cell division and apoptosis can be functionally linked. Specifically, we show that asymmetric cell division in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by a pathway involving three genes, dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail, that directly control the enzymatic machinery responsible for apoptosis. Interestingly, the MIDA1-like protein GlsA of the alga Volvox carteri, as well as the Snail-related proteins Snail, Escargot, and Worniu of Drosophila melanogaster, have previously been implicated in asymmetric cell division. Therefore, C. elegans dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail may be components of a pathway involved in asymmetric cell division that is conserved throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Furthermore, based on our results, we propose that this pathway directly controls the apoptotic fate in C. elegans, and possibly other animals as well.

  7. Physics Division progress report, January 1, 1984-September 30, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, W.E. (comp.)

    1987-10-01

    This report provides brief accounts of significant progress in development activities and research results achieved by Physics Division personnel during the period January 1, 1984, through September 31, 1986. These efforts are representative of the three main areas of experimental research and development in which the Physics Division serves Los Alamos National Laboratory's and the Nation's needs in defense and basic sciences: (1) defense physics, including the development of diagnostic methods for weapons tests, weapon-related high-energy-density physics, and programs supporting the Strategic Defense Initiative; (2) laser physics and applications, especially to high-density plasmas; and (3) fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics, condensed-matter physics, and biophysics. Throughout the report, emphasis is placed on the design, construction, and application of a variety of advanced, often unique, instruments and instrument systems that maintain the Division's position at the leading edge of research and development in the specific fields germane to its mission. A sampling of experimental systems of particular interest would include the relativistic electron-beam accelerator and its applications to high-energy-density plasmas; pulsed-power facilities; directed energy weapon devices such as free-electron lasers and neutral-particle-beam accelerators; high-intensity ultraviolet and x-ray beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (at Brookhaven National Laboratory); the Aurora KrF ultraviolet laser system for projected use as an inertial fusion driver; antiproton physics facility at CERN; and several beam developments at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility for studying nuclear, condensed-matter, and biological physics, highlighted by progress in establishing the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center.

  8. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1989-03-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1988 fiscal year, beginning October 1, 1987, and ending September 30, 1988. The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. Operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility continues to represent the single largest activity within the Division. This year saw the completion of the acceleration tube upgrade of the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator and the achievement of record terminal potentials, operation for an experiment with 25 million volts on terminal, and successful tests with beam at 25.5 MV. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen significant growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies and especially ultrarelativistic beams. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as ''User Resources.'' The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program. The concentration of this program on optical and laser technology is marked by the change in designation to the Laser and Electro-Optics Lab. A small, continuing effort in elementary particle physics, carried out in collaboration with the University of Tennessee, is reported.

  9. Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period July 1, 1994, to December 31, 1997: Working Together on New Horizons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, D.W.

    1998-04-01

    The ORNL I&C Division was created to support DOE-funded research. We have since broadened our mission to include other sponsors as the need for our services has grown. This report summarizes some of the work we have been conducting on behalf of DOE, other federal agencies, and the private sector during the past three and a half years. Because we take on nearly 750 individual projects every year, much of our work cannot be reported in detail. We hope that these summaries are of interest and demonstrate that our work, rooted in DOE scientific and technological programs, can also benefit the nation, its industry, and its citizens in direct and tangible ways.

  10. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1988-03-01

    The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. A major activity within the Division is operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. Highlights for this year, which include a record number of beam hours provided for research, are summarized. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies (GANIL) and ultrarelativistic beams (CERN). The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. The experimental nuclear structure research of this consortium is included. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division also operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as /open quotes/User Resources/close quotes/. The tandem continues a long history of supporting research in accelerator-based atomic physics. During this past year, new beam lines have been added to the ECR ion source to create user opportunities for atomic physics experiments with this unique device. These two facilities and the experimental programs in atomic physics are discussed. The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. Also included is the theory effort in support of the UNISOR structure program. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program and operation of an atomic physics data center. The nuclear physics program also operates a compilation and evaluation effort; this work is also described.

  11. Experimental Facilities Division progress report 1996--97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the activities of the Experimental Facilities Division (XFD) in support of the users of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), primarily focusing on the past year of operations. In September 1996, the APS began operations as a national user facility serving the US community of x-ray researchers from private industry, academic institutions, and other research organizations. The start of operations was about three months ahead of the baseline date established in 1988. This report is divided into the following sections: (1) overview; (2) user operations; (3) user administration and technical support; (4) R and D in support of view operations; (5) collaborative research; and (6) long-term strategic plans for XFD.

  12. Control of oriented cell division in the Arabidopsis embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dop, van M.; Liao, C.Y.; Weijers, D.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular plant development requires strict control of cell division orientation. A key unanswered question is how developmental regulators interact with the generic cell division machinery to trigger oriented divisions. We discuss the Arabidopsis embryo as a model for addressing this question.

  13. Chemical Technology Division progress report, January 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This progress report presents a summary of the missions and activities of the various sections and administrative groups in this Division for this period. Specific projects in areas such as energy research, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing are highlighted, and special programmatic activities conducted by the Division are identified and described. The administrative summary portion features information about publications and presentations of Chemical Technology Division staff, as well as a listing of patents awarded to Division personnel during this period.

  14. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  15. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1986-04-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1985 fiscal year. The research activities were centered on experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The experimental nuclear physics program is dominated by heavy ion research. A major part of this effort is the responsibility for operating the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. A major new activity described is the preparation for participation in an ultrarelativistic heavy ion experiment to be performed at CERN in 1986. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. Theory efforts associated with the UNISOR program are described, as well as smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics. (LEW)

  16. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1985-01-01

    The research activities of the Division are centered primarily in three areas: experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The largest of these efforts, experimental nuclear physics, is dominated by the heavy ion research program. A major responsibility under this program is the operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. During the period of this report, the facility has begun routine operation for the experimental program. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. The theoretical physics program, both nuclear and atomic, is covered. This program has benefited this year from the success of the VAX-AP computer system and from the increase in manpower provided by the ORNL/University of Tennessee Distinguished Scientist Program. Smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics are summarized. During the period of this report, we continued to explore possible future extensions of the Holifield Facility. We retain a strong interest in a relativistic heavy-ion collider in the 10 x 10 GeV/nuclear energy range. The ideas for such a facility, described in last year's report, have been modified to utilize the HHIRF 25 MV tandem accelerator as the first stage. Finally, the report concludes with some general information on publications, Division activities, and personnel changes.

  17. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sincovec, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a record of the research activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division for the period January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1994. This report is the final archival record of the EPM Division. On October 1, 1994, ORELA was transferred to Physics Division and on January 1, 1995, the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division and the Computer Applications Division reorganized to form the Computer Science and Mathematics Division and the Computational Physics and Engineering Division. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL`s research in the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division.

  18. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology. (KRM)

  19. Environmental Research Division technical progress report: January 1986--October 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    Technical process in the various research activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1986-1987. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Organic Geochemistry and Environmental Instrumentation Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter. Individual projects under each division are processed separately for the data bases.

  20. Solid State Division Progress Report for Period Ending September 30, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, J.F.

    2001-02-26

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1997, through September 30, 1999. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program in support of Department of Energy science and technology missions. The report includes brief summaries of research activities in condensed matter theory, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. An addendum includes listings of division publications and professional activities. Over the past two years, a number of important infrastructure improvements that will provide significant new research opportunities and unique capabilities for the division in neutron scattering and synchrotron x-ray research, electron microscopy, nanostructure fabrication, and theory have been pursued. A major upgrade of neutron scattering capabilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), including a high-performance cold source, new beam lines and guides, and new and upgraded instrumentation, is under way. These upgrades, together with the proposed Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL, will provide the nation with unsurpassed capabilities worldwide in neutron scattering. The division is also involved in the development of two synchrotron beam lines at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, an upgrade of the Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscope to sub-angstrom resolution, development of a unique laser molecular beam epitaxy laboratory, and acquisition of a 11-Gflop parallel computer. Theoretical progress has included new insights into thin-film and surface phenomena, highly correlated systems, many body effects, quantum dots, and simulation of laser ablation. Neutron scattering has seen continued growth in the scientific user program along with progress on a broad research front including superconductivity, magnetism, polymers and complex fluids

  1. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.

    1997-12-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1995, through March 31, 1997. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program in support of Department of Energy science and technology missions. The report includes brief summaries of research activities in condensed matter theory, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. An addendum includes listings of division publications and professional activities.

  2. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  3. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. (eds.)

    1991-03-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1989, to September 30, 1990. During this period, division research programs were significantly enhanced by the restart of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and by new initiatives in processing and characterization of materials.

  4. Theoretical Division progress report. [October 1976-January 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, N.G. (comp.)

    1979-04-01

    This report presents highlights of activities in the Theoretical (T) Division from October 1976-January 1979. The report is divided into three parts. Part I presents an overview of the Division: its unique function at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) and within the scientific community as a whole; the organization of personnel; the main areas of research; and a survey of recent T-Division initiatives. This overview is followed by a survey of the 13 groups within the Division, their main responsibilities, interests, and expertise, consulting activities, and recent scientific accomplisments. The remainder of the report, Parts II and III, is devoted to articles on selected research activities. Recent efforts on topics of immediate interest to energy and weapons programs at LASL and elsewhere are described in Part II, Major National Programs. Separate articles present T-Divison contributions to weapons research, reactor safety and reactor physics research, fusion research, laser isotope separation, and other energy research. Each article is a compilation of independent projects within T Division, all related to but addressing different aspects of the major program. Part III is organized by subject discipline, and describes recent scientific advances of fundamental interest. An introduction, defining the scope and general nature of T-Division efforts within a given discipline, is followed by articles on the research topics selected. The reporting is done by the scientists involved in the research, and an attempt is made to communicate to a general audience. Some data are given incidentally; more technical presentations of the research accomplished may be found among the 47 pages of references. 110 figures, 5 tables.

  5. Physics division. Progress report for period ending September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, S.J. [ed.

    1997-04-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1995 and 1996 fiscal years, beginning October 1, 1994, and ending September 30, 1996. The activities of the Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. In addition, there are smaller programs in plasma diagnostics and data compilation and evaluation. During the period of this report, there has been considerable success in bringing the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) into routine operation. The budgets of the nuclear physics portion of the Division have increased each year in nearly all areas, and several new members have been added to the Division research and development staff. On August 30, 1996, the HRIBF successfully accelerated its first radioactive ion beams, {sup 69}As and {sup 70}As. Prior to this, the heart of the facility, the RIB injector system, was completed, including installation of a remote handling system for the target/ion source assembly. Target and ion source development is likely to be the technical key to success of the HRIBF. We have expanded our efforts in those development areas. Of special note is the development of highly permeable composite targets which have now been shown to allow release of difficult-to-produce radioactive ions such as {sup 17,18}F. A summary of the HRIBF work is provided in Chapter 1, along with supporting activities of the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research.

  6. Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division progress report for the period January 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poutsma, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides brief summaries of progress in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) during 1993 and 1994. The first four chapters, which cover the research mission, are organized to mirror the major organizational units of the division and indicate the scope of the research portfolio. These divisions are the Analytical Spectroscopy Section, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Section, Organic Chemistry Section, and Physical and Materials Chemistry Section. The fifth and sixth chapters summarize the support activities within CASD that are critical for research progress. Finally, the appendices indicate the productivity and recognition of the staff in terms of various forms of external publications, professional activities, and awards.

  7. Health, Safety, and Environment Division: Annual progress report 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.A. (comp.)

    1988-04-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environment protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Many disciplines are required to meet the responsibilities, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health and safety problems arise occasionally from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory. Research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed to study specific problems for the Department of Energy and to help develop better occupational health and safety practices.

  8. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1991-03-01

    The activities of this Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and its operation as a national user facility continued as the single largest activity within the Division. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to emphasize heavy ion studies, with much of the activity centered at the Holifield Facility. The work with heavy ions at ultrarelativistic energies continues at the CERN SPS. Studies at the Brookhaven AGS, particularly in preparation of future experiments at RHIC, have seen an increased emphasis. A major consortium has been formed to propose the design and construction of a dimuon detector as the basis for one the principal experiments for RHIC. Also included are results from the increasing effort in particle physics, including participation in the L* proposal for the SSC. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been associated intimately with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. A major area of experimental research for the Division is atomic physics. This activity comprises two groups: one on accelerator-based atomic physics, centered primarily at the EN-tandem and the Holifield Facility, but extending this year to an experiment at ultrarelativistic energies at the CERN SPS; and one on atomic physics in support of fusion energy, based primarily at the ECR ion source facility. Included in this section is also a description of a new effort in multicharged ion-surface interactions, and details of a planned upgrade of the ECR source.

  9. Illuminating traffic control for cell-division planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robatzek, Silke

    2014-01-01

    When a plant cell divides, four related proteins control the trafficking of vesicles and ensure that cargo that is normally recycled to the plasma membrane is instead re-routed to the plane of cell division.

  10. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, A.K.; Cerbone, R.J.; Sastre, C.

    1980-06-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  11. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR safety evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  12. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to provide an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period September 1, 1989 through March 31, 1991. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL's research on the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the division. As in previous reports, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations. Summary lists of publications and presentations, staff additions and departures, scientific and professional activities of division staff, and technical conferences organized and sponsored by the division are included as appendices. The report is organized following the division of our research among four sections and information centers. These research areas are: Mathematical Sciences; Nuclear Data Measurement and Evaluations; Intelligent Systems; Nuclear Analysis and Shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center.

  13. Physics Division annual progress report, January 1-December 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trela, W.J. (comp.)

    1984-12-01

    The Physics Division is organized into three major research areas: Weapons Physics, Inertial Fusion Physics, and Basic Research. In Weapons Physics, new strategic defensive research initiatives were developed in response to President Reagan's speech in May 1983. Significant advances have been made in high-speed diagnostics including electro-optic technique, fiber-optic systems, and imaging. In Inertial Fusion, the 40-kJ Antares CO/sub 2/ laser facility was completed, and the 1- by 1- by 2-m-long large-aperture module amplifier (LAM) was constructed and operated. In Basic Research, our main emphasis was on development of the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility as a world-class pulsed neutron research facility

  14. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shultz, W.D.

    1986-05-01

    Progress reports are presented for the four major sections of the division: analytical spectroscopy, radioactive materials laboratories, inorganic chemistry, and organic chemistry. A brief discussion of the division's role in the Laboratory's Environmental Restoration and Facilities Upgrade is given. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited.

  15. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD`s accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  16. Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period April 1, 1985, through December 31, 1986. The following major areas are covered in the discussion: nuclear and chemical waste management, environmental control technology, basic science and technology, biotechnology research, transuranium-element processing, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, radioactive materials production, computer/engineering applications, fission energy, environmental cleanup projects, and various other work activities. As an appendix, the Administrative Summary presents a comprehensive compilation of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this report period. An organization chart, a staffing level and financial summary, and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included to provide additional information. 78 figs., 40 tabs.

  17. Physics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-01

    Progress is reported in detail in the following areas: Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, neutron physics, theoretical physics, the Nuclear Data Project, atomic and plasma physics, and high energy physics. Publications are listed. Separate abstracts were prepared for 34 papers. (WHK)

  18. Biology Division progress report, June 1, 1980-July 31, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-12-01

    Highlights of progress for the period June 1980 through July 1982 are summarized. Discussions of projects are presented under the following headings: molecular and cellular sciences; cellular and comparative mutagenesis; mammalian genetics and teratology; toxicology; and carcinogenesis. In addition this report includes an outline of educational activities. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual technical reports for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  19. Physics Division progress report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollen, G.Y.; Schappert, G.T. [comp.

    1994-07-01

    This report discusses its following topics: Recent Weapons-Physics Experiments on the Pegasus II Pulsed Power Facility; Operation of a Large-Scale Plasma Source Ion Implantation Experiment; Production of Charm and Beauty Mesons at Fermilab Sudbury Neutrino Observatory; P-Division`s Essential Role in the Redirected Inertial Confinement Fusion Program; Trident Target Physics Program; Comparative Studies of Brain Activation with Magnetocephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Cellular Communication, Interaction of G-Proteins, and Single-Photon Detection; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Oxygen-doped La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+{delta}} Thermoacoustic Engines; A Shipborne Raman Water-Vapor Lidar for the Central Pacific Experiment; Angara-5 Pinch Temperature Verification with Time-resolved Spectroscopy; Russian Collaborations on Megagauss Magnetic Fields and Pulsed-Power Applications; Studies of Energy Coupling from Underground Explosions; Trapping and Cooling Large Numbers of Antiprotons: A First Step Toward the Measurement of Gravity on Antimatter; and Nuclear-Energy Production Without a Long-Term High-Level Waste Stream.

  20. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogden, I. (ed.)

    1984-09-01

    This progress report covers the research and development activities of the Metals and Ceramics Division from January 1, 1983, through June 30, 1984. The format of the report follows the organizational structure of the division. Short summaries of technical work in progress in the various experimental groups are presented in six parts. Chapter 1 deals with the research and development activities of the Engineering Materials Section, Chapter 2 with the Processing Science and Technology Section, Chapter 3 with the Materials Science Section, Chapter 4 with Project Activities, Chapter 5 with Specialized Research Facilities and Equipment, and Chapter 6 with Miscellaneous Activities.

  1. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD's accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  2. Proper division plane orientation and mitotic progression together allow normal growth of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Anding; Sylvester, Anne

    2017-01-01

    How growth, microtubule dynamics, and cell-cycle progression are coordinated is one of the unsolved mysteries of cell biology. A maize mutant, tangled1, with known defects in growth and proper division plane orientation, and a recently characterized cell-cycle delay identified by time-lapse imaging, was used to clarify the relationship between growth, cell cycle, and proper division plane orientation. The tangled1 mutant was fully rescued by introduction of cortical division site localized TANGLED1-YFP. A CYCLIN1B destruction box was fused to TANGLED1-YFP to generate a line that mostly rescued the division plane defect but still showed cell-cycle delays when expressed in the tangled1 mutant. Although an intermediate growth phenotype between wild-type and the tangled1 mutant was expected, these partially rescued plants grew as well as wild-type siblings, indicating that mitotic progression delays alone do not alter overall growth. These data indicate that division plane orientation, together with proper cell-cycle progression, is critical for plant growth. PMID:28202734

  3. Engineering Physics Division progress report period ending May 31, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-07-01

    Progress is described in the following areas: nuclear cross sections and related quantities; methods for generating and validating multigroup cross-section libraries; methods for reactor and shield analysis; methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis; integral experiments and nuclear analyses (integral experiments supporting fusion reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting fusion reactor designs, high-energy particle transport calculations, integral experiments supporting gas-cooled fast breeder reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting gas-cooled reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting utilization of light-water reactors, and integral experiment analyses supporting surveillance dosimetry improvement program); energy economics modeling and analysis; safety and reliability assessments for nuclear power reactors; and information analysis and distribution. Publications and papers presented are listed. (WHK)

  4. Solid State Division progress report, September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-04-01

    Progress made during the 19 months from March 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981, is reported in the following areas: theoretical solid state physics (surfaces, electronic and magnetic properties, particle-solid interactions, and laser annealing); surface and near-surface properties of solids (plasma materials interactions, ion-solid interactions, pulsed laser annealing, and semiconductor physics and photovoltaic conversion); defects in solids (radiation effects, fracture, and defects and impurities in insulating crystals); transport properties of solids (fast-ion conductors, superconductivity, and physical properties of insulating materials); neutron scattering (small-angle scattering, lattice dynamics, and magnetic properties); crystal growth and characterization (nuclear waste forms, ferroelectric mateirals, high-temperature materials, and special materials); and isotope research materials. Publications and papers are listed. (WHK)

  5. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report.

  6. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report.

  7. Relevant parameters in models of cell division control

    CERN Document Server

    Grilli, Jacopo; Kennard, Andrew S; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2016-01-01

    A recent burst of dynamic single-cell growth-division data makes it possible to characterize the stochastic dynamics of cell division control in bacteria. Different modeling frameworks were used to infer specific mechanisms from such data, but the links between frameworks are poorly explored, with relevant consequences for how well any particular mechanism can be supported by the data. Here, we describe a simple and generic framework in which two common formalisms can be used interchangeably: (i) a continuous-time division process described by a hazard function and (ii) a discrete-time equation describing cell size across generations (where the unit of time is a cell cycle). In our framework, this second process is a discrete-time Langevin equation with a simple physical analogue. By perturbative expansion around the mean initial size (or inter-division time), we show explicitly how this framework describes a wide range of division control mechanisms, including combinations of time and size control, as well a...

  8. Relevant parameters in models of cell division control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, Jacopo; Osella, Matteo; Kennard, Andrew S.; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2017-03-01

    A recent burst of dynamic single-cell data makes it possible to characterize the stochastic dynamics of cell division control in bacteria. Different models were used to propose specific mechanisms, but the links between them are poorly explored. The lack of comparative studies makes it difficult to appreciate how well any particular mechanism is supported by the data. Here, we describe a simple and generic framework in which two common formalisms can be used interchangeably: (i) a continuous-time division process described by a hazard function and (ii) a discrete-time equation describing cell size across generations (where the unit of time is a cell cycle). In our framework, this second process is a discrete-time Langevin equation with simple physical analogues. By perturbative expansion around the mean initial size (or interdivision time), we show how this framework describes a wide range of division control mechanisms, including combinations of time and size control, as well as the constant added size mechanism recently found to capture several aspects of the cell division behavior of different bacteria. As we show by analytical estimates and numerical simulations, the available data are described precisely by the first-order approximation of this expansion, i.e., by a "linear response" regime for the correction of size fluctuations. Hence, a single dimensionless parameter defines the strength and action of the division control against cell-to-cell variability (quantified by a single "noise" parameter). However, the same strength of linear response may emerge from several mechanisms, which are distinguished only by higher-order terms in the perturbative expansion. Our analytical estimate of the sample size needed to distinguish between second-order effects shows that this value is close to but larger than the values of the current datasets. These results provide a unified framework for future studies and clarify the relevant parameters at play in the control of

  9. Command Post Exercise Control at Division Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-05-01

    play. 7. vlar gaming methods utilized. 45Rudolf, War Games ( MSIP - 094, 1952), P• 22. ( ( ( 102 8. Intelligenc e play. 9. CBR play. Other areas...Army, MS #P-094, Washington , D. C., 1952. Howell, Robert P. Comments on CPX Control , Seventh Corps~ HQ Seventh Corps, APO 107, N.Y., N.Y., 14 Feb

  10. Process for control of cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, C. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method of controlling mitosis of biological cells was developed, which involved inducing a change in the intracellular ionic hierarchy accompanying the cellular electrical transmembrane potential difference (Esubm) of the cells. The ionic hierarchy may be varied by imposing changes on the relative concentrations of Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-), or by directly imposing changes in the physical Esubm level across the cell surface.

  11. Technical Division quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slansky, C.M. (ed.)

    1977-05-01

    Progress is reported in three categories: Fuel Cycle Research and Development, special materials production, and projects supporting energy development. Results are presented on the fluidized-bed calcination of high-level radioactive waste from the reprocessing of spent commercial nuclear fuel, on the post treatment of the calcine, and on the removal of actinide elements from the waste prior to calcination. Other projects include the development of storage technology for /sup 85/Kr waste; a study of the hydrogen mordenite catalyzed reaction between NO/sub x/ and NH/sub 3/; the adsorption and storage of /sup 129/I on silver exchanged mordenite; physical properties, materials of construction, and unit operations studies on the evaporation of high-level waste; the behavior of volatile radionuclides during the combustion of HTGR graphite-based fuel; and the use of fission product ruthenium in age-dating uranium ore bodies. The long-term management of defense waste from the ICPP covers post-calcination treatment of ICPP calcined waste. Improvements are reported on the Fluorinel head end process for Zircaloy-clad fuels. Studies are included on nuclear materials security; application of a liquid-solid fluidized-bed heat exchanger to the recovery of geothermal heat; inplant reactor source term measurements; burnup methods for fast breeder reactor fuels; research on analytical methods; and the behavior of environmental species of iodine.

  12. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continues to maintain an outstanding program of basic and applied research displaying a high level of creativity and achievement as documented by awards, publications, professional service, and successful completion of variety of projects. Our focus is on human health and the scientific basis for measurement and assessment of health-related impacts of energy technologies. It is our custom to publish a division progress report every 18 months that summarizes our programmatic progress and other measures of achievement over the reporting period. Since it is not feasible to summarize in detail all of our work over the period covered by this report (October 1, 1988, to March 30, 1990), we intend this document to point the way to the expensive open literature that documents our findings. During the reporting period the Division continued to maintain strong programs in its traditional areas of R D, but also achieved noteworthy progress in other areas. Much of the Division's work on site characterization, development of new field instruments, compilation of data bases, and methodology development fits into this initiative. Other new work in tunneling microscopy in support of DOE's Human Genome Program and the comprehensive R D work related to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy have attained new and exciting results. These examples of our progress and numerous other activities are highlighted in this report.

  13. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period October 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berven, B.A.

    1993-09-01

    This is a progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology, Biological and Radiation Physics, Chemical Physics, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis, Risk Analysis, Center for Risk Management, Associate Laboratories for Excellence in Radiation Technology (ALERT), and Contributions to National and Lead Laboratory Programs and Assignments--Environmental Restoration.

  14. Water Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abuaf, N.; Levine, M.M.; Saha, P.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-08-01

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evlauation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  15. Life Sciences Division progress report for CYs 1997-1998 [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Reinhold C.

    1999-06-01

    This is the first formal progress report issued by the ORNL Life Sciences Division. It covers the period from February 1997 through December 1998, which has been critical in the formation of our new division. The legacy of 50 years of excellence in biological research at ORNL has been an important driver for everyone in the division to do their part so that this new research division can realize the potential it has to make seminal contributions to the life sciences for years to come. This reporting period is characterized by intense assessment and planning efforts. They included thorough scrutiny of our strengths and weaknesses, analyses of our situation with respect to comparative research organizations, and identification of major thrust areas leading to core research efforts that take advantage of our special facilities and expertise. Our goal is to develop significant research and development (R&D) programs in selected important areas to which we can make significant contributions by combining our distinctive expertise and resources in the biological sciences with those in the physical, engineering, and computational sciences. Significant facilities in mouse genomics, mass spectrometry, neutron science, bioanalytical technologies, and high performance computing are critical to the success of our programs. Research and development efforts in the division are organized in six sections. These cluster into two broad areas of R&D: systems biology and technology applications. The systems biology part of the division encompasses our core biological research programs. It includes the Mammalian Genetics and Development Section, the Biochemistry and Biophysics Section, and the Computational Biosciences Section. The technology applications part of the division encompasses the Assessment Technology Section, the Environmental Technology Section, and the Toxicology and Risk Analysis Section. These sections are the stewards of the division's core competencies. The

  16. Engineering Physics Division progress report, December 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maienschein, F.C.

    1984-03-01

    Research summaries are given under the following headings: (1) nuclear data, (2) fission reactor research, (3) fusion reactor research, (4) high-energy accelerator shielding and detector research, (5) studies of nuclear weapons effects, (6) energy economics modeling and analysis, (7) analysis of CO/sub 2/ impact on climate, (8) intelligent control system research, and (9) information analysis and distribution. Publications and seminars are listed. (WHK)

  17. Control of sporulation-specific cell division in Streptomyces coelicolor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noens, Elke

    2007-01-01

    During developmental cell division in sporulation-committed aerial hyphae of streptomycetes, up to a hundred septa are simultaneously produced, in close harmony with synchromous chromosome condensation and segregation. Several unique protein families are involved in the control of this process, incl

  18. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, J.N. [ed.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division`s total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division`s programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  19. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8.

  20. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Counce, D.M.; Wolff, P.P. [eds.

    1993-04-01

    Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related Issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1992. Energy Division`s total expenditures in FY 1992 were $42.8 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, the US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 116.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, technology transfer, analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries, and civilian transportation analysis. Energy conservation technologies focus on electric power systems, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems conduct research for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. Much of Energy Division`s research is valuable to other organizations as well as to sponsors. This information is disseminated by the staff`s involvement in professional and trade organizations and workshops; joint research with universities and private-sector firms; collaboration with state and local governments; presentation of work at conferences; and publication of research results in journals, reports, and conference proceedings.

  1. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, P.P. [ed.

    1994-07-01

    One of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY1993. Energy Division is committed to (1) understanding the mechanisms by which societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society`s understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy-efficient technologies; (4) improving transportation policy and planning; (5) enhancing basic knowledge in the social sciences as related to energy and associated issues. Energy Division`s expenditures in FY1993 totaled $42 million. The work was supported by the US DOE, DOD, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 126.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and computer sciences and data systems. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy use and delivery technologies, and (3) transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, transportation analysis, and analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on electric power systems, building equipment, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Transportation systems research is conducted both to improve the quality of civilian transportation and for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  2. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 2001 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.G. Hoffman; K. Alvar; T. Buhl; E. Foltyn; W. Hansen; B. Erdal; P. Fresquez; D. Lee; B. Reinert

    2002-05-01

    This progress report presents the results of 11 projects funded ($500K) in FY01 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division (ESH). Five projects fit into the Health Physics discipline, 5 projects are environmental science and one is industrial hygiene/safety. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published sixteen papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplement funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and workspace, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Divisions.

  3. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1999 Progress Report, Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Hoffman

    2000-12-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($500K) in FY99 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Five are new projects for this year; seven projects have been completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published thirty-four papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division.

  4. Chemical Technology Division progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genung, R.K.; Hightower, J.R.; Bell, J.T.

    1993-05-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period July 1, 1991, through December 31, 1992. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Special programmatic activities conducted by the division are identified and described. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  5. Health physics division annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-01

    This annual progress report follows, as in the past, the organizational structure of the Health Physics Division. Each part is a report of work done by a section of the division: Assessment and Technology Section (Part I), headed by H.W. Dickson; Biological and Radiation Physics Section (Part II), H.A. Wright; Chemical Physics and Spectroscopy Section (Part III), W.R. Garrett; Emergency Technology Section (Part IV), C.V. Chester, Medical Physics and Internal Dosimetry Section (Part V), K.E. Cowser; and the Analytic Dosimetry and Education Group (Part VI), J.E. Turner.

  6. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selden, R.H. (ed.)

    1991-06-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division are described in this annual progress report for FY 1990. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of how societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy efficient technologies; and (4) developing improved transportation planning and policy. Disciplines of the 129 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, chemical heat pumps, refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building enveloped (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), retrofits for existing buildings, and electric power systems. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. 48 refs., 34 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. 75 FR 38128 - Sensata Technologies MA, Inc., Power Controls Division, Formerly Known As Airpax Corp., Cambridge...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Employment and Training Administration Sensata Technologies MA, Inc., Power Controls Division, Formerly Known..., 2010, applicable to workers of Sansata Technologies MA, Incorporated, Power Controls Division, formerly... under the control of the Cambridge, Maryland location of Sensata Technologies MA, Incorporated,...

  8. 75 FR 77664 - Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division, Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions... of Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division, Rock Island, Illinois... International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division. The Department has determined that these...

  9. Asymmetric cell division during T cell development controls downstream fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Kim; Shimoni, Raz; Charnley, Mirren; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Ramsbottom, Kelly; Oliaro, Jane; Izon, David; Ting, Stephen B.; Reynolds, Joseph; Lythe, Grant; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Melichar, Heather; Robey, Ellen; Humbert, Patrick O.; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian T cell development, the requirement for expansion of many individual T cell clones, rather than merely expansion of the entire T cell population, suggests a possible role for asymmetric cell division (ACD). We show that ACD of developing T cells controls cell fate through differential inheritance of cell fate determinants Numb and α-Adaptin. ACD occurs specifically during the β-selection stage of T cell development, and subsequent divisions are predominantly symmetric. ACD is controlled by interaction with stromal cells and chemokine receptor signaling and uses a conserved network of polarity regulators. The disruption of polarity by deletion of the polarity regulator, Scribble, or the altered inheritance of fate determinants impacts subsequent fate decisions to influence the numbers of DN4 cells arising after the β-selection checkpoint. These findings indicate that ACD enables the thymic microenvironment to orchestrate fate decisions related to differentiation and self-renewal. PMID:26370500

  10. Cell division control by the Chromosomal Passenger Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waal, Maike S. van der; Hengeveld, Rutger C.C.; Horst, Armando van der; Lens, Susanne M.A., E-mail: s.m.a.lens@umcutrecht.nl

    2012-07-15

    The Chromosomal Passenger Complex (CPC) consisting of Aurora B kinase, INCENP, Survivin and Borealin, is essential for genomic stability by controlling multiple processes during both nuclear and cytoplasmic division. In mitosis it ensures accurate segregation of the duplicated chromosomes by regulating the mitotic checkpoint, destabilizing incorrectly attached spindle microtubules and by promoting the axial shortening of chromosomal arms in anaphase. During cytokinesis the CPC most likely prevents chromosome damage by imposing an abscission delay when a chromosome bridge connects the two daughter cells. Moreover, by controlling proper cytoplasmic division, the CPC averts tetraploidization. This review describes recent insights on how the CPC is capable of conducting its various functions in the dividing cell to ensure chromosomal stability.

  11. Genetic control of plant development by overriding a geometric division rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshida, S.; Barbier de Reuille, P.; Lane, B.; Bassel, G.W.; Prusinkiewicz, P.; Smith, R.S.; Weijers, D.

    2014-01-01

    Formative cell divisions are critical for multicellular patterning. In the early plant embryo, such divisions follow from orienting the division plane. A major unanswered question is how division plane orientation is genetically controlled, and in particular whether this relates to cell geometry. We

  12. Genetic control of plant development by overriding a geometric division rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshida, S.; Barbier de Reuille, P.; Lane, B.; Bassel, G.W.; Prusinkiewicz, P.; Smith, R.S.; Weijers, D.

    2014-01-01

    Formative cell divisions are critical for multicellular patterning. In the early plant embryo, such divisions follow from orienting the division plane. A major unanswered question is how division plane orientation is genetically controlled, and in particular whether this relates to cell geometry. We

  13. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, J.N. (ed.)

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division's total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  14. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.

    1994-08-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. This research effort was enhanced by new capabilities in atomic-scale materials characterization, new emphasis on the synthesis and processing of materials, and increased partnering with industry and universities. The theoretical effort included a broad range of analytical studies, as well as a new emphasis on numerical simulation stimulated by advances in high-performance computing and by strong interest in related division experimental programs. Superconductivity research continued to advance on a broad front from fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity to the development of new materials and processing techniques. The Neutron Scattering Program was characterized by a strong scientific user program and growing diversity represented by new initiatives in complex fluids and residual stress. The national emphasis on materials synthesis and processing was mirrored in division research programs in thin-film processing, surface modification, and crystal growth. Research on advanced processing techniques such as laser ablation, ion implantation, and plasma processing was complemented by strong programs in the characterization of materials and surfaces including ultrahigh resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic-resolution chemical analysis, synchrotron x-ray research, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

  15. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1988: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-06-01

    The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described in this annual progress report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1988. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of the way society makes choices in energy use and energy-using technologies, (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental implications of changes in energy technology, and (3) improving and developing new energy-efficient technologies. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on four major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation and decision systems research, (3) technology research and development for improving the efficiency of energy and end-use technologies, and (4) electric power systems. The Division's total expenditures in FY 1988 were $44.3 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 139 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics.

  16. Fusion Energy Division progress report, 1 January 1990--31 December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1994-03-01

    The Fusion Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, encompasses nearly all areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an economical and environmentally attractive energy source for the future. The program involves staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the US and abroad. Achievements resulting from this collaboration are documented in this report, which is issued as the progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division; it also contains information from components for the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling; development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments; assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas; development and testing of materials for fusion devices; and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas (about 15% of the Division`s activities). Highlights from program activities during 1990 and 1991 are presented.

  17. Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, W. S. [ed.

    1982-04-01

    The functions of the Analytical Chemistry Division fall into three general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development and utilization; (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections each of which may carry out any type of work falling into the thre categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections which are: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; analytical technical support; bio/organic analysis section; and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Chapter 7 covers supplementary activities. Chapter 8 is on presentation of research results (publications, articles reviewed or referred for periodicals). Approximately 56 articles, 31 proceedings publications and 33 reports have been published, and 119 oral presentations given during this reporting period.

  18. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1998 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Hoffman; Kenneth Alvar; Thomas Buhl; Bruce Erdal; Philip Fresquez; Elizabeth Foltyn; Wayne Hansen; Bruce Reinert

    1999-06-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($504K) in FY98 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Nine projects are new for this year; two projects were completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published 19 papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space were also provided to the TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division. Products generated from the projects funded in FY98 included a new extremity dosimeter that replaced the previously used finger-ring dosimeters, a light and easy-to-use detector to measure energy deposited by neutron interactions, and a device that will allow workers to determine the severity of a hazard.

  19. Chemical Technology Division: Progress report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period January 1, 1987, to June 30, 1988. The following major areas are covered: waste management and environmental programs, radiochemical and reactor engineering programs, basic science and technology, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, and administrative resources and facilities. The Administrative Summary, an appendix, presents a comprehensive listing of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this period. A staffing level and financial summary and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included.

  20. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  1. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech's energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  2. Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

    1982-05-01

    This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  3. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1992-03-01

    This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

  4. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1992-03-01

    This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

  5. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-04-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: Analytical Research, Development and Implementation; Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization; and Technical Support. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1989. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 69 articles, 41 proceedings, and 31 reports were published, and 151 oral presentations were given during this reporting period. Some 308,981 determinations were performed.

  6. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shults, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    This report is divided into: Analytical spectroscopy (optical spectroscopy, organic mass spectrometry, inorganic mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry), inorganic and radiochemistry (transuranium and activation analysis, low-level radiochemical analysis, inorganic analysis, radioactive materials analysis, special projects), organic chemistry (organic spectroscopy, separations and synthesis, special projects, organic analysis, ORNL/UT research program), operations (quality assurance/quality control, environmental protection, safety, analytical improvement, training, radiation control), education programs, supplementary activities, and presentation of research results. Tables are included for articles reviewed or refereed for periodicals, analytical service work, division manpower and financial summary, and organization chart; a glossary is also included.

  7. E-Division semiannual report. Progress report, June 1--December 31, 1977. [Electronics and Instrumentation Division, LASL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, P.A. (comp.)

    1978-03-01

    The status of the programs and projects of the Electronics Division is reported for the period of June through December 1977. The presentation is divided into three sections: Research, Engineering Support, and Technical Services. Each of these sections presents the activities and accomplishments of the corresponding branch within the Division. The primary goal of the Research and Development branch is to advance technology for future applications. The primary goal of the Engineering Support branch is to apply advanced technology to laboratory and material problems. The primary goal of the Technical Services branch is to provide a technical base and support for Laboratory programs. These goals are reflected in this report. Among the subject areas included are the following: radiation detectors, temperature monitoring, electromagnetic probing, Josephson junction switching devices, fiber optics, high-temperature electronics, HVAC systems, microprocessors, fuel cell-powered vehicles, laser fusion.

  8. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Health and Safety Research Division: Progress report, October 1, 1985-March 31, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, P.J.

    1987-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress in our programs for the period October 1, 1985, through March 31, 1987. The division's presentations and publications represented important contributions on the forefronts of many fields. Eleven invention disclosures were filed, two patent applications submitted, and one patent issued. The company's transfers new technologies to the private sector more efficiently than in the past. The division's responsibilities to DOE under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) program includes inclusion recommendations for 3100 properties. The nuclear medicine program developed new radiopharmaceuticals and radionuclide generators through clinical trials with some of our medical cooperatives. Two major collaborative indoor air quality studies and a large epidemiological study of drinking water quality and human health were completed. ORNL's first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has achieved single atom resolution and has produced some of the world's best images of single atoms on the surface of a silicon crystal. The Biological and Radiation Physics Section, designed and constructed a soft x-ray spectrometer which has exhibited a measuring efficiency that is 10,000 times higher than other equipment. 1164 refs.

  10. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1995 January 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, M. (ed.)

    1996-05-01

    This document is a Progress Report for the Physical and Environmental Sciences, Physics Division, for the period 1995 January 1 to December 31, at the Chalk River nuclear Labs. The condensed matter science group continued to operate a multi-faceted program involving collaborative basic and applied research with external scientists in the fields of materials science, physics, chemistry and biology. The Applied Neutron Diffraction for Industry (And) program gained strength with ever wider applications for the nuclear, aerospace, and manufacturing programs. Steps continued towards making neutron scattering facilities at NRU reactor more user friendly. The neutrino physics group, as part of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Institute, collaborating with scientists from Canada, USA and UK. The accelerator physics group spent considerable effort working with materials and fuels scientists to show the value of accelerators as an out-reactor source of radiation. Specific research activities have included the demonstration of laser plasma deposition of diamond coating, which has potential application for high-wear components in reactors, and the study for a Free Electron Laser upgrade for the IMPELA accelerator. As a result of funding reduction all programs of the Division were dissolved as of 1997 March 31.

  11. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program.

  12. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1977-09-01

    Progress is reported for research programs in the metals and ceramics division of ORNL. In structure of materials, theoretical research, x-ray diffraction studies, studies of erosion of ceramics, preparation and synthesis of high temperature and special service materials, and studies of stabilities of microphases in high-temperature structural materials. Research into deformation and mechanical properties included physical metallurgy, and grain boundary segregation and embrittlement. Physical properties and transport phenomena were studied and included mechanisms of surface and solid state reactions, and properties of superconducting materials. The radiation effects program, directed at understanding the effects of composition and microstructure on the structure and properties of materials irradiated at elevated temperatures, is also described. (GHT)

  13. Control of nuclear division by the Chromosomal Passenger Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Most cells within an organism function while they are in a non-dividing state. Cells enter the division cycle to initiate tissue growth or to repair damaged tissue. In the last phase of this cycle, M-phase, cytoplasmic division (cytokinesis) is accomplished after, in case of dividing human cells, 23

  14. Cell division cycle 45 promotes papillary thyroid cancer progression via regulating cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Shi, Run; Zhao, Sha; Li, Xiaona; Lu, Shan; Bu, Hemei; Ma, Xianghua

    2017-05-01

    Cell division cycle 45 was reported to be overexpressed in some cancer-derived cell lines and was predicted to be a candidate oncogene in cervical cancer. However, the clinical and biological significance of cell division cycle 45 in papillary thyroid cancer has never been investigated. We determined the expression level and clinical significance of cell division cycle 45 using The Cancer Genome Atlas, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. A great upregulation of cell division cycle 45 was observed in papillary thyroid cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, overexpression of cell division cycle 45 positively correlates with more advanced clinical characteristics. Silence of cell division cycle 45 suppressed proliferation of papillary thyroid cancer cells via G1-phase arrest and inducing apoptosis. The oncogenic activity of cell division cycle 45 was also confirmed in vivo. In conclusion, cell division cycle 45 may serve as a novel biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for papillary thyroid cancer.

  15. Divisive gain modulation of motoneurons by inhibition optimizes muscular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Mikkel; Berg, Rune W

    2015-02-25

    When using muscles, the precision with which force is delivered is as important as the delivery of force itself. Force is regulated by both the number of recruited motoneurons and their spike frequency. While it is known that the recruitment is ordered to reduce variability in force, it remains unclear whether the motoneuron gain, i.e., the slope of the transformation between synaptic input and spiking output, is also modulated to reduce variability in force. To address this issue, we use turtle hindlimb scratching as a model for fine motor control, since this behavior involves precise limb movement to rub the location of somatic nuisance touch. We recorded intracellularly from motoneurons in a reduced preparation where the limbs were removed to increase mechanical stability and the motor nerve activity served as a surrogate for muscle force. We found that not only is the gain of motoneurons regulated on a subsecond timescale, it is also adjusted to minimize variability. The modulation is likely achieved via an expansive nonlinearity between spike rate and membrane potential with inhibition having a divisive influence. These findings reveal a versatile mechanism of modulating neuronal sensitivity and suggest that such modulation is fundamentally linked to optimization.

  16. 76 FR 81986 - Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division, Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... Employment and Training Administration Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions... Assistance on July 30, 2010, applicable to workers of Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control... location of Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division. The Department...

  17. ATP-binding cassette G-subfamily transporter 2 regulates cell cycle progression and asymmetric division in mouse cardiac side population progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Oikonomopoulos, Angelos; Unno, Kazumasa; Cao, Xin; Qiu, Yiling; Liao, Ronglih

    2013-01-04

    After cardiac injury, cardiac progenitor cells are acutely reduced and are replenished in part by regulated self-renewal and proliferation, which occurs through symmetric and asymmetric cellular division. Understanding the molecular cues controlling progenitor cell self-renewal and lineage commitment is critical for harnessing these cells for therapeutic regeneration. We previously have found that the cell surface ATP-binding cassette G-subfamily transporter 2 (Abcg2) influences the proliferation of cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cells, but through unclear mechanisms. To determine the role of Abcg2 on cell cycle progression and mode of division in mouse CSP cells. Herein, using CSP cells isolated from wild-type and Abcg2 knockout mice, we found that Abcg2 regulates G1-S cell cycle transition by fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicators, cell cycle-focused gene expression arrays, and confocal live-cell fluorescent microscopy. Moreover, we found that modulation of cell cycle results in transition from symmetric to asymmetric cellular division in CSP cells lacking Abcg2. Abcg2 modulates CSP cell cycle progression and asymmetric cell division, establishing a mechanistic link between this surface transporter and cardiac progenitor cell function. Greater understanding of progenitor cell biology and, in particular, the regulation of resident progenitor cell homeostasis is vital for guiding the future development of cell-based therapies for cardiac regeneration.

  18. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K. (comps.)

    1981-09-01

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  19. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1983-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Dvision of Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development, and utilization; and (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections, each of which may carry out any type of work falling in the three categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections (analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials, bio/organic analysis, and general and environmental analysis) during the period January 1, 1982 to December 31, 1982. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 61 articles, 32 proceedings publications and 37 reports have been published, and 107 oral presentations were given during this reporting period.

  20. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  1. You Are What You Eat: Metabolic Control of Bacterial Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Leigh G; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2016-03-01

    Fluctuations in nutrient availability are a fact of life for bacterial cells in the 'wild'. To survive and compete, bacteria must rapidly modulate cell-cycle processes to accommodate changing nutritional conditions and concomitant changes in cell growth. Our understanding of how this is achieved has been transformed in recent years, with cellular metabolism emerging as a central player. Several metabolic enzymes, in addition to their normal catalytic functions, have been shown to directly modulate cell-cycle processes in response to changing nutrient levels. Here we focus on cell division, the final event in the bacterial cell cycle, and discuss recent compelling evidence connecting division regulation to nutritional status and metabolic activity.

  2. Interface control document between PUREX/UO{sub 3} Plant Transition and Solid Waste Disposal Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1994-06-30

    This interface control document (ICD) between PUREX/UO{sub 3} Plant Transition (PPT) and Solid Waste Disposal Division (SWD) establishes at a top level the functional responsibilities of each division where interfaces exist between the two divisions. Since the PUREX Transition and Solid Waste Disposal divisions operate autonomously, it is important that each division has a clear understanding of the other division`s expectations regarding these interfaces. This ICD primarily deals with solid wastes generated by the PPT. In addition to delineating functional responsibilities, the ICD includes a baseline description of those wastes that will require management as part of the interface between the divisions. The baseline description of wastes includes waste volumes and timing for use in planning the proper waste management capabilities: the primary purpose of this ICD is to ensure defensibility of expected waste stream volumes and Characteristics for future waste management facilities. Waste descriptions must be as complete as-possible to ensure adequate treatment, storage, and disposal capability will exist. The ICD also facilitates integration of existing or planned waste management capabilities of the PUREX. Transition and Solid Waste Disposal divisions. The ICD does not impact or affect the existing processes or procedures for shipping, packaging, or approval for shipping wastes by generators to the Solid Waste Division.

  3. Metabolic control of cell division in α-proteobacteria by a NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufay, François; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    Prior to initiate energy-consuming processes, such as DNA replication or cell division, cells need to evaluate their metabolic status. We have recently identified and characterized a new connection between metabolism and cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We showed that an NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GdhZ) coordinates growth with cell division according to its enzymatic activity. Here we report the conserved role of GdhZ in controlling cell division in another α-proteobacterium, the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus. We also discuss the importance of amino acids as a main carbon source for α-proteobacteria.

  4. Divisive gain modulation of motoneurons by inhibition optimizes muscular control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mikkel; Berg, Rune W.

    2015-01-01

    regulated on a subsecond timescale, it is also adjusted to minimize variability. The modulation is likely achieved via an expansive nonlinearity between spike rate and membrane potential with inhibition having a divisive influence. These findings reveal a versatile mechanism of modulating neuronal...

  5. Religious Control of Schooling in England: Diversity and Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Britain is a multicultural, multi-faith and multiracial society overlaid by white institutional racism. The race riots in the northern cities of England in 2001 and in 2005 signal that social and ethnic divisions are prominent. This article considers the state schooling in England and the role which state-funded faith schools play in government…

  6. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The major elements of the Materials Sciences Program can be grouped under the areas of (1) structural characterization, (2) high-temperature alloy studies, (3) structural ceramics, and (4) radiation effects.

  7. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, D.F.; Bradley, R.A.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides an overview of activities and accomplishsments of the division from October 1992 through December 1993; the division is organized to provide technical support, mainly in the area of high-temperature materials, for technologies being developed by DOE. Activities span the range from basic research to industrial interactions (cooperative research and technology transfer). Sections 1-5 describe the different functional groups (engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials). Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines. Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative R and D programs and technology transfer functions. Finally, Sect. 8 briefly describes the division`s involvement in educational activities. Several organizational changes were effected during this period.

  8. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-01-01

    The following sentences highlight some of the technical activities carried out during 1991. They illustrate the diversity of programs and technical work performed within the Analytical Chemistry Division. Our neutron activation analysis laboratory at HFIR was placed into operation during 1991. We have combined inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) with a preparation procedure developed at the Argonne National Laboratory to measure ultra-trace levels of U, Pu, Np, and Am in body fluids, primarily urine. Much progress has been made over the last year in the interfacing of an rf-powered glow discharge source to a double-focusing mass spectrometer. Preliminary experiments using electrospray ionization combined with ion trap mass spectrometry show much promise for the analysis of metals in solution. A secondary ion microprobe has been constructed that permits determination of the distribution of organic compounds less than a monolayer thick on samples as large as 1 cm diameter. Fourier transform mass spectrometry has been demonstrated to be a highly effective tool for the detailed characterization of biopolymers, especially normal and modified oligonucleotides. Much has been accomplished in understanding the fundamentals of quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Work with ITMS instrumentation has led to the development of rapid methods for the detection of trace organics in environmental and physiological samples. A new type of time-of-flight mass spectrometer was designed for use with our positron ionization experiments. Fundamental research on chromatography at high concentrations and on gas-solid adsorption has continued. The preparation of a monograph on the chemistry of environmental tobacco smoke was completed this year.

  9. T.L. Lakwo, BSc, MPH, Senior Entomologist, Vector Control Division ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-06

    Jun 6, 2006 ... Request for reprints to: T.L. Lakwo, Vector Control Division, Ministry of Health, P.O. Box 1661, Kampala, Uganda ... sustainability, ownership and cost savings by health ..... other information dissemination media like posters,.

  10. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-01

    This eighth annual report of the Division covers work done during FY 1981 (October 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981). As with these documents in the past, the format follows approximately the organizational structure of the Energy Division. Chapters 2 through 6 summarize the activities of the sections of the Division: Environmental Impact Section, headed by H.E. Zittel; Regional and Urban Studies Section, R.M. Davis; Economic Analysis Section, R.B. Shelton; Data and Analysis Section, A.S. Loebl; and Efficiency and Renewables Research Section, J.W. Michel. In addition, work on a variety of projects which cut across section lines is reported in Chapter 7, Integrated Programs. These activities are under the supervision of T.J. Wilbanks, Associate Director for the Division. Separate abstracts are included for individual projects.

  11. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1985-03-01

    During the reporting period, relatively minor changes have occurred in the research areas of interest to the Division. Nearly all the research of the Division can be classified broadly as mission-oriented basic research. Topics covered include: theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; and preparation and characterization of research materials. (GHT)

  12. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, D.F.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the division, whose purpose is to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by US DOE. Activities range from basic research to industrial research and technology transfer. The division (and the report) is divided into the following: Engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials, program activities, collaborative research facilities and technology transfer, and educational programs.

  13. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys.

  14. Cell shape and Wnt signaling redundantly control the division axis of C. elegans epithelial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildwater, Marjolein; Sander, Nicholas; de Vreede, Geert; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2011-10-01

    Tissue-specific stem cells combine proliferative and asymmetric divisions to balance self-renewal with differentiation. Tight regulation of the orientation and plane of cell division is crucial in this process. Here, we study the reproducible pattern of anterior-posterior-oriented stem cell-like divisions in the Caenorhabditis elegans seam epithelium. In a genetic screen, we identified an alg-1 Argonaute mutant with additional and abnormally oriented seam cell divisions. ALG-1 is the main subunit of the microRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC) and was previously shown to regulate the timing of postembryonic development. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of developing larvae revealed that reduced alg-1 function successively interferes with Wnt signaling, cell adhesion, cell shape and the orientation and timing of seam cell division. We found that Wnt inactivation, through mig-14 Wntless mutation, disrupts tissue polarity but not anterior-posterior division. However, combined Wnt inhibition and cell shape alteration resulted in disordered orientation of seam cell division, similar to the alg-1 mutant. Our findings reveal additional alg-1-regulated processes, uncover a previously unknown function of Wnt ligands in seam tissue polarity, and show that Wnt signaling and geometric cues redundantly control the seam cell division axis.

  15. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

  16. Equipment, Organization and Command and Control Relationships of Intelligence and Electronic Warfare Support to the Heavy Division,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-05

    standard tactical mission given to the ESM and ECM as- sets of the division, the MI battalion Technical Control and Analysis Element ( TCAE ) performs all...and ESM assets within the division and assets that are supporting the division. Doctrinally the TCAE orchestrates the IEW system at division level by...totally dependent on the mission management and technical control exercised by the TCAE . It is this centralized management which most drives the

  17. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for period ending April 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1978-08-01

    The research goal of the Health and Safety Research Division is to conduct basic and applied research that contributes new scientific knowledge with emphasis in biophysical areas that lead to a better understanding of how alternative energy-related technologies affect man. Included in the basic research are fundamental processes that are important to understand formation, mobility, toxicity, detection, and characterization of pollutants. The applied research includes the integration of data from basic and applied studies through development of concepts and methodologies that can be used for energy-related assessments with primary focus on the health and safety of man. The division has no responsibilities for on-site health and safety.

  18. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    This report describes work done by staff of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during FY 1986. The work of the Division is quite diversified, but it can be divided into four research themes: (1) technology for improving the productivity of energy use; (2) technology for electric power systems; (3) analysis and assessment of energy and environmental issues, policies, and technologies; and (4) data systems research and development (R and D). The research is supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), numerous other federal agencies, and some private organizations. 190 refs., 60 figs., 23 tabs.

  19. E-Division semiannual report. Progress report, July 1--December 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, P.A. (comp.)

    1979-01-01

    The status of the programs and projects of the Electronics Division for the period July through December 1978 is reported. The presentation is divided into three sections: Research, Engineering Support, and Technical Services. Each of these sections presents the activities and accomplishments of the corresponding branch within the Division. The primary goal of the Research and Development branch is to advance technology for future applications. The primary goal of the Engineering Support Branch is to apply advanced technology to Laboratory and material problems. The primary goal of the Technical Services Branch is to provide a technical base and support for Laboratory programs. Most of the individual reports are quite short.

  20. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report.

  1. Arabidopsis TCP20 links regulation of growth and cell division control pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    During postembryonic plant development, cell division is coupled to cell growth. There is a stringent requirement to couple these processes in shoot and root meristems. As cells pass through meristems, they transit through zones with high rates of cell growth and proliferation during organogenesis. This transition implies a need for coordinate regulation of genes underpinning these two fundamental cell functions. Here, we report a mechanism for coregulation of cell division control genes and ...

  2. Physics Division annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977. [ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelson, P.H.

    1977-09-01

    The bulk of the Division's effort concerned nuclear physics and accelerator development, but work in the areas of nuclear data, research applicable to the magnetic fusion project, atomic and molecular physics, and high-energy physics is also recounted. Lists of publications, technical talks, personnel, etc., are included. Individual reports with sufficient data are abstracted separately. (RWR)

  3. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. (eds.)

    1992-09-01

    During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, superconductivity, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. The High Flux Isotope Reactor was returned to full operation.

  4. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending August 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-01

    This paper contains abstracts on research performed at the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The areas covered are: mathematical science; nuclear-data measurement and evaluation; intelligent systems; nuclear analysis and shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center. (LSP)

  5. Solid State Division: Progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1988-03-01

    This paper contains a collection of articles on research done at the Solid State Division of ORNL. General topics covered are: theoretical solid state physics; neutron scattering; physical properties of superconductors and ceramics; synthesis and characterization of solids; ion beam and laser processing; and surface and defect studies. (LSP)

  6. Stability of networked control systems with multi-step delay based on time-division algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changlin MA; Huajing FANG

    2005-01-01

    A new control mode is proposed for a networked control system whose network-induced delay is longer than a sampling period. A time-division algorithm is presented to implement the control and for the mathematical modeling of such networked control system. The infinite horizon controller is designed, which renders the networked control system mean square exponentially stable. Simulation results show the validity of the proposed theory.

  7. [Research progress on malaria vector control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guo-Ding; Cao, Jun; Zhou, Hua-Yun; Gao, Qi

    2013-06-01

    Vector control plays a crucial role in the stages of malaria control and elimination. Currently, it mainly relies on the chemical control methods for adult mosquitoes in malaria endemic areas, however, it is undergoing the serious threat by insecticide resistance. In recent years, the transgenic technologies of malaria vectors have made a great progress in the laboratory. This paper reviews the challenges of the traditional methods and the rapid developed genetic modified technology in the application of vector control.

  8. Positive control of cell division: FtsZ is recruited by SsgB during sporulation of Streptomyces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, J.; Borst, J.W.; Waal, de E.; Bisseling, T.; Wezel, van G.P.

    2011-01-01

    In bacteria that divide by binary fission, cell division starts with the polymerization of the tubulin homolog FtsZ at mid-cell to form a cell division scaffold (the Z ring), followed by recruitment of the other divisome components. The current view of bacterial cell division control starts from the

  9. Engineering Physics Division progress report for period ending November 30, 1978. [ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maienschein, F.C.

    1979-01-01

    Research and other activities of the Engineering Physics Division (formerly Neutron Physics Division) of ORNL during the period February 28, 1977 to November 30, 1978, are reported. The format is that of abstracts and summaries of prepared papers. Work is summarized in the following general areas: measurements of neutron cross sections and related quantities; cross-section theory, evaluations, and evaluation techniques; cross-section processing, testing, and sensitivity analyses; integral experiments and their analyses; development of methods for shield and reactor analyses; analyses for specific systems or applications (liquid-metal fast breeder reactor program, gas-cooled reactor program, alternate fuel cycle program, magnetic fusion energy program, high-energy physics program, accelerator breeding studies, miscellaneous studies); and information analysis and distribution. Overviews of each of these areas are included. (RWR)

  10. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    This report covers work done during FY 1983 by the staff of the Energy Division and its subcontractors and by colleagues in other Oak Ridge National Laboratory divisions working on Energy Division projects. The work can be divided into four areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) models and data systems, (3) research to improve the efficiency of energy use and to improve electric power transmission and distribution, and (4) research utilization. Support came principally from the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the US Department of Defense, but also from a number of other agencies and organizations. Analysis and assessment included work on (a) environmental issues, including those deriving from the preparation of environmental impact statements; (b) energy and resource analysis; and (c) emergency preparedness. The models and data systems area involved research on evaluating and developing energy, environment, and engineering simulation models and on devising large data management systems, evaluating user data requirements, and compiling data bases. Research on improving the efficiency of energy use was focused primarily on the buildings and electricity sectors. A major effort on heat pump technology, which includes both heat-activated and electrically driven systems, continues. An important aspect of all the work was research utilization. Since the Energy Division is doing applied research, results are, by definition, intended to solve problems or answer questions of DOE and other sponsors. However, there are other users, and research utilization activities include technology transfer, commercialization efforts, outreach to state and regional organizations, and, of course, information dissemination.

  11. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, R.C.

    1993-05-01

    In this report, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations organized into sections following the five major operating units in the division: Mathematical Sciences, Intelligent Systems, Nuclear Data and Measurement Analysis, Nuclear Analysis and Shielding, and the Engineering Physics Information Centers. Each section begins with an introduction highlighting honors, awards, and significant research accomplishments in that unit during the reporting period.

  12. Engineering Physics Division progress report for period ending November 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    Separate abstracts are included for sections concerning measurement of nuclear cross sections and related quantities; nuclear cross-section evaluations and theory; nuclear cross-section processing, testing, and sensitivity analysis; engineering physics division integral experiments and their analyses; development of methods for shield and reactor analysis; analyses for specific systems or applications; energy model validation; systems reliability and operations research; and information analysis and distribution.

  13. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    The energy crisis and creation of ERDA were dominant factors affecting the activities of the Environmental Sciences Division during the past year. Efforts primarily centered on coal conversion effluents, aquatic effects from power plants, terrestrial modeling of both radioactive and nonradioactive waste transport, mineral cycling, forest management, and information handling codes and techniques. A bibliography of publications, presentation, these, and other professional activities is included. (PCS)

  14. Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

    1981-05-01

    This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  15. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shults, W.D.; Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1980-05-01

    The progress is reported in the following sections: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, technical support, bio-organic analysis, nuclear and radiochemical analysis, and quality assurance. (DLC)

  16. Metal finishing and vacuum processes groups, Materials Fabrication Division progress report, March-May 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, J.W.; Romo, J.G.; Jones, L.M.

    1984-07-11

    Progress is reported in fabrication and coating activities being conducted for the weapons program, nuclear test program, nuclear design program, magnetic fusion program, and miscellaneous applications. (DLC)

  17. Controlling myopia progression in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith MJ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Molly J Smith, Jeffrey J WallineThe Ohio State University College of Optometry, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Myopia is a common disorder, affecting approximately one-third of the US population and over 90% of the population in some East Asian countries. High amounts of myopia are associated with an increased risk of sight-threatening problems, such as retinal detachment, choroidal degeneration, cataracts, and glaucoma. Slowing the progression of myopia could potentially benefit millions of children in the USA. To date, few strategies used for myopia control have proven to be effective. Treatment options such as undercorrection of myopia, gas permeable contact lenses, and bifocal or multifocal spectacles have all been proven to be ineffective for myopia control, although one recent randomized clinical trial using executive top bifocal spectacles on children with progressive myopia has shown to decrease the progression to nearly half of the control subjects. The most effective methods are the use of orthokeratology contact lenses, soft bifocal contact lenses, and topical pharmaceutical agents such as atropine or pirenzepine. Although none of these modalities are US Food and Drug Administration-approved to slow myopia progression, they have been shown to slow the progression by approximately 50% with few risks. Both orthokeratology and soft bifocal contact lenses have shown to slow myopia progression by slightly less than 50% in most studies. Parents and eye care practitioners should work together to determine which modality may be best suited for a particular child. Topical pharmaceutical agents such as anti-muscarinic eye drops typically lead to light sensitivity and poor near vision. The most effective myopia control is provided by atropine, but is rarely prescribed due to the side effects. Pirenzepine provides myopia control with little light sensitivity and few near-vision problems, but it is not yet commercially available as an eye drop or

  18. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poutsma, M.L.; Ferris, L.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    The Chemistry Division conducts basic and applied chemical research on projects important to DOE`s missions in sciences, energy technologies, advanced materials, and waste management/environmental restoration; it also conducts complementary research for other sponsors. The research are arranged according to: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, chemistry of advanced inorganic materials, structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, chemical and structural principles in solvent extraction, surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis, photolytic transformations of hazardous organics, DNA sequencing and mapping, and special topics.

  19. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1989-03-01

    The mission of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) is to provide a sound scientific basis for the measurement and assessment of human health impacts of radiological and chemical substances. Our approach to fulfilling this mission is to conduct a broad program of experimental, theoretical, and field research based on a strong foundation of fundamental physical studies that blend into well-established programs in life sciences. Topics include biomedical screening techniques, biological and chemical sensors, risk assessment, health hazards, dosimetry, nuclear medicine, environmental pollution monitoring, electron-molecule interactions, interphase physics, surface physics, data base management, environmental mutagens, carcinogens, and tetratogens.

  20. Long-term microfluidic tracking of coccoid cyanobacterial cells reveals robust control of division timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Feiqiao Brian; Willis, Lisa; Chau, Rosanna Man Wah; Zambon, Alessandro; Horowitz, Mark; Bhaya, Devaki; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Quake, Stephen R

    2017-02-14

    Cyanobacteria are important agents in global carbon and nitrogen cycling and hold great promise for biotechnological applications. Model organisms such as Synechocystis sp. and Synechococcus sp. have advanced our understanding of photosynthetic capacity and circadian behavior, mostly using population-level measurements in which the behavior of individuals cannot be monitored. Synechocystis sp. cells are small and divide slowly, requiring long-term experiments to track single cells. Thus, the cumulative effects of drift over long periods can cause difficulties in monitoring and quantifying cell growth and division dynamics. To overcome this challenge, we enhanced a microfluidic cell-culture device and developed an image analysis pipeline for robust lineage reconstruction. This allowed simultaneous tracking of many cells over multiple generations, and revealed that cells expand exponentially throughout their cell cycle. Generation times were highly correlated for sister cells, but not between mother and daughter cells. Relationships between birth size, division size, and generation time indicated that cell-size control was inconsistent with the "sizer" rule, where division timing is based on cell size, or the "timer" rule, where division occurs after a fixed time interval. Instead, single cell growth statistics were most consistent with the "adder" rule, in which division occurs after a constant increment in cell volume. Cells exposed to light-dark cycles exhibited growth and division only during the light period; dark phases pause but do not disrupt cell-cycle control. Our analyses revealed that the "adder" model can explain both the growth-related statistics of single Synechocystis cells and the correlation between sister cell generation times. We also observed rapid phenotypic response to light-dark transitions at the single cell level, highlighting the critical role of light in cyanobacterial cell-cycle control. Our findings suggest that by monitoring the growth

  1. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, July 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes progress made for the period July 1984 through September 1985. Sections describe research in health studies, dosimetry and biophysical transport, biological and radiation physics, chemical physics, and risk analysis. (ACR)

  2. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This progress report is divided into: engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, program activities, and collaborative research facilities. Very little hard data is presented. The appendices include listings of seminars, publications, and conference papers. (DLC)

  3. Advances in materials science, Metals and Ceramics Division. Triannual progress report, October 1979-January 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-31

    Progress is summarized concerning magnetic fusion energy materials, laser fusion energy, aluminium-air battery and vehicle, geothermal research, oil-shale research, nuclear waste management, office of basic energy sciences research, and materials research notes. (FS)

  4. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1978-May 31, 1980. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the four sections into which this progress report has been divided. The report also contains sections related to interdivision activities and educational activities. (ERB)

  5. New Cancer Prevention and Control Central Institutional Review Board Established | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Central Institutional Review Board (CIRB) Initiative announced the establishment of the Cancer Prevention and Control (CPC) CIRB January 14, extending the benefits of centralized review to investigators participating in clinical trials sponsored by the Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP). |

  6. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-04-01

    A summmary of the work in each section of the Energy Division at ORNL is given and can be characterized by two themes: (1) environmental assessment, including social and economic considerations, and (2) fuel conservation and energy conversion efficiency. The first theme encompasses the preparation of environmental statements and assessments for nuclear power plants and other energy facilities (Chap. 2) as well as regional analyses of social, economic, and environmental effects due to energy system development patterns (Chap. 3). The second theme characterizes a broad scope of conservation-related work, including efforts to understand energy demand patterns and to develop technologies and arrangements for reducing these demands (Chap. 4). This theme also encompasses research directed at improving both high- and low-temperature thermodynamic cycles driven by solar, geothermal, or fossil energy sources (Chaps. 5 and 6). A listing of publications and oral presentations complete the report. A separate abstract was prepared for each major section or program. (MCW)

  7. Fusion energy division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-01

    The ORNL Program encompasses most aspects of magnetic fusion research including research on two magnetic confinement programs (tokamaks and ELMO bumpy tori); the development of the essential technologies for plasma heating, fueling, superconducting magnets, and materials; the development of diagnostics; the development of atomic physics and radiation effect data bases; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; the physics and engineering of present-generation devices; and the design of future devices. The integration of all of these activities into one program is a major factor in the success of each activity. An excellent example of this integration is the extremely successful application of neutral injection heating systems developed at ORNL to tokamaks both in the Fusion Energy Division and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The goal of the ORNL Fusion Program is to maintain this balance between plasma confinement, technology, and engineering activities.

  8. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-01

    This report provides an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period June 30, 1985 through September 30, 1987. Work in Mathematical Sciences continues to include applied mathematics research, statistics research, and computer science. Nuclear-data measurements and evaluations continue for fusion reactors, fission reactors, and other nuclear systems. Also discussed are long-standing studies of fission-reactor shields through experiments and related analysis, of accelerator shielding, and of fusion-reactor neutronics. Work in Machine Intelligence continues to feature the development of an autonomous robot. The last descriptive part of this report reflects the work in our Engineering Physics Information Center, which again concentrates primarily upon radiation-shielding methods and related data.

  9. Stereotypical cell division orientation controls neural rod midline formation in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Hernández, Elena; Caneparo, Luca; Schneider, Sylvia; Winkler, Sylke; Liebling, Michael; Fraser, Scott E; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2010-11-09

    The development of multicellular organisms is dependent on the tight coordination between tissue growth and morphogenesis. The stereotypical orientation of cell divisions has been proposed to be a fundamental mechanism by which proliferating and growing tissues take shape. However, the actual contribution of stereotypical division orientation (SDO) to tissue morphogenesis is unclear. In zebrafish, cell divisions with stereotypical orientation have been implicated in both body-axis elongation and neural rod formation, although there is little direct evidence for a critical function of SDO in either of these processes. Here we show that SDO is required for formation of the neural rod midline during neurulation but dispensable for elongation of the body axis during gastrulation. Our data indicate that SDO during both gastrulation and neurulation is dependent on the noncanonical Wnt receptor Frizzled 7 (Fz7) and that interfering with cell division orientation leads to severe defects in neural rod midline formation but not body-axis elongation. These findings suggest a novel function for Fz7-controlled cell division orientation in neural rod midline formation during neurulation.

  10. BRCA1 controls the cell division axis and governs ploidy and phenotype in human mammary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhengcheng; Kannan, Nagarajan; Nemirovsky, Oksana; Chen, Helen; Connell, Marisa; Taylor, Brian; Jiang, Jihong; Pilarski, Linda M; Fleisch, Markus C; Niederacher, Dieter; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Eaves, Connie J; Maxwell, Christopher A

    2017-05-16

    BRCA1 deficiency may perturb the differentiation hierarchy present in the normal mammary gland and is associated with the genesis of breast cancers that are genomically unstable and typically display a basal-like transcriptome. Oriented cell division is a mechanism known to regulate cell fates and to restrict tumor formation. We now show that the cell division axis is altered following shRNA-mediated BRCA1 depletion in immortalized but non-tumorigenic, or freshly isolated normal human mammary cells with graded consequences in progeny cells that include aneuploidy, perturbation of cell polarity in spheroid cultures, and a selective loss of cells with luminal features. BRCA1 depletion stabilizes HMMR abundance and disrupts cortical asymmetry of NUMA-dynein complexes in dividing cells such that polarity cues provided by cell-matrix adhesions were not able to orient division. We also show that immortalized mammary cells carrying a mutant BRCA1 allele (BRCA1 185delAG/+) reproduce many of these effects but in this model, oriented divisions were maintained through cues provided by CDH1+ cell-cell junctions. These findings reveal a previously unknown effect of BRCA1 suppression on mechanisms that regulate the cell division axis in proliferating, non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells and consequent downstream effects on the mitotic integrity and phenotype control of their progeny.

  11. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1984-05-01

    Progress and activities are reported in: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials analysis, bio/organic analysis, general and environmental analysis, and quality assurance and safety. Supplementary activities are also discussed, and a bibliography of publications is also included. (DLC)

  12. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, April 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-02-01

    Research progress for the reporting period is briefly summarized for the following sections: (1) health studies, (2) technology assessments, (3) biological and radiation physics, (4) chemical physics, (5) Office of Risk Analysis, and (6) health and environmental risk and analysis. (ACR)

  13. Metals and ceramics division materials science program. Aunnual progress report for period ending June 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1979-10-01

    Progress is reported concerning theoretical studies of metals and alloys, deformation and mechanical properties, physical properties and transport phenomena, radiation effects, and engineering materials. During this period emphasis was shifted from support of nuclear technologies to support of nonnuclear energy systems. (FS)

  14. Health and Safety Research Division. Progress report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-08-01

    Research progress for the period October 1, 1979 through March 31, 1981 is reported. Research conducted by the Office of Integrated Assessments and Policy Analysis, Health Studies Section, Technology Assessments Section, Biological and Radiation Physics Section, and Chemical Physics Section is summarized. (ACR)

  15. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1985-04-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following sections: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectroscopy; radioactive materials analysis; bio/organic analysis; and general and environmental analysis; quality assurance, safety, and tabulation analyses. In addition a list of publications and oral presentations and supplemental activities are included.

  16. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-10-01

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

  17. Neutron Physics Division progress report for period ending February 28, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maienschein, F.C.

    1977-05-01

    Summaries are given of research progress in the following areas: (1) measurements of cross sections and related quantities, (2) cross section evaluations and theory, (3) cross section processing, testing, and sensitivity analysis, (4) integral experiments and their analyses, (5) development of methods for shield and reactor analyses, (6) analyses for specific systems or applications, and (7) information analysis and distribution. (SDF)

  18. Experimental Physics Division of the Los Alamos Project. Progress report No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-09-01

    Included in this semi-monthly report written in 1943 are progress with neutron beams, neutron absorption in enriched materials, equipment operation and maintenance reports of the cyclotron neutron source facility, and instrumentation maintenance activities of individuals in the cyclotron group. (GHT)

  19. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-05-01

    Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

  20. Occupational health and environment research 1983: Health, Safety, and Environment Division. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelz, G.L. (comp.)

    1985-05-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of respiratory protective equipment included the XM-30 and M17A1 military masks, use of MAG-1 spectacles in respirators, and eight self-contained units. The latter units were used in an evaluation of test procedures used for Bureau of Mines approval of breathing apparatuses. Analyses of air samples from field studies of a modified in situ oil shale retorting facility were performed for total cyclohexane extractables and selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Aerosols generation and characterization of effluents from oil shale processing were continued as part of an inhalation toxicology study. Additional data on plutonium excretion in urine are presented and point up problems in using the Langham equation to predict plutonium deposition in the body from long-term excretion data. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1983 showed the highest estimated radiation dose from Laboratory operations to be about 26% of the natural background radiation dose. Several studies on radionuclides and their transport in the Los Alamos environment are described. The chemical quality of surface and ground water near the geothermal hot dry rock facility is described. Short- and long-term consequences to man from releases of radionuclides into the environment can be simulated by the BIOTRAN computer model, which is discussed brirfly.

  1. Fusion Energy Division progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.

    1995-09-01

    The report covers all elements of the ORNL Fusion Program, including those implemented outside the division. Non-fusion work within FED, much of which is based on the application of fusion technologies and techniques, is also discussed. The ORNL Fusion Program includes research and development in most areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US and international fusion efforts. The research discussed in this report includes: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices; development and testing of plasma diagnostic tools and techniques; assembly and distribution of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. The activities involving the use of fusion technologies and expertise for non-fusion applications ranged from semiconductor manufacturing to environmental management.

  2. Division of Atomic Physics. Lund Institute of Technology. Progress Report 1993-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlstroem, C.G. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    The Division of Atomic Physics is responsible for basic physics teaching in all engineering disciplines and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Spectroscopy, Laser Physics, and Non-Linear Optics. Research activities are mainly carried out in the fields of basic and applied spectroscopy, largely based on the use of lasers. Projects in the following areas are reported: Basic Atomic Physics - Atomic physics with high power laser radiation; Laser spectroscopic investigations of atomic and ionic excited states in the short-wavelength region; Laser spectroscopy in the visible; Theoretical Atomic Physics; Applied Optics and Quantum Electronics -High resolution spectroscopy; Photon echoes in Rare Earth Ion Doped Crystals; diode laser Spectroscopy; Environmental Remote Sensing -Tropospheric Ozone Lidar; Measurement of gases of geophysical origin; Industrial and Urban Pollution Measurements; Laser induced fluorescence of vegetation and water; Applications in Medicine and Biology - Tissue diagnostic using Laser-induced fluorescence; Photodynamic Therapy; Measurement of Optical Properties of Tissue with applications to Diagnostics; Two Photon Excited fluorescence Microscopy; Capillary Electrophoresis; New Techniques; Industrial Applications - Optical spectroscopy in Metallurgy; Physics of Electric Breakdown in Dielectric liquids; Optical Spectroscopy of Paper.

  3. Polarity, cell division, and out-of-equilibrium dynamics control the growth of epithelial structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, Benedetta; Puliafito, Alberto; Shewan, Annette M.; Yu, Wei; Combes, Alexander N.; Little, Melissa H.; Chianale, Federica; Primo, Luca; Serini, Guido; Mostov, Keith E.; Celani, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The growth of a well-formed epithelial structure is governed by mechanical constraints, cellular apico-basal polarity, and spatially controlled cell division. Here we compared the predictions of a mathematical model of epithelial growth with the morphological analysis of 3D epithelial structures. In both in vitro cyst models and in developing epithelial structures in vivo, epithelial growth could take place close to or far from mechanical equilibrium, and was determined by the hierarchy of time-scales of cell division, cell–cell rearrangements, and lumen dynamics. Equilibrium properties could be inferred by the analysis of cell–cell contact topologies, and the nonequilibrium phenotype was altered by inhibiting ROCK activity. The occurrence of an aberrant multilumen phenotype was linked to fast nonequilibrium growth, even when geometric control of cell division was correctly enforced. We predicted and verified experimentally that slowing down cell division partially rescued a multilumen phenotype induced by altered polarity. These results improve our understanding of the development of epithelial organs and, ultimately, of carcinogenesis. PMID:24145168

  4. Solid-State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1983-09-01

    Progress and activities are reported on: theoretical solid-state physics (surfaces; electronic, vibrational, and magnetic properties; particle-solid interactions; laser annealing), surface and near-surface properties of solids (surface, plasma-material interactions, ion implantation and ion-beam mixing, pulsed-laser and thermal processing), defects in solids (radiation effects, fracture, impurities and defects, semiconductor physics and photovoltaic conversion), transport properties of solids (fast-ion conductors, superconductivity, mass and charge transport in materials), neutron scattering (small-angle scattering, lattice dynamics, magnetic properties, structure and instrumentation), and preparation and characterization of research materials (growth and preparative methods, nuclear waste forms, special materials). (DLC)

  5. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1996 January 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, B.M. (ed.)

    1997-04-01

    This document is the last Progress Report for the Neutron and Condensed Matter Science Branch, at Chalk River Labs of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The materials science program continued to include measurements of stress as a major component, but the determination of phase diagrams for specific alloys was also a prominent activity. Studies were made of two types of unusual magnetic materials. The magnetic properties of several oxide pyrochlore were investigated and spin waves were measured in the magnetic semiconductor, chalcopyrite. The crystal structures of the deuterated anti fluorite were determined and the reorientation of the ammonium ion was refined in detail. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were used to investigate whether spontaneous phase separation into chiral domains occurs for mixtures of DPPC of opposite chirality. A new Neutron Velocity Selector was commissioned.

  6. A novel method of polarization state control for olarization division multiplexing system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tiecheng Wang; Shoufeng Lan; Junfeng Jiang; Tiegen Liu

    2008-01-01

    We describe a new algorithm in a cost effective polarization division multiplexing (PDM) system. Without modifying the existing transmitter, receiver electronics, or softwares, we use a special optical scheme to demultiplex the signal multiplexed and improve it with a conjugated gradient algorithm. We experimentally resume the polarization state with a deviation under 5% and the power loss less than 20 dB which proves the feasibility of the polarization control algorithm in the new polarization multiplexing system.

  7. Progress on control experiments of flexible structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    1990-01-01

    Progress at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of control experiments for flexible structures is described. First the author presents the experimental results for a linear model which represents slewing maneuvers of a generic space station solar panel carried out to evaluate experimentally some control technologies. Then the status of the rotational/translational maneuvering experiment of a flexible steel panel carried by a translation cart is presented. Finally, experimental results of the NASA minimast testbed using velocity command stepper motors as reaction mass reactors are shown. All the test configurations are briefly described, including actuator and sensor, test setup, and test software. The status of some research activities oriented primarily to the experimental methods for control of flexible structures is presented.

  8. Chemical Technology Division progress report, April 1, 1983-March 31, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-10-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: fission energy; nuclear and chemical waste management; environmental control technology; basic science and technology; biotechnology programs; transuranium-element processing; Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs; Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project; radioactive materials production; computer 1 engineering applications; and miscellanous programs.

  9. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel cycle work included hydraulic performance and extraction efficiency of eight-stage centrifugal contactors, flowsheet for the Aralex process, Ru and Zr extraction in a miniature centrifugal contactor, study of Zr aging in the organic phase and its effect on Zr extraction and hydraulic testing of the 9-cm-ID contactor. Work for predicting accident consequences in LWR fuel processing covered the relation between energy input (to subdivide a solid) and the modes of particle size frequency distribution. In the pyrochemical and dry processing program corrosion-testing materials for containment vessels and equipment for studying carbide reactions in bismuth is under way. Analytical studies have been made of salt-transport processes; efforts to spin tungsten crucibles 13 cm dia continue, and other information on tungsten fabrication is being assembled; the process steps of the chloride volatility process have been demonstrated and the thoria powder product used to produce oxide pellets; solubility of UO/sub 2/, PuO/sub 2/, and fission products in molten alkali nitrates is being investigated; work was continued on reprocessing actinide oxides by extracting the actinides into ammonium chloroaluminate from bismuth; the preparation of thorium-uranium carbide from the oxide is being studied as a means of improving the oxide reactivity; studies are in progress on producing uranium metal and decontaminated ThO/sub 2/ by the reaction of (Th,U)O/sub 2/ solid solution in molten salts containing ThCl/sub 4/ and thorium metal chips. In the molten tin process, no basic thermodynamic or kinetic factors have been found that may limit process development.

  10. Chemical Technology Division annual progress report for period ending March 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    The status is reported for various research programs including waste management, transuranium-element processing, isotopic separations, preparation of /sup 233/UO/sub 2/, separations chemistry, biomedical technology, environmental studies, coal technology program, actinide oxides and nitrides and carbides, chemical engineering, controlled thermonuclear program, iodine studies, reactor safety, NRC programs, and diffusion of adsorbed species in porous media. Details of these programs are given in topical reports and journal articles. (JSR)

  11. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-02-01

    The report is divided into eight sections: (1) nuclear data measurements and evaluation; (2) systems analysis and shielding; (3) applied physics and fusion reactor analysis; (4) mathematical modeling and intelligent control; (5) reliability and human factors research; (6) applied risk and decision analysis; (7) information analysis and data management; and (8) mathematical sciences. Each section then consists of abstracts of presented or published papers. (WRF)

  12. E-Division semiannual report. Progress report, December 1, 1976--May 30, 1977. [LASL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, P.A. (comp.)

    1977-11-01

    Detector research and development are described first. Then, briefer reports are given on research on the following topics: electronic temperature monitoring and identification for livestock, electromagnetic probing (for fracture mapping), fiber optics for downhole instrumentation (for weapons testing), adaptive control applied to HVAC systems, energy environmental simulator, and high-temperature electronics. Engineering support (development projects, program support, instrumentation support) and technical services (general group activities, recharge programs, research and development programs, minicomputer maintenance, information and training services) are sketched. The report is basically administrative in nature, with a minimum of technical material. 47 figures, 10 tables. (RWR)

  13. Cell Division Mode Change Mediates the Regulation of Cerebellar Granule Neurogenesis Controlled by the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Yang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Symmetric and asymmetric divisions are important for self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells during neurogenesis. Although cerebellar granule neurogenesis is controlled by sonic hedgehog (SHH signaling, whether and how this process is mediated by regulation of cell division modes have not been determined. Here, using time-lapse imaging and cell culture from neuronal progenitor-specific and differentiated neuron-specific reporter mouse lines (Math1-GFP and Dcx-DsRed and Patched+/− mice in which SHH signaling is activated, we find evidence for the existence of symmetric and asymmetric divisions that are closely associated with progenitor proliferation and differentiation. While activation of the SHH pathway enhances symmetric progenitor cell divisions, blockade of the SHH pathway reverses the cell division mode change in Math1-GFP;Dcx-DsRed;Patched+/− mice by promoting asymmetric divisions or terminal neuronal symmetric divisions. Thus, cell division mode change mediates the regulation of cerebellar granule neurogenesis controlled by SHH signaling.

  14. Temporal controls of the asymmetric cell division cycle in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghua Li

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric cell division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus is orchestrated by an elaborate gene-protein regulatory network, centered on three major control proteins, DnaA, GcrA and CtrA. The regulatory network is cast into a quantitative computational model to investigate in a systematic fashion how these three proteins control the relevant genetic, biochemical and physiological properties of proliferating bacteria. Different controls for both swarmer and stalked cell cycles are represented in the mathematical scheme. The model is validated against observed phenotypes of wild-type cells and relevant mutants, and it predicts the phenotypes of novel mutants and of known mutants under novel experimental conditions. Because the cell cycle control proteins of Caulobacter are conserved across many species of alpha-proteobacteria, the model we are proposing here may be applicable to other genera of importance to agriculture and medicine (e.g., Rhizobium, Brucella.

  15. Active and Precise Control of Microdroplet Division Using Horizontal Pneumatic Valves in Bifurcating Microchannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Shoji

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a microfluidic system for the active and precise control of microdroplet division in a micro device. Using two horizontal pneumatic valves formed at downstream of bifurcating microchannel, flow resistances of downstream channels were variably controlled. With the resistance control, volumetric ratio of downstream flows was changed and water-in-oil microdroplets were divided into two daughter droplets of different volume corresponding to the ratio. The microfluidic channels and pneumatic valves were fabricated by single-step soft lithography process of PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane using SU-8 mold. A wide range control of the daughter droplets’ volume ratio was achieved by the simple channel structure. Volumetric ratio between large and small daughter droplets are ranged from 1 to 70, and the smallest droplet volume of 14 pL was obtained. The proposed microfluidic device is applicable for precise and high throughput droplet based digital synthesis.

  16. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities. Semi-annual progress report, July 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norem, J.; Bajt, D.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period July 1, 1995 - December 31, 1995. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  17. Endosymbiosis in trypanosomatid protozoa: the bacterium division is controlled during the host cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catta-Preta, Carolina M. C.; Brum, Felipe L.; da Silva, Camila C.; Zuma, Aline A.; Elias, Maria C.; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; Motta, Maria Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutualism is defined as a beneficial relationship for the associated partners and usually assumes that the symbiont number is controlled. Some trypanosomatid protozoa co-evolve with a bacterial symbiont that divides in coordination with the host in a way that results in its equal distribution between daughter cells. The mechanism that controls this synchrony is largely unknown, and its comprehension might provide clues to understand how eukaryotic cells evolved when acquiring symbionts that later became organelles. Here, we approached this question by studying the effects of inhibitors that affect the host exclusively in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Strigomonas culicis and Angomonas deanei. We found that inhibiting host protein synthesis using cycloheximide or host DNA replication using aphidicolin did not affect the duplication of bacterial DNA. Although the bacteria had autonomy to duplicate their DNA when host protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide, they could not complete cytokinesis. Aphidicolin promoted the inhibition of the trypanosomatid cell cycle in the G1/S phase, leading to symbiont filamentation in S. culicis but not in A. deanei. Treatment with camptothecin blocked the host protozoa cell cycle in the G2 phase and induced the formation of filamentous symbionts in both species. Oryzalin, which affects host microtubule polymerization, blocked trypanosomatid mitosis and abrogated symbiont division. Our results indicate that host factors produced during the cell division cycle are essential for symbiont segregation and may control the bacterial cell number. PMID:26082757

  18. Trends in industrial control systems in ST Division and at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Ciriani, P

    1998-01-01

    Since the 1970s, industrial systems have been introduced in ST Division and have formed the basis for the overwhelming majority of the equipment for which it is responsible. The first systems were independent and not integrated into the accelerator control networks. This first generation included the Technical Control Room (TCR) site and networks monitoring system supplied by Télémécanique. In 1980, this system was replaced by the BBC and the Landis & Gyr systems for the cooling and ventilation equipment. In 1979, the Sprecher & Schuh system for the control of the electrical generator sets (with CERN's first PLC) was installed. Since the 1980s, these systems have been gradually integrated, initially using G64s as the interface with the PLCs, then, with the introduction of FactoryLink to handle H1 communications based on TCP/IP and, finally, with the Technical Data Server (TDS) and the TCP/IP communication replacing H1.

  19. Private GPs contribute to TB control in Myanmar: evaluation of a PPM initiative in Mandalay Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, M; Kluge, H; Aye, T; Maung, W; Noe, P; Zaw, M; Jost, S P; Uplekar, M; Lönnroth, K

    2006-09-01

    Mandalay Division, Myanmar. To assess the effect of an initiative to involve private general practitioners (GPs) in the National Tuberculosis Programme (NTP) and to identify lessons learnt for public-private mix scale-up. Source of referral/diagnosis and place of treatment were included in the routine recording and reporting systems to enable disaggregated analysis of the contribution of GPs to case notification and treatment outcomes. Case notification trends were compared between the intervention and control areas over a 4-year period. Private GPs contributed 44% of new smear-positive cases registered during the study period (July 2002-December 2004). The notification of new sputum smear-positive TB in the study area increased by 85% between the year prior to the GP involvement and 2 years after (from 46 to 85/100,000). Case notification increased by 57% in the control townships and by 42% in all of Mandalay Division. The treatment success rate for new smear-positive cases treated by GPs was 90%. The involvement of private GPs substantially increased TB case notification, while a high treatment success rate was maintained. Success factors include a well-developed local medical association branch, strong managerial support, training and supervision by the public sector and provision of drugs and consumables free of charge by the NTP.

  20. Cell Division Mode Change Mediates the Regulation of Cerebellar Granule Neurogenesis Controlled by the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Yang; Minglei Wang; Jia Wang; Xingxu Huang; Ru Yang; Wei-Qiang Gao

    2015-01-01

    Summary Symmetric and asymmetric divisions are important for self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells during neurogenesis. Although cerebellar granule neurogenesis is controlled by sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, whether and how this process is mediated by regulation of cell division modes have not been determined. Here, using time-lapse imaging and cell culture from neuronal progenitor-specific and differentiated neuron-specific reporter mouse lines (Math1-GFP and Dcx-DsRed) and Patche...

  1. Control of patterns of symmetric cell division in the epidermal and cortical tissues of the Arabidopsis root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanwen; Iakovidis, Michail; Costa, Silvia

    2016-03-15

    Controlled cell division is central to the growth and development of all multicellular organisms. Within the proliferating zone of the Arabidopsis root, regular symmetric divisions give rise to patterns of parallel files of cells, the genetic basis of which remains unclear. We found that genotypes impaired in the TONNEAU1a (TON1a) gene display misoriented symmetric divisions in the epidermis and have no division defects in the underlying cortical tissue. The TON1a gene encodes a microtubule-associated protein. We show that in the ton1a mutant, epidermal and cortical cells do not form narrow, ring-like preprophase bands (PPBs), which are plant-specific, cytoskeletal structures that predict the position of the division plane before mitosis. The results indicate that in the cortex but not in the epidermis, division plane positioning and patterning can proceed correctly in the absence of both a functional TON1a and PPB formation. Differences between tissues in how they respond to the signals that guide symmetric division orientation during patterning might provide the basis for organised organ growth in the absence of cell movements.

  2. A Prophage-Encoded Small RNA Controls Metabolism and Cell Division in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Divya; Ragunathan, Preethi T; Fei, Jingyi; Vanderpool, Carin K

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of small RNAs (sRNAs) have been identified in diverse bacterial species, and while the functions of most remain unknown, some regulate key processes, particularly stress responses. The sRNA DicF was identified over 25 years ago as an inhibitor of cell division but since then has remained uncharacterized. DicF consists of 53 nucleotides and is encoded by a gene carried on a prophage (Qin) in the genomes of many Escherichia coli strains. We demonstrated that DicF inhibits cell division via direct base pairing with ftsZ mRNA to repress translation and prevent new synthesis of the bacterial tubulin homolog FtsZ. Systems analysis using computational and experimental methods identified additional mRNA targets of DicF: xylR and pykA mRNAs, encoding the xylose uptake and catabolism regulator and pyruvate kinase, respectively. Genetic analyses showed that DicF directly base pairs with and represses translation of these targets. Phenotypes of cells expressing DicF variants demonstrated that DicF-associated growth inhibition is not solely due to repression of ftsZ, indicating that the physiological consequences of DicF-mediated regulation extend beyond effects on cell division caused by reduced FtsZ synthesis. IMPORTANCE sRNAs are ubiquitous and versatile regulators of bacterial gene expression. A number of well-characterized examples in E. coli are highly conserved and present in the E. coli core genome. In contrast, the sRNA DicF (identified over 20 years ago but remaining poorly characterized) is encoded by a gene carried on a defective prophage element in many E. coli genomes. Here, we characterize DicF in order to better understand how horizontally acquired sRNA regulators impact bacterial gene expression and physiology. Our data confirm the long-hypothesized DicF-mediated regulation of ftsZ, encoding the bacterial tubulin homolog required for cell division. We further uncover DicF-mediated posttranscriptional control of metabolic gene expression. Ectopic

  3. Planar cell polarity signalling controls cell division orientation during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ying; Mo, Chunhui; Fraser, Scott E

    2004-08-05

    Oriented cell division is an integral part of pattern development in processes ranging from asymmetric segregation of cell-fate determinants to the shaping of tissues. Despite proposals that it has an important function in tissue elongation, the mechanisms regulating division orientation have been little studied outside of the invertebrates Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we have analysed mitotic divisions during zebrafish gastrulation using in vivo confocal imaging and found that cells in dorsal tissues preferentially divide along the animal-vegetal axis of the embryo. Establishment of this animal-vegetal polarity requires the Wnt pathway components Silberblick/Wnt11, Dishevelled and Strabismus. Our findings demonstrate an important role for non-canonical Wnt signalling in oriented cell division during zebrafish gastrulation, and indicate that oriented cell division is a driving force for axis elongation. Furthermore, we propose that non-canonical Wnt signalling has a conserved role in vertebrate axis elongation, orienting both cell intercalation and mitotic division.

  4. A Fuzzy Logic Based Power Control for Wideband Code Division Multiple Access Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ravichandran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Resource management is one of the most important engineering issues in 3G systems where multiple traffic classes are supported each being characterized by its required Quality of Service (QoS parameters. Call Admission Control (CAC is one of the resource management functions, which regulates network access to ensure QoS provisioning. Efficient CAC is necessary for the QoS provisioning in WCDMA environment. The effective functioning of WCDMA systems is influenced by the power control utility. Approach: In this study, we propose to design a fuzzy logic based power control for Wideband Code Division Multiple Access Wireless Networks. This proposed technique is aimed at multiple services like voice, video and data for multiclass users. The fuzzy logic technique is used to estimate the optimal admissible users group inclusive of optimum transmitting power level. This technique reduces the interference level and call rejection rate. Results: By simulation results, we demonstrate that the proposed technique achieve reduced energy consumption for a cell with increased throughput. Conclusion: The proposed technique minimizes the power consumption and call rejection rate.

  5. How to get (a)round : mechanisms controlling growth and division of coccoid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinho, Mariana G.; Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria come in a range of shapes, including round, rod-shaped, curved and spiral cells. This morphological diversity implies that different mechanisms exist to guide proper cell growth, division and chromosome segregation. Although the majority of studies on cell division have focused on rod-shape

  6. Overview of progress in quantum systems control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG Shuang; ZHENG Yisong; JI Beichen; DAI Yi

    2007-01-01

    The development of the theory on quantum systems control in the last 20 years is reviewed in detail.The research on the controllability of quantum systems is first introduced,then the study on the quantum open-loop control methods often used for controlling simple quantum systems is analyzed briefly.The learning control method and the feedback control method are mainly discussed for they are two important methods in quantum systems control and their advantages and disadvantages are presented.According to the trends in quantum systems control development,the paper predicts the future trends of its development and applications.A complete design procedure necessary for the quantum control system is presented.Finally,several vital problems hindering the advancement of quantum control are pointed out.

  7. ALIX and ESCRT-III coordinately control cytokinetic abscission during germline stem cell division in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsmund H Eikenes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abscission is the final step of cytokinesis that involves the cleavage of the intercellular bridge connecting the two daughter cells. Recent studies have given novel insight into the spatiotemporal regulation and molecular mechanisms controlling abscission in cultured yeast and human cells. The mechanisms of abscission in living metazoan tissues are however not well understood. Here we show that ALIX and the ESCRT-III component Shrub are required for completion of abscission during Drosophila female germline stem cell (fGSC division. Loss of ALIX or Shrub function in fGSCs leads to delayed abscission and the consequent formation of stem cysts in which chains of daughter cells remain interconnected to the fGSC via midbody rings and fusome. We demonstrate that ALIX and Shrub interact and that they co-localize at midbody rings and midbodies during cytokinetic abscission in fGSCs. Mechanistically, we show that the direct interaction between ALIX and Shrub is required to ensure cytokinesis completion with normal kinetics in fGSCs. We conclude that ALIX and ESCRT-III coordinately control abscission in Drosophila fGSCs and that their complex formation is required for accurate abscission timing in GSCs in vivo.

  8. Hoxb1b controls oriented cell division, cell shape and microtubule dynamics in neural tube morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Mihaela; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Titus, Tom; Postlethwait, John; Moens, Cecilia B

    2014-02-01

    Hox genes are classically ascribed to function in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of bilaterian animals; however, their role in directing molecular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis at the cellular level remains largely unstudied. We unveil a non-classical role for the zebrafish hoxb1b gene, which shares ancestral functions with mammalian Hoxa1, in controlling progenitor cell shape and oriented cell division during zebrafish anterior hindbrain neural tube morphogenesis. This is likely distinct from its role in cell fate acquisition and segment boundary formation. We show that, without affecting major components of apico-basal or planar cell polarity, Hoxb1b regulates mitotic spindle rotation during the oriented neural keel symmetric mitoses that are required for normal neural tube lumen formation in the zebrafish. This function correlates with a non-cell-autonomous requirement for Hoxb1b in regulating microtubule plus-end dynamics in progenitor cells in interphase. We propose that Hox genes can influence global tissue morphogenesis by control of microtubule dynamics in individual cells in vivo.

  9. Reward value-based gain control: divisive normalization in parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Kenway; Grattan, Lauren E; Glimcher, Paul W

    2011-07-20

    The representation of value is a critical component of decision making. Rational choice theory assumes that options are assigned absolute values, independent of the value or existence of other alternatives. However, context-dependent choice behavior in both animals and humans violates this assumption, suggesting that biological decision processes rely on comparative evaluation. Here we show that neurons in the monkey lateral intraparietal cortex encode a relative form of saccadic value, explicitly dependent on the values of the other available alternatives. Analogous to extra-classical receptive field effects in visual cortex, this relative representation incorporates target values outside the response field and is observed in both stimulus-driven activity and baseline firing rates. This context-dependent modulation is precisely described by divisive normalization, indicating that this standard form of sensory gain control may be a general mechanism of cortical computation. Such normalization in decision circuits effectively implements an adaptive gain control for value coding and provides a possible mechanistic basis for behavioral context-dependent violations of rationality.

  10. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April-June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during th eperiod April-June 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  11. Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-December 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  12. Progress in multirate digital control system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Martin C.; Mason, Gregory S.

    1991-01-01

    A new methodology for multirate sampled-data control design based on a new generalized control law structure, two new parameter-optimization-based control law synthesis methods, and a new singular-value-based robustness analysis method are described. The control law structure can represent multirate sampled-data control laws of arbitrary structure and dynamic order, with arbitrarily prescribed sampling rates for all sensors and update rates for all processor states and actuators. The two control law synthesis methods employ numerical optimization to determine values for the control law parameters. The robustness analysis method is based on the multivariable Nyquist criterion applied to the loop transfer function for the sampling period equal to the period of repetition of the system's complete sampling/update schedule. The complete methodology is demonstrated by application to the design of a combination yaw damper and modal suppression system for a commercial aircraft.

  13. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-07-04

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis.

  14. Division of labor: subsets of dorsal-appendage-forming cells control the shape of the entire tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Michael J; French, Rachael L; Cosand, K Amber; Dorman, Jennie B; Kiehart, Daniel P; Berg, Celeste A

    2010-10-01

    The function of an organ relies on its form, which in turn depends on the individual shapes of the cells that create it and the interactions between them. Despite remarkable progress in the field of developmental biology, how cells collaborate to make a tissue remains an unsolved mystery. To investigate the mechanisms that determine organ structure, we are studying the cells that form the dorsal appendages (DAs) of the Drosophila melanogaster eggshell. These cells consist of two differentially patterned subtypes: roof cells, which form the outward-facing roof of the lumen, and floor cells, which dive underneath the roof cells to seal off the floor of the tube. In this paper, we present three lines of evidence that reveal a further stratification of the DA-forming epithelium. Laser ablation of only a few cells in the anterior of the region causes a disproportionately severe shortening of the appendage. Genetic alteration through the twin peaks allele of tramtrack69 (ttk(twk)), a female-sterile mutation that leads to severely shortened DAs, causes no such shortening when removed from a majority of the DA-forming cells, but rather, produces short appendages only when removed from cells in the very anterior of the tube-forming tissue. Additionally we show that heterotrimeric G-protein function is required for DA morphogenesis. Like TTK69, Gbeta 13F is not required in all DA-forming follicle cells but only in the floor and leading roof cells. The different phenotypes that result from removal of Gbeta 13F from each region demonstrate a striking division of function between different DA-forming cells. Gbeta mutant floor cells are unable to control the width of the appendage while Gbeta mutant leading roof cells fail to direct the elongation of the appendage and the convergent-extension of the roof-cell population.

  15. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January-March 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies.

  16. Control of cell division and the spatial localization of assembled gene products in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments are described that examine the role of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in the regulation of cell division in Caulobacter crescentus; and the spatial localization of methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) in C. crescentus swarmer and predivisional cells. In the analysis of PBP function, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus PBPs with (/sup 3/H) penicillin G in wild type strain CB15, in a series of conditional cell division mutants and in new temperature sensitive cephalosporin C resistant mutants PC8002 and PC8003. 14 PBPs are characterized and a high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1B) that is required for cell division is identified. PBP 1B competes for ..beta..-lactams that induce filament formation and may be a high affinity binding protein. A second high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1C) is also associated with defective cell division. The examination of PBP patterns in synchronous swarmer cells reveals that the in vivo activity of PBP 1B and PBP 1C increases at the time that the cell division pathway is initiated. None of the PBPs, however, appear to be differentially localized in the C. crescentus cell. In the analysis of MCP localization, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus MCPs with methyl-/sup 3/H. MCPs are examined in flagellated and non-flagellated vesicles prepared from cells by immunoaffinity chromatography.

  17. Fighting Divisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1945-12-01

    when it hit the beaches of Morotai to open the drive that later led to the liberation of the Philippines, its Doughboys were alternately whistling...the Dixie Division sailed from Maffin Bay for the reconquest of Morotai , and on the 15th of the month hit the beaches of this Dutch island, less than...quickly secured a beachhead and by noon of D-day had seized Pitoe Airdrome. Morotai gave our forces control of the Halma- hera Sea and cut off 20,000

  18. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July--September 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  19. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January--March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1997. Created in March 1997 when the CTD Chemical Development and Energy Research sections were combined, the Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within seven major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, and Biotechnology Research. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described in the report, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  20. The Impact of the Academic Progress Rating on the Retention and Recruiting Strategies of NCAA Division I Football Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) adopted legislation that it hoped would help increase the graduation rates of student athletes. The Academic Progress Rating (APR), was designed to hold each individual athletic program accountable for keeping student athletes eligible and at the institution until the student athlete…

  1. The Impact of the Academic Progress Rating on the Retention and Recruiting Strategies of NCAA Division I Football Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) adopted legislation that it hoped would help increase the graduation rates of student athletes. The Academic Progress Rating (APR), was designed to hold each individual athletic program accountable for keeping student athletes eligible and at the institution until the student athlete…

  2. 75 FR 24748 - Johnson Controls, Inc., Automotive Experience Division, Including Workers Whose Unemployment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid Through Hoover Universal, Greenfield, OH; Amended... their wages reported under a separate unemployment insurance (UI) tax account, under the name Hoover..., Inc., Automotive Experience Division, including workers whose unemployment insurance (UI) wages are...

  3. Review on development progress of automatic manual transmissions control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ALI Amir Ibrahim; QIN Da-tong; ATTIA Nabil Abdulla

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, the sustainable development of automatic manual transmissions (AMTs) control in vehicles is conspicuous. The control applications have grown fast and steadily due to the tremendous progress in power electronics components and the control software that enhance the requirements for delivering higher vehicles performance. AMTs control strategies achieve a reduction in the driveline dynamic oscillations behavior during gear shifting and clutch starting up processes.AMTs future expectations are an increase of torque capacity, more speed ratios and the development of advanced and efficient electronic control systems. This paper concerns with the progressing view of AMTs in the past, today and future, gives an overview of the potential dynamic problems concerned with AMTs and some control strategies used to solve those problems.

  4. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October-December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-02-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October--December 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included efforts to optimize the processing conditions for Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford tank sludge, the testing of candidate absorbers and ion exchangers under continuous-flow conditions using actual supernatant from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, and attempts to develop a cesium-specific spherical inorganic sorbent for the treatment of acidic high-salt waste solutions. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed and experimental collaborative efforts with Russian scientists to determine the solidification conditions of yttrium barium, and copper oxides from their melts were completed.

  5. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1997-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October-December 1996. The report describes ten tasks conducted in four major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area -- Chemical Processes for Waste Management -- includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Components by Caustic Leaching, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, Development and Testing of Inorganic Sorbents, and Sludge Treatment Studies. Within the second research area -- Reactor Fuel Chemistry -- the distribution of iodine in containment during an AP600 design-basis accident was evaluated using models in the TRENDS code. Within the third research area -- Thermodynamics -- efforts continued in the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of energy-Related Materials task. The fourth major research area -- Processes for Waste Management -- includes work on these tasks: Ion-Exchange Process for Heavy Metals Removal, Search for Technetium in Natural Metallurgical Residues, and Waste Form Development and Testing of a Glass- and Cement-Based Dedicated Hot-Cell Facility.

  6. The Ecological Controls on the Prevalence of Candidate Division TM7 in Polar Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristrom eWinsley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The candidate division TM7 is ubiquitous and yet uncultured phylum of the Bacteria that encompasses a commonly environmental associated clade, TM7-1, and a ‘host-associated’ clade, TM7-3. However, as members of the TM7 phylum have not been cultured, little is known about what differs between these two clades. We hypothesized that these clades would have different environmental niches. To test this, we used a large-scale global soil dataset, encompassing 223 soil samples, their environmental parameters and associated bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequence data. We correlated chemical, physical and biological parameters of each soil with the relative abundance of the two major classes of the phylum to deduce factors that influence the groups’ seemingly ubiquitous nature. The two classes of the phylum (TM7-1 and TM7-3 were indeed distinct from each other in their habitat requirements. A key determinant of each class’ prevalence appears to be the pH of the soil. The class TM7-1 displays a facultative anaerobic nature with correlations to more acidic soils with total iron, silicon, titanium and copper indicating a potential for siderophore production. However, the TM7-3 class shows a more classical oligotrophic, heterotroph nature with a preference for more alkaline soils, and a probable pathogenic role with correlations to extractable iron, sodium and phosphate. In addition, the TM7-3 was abundant in diesel contaminated soils highlighting a resilient nature along with a possible carbon source. In addition to this both classes had unique co-occurrence relationships with other bacterial phyla. In particular, both groups had opposing correlations to the Gemmatimonadetes phylum, with the TM7-3 class seemingly being outcompeted by this phylum to result in a negative correlation. These ecological controls allow the characteristics of a TM7 phylum preferred niche to be defined and give insight into possible avenues for cultivation of this previously

  7. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-September 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    2001-04-16

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-September 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within ten major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Physical Properties Research, Biochemical Engineering, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structures and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of the Cell Operations involved the testing of two continuously stirred tank reactors in series to evaluate the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium and transuranics from supernatant. Within the area of Process Chemistry, various topics related to solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge were addressed. Saltcake dissolution efforts continued, including the development of a predictive algorithm. New initiatives for the section included modeling activities centered on detection of hydrogen in {sup 233}U storage wells and wax formation in petroleum mixtures, as well as support for the Spallation Neutron Source (investigation of transmutation products formed during operation). Other activities involved in situ grouting and evaluation of options for use (i.e., as castable shapes) of depleted uranium. In a continuation of activities of the preceding

  8. Quality Control in Primary Schools: Progress from 2001-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Roelande H.; de Boom, Jan; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings of research into the quality control (QC) of schools from 2001-2006. In 2001 several targets for QC were set and the progress of 939 primary schools is presented. Furthermore, using cluster analysis, schools are classified into four QC-types that differ in their focus on school (self) evaluation and school…

  9. Quality Control in Primary Schools: Progress from 2001-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Roelande H.; de Boom, Jan; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings of research into the quality control (QC) of schools from 2001-2006. In 2001 several targets for QC were set and the progress of 939 primary schools is presented. Furthermore, using cluster analysis, schools are classified into four QC-types that differ in their focus on school (self) evaluation and school…

  10. Cell cycle kinetics with supramitotic control, two cell types, and unequal division: a model of transformed embryonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, M; Arino, O

    1991-06-01

    We develop a mathematical model of cell cycle kinetics of transformed embryonic cells. The model includes supramitotic regulation, in which decisions regarding growth control are made at a point inside the cell division cycle and their impact extends to the next decision point, located in the next division cycle. Another feature is the presence of two varieties of cells, which switch from one to the other with given transition probabilities. The third factor considered is unequal division of cells, also defined in probabilistic terms. We provide a rigorous description of the model and derivation of its equations and analyze its asymptotic properties by defining and investigating an abstract semigroup of positive linear operators in appropriate state space. The spectral properties of the semigroup yield the balanced exponential growth law for the model. To compare the model to experimental data, we derive basic pedigree statistics, beta curves, and generation time correlations. We present numerical calculations based on measurements available for the embryonic cells. We conclude that to yield the experimentally obtained pedigree statistics, switches from one cell variety to the other must be quite infrequent.

  11. Cell division in apicomplexan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Maria E; Striepen, Boris

    2014-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum are important human pathogens. These parasites and many of their apicomplexan relatives undergo a complex developmental process in the cells of their hosts, which includes genome replication, cell division and the assembly of new invasive stages. Apicomplexan cell cycle progression is both globally and locally regulated. Global regulation is carried out throughout the cytoplasm by diffusible factors that include cell cycle-specific kinases, cyclins and transcription factors. Local regulation acts on individual nuclei and daughter cells that are developing inside the mother cell. We propose that the centrosome is a master regulator that physically tethers cellular components and that provides spatial and temporal control of apicomplexan cell division.

  12. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-11-01

    This reports summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within eight major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included column loading of cesium from Melton Valley Storage Tank supematants using an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate. A second task was to design and construct a continuously stirred tank reactor system to test the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium, and transuranics from supematant. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed, including issues such as pipeline plugging and viscosity measurements. Investigation of solution conditions required to dissolve Hanford saltcake was also continued. MSRE Remediation Studies focused on recovery of {sup 233}U and its transformation into a stable oxide and radiolysis experiments to permit remediation of MSRE fuel salt. In the area of Chemistry Research, activities included studies relative to molecular imprinting for

  13. ftsZ gene and plastid division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Plastid is one of the most important cellular organelles, the normal division process of plastid is essential for the differentiation and development of plant cells. For a long time, morphological observations and genetic analyses to special mutants are the major research fields of plastid division, but the molecular mechanisms underlying plastid division are largely unknown. Because of the endosymbiotic origin, plastid division might have mechanisms in common with those involved in bacterial cell division. It has been proved that several prokaryotic cell division genes also participate in the plastid division. Recently, the mechanisms of prokaryotic cell division have been well documented, which provides a valuable paradigm for understanding the plastid division mechanisms. In plants, the functional analyses of ftsZ, a key gene involved both in bacteria and plastid division, have established the solid foundation for people to understand the plastid division in molecular level. In this paper we will make a review for the research history and progress of plastid division.

  14. Research by ESS Division for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Progress report, January-June 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaniman, D. (comp.)

    1987-10-01

    Petrographic research for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations focused on xenolithic variability in the Topopah Spring Member and on variations of clinoptilolite composition at Yucca Mountain. Zeolite and smectite occurrences were considered in terms of their relation to a disturbed zone beneath the potential repository, and mineral stability experiments have produced a new clinoptilolite structure as a result of prolonged heating at low temperature. Limitations were defined on the abundance of erionite and of sulfur. X-ray diffraction studies lead to improved analytical methods. Progress was made in the comparative study of mineralogy in sand ramps and in faults. Geological modeling considered the differences of the diffusion of nonsorbing tracers in vertically and in horizontally fractured rock. Modeling also treated the diffusion of a nonsorbing tracer in devitrified and in zeolitized rock. The results of these experiments in all cases show relatively symmetrical two-dimensional diffusion patterns. Preliminary calculations compare the dispersion/diffusion of nonsorbing Tc with the dispersion/diffusion/sorption of U. 27 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Mathematics and Statistics Research Department progress report for period ending June 30, 1976. [Computer Sciences Division, ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosslee, D.G.; Shelton, B.K.; Ward, R.C.; Wilson, D.G. (comps.)

    1976-10-01

    Brief summaries of work done in mathematics and related fields are presented. Research in mathematics and statistics concerned statistical estimation, statistical testing, experiment design, probability, continuum mechanics, functional integration, matrices and other operators, and mathematical software. More applied studies were conducted in the areas of analytical chemistry, biological research, chemistry and physics research, energy research, environmental research, health physics research, materials research, reactor and thermonuclear research, sampling inspection, quality control, and life testing, and uranium resource evaluation research. Additional sections deal with educational activities, presentation of research results, and professional activities. 7 figures, 9 tables (RWR)

  16. Mechanisms of asymmetric cell divisions in Drosophila melanogaster neuroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X Jiang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells possess the properties of self-renewal and differentiation, and mainly rely on two strategies for division, including symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. In this review, we summarize the latest progress on asymmetric cell divisions in Drosophila melanogaster neuroblasts (NBs, which focus on the establishment of cell polarity, mitotic spindle orientation, the asymmetric segregation of cell fate determinants as well as cell-cycle control. Here we also introduce five major cell fate determinants, including Numb, Prospero, Brat, Miranda, and Pon, which are thought to be unequally segregated to the ganglion mother cells (GMCs and play an important role in the formation of stem cell-derived tumors

  17. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Biorepositories- | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carefully collected and controlled high-quality human biospecimens, annotated with clinical data and properly consented for investigational use, are available through the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories listed in the charts below. Biorepositories Managed by the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories Supported by the Division of Cancer Prevention Related Biorepositories | Information about accessing biospecimens collected from DCP-supported clinical trials and projects.

  19. How Can Progress on Global Tobacco Control Inform Progress on NCD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yach, Derek

    2016-12-01

    Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland's appointment as Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1998 led to a stronger global focus on tobacco control, and eventually, all noncommunicable diseases (NCD) and mental health. Since the adoption of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) in 2003, global health has turned toward addressing all NCD. I pose 2 questions. 1) What lessons can we apply from the WHO FCTC development and implementation processes to broader aspects of NCD prevention and control? 2) In retrospect, what could we have done better? I also propose 3 lessons: 1) it takes a broad-based alliance to make progress; 2) visible and courageous leadership matters, and is aided by financial support; and 3) in developing the FCTC, WHO focused on a few messages: demonize industry, tax, and regulate tobacco. We now need to broaden public and private players required for progress, use insights on levering market forces for NCD control, and build approaches that demonstrate empathy for millions struggling with NCD risks. Copyright © 2016 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanical control of mitotic progression in single animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattin, Cedric J; Düggelin, Marcel; Martinez-Martin, David; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J; Stewart, Martin P

    2015-09-08

    Despite the importance of mitotic cell rounding in tissue development and cell proliferation, there remains a paucity of approaches to investigate the mechanical robustness of cell rounding. Here we introduce ion beam-sculpted microcantilevers that enable precise force-feedback-controlled confinement of single cells while characterizing their progression through mitosis. We identify three force regimes according to the cell response: small forces (∼5 nN) that accelerate mitotic progression, intermediate forces where cells resist confinement (50-100 nN), and yield forces (>100 nN) where a significant decline in cell height impinges on microtubule spindle function, thereby inhibiting mitotic progression. Yield forces are coincident with a nonlinear drop in cell height potentiated by persistent blebbing and loss of cortical F-actin homogeneity. Our results suggest that a buildup of actomyosin-dependent cortical tension and intracellular pressure precedes mechanical failure, or herniation, of the cell cortex at the yield force. Thus, we reveal how the mechanical properties of mitotic cells and their response to external forces are linked to mitotic progression under conditions of mechanical confinement.

  1. Frequency-Division Power Sharing and Hierarchical Control Design for DC Shipboard Microgrids with Hybrid Energy Storage Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zheming; Meng, Lexuan; Quintero, Juan Carlos Vasquez

    2017-01-01

    Due to the increasing need to reduce the cost and emission of ships, shipboard applications are calling advanced technologies to go onboard. Recently, cleaner power sources (i.e. gas turbines, fuel cell, solar and wind power), energy storage, advanced control and power/energy management are intro......Due to the increasing need to reduce the cost and emission of ships, shipboard applications are calling advanced technologies to go onboard. Recently, cleaner power sources (i.e. gas turbines, fuel cell, solar and wind power), energy storage, advanced control and power/energy management...... are introduced to meet the new requirement, and therefore, making shipboard power system more like a microgrid. In this paper, a frequency-division based power sharing method is proposed to solve the contradiction between fuel efficiency and dynamic load conditions of marine vessels. With effective design...

  2. A Novel Architecture for Adaptive Traffic Control in Network on Chip using Code Division Multiple Access Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh. Dehghani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Network on chip has emerged as a long-term and effective method in Multiprocessor System-on-Chip communications in order to overcome the bottleneck in bus based communication architectures. Efficiency and performance of network on chip is so dependent on the architecture and structure of the network. In this paper a new structure and architecture for adaptive traffic control in network on chip using Code Division Multiple Access technique is presented. To solve the problem of synchronous access to bus based interconnection the code division multiple access technique was applied. In the presented structure that is based upon mesh topology and simple routing method we attempted to increase the exchanged data bandwidth rate among different cores. Also an attempt has been made to increase the performance by isolating the target address transfer path from data transfer path. The main goal of this paper is presenting a new structure to improve energy consumption, area and maximum frequency in network on chip systems using information coding and decoding techniques. The presented structure is simulated using Xilinx ISE software and the results show effectiveness of this architecture.

  3. A Link between Meiotic Prophase Progression and CrossoverControl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, Peter M.; Farruggio, Alfonso P.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-07-06

    During meiosis, most organisms ensure that homologous chromosomes undergo at least one exchange of DNA, or crossover, to link chromosomes together and accomplish proper segregation. How each chromosome receives a minimum of one crossover is unknown. During early meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans and many other species, chromosomes adopt a polarized organization within the nucleus, which normally disappears upon completion of homolog synapsis. Mutations that impair synapsis even between a single pair of chromosomes in C. elegans delay this nuclear reorganization. We quantified this delay by developing a classification scheme for discrete stages of meiosis. Immunofluorescence localization of RAD-51 protein revealed that delayed meiotic cells also contained persistent recombination intermediates. Through genetic analysis, we found that this cytological delay in meiotic progression requires double-strand breaks and the function of the crossover-promoting heteroduplex HIM-14 (Msh4) and MSH-5. Failure of X chromosome synapsis also resulted in impaired crossover control on autosomes, which may result from greater numbers and persistence of recombination intermediates in the delayed nuclei. We conclude that maturation of recombination events on chromosomes promotes meiotic progression, and is coupled to the regulation of crossover number and placement. Our results have broad implications for the interpretation of meiotic mutants, as we have shown that asynapsis of a single chromosome pair can exert global effects on meiotic progression and recombination frequency.

  4. A link between meiotic prophase progression and crossover control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Carlton

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available During meiosis, most organisms ensure that homologous chromosomes undergo at least one exchange of DNA, or crossover, to link chromosomes together and accomplish proper segregation. How each chromosome receives a minimum of one crossover is unknown. During early meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans and many other species, chromosomes adopt a polarized organization within the nucleus, which normally disappears upon completion of homolog synapsis. Mutations that impair synapsis even between a single pair of chromosomes in C. elegans delay this nuclear reorganization. We quantified this delay by developing a classification scheme for discrete stages of meiosis. Immunofluorescence localization of RAD-51 protein revealed that delayed meiotic cells also contained persistent recombination intermediates. Through genetic analysis, we found that this cytological delay in meiotic progression requires double-strand breaks and the function of the crossover-promoting heteroduplex HIM-14 (Msh4 and MSH-5. Failure of X chromosome synapsis also resulted in impaired crossover control on autosomes, which may result from greater numbers and persistence of recombination intermediates in the delayed nuclei. We conclude that maturation of recombination events on chromosomes promotes meiotic progression, and is coupled to the regulation of crossover number and placement. Our results have broad implications for the interpretation of meiotic mutants, as we have shown that asynapsis of a single chromosome pair can exert global effects on meiotic progression and recombination frequency.

  5. Progress Toward the Control and Management of the Thalassemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucharoen, Suthat; Weatherall, David J

    2016-04-01

    Because of the particularly high frequency of different severe forms of both α and β thalassemia in Asia, the development of approaches for their prevention and management is particularly challenging. However, because of earlier partnerships with richer countries, so-called North/South partnerships, and help from their governments, considerable progress toward the better control of the thalassemias has been achieved in some countries. It is vital that the global health importance of the thalassemias and related disorders, by far the commonest genetic diseases, is emphasized to the appropriate international health agencies.

  6. Quality Control Review of the Defense Intelligence Agency, Office of Inspector General, Audit Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-26

    audits, the auditors did not sufficiently assess audit risk by gaining an understanding of the internal controls within the context of the audit...unreliable. For the FY 2012 IPERA audit, the auditors documented that the internal control weaknesses within the procure-to-pay or accounts payable...audit, the auditors documented that they obtained an understanding of the internal controls related to the DIA accounts payable process for the three

  7. Type division and controlling factor analysis of 3rd-order sequences in marine carbonate rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbo Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Type division and controlling factor analysis of 3rd-order sequence are of practical significance to tectonic analysis, sedimentary environment identification, and other geological researches. Based on the comprehensive analysis of carbon and oxygen isotope trends, paleobathymetry and spectral-frequency of representative well logs, 3rd-order sequences can be divided into 3 types: (a global sea level (GSL sequence mainly controlled by GSL change; (b tectonic sequence mainly controlled by regional tectonic activity; and (c composite sequence jointly controlled by GSL change and regional tectonic activity. This study aims to identify the controlling factors of 3rd-order sequences and to illustrate a new method for classification of 3rd-order sequences of the middle Permian strata in the Sichuan Basin, China. The middle Permian strata in the Sichuan Basin consist of 3 basin-contrastive 3rd-order sequences, i.e., PSQ1, PSQ2 and PSQ3. Of these, PSQ1 is a GSL sequence while PSQ2 and PSQ3 are composite sequences. The results suggest that the depositional environment was stable during the deposition of PSQ1, but was activated by tectonic activity during the deposition of the middle Permian Maokou Formation.

  8. Acupressure in Controlling Nausea in Young Patients Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: Acupressure wristbands may prevent or reduce nausea and caused by chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether standard care is more effective with or without acupressure wristbands in controlling acute and delayed nausea. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying how well acupressure wristbands work with or without standard care in controlling nausea in young patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. |

  9. Metacognition in Upper-Division Biology Students: Awareness Does Not Always Lead to Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Kathryn Morris; Stanton, Julie Dangremond

    2017-01-01

    Students with awareness and control of their own thinking can learn more and perform better than students who are not metacognitive. Metacognitive regulation is how you control your thinking in order to learn. It includes the skill of evaluation, which is the ability to appraise your approaches to learning and then modify future plans based on…

  10. Automated control for coal handling operations at Bethlehem Steel, Burns Harbor Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zendzian, T.N. [Bethlehem Steel Corp., Chesterton, IN (United States). Burns Harbor Div.

    1997-12-31

    The Burns Harbor coal handling operation processes 7,200 tons of coal per day to supply two 82 oven, six meter batteries. The operations in coal handling are subdivided into three separate sections: the coal field and stacker reclaimer operation, the crushing and storage of coal, and the coal blending operation. In 1996 a supervisory system was developed and installed to fully automate all the operations and equipment in the coal handling unit, add additional instrumentation and logic controls to prevent coal contamination, and improve data collection and logging. The supervisory system is operated from a computer based workstation and is based on a distributed control philosophy utilizing programmable logic controllers, set point controllers, and man-machine interface displays. The previous control system for the coal handling operation consisted of a switchboard from which an operator controller the set up and running of the conveyor systems and equipment to stack, reclaim, and blend coal. The new supervisory system was installed in parallel with the original control system to safeguard continued operation during the system installation and commissioning. The original system still exists and can be operated in even of failure of the supervisory system.

  11. The Measurement of Optimization Performance of Managed Service Division with ITIL Framework using Statistical Process Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasman Suhairi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the Configuration Management process is carrying and all IT assets, status, configuration, and relationship between each other being well documented. This documentation is useful, among others, for some purposes. The first objective is to create clarity in the relationship between key performance indicators (KPI an IT services with the infrastructure. Changes to the configuration of those devices would obviously very disturbing the performance of IT services. The second objective is the accuracy of the information which will be used by the Service Delivery processes. So a Service Desk staff who need to get information about how a user at a branch office to connect to the network's headquarters, linked to issues of access to certain applications. Accurate network configuration information will be helpful Service Desk staff in helping the user solve the problem. The third objective is the accuracy of the information will be used for the IT audit.PT. XYZ is a telecommunications company which relatively new and aware of the increasing competitive competition in the telecommunications industry. PT. XYZ was starting its operation in 2006. The company's ambition is to develop progressively by increasing operational performance which closely linkages between operational performance improvements company with a bottom line of the company. Thus, it is a necessity / obligation for companies in the global era of integrated telecommunications services, to focus on Quality of services (QoS provided to its customers, in order to survive in an increasingly competitive telecommunications business.

  12. Monthly Progress Report October 1952. Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services division for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1952-10-01

    The present monthly report covers the work in Argonne National Laboratory's Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services division for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1952.

  13. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern Division, Reservoir Control Center Annual Report 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    transferred from Cochiti to the flood control pool in Caballo Reservoir, which is administered by VI-3 IBWC, while the channel work was being completed...The Bureau of Reclamation, who is the project owner of Caballo , began noticing increased seepage and small sand boils below the dam in early March. They...requested a delay in the Cochiti evacuation concurrent with the emergency evacuation of 48,000 acre-feet of Caballo storage. The remaining Cochiti

  14. Gain transient control for wavelength division multiplexed access networks using semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibbon, Timothy Braidwood; Osadchiy, Alexey Vladimirovich; Kjær, Rasmus;

    2009-01-01

    measurements how a near-saturated semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) can be used to control these gain transients. An SOA is shown to reduce the penalty of transients originating in an EDFA from 2.3 dB to 0.2 dB for 10 Gb/s transmission over standard single mode fiber using a 231-1 PRBS pattern. The results...

  15. Control of cell division in Streptococcus pneumoniae by the conserved Ser/Thr protein kinase StkP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beilharz, Katrin; Nováková, Linda; Fadda, Daniela; Branny, Pavel; Massidda, Orietta; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2012-01-01

    How the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae coordinates cell-wall synthesis during growth and division to achieve its characteristic oval shape is poorly understood. The conserved eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinase of S. pneumoniae, StkP, previously was reported to phosphorylate the cell-division

  16. Developing a Progressive Control Pathway for African Animal Trypanosomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diall, Oumar; Cecchi, Giuliano; Wanda, Gift; Argilés-Herrero, Rafael; Vreysen, Marc J B; Cattoli, Giovanni; Viljoen, Gerrit J; Mattioli, Raffaele; Bouyer, Jérémy

    2017-07-01

    Progressive control pathways (PCPs) are stepwise approaches for the reduction, elimination, and eradication of human and animal diseases. They provide systematic frameworks for planning and evaluating interventions. Here we outline a PCP for tsetse-transmitted animal trypanosomosis, the scourge of poor livestock keepers in tropical Africa. Initial PCP stages focus on the establishment of national coordination structures, engagement of stakeholders, development of technical capacities, data collection and management, and pilot field interventions. The intermediate stage aims at a sustainable and economically profitable reduction of disease burden, while higher stages target elimination. The mixed-record of success and failure in past efforts against African animal trypanosomosis (AAT) makes the development of this PCP a high priority. Copyright © 2017 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Hormonal control of cell division and elongation along differentiation trajectories in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsuka, Hirotomo; Umeda, Masaaki

    2014-06-01

    The continuous development of roots is supported by a sustainable system for cell production and growth at the root tip. In the stem cell niche that consists of a quiescent centre and surrounding stem cells, an undifferentiated state and low mitotic activity are preserved by the action of auxin and abscisic acid. Stem cell daughters divide several times in the proximal meristem, where auxin and gibberellin mainly promote cell proliferation. Cells then elongate with the help of gibberellin, and become finally differentiated as a constituent of a cell file in the elongation/differentiation zone. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the transition zone is located between the proximal meristem and the elongation/differentiation zone, and plays an important role in switching from mitosis to the endoreplication that causes DNA polyploidization. Recent studies have shown that cytokinins are essentially required for this transition by antagonizing auxin signalling and promoting degradation of mitotic regulators. In each root zone, different phytohormones interact with one another and coordinately control cell proliferation, cell elongation, cell differentiation, and endoreplication. Such hormonal networks maintain the elaborate structure of the root tip under various environmental conditions. In this review, we summarize and discuss key issues related to hormonal regulation of root growth, and describe how phytohormones are associated with the control of cell cycle machinery. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Mos in the Oocyte: How to Use MAPK Independently of Growth Factors and Transcription to Control Meiotic Divisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude Dupré

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In many cell types, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK also named extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK is activated in response to a variety of extracellular growth factor-receptor interactions and leads to the transcriptional activation of immediate early genes, hereby influencing a number of tissue-specific biological activities, as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. In one specific cell type however, the female germ cell, MAPK does not follow this canonical scheme. In oocytes, MAPK is activated independently of growth factors and tyrosine kinase receptors, acts independently of transcriptional regulation, plays a crucial role in controlling meiotic divisions, and is under the control of a peculiar upstream regulator, the kinase Mos. Mos was originally identified as the transforming gene of Moloney murine sarcoma virus and its cellular homologue was the first proto-oncogene to be molecularly cloned. What could be the specific roles of Mos that render it necessary for meiosis? Which unique functions could explain the evolutionary cost to have selected one gene to only serve for few hours in one very specific cell type? This review discusses the original features of MAPK activation by Mos and the roles of this module in oocytes.

  19. International Federation of Library Associations Annual Conference Papers. Bibliographic Control Division: Bibliography and Cataloguing Sections (47th, Leipzig, East Germany, August 17-22, 1981).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Susan H.; And Others

    This set of papers delivered to the Bibliographic Control Division of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) during its 47th annual conference (1981) includes: "Cataloging in Publication in the United States--Problems and Prospects," by Susan H. Vita; "Development and Coordination of Bibliographic Activities:…

  20. IFT88 Plays a Cilia- and PCP-Independent Role in Controlling Oriented Cell Divisions during Vertebrate Embryonic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Borovina

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The role for cilia in establishing planar cell polarity (PCP is contentious. Although knockdown of genes known to function in ciliogenesis has been reported to cause PCP-related morphogenesis defects in zebrafish, genetic mutations affecting intraflagellar transport (IFT do not show PCP phenotypes despite the requirement for IFT in cilia formation. This discrepancy has been attributed to off-target effects of antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO injection, confounding maternal effects in zygotic mutant embryos, or an inability to distinguish between cilia-dependent versus cilia-independent protein functions. To determine the role of cilia in PCP, we generated maternal + zygotic IFT88 (MZift88 mutant zebrafish embryos, which never form cilia. We clearly demonstrate that cilia are not required to establish PCP. Rather, IFT88 plays a cilia-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions at gastrulation and neurulation. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of cilia gene function in normal development and in disease.

  1. IFT88 plays a cilia- and PCP-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions during vertebrate embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovina, Antonia; Ciruna, Brian

    2013-10-17

    The role for cilia in establishing planar cell polarity (PCP) is contentious. Although knockdown of genes known to function in ciliogenesis has been reported to cause PCP-related morphogenesis defects in zebrafish, genetic mutations affecting intraflagellar transport (IFT) do not show PCP phenotypes despite the requirement for IFT in cilia formation. This discrepancy has been attributed to off-target effects of antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) injection, confounding maternal effects in zygotic mutant embryos, or an inability to distinguish between cilia-dependent versus cilia-independent protein functions. To determine the role of cilia in PCP, we generated maternal + zygotic IFT88 (MZift88) mutant zebrafish embryos, which never form cilia. We clearly demonstrate that cilia are not required to establish PCP. Rather, IFT88 plays a cilia-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions at gastrulation and neurulation. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of cilia gene function in normal development and in disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1981. [Leading abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G. (comps.)

    1982-10-01

    This report summarizes research and development activities of the Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's Biomedical and Environmental Research program for the calendar year 1981. Individual reports describing the current status of projects have been entered individually into the data base.

  3. Polarity in plant asymmetric cell division: Division orientation and cell fate differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wanchen; Dong, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is universally required for the development of multicellular organisms. Unlike animal cells, plant cells have a rigid cellulosic extracellular matrix, the cell wall, which provides physical support and forms communication routes. This fundamental difference leads to some unique mechanisms in plants for generating asymmetries during cell division. However, plants also utilize intrinsically polarized proteins to regulate asymmetric signaling and cell division, a strategy similar to the differentiation mechanism found in animals. Current progress suggests that common regulatory modes, i.e. protein spontaneous clustering and cytoskeleton reorganization, underlie protein polarization in both animal and plant cells. Despite these commonalities, it is important to note that intrinsic mechanisms in plants are heavily influenced by extrinsic cues. To control physical asymmetry in cell division, although our understanding is fragmentary thus far, plants might have evolved novel polarization strategies to orientate cell division plane. Recent studies also suggest that the phytohormone auxin, one of the most pivotal small molecules in plant development, regulates ACD in plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Mechanical impulses can control metaphase progression in a mammalian cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itabashi, Takeshi; Terada, Yasuhiko; Kuwana, Kenta; Kan, Tetsuo; Shimoyama, Isao; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2012-05-08

    Chromosome segregation machinery is controlled by mechanochemical regulation. Tension in a mitotic spindle, which is balanced by molecular motors and polymerization-depolymerization dynamics of microtubules, is thought to be essential for determining the timing of chromosome segregation after the establishment of the kinetochore-microtubule attachments. It is not known, however, whether and how applied mechanical forces modulate the tension balance and chemically affect the molecular processes involved in chromosome segregation. Here we found that a mechanical impulse externally applied to mitotic HeLa cells alters the balance of forces within the mitotic spindle. We identified two distinct mitotic responses to the applied mechanical force that either facilitate or delay anaphase onset, depending on the direction of force and the extent of cell compression. An external mechanical impulse that physically increases tension within the mitotic spindle accelerates anaphase onset, and this is attributed to the facilitation of physical cleavage of sister chromatid cohesion. On the other hand, a decrease in tension activates the spindle assembly checkpoint, which impedes the degradation of mitotic proteins and delays the timing of chromosome segregation. Thus, the external mechanical force acts as a crucial regulator for metaphase progression, modulating the internal force balance and thereby triggering specific mechanochemical cellular reactions.

  5. Continuing progress toward controlled intracellular delivery of semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, Joyce; Delehanty, James B; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-01-01

    The biological applications of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) continue to grow at a nearly unabated pace. This growth is driven, in part, by their unique photophysical and physicochemical properties which have allowed them to be used in many different roles in cellular biology including: as superior fluorophores for a wide variety of cellular labeling applications; as active platforms for assembly of nanoscale sensors; and, more recently, as a powerful tool to understand the mechanisms of nanoparticle mediated drug delivery. Given that controlled cellular delivery is at the intersection of all these applications, the latest progress in delivering QDs to cells is examined here. A brief discussion of relevant considerations including the importance of materials preparation and bioconjugation along with the continuing issue of endosomal sequestration is initially provided for context. Methods for the cellular delivery of QDs are then highlighted including those based on passive exposure, facilitated strategies that utilize peptides or polymers and fully active modalities such as electroporation and other mechanically based methods. Following on this, the exciting advent of QD cellular delivery using multiple or combined mechanisms is then previewed. Several recent methods reporting endosomal escape of QD materials in cells are also examined in detail with a focus on the mechanisms by which access to the cytosol is achieved. The ongoing debate over QD cytotoxicity is also discussed along with a perspective on how this field will continue to evolve in the future. PMID:25154379

  6. Computational analysis of mammalian cell division gated by a circadian clock: quantized cell cycles and cell size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámborszky, Judit; Hong, Christian I; Csikász Nagy, Attila

    2007-12-01

    Cell cycle and circadian rhythms are conserved from cyanobacteria to humans with robust cyclic features. Recently, molecular links between these two cyclic processes have been discovered. Core clock transcription factors, Bmal1 and Clock (Clk), directly regulate Wee1 kinase, which inhibits entry into the mitosis. We investigate the effect of this connection on the timing of mammalian cell cycle processes with computational modeling tools. We connect a minimal model of circadian rhythms, which consists of transcription-translation feedback loops, with a modified mammalian cell cycle model from Novak and Tyson (2004). As we vary the mass doubling time (MDT) of the cell cycle, stochastic simulations reveal quantized cell cycles when the activity of Wee1 is influenced by clock components. The quantized cell cycles disappear in the absence of coupling or when the strength of this link is reduced. More intriguingly, our simulations indicate that the circadian clock triggers critical size control in the mammalian cell cycle. A periodic brake on the cell cycle progress via Wee1 enforces size control when the MDT is quite different from the circadian period. No size control is observed in the absence of coupling. The issue of size control in the mammalian system is debatable, whereas it is well established in yeast. It is possible that the size control is more readily observed in cell lines that contain circadian rhythms, since not all cell types have a circadian clock. This would be analogous to an ultradian clock intertwined with quantized cell cycles (and possibly cell size control) in yeast. We present the first coupled model between the mammalian cell cycle and circadian rhythms that reveals quantized cell cycles and cell size control influenced by the clock.

  7. Effects of MEK inhibitor U0126 on meiotic progression in mouse oocytes:microtuble organization, asymmetric division and metaphase Ⅱ arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN WEN DONG; HAl FENG ZHU; WEI ZHONG ZHU; HAI LEI DING; TIE MIN MA; ZHAO NIAN ZHOU

    2003-01-01

    In this study we used U0126, a potent and specific inhibitor of MEK, to study the roles of MEK/ERK/p90rsk signaling pathway in the meiotic cell cycle of mouse oocytes. The phosphorylation of MAP kinase and p90rsk in the oocytes treated with 1.5 μMU0126 was the same as that in oocytes cultured in drug-free medium. With 1.5 μM U0126 treatment, the spindles appeared normal as they formed in oocytes, but failed to maintain its structure.Instead, the spindle lost one pole or elongated extraordinarily. After further culture, some oocytes extruded gigantic polar bodies (>30 μm) that later divided into two small ones. Some oocytes underwent symmetric division and produced two equal-size daughter cells in which normal spindles formed. In oocytes with different division patterns,MAP kinase was normally phosphorylated. When the concentration of U0126 was increased to 15 mM, the phosphorylation of both MAPK and p90rsk were inhibited, while symmetric division was decreased. When incubating in medium containing 15 μM U0126 for 14 h, oocytes were activated, but part of them failed to emit polar bodies. MII oocytes were also activated by 15 μM U0126, at the same time the dephosphorylation of MAP kinase and p90rsk was observed. Our results indicate that 1) MEK plays important but not indispensable roles in microtubule organization;2) MEK keeps normal meiotic spindle morphology, targets peripheral spindle positioning and regulates asymmetric division by activating some unknown substrates other than MAP kinase/p90rsk; and 3) activation of MEK/ERK/p90rsk cascade maintains MII arrest in mouse oocytes.

  8. Uhrf1 controls the self-renewal versus differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells by epigenetically regulating the cell-division modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingyao; Chen, Xufeng; Song, Guangrong; Zhang, Jiali; Liu, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaolong

    2017-01-10

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are able to both self-renew and differentiate. However, how individual HSC makes the decision between self-renewal and differentiation remains largely unknown. Here we report that ablation of the key epigenetic regulator Uhrf1 in the hematopoietic system depletes the HSC pool, leading to hematopoietic failure and lethality. Uhrf1-deficient HSCs display normal survival and proliferation, yet undergo erythroid-biased differentiation at the expense of self-renewal capacity. Notably, Uhrf1 is required for the establishment of DNA methylation patterns of erythroid-specific genes during HSC division. The expression of these genes is enhanced in the absence of Uhrf1, which disrupts the HSC-division modes by promoting the symmetric differentiation and suppressing the symmetric self-renewal. Moreover, overexpression of one of the up-regulated genes, Gata1, in HSCs is sufficient to phenocopy Uhrf1-deficient HSCs, which show impaired HSC symmetric self-renewal and increased differentiation commitment. Taken together, our findings suggest that Uhrf1 controls the self-renewal versus differentiation of HSC through epigenetically regulating the cell-division modes, thus providing unique insights into the relationship among Uhrf1-mediated DNA methylation, cell-division mode, and HSC fate decision.

  9. Regulation of Asymmetric Cell Division in Mammalian Neural Stem and Cancer Precursor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daynac, Mathieu; Petritsch, Claudia K

    Stem and progenitor cells are characterized by their abilities to self-renew and produce differentiated progeny. The balance between self-renewal and differentiation is achieved through control of cell division mode, which can be either asymmetric or symmetric. Failure to properly control cell division mode may result in premature depletion of the stem/progenitor cell pool or abnormal growth and impaired differentiation. In many tissues, including the brain, stem cells and progenitor cells undergo asymmetric cell division through the establishment of cell polarity. Cell polarity proteins are therefore potentially critical regulators of asymmetric cell division. Decrease or loss of asymmetric cell division can be associated with reduced differentiation common during aging or impaired remyelination as seen in demyelinating diseases. Progenitor-like glioma precursor cells show decreased asymmetric cell division rates and increased symmetric divisions, which suggests that asymmetric cell division suppresses brain tumor formation. Cancer stem cells, on the other hand, still undergo low rates of asymmetric cell division, which may provide them with a survival advantage during therapy. These findings led to the hypotheses that asymmetric cell divisions are not always tumor suppressive but can also be utilized to maintain a cancer stem cell population. Proper control of cell division mode is therefore not only deemed necessary to generate cellular diversity during development and to maintain adult tissue homeostasis but may also prevent disease and determine disease progression. Since brain cancer is most common in the adult and aging population, we review here the current knowledge on molecular mechanisms that regulate asymmetric cell divisions in the neural and oligodendroglial lineage during development and in the adult brain.

  10. Defect driven shapes in nematic droplets: analogies with cell division

    CERN Document Server

    Leoni, Marco; Bowick, Mark J; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Building on the striking similarity between the structure of the spindle during mitosis in living cells and nematic textures in confined liquid crystals, we use a continuum model of two-dimensional nematic liquid crystal droplets, to examine the physical aspects of cell division. The model investigates the interplay between bulk elasticity of the microtubule assembly, described as a nematic liquid crystal, and surface elasticity of the cell cortex, modelled as a bounding flexible membrane, in controlling cell shape and division. The centrosomes at the spindle poles correspond to the cores of the topological defects required to accommodate nematic order in a closed geometry. We map out the progression of both healthy bipolar and faulty multi-polar division as a function of an effective parameter that incorporates active processes and controls centrosome separation. A robust prediction, independent of energetic considerations, is that the transition from a single cell to daughters cells occurs at critical value...

  11. Wnt signaling controls the stem cell-like asymmetric division of the epithelial seam cells during C. elegans larval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Julie E; Eisenmann, David M

    2010-12-01

    Metazoan stem cells repopulate tissues during adult life by dividing asymmetrically to generate another stem cell and a cell that terminally differentiates. Wnt signaling regulates the division pattern of stem cells in flies and vertebrates. While the short-lived nematode C. elegans has no adult somatic stem cells, the lateral epithelial seam cells divide in a stem cell-like manner in each larval stage, usually generating a posterior daughter that retains the seam cell fate and an anterior daughter that terminally differentiates. We show that while wild-type adult animals have 16 seam cells per side, animals with reduced function of the TCF homolog POP-1 have as many as 67 seam cells, and animals with reduced function of the β-catenins SYS-1 and WRM-1 have as few as three. Analysis of seam cell division patterns showed alterations in their stem cell-like divisions in the L2-L4 stages: reduced Wnt signaling caused both daughters to adopt non-seam fates, while activated Wnt signaling caused both daughters to adopt the seam fate. Therefore, our results indicate that Wnt signaling globally regulates the asymmetric, stem cell-like division of most or all somatic seam cells during C. elegans larval development, and that Wnt pathway regulation of stem cell-like behavior is conserved in nematodes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Progress in the control of bovine tuberculosis in Spanish wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gortazar, Christian; Vicente, Joaquín; Boadella, Mariana; Ballesteros, Cristina; Galindo, Ruth C; Garrido, Joseba; Aranaz, Alicia; de la Fuente, José

    2011-07-01

    Despite the compulsory test and slaughter campaigns in cattle, bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is still present in Spain, and the role of wildlife reservoirs is increasingly recognized. We provide an update on recent progress made in bTB control in Spanish wildlife, including aspects of epidemiology, surveillance, host-pathogen interaction and wildlife vaccination. At the high densities and in the particular circumstances of Mediterranean environments, wild ungulates, mainly Eurasian wild boar and red deer, are able to maintain Mycobacterium bovis circulation even in absence of domestic livestock. Infection is widespread among wild ungulates in the south of the country, local infection prevalence being as high as 52% in wild boar and 27% in red deer. Risk factors identified include host genetic susceptibility, abundance, spatial aggregation at feeders and waterholes, scavenging, and social behaviour. An increasing trend of bTB compatible lesions was reported among wild boar and red deer inspected between 1992 and 2004 in Southwestern Spain. Sporadic cases of badger TB have been detected, further complicating the picture. Gene expression profiles were characterized in European wild boar and Iberian red deer naturally infected with M. bovis. The comparative analysis of gene expression profiles in wildlife hosts in response to infection advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of infection and pathogenesis, revealed common and distinctive host responses to infection and identified candidate genes associated with resistance to bTB and for the characterization of host response to infection and vaccination. Ongoing research is producing valuable knowledge on vaccine delivery, safety and efficacy issues. Baits for the oral delivery of BCG vaccine preparations to wild boar piglets were developed and evaluated. The use of selective feeders during the summer was found to be a potentially reliable bait-deployment strategy. Safety experiments yielded no isolation of M

  13. Progress control in iterated local search for nurse rostering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burke, E.K.; Curtois, T.; Fijn van Draat, L.; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.; Post, Gerhard F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an approach in which a local search technique is alternated with a process which ‘jumps’ to another point in the search space. After each ‘jump’ a (time-intensive) local search is used to obtain a new local optimum. The focus of the paper is in monitoring the progress of this te

  14. Home | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Research The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into cancer. |

  15. Ingression Progression Complexes Control Extracellular Matrix Remodelling during Cytokinesis in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltman, Magdalena; Molist, Iago; Arcones, Irene; Sacristan, Carlos; Filali-Mouncef, Yasmina; Roncero, Cesar; Sanchez-Diaz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells must coordinate contraction of the actomyosin ring at the division site together with ingression of the plasma membrane and remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) to support cytokinesis, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. In eukaryotes, glycosyltransferases that synthesise ECM polysaccharides are emerging as key factors during cytokinesis. The budding yeast chitin synthase Chs2 makes the primary septum, a special layer of the ECM, which is an essential process during cell division. Here we isolated a group of actomyosin ring components that form complexes together with Chs2 at the cleavage site at the end of the cell cycle, which we named ‘ingression progression complexes’ (IPCs). In addition to type II myosin, the IQGAP protein Iqg1 and Chs2, IPCs contain the F-BAR protein Hof1, and the cytokinesis regulators Inn1 and Cyk3. We describe the molecular mechanism by which chitin synthase is activated by direct association of the C2 domain of Inn1, and the transglutaminase-like domain of Cyk3, with the catalytic domain of Chs2. We used an experimental system to find a previously unanticipated role for the C-terminus of Inn1 in preventing the untimely activation of Chs2 at the cleavage site until Cyk3 releases the block on Chs2 activity during late mitosis. These findings support a model for the co-ordinated regulation of cell division in budding yeast, in which IPCs play a central role. PMID:26891268

  16. Ingression Progression Complexes Control Extracellular Matrix Remodelling during Cytokinesis in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Foltman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells must coordinate contraction of the actomyosin ring at the division site together with ingression of the plasma membrane and remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM to support cytokinesis, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. In eukaryotes, glycosyltransferases that synthesise ECM polysaccharides are emerging as key factors during cytokinesis. The budding yeast chitin synthase Chs2 makes the primary septum, a special layer of the ECM, which is an essential process during cell division. Here we isolated a group of actomyosin ring components that form complexes together with Chs2 at the cleavage site at the end of the cell cycle, which we named 'ingression progression complexes' (IPCs. In addition to type II myosin, the IQGAP protein Iqg1 and Chs2, IPCs contain the F-BAR protein Hof1, and the cytokinesis regulators Inn1 and Cyk3. We describe the molecular mechanism by which chitin synthase is activated by direct association of the C2 domain of Inn1, and the transglutaminase-like domain of Cyk3, with the catalytic domain of Chs2. We used an experimental system to find a previously unanticipated role for the C-terminus of Inn1 in preventing the untimely activation of Chs2 at the cleavage site until Cyk3 releases the block on Chs2 activity during late mitosis. These findings support a model for the co-ordinated regulation of cell division in budding yeast, in which IPCs play a central role.

  17. Negative control of cell division by mreB, a gene that functions in determining the rod shape of Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachi, M; Matsuhashi, M

    1989-06-01

    Exponentially growing Escherichia coli cells containing additional copies of the shape-determining gene mreB were found to be elongated, whereas mreB mutant cells were spherical and overproduced penicillin-binding protein 3, a septum peptidoglycan synthetase. The effect of the mreB gene on expression of ftsI, the structural gene for penicillin-binding protein 3, was examined by using an ftsI-lacZ fusion gene on a plasmid. Formation of beta-galactosidase from the fusion gene was significantly increased in mreB129 mutant cells, and its overproduction was suppressed to a normal level by the presence of a plasmid containing the mreB gene. These results indicate a negative mechanism of control of cell division by this morphology gene and suggest that the gene functions in determining whether division or elongation of the cells occurs.

  18. A Negative Feedback Loop Controlling bHLH Complexes Is Involved in Vascular Cell Division and Differentiation in the Root Apical Meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Hirofumi; Iwamoto, Kuninori; Kariya, Yuka; Asakawa, Tomohiro; Kan, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Hiroo; Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko

    2015-12-07

    Controlling cell division and differentiation in meristems is essential for proper plant growth. Two bHLH heterodimers consisting of LONESOME HIGHWAY (LHW) and TARGET OF MONOPTEROS 5 (TMO5)/TMO5-LIKE1 (T5L1) regulate periclinal cell division in vascular cells in the root apical meristem (RAM). In this study, we further investigated the functions of LHW-T5L1, finding that in addition to controlling cell division, this complex regulates xylem differentiation in the RAM via a novel negative regulatory system. LHW-T5L1 upregulated the thermospermine synthase gene ACAULIS5 (ACL5), as well as SUPPRESSOR OF ACAULIS5 LIKE3 (SACL3), which encodes a bHLH protein, in the RAM. The SACL3 promoter sequence contains a conserved upstream open reading frame (uORF), which blocked translation of the main SACL3 ORF in the absence of thermospermine. Thermospermine eliminated the negative effect of uORF and enhanced SACL3 production. Further genetic and molecular biological analyses indicated that ACL5 and SACL3 suppress the function of LHW-T5L1 through a protein-protein interaction between LHW and SACL3. Finally, we showed that a negative feedback loop consisting of LHW-T5L1, ACL5, SACL3, and LHW-SACL3 contributes to maintain RAM size and proper root growth. These findings suggest that a negative feedback loop regulates the LHW-T5L1 output level to coordinate cell division and differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Coverage & missed opportunity for Japanese encephalitis vaccine, Gorakhpur division, Uttar Pradesh, India, 2015: Implications for Japanese encephalitis control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj V Murhekar

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The survey results showed that three of the four children aged 25-36 months in Gorakhpur division had received at least one dose of JE vaccine. The coverage of second dose of JE vaccine, however, was low. Failure to administer vaccination simultaneously was the most common reason for MoV for JE vaccine. Training vaccinators about correct vaccination schedule and removing their misconception about administering vaccines simultaneously would substantially improve JE vaccine coverage in Gorakhpur.

  20. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division, 1991 Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Willard S., Ed.

    This report documents research and development performed under the sponsorship of the Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division of the Office of Naval Research in fiscal year 1991. It provides abstracts (title, principal investigator, project code, objective, approach, progress, and related reports) of projects of three program divisions (cognitive…

  1. PERSONNEL DIVISION BECOMES HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION

    CERN Document Server

    Division des ressources humaines

    2000-01-01

    In the years to come, CERN faces big challenges in the planning and use of human resources. At this moment, Personnel (PE) Division is being reorganised to prepare for new tasks and priorities. In order to accentuate the purposes of the operation, the name of the division has been changed into Human Resources (HR) Division, with effect from 1st January 2000. Human Resources DivisionTel.73222

  2. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  3. Research progress of control of condensate depression for condenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Liang, Run; Li, Fengyu

    2017-08-01

    It is introduced that significance and structure of the condensate depression control system. In accordance with controller devised procedure, we analyze and elaborate how to construct the lumped parameter and dynamic mathematical model which possesses distinct physics significance. Neural network model being called black-box model is also introduced. We analyze and contrast the control technique of condensate depression as conventional PI control, fuzzy PI control and fuzzy control. It is indicated that if the controller of condensate depression were devised inappropriate, while the steam discharged of turbine varying by a large margin, would result in the rotation rate of cooling water circulating pump accelerating at a great lick even to trigger the galloping danger which is less impressive for the units operating safely.

  4. Hazards control progress report No. 55, July through December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-16

    Progress is reported on environmental protection and enhanced filtration studies. Environmental protection studies emphasized on-line x-ray fluorescence analysis of transition metals in waste water. Enhanced filtration studies included the following: expansion of test facility; cost-benefit analysis of placing prefilters before HEPA filters; effect of fiber-size distribution on filter pressure drop; and experimental and theoretical studies on filter loading. The following technical notes are included: data retrieval program for the whole body counter; hydrogen cyanide sorption by acid-gas respirator cartridges; glove permeation study; fire safety evaluation of boron-loaded polymer; and high-explosive shipping container studies. (HLW)

  5. [Research progresses of anabolic steroids analysis in doping control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yuanyuan; Wang, Dingzhong; Li, Ke'an; Liu, Feng

    2008-07-01

    Anabolic steroids, a kind of physiological active substance, are widely abused to improve athletic performance in human sports. They have been forbidden in sports by the International Olympic Committee since 1983. Since then, many researchers have been focusing their attentions on the establishment of reliable detection methods. In this paper, we review the research progresses of different analytical methods for anabolic steroids since 2002, such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, immunoassay, electrochemistry analysis and mass spectrometry. The developing prospect of anabolic steroids analysis is also discussed.

  6. Implications of intravital imaging of murine germinal centres on the control of B cell selection and division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian C. Binder

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravital imaging of antibody optimization in germinal centre (GC reactions hasset a new dimension in the understanding of the humoral immune response duringthe last decade. The inclusion of spatio-temporal cellular dynamics inthe research on GCs required analysis with agent-based mathematical models.Here, we integrate the available intravital imaging data from various researchgroups and incorporate these into a quantitative mathematical model ofGC reactions and antibody affinity maturation. Interestingly, the integrationof data concerning the spatial organisation of GCs and B cell motility allows to drawconclusions on the strength of the selection pressure and the controlof B cell division by T follicular helper cells.

  7. Progression of atrial fibrillation in the REgistry on Cardiac rhythm disORDers assessing the control of Atrial Fibrillation cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vos, Cees B; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, A John;

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) may progress to persistent AF. We studied the clinical correlates and the effect of rhythm-control strategy on AF progression.......Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) may progress to persistent AF. We studied the clinical correlates and the effect of rhythm-control strategy on AF progression....

  8. Using Statistical Process Control to Enhance Student Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Mark D.; Raichura, Nilesh; Bernardes, Ednilson

    2012-01-01

    Public interest in educational outcomes has markedly increased in the most recent decade; however, quality management and statistical process control have not deeply penetrated the management of academic institutions. This paper presents results of an attempt to use Statistical Process Control (SPC) to identify a key impediment to continuous…

  9. Actin related protein complex subunit 1b controls sperm release, barrier integrity and cell division during adult rat spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anita; Dumasia, Kushaan; Deshpande, Sharvari; Gaonkar, Reshma; Balasinor, N H

    2016-08-01

    Actin remodeling is a vital process for signaling, movement and survival in all cells. In the testes, extensive actin reorganization occurs at spermatid-Sertoli cell junctions during sperm release (spermiation) and at inter Sertoli cell junctions during restructuring of the blood testis barrier (BTB). During spermiation, tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs), rich in branched actin networks, ensure recycling of spermatid-Sertoli cell junctional molecules. Similar recycling occurs during BTB restructuring around the same time as spermiation occurs. Actin related protein 2/3 complex is an essential actin nucleation and branching protein. One of its subunits, Arpc1b, was earlier found to be down-regulated in an estrogen-induced rat model of spermiation failure. Also, Arpc1b was found to be estrogen responsive through estrogen receptor beta in seminiferous tubule culture. Here, knockdown of Arpc1b by siRNA in adult rat testis led to defects in spermiation caused by failure in TBC formation. Knockdown also compromised BTB integrity and caused polarity defects of mature spermatids. Apart from these effects pertaining to Sertoli cells, Arpc1b reduction perturbed ability of germ cells to enter G2/M phase thus hindering cell division. In summary, Arpc1b, an estrogen responsive gene, is a regulator of spermiation, mature spermatid polarity, BTB integrity and cell division during adult spermatogenesis.

  10. From linear to nonlinear control means: a practical progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiqiang

    2002-04-01

    With the rapid advance of digital control hardware, it is time to take the simple but effective proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control technology to the next level of performance and robustness. For this purpose, a nonlinear PID and active disturbance rejection framework are introduced in this paper. It complements the existing theory in that (1) it actively and systematically explores the use of nonlinear control mechanisms for better performance, even for linear plants; (2) it represents a control strategy that is rather independent of mathematical models of the plants, thus achieving inherent robustness and reducing design complexity. Stability analysis, as well as software/hardware test results, are presented. It is evident that the proposed framework lends itself well in seeking innovative solutions to practical problems while maintaining the simplicity and the intuitiveness of the existing technology.

  11. Progress in thermomechanical control of steel plates and their commercialization

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyoshi Nishioka and Kazutoshi Ichikawa

    2012-01-01

    The water-cooled thermomechanical control process (TMCP) is a technology for improving the strength and toughness of water-cooled steel plates, while allowing control of the microstructure, phase transformation and rolling. This review describes metallurgical aspects of the microalloying of steel, such as niobium addition, and discusses advantages of TMCP, for example, in terms of weldability, which is reduced upon alloying. Other covered topics include the development of equipment, distortio...

  12. [Endemic situation and control progress of taeniasis in western China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Chang-Ping; Qian, Ying-Jun; Li, Tiao-Ying; Fu, Qing; Wang, Qiang; Xiao, Ning

    2014-06-01

    Taeniasis, caused by Taenia species, is one of the common zoonoses in China, particularly in the western region of China. Up to now, not enough attention has been given in the high prevalence and high burden of the diseases. In order to study the endemic patterns and control strategies of taeniasis, a series of epidemiological investigations, molecular researches and pilot control activities have been conducted in recent years. This paper reviews the relevant publications in taeniasis research over the last 10 years.

  13. [Research progress of thermal control system for extravehicular activity space suit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z Q; Shen, L P; Yuan, X G

    1999-08-01

    New research progress of thermal control system for oversea Extravehicular Activity (EVA) space suit is presented. Characteristics of several thermal control systems are analyzed in detail. Some research tendencies and problems are discussed, which are worthwhile to be specially noted. Finally, author's opinion about thermal control system in the future is put forward.

  14. Progress in Aluminum Electrolysis Control and Future Direction for Smart Aluminum Electrolysis Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Tianshuang; Li, Jie; Yang, Shuai; Zou, Zhong

    2016-10-01

    The industrial aluminum reduction cell is an electrochemistry reactor that operates under high temperatures and highly corrosive conditions. However, these conditions have restricted the measurement of key control parameters, making the control of aluminum reduction cells a difficult problem in the industry. Because aluminum electrolysis control systems have a significant economic influence, substantial research has been conducted on control algorithms, control systems and information systems for aluminum reduction cells. This article first summarizes the development of control systems and then focuses on the progress made since 2000, including alumina concentration control, temperature control and electrolyte molecular ratio control, fault diagnosis, cell condition prediction and control system expansion. Based on these studies, the concept of a smart aluminum electrolysis plant is proposed. The frame construction, key problems and current progress are introduced. Finally, several future directions are discussed.

  15. Progress Towards Computational Method for Circulation Control Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Anders, S. G.

    2005-01-01

    The compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved for circulation control airfoil flows. Numerical solutions are computed with both structured and unstructured grid solvers. Several turbulence models are considered, including the Spalart-Allmaras model with and without curvature corrections, the shear stress transport model of Menter, and the k-enstrophy model. Circulation control flows with jet momentum coefficients of 0.03, 0.10, and 0.226 are considered. Comparisons are made between computed and experimental pressure distributions, velocity profiles, Reynolds stress profiles, and streamline patterns. Including curvature effects yields the closest agreement with the measured data.

  16. Energy-efficient orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-based passive optical network based on adaptive sleep-mode control and dynamic bandwidth allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Xiao, Nengwu; Chen, Chen; Yuan, Weicheng; Qiu, Kun

    2016-02-01

    We propose an energy-efficient orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-based passive optical network (OFDM-PON) using adaptive sleep-mode control and dynamic bandwidth allocation. In this scheme, a bidirectional-centralized algorithm named the receiver and transmitter accurate sleep control and dynamic bandwidth allocation (RTASC-DBA), which has an overall bandwidth scheduling policy, is employed to enhance the energy efficiency of the OFDM-PON. The RTASC-DBA algorithm is used in an optical line terminal (OLT) to control the sleep mode of an optical network unit (ONU) sleep and guarantee the quality of service of different services of the OFDM-PON. The obtained results show that, by using the proposed scheme, the average power consumption of the ONU is reduced by ˜40% when the normalized ONU load is less than 80%, compared with the average power consumption without using the proposed scheme.

  17. A century of progress in weed control in hardwood seedbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. South

    2009-01-01

    Weeds have existed in nurseries since before the time Bartram grew hardwoods during the 18th century. Hand weeding was the primary method of weed control during the first part of the 20th century. From 1931 to 1970, advances in chemistry increased the use of herbicides, and advances in engineering increased the reliance on machines for cultivation. Many managers now...

  18. In tobacco BY-2 cells xyloglucan oligosaccharides alter the expression of genes involved in cell wall metabolism, signalling, stress responses, cell division and transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pérez, Lien; Perrotta, Lara; Acosta, Alexis; Orellana, Esteban; Spadafora, Natasha; Bruno, Leonardo; Bitonti, Beatrice M; Albani, Diego; Cabrera, Juan Carlos; Francis, Dennis; Rogers, Hilary J

    2014-10-01

    Xyloglucan oligosaccharides (XGOs) are breakdown products of XGs, the most abundant hemicelluloses of the primary cell walls of non-Poalean species. Treatment of cell cultures or whole plants with XGOs results in accelerated cell elongation and cell division, changes in primary root growth, and a stimulation of defence responses. They may therefore act as signalling molecules regulating plant growth and development. Previous work suggests an interaction with auxins and effects on cell wall loosening, however their mode of action is not fully understood. The effect of an XGO extract from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) on global gene expression was therefore investigated in tobacco BY-2 cells using microarrays. Over 500 genes were differentially regulated with similar numbers and functional classes of genes up- and down-regulated, indicating a complex interaction with the cellular machinery. Up-regulation of a putative XG endotransglycosylase/hydrolase-related (XTH) gene supports the mechanism of XGO action through cell wall loosening. Differential expression of defence-related genes supports a role for XGOs as elicitors. Changes in the expression of genes related to mitotic control and differentiation also support previous work showing that XGOs are mitotic inducers. XGOs also affected expression of several receptor-like kinase genes and transcription factors. Hence, XGOs have significant effects on expression of genes related to cell wall metabolism, signalling, stress responses, cell division and transcriptional control.

  19. Characterization of dependencies between growth and division in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Michael B; Iversen, Edwin S; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2017-02-01

    Cell growth and division are processes vital to the proliferation and development of life. Coordination between these two processes has been recognized for decades in a variety of organisms. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this coordination or 'size control' appears as an inverse correlation between cell size and the rate of cell-cycle progression, routinely observed in G1 prior to cell division commitment. Beyond this point, cells are presumed to complete S/G2/M at similar rates and in a size-independent manner. As such, studies of dependence between growth and division have focused on G1 Moreover, in unicellular organisms, coordination between growth and division has commonly been analysed within the cycle of a single cell without accounting for correlations in growth and division characteristics between cycles of related cells. In a comprehensive analysis of three published time-lapse microscopy datasets, we analyse both intra- and inter-cycle dependencies between growth and division, revisiting assumptions about the coordination between these two processes. Interestingly, we find evidence (i) that S/G2/M durations are systematically longer in daughters than in mothers, (ii) of dependencies between S/G2/M and size at budding that echo the classical G1 dependencies, and (iii) in contrast with recent bacterial studies, of negative dependencies between size at birth and size accumulated during the cell cycle. In addition, we develop a novel hierarchical model to uncover inter-cycle dependencies, and we find evidence for such dependencies in cells growing in sugar-poor environments. Our analysis highlights the need for experimentalists and modellers to account for new sources of cell-to-cell variation in growth and division, and our model provides a formal statistical framework for the continued study of dependencies between biological processes.

  20. Progress in thermomechanical control of steel plates and their commercialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Nishioka and Kazutoshi Ichikawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The water-cooled thermomechanical control process (TMCP is a technology for improving the strength and toughness of water-cooled steel plates, while allowing control of the microstructure, phase transformation and rolling. This review describes metallurgical aspects of the microalloying of steel, such as niobium addition, and discusses advantages of TMCP, for example, in terms of weldability, which is reduced upon alloying. Other covered topics include the development of equipment, distortions in steel plates, peripheral technologies such as steel making and casting, and theoretical modeling, as well as the history of property control in steel plate production and some early TMCP technologies. We provide some of the latest examples of applications of TMCP steel in various industries such as shipbuilding, offshore structures, building construction, bridges, pipelines, penstocks and cryogenic tanks. This review also introduces high heat-affected-zone toughness technologies, wherein the microstructure of steel is improved by the addition of fine particles of magnesium-containing sulfides and magnesium- or calcium-containing oxides. We demonstrate that thanks to ongoing developments TMCP has the potential to meet the ever-increasing demands of steel plates.

  1. Progress in thermomechanical control of steel plates and their commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Kiyoshi; Ichikawa, Kazutoshi

    2012-04-01

    The water-cooled thermomechanical control process (TMCP) is a technology for improving the strength and toughness of water-cooled steel plates, while allowing control of the microstructure, phase transformation and rolling. This review describes metallurgical aspects of the microalloying of steel, such as niobium addition, and discusses advantages of TMCP, for example, in terms of weldability, which is reduced upon alloying. Other covered topics include the development of equipment, distortions in steel plates, peripheral technologies such as steel making and casting, and theoretical modeling, as well as the history of property control in steel plate production and some early TMCP technologies. We provide some of the latest examples of applications of TMCP steel in various industries such as shipbuilding, offshore structures, building construction, bridges, pipelines, penstocks and cryogenic tanks. This review also introduces high heat-affected-zone toughness technologies, wherein the microstructure of steel is improved by the addition of fine particles of magnesium-containing sulfides and magnesium- or calcium-containing oxides. We demonstrate that thanks to ongoing developments TMCP has the potential to meet the ever-increasing demands of steel plates.

  2. Mammalian neurogenesis requires Treacle-Plk1 for precise control of spindle orientation, mitotic progression, and maintenance of neural progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Sakai

    Full Text Available The cerebral cortex is a specialized region of the brain that processes cognitive, motor, somatosensory, auditory, and visual functions. Its characteristic architecture and size is dependent upon the number of neurons generated during embryogenesis and has been postulated to be governed by symmetric versus asymmetric cell divisions, which mediate the balance between progenitor cell maintenance and neuron differentiation, respectively. The mechanistic importance of spindle orientation remains controversial, hence there is considerable interest in understanding how neural progenitor cell mitosis is controlled during neurogenesis. We discovered that Treacle, which is encoded by the Tcof1 gene, is a novel centrosome- and kinetochore-associated protein that is critical for spindle fidelity and mitotic progression. Tcof1/Treacle loss-of-function disrupts spindle orientation and cell cycle progression, which perturbs the maintenance, proliferation, and localization of neural progenitors during cortical neurogenesis. Consistent with this, Tcof1(+/- mice exhibit reduced brain size as a consequence of defects in neural progenitor maintenance. We determined that Treacle elicits its effect via a direct interaction with Polo-like kinase1 (Plk1, and furthermore we discovered novel in vivo roles for Plk1 in governing mitotic progression and spindle orientation in the developing mammalian cortex. Increased asymmetric cell division, however, did not promote increased neuronal differentiation. Collectively our research has therefore identified Treacle and Plk1 as novel in vivo regulators of spindle fidelity, mitotic progression, and proliferation in the maintenance and localization of neural progenitor cells. Together, Treacle and Plk1 are critically required for proper cortical neurogenesis, which has important implications in the regulation of mammalian brain size and the pathogenesis of congenital neurodevelopmental disorders such as microcephaly.

  3. Drug-resistant tuberculosis control in China: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Qian; Qu, Yan; Lucas, Henry

    2016-01-29

    China has the second highest caseload of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in the world. In 2009, the Chinese government agreed to draw up a plan for MDR-TB prevention and control in the context of a comprehensive health system reform launched in the same year. China is facing high prevalence rates of drug-resistant TB and MDR-TB. MDR-TB disproportionally affects the poor rural population and the highest rates are in less developed regions largely due to interrupted and/or inappropriate TB treatment. Most households with an affected member suffer a heavy financial burden because of a combination of treatment and other related costs. The influential Global Fund programme for MDR-TB control in China provides technical and financial support for MDR-TB diagnosis and treatment. However, this programme has a fixed timeline and cannot provide a long term solution. In 2009, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, in cooperation with the National Health and Family Planning Commission of China, started to develop innovative approaches to TB/MDR-TB management and case-based payment mechanisms for treatment, alongside increased health insurance benefits for patients, in order to contain medical costs and reduce financial barriers to treatment. Although these efforts appear to be in the right direction, they may not be sufficient unless (a) domestic sources are mobilized to raise funding for TB/MDR-TB prevention and control and (b) appropriate incentives are given to both health facilities and their care providers. Along with the on-going Chinese health system reform, sustained government financing and social health protection schemes will be critical to ensure universal access to appropriate TB treatment in order to reduce risk of developing MDR-TB and systematic MDR-TB treatment and management.

  4. Drug-resistant tuberculosis control in China: progress and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Long; Yan Qu; Henry Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Background:China has the second highest caseload of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in the world.In 2009,the Chinese government agreed to draw up a plan for MDR-TB prevention and control in the context of a comprehensive health system reform launched in the same year.Discussion:China is facing high prevalence rates of drug-resistant TB and MDR-TB.MDR-TB disproportionally affects the poor rural population and the highest rates are in less developed regions largely due to interrupted and/or inappropriate TB treatment.Most households with an affected member suffer a heavy financial burden because of a combination of treatment and other related costs.The influential Global Fund programme for MDR-TB control in China provides technical and financial support for MDR-TB diagnosis and treatment.However,this programme has a fixed timeline and cannot provide a long term solution.In 2009,the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation,in cooperation with the National Health and Family Planning Commission of China,started to develop innovative approaches to TB/MDR-TB management and case-based payment mechanisms for treatment,alongside increased health insurance benefits for patients,in order to contain medical costs and reduce financial barriers to treatment.Although these efforts appear to be in the right direction,they may not be sufficient unless (a) domestic sources are mobilized to raise funding for TB/MDR-TB prevention and control and (b) appropriate incentives are given to both health facilities and their care providers.Summary:Along with the on-going Chinese health system reform,sustained government financing and social health protection schemes will be critical to ensure universal access to appropriate TB treatment in order to reduce risk of developing MDR-TB and systematic MDR-TB treatment and management.

  5. Instrumentation and process control for fossil demonstration plants. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeSage, L.G.; O' Fallon, N.M.

    1977-09-01

    Progress during the quarter of January through March 1977 on ANL 189a 49622R2, Instrumentation and Process Control for Fossil Demonstration Plants (FDP) is reported. Work has been performed on updating the study of the state-of-the-art of instrumentation for Fossil Demonstration Plants (FDP), on development of mass-flow and other on-line instruments for FDP, process control analysis for FDP, and organization of a symposium on instrumentation and control for FDP. Progress in these areas is described.

  6. Aurora kinase A controls meiosis I progression in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saskova, Adela; Solc, Petr; Baran, Vladimir; Kubelka, Michal; Schultz, Richard M; Motlik, Jan

    2008-08-01

    Aurora kinase A (AURKA), which is a centrosome-localized serine/threonine kinase crucial for cell cycle control, is critically involved in centrosome maturation and spindle assembly in somatic cells. Active T288 phosphorylated AURKA localizes to the centrosome in the late G(2) and also spreads to the minus ends of mitotic spindle microtubules. AURKA activates centrosomal CDC25B and recruits cyclin B1 to centrosomes. We report here functions for AURKA in meiotic maturation of mouse oocytes, which is a model system to study the G(2) to M transition. Whereas AURKA is present throughout the entire GV-stage oocyte with a clear accumulation on microtubule organizing centers (MTOC), active AURKA becomes entirely localized to MTOCs shortly before germinal vesicle breakdown. In contrast to somatic cells in which active AURKA is present at the centrosomes and minus ends of microtubules, active AURKA is mainly located on MTOCs at metaphase I (MI) in oocytes. Inhibitor studies using Roscovitine (CDK1 inhibitor), LY-294002 (PI3K inhibitor) and SH-6 (PKB inhibitor) reveal that activation of AURKA localized on MTOCs is independent on PI3K-PKB and CDK1 signaling pathways and MOTC amplification is observed in roscovitine- and SH-6-treated oocytes that fail to undergo nuclear envelope breakdown. Moreover, microinjection of Aurka mRNA into GV-stage oocytes cultured in 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine (IBMX)-containing medium to prevent maturation also results in MOTC amplification in the absence of CDK1 activation. Overexpression of AURKA also leads to formation of an abnormal MI spindle, whereas RNAi-mediated reduction of AURKA interferes with resumption of meiosis and spindle assembly. Results of these experiments indicate that AURKA is a critical MTOC-associated component involved in resumption of meiosis, MTOC multiplication, proper spindle formation and the metaphase I-metaphase II transition.

  7. A parasitic nematode releases cytokinin that controls cell division and orchestrates feeding site formation in host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Shahid; Radakovic, Zoran S; De La Torre, Carola M; Chronis, Demosthenis; Novák, Ondřej; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Holbein, Julia; Matera, Christiane; Hütten, Marion; Gutbrod, Philipp; Anjam, Muhammad Shahzad; Rozanska, Elzbieta; Habash, Samer; Elashry, Abdelnaser; Sobczak, Miroslaw; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Strnad, Miroslav; Schmülling, Thomas; Mitchum, Melissa G; Grundler, Florian M W

    2015-10-13

    Sedentary plant-parasitic cyst nematodes are biotrophs that cause significant losses in agriculture. Parasitism is based on modifications of host root cells that lead to the formation of a hypermetabolic feeding site (a syncytium) from which nematodes withdraw nutrients. The host cell cycle is activated in an initial cell selected by the nematode for feeding, followed by activation of neighboring cells and subsequent expansion of feeding site through fusion of hundreds of cells. It is generally assumed that nematodes manipulate production and signaling of the plant hormone cytokinin to activate cell division. In fact, nematodes have been shown to produce cytokinin in vitro; however, whether the hormone is secreted into host plants and plays a role in parasitism remained unknown. Here, we analyzed the spatiotemporal activation of cytokinin signaling during interaction between the cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, and Arabidopsis using cytokinin-responsive promoter:reporter lines. Our results showed that cytokinin signaling is activated not only in the syncytium but also in neighboring cells to be incorporated into syncytium. An analysis of nematode infection on mutants that are deficient in cytokinin or cytokinin signaling revealed a significant decrease in susceptibility of these plants to nematodes. Further, we identified a cytokinin-synthesizing isopentenyltransferase gene in H. schachtii and show that silencing of this gene in nematodes leads to a significant decrease in virulence due to a reduced expansion of feeding sites. Our findings demonstrate the ability of a plant-parasitic nematode to synthesize a functional plant hormone to manipulate the host system and establish a long-term parasitic interaction.

  8. A parasitic nematode releases cytokinin that controls cell division and orchestrates feeding site formation in host plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Shahid; Radakovic, Zoran S.; De La Torre, Carola M.; Chronis, Demosthenis; Novák, Ondřej; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Holbein, Julia; Matera, Christiane; Hütten, Marion; Gutbrod, Philipp; Anjam, Muhammad Shahzad; Rozanska, Elzbieta; Habash, Samer; Elashry, Abdelnaser; Sobczak, Miroslaw; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Strnad, Miroslav; Schmülling, Thomas; Mitchum, Melissa G.; Grundler, Florian M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Sedentary plant-parasitic cyst nematodes are biotrophs that cause significant losses in agriculture. Parasitism is based on modifications of host root cells that lead to the formation of a hypermetabolic feeding site (a syncytium) from which nematodes withdraw nutrients. The host cell cycle is activated in an initial cell selected by the nematode for feeding, followed by activation of neighboring cells and subsequent expansion of feeding site through fusion of hundreds of cells. It is generally assumed that nematodes manipulate production and signaling of the plant hormone cytokinin to activate cell division. In fact, nematodes have been shown to produce cytokinin in vitro; however, whether the hormone is secreted into host plants and plays a role in parasitism remained unknown. Here, we analyzed the spatiotemporal activation of cytokinin signaling during interaction between the cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, and Arabidopsis using cytokinin-responsive promoter:reporter lines. Our results showed that cytokinin signaling is activated not only in the syncytium but also in neighboring cells to be incorporated into syncytium. An analysis of nematode infection on mutants that are deficient in cytokinin or cytokinin signaling revealed a significant decrease in susceptibility of these plants to nematodes. Further, we identified a cytokinin-synthesizing isopentenyltransferase gene in H. schachtii and show that silencing of this gene in nematodes leads to a significant decrease in virulence due to a reduced expansion of feeding sites. Our findings demonstrate the ability of a plant-parasitic nematode to synthesize a functional plant hormone to manipulate the host system and establish a long-term parasitic interaction. PMID:26417108

  9. Neuron division or enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, O S; Laktionova, A A; Solovieva, I A; Krasnova, T V

    2010-10-01

    The classical Bielschowsky-Gross neurohistological method was used to reproduce all the morphological phenomena interpreted by many authors as signs of neuron division, budding, and fission. It is suggested that these signs are associated with the effects of enucleation, which occurs in many cells of other tissue types in response to a variety of chemical and physical treatments. Studies were performed using neurons isolated from the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis and exposed in tissue culture to the actin microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B. Phase contrast time-lapse video recording over periods of 4-8 h demonstrated nuclear displacement, ectopization, and budding, to the level of almost complete fission of the neuron body. This repeats the pattern seen in static fixed preparations in "normal" conditions and after different experimental treatments. Budding of the cytoplasm was also sometimes seen at the early stages of the experiments. Control experiments in which cultured neurons were exposed to the solvent for cytochalasin B, i.e., dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), did not reveal any changes in neurons over a period of 8 h. We take the view that the picture previously interpreted as neuron division and fission can be explained in terms of the inhibition of actin microfilaments, sometimes developing spontaneously in cells undergoing individual metabolic changes preventing the maintenance of cytoskeleton stability.

  10. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, July-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C. (ed.)

    1981-03-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report also includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions.

  11. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, January-June 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C. (ed.)

    1981-09-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions.

  12. SON controls cell-cycle progression by coordinated regulation of RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eun-Young; DeKelver, Russell C; Lo, Miao-Chia; Nguyen, Tuyet Ann; Matsuura, Shinobu; Boyapati, Anita; Pandit, Shatakshi; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2011-04-22

    It has been suspected that cell-cycle progression might be functionally coupled with RNA processing. However, little is known about the role of the precise splicing control in cell-cycle progression. Here, we report that SON, a large Ser/Arg (SR)-related protein, is a splicing cofactor contributing to efficient splicing of cell-cycle regulators. Downregulation of SON leads to severe impairment of spindle pole separation, microtubule dynamics, and genome integrity. These molecular defects result from inadequate RNA splicing of a specific set of cell-cycle-related genes that possess weak splice sites. Furthermore, we show that SON facilitates the interaction of SR proteins with RNA polymerase II and other key spliceosome components, suggesting its function in efficient cotranscriptional RNA processing. These results reveal a mechanism for controlling cell-cycle progression through SON-dependent constitutive splicing at suboptimal splice sites, with strong implications for its role in cancer and other human diseases.

  13. Progress in the studies of electrochemically controllable host-guest interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing; LI Yuangang; FANG Yu

    2005-01-01

    Studies on the electrochemically controllable host-guest interactions have received considerable attention since the middle of the 1980s. In this paper, progress in such studies is reviewed according to the types of the hosts, including cyclodextrin, calixarene,cucurbituril, cyclophane, and so on. In addition, perspectives for the future development and potential applications of the interactions are discussed.

  14. Developmental Regulation with Progressive Vision Loss: Use of Control Strategies and Affective Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Oliver K.; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Boerner, Kathrin; Horowitz, Amy; Reinhardt, Joann P.; Cimarolli, Verena R.; Brennan-Ing, Mark; Heckhausen, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The present study addresses older adults' developmental regulation when faced with progressive and irreversible vision loss. We used the motivational theory of life span development as a conceptual framework and examined changes in older adults' striving for control over everyday goal achievement, and their association with affective well-being,…

  15. DNA copy-number control through inhibition of replication fork progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. Nordman (Jared T.); E. Kozhevnikova (Elena); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter); A.V. Pindyurin (Alexey); E.N. Andreyeva (Evgeniya); V.V. Shloma (Victor); I.F. Zhimulev (Igor); T. Orr-Weaver (T.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractProper control of DNA replication is essential to ensure faithful transmission of genetic material and prevent chromosomal aberrations that can drive cancer progression and developmental disorders. DNA replication is regulated primarily at the level of initiation and is under strict

  16. DNA copy-number control through inhibition of replication fork progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. Nordman (Jared T.); E. Kozhevnikova (Elena); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter); A.V. Pindyurin (Alexey); E.N. Andreyeva (Evgeniya); V.V. Shloma (Victor); I.F. Zhimulev (Igor); T. Orr-Weaver (T.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractProper control of DNA replication is essential to ensure faithful transmission of genetic material and prevent chromosomal aberrations that can drive cancer progression and developmental disorders. DNA replication is regulated primarily at the level of initiation and is under strict cell

  17. Progress towards malaria control targets in relation to national malaria programme funding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L. Korenromp (Eline); M. Hosseini (Mehran); R.D. Newman (Robert D); R.E. Cibulskis (Richard E)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Malaria control has been dramatically scaled up the past decade, mainly thanks to increasing international donor financing since 2003. This study assessed progress up to 2010 towards global malaria impact targets, in relation to Global Fund, other donor and domestic malaria

  18. DNA copy-number control through inhibition of replication fork progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. Nordman (Jared T.); E. Kozhevnikova (Elena); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter); A.V. Pindyurin (Alexey); E.N. Andreyeva (Evgeniya); V.V. Shloma (Victor); I.F. Zhimulev (Igor); T. Orr-Weaver (T.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractProper control of DNA replication is essential to ensure faithful transmission of genetic material and prevent chromosomal aberrations that can drive cancer progression and developmental disorders. DNA replication is regulated primarily at the level of initiation and is under strict cell

  19. Progress towards malaria control targets in relation to national malaria programme funding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L. Korenromp (Eline); M. Hosseini (Mehran); R.D. Newman (Robert D); R.E. Cibulskis (Richard E)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Malaria control has been dramatically scaled up the past decade, mainly thanks to increasing international donor financing since 2003. This study assessed progress up to 2010 towards global malaria impact targets, in relation to Global Fund, other donor and domestic malaria p

  20. Prevalence of Disordered Eating and Pathogenic Weight Control Behaviors among NCAA Division I Female Collegiate Gymnasts and Swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carlin; Petrie, Trent A.

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders and related weight control behaviors, such as excessive exercising and restrictive eating, represent serious health problems for girls and women in the United States and other industrialized nations. Female athletes, in particular, have been identified as a subgroup to study because of the unique weight, performance, and body…

  1. Prevalence of Disordered Eating and Pathogenic Weight Control Behaviors among NCAA Division I Female Collegiate Gymnasts and Swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carlin; Petrie, Trent A.

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders and related weight control behaviors, such as excessive exercising and restrictive eating, represent serious health problems for girls and women in the United States and other industrialized nations. Female athletes, in particular, have been identified as a subgroup to study because of the unique weight, performance, and body…

  2. 40 CFR 60.2840 - How do I comply with the increment of progress for submittal of a control plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Emissions Guidelines and Compliance Times for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units that... progress for submittal of a control plan? 60.2840 Section 60.2840 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... comply with the increment of progress for submittal of a control plan? For your control plan increment...

  3. Genome-wide analysis of intracellular pH reveals quantitative control of cell division rate by pH(c) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orij, Rick; Urbanus, Malene L; Vizeacoumar, Franco J; Giaever, Guri; Boone, Charles; Nislow, Corey; Brul, Stanley; Smits, Gertien J

    2012-09-10

    Because protonation affects the properties of almost all molecules in cells, cytosolic pH (pH(c)) is usually assumed to be constant. In the model organism yeast, however, pH(c) changes in response to the presence of nutrients and varies during growth. Since small changes in pH(c) can lead to major changes in metabolism, signal transduction, and phenotype, we decided to analyze pH(c) control. Introducing a pH-sensitive reporter protein into the yeast deletion collection allowed quantitative genome-wide analysis of pH(c) in live, growing yeast cultures. pH(c) is robust towards gene deletion; no single gene mutation led to a pH(c) of more than 0.3 units lower than that of wild type. Correct pH(c) control required not only vacuolar proton pumps, but also strongly relied on mitochondrial function. Additionally, we identified a striking relationship between pH(c) and growth rate. Careful dissection of cause and consequence revealed that pH(c) quantitatively controls growth rate. Detailed analysis of the genetic basis of this control revealed that the adequate signaling of pH(c) depended on inositol polyphosphates, a set of relatively unknown signaling molecules with exquisitely pH sensitive properties. While pH(c) is a very dynamic parameter in the normal life of yeast, genetically it is a tightly controlled cellular parameter. The coupling of pH(c) to growth rate is even more robust to genetic alteration. Changes in pH(c) control cell division rate in yeast, possibly as a signal. Such a signaling role of pH(c) is probable, and may be central in development and tumorigenesis.

  4. Accelerator Technology Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  5. Division of Gas Accumulation System and Laws Controlling Distribution of Natural Gas in Typical Petroliferous Basins of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Considering the existing problems of the petroleum system, this paper brings forward the concept of natural gas accumulation system and presents the dividing principles. Then detailed statistics on the accumulation factors of the 32 typical natural gas accumulation systems in China and studies on the laws controlling distribution of gas are collected. The research shows that the petroleum accumulation system is the basic unit controlling petroleum generation, migration and accumulation. Generating intensity, generating amount, accumulating efficiency and migration distance plays an important role in the distribution of natural gas. Through analysis on results of resources evaluation, discovered reserves and residual reserves, potential areas in middle-scaled petroliferous basins in China are forecasted in this paper. Ordos, Sichuan, Tarim and Qaidam basins are found out to be the main basins developing and enriching gas accumulation systems.

  6. Computational Fair Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branzei, Simina

    Fair division is a fundamental problem in economic theory and one of the oldest questions faced through the history of human society. The high level scenario is that of several participants having to divide a collection of resources such that everyone is satisfied with their allocation -- e.g. two...... heirs dividing a car, house, and piece of land inherited. The literature on fair division was developed in the 20th century in mathematics and economics, but computational work on fair division is still sparse. This thesis can be seen as an excursion in computational fair division divided in two parts...... study alternative and richer models, such as externalities in cake cutting, simultaneous cake cutting, and envy-free cake cutting. The second part of the thesis tackles the fair allocation of multiple goods, divisible and indivisible. In the realm of divisible goods, we investigate the well known...

  7. Periodontal disease progression and glycaemic control among Gullah African Americans with type-2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Marlow, Nicole M.; Fernandes, Jyotika K.; Leite, Renata S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate associations between glycaemic control and periodontitis progression among Gullah African Americans with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Materials and Methods From an ongoing clinical trial among T2DM Gullah, we extracted a cohort previously in a cross-sectional study (N 5 88). Time from baseline (previous study) to follow-up (trial enrollment, before treatment interventions) ranged 1.93–4.08 years [mean 5 2.99, standard deviation (SD) = 0.36]. We evaluated tooth site-level periodontitis progression [clinical attachment loss (CAL) worsening of ≥ 2 mm, periodontal probing depth (PPD) increases of ≥ 2 mm and bleeding on probing (BOP) from none to present] by glycaemic control status (well-controlled = HbA1c periodontitis, particularly among those with disparities for both diseases. PMID:20507373

  8. The Influence of Science Process Skills, Logical Thinking Abilities, Attitudes towards Science, and Locus of Control on Science Achievement among Form 4 Students in the Interior Division of Sabah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fah, Lay Yoon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the direct and indirect effects of science process skills, logical thinking abilities, attitudes towards science, and locus of control on science achievement among Form 4 students in the Interior Division of Sabah, Malaysia. Research findings showed that there were low to moderate, positive but significant…

  9. The Influence of Science Process Skills, Logical Thinking Abilities, Attitudes towards Science, and Locus of Control on Science Achievement among Form 4 Students in the Interior Division of Sabah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fah, Lay Yoon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the direct and indirect effects of science process skills, logical thinking abilities, attitudes towards science, and locus of control on science achievement among Form 4 students in the Interior Division of Sabah, Malaysia. Research findings showed that there were low to moderate, positive but significant…

  10. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences).

  11. Division: The Sleeping Dragon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Of the four mathematical operators, division seems to not sit easily for many learners. Division is often described as "the odd one out". Pupils develop coping strategies that enable them to "get away with it". So, problems, misunderstandings, and misconceptions go unresolved perhaps for a lifetime. Why is this? Is it a case of "out of sight out…

  12. Division: The Sleeping Dragon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Of the four mathematical operators, division seems to not sit easily for many learners. Division is often described as "the odd one out". Pupils develop coping strategies that enable them to "get away with it". So, problems, misunderstandings, and misconceptions go unresolved perhaps for a lifetime. Why is this? Is it a case of "out of sight out…

  13. Arithmetic of Division Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Brumer, Armand

    2011-01-01

    We study the arithmetic of division fields of semistable abelian varieties A over the rationals. The Galois group of the 2-division field of A is analyzed when the conductor is odd and squarefree. The irreducible semistable mod 2 representations of small conductor are determined under GRH. These results are used in "Paramodular abelian varieties of odd conductor," arXiv:1004.4699.

  14. On infinitely divisible semimartingales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse-O'Connor, Andreas; Rosiński, Jan

    2015-01-01

    are strictly representable due to Hida's multiplicity theorem, the classical Stricker's theorem follows from our result. Another consequence is that the question when an infinitely divisible process is a semimartingale can often be reduced to a path property, when a certain associated infinitely divisible...

  15. SIFT并行结构中的滤波器时分复用控制器%Time division controller for Gaussian filters in SIFT parallel architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张静; 桑红石; 沈绪榜

    2013-01-01

    为了降低尺度不变特征(SIFT)硬件加速的成本,采用时分复用的方式共用一组高斯滤波器来实现高斯差分尺度空间的构造.相应的时分复用控制器通过令牌分配的方式控制各个倍频程(octave)的运行,只有获得相应令牌的倍频程才能使用高斯滤波器组执行操作,并提出了带有优先级的令牌分配算法.采用Altera公司stratixⅡ系列的芯片EP2S60F672C3实现,相比传统的结构,电路的查找表单元数量降低了40%.在125MHz的工作频率下,对于320×240的图像,完成高斯差分尺度空间的构造仅需要0.83 ms.%In order to reduce hardware cost for accelerating SIFT (scale invariant feature transformation) , difference of Gaussian (DoG) scale space was constructed by a set of Gaussian filters in time-division multiplexing way. The time-division multiplexing controller managed data flows of three octaves by assigning tokens. The octave with corresponding token had right to use the Gaussian filters. The algorithm of how to assign tokens with priority was also proposed. The proposed architecture was implemented on an Altera Stratix Ⅱ (EP2S60F672C3). Compared with the conventional architecture, the number of LUTs (look up table) was reduced by 40%. It only took 0. 83 ms to construct DoG scale space for a 320×240 image at 125 MHz.

  16. 精子发生过程中第一次减数分裂相关因子的研究进展%Research progress in factors involved in the first meiotic division in spermatogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琪; 张文杰; 于泊洋; 刘陶迪; 周好乐

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a highly complex and unique process of cell proliferation and differentiation in reproductive cells.Spermatogenesis is controlled by many factors;among them some genes and specific protein factors,RNAs,enzymes play essential roles.Meiosis is an important link in the process of spermatogenesis.There are lots of associated factors in meiosis and spermatogenesis whose change or deletion can affect the spermatogenesis and disable the formation of a normal mature sperm.The deletion mutation of genes such as Scp3 、M1 ap、TEX11、Spata22、Smc6 、Ku70、TSF22,and absence of correlation factors and enzymes,can also affect the first meiotic division and spermatogenesis.In this paper,we review these factors that influence the first meiosis division.%精子发生是生殖细胞经历的一个复杂而独特的细胞增殖与分化过程,其中一些基因及特殊的蛋白因子、RNA、酶等都发挥着至关重要的作用.减数分裂是配子发生过程中一个重要的环节.参与精子发生减数分裂的相关因子非常多,它们的改变或缺失能够造成精子发生阻断,无法形成正常成熟精子,如Scp3、M1 ap、TEX11、Spata 22、Smc6、Ku70、TSF22等基因的缺失突变、相关因子及酶的缺失,都将影响第一次减数分裂,进而影响精子发生.本文将对这些影响第一次减数分裂的相关因子作一综述.

  17. Progress in sub-femtosecond control of electron localization in molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kamal P Singh

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in controlled generation of intense, ultrashort laser pulses in the femtosecond and attosecond time-scales have pushed new avenues of research in the coherent control of ultrafast electron dynamics in atoms and molecules. We present a topical review on the phenomenon of control of electron localization in small dissociating molecules. By creating and controlling coherent superposition of the symmetric and antisymmetric electronic states, it becomes possible to confine the evolving electron cloud onto a preferred nucleus, thereby steering the molecule towards a desired dissociation route. We discuss the origin of the idea and various mechanisms to achieve electron localization in small molecules. To highlight recent experimental progress, we explain how one can employ few-cycle IR pulses and different attosecond extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulses in various ways to successfully demonstrate the control of electronic dynamics. Future research opportunities and challenges on this topic are envisioned.

  18. Recent research progress on unstart mechanism, detection and control of hypersonic inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juntao; Li, Nan; Xu, Kejing; Bao, Wen; Yu, Daren

    2017-02-01

    The present paper aims to provide a summary report on recent research progress about unstart mechanism, detection and control of hypersonic inlet to help the researchers working on hypersonic inlet to further their work. It covers unstart patterns with their mechanisms, monitoring methods for start/unstart classification and detection, characterization methods for unstart margin, and methods for unstart suppression and control. At first, the inner mechanisms of various unstart patterns have been surveyed and classified, which are respectively caused by contraction ratio (CR)/internal contraction ratio (ICR), backpressure, Mach number and heat release. Followed, monitoring methods (one is for start/unstart classification and the other is for unstart detection) have been introduced respectively. Thirdly, three types of techniques for margin characterization of unstart are listed, which are respectively based on backpressure, the location of shock train leading edge and pressure distribution. At last, unstart suppression and control have been discussed, which are based on flow control or feedback control.

  19. The progression of the intra-erythrocytic cell cycle of Plasmodium falciparum and the role of the centriolar plaques in asynchronous mitotic division during schizogony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnot, David E; Ronander, Elena; Bengtsson, Dominique C

    2011-01-01

    The cell division cycle and mitosis of intra-erythrocytic (IE) Plasmodium falciparum are poorly understood aspects of parasite development which affect malaria molecular pathogenesis. Specifically, the timing of the multiple gap (G), DNA synthesis (S) and chromosome separation (M) phases of paras......The cell division cycle and mitosis of intra-erythrocytic (IE) Plasmodium falciparum are poorly understood aspects of parasite development which affect malaria molecular pathogenesis. Specifically, the timing of the multiple gap (G), DNA synthesis (S) and chromosome separation (M) phases...... of parasite mitosis are not well defined, nor whether genome divisions are immediately followed by cleavage of the nuclear envelope. Curiously, daughter merozoite numbers do not follow the geometric expansion expected from equal numbers of binary divisions, an outcome difficult to explain using the standard...

  20. Trial NCT01950403 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Trial NCT01141231 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Trial NCT02237183 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Trial NCT01382082 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Trial NCT02273362 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Meetings and Events | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Trial NCT02112188 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Trial NCT01824836 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Trial NCT01968798 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Trial NCT01849250 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Trial NCT02116530 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Clinical Trials Node | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Nutritional Science Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Cost and results accounting as an instrument for controlling divisions of energy supply companies; Kosten- und Leistungsrechnung als Instrument des Controlling in Unternehmen der Energiewirtschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-23

    Under the competitive market regime, corporate success of the electric utilities is increasingly determined by the efficiency of cost management and controlling functions. The various cost accounting systems available produce a variety of information of different relevance for the decision-making process in controlling departments. The authors of the article present a comparative analysis of the cost and results accounting systems in terms of their suitability and efficiency for controlling purposes. (orig./CB) [German] Im wettbewerblichen Ordnungsrahmen spielen fuer den unternehmerischen Erfolg der EVU die Leistungsfaehigkeit von Kostenmanagement sowie Controlling eine wesentliche, an Bedeutung gewinnende Rolle. Dabei stellen die verschiedenen, in der betrieblichen Praxis verwendeten Kostenrechnungssysteme in unterschiedlichem Ausmass entscheidungsorientierte Informationen zur aktiven Unterstuetzung von Controlling-Aufgaben bereit. Ausgehend von den sich aus Sicht des Controlling ergebenden Anforderungen an die Kosten- und Leistungsrechnung stellen die Verfasser die einzelnen Kostenrechnungssysteme dar und untersuchen diese hinsichtlich ihrer jeweiligen Verwendbarkeit als Controlling-Instrument. (orig.)

  14. Malaria control in South Sudan, 2006–2013: strategies, progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background South Sudan has borne the brunt of years of chronic warfare and probably has the highest malaria burden in sub-Saharan Africa. However, effective malaria control in post-conflict settings is hampered by a multiplicity of challenges. This manuscript reports on the strategies, progress and challenges of malaria control in South Sudan and serves as an example epitome for programmes operating in similar environments and provides a window for leveraging resources. Case description To evaluate progress and challenges of the national malaria control programme an in-depth appraisal was undertaken according to the World Health Organization standard procedures for malaria programme performance review. Methodical analysis of published and unpublished documents on malaria control in South Sudan was conducted. To ensure completeness, findings of internal thematic desk assessments were triangulated in the field and updated by external review teams. Discussion and evaluation South Sudan has strived to make progress in implementing the WHO recommended malaria control interventions as set out in the 2006–2013 National Malaria Strategic Plan. The country has faced enormous programmatic constraints including infrastructure, human and financial resource and a weak health system compounded by an increasing number of refugees, returnees and internally displaced people. The findings present a platform on which to tailor an evidence-based 2014–2018 national malaria strategic plan for the country and a unique opportunity for providing a model for countries in a post-conflict situation. Conclusions The prospects for effective malaria control and elimination are huge in South Sudan. Nevertheless, strengthened coordination, infrastructure and human resource capacity, monitoring and evaluation are required. To achieve all this, allocation of adequate local funding would be critical. PMID:24160336

  15. Dendrimer-Based Selective Proteostasis-Inhibition Strategy to Control NSCLC Growth and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walworth, Kyla; Bodas, Manish; Campbell, Ryan John; Swanson, Doug; Sharma, Ajit; Vij, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Elevated valosin containing protein (VCP/p97) levels promote the progression of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although many VCP inhibitors are available, most of these therapeutic compounds have low specificity for targeted tumor cell delivery. Hence, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of dendrimer-encapsulated potent VCP-inhibitor drug in controlling non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) progression. The VCP inhibitor(s) (either in their pure form or encapsulated in generation-4 PAMAM-dendrimer with hydroxyl surface) were tested for their in vitro efficacy in modulating H1299 (NSCLC cells) proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Our results show that VCP inhibition by DBeQ was significantly more potent than NMS-873 as evident by decreased cell proliferation (p<0.0001, MTT-assay) and migration (p<0.05; scratch-assay), and increased apoptosis (p<0.05; caspase-3/7-assay) as compared to untreated control cells. Next, we found that dendrimer-encapsulated DBeQ (DDNDBeQ) treatment increased ubiquitinated-protein accumulation in soluble protein-fraction (immunoblotting) of H1299 cells as compared to DDN-control, implying the effectiveness of DBeQ in proteostasis-inhibition. We verified by immunostaining that DDNDBeQ treatment increases accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins that co-localizes with an ER-marker, KDEL. We observed that proteostasis-inhibition with DDNDBeQ, significantly decreased cell migration rate (scratch-assay and transwell-invasion) as compared to the control-DDN treatment (p<0.05). Moreover, DDNDBeQ treatment showed a significant decrease in cell proliferation (p<0.01, MTT-assay) and increased caspase-3/7 mediated apoptotic cell death (p<0.05) as compared to DDN-control. This was further verified by cell cycle analysis (propidium-iodide-staining) that demonstrated significant cell cycle arrest in the G2/M-phase (p<0.001) by DDNDBeQ treatment as compared to control-DDN. Moreover

  16. Dendrimer-Based Selective Proteostasis-Inhibition Strategy to Control NSCLC Growth and Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyla Walworth

    Full Text Available Elevated valosin containing protein (VCP/p97 levels promote the progression of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. Although many VCP inhibitors are available, most of these therapeutic compounds have low specificity for targeted tumor cell delivery. Hence, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of dendrimer-encapsulated potent VCP-inhibitor drug in controlling non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC progression. The VCP inhibitor(s (either in their pure form or encapsulated in generation-4 PAMAM-dendrimer with hydroxyl surface were tested for their in vitro efficacy in modulating H1299 (NSCLC cells proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Our results show that VCP inhibition by DBeQ was significantly more potent than NMS-873 as evident by decreased cell proliferation (p<0.0001, MTT-assay and migration (p<0.05; scratch-assay, and increased apoptosis (p<0.05; caspase-3/7-assay as compared to untreated control cells. Next, we found that dendrimer-encapsulated DBeQ (DDNDBeQ treatment increased ubiquitinated-protein accumulation in soluble protein-fraction (immunoblotting of H1299 cells as compared to DDN-control, implying the effectiveness of DBeQ in proteostasis-inhibition. We verified by immunostaining that DDNDBeQ treatment increases accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins that co-localizes with an ER-marker, KDEL. We observed that proteostasis-inhibition with DDNDBeQ, significantly decreased cell migration rate (scratch-assay and transwell-invasion as compared to the control-DDN treatment (p<0.05. Moreover, DDNDBeQ treatment showed a significant decrease in cell proliferation (p<0.01, MTT-assay and increased caspase-3/7 mediated apoptotic cell death (p<0.05 as compared to DDN-control. This was further verified by cell cycle analysis (propidium-iodide-staining that demonstrated significant cell cycle arrest in the G2/M-phase (p<0.001 by DDNDBeQ treatment as compared to control

  17. Effect of the antioxidant ionol (BHT) on growth and development of etiolated wheat seedlings: control of apoptosis, cell division, organelle ultrastructure, and plastid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeeva, L E; Zamyatnina, V A; Shorning, B Y; Aleksandrushkina, N I; Vanyushin, B F

    2001-08-01

    Ionol (BHT), a compound having antioxidant activity, at concentrations in the range 1-50 mg/liter (0.45 x 10(-5)-2.27 x 10(-4) M), inhibits growth of etiolated wheat seedlings, changes the morphology of their organs, prolongs the coleoptile life span, and prevents the appearance of specific features of aging and apoptosis in plants. In particular, BHT prevents the age-dependent decrease in total DNA content, apoptotic internucleosomal fragmentation of nuclear DNA, appearance in the cell vacuole of specific vesicles with active mitochondria intensively producing mtDNA, and formation of heavy mitochondrial DNA rho = 1.718 g/cm3) in coleoptiles of etiolated wheat seedlings. BHT induces large structural changes in the organization of all cellular organelles (nucleus, mitochondria, plastids, Golgi apparatus, endocytoplasmic reticulum) and the formation of new unusual membrane structures in the cytoplasm. BHT distorts the division of nuclei and cells, and this results in the appearance of multi-bladed polyploid nuclei and multinuclear cells. In roots of etiolated wheat seedlings, BHT induces intensive synthesis of pigments, presumably carotenoids, and the differentiation of plastids with formation of chloro- or chromoplasts. The observed multiple effects of BHT are due to its antioxidative properties (the structural BHT analog 3,5-di-tert-butyltoluene is physiologically inert; it has no effect similar to that of BHT). Therefore, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) controlled by BHT seem to trigger apoptosis and the structural reorganization of the cytoplasm in the apoptotic cell with formation of specific vacuolar vesicles that contain active mitochondria intensively producing mtDNA. Thus, the inactivation of ROS by BHT may be responsible for the observed changes in the structure of all the mentioned cellular organelles. This corresponds to the idea that ROS control apoptosis and mitosis including formation of cell wall, and they are powerful secondary messengers that

  18. Progress in research, control and elimination of helminth infections in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzinger, Jürg; Brattig, Norbert W; Leonardo, Lydia; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Bergquist, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Global health has substantially improved over the past 20 years. In low- and middle-income countries, in particular, great strives have been made in the control of communicable diseases, including helminth infections. Nevertheless, the most marginalised communities still suffer from infectious diseases that are intimately connected with poverty and lack of access to essential commodities and services, such as clean water, improved sanitation and sufficient food. A two-pronged approach is thus necessary: (i) intensifying control in remaining high-endemicity areas and pockets of high transmission; and (ii) moving from morbidity control to interruption of disease transmission in low-endemicity areas with the goal of local elimination. The latter will require new tools and strategies, going hand-in-hand with strong partnerships and new strategic alliances. In this special issue of Acta Tropica, 35 articles are featured that, together, provide an up-to-date overview of the latest progress made in research, control and elimination of helminth infections in East and Southeast Asia. The first 12 articles expound tools and approaches for improved detection, surveillance and monitoring of helminth infections. Control and elimination approaches for the most important helminth infections are revisited in the next 20 articles. The three remaining articles are cross-cutting pieces examining the interface of agriculture, environment and helminth infections and providing a rationale for integrated, multi-sectorial control approaches that are necessary for sustaining helminthiasis control and progressively moving towards elimination. An interesting aspect revealed through an in-depth analysis of the provenance of the 35 contributions is that the People's Republic of China emerges as a key player in global health, which is documented through its prominent role in research and control of helminth infection and networking throughout Asia. Policy implications are discussed and will

  19. Controlled prospective trial of prednisolone and cytotoxics in progressive IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballardie, Francis W; Roberts, Ian S D

    2002-01-01

    In a single-center, multiple-referral source study, 38 patients with progressive IgA nephropathy and controlled hypertension were randomized to treatment with prednisolone and cytotoxic agents, to therapy with low-dose cyclophosphamide then azathioprine, and to control groups. The follow-up period lasted 2 to 6 yr. Renal survival, as assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis annually to 5 yr, showed significant preservation of function from 3 yr in the treatment group and 82, 82, 72, and 72% for 2, 3, 4, and 5 yr, respectively, compared with 68, 47, 26, and 6% in controls. Rate of loss of renal function, evaluated objectively by least-squares analyses of reciprocal serum creatinine, was reduced-and in one-third of the patients, arrested-during immunosuppressive treatment. Proteinuria, present in all patients at the time of entry into the trial, was reduced by treatment from 12 mo, compared with pretreatment levels or controls; erythrocyturia was reduced from 6 mo. Histologic activity and chronicity indexes were determined in renal biopsies performed at trial entry. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that mesangial cell proliferation and matrix scores were highest in those patients with more rapidly progressive disease. No morphologic variable or residual renal function predicted response to immunosuppressive therapy at entry. Mean arterial pressures did not differ significantly between treatment and control groups. There was thus no explanation other than treatment for the improved outcome in patients who received immunosuppressive therapy. Morbidity attributable to treatment or to renal failure occurred in both groups; an audit showed that benefits of therapy outweighed expected or minor side effects of drugs in this population at risk of end-stage renal failure. Patients selected for moderately progressive IgA nephropathy benefit from treatment with prednisolone and cytotoxic agents; results are consistent with modulation of systemic immune response or nephritic injury

  20. The effects of progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control technique on blood pressure during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalami, Mahboobeh; Jafarnejad, Farzaneh; ModarresGharavi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are the main cause of maternal and fetal mortality; however, they have no definite effective treatment. The researchers aimed to study the effects of progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control technique on blood pressure (BP) during pregnancy. This three-group clinical trial was conducted in Mashhad health centers and governmental hospitals. Sixty pregnant (after 20 weeks of gestational age) women with systolic BP ≥ 135 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥ 85 mmHg were assigned to three groups. Progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control exercises were administered to the two experimental groups once a week in person and in the rest of the days by instructions given on a CD for 4 weeks. BP was checked before and after the interventions. BP was measured before and after 15 min subjects' waiting without any especial intervention in the control group. After 4 weeks of intervention, the systolic (by a mean of 131.3 to 117.2, P = 0.001 and by a mean of 131.05 to 120.5, P = 0.004, respectively) and diastolic (by a mean of 79.2 to 72.3, P = 0.001 and by a mean of 80.1 to 76.5, P = 0.047, respectively) BPs were significantly decreased in progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control groups, but they were not statistically significant in the control group. The interventions were effective on decreasing systolic and diastolic BP to normal range after 4 weeks in both the groups. The effects of both the interventions were more obvious on systolic BP compared to diastolic BP.

  1. Stochastic control under progressive enlargement of filtrations and applications to multiple defaults risk management

    CERN Document Server

    Pham, Huyen

    2010-01-01

    We formulate and investigate a general stochastic control problem under a progressive enlargement of filtration. The global information is enlarged from a reference filtration and the knowledge of multiple random times together with associated marks when they occur. By working under a density hypothesis on the conditional joint distribution of the random times and marks, we prove a decomposition of the original stochastic control problem under the global filtration into classical stochastic control problems under the reference filtration, which are determined in a finite backward induction. Our method revisits and extends in particular stochastic control of diffusion processes with finite number of jumps. This study is motivated by optimization problems arising in default risk management, and we provide applications of our decomposition result for the indifference pricing of defaultable claims, and the optimal investment under bilateral counterparty risk. The solutions are expressed in terms of BSDEs involvin...

  2. Divisible ℤ-modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futa Yuichi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formalize the definition of divisible ℤ-module and its properties in the Mizar system [3]. We formally prove that any non-trivial divisible ℤ-modules are not finitely-generated.We introduce a divisible ℤ-module, equivalent to a vector space of a torsion-free ℤ-module with a coefficient ring ℚ. ℤ-modules are important for lattice problems, LLL (Lenstra, Lenstra and Lovász base reduction algorithm [15], cryptographic systems with lattices [16] and coding theory [8].

  3. PROSPERA: a randomized, controlled trial evaluating rasagiline in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuebling, Georg; Hensler, Mira; Paul, Sabine; Zwergal, Andreas; Crispin, Alexander; Lorenzl, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    To date, pharmacological treatment options for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a neurodegenerative tauopathy, are limited. The MAO-B inhibitor rasagiline has shown neuroprotective effects in preclinical models of neurodegeneration. To evaluate the safety, tolerability and therapeutic effect of rasagiline on symptom progression in PSP. In this 1-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 44 patients fulfilling the NINDS-PSP criteria were randomized to 1 mg/d rasagiline or placebo. The combined primary endpoint included symptom progression as measured by the PSP rating scale (PSP-RS) and the requirement of L-dopa rescue medication. Secondary endpoints included Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (SEADL), Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, Mini Mental State Examination, Frontal Assessment Battery and posturographic measurements. Of the 44 patients randomized, 26 completed the trial per protocol. Rasagiline was well tolerated, with a slight increase of known side effects (hallucinations, ventricular extrasystoles). No effect on the primary endpoint (p = 0.496) was detected. Symptom progression averaged at 11.2 (rasagiline) and 10.8 (placebo) points per year (ΔPSP-RS). No difference was seen in SEADL, depression, cognitive function, frontal executive function and posturographic measurements. Post hoc analyses of PSP-RS subdomains indicate a potential beneficial effect in the "limb motor" subdomain, whereas performance appeared lower in the "mentation" and "history" subdomains in the treatment group. While rasagiline is well tolerated in PSP, a beneficial effect on overall symptom progression was not detected. Post hoc analyses suggest the implementation of more specific endpoints in future studies.

  4. A comparison between two lingual orthodontic brackets in terms of speech performance and patients' acceptance in correcting Class II, Division 1 malocclusion: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiha Haj-Younis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare speech performance and levels of oral impairment between two types of lingual brackets. Methods: A parallel-group randomized controlled trial was carried out on patients with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion treated at the University of Hama School of Dentistry in Hama, Syria. A total of 46 participants (mean age: 22.3 ± 2.3 years with maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion were randomly distributed into two groups with 23 patients each (1:1 allocation ratio. Either STb (Ormco or 7th Generation (Ormco lingual brackets were applied. Fricative sound/s/ spectrograms were analyzed directly before intervention (T0, one week following premolar extraction prior to bracket placement (T1, within 24 hours of bracket bonding (T2, one month after (T3, and three months after (T4 bracket placement. Patients′ acceptance was assessed by means of standardized questionnaires. Results: After bracket placement, significant deterioration in articulation was recorded at all assessment times in the 7th Generation group, and up to T3 in the STb group. Significant intergroup differences were detected at T2 and T3. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in reported tongue irritation levels, whereas chewing difficulty was significantly higher in the 7th Generation group one month after bracket placement. Conclusions: 7th Generation brackets have more interaction with sound production than STb ones. Although patients in both groups complained of some degree of oral impairment, STb appliances appeared to be more comfortable than the 7th Generation ones, particularly within the first month of treatment.

  5. Underwater Sound Reference Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Underwater Sound Reference Division (USRD) serves as the U.S. standardizing activity in the area of underwater acoustic measurements, as the National Institute...

  6. Underwater Sound Reference Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Underwater Sound Reference Division (USRD) serves as the U.S. standardizing activity in the area of underwater acoustic measurements, as the National Institute...

  7. On Geometric Infinite Divisibility

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhya, E.; Pillai, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    The notion of geometric version of an infinitely divisible law is introduced. Concepts parallel to attraction and partial attraction are developed and studied in the setup of geometric summing of random variables.

  8. Evaluation of tumor response, disease control, progression-free survival, and time to progression as potential surrogate end points in metastatic breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burzykowski, Tomasz; Buyse, Marc; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J.; Sledge, George; Carmichael, James; Lueck, Hans-Joachim; Mackey, John R.; Nabholtz, Jean-Marc; Paridaens, Robert; Biganzoli, Laura; Jassem, Jacek; Bontenbal, Marijke; Bonneterre, Jacques; Chan, Stephen; Basaran, Gul Atalay; Therasse, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Overall survival (OS) can be observed only after prolonged follow-up, and any potential effect of first-line therapies on OS may be confounded by the effects of subsequent therapy. We investigated whether tumor response, disease control, progression-free survival (PFS), or time to progressio

  9. Research progress of cell division cycle 25 homolog C and tumor radiosensitivity%细胞分裂周期蛋白25同源蛋白C与肿瘤放疗敏感性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹亚超; 李多杰

    2014-01-01

    AsoneoftheCdc25phosphatasefamilymembers,Cdc25Cplaysanimportantroleinregu-lating mitosis of eukaryotic cells.In eukaryotic cells,CDK1-cell cycle protein B (CyclinB)compound mainly control the process of G2-M.The activity of Cdc25 C is the key in cell cycle into M phase.It activates CDK1-cyclinB complexes to promote cells from G2 to M phase .Improving Cdc25 C activity can promote the G2-M phase transition,and remove the G2-M phase retardation induced by ionizing radiation,preventing the damaged DNA from repaired into the phase of cell division,resulting in cell death caused by excessive cell proliferation, thus enhance radiosensitivity.%细胞分裂周期蛋白25同源蛋白C(Cdc25C)在真核细胞的有丝分裂中起重要调节作用。真核细胞中的G2-M进程主要由细胞周期蛋白依赖性激酶1(CDK1)-细胞周期蛋白B(cyclinB)复合物调控。CDK1-cyclinB复合物由Cdc25 C激活促进细胞从G2期进入M期,Cdc25 C活性是细胞周期进入M期的关键之一。提高Cdc25 C活性可促进G2-M期转变,去除电离辐射诱导的G2-M期阻滞,使损伤的DNA在未得到修复的情况下进入细胞分裂期,可导致细胞的增殖性死亡,而提高放疗敏感性。

  10. Instrumentation and process control for fossil demonstration plants. Annual technical progress report, October 1976--September 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeSage, L. G.; O' Fallon, N. M.

    1977-10-01

    Progress on Instrumentation and Process Control for Fossil Demonstration Plants (FDP) is reported. Work has been performed on updating the study of the state-of-the-art of instrumentation for FDP, development of mass-flow and other on-line instruments for FDP, process control analysis for FDP, and organization of a symposium on instrumentation and control for FDP. A Solids/Gas Flow Test Facility (S/GFTF) under construction for instrument development, testing, evaluation, and calibration is described. The development work for several mass-flow and other on-line instruments is described: acoustic flowmeter, capacitive density flowmeter, neutron activation flowmeter, gamma ray correlation flowmeter, optical flowmeter, composition analysis system, and capacitive liquid interface level meter.

  11. Recent progress concerning the production of controlled highly oriented electrospun nanofibrous arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, L. R.; Hristian, L.; Leon, A. L.; Popa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Among the foreground domains of all the research-development programs at national and international level, a special place is occupied by that concerning the nanosciences, nanotechnologies, new materials and technologies. Electrospinning found a well-deserved place in this space, offering the preparation of nanomaterials with distinctive properties and applications in medicine, environment, photonic sensors, filters, etc. These multiple applications are generated by the fact that the electrospinning technology makes available the production of nanofibers with controllable characteristics (length, porosity, density, and mechanical characteristics), complexity and architecture. The apparition of 3D printing technology favors the production of complex nanofibrous structures, controlled assembly, self-assembly of electrospun nanofibers for the production of scaffolds used in various medical applications. The architecture of fibrous deposits has a special influence on the subsequent development of the cells of the reconstructed organism. The present work proposes to study of recent progress concerning the production of controlled highly oriented electrospun nanofibrous arrays and progress in research on the production of complex 2D and 3D structures.

  12. HIV-1 DNA predicts disease progression and post-treatment virological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James P; Hurst, Jacob; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Carrington, Mary; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials. Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN76742797 and EudraCT2004-000446-20 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03821.001 PMID:25217531

  13. The effects of robot-assisted gait training in progressive multiple sclerosis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straudi, Sofia; Fanciullacci, Chiara; Martinuzzi, Carlotta; Pavarelli, Claudia; Rossi, Bruno; Chisari, Carmelo; Basaglia, Nino

    2016-03-01

    Gait and mobility impairments are common in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), leading to reduced quality of life (QoL). In this randomized controlled study, we tested the effects of robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) and compared it to conventional physiotherapy, measuring walking ability, depression, fatigue, and QoL in patients with progressive MS and severe gait disability. Fifty-two participants (Expanded Disability Status Scale score 6-7) completed the study protocol. They received two sessions/week over 6 weeks of RAGT or conventional walking therapy. Outcome measures were Six-Minute Walk Test, Ten-Meter Walk Test, Timed Up and Go Test, Berg Balance Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire, and Short Form 36. They were performed pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at 3 months. Walking endurance (p QoL increased. No significant effects on fatigue were found. RAGT is a treatment option in progressive MS patients with severe gait impairments to induce short-lasting effects on mobility and QoL. © The Author(s), 2015.

  14. Air pollution control by economic incentives in the U.S.: Policy, problems, and progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Hyder

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with cost-effectiveness of the economic incentive policies of the bubble concept and offset credits relative to the policy of direct regulations of air emissions. The second section discusses single- and multi-plant bubbles, their adoption across regions and industries, the methods used to control emissions and the extent of savings in costs. We conclude that despite the delay resulting from duplication of review of state implementation plans by both the state and the Environmental Protection Agency, the required technological commands, the requirement to model air quality and the restrictions to permit bubbling only in the attainment areas, the policy is progressing successfully and should be encouraged by eliminating the restrictions. The third section analyzes the policy of emission offset credit, trading, and banking which can permit economic growth in nonattainment areas. It reviews the available literature, which deals only with aggregation of offsets across cities instead of individual offset trades. Progress by individual offset trades is analyzed in terms of the number of offsets, their acceptance across regions, the extent of reductions in emissions, and the classification of the offsets into internal and external trades. Comparison of estimated capital costs and prices of individual offsets with direct regulation costs reveals that the former are economical. We conclude that despite the problems of high tradeoff ratios, the short and uncertain life of the emission offset credits and the technological commands, the policy is progressing successfully and should be encouraged further by relaxing restrictions.

  15. Progress and prospects in nanoscale dry processes: How can we control atomic layer reactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Karahashi, Kazuhiro; Ichiki, Takanori; Chang, Jane P.; George, Steven M.; Kessels, W. M. M.; Lee, Hae June; Tinck, Stefan; Um, Jung Hwan; Kinoshita, Keizo

    2017-06-01

    In this review, we discuss the progress of emerging dry processes for nanoscale fabrication. Experts in the fields of plasma processing have contributed to addressing the increasingly challenging demands in achieving atomic-level control of material selectivity and physicochemical reactions involving ion bombardment. The discussion encompasses major challenges shared across the plasma science and technology community. Focus is placed on advances in the development of fabrication technologies for emerging materials, especially metallic and intermetallic compounds and multiferroic, and two-dimensional (2D) materials, as well as state-of-the-art techniques used in nanoscale semiconductor manufacturing with a brief summary of future challenges.

  16. Informing efficient randomised controlled trials: exploration of challenges in developing progression criteria for internal pilot studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Paula R; Gamble, Carrol; O'Connell Francischetto, Elaine; Metcalfe, Chris; Davidson, Peter; Williams, Hywel; Blazeby, Jane M

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Designing studies with an internal pilot phase may optimise the use of pilot work to inform more efficient randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Careful selection of preagreed decision or ‘progression’ criteria at the juncture between the internal pilot and main trial phases provides a valuable opportunity to evaluate the likely success of the main trial and optimise its design or, if necessary, to make the decision not to proceed with the main trial. Guidance on the appropriate selection and application of progression criteria is, however, lacking. This paper outlines the key issues to consider in the optimal development and review of operational progression criteria for RCTs with an internal pilot phase. Design A structured literature review and exploration of stakeholders' opinions at a Medical Research Council (MRC) Hubs for Trials Methodology Research workshop. Key stakeholders included triallists, methodologists, statisticians and funders. Results There is considerable variation in the use of progression criteria for RCTs with an internal pilot phase, although 3 common issues predominate: trial recruitment, protocol adherence and outcome data. Detailed and systematic reporting around the decision-making process for stopping, amending or proceeding to a main trial is uncommon, which may hamper understanding in the research community about the appropriate and optimal use of RCTs with an internal pilot phase. 10 top tips for the development, use and reporting of progression criteria for internal pilot studies are presented. Conclusions Systematic and transparent reporting of the design, results and evaluation of internal pilot trials in the literature should be encouraged in order to facilitate understanding in the research community and to inform future trials. PMID:28213598

  17. Progressive artificial endocrine pancreas: The era of novel perioperative blood glucose control for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2011-10-01

    Strict glycemic control needs to be maintained in critically ill surgical patients to reduce the mortality and morbidity due to hyperglycemia and associated infection. However, conventional intensive insulin therapy (IIT), which consists of intermittent blood glucose measurement and manually controlled infusions of insulin, tends to induce hypoglycemia and glucose variability. Many randomized clinical trials have been conducted to improve the efficacy of IIT, although some of these were stopped owing to frequent hypoglycemia. In pursuing safe and strict glycemic control for critically ill surgical patients, we found that a closed-loop glycemic control system was able to maintain appropriate blood glucose levels without hypoglycemia in more than 400 clinical cases. Considering the need for the perioperative and intensive care environment, a well-established artificial pancreas was modified into a new closed-loop glycemic control system, called the progressive artificial pancreas. The new device is slim in shape and shows clinical compatibility with the conventional artificial pancreas. We herein review this new closed-loop glycemic control system and the expectations for its future application in critically ill surgical patients.

  18. Evaluating Progress in Radon Control Activities for Lung Cancer Prevention in National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Plans, 2011-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, Pascal; Puckett, Mary; Neri, Antonio

    2017-04-04

    Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer among smokers and the leading cause among nonsmokers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) funds every state, seven tribes, seven territories and the District of Columbia to develop formal cancer plans that focus efforts in cancer control. A 2010 review of cancer plans identified radon-related activities in 27 (42%) plans. Since then, 37 coalitions have updated their plans with new or revised cancer control objectives. There has also been recent efforts to increase awareness about radon among cancer coalitions. This study assesses NCCCP grantees current radon activities and changes since the 2010 review. We reviewed all 65 NCCCP grantee cancer plans created from 2005 to 2015 for radon related search terms and categorized plans by radon activities. The program's most recent annual progress report to CDC was also reviewed. We then compared the results from the updated plans with the findings from the 2010 review to assess changes in radon activities among cancer coalitions. Changes in state radon laws between 2010 and 2015 were also assessed. While a number of cancer plans have added or expanded radon-specific activities since 2010, approximately one-third of NCCCP grantees still do not include radon in their cancer plans. Cancer programs can consider addressing radon through partnership with existing radon control programs to further reduce the risk of lung cancer, especially among non-smokers.

  19. Identification of a ZEB2-MITF-ZEB1 transcriptional network that controls melanogenesis and melanoma progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Denecker (Geertrui); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); E. Akay (Ela); D. Koludrovic (D.); J. Taminau (J.); K. Lemeire (K.); A. Gheldof (A.); B. de Craene (B.); M. van Gele (M.); L. Brochez (L.); G.M. Udupi (G.); S.M. Rafferty; B. Balint (B.); W.M. Gallagher (W.); M.A.I. Ghanem (Mazen); D. Huylebroeck (Danny); K. Haigh (Katharina); J.J. van den Oord (Joost); L. Larue; I. Davidson (Irwin); J.-C. Marine (J.); G. Berx (Geert)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractDeregulation of signaling pathways that control differentiation, expansion and migration of neural crest-derived melanoblasts during normal development contributes also to melanoma progression and metastasis. Although several epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) transcription factors, such as

  20. Arterial hypertension and skin allergy are risk factors for progression from dengue to dengue hemorrhagic fever: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Maria Glória; Paixão, Enny S; Costa, Maria da Conceição N; Cunha, Rivaldo V; Pamplona, Luciano; Dias, Juarez P; Figueiredo, Camila A; Figueiredo, Maria Aparecida A; Blanton, Ronald; Morato, Vanessa; Barreto, Maurício L; Rodrigues, Laura C

    2015-05-01

    Currently, knowledge does not allow early prediction of which cases of dengue fever (DF) will progress to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), to allow early intervention to prevent progression or to limit severity. The objective of this study is to investigate the hypothesis that some specific comorbidities increase the likelihood of a DF case progressing to DHF. A concurrent case-control study, conducted during dengue epidemics, from 2009 to 2012. Cases were patients with dengue fever that progressed to DHF, and controls were patients of dengue fever who did not progress to DHF. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between DHF and comorbidities. There were 490 cases of DHF and 1,316 controls. Among adults, progression to DHF was associated with self-reported hypertension (OR = 1.6; 95% CI 1.1-2.1) and skin allergy (OR = 1.8; 95% CI 1.1-3.2) with DHF after adjusting for ethnicity and socio-economic variables. There was no statistically significant association between any chronic disease and progression to DHF in those younger than 15 years. Physicians attending patients with dengue fever should keep those with hypertension or skin allergies in health units to monitor progression for early intervention. This would reduce mortality by dengue.

  1. Progress in analytical methods to predict and control azimuthal combustion instability modes in annular chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerheim, M.; Nicoud, F.; Poinsot, T.

    2016-02-01

    Longitudinal low-frequency thermoacoustic unstable modes in combustion chambers have been intensively studied experimentally, numerically, and theoretically, leading to significant progress in both understanding and controlling these acoustic modes. However, modern annular gas turbines may also exhibit azimuthal modes, which are much less studied and feature specific mode structures and dynamic behaviors, leading to more complex situations. Moreover, dealing with 10-20 burners mounted in the same chamber limits the use of high fidelity simulations or annular experiments to investigate these modes because of their complexity and costs. Consequently, for such circumferential acoustic modes, theoretical tools have been developed to uncover underlying phenomena controlling their stability, nature, and dynamics. This review presents recent progress in this field. First, Galerkin and network models are described with their pros and cons in both the temporal and frequency framework. Then, key features of such acoustic modes are unveiled, focusing on their specificities such as symmetry breaking, non-linear modal coupling, forcing by turbulence. Finally, recent works on uncertainty quantifications, guided by theoretical studies and applied to annular combustors, are presented. The objective is to provide a global view of theoretical research on azimuthal modes to highlight their complexities and potential.

  2. Er:YAG laser irradiation to control the progression of enamel erosion: an in situ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scatolin, R S; Colucci, V; Lepri, T P; Alexandria, A K; Maia, L C; Galo, R; Borsatto, M C; Corona, S A M

    2015-07-01

    This in situ study evaluated the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation in controlling the progression of enamel erosion-like lesions. Fifty-six enamel slabs (330 KHN ± 10 %) with one fourth of the surface covered with resin composite (control area) were submitted to initial erosion-like lesion formation with citric acid. The slabs were divided into two groups: irradiated with Er:YAG laser and non-irradiated. Fourteen volunteers used an intraoral palatal appliance containing two slabs, in two phases of 5 days each. During the intraoral phase, in a crossed-over design, half of the volunteers immersed the appliance in citric acid while the other half used deionized water, both for 5 min, three times per day. Enamel wear was determined by an optical 3D profilometer. ANOVA revealed that when deionized water was used as immersion solution during the intraoral phase, lower values of wear were showed when compared with the groups that were eroded with citric acid, whether irradiated or non-irradiated with Er:YAG laser. When erosion with citric acid was performed, Er:YAG laser was not able to reduce enamel wear. Small changes on enamel surface were observed when it was irradiated with Er:YAG laser. It may be concluded that Er:YAG laser irradiation did not reduce the progression of erosive lesions on enamel submitted to in situ erosion with citric acid.

  3. [Progress report on a World Bank loan to China for a tuberculosis control project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, F; Chi, Y; Wang, K

    1995-02-01

    The progress of the World Bank loaned TB control project implemented from the second quarter of 1991 to the fourth quarter of 1993 was described in this paper. In the past three years, 737 counties of the 12 provinces with the population of 360 million has been covered by the project. Among 95176 new smear positive cases discovered, 93909 patients received free treatment of TB. The treatment coverage is 98.7%, of which 95% were treated under full course supervision. The smear conversion rate at two, three months of new smear positive TB patients are 83.4% and 90.6% respectively. The cohort analysis showed that the cure rate is 89.8%, which has reached the advanced level of the modern national tuberculosis control programme in the world.

  4. Sperner's lemma and fair division

    OpenAIRE

    DAKSKOBLER, LARISA

    2016-01-01

    Fair division is an active research area in Mathematics, Economics, Computer Science, etc. There are many different kinds of fair division problems. These are often named after everyday situations: fair resource allocation, fair cake-cutting, fair chore division, room assignment – rent division, and more. Although many exact and approximative methods for finding fair solutions already exist, the area of fair division still expands and tries to find better solutions for everyday problems. The...

  5. Division algebras and supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Baez, John C

    2009-01-01

    Supersymmetry is deeply related to division algebras. Nonabelian Yang--Mills fields minimally coupled to massless spinors are supersymmetric if and only if the dimension of spacetime is 3, 4, 6 or 10. The same is true for the Green--Schwarz superstring. In both cases, supersymmetry relies on the vanishing of a certain trilinear expression involving a spinor field. The reason for this, in turn, is the existence of normed division algebras in dimensions 1, 2, 4 and 8: the real numbers, complex numbers, quaternions and octonions. Here we provide a self-contained account of how this works.

  6. Power Dissipation in Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    A few classes of algorithms to implement division in hardware have been used over the years: division by digit-recurrence, by reciprocal approximation by iterative methods and by polynomial approximation. Due to the differences in the algorithms, a comparison among their implementation in terms...... of performance and precision is sometimes hard to make. In this work, we use power dissipation and energy consumption as metrics to compare among those different classes of algorithms. There are no previous works in the literature presenting such a comparison....

  7. A male patient with acromegaly and breast cancer: treating acromegaly to control tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leporati, Paola; Fonte, Rodolfo; de Martinis, Luca; Zambelli, Alberto; Magri, Flavia; Pavesi, Lorenzo; Rotondi, Mario; Chiovato, Luca

    2015-05-12

    Acromegaly is a rare disease associated with an increased risk of developing cancer. We report the case of a 72-year-old man who was diagnosed with acromegaly (IGF-1 770 ng/ml) and breast cancer. Four years before he suffered from a colon-rectal cancer. Pituitary surgery and octreotide-LAR treatment failed to control acromegaly. Normalization of IGF-1 (97 ng/ml) was obtained with pegvisomant therapy. Four years after breast cancer surgery, 2 pulmonary metastases were detected at chest CT. The patient was started on anastrozole, but, contrary to medical advice, he stopped pegvisomant treatment (IGF-I 453 ng/ml). Four months later, chest CT revealed an increase in size of the metastatic lesion of the left lung. The patient was shifted from anastrozole to tamoxifen and was restarted on pegvisomant, with normalization of serum IGF-1 levels (90 ng/ml). Four months later, a reduction in size of the metastatic lesion of the left lung was detected by CT. Subsequent CT scans throughout a 24-month follow-up showed a further reduction in size and then a stabilization of the metastasis. This is the first report of a male patient with acromegaly and breast cancer. The clinical course of breast cancer was closely related to the metabolic control of acromegaly. The rapid progression of metastatic lesion was temporally related to stopping pegvisomant treatment and paralleled a rise in serum IGF-1 levels. Normalization of IGF-1 after re-starting pegvisomant impressively reduced the progression of metastatic breast lesions. Control of acromegaly is mandatory in acromegalic patients with cancer.

  8. Systemic control of cell division and endoreduplication by NAA and BAP by modulating CDKs in root tip cells of Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, Jigna G; Thaker, Vrinda S

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanism regulated by auxin and cytokinin during endoreduplication, cell division, and elongation process is studied by using Allium cepa roots as a model system. The activity of CDK genes modulated by auxin and cytokinin during cell division, elongation, and endoreduplication process is explained in this research work. To study the significance of auxin and cytokinin in the management of cell division and endoreduplication process in plant meristematic cells at molecular level endoreduplication was developed in root tips of Allium cepa by giving colchicine treatment. There were inhibition of vegetative growth, formation of c-tumor at root tip, and development of endoreduplicated cells after colchicine treatment. This c-tumor was further treated with NAA and BAP to reinitiate vegetative growth in roots. BAP gave positive response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from center of c-tumor. However, NAA gave negative response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from c-tumor. Further, CDKs gene expression analysis from normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormone (NAA or BAP) treated root tip was done and remarkable changes in transcription level of CDK genes in normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormones treated cells were observed.

  9. Systemic Control of Cell Division and Endoreduplication by NAA and BAP by Modulating CDKs in Root Tip Cells of Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigna G. Tank

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanism regulated by auxin and cytokinin during endoreduplication, cell division, and elongation process is studied by using Allium cepa roots as a model system. The activity of CDK genes modulated by auxin and cytokinin during cell division, elongation, and endoreduplication process is explained in this research work. To study the significance of auxin and cytokinin in the management of cell division and endoreduplication process in plant meristematic cells at molecular level endoreduplication was developed in root tips of Allium cepa by giving colchicine treatment. There were inhibition of vegetative growth, formation of c-tumor at root tip, and development of endoreduplicated cells after colchicine treatment. This c-tumor was further treated with NAA and BAP to reinitiate vegetative growth in roots. BAP gave positive response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from center of c-tumor. However, NAA gave negative response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from c-tumor. Further, CDKs gene expression analysis from normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormone (NAA or BAP treated root tip was done and remarkable changes in transcription level of CDK genes in normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormones treated cells were observed.

  10. Heparan sulfate and cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porcionatto M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Heparan sulfate is a component of vertebrate and invertebrate tissues which appears during the cytodifferentiation stage of embryonic development. Its structure varies according to the tissue and species of origin and is modified during neoplastic transformation. Several lines of experimental evidence suggest that heparan sulfate plays a role in cellular recognition, cellular adhesion and growth control. Heparan sulfate can participate in the process of cell division in two distinct ways, either as a positive or negative modulator of cellular proliferation, or as a response to a mitogenic stimulus.

  11. Progress in rubella control initiated through measles elimina-tion strategies:the Malaysian experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saraswathy TS; Az-Ulhusna A; Nor Zahrin H; Nurhasmimi Hassan; Zainah S; Rohani J

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To analyse the laboratory surveillance data from 2004 till 2008 to examine the changing trend of ru-bella cases in Malaysia.Methods:Samples for this study were either received through the measles case based surveillance program or were hospital cases received for sero-diagnosis of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Specific rubella IgMantibody test was carried out on all samples that were negative for measles IgM antibody and for sero-diagnosis of CRS.Results:Through the surveillance program for measles,the samples received for rubella had increased five fold from 365 in 2004 to 1 522 in 2007.Positive rubella cases detected had also in-creased from 4.1 % in 2004 to 33.2 % in 2007.The age group 11 to 20 years accounted for 73.6 % of rubel-la cases confirmed in 2008,with a higher incidence among males than females.Positive rubella IgMwas detec-ted in 25 CRS cases during the 6 year period between January 2003 and December 2008.Conclusion:The mea-sles elimination program had contributed to significant progress in the control of rubella,with the majority of rubella cases detected through this strategy.Since rubella is not notifiable in Malaysia,this integrated measles and rubella surveillance should be continued.However,to enhance the progress,specific targets should also be established in the national program to eliminate rubella and CRS.

  12. Progress of wavefront-division Fourier transform spectrometry in the vacuum ultraviolet%真空紫外分波前傅里叶变换光谱技术进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志刚

    2015-01-01

    The principle, characteristics and necessity of vacuum ultraviolet wavefront-division Fourier trans-form spectrometry are analyzed in this paper.The typical structures, performances, and applications of several spectrometers using vacuum ultraviolet wavefront-division Fourier transform spectrometry are introduced.The future development of domestic vacuum ultraviolet wavefront-division Fourier transform spectrometry is dis-cussed.Another approach is offered for obtaining high resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectra.%本文分析了真空紫外分波前傅里叶变换光谱技术原理、特点及其必要性,介绍了几种采用真空紫外分波前傅里叶变换光谱技术的光谱仪的代表性结构、性能和应用,探讨了国内真空紫外分波前傅里叶变换光谱技术的未来发展,为获得高分辨率真空紫外光谱提供了另一途径。

  13. On infinitely divisible semimartingales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse-O'Connor, Andreas; Rosiński, Jan

    2015-01-01

    processes, including linear fractional processes, mixed moving averages, and supOU processes, as particular cases. The proof of the main theorem relies on series representations of jumps of cadlag infinitely divisible processes given in Basse-O'Connor and Rosinski [2013, Ann. Probab. 41(6)] combined...

  14. Solid State Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  15. Encrypted integer division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veugen, P.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    When processing signals in the encrypted domain, homomorphic encryption can be used to enable linear operations on encrypted data. Integer division of encrypted data however requires an additional protocol with the server and will be relatively expensive. We present new solutions for dividing encryp

  16. The Problem with Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Of the "big four", division is likely to regarded by many learners as "the odd one out", "the difficult one", "the one that is complicated", or "the scary one". It seems to have been that way "for ever", in the perception of many who have trodden the learning pathways through the world of number. But, does it have to be like this? Clearly the…

  17. ACT-asthma control y tratamiento para niños: a progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, M A; de la Sota, A; Rachelefsky, G; Lewis, C E; Quinones, H; Richards, W

    1987-01-01

    A randomized clinical trial is in progress to evaluate an asthma educational program for Latino children and their parents. The intervention, "ACT-Asma Control y Tratamiento Para Niños," was adapted from ACT for Kids, an asthma self-management program for English-speaking families. Results of a pilot study indicated that socioeconomic status was a critical variable to be considered in the design of such programs. Latino children and parents encounter significant barriers to access and continuity of medical care. Therefore, the intervention was redesigned to include "linkages" using a nurse to reduce barriers and to coordinate care. The lesson plans emphasize concrete, experimental learning experiences, with repetition of key points in each session.

  18. Control of the cell cycle progression by the MAPK Hog1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Clotet

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells coordinate various intracellular activities in response to environmental stresses, activating an adaptive program to maximize the probability of survival and proliferation. Cells transduce diverse cellular stimuli by multiple mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades. MAPK are key signal transduction kinases required to respond to stress. A prototypical member of the MAPK family is the yeast high osmolarity glycerol (Hog1. Activation of Hog1 results in the generation of a set of adaptive responses that leads to the modulation of several aspects of cell physiology that are essential for cell survival, such as gene expression, translation, and morphogenesis. This review focuses on the control of cell cycle progression by Hog1 which is critical for cell survival in response to stress conditions.

  19. Progress in the remote-controlled activation of self-healing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Ahmad; Schmidt, Annette M.

    2016-08-01

    Self-healing materials, able to heal themselves either spontaneously or after activation, and ultimately restore diverse properties such as mechanical, optical or electrical properties, are under intense investigation for various classes of material, including polymers, cementous materials, asphalts, metals, composites, and more. Among these, on-command self-healing systems can be classified as an approach towards a spatially resolved, externally controlled activation of self-healing behavior. Towards this goal, the last decade has experienced significant progress. Various methods, mainly based on indirect heating mechanisms, such as resistive, induction, or photo-induced heating, have been presented, depending on different antenna materials and energy sources, and tailored for different applications. This review discusses the up-to-date achievements in the field of on-command self-healing materials with a focus on electromagnetic and mechanochemical activation.

  20. Histone deacetylases 1 and 2 control the progression of neural precursors to neurons during brain development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Rusty L.; Hsieh, Jenny; Barbosa, Ana C.; Richardson, James A.; Olson, Eric N.

    2009-01-01

    The molecular mechanism by which neural progenitor cells commit to a specified lineage of the central nervous system remains unknown. We show that HDAC1 and HDAC2 redundantly control neuronal development and are required for neuronal specification. Mice lacking HDAC1 or HDAC2 in neuronal precursors show no overt histoarchitectural phenotypes, whereas deletion of both HDAC1 and HDAC2 in developing neurons results in severe hippocampal abnormalities, absence of cerebellar foliation, disorganization of cortical neurons, and lethality by postnatal day 7. These abnormalities in brain formation can be attributed to a failure of neuronal precursors to differentiate into mature neurons and to excessive cell death. These results reveal redundant and essential roles for HDAC1 and HDAC2 in the progression of neuronal precursors to mature neurons in vivo. PMID:19380719

  1. Nonmetabolic functions of pyruvate kinase isoform M2 in controlling cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhimin Lu

    2012-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase catalyzes the rate-limiting final step of glycolysis,generating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and pyruvate.The M2 tumor-specific isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) promotes glucose uptake and lactate production in the presence of oxygen,known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect.As recently reported in Nature,PKM2,besides its metabolic function,has a nonmetabolic function in the direct control of cell cycle progression by activating β-catenin and inducing expression of the β-catenin downstream gene CCND1 (encoding for cyclin D1).This nonmetabolic function of PKM2 is essential for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation-induced tumorigenesis.

  2. A new key neurohormone controlling reproduction, gonadotrophin-inhibitory hormone in birds: discovery, progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, K; Saigoh, E; Yin, H; Ubuka, T; Chowdhury, V S; Osugi, T; Ukena, K; Sharp, P J; Wingfield, J C; Bentley, G E

    2009-03-01

    In vertebrates, the neuropeptide control of gonadotrophin secretion is primarily through the stimulatory action of the hypothalamic decapeptide, gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Gonadal sex steroids and inhibin inhibit gonadotrophin secretion via feedback from the gonads, but a hypothalamic neuropeptide inhibiting gonadotrophin secretion was, until recently, unknown in vertebrates. In 2000, we discovered a novel hypothalamic dodecapeptide that directly inhibits gonadotrophin release in quail and termed it gonadotrophin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH). GnIH acts on the pituitary and GnRH neurones in the hypothalamus via a novel G-protein-coupled receptor for GnIH to inhibit gonadal development and maintenance by decreasing gonadotrophin release and synthesis. The pineal hormone melatonin is a key factor controlling GnIH neural function. GnIH occurs in the hypothalamus of several avian species and is considered to be a new key neurohormone inhibiting avian reproduction. Thus, the discovery of GnIH provides novel directions to investigate neuropeptide regulation of reproduction. This review summarises the discovery, progress and prospects of GnIH, a new key neurohormone controlling reproduction.

  3. Euglycemic progression: worsening of diabetic retinopathy in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurter, A; Genter, P; Ouyang, D; Ipp, E

    2013-06-01

    In type 2 diabetes, early effects of strict near-normalization of glucose control on macrovascular and microvascular disease are still uncertain. We evaluated the effects of early dramatic improvement in glycemia on retinal disease in poorly controlled diabetes. A retrospective, case-control study in public hospital patients with type 2 diabetes, who had annual retinal imaging as part of a case management program or standard diabetes care. Patients included had ≥2 two retinal images ≥1 one year apart, and at least 3 HbA1C measurements. Retinal images were graded using a modified Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy grading scheme. An 'intensive' group (n=34) with HbA1C decrease >1.5% was compared with randomly chosen patients (n=34) with minimal HbA1C changes. Mean HbA1C (±SEM) over two years was similar in intensive (8.5 ± 0.21%) and control groups (8.1 ± 0.28%, p=NS). However, the intensive group had higher baseline HbA1C and a mean maximal decrease of 4.0 ± 0.41% in contrast to the control group (0.2 ± 0.11%). Retinopathy grade progressed +0.7 ± 0.25 units from baseline in the intensive group (p=0.015), a 22.6% worsening. The control group changed minimally from baseline (0.03 ± 0.14 units, p=NS). Change in retinopathy grade was significantly different between groups (p=0.02). More eyes worsened by ≥ 1 retinal grade (p=0.0025) and developed sight-threatening retinopathy (p=0.003) in the intensive group. Visual acuity was unchanged. Diabetic retinopathy significantly worsened in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes after early intensification of glycemic control and dramatic HbA1C change. Retinal status should be part of risk-factor evaluation in patients likely to experience marked reductions in HbA1C in poorly controlled diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Studies on the control of cell wall extension. Yearly progress report, September 1, 1978-August 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleland, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Research has been centered around the question as to how plant cell enlargement is controlled and regulated at the cellular level. Progress is reported on the following projects: proton permeability of plant cuticles; the control of osmoregulation in Avena coleoptiles; an analysis of the acid-extension curves. (ACR)

  5. Podcast: The Electronic Crimes Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sept 26, 2016. Chris Lukas, the Special Agent in Charge of the Electronic Crimes Division within the OIG's Office of Investigations talks about computer forensics, cybercrime in the EPA and his division's role in criminal investigations.

  6. 2016 T Division Lightning Talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Marilyn Leann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Adams, Luke Clyde [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Ferre, Gregoire Robing [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Grantcharov, Vesselin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Iaroshenko, Oleksandr [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Krishnapriyan, Aditi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Kurtakoti, Prajvala Kishore [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Le Thien, Minh Quan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Lim, Jonathan Ng [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Low, Thaddeus Song En [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Lystrom, Levi Aaron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Ma, Xiaoyu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Nguyen, Hong T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Pogue, Sabine Silvia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Orandle, Zoe Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Reisner, Andrew Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Revard, Benjamin Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Roy, Julien [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Sandor, Csanad [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Slavkova, Kalina Polet [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Weichman, Kathleen Joy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Wu, Fei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Yang, Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division

    2016-11-29

    These are the slides for all of the 2016 T Division lightning talks. There are 350 pages worth of slides from different presentations, all of which cover different topics within the theoretical division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  7. 75 FR 16178 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Joint... Director of Operations, Antitrust Division. BILLING CODE 4410-11-M...

  8. Effect of Rebamipide on the Premalignant Progression of Chronic Gastritis: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xue; Jiang, Kui; Wang, Bangmao; Zhou, Lu; Chen, Xin; Li, Shu

    2015-10-01

    Chronic gastritis frequently progresses into precancerous intestinal metaplasia and intraepithelial neoplasia lesions. Rebamipide is a free radical scavenger and we assessed its efficacy on clinical symptoms, gastric mucosal lesions, pathologic grade, and immunohistochemistry in chronic gastritis patients. 178 eligible patients were randomized into treatment and control groups. Both groups followed an optimized lifestyle for 26 weeks, but the treatment group was additionally medicated with rebamipide 0.1 g three times per day. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed in all patients to evaluate the severity of gastritis by the Modified Lanza Scoring (MLS) and histological changes were evaluated by the Updated Sydney System Score (USSS). Gastric mucosa immunohistochemistry in the treatment group was performed using the intestinal metaplasia markers caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) and trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) detection. There were significant outcome differences between the treatment and control groups regarding the clinical symptom scores (2.62 ± 1.86 vs. 1.55 ± 1.61, P = 0.0001), gastric mucosal lesion scores (0.57 ± 1.05 vs. 0.16 ± 0.90, P = 0.002), and inflammation (P rebamipide medication than pre-treatment values. Rebamipide improved the clinical symptoms, gastric mucosal lesions, and pathological grades of chronic gastritis patients and decreased the expression rates of CDX2 and TFF3 in gastric cells.

  9. Division of Labor

    KAUST Repository

    Oke, Muse

    2014-09-12

    The first assignment of DNA polymerases at the eukaryotic replication fork was possible after the in vitro reconstitution of the simian virus 40 (SV40) replication system. In this system, DNA polymerase α (Pol α) provides both leading and lagging strands with RNA-DNA primers that are extended by DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ). Extrapolating the architecture of the replication fork from the SV40 model system to an actual eukaryotic cell has been challenged by the discovery of a third DNA polymerase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε). A division of labor has been proposed for the eukaryotic replication fork whereby Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand. However, an alternative model of unequal division of labor in which Pol δ can still participate in leading-strand synthesis is plausible.

  10. Global Progress Toward Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome Control and Elimination - 2000-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gavin B; Reef, Susan E; Dabbagh, Alya; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Strebel, Peter M

    2015-09-25

    Rubella virus usually causes a mild fever and rash in children and adults. However, infection during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester, can result in miscarriage, fetal death, stillbirth, or a constellation of congenital malformations known as congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). In 2011, the World Health Organization (WHO) updated guidance on the preferred strategy for introduction of rubella-containing vaccine (RCV) into national routine immunization schedules, including an initial vaccination campaign usually targeting children aged 9 months-15 years . The Global Vaccine Action Plan endorsed by the World Health Assembly in 2012 and the Global Measles and Rubella Strategic Plan (2012-2020) published by Measles and Rubella Initiative partners in 2012 both include goals to eliminate rubella and CRS in at least two WHO regions by 2015, and at least five WHO regions by 2020 (2,3). This report updates a previous report and summarizes global progress toward rubella and CRS control and elimination during 2000-2014. As of December 2014, RCV had been introduced in 140 (72%) countries, an increase from 99 (51%) countries in 2000 (for this report, WHO member states are referred to as countries). Reported rubella cases declined 95%, from 670,894 cases in 102 countries in 2000 to 33,068 cases in 162 countries in 2014, although reporting is inconsistent. To achieve the 2020 Global Vaccine Action Plan rubella and CRS elimination goals, RCV introduction needs to continue as country criteria indicating readiness are met, and rubella and CRS surveillance need to be strengthened to ensure that progress toward elimination can be measured.

  11. Ssrp1a controls organogenesis by promoting cell cycle progression and RNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltowska, Katarzyna; Apitz, Holger; Stamataki, Despina; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Verkade, Heather; Salecker, Iris; Ober, Elke A.

    2013-01-01

    Tightly controlled DNA replication and RNA transcription are essential for differentiation and tissue growth in multicellular organisms. Histone chaperones, including the FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) complex, are central for these processes and act by mediating DNA access through nucleosome reorganisation. However, their roles in vertebrate organogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we report the identification of zebrafish mutants for the gene encoding Structure specific recognition protein 1a (Ssrp1a), which, together with Spt16, forms the FACT heterodimer. Focussing on the liver and eye, we show that zygotic Ssrp1a is essential for proliferation and differentiation during organogenesis. Specifically, gene expression indicative of progressive organ differentiation is disrupted and RNA transcription is globally reduced. Ssrp1a-deficient embryos exhibit DNA synthesis defects and prolonged S phase, uncovering a role distinct from that of Spt16, which promotes G1 phase progression. Gene deletion/replacement experiments in Drosophila show that Ssrp1b, Ssrp1a and N-terminal Ssrp1a, equivalent to the yeast homologue Pob3, can substitute Drosophila Ssrp function. These data suggest that (1) Ssrp1b does not compensate for Ssrp1a loss in the zebrafish embryo, probably owing to insufficient expression levels, and (2) despite fundamental structural differences, the mechanisms mediating DNA accessibility by FACT are conserved between yeast and metazoans. We propose that the essential functions of Ssrp1a in DNA replication and gene transcription, together with its dynamic spatiotemporal expression, ensure organ-specific differentiation and proportional growth, which are crucial for the forming embryo. PMID:23515471

  12. Physics division annual report 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2007-03-12

    This report highlights the research performed in 2005 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The mission of Nuclear Physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the matter that makes up stars, planets and human life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission and 2005 was a year of great progress. One of the most exciting developments is the initiation of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, CARIBU. By combining a Cf-252 fission source, the gas catcher technology developed for rare isotope beams, a high-resolution isobar separator, and charge breeding ECR technology, CARIBU will make hundreds of new neutron-rich isotope beams available for research. The cover illustration shows the anticipated intensities of low-energy beams that become available for low-energy experiments and for injection into ATLAS for reacceleration. CARIBU will be completed in early 2009 and provide us with considerable experience in many of the technologies developed for a future high intensity exotic beam facility. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the isomeric states in {sup 252}No that helps pin down the single particle structure expected for superheavy elements, and a new low-background measurement of {sup 16}N beta-decay to determine the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction rate that is so important in astrophysical environments. Precise mass measurements shed new light on the unitarity of the quark weak-mixing matrix in the search for physics beyond the standard model. ATLAS operated for 4686 hours of research in FY2005 while achieving 95% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium-Energy Physics, radium

  13. Effects of blood pressure lowering and intensive glucose control on the incidence and progression of retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus : a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, J. W. J.; Patel, A.; Vingerling, J. R.; Cruickshank, J. K.; Hughes, A. D.; Stanton, A.; Lu, J.; Thom, S. A. McG; Grobbee, D. E.; Stolk, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of blood pressure lowering and intensive glucose control on the incidence and progression of retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients. The Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron MR Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) Reti

  14. Joy Osborne, MS, MPA | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy Osborne is the ARC Director for the Division of Cancer Prevention and the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences. The ARC (Administrative Resource Center) provides services to DCP in the areas of budget, contracts, grants, human resources, travel, space and facilities, and other administrative areas. Joy came to NCI in 1992 as a Presidential Management Intern and has worked with many of the NCI Divisions in both intramural and extramural. |

  15. Asymmetric zygote division: A mystery starting point of embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2016-10-02

    In angiosperm, asymmetric zygote division is critical for embryogenesis. The molecular mechanism underlying this process has gained a great attention recently. Some players involve in the control of both accurate position and correct orientation of zygote division plane have been found, which provide useful clues for the extensive investigations. It is getting clear that both internal and external factors are involved in this complex regulatory mechanism and the asymmetric zygote division seems with great impact in cell fate determination and embryo pattern formation.

  16. Plasmids in the driving seat: The regulatory RNA Rcd gives plasmid ColE1 control over division and growth of its E. coli host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaimster, Hannah; Summers, David

    2015-03-01

    Regulation by non-coding RNAs was found to be widespread among plasmids and other mobile elements of bacteria well before its ubiquity in the eukaryotic world was suspected. As an increasing number of examples was characterised, a common mechanism began to emerge. Non-coding RNAs, such as CopA and Sok from plasmid R1, or RNAI from ColE1, exerted regulation by refolding the secondary structures of their target RNAs or modifying their translation. One regulatory RNA that seemed to swim against the tide was Rcd, encoded within the multimer resolution site of ColE1. Required for high fidelity maintenance of the plasmid in recombination-proficient hosts, Rcd was found to have a protein target, elevating indole production by stimulating tryptophanase. Rcd production is up-regulated in dimer-containing cells and the consequent increase in indole is part of the response to the rapid accumulation of dimers by over-replication (known as the dimer catastrophe). It is proposed that indole simultaneously inhibits cell division and plasmid replication, stopping the catastrophe and allowing time for the resolution of dimers to monomers. The idea of a plasmid-mediated cell division checkpoint, proposed but then discarded in the 1980s, appears to be enjoying a revival. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Division Quilts: A Measurement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Sarah S.; Lupton, Tina M.; Richardson, Kerri

    2015-01-01

    As teachers seek activities to assist students in understanding division as more than just the algorithm, they find many examples of division as fair sharing. However, teachers have few activities to engage students in a quotative (measurement) model of division. Efraim Fischbein and his colleagues (1985) defined two types of whole-number…

  18. Theory on real-time control of construction quality and progress and its application to high arc dam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A complete scheme for solving the key scientific problems associated with high-standard,high-intensity continuous construction of high arch dams was presented. First,based on a coupling analysis of construction system decomposition and coordination for a high arc dam,a mathematical model for real-time control of construction quality and progress that considers complex constraints was developed. Second,a method of progress control was proposed based on a dynamic simulation. Third,a dynamic quality control mechanism was established based on construction information collected using a PDA. Fourth,a system for integrating collected information,progress simulation and quality control analyses under a network environment was developed. Finally,these methods were applied to a practical project to show that each aspect of a construction process can be managed effectively and that real-time monitoring and feedback control can be realized. Our methods provide new theoretical principles and technical measures for quality and progress control in the high arc dam construction process.

  19. Host biomarkers are associated with progression to dengue haemorrhagic fever: a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Andrea L; Gélvez, Margarita; Hawkes, Michael; Rajwans, Nimerta; Tran, Vanessa; Liles, W Conrad; Villar-Centeno, Luis Angel; Kain, Kevin C

    2015-11-01

    Dengue represents the most important arboviral infection worldwide. Onset of circulatory collapse can be unpredictable. Biomarkers that can identify individuals at risk of plasma leakage may facilitate better triage and clinical management. Using a nested case-control design, we randomly selected subjects from a prospective cohort study of dengue in Colombia (n=1582). Using serum collected within 96 hours of fever onset, we tested 19 biomarkers by ELISA in cases (developed dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS); n=46), and controls (uncomplicated dengue fever (DF); n=65) and healthy controls (HC); n=15. Ang-1 levels were lower and angptl3, sKDR, sEng, sICAM-1, CRP, CXCL10/IP-10, IL-18 binding protein, CHI3L1, C5a and Factor D levels were increased in dengue compared to HC. sICAM-1, sEng and CXCL10/IP-10 were further elevated in subjects who subsequently developed DHF/DSS (p=0.008, p=0.028 and p=0.025, respectively). In a logistic regression model, age (odds ratio (OR) (95% CI): 0.95 (0.92-0.98), p=0.001), hyperesthesia/hyperalgesia (OR; 3.8 (1.4-10.4), p=0.008) and elevated sICAM-1 (>298ng/mL: OR; 6.3 (1.5-25.7), p=0.011) at presentation were independently associated with progression to DHF/DSS. These results suggest that inflammation and endothelial activation are important pathways in the pathogenesis of dengue and sICAM-1 levels may identify individuals at risk of plasma leakage. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Mitochondrial inheritance is mediated by microtubules in mammalian cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Elizabeth; Mandato, Craig

    2013-11-01

    The mitochondrial network fragments and becomes uniformly dispersed within the cytoplasm when mammalian cells enter mitosis. Such morphology and distribution of mitochondria was previously thought to facilitate the stochastic inheritance of mitochondria by daughter cells. In contrast, we recently reported that mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells are inherited by an ordered mechanism of inheritance mediated by microtubules. We showed that mitochondria are progressively enriched at the cell equator and depleted at the poles throughout division. Furthermore, the mitochondrial distribution during division is dependent on microtubules, indicating an ordered inheritance strategy. The microtubule-mediated positioning of mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells may have functional consequences for cell division and/or mitochondrial inheritance.

  1. A new class of cyclin dependent kinase in Chlamydomonas is required for coupling cell size to cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubing; Liu, Dianyi; López-Paz, Cristina; Olson, Bradley JSC; Umen, James G

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cells actively control their size by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii divides by multiple fission, wherein a ‘counting’ mechanism couples mother cell-size to cell division number allowing production of uniform-sized daughters. We identified a sizer protein, CDKG1, that acts through the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway as a D-cyclin-dependent RB kinase to regulate mitotic counting. Loss of CDKG1 leads to fewer mitotic divisions and large daughters, while mis-expression of CDKG1 causes supernumerous mitotic divisions and small daughters. The concentration of nuclear-localized CDKG1 in pre-mitotic cells is set by mother cell size, and its progressive dilution and degradation with each round of cell division may provide a link between mother cell-size and mitotic division number. Cell-size-dependent accumulation of limiting cell cycle regulators such as CDKG1 is a potentially general mechanism for size control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10767.001 PMID:27015111

  2. CAS Academic Divisions in 2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ 1.Election of New Members In 2001, 56 scientists were elected new CAS members, including l0 in the Division of Mathematics & Physics, 10 in the Division of Chemistry, 12 in the Division of Biology, nine in the Division of Earth Sciences and 15 in the Division of Engineering Sciences.The average age of the new members is 60.4, and the youngest one is 38 years old. They are now working in nine provinces or municipalities, or governmental departments under the State Council, including 23 outstanding experts working for the CAS.

  3. Dynamic and Progressive Control of DNA Origami Conformation by Modulating DNA Helicity with Chemical Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haorong; Zhang, Hanyu; Pan, Jing; Cha, Tae-Gon; Li, Shiming; Andréasson, Joakim; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2016-05-24

    DNA origami has received enormous attention for its ability to program complex nanostructures with a few nanometer precision. Dynamic origami structures that change conformation in response to environmental cues or external signals hold great promises in sensing and actuation at the nanoscale. The reconfiguration mechanism of existing dynamic origami structures is mostly limited to single-stranded hinges and relies almost exclusively on DNA hybridization or strand displacement. Here, we show an alternative approach by demonstrating on-demand conformation changes with DNA-binding molecules, which intercalate between base pairs and unwind DNA double helices. The unwinding effect modulates the helicity mismatch in DNA origami, which significantly influences the internal stress and the global conformation of the origami structure. We demonstrate the switching of a polymerized origami nanoribbon between different twisting states and a well-constrained torsional deformation in a monomeric origami shaft. The structural transformation is shown to be reversible, and binding isotherms confirm the reconfiguration mechanism. This approach provides a rapid and reversible means to change DNA origami conformation, which can be used for dynamic and progressive control at the nanoscale.

  4. Fibromodulin: a master regulator of myostatin controlling progression of satellite cells through a myogenic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Ju; Jan, Arif Tasleem; Baig, Mohammad Hassan; Ashraf, Jalaluddin Mohammad; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Kim, Yong-Woon; Park, So-Young; Choi, Inho

    2016-08-01

    Differentiation of muscle satellite cells (MSCs) involves interaction of the proteins present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) with MSCs to regulate their activity, and therefore phenotype. Herein, we report fibromodulin (FMOD), a member of the proteoglycan family participating in the assembly of ECM, as a novel regulator of myostatin (MSTN) during myoblast differentiation. In addition to having a pronounced effect on the expression of myogenic marker genes [myogenin (MYOG) and myosin light chain 2 (MYL2)], FMOD was found to maintain the transcriptional activity of MSTN Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation and in silico studies performed to investigate the interaction of FMOD helped confirm that it antagonizes MSTN function by distorting its folding and preventing its binding to activin receptor type IIB. Furthermore, in vivo studies revealed that FMOD plays an active role in healing by increasing satellite cell recruitment to sites of injury. Together, these findings disclose a hitherto unrecognized regulatory role for FMOD in MSCs and highlight new mechanisms whereby FMOD circumvents the inhibitory effects of MSTN and triggers myoblast differentiation. These findings offer a basis for the design of novel MSTN inhibitors that promote muscle regeneration after injury or for the development of pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of different muscle atrophies.-Lee, E. J., Jan, A. T., Baig, M. H., Ashraf, J. M., Nahm, S.-S., Kim, Y.-W., Park, S.-Y., Choi, I. Fibromodulin: a master regulator of myostatin controlling progression of satellite cells through a myogenic program.

  5. Cell division activity during apical hook development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, V.; Koornneef, M.

    2001-01-01

    Growth during plant development is predominantly governed by the combined activities of cell division and cell elongation. The relative contribution of both activities controls the growth of a tissue. A fast change in growth is exhibited at the apical hypocotyl of etiolated seedlings where cells

  6. Cell division activity during apical hook development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, V.; Koornneef, M.

    2001-01-01

    Growth during plant development is predominantly governed by the combined activities of cell division and cell elongation. The relative contribution of both activities controls the growth of a tissue. A fast change in growth is exhibited at the apical hypocotyl of etiolated seedlings where cells gro

  7. A two-year randomized controlled trial of progressive resistance exercise for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcos, Daniel M; Robichaud, Julie A; David, Fabian J; Leurgans, Sue E; Vaillancourt, David E; Poon, Cynthia; Rafferty, Miriam R; Kohrt, Wendy M; Comella, Cynthia L

    2013-08-01

    The effects of progressive resistance exercise (PRE) on the motor signs of Parkinson's disease have not been studied in controlled trials. The objective of the current trial was to compare 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-month outcomes of patients with Parkinson's disease who received PRE with a stretching, balance, and strengthening exercise program. The authors conducted a randomized controlled trial between September 2007 and July 2011. Pairs of patients matched by sex and off-medication scores on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, motor subscale (UPDRS-III), were randomly assigned to the interventions with a 1:1 allocation ratio. The PRE group performed a weight-lifting program. The modified fitness counts (mFC) group performed a stretching, balance, and strengthening exercise program. Patients exercised 2 days per week for 24 months at a gym. A personal trainer directed both weekly sessions for the first 6 months and 1 weekly session after 6 months. The primary outcome was the off-medication UPDRS-III score. Patients were followed for 24 months at 6-month intervals. Of 51 patients, 20 in the PRE group and 18 in the mFC group completed the trial. At 24 months, the mean off-medication UPDRS-III score decreased more with PRE than with mFC (mean difference, -7.3 points; 95% confidence interval, -11.3 to -3.6; P<0.001). The PRE group had 10 adverse events, and the mFC group had 7 adverse events. PRE demonstrated a statistically and clinically significant reduction in UPDRS-III scores compared with mFC and is recommended as a useful adjunct therapy to improve Parkinsonian motor signs. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Malaria Control and Elimination in Sri Lanka: Documenting Progress and Success Factors in a Conflict Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyasinghe, Rabindra R.; Galappaththy, Gawrie N. L.; Smith Gueye, Cara; Kahn, James G.; Feachem, Richard G. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sri Lanka has a long history of malaria control, and over the past decade has had dramatic declines in cases amid a national conflict. A case study of Sri Lanka's malaria programme was conducted to characterize the programme and explain recent progress. Methods The case study employed qualitative and quantitative methods. Data were collected from published and grey literature, district-level and national records, and thirty-three key informant interviews. Expenditures in two districts for two years – 2004 and 2009 – were compiled. Findings Malaria incidence in Sri Lanka has declined by 99.9% since 1999. During this time, there were increases in the proportion of malaria infections due to Plasmodium vivax, and the proportion of infections occurring in adult males. Indoor residual spraying and distribution of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets have likely contributed to the low transmission. Entomological surveillance was maintained. A strong passive case detection system captures infections and active case detection was introduced. When comparing conflict and non-conflict districts, vector control and surveillance measures were maintained in conflict areas, often with higher coverage reported in conflict districts. One of two districts in the study reported a 48% decline in malaria programme expenditure per person at risk from 2004 to 2009. The other district had stable malaria spending. Conclusions/Significance Malaria is now at low levels in Sri Lanka – 124 indigenous cases were found in 2011. The majority of infections occur in adult males and are due to P. vivax. Evidence-driven policy and an ability to adapt to new circumstances contributed to this decline. Malaria interventions were maintained in the conflict districts despite an ongoing war. Sri Lanka has set a goal of eliminating malaria by the end of 2014. Early identification and treatment of infections, especially imported ones, together with effective surveillance and response, will

  9. Effect of PKC pathway on G1/S progression control in HeLa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effect of PKC activity on G1/S progression in HeLa cells has been studied.The result shows that (ⅰ) PKC activity alteration in G1 phase affects G1/S progression in HeLa cells.It has been observed that G1/S progression is stimulated by PKC agonist TPA and inhibited by PKC inhibitor GF-109203X.(ⅱ) The expression of c-myc and c-jun is stimulated by TPA and inhibited by GF-109203X treatment in early G1 phase.(ⅲ) During G1/S progression,the expression of CyclinD1 is stimulated by TPA treatment and inhibited by GF-109203X treatment.There is no effect on the expression of CDK4.It is likely that PKC pathway regulates G1/S progression through regulating the expression of some early response genes and engine molecules in HeLa cells.

  10. Modeling freedom from progression for standard-risk medulloblastoma: a mathematical tumor control model with multiple modes of failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, Nils Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Bjørk-Eriksson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    As pediatric medulloblastoma (MB) is a relatively rare disease, it is important to extract the maximum information from trials and cohort studies. Here, a framework was developed for modeling tumor control with multiple modes of failure and time-to-progression for standard-risk MB, using publishe...

  11. Effect of statins, smoking and obesity on progression of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael A; Kyle, Robert A; Melton, L Joseph; Plevak, Matthew F; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2004-05-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP, a surrogate marker for IL-6) are important in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and myeloma. Smoking and obesity may elevate CRP levels, while statins decrease CRP levels. A case-control study in 200 MGUS patients found that statin use, smoking history and obesity do not affect MGUS progression.

  12. Effectiveness of Functional Progressive Resistance Exercise Training on Walking Ability in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Becher, Jules G.; Janssen-Potten, Yvonne J.; Dekkers, Hurnet; Smallenbroek, Linda; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of functional progressive resistance exercise (PRE) training on walking ability in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Fifty-one ambulant children with spastic CP (mean age 10 years 5 months, 29 boys) were randomized to an intervention (n=26) or control group (n=25, receiving usual care).…

  13. [Progress of research on genetic engineering antibody and its application in prevention and control of parasitic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Yu, Chuan-xin

    2013-08-01

    Antibody has extensive application prospects in the biomedical field. The inherent disadvantages of traditional polyclonal antibody and monoclonal antibody limit their application values. The humanized and fragmented antibody remodeling has given a rise to a series of genetic engineered antibody variant. This paper reviews the progress of research on genetic engineering antibody and its application in prevention and control of parasitic diseases.

  14. State‐of‐the‐art and progress in the optimization‐based simultaneous design and control for chemical processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Zhihong; Chen, Bingzhen; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress in the area of simultaneous design and control for chemical processes has been achieved and various methodologies have been put forward to address this issue over the last several decades. These methods can be classified in two categories (1) controllability indicator...... the simultaneous design methods to challenging problem areas. In particular, the application of optimization‐based simultaneous design and control methods to large‐scale systems with highly inherent nonlinear dynamics often the case in industrial chemical processes remains a challenging task and yet to be solved......‐based frameworks that are capable of screening alternative designs, and (2) optimization‐based frameworks that integrate the process design and control system design. The major objective is to give an up‐to‐date review of the state‐of‐the‐art and progress in the challenging area of optimization‐based simultaneous...

  15. Few-mode fiber technology for mode division multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takayoshi; Sakamoto, Taiji; Wada, Masaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Nakajima, Kazuhide

    2017-02-01

    We review recent progress on few-mode fiber (FMF) technologies for mode-division multiplexing (MDM) transmission. First, we introduce fibers for use without and with multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) digital signal processing (DSP) to compensate for modal crosstalk, and briefly report recent work on FMF for use without/with a MIMO DSP system. We next discuss in detail a fiber for MIMO transmission systems, and show numerically that a graded-index core can flexibly tune the differential mode group delay (DMD) and a cladding trench can flexibly control the guiding mode number. We optimized the spacing of the core and trench. Accordingly, we can achieve a 6 LP (10 spatial) mode operation and a low DMD while preventing the high index difference that leads to manufacturing difficulties and any loss increase. We finally describe our experimental results for a 6 LP (10 spatial) mode transmission line for use in a C + L band wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) MDM transmission with MIMO DSP.

  16. Maintenance Management in the ST Division

    CERN Document Server

    Rühl, I

    2001-01-01

    The Maintenance Manager Working Group was established in order to revise existing maintenance contracts and to provide comprehensive and applicable tools for the execution of maintenance activities in the ST Division. This was necessary mainly due to the fact that the maintenance plans in the Division have often evolved rather than being consciously set up and in respect to the change towards result orientated contracts. Also, because the decrease of CERN staff and the trend towards outsourcing, a tighter and well-organised maintenance management has to be established. In order to achieve the most realistic and applicable results the technical and commercial aspects must be considered by following the industrial approach. This document will outline the objectives of the working group and will show the progress that has been made by the implementation of already achieved results. Furthermore this paper will show a possible structure of future maintenance management.

  17. A New Region-of-interest Coding Method to Control the Relative Quality of Progressive Decoded Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ji-liang; FANG Xiang-zhong; ZHANG Dong-dong

    2007-01-01

    Based on the ideas of controlling relative quality and rearranging bitplanes, a new ROI coding method for JPEG2000 was proposed, which shifts and rearranges bitplanes in units of bitplane groups.It can code arbitrary shaped ROI without shape coding, and reserve almost arbitrary percent of background information.It also can control the relative quality of progressive decoded images.In addition, it is easy to be implemented and has low computational cost.

  18. Physics Division annual report 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.

    2006-04-06

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne

  19. A NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase coordinates metabolism with cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufay, François; Coppine, Jérôme; Mayard, Aurélie; Laloux, Géraldine; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2015-07-01

    Coupling cell cycle with nutrient availability is a crucial process for all living cells. But how bacteria control cell division according to metabolic supplies remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism that coordinates central metabolism with cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This mechanism involves the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase GdhZ and the oxidoreductase-like KidO. While enzymatically active GdhZ directly interferes with FtsZ polymerization by stimulating its GTPase activity, KidO bound to NADH destabilizes lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments. Both GdhZ and KidO share the same regulatory network to concomitantly stimulate the rapid disassembly of the Z-ring, necessary for the subsequent release of progeny cells. Thus, this mechanism illustrates how proteins initially dedicated to metabolism coordinate cell cycle progression with nutrient availability.

  20. Deconstructing Calculation Methods, Part 4: Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    In the final article of a series of four, the author deconstructs the primary national strategy's approach to written division. The approach to division is divided into five stages: (1) mental division using partition; (2) short division of TU / U; (3) "expanded" method for HTU / U; (4) short division of HTU / U; and (5) long division. [For part…

  1. General trigeminospinal central sensitization and impaired descending pain inhibitory controls contribute to migraine progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Nelly; Dallel, Radhouane; Artola, Alain; Monconduit, Lénaïc

    2014-07-01

    Migraine is a chronic disease with episodic manifestations. In a subgroup, attack frequency increases over time, leading to chronic migraine. One of the most important risk factors for migraine progression is frequency of headache attacks at baseline. Unfortunately, the actual effects of repeated activation of dural nociceptors are poorly known. We investigated the behavioral, anatomical, and electrophysiological changes induced by repeated low- and high-intensity stimulation of meningeal nociceptor by injecting an inflammatory soup in rats. Single high-intensity, but not low-intensity, stimulation produces a reversible cephalic allodynia. Upon repetition, however, low-intensity stimulation, too, induces a reversible cephalic allodynia, and high-intensity, reversible cephalic and extracephalic allodynia. Moreover, cephalic allodynia becomes, in part, persistent upon repeated high-intensity stimulation. Fos expression reveals that a single high-intensity stimulation already leads to widespread, trigeminal, and spinal central sensitization, and that such general central sensitization potentiates upon repetition. Trigeminovascular nociceptive neurons become persistently sensitized and their diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC) concomitantly impaired. Thus, compared with single stimulation, repeated dural nociceptor activation specifically leads to: 1) a gradual worsening of cutaneous hypersensitivity and general neuronal hyperexcitability and 2) spreading of cutaneous hypersensitivity superimposed on 3) persistent cephalic cutaneous hypersensitivity and trigeminal central sensitization. Such repetition-induced development of central sensitization and its consequence, cutaneous allodynia, may arise from both the general neuronal hyperexcitability that results from DNIC impairment and hyperexcitability that likely develops in trigeminal nociceptive neurons in response to their repetitive activation. These neuronal changes may in turn elevate the risk for

  2. Bipolarity and the relational division

    OpenAIRE

    Tamani, Nouredine; Lietard, Ludovic; Rocacher, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    International audience; A fuzzy bipolar relation is a relation defined by a fuzzy bipolar condition, which could be interpreted as an association of a constraint and a wish. In this context, the extension of the relational division operation to bipolarity is studied in this paper. Firstly, we define a bipolar division when the involved relations are crisp. Then, we define, from the semantic point of view, several forms of bipolar division when the involved relations are defined by fuzzy bipol...

  3. 基于抽象和搜索空间划分的安全性判定方法%Security Analysis of Access Control Policy Based on Predicate Abstract and Verification Space Division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王昌达; 华明辉; 周从华; 宋香梅; 鞠时光

    2011-01-01

    In order to implement security analysis of access control policy rapidly, predicate abstract with verification space division was presented, I. E. Transfer pristine state machine model analysis to abstract state machine model which contains fewer states. Furthermore, verification space division was introduced to decrease the dimensions of model checking. Endorsed by both theoretic analysis and experiment,time and space requirement are effectively reduced. Compared with the known methods,our methodology is more efficiency and less human interacted.%为满足访问控制策略安全性快速判定的要求,提出一种基于谓词抽象和验证空间划分的访问控制策略状态空间约减方法,将在访问控制策略原始状态机模型上的安全性分析工作转移到包含较少状态的抽象模型上,并进一步划分抽象模型的验证空间,以提高效率.理论分析和实验数据均表明,其安全性分析所需的时间和空间都得到有效约减.与传统方法相比,它具有速度更快、自动化程度更高等优点.

  4. Rapid progression of intracranial melanoma metastases controlled with combined BRAF/MEK inhibition after discontinuation of therapy: a clinical challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Cagney, Daniel; Alexander, Brian M; Hodi, F Stephen; Buchbinder, Elizabeth I; Ott, Patrick A; Aizer, Ayal A

    2016-09-01

    Novel systemic therapies with anti-tumor activity in the brain including small molecules targeting BRAF and MEK, and immune checkpoint inhibition, offer the possibility of improved control of intracranial disease. A number of prospective trials support the judicious use of modern systemic therapies in patients with melanoma and limited brain metastases .The intracranial clinical course of patients who progress extracranially on BRAF/MEK inhibition remains poorly described in the literature. In this report, we highlight a series of clinical cases, with rapid progression of intracranial disease following discontinuation of dabrafenib/trametinib for extracranial disease progression or toxicity, a previously unreported finding in the medical literature with significant implications for patient care.

  5. Situational Awareness and Logistics Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Situational Awareness and Logistics Division researches, develops, implements, and analyzes advanced systems to protect, enhance, and ensure resilienceof the...

  6. Systems Safety and Engineering Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Systems Safety and Engineering Division conducts engineering, research, and analysis to improve transportation safety, capacity, and resiliency. We provide...

  7. Security and Emergency Management Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Security and Emergency Management Division identifies vulnerabilities, risks, and opportunities to improve the security of transportation systems, critical...

  8. Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division advances transportation innovation by being leaders in infrastructure technology, including vehicles and...

  9. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Madhuparna, E-mail: mroy17@jhmi.edu; Itoh, Kie, E-mail: kito5@jhmi.edu; Iijima, Miho, E-mail: miijima@jhmi.edu; Sesaki, Hiromi, E-mail: hsesaki@jhmi.edu

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson’s disease-associated protein—parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1—in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division. -- Highlights: •A Drp1-mediated mechanism accounts for ∼95% of mitochondrial division. •Parkin controls the connectivity of mitochondria via a mechanism that is independent of Drp1. •In the absence of Drp1, connected mitochondria transiently depolarize. •The transient depolarization is independent of calcium signaling and uncoupling protein 2.

  10. Physics division annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example

  11. Physics division annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example

  12. A new perspective on the interplay between self-control and cognitive performance: Modeling progressive depletion patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Christoph; Nagy, Gabriel; Ramos Arhuis, Wolfgang Andreas; Retelsdorf, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Exerting self-control in a first task weakens self-control performance in a subsequent unrelated task (ego depletion). In self-control research new strategies are required to investigate the ego-depletion effect, which has recently been shown to be more fragile than previously assumed. Moreover, the relation between ego depletion and trait self-control is still unclear, as various studies have reported heterogeneous findings concerning the interplay of both variables. We addressed these lacunas by drawing on a sample of N = 120 students, who participated in two test sessions. In the first test session, we assessed trait self-control and several control variables. The second test session followed an experimental design and tested the effects of ego depletion on invested effort and cognitive performance trajectories in an ecologically valid computer-based assessment setting (i.e., a 30-minute mathematical problem-solving and reasoning test). Trait self-control was then used as a moderator of the ego-depletion effect. Combining an established ego-depletion paradigm (i.e., the sequential-task paradigm) with multilevel modeling of time-on-task and performance changes, our results indicate (1) that trait self-control predicted the motivation to solve cognitive tasks, (2) that ego depletion led to a progressive performance decrease, and (3) that the negative effect of ego depletion on performance was stronger for students with high trait self-control. Additional analyses revealed that our results could not be alternatively explained by fatigue effects. All effects were robust even after controlling for the students' cognitive abilities, which are known to be closely related to mathematical performance. Our results provide evidence that the self-control invested in order to keep performance at a consistently high level wanes over time. By modeling progressive ego-depletion effects while considering trait self-control, we provide an alternative approach that may help future

  13. A plant-specific cyclin-dependent kinase is involved in the control of G2/M progression in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porceddu, A; Stals, H; Reichheld, J P; Segers, G; De Veylder, L; Barroco, R P; Casteels, P; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Mironov, V

    2001-09-28

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) control the key transitions in the eukaryotic cell cycle. All the CDKs known to control G(2)/M progression in yeast and animals are distinguished by the characteristic PSTAIRE motif in their cyclin-binding domain and are closely related. Higher plants contain in addition a number of more divergent non-PSTAIRE CDKs with still obscure functions. We show that a plant-specific type of non-PSTAIRE CDKs is involved in the control of the G(2)/M progression. In synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells, the corresponding protein, accumulated in a cell cycle-regulated fashion, peaking at the G(2)/M transition. The associated histone H1 kinase activity reached a maximum in mitosis and required a yet unidentified subunit to be fully active. Down-regulation of the associated kinase activity in transgenic tobacco plants using a dominant-negative mutation delayed G(2)/M transition. These results provide the first evidence that non-PSTAIRE CDKs are involved in the control of the G(2)/M progression in plants.

  14. 袁河流域水环境管理中控制单元的划分研究%Division of Control Units in Water Environmental Management in Yuanhe River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭昆国; 王涛; 张萌; 陈宏文

    2012-01-01

    以江西省袁河流域为例,介绍了控制单元划分的原则和方法,初步提出了控制单元的命名方法,同时还探讨了控制单元划分的尺度和等级问题.根据划分结果,袁河流域自上游而下共划分为5个控制单元,依次为芦溪控制单元、袁州区控制单元、仙女湖控制单元、新余控制单元和樟树控制单元,这样的划分模式既保证了小流域的完整性,又为袁河流域水质目标管理提供了实施单元.%With Yuanhe River Basin in Jiangxi Province as the example, the principle and method of control units division were introduced, and the nomenclature of control unit was proposed tentatively,in addition,the dimension and grade of control unit were also discussed. According to the results,five control units were divided along Yuanhe River from up-stream to down-stream,I. E. Luxi control unit,Yuanzhouqu control unit, Xiannvhu control unit,Xinyu control unit and Zhangshu control unit. The divided pattern of control unit in Yuanhe River Basin not only kept the integrity of sub -basin,but also provided implementation unit for water quality target management.

  15. Lightning Talks 2015: Theoretical Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlachter, Jack S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    This document is a compilation of slides from a number of student presentations given to LANL Theoretical Division members. The subjects cover the range of activities of the Division, including plasma physics, environmental issues, materials research, bacterial resistance to antibiotics, and computational methods.

  16. Division of Analytical Chemistry, 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1999-01-01

    The article recounts the 1998 activities of the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC- formerly the Working Party on Analytical Chemistry, WPAC), which body is a division of the Federation of European Chemical Societies (FECS). Elo Harald Hansen is the Danish delegate, representing The Danish...... Chemical Society/The Society for Analytical Chemistry....

  17. 78 FR 17431 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... January 2, 2013 (78 FR 117). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement, Antitrust Division. BILLING...) of the Act on July 30, 2001 (66 FR 39336). The last notification was filed with the Department on... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of...

  18. 77 FR 54611 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... on June 8, 2012 (77 FR 34067). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement, Antitrust Division... Section 6(b) of the Act on June 30, 2000 (65 FR 40693). The last notification was filed with the... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of...

  19. The development of KMRR schedule and progress control system (KSPCS) for the master schedule of KMRR project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Woong; Lee, Tae Joon; Kim, Joon Yun; Cho, Yun Ho; Hah, Jong Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-01

    This report was to development the computerized schedule and progress control system for the master schedule of KMRR project with ARTEMIS 7000/386 CM (Ver. 7.4.2.) based on project management theory (PERT/CPM, PDM, and S-curve). This system has been efficiently used for KMRR master schedule and will be utilized for the detail scheduling of KMRR project. (Author) 23 refs., 26 figs., 52 tabs.

  20. Treatment of large overjet in Angle Class II: division 1 malocclusion with Andresen activators versus prefabricated functional appliances-a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čirgić, Emina; Kjellberg, Heidrun; Hansen, Ken

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness in reducing large overjet between a prefabricated functional appliance (PFA) and a slightly modified Andresen activator (AA). Public Dental Service, Gothenburg, Sweden. A multicentre, prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted with patients from 12 general dental practices. One hundred and five patients with an Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion and an overjet of ≥6mm were eligible for the study. Eight patients were excluded due to various reasons and the sample consisted thus of 97 subjects (44 girls, 53 boys) with a mean age of 10.3 years. The study was designed as intention to treat and the patients were randomly allocated by lottery to treatment with either a PFA or an AA. The PFA and AA group consisted of 57 subjects (28 girls, 29 boys) and 40 subjects (16 girls, 24 boys), respectively. Overjet, overbite, lip seal, and sagittal molar relationship were recorded before, at the end of treatment and 1-year post-treatment. Blinding was not performed. The endpoint of treatment was set to overjet ≤3mm and after this a 6 months retention period followed. No significant difference was found in overjet, overbite, sagittal relation, and lip seal between the two groups for the total observation period. The treatment of 40 (70 per cent) patients with PFA and 21 (53 per cent) with AA were considered unsuccessful mainly due to poor compliance. No cephalometric records were taken as only patient-centred clinical outcome were used as an indicator for treatment success. The criteria of reduction of overjet to as low as 3mm could have affected the success rate. No difference in effectiveness could be shown between PFAs and AAs in correcting overjet, overbite, sagittal molar relation, and lip seal. The success rate in treatment with both appliances is, however, low. This trial was registered in "FoU i Sverige" (http://www.fou.nu/is/sverige), registration number: 97131. The protocol was not

  1. Raven's coloured progressive matrices: normative values on 305 adult normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, A; Capitani, E; Laiacona, M

    1987-01-01

    The use of Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (PM 47) in experiments with brain-damaged patients is briefly reviewed. Because norms for adults are still not available, normative data were calculated on 305 normals; corrections for age and education and centile allocation of the scores are furnished.

  2. Effects of proactive population-based nephrologist oversight on progression of chronic kidney disease: a retrospective control analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Brian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benefits of early nephrology care are well-established, but as many as 40% of U.S. patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD do not see a nephrologist before its onset. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of proactive, population-based nephrologist oversight (PPNO on chronic kidney disease (CKD progression. Methods Retrospective control analysis of Kaiser Permanente Hawaii members with CKD using propensity score matching methods. We matched 2,938 control and case pairs of individuals with stage 3a CKD for the pre-PPNO period (2001–2004 and post-PPNO period (2005–2008 that were similar in other characteristics: age, gender, and the presence of diabetes and hypertension. After three years, we classified the stage outcomes for all individuals. We assessed the PPNO effect across all stages of progression with a χ2- test. We used the z-score test to assess the proportional differences in progression within a stage. Results The progression within the post-PPNO period was less severe and significantly different from the pre-PPNO period (p = 0.027. Within the stages, there were 2.6% more individuals remaining in 3a in the post-period (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5% to 3.8%; P value P value = 0.0017, 3a to 4/5 was 0.2% less (95% CI, 0.0% to 0.87%; P value = 0.26, and 3a to ESRD was 0.24% less (95% CI, 0.0% to 0.66%, P value = 0.10. Conclusions Proactive, population-based nephrologist oversight was associated with a statistically significant decrease in progression. With enabling health information technology, risk stratification and targeted intervention by collaborative primary and specialty care achieves population-level care improvements. This model may be applicable to other chronic conditions.

  3. Grant R01CA128134 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Grant R01CA148817 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Grant R21CA190028 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Grant R01CA154489 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Grant R01CA179511 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Grant R01CA170549 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Grant R01CA155297 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Grant R21CA182861 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Grant U01CA163056 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Grant R21CA174541 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Grant R01CA107408 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Grant R01CA164782 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Grant R01CA155301 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Grant R01CA098286 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Grant R21CA174594 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Grant U54CA163060 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Grant R21CA190021 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Grant R01CA132951 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Grant R01CA134620 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Prostate and Urologic Cancer Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Active Prostate and Urologic Cancer Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Prostate and Urologic Cancer Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Active Nutritional Science Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Nutritional Science Funding Opportunities | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Nutritional Science Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Nutritional Science Meetings and Events | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Quarterly report of Biological and Medical Research Division, April 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brues, A.M.

    1955-04-01

    This report is a compilation of 48 investigator prepared summaries of recent progress in individual research programs of the Biology and Medical Division of the Argonne National Laboratory for the quarterly period ending April,1955. Individual reports are about 3-6 pages in length and often contain research data.

  13. Physics Division computer facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyborski, D.R.; Teh, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Physics Division maintains several computer systems for data analysis, general-purpose computing, and word processing. While the VMS VAX clusters are still used, this past year saw a greater shift to the Unix Cluster with the addition of more RISC-based Unix workstations. The main Divisional VAX cluster which consists of two VAX 3300s configured as a dual-host system serves as boot nodes and disk servers to seven other satellite nodes consisting of two VAXstation 3200s, three VAXstation 3100 machines, a VAX-11/750, and a MicroVAX II. There are three 6250/1600 bpi 9-track tape drives, six 8-mm tapes and about 9.1 GB of disk storage served to the cluster by the various satellites. Also, two of the satellites (the MicroVAX and VAX-11/750) have DAPHNE front-end interfaces for data acquisition. Since the tape drives are accessible cluster-wide via a software package, they are, in addition to replay, used for tape-to-tape copies. There is however, a satellite node outfitted with two 8 mm drives available for this purpose. Although not part of the main cluster, a DEC 3000 Alpha machine obtained for data acquisition is also available for data replay. In one case, users reported a performance increase by a factor of 10 when using this machine.

  14. Safety and Environmental Protection Division. Progress report, January 1, 1974--December 31, 1975. [Radionuclides in Bikini foods during 1974 and 1975 and environmental monitoring data for BNL during 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported in the analysis of food chain samples collected during 1974 and 1975 at the Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands for /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am remaining in the environment from the 1946-1958 nuclear tests. Data on levels of radioactivity in environmental samples and SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ in air samples collected in the vicinity of Brookhaven National Laboratory during 1975 are reported. Samples of surface air, surface waters, ground water, sediments and biota from streams, soils, grass, and milk were analyzed. Abstracts of papers published during 1974 and 1975 are included. (CH)

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF CAFFEINE ON MITOTIC DIVISION AT CAPSICUM ANNUUM L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rosu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents, the caffeine effects in mitotic division at Capsicum annuum L.. The treatment has determined the lessening of the mitotic index (comparative with the control variant, until mitotic division total inhibition, as well as an growth frequency of division aberation in anaphase and telophase.

  16. Lin-28 homologue A (LIN28A) promotes cell cycle progression via regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), cyclin D1 (CCND1), and cell division cycle 25 homolog A (CDC25A) expression in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Zhong, Xiaomin; Lin, Xiaojuan; Guo, Jinyi; Zou, Lian; Tanyi, Janos L; Shao, Zhongjun; Liang, Shun; Wang, Li-Ping; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Montone, Kathleen; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin

    2012-05-18

    The RNA-binding protein LIN28A regulates the translation and stability of a large number of mRNAs as well as the biogenesis of certain miRNAs in embryonic stem cells and developing tissues. Increasing evidence indicates that LIN28A functions as an oncogene promoting cancer cell growth. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism of cell cycle regulation in cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we found that strong LIN28A expression was reactivated in about 10% (7.1-17.1%) of epithelial tumors (six tumor types, n = 369). Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that LIN28A promotes cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Genome-wide RNA-IP-chip experiments indicate that LIN28A binds to thousands of mRNAs, including a large group of cell cycle regulatory mRNAs in cancer and embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, the ability of LIN28A to stimulate translation of LIN28A-binding mRNAs, such as CDK2, was validated in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using a combined gene expression microarray and bioinformatics approach, we found that LIN28A also regulates CCND1 and CDC25A expression and that this is mediated by inhibiting the biogenesis of let-7 miRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LIN28A is reactivated in about 10% of epithelial tumors and promotes cell cycle progression by regulation of both mRNA translation (let-7-independent) and miRNA biogenesis (let-7-dependent).

  17. Lin-28 Homologue A (LIN28A) Promotes Cell Cycle Progression via Regulation of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2), Cyclin D1 (CCND1), and Cell Division Cycle 25 Homolog A (CDC25A) Expression in Cancer*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Zhong, Xiaomin; Lin, Xiaojuan; Guo, Jinyi; Zou, Lian; Tanyi, Janos L.; Shao, Zhongjun; Liang, Shun; Wang, Li-Ping; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Montone, Kathleen; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein LIN28A regulates the translation and stability of a large number of mRNAs as well as the biogenesis of certain miRNAs in embryonic stem cells and developing tissues. Increasing evidence indicates that LIN28A functions as an oncogene promoting cancer cell growth. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism of cell cycle regulation in cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we found that strong LIN28A expression was reactivated in about 10% (7.1–17.1%) of epithelial tumors (six tumor types, n = 369). Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that LIN28A promotes cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Genome-wide RNA-IP-chip experiments indicate that LIN28A binds to thousands of mRNAs, including a large group of cell cycle regulatory mRNAs in cancer and embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, the ability of LIN28A to stimulate translation of LIN28A-binding mRNAs, such as CDK2, was validated in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using a combined gene expression microarray and bioinformatics approach, we found that LIN28A also regulates CCND1 and CDC25A expression and that this is mediated by inhibiting the biogenesis of let-7 miRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LIN28A is reactivated in about 10% of epithelial tumors and promotes cell cycle progression by regulation of both mRNA translation (let-7-independent) and miRNA biogenesis (let-7-dependent). PMID:22467868

  18. Modeling Freedom From Progression for Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma: A Mathematical Tumor Control Model With Multiple Modes of Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, N. Patrik, E-mail: nils.patrik.brodin@rh.dk [Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Vogelius, Ivan R. [Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Björk-Eriksson, Thomas [Department of Oncology, Skåne University Hospital and Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Munck af Rosenschöld, Per [Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bentzen, Søren M. [Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: As pediatric medulloblastoma (MB) is a relatively rare disease, it is important to extract the maximum information from trials and cohort studies. Here, a framework was developed for modeling tumor control with multiple modes of failure and time-to-progression for standard-risk MB, using published pattern of failure data. Methods and Materials: Outcome data for standard-risk MB published after 1990 with pattern of relapse information were used to fit a tumor control dose-response model addressing failures in both the high-dose boost volume and the elective craniospinal volume. Estimates of 5-year event-free survival from 2 large randomized MB trials were used to model the time-to-progression distribution. Uncertainty in freedom from progression (FFP) was estimated by Monte Carlo sampling over the statistical uncertainty in input data. Results: The estimated 5-year FFP (95% confidence intervals [CI]) for craniospinal doses of 15, 18, 24, and 36 Gy while maintaining 54 Gy to the posterior fossa was 77% (95% CI, 70%-81%), 78% (95% CI, 73%-81%), 79% (95% CI, 76%-82%), and 80% (95% CI, 77%-84%) respectively. The uncertainty in FFP was considerably larger for craniospinal doses below 18 Gy, reflecting the lack of data in the lower dose range. Conclusions: Estimates of tumor control and time-to-progression for standard-risk MB provides a data-driven setting for hypothesis generation or power calculations for prospective trials, taking the uncertainties into account. The presented methods can also be applied to incorporate further risk-stratification for example based on molecular biomarkers, when the necessary data become available.

  19. [Control of the progress of arteriosclerosis in high risk subjects treated with mesoglycan. Measuring the intima media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurora, G; Cesarone, M R; Belcaro, G; De Sanctis, M T; Pomante, P; Incandela, L; Romandini, S; Dugall, M

    1998-03-01

    Noninvasive ultrasonic biopsy (UB) can be used to classify arteriosclerotic lesions and their progression in the carotid and femoral bifurcation. Also the evaluation of intima-media thickness (IMT) is useful to quantify the progression of early arteriosclerosis. Two randomly selected groups of asymptomatic subjects were included in a 18 month, open study. One group was treated with oral mesoglycan (200 mg/day) and one group was followed-up as control. The two groups were comparable for age and sex distribution. The average UB score was 14.4 +/- 5 in the treatment group and 14.3 +/- 8 in the control group. After 18 months the UB score was 15.7 +/- 4 in the treatment and 16.2 +/- 6 in the control group. The average increase in IMT in 18 months in the treatment group was 0.016 mm equivalent to 0.0106 mm per year. In the control group the average increase was 0.119 equivalent to 0.0793 per year. Therefore the increase in IMT was 7.48 times greater in the control group. These differences were significant (p mesoglycan treatment. These results need to be confirmed by a larger randomised study.

  20. Physics division annual report - October 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K. [ed.

    2000-10-16

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part, defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design.