WorldWideScience

Sample records for controls circadian clockwork

  1. An LHX1-Regulated Transcriptional Network Controls Sleep/Wake Coupling and Thermal Resistance of the Central Circadian Clockworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedont, Joseph L; LeGates, Tara A; Buhr, Ethan; Bathini, Abhijith; Ling, Jonathan P; Bell, Benjamin; Wu, Mark N; Wong, Philip C; Van Gelder, Russell N; Mongrain, Valerie; Hattar, Samer; Blackshaw, Seth

    2017-01-09

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the central circadian clock in mammals. It is entrained by light but resistant to temperature shifts that entrain peripheral clocks [1-5]. The SCN expresses many functionally important neuropeptides, including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), which drives light entrainment, synchrony, and amplitude of SCN cellular clocks and organizes circadian behavior [5-16]. The transcription factor LHX1 drives SCN Vip expression, and cellular desynchrony in Lhx1-deficient SCN largely results from Vip loss [17, 18]. LHX1 regulates many genes other than Vip, yet activity rhythms in Lhx1-deficient mice are similar to Vip -/- mice under light-dark cycles and only somewhat worse in constant conditions. We suspected that LHX1 targets other than Vip have circadian functions overlooked in previous studies. In this study, we compared circadian sleep and temperature rhythms of Lhx1- and Vip-deficient mice and found loss of acute light control of sleep in Lhx1 but not Vip mutants. We also found loss of circadian resistance to fever in Lhx1 but not Vip mice, which was partially recapitulated by heat application to cultured Lhx1-deficient SCN. Having identified VIP-independent functions of LHX1, we mapped the VIP-independent transcriptional network downstream of LHX1 and a largely separable VIP-dependent transcriptional network. The VIP-independent network does not affect core clock amplitude and synchrony, unlike the VIP-dependent network. These studies identify Lhx1 as the first gene required for temperature resistance of the SCN clockworks and demonstrate that acute light control of sleep is routed through the SCN and its immediate output regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of the circadian clockwork in the kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mészáros, Krisztina; Pruess, Linda; Szabó, Attila J.

    2014-01-01

    intervals on embryonic day 20 and at postnatal weeks 1, 4, and 12. Canonical clock gene (Clock, Bmal1, Rev-erbα, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, Per2) and kidney-specific clock-controlled gene (αENaC, SGK1, NHE3, AVPR2) expression was profiled by RT-PCR. To investigate the role of nutritional cues, the feeding pattern...... was modified postpartum. Clock, Rev-erbα, Per2, αENaC, SGK1, NHE3, and AVPR2 showed circadian expression at the end of intrauterine development. By 1 week, all genes oscillated with a distinct acrophase shift toward the time of peak feeding activity. Daily 4-hour withdrawal of mothers induced a 12-hour phase....... During the nursing period, oscillations are entrained by nutritional cues. The coupling of the circadian expression of tubular regulators of fluid and electrolyte excretion to the feeding-entrained clockwork may be important to maintain homeostasis during this critical period....

  3. A functional genomics strategy reveals clockwork orange as a transcriptional regulator in the Drosophila circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akira; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Yamada, Rikuhiro G; Houl, Jerry; Uno, Kenichiro D; Kasukawa, Takeya; Dauwalder, Brigitte; Itoh, Taichi Q; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Ueda, Ryu; Hardin, Paul E; Tanimura, Teiichi; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2007-07-01

    The Drosophila circadian clock consists of integrated autoregulatory feedback loops, making the clock difficult to elucidate without comprehensively identifying the network components in vivo. Previous studies have adopted genome-wide screening for clock-controlled genes using high-density oligonucleotide arrays that identified hundreds of clock-controlled genes. In an attempt to identify the core clock genes among these candidates, we applied genome-wide functional screening using an RNA interference (RNAi) system in vivo. Here we report the identification of novel clock gene candidates including clockwork orange (cwo), a transcriptional repressor belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix ORANGE family. cwo is rhythmically expressed and directly regulated by CLK-CYC through canonical E-box sequences. A genome-wide search for its target genes using the Drosophila genome tiling array revealed that cwo forms its own negative feedback loop and directly suppresses the expression of other clock genes through the E-box sequence. Furthermore, this negative transcriptional feedback loop contributes to sustaining a high-amplitude circadian oscillation in vivo. Based on these results, we propose that the competition between cyclic CLK-CYC activity and the adjustable threshold imposed by CWO keeps E-box-mediated transcription within the controllable range of its activity, thereby rendering a Drosophila circadian clock capable of generating high-amplitude oscillation.

  4. Clockwork orange encodes a transcriptional repressor important for circadian-clock amplitude in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chunghun; Chung, Brian Y; Pitman, Jena L; McGill, Jermaine J; Pradhan, Suraj; Lee, Jongbin; Keegan, Kevin P; Choe, Joonho; Allada, Ravi

    2007-06-19

    Gene transcription is a central timekeeping process in animal clocks. In Drosophila, the basic helix-loop helix (bHLH)-PAS transcription-factor heterodimer, CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC), transcriptionally activates the clock components period (per), timeless (tim), Par domain protein 1 (Pdp1), and vrille (vri), which feed back and regulate distinct features of CLK/CYC function. Microarray studies have identified numerous rhythmically expressed transcripts, some of which are potential direct CLK targets. Here we demonstrate a circadian function for one such target, a bHLH-Orange repressor, CG17100/CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO). cwo is rhythmically expressed, and levels are reduced in Clk mutants, suggesting that cwo is CLK activated in vivo. cwo mutants display reduced-amplitude molecular and behavioral rhythms with lengthened periods. Molecular analysis suggests that CWO acts, in part, by repressing CLK target genes. We propose that CWO acts as a transcriptional and behavioral rhythm amplifier.

  5. clockwork orange encodes a transcriptional repressor important for circadian clock amplitude in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chunghun; Chung, Brian Y.; Pitman, Jena L.; McGill, Jermaine J.; Pradhan, Suraj; Lee, Jongbin; Keegan, Kevin P.; Choe, Joonho; Allada, Ravi

    2007-01-01

    Summary Gene transcription is a central timekeeping process in animal clocks. In Drosophila, the basic helix-loop helix (bHLH)-PAS transcription factor heterodimer, CLOCK (CLK)/CYCLE(CYC) transcriptionally activates the clock components period (per), timeless (tim), Par domain protein 1 (Pdp1), and vrille (vri) that feedback and regulate distinct features of CLK/CYC function [1]. Microarray studies have identified numerous rhythmically expressed transcripts [2-7], some of which are potential direct CLK targets [7]. Here we demonstrate a circadian function for one such target, a bHLH-Orange repressor CG17100/CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO). cwo is rhythmically expressed and levels are reduced in Clk mutants, suggesting that cwo is CLK-activated in vivo. cwo mutants display reduced amplitude molecular and behavioral rhythms with lengthened periods. Molecular analysis suggests CWO acts, in part, by repressing CLK target genes. We propose that CWO acts as a transcriptional and behavioral rhythm amplifier. PMID:17555964

  6. Clockwork Orange is a transcriptional repressor and a new Drosophila circadian pacemaker component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadener, Sebastian; Stoleru, Dan; McDonald, Michael; Nawathean, Pipat; Rosbash, Michael

    2007-07-01

    Many organisms use circadian clocks to keep temporal order and anticipate daily environmental changes. In Drosophila, the master clock gene Clock promotes the transcription of several key target genes. Two of these gene products, PER and TIM, repress CLK-CYC-mediated transcription. To recognize additional direct CLK target genes, we designed a genome-wide approach and identified clockwork orange (cwo) as a new core clock component. cwo encodes a transcriptional repressor that synergizes with PER and inhibits CLK-mediated activation. Consistent with this function, the mRNA profiles of CLK direct target genes in cwo mutant flies manifest high trough values and low amplitude oscillations. Because behavioral rhythmicity fails to persist in constant darkness (DD) with little or no effect on average mRNA levels in flies lacking cwo, transcriptional oscillation amplitude appears to be linked to rhythmicity. Moreover, the mutant flies are long period, consistent with the late repression indicated by the RNA profiles. These findings suggest that CWO acts preferentially in the late night to help terminate CLK-CYC-mediated transcription of direct target genes including cwo itself. The presence of mammalian homologs with circadian expression features (Dec1 and Dec2) suggests that a similar feedback mechanism exists in mammalian clocks.

  7. Woody clockworks: circadian regulation of night-time water use in Eucalyptus globulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resco de Dios, Víctor; Díaz-Sierra, Rubén; Goulden, Michael L; Barton, Craig V M; Boer, Matthias M; Gessler, Arthur; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Pfautsch, Sebastian; Tissue, David T

    2013-11-01

    The role of the circadian clock in controlling the metabolism of entire trees has seldom been considered. We tested whether the clock influences nocturnal whole-tree water use. Whole-tree chambers allowed the control of environmental variables (temperature, relative humidity). Night-time stomatal conductance (gs ) and sap flow (Q) were monitored in 6- to 8-m-tall Eucalyptus globulus trees during nights when environmental variables were kept constant, and also when conditions varied with time. Artificial neural networks were used to quantify the relative importance of circadian regulation of gs and Q. Under a constant environment, gs and Q declined from 0 to 6 h after dusk, but increased from 6 to 12 h after dusk. While the initial decline could be attributed to multiple processes, the subsequent increase is most consistent with circadian regulation of gs and Q. We conclude that endogenous regulation of gs is an important driver of night-time Q under natural environmental variability. The proportion of nocturnal Q variation associated with circadian regulation (23-56%) was comparable to that attributed to vapor pressure deficit variation (25-58%). This study contributes to our understanding of the linkages between molecular and cellular processes related to circadian regulation, and whole-tree processes related to ecosystem gas exchange in the field. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Deleting the Arntl clock gene in the granular layer of the mouse cerebellum: impact on the molecular circadian clockwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, Tenna; Carstensen, Mikkel Bloss; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2017-07-14

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus houses the central circadian clock and is characterized by the timely regulated expression of clock genes. However, neurons of the cerebellar cortex also contain a circadian oscillator with circadian expression of clock genes being controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus. It has been suggested that the cerebellar circadian oscillator is involved in food anticipation, but direct molecular evidence of the role of the circadian oscillator of the cerebellar cortex is currently unavailable. To investigate the hypothesis that the circadian oscillator of the cerebellum is involved in circadian physiology and food anticipation, we therefore by use of Cre-LoxP technology generated a conditional knockout mouse with the core clock gene Arntl deleted specifically in granule cells of the cerebellum, since expression of clock genes in the cerebellar cortex is mainly located in this cell type. We here report that deletion of Arntl heavily influences the molecular clock of the cerebellar cortex with significantly altered and arrhythmic expression of other central clock and clock-controlled genes. On the other hand, daily expression of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus was unaffected. Telemetric registrations in different light regimes did not detect significant differences in circadian rhythms of running activity and body temperature between Arntl conditional knockout mice and controls. Furthermore, food anticipatory behavior did not differ between genotypes. These data suggest that Arntl is an essential part of the cerebellar oscillator; however, the oscillator of the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex does not control traditional circadian parameters or food anticipation. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Clockwork Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Kehagias, Alex

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the recently proposed clockwork mechanism delivering light degrees of freedom with suppressed interactions and show, with various examples, that it can be efficiently implemented in inflationary scenarios to generate flat inflaton potentials and small density perturbations without fine-tunings. We also study the clockwork graviton in de Sitter and, interestingly, we find that the corresponding clockwork charge is site-dependent. As a consequence, the amount of tensor modes is generically suppressed with respect to the standard cases where the clockwork set-up is not adopted. This point can be made a virtue in resurrecting models of inflation which were supposed to be ruled out because of the excessive amount of tensor modes from inflation.

  10. A clockwork theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giudice, Gian F.; McCullough, Matthew [CERN, Theoretical Physics Department,Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-02-07

    The clockwork is a mechanism for generating light particles with exponentially suppressed interactions in theories which contain no small parameters at the fundamental level. We develop a general description of the clockwork mechanism valid for scalars, fermions, gauge bosons, and gravitons. This mechanism can be implemented with a discrete set of new fields or, in its continuum version, through an extra spatial dimension. In both cases the clockwork emerges as a useful tool for model-building applications. Notably, the continuum clockwork offers a solution to the Higgs naturalness problem, which turns out to be the same as in linear dilaton duals of Little String Theory. We also elucidate the similarities and differences of the continuum clockwork with large extra dimensions and warped spaces. All clockwork models, in the discrete and continuum, exhibit novel phenomenology with a distinctive spectrum of closely spaced resonances.

  11. A Clockwork Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Giudice, Gian F.

    2017-02-07

    The clockwork is a mechanism for generating light particles with exponentially suppressed interactions in theories which contain no small parameters at the fundamental level. We develop a general description of the clockwork mechanism valid for scalars, fermions, gauge bosons, and gravitons. This mechanism can be implemented with a discrete set of new fields or, in its continuum version, through an extra spatial dimension. In both cases the clockwork emerges as a useful tool for model-building applications. Notably, the continuum clockwork offers a solution to the Higgs naturalness problem, which turns out to be the same as in linear dilaton duals of Little String Theory. We also elucidate the similarities and differences of the continuum clockwork with large extra dimensions and warped spaces. All clockwork models, in the discrete and continuum, exhibit novel phenomenology with a distinctive spectrum of closely spaced resonances.

  12. Irradiation with X-rays phase-advances the molecular clockwork in liver, adrenal gland and pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mareike Hildegard; Rödel, Franz; Rüb, Udo; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-02-01

    The circadian clock of man and mammals shows a hierarchic organization. The master clock, located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), controls peripheral oscillators distributed throughout the body. Rhythm generation depends on molecular clockworks based on transcriptional/translational interaction of clock genes. Numerous studies have shown that the clockwork in peripheral oscillators is capable to maintain circadian rhythms for several cycles in vitro, i.e. in the absence of signals from the SCN. The aim of the present study is to analyze the effects of irradiation with X-rays on the clockwork of liver, adrenal and pancreas. To this end organotypic slice cultures of liver (OLSC) and organotypic explant cultures of adrenal glands (OAEC) and pancreas (OPEC) were prepared from transgenic mPer2(luc) mice which express luciferase under the control of the promoter of an important clock gene, Per2, and allow to study the dynamics of the molecular clockwork by bioluminometry. The preparations were cultured in a membrane-based liquid-air interface culturing system and irradiated with X-rays at doses of 10 Gy and 50 Gy or left untreated. Bioluminometric real-time recordings show a stable oscillation of all OLSC, OAEC and OPEC for up to 12 days in vitro. Oscillations persist after irradiation with X-rays. However, a dose of 50 Gy caused a phase advance in the rhythm of the OLSC by 5 h, in the OPEC by 7 h and in the OAEC by 6 h. Our study shows that X-rays affect the molecular clockwork in liver, pancreas and adrenal leading to phase advances. Our results confirm and extend previous studies showing a phase-advancing effect of X-rays at the level of the whole animal and single cells.

  13. Dynamics of the Drosophila circadian clock: theoretical anti-jitter network and controlled chaos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan M Fathallah-Shaykh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Electronic clocks exhibit undesirable jitter or time variations in periodic signals. The circadian clocks of humans, some animals, and plants consist of oscillating molecular networks with peak-to-peak time of approximately 24 hours. Clockwork orange (CWO is a transcriptional repressor of Drosophila direct target genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Theory and data from a model of the Drosophila circadian clock support the idea that CWO controls anti-jitter negative circuits that stabilize peak-to-peak time in light-dark cycles (LD. The orbit is confined to chaotic attractors in both LD and dark cycles and is almost periodic in LD; furthermore, CWO diminishes the Euclidean dimension of the chaotic attractor in LD. Light resets the clock each day by restricting each molecular peak to the proximity of a prescribed time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The theoretical results suggest that chaos plays a central role in the dynamics of the Drosophila circadian clock and that a single molecule, CWO, may sense jitter and repress it by its negative loops.

  14. Dynamics of the Drosophila circadian clock: theoretical anti-jitter network and controlled chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan M

    2010-10-13

    Electronic clocks exhibit undesirable jitter or time variations in periodic signals. The circadian clocks of humans, some animals, and plants consist of oscillating molecular networks with peak-to-peak time of approximately 24 hours. Clockwork orange (CWO) is a transcriptional repressor of Drosophila direct target genes. Theory and data from a model of the Drosophila circadian clock support the idea that CWO controls anti-jitter negative circuits that stabilize peak-to-peak time in light-dark cycles (LD). The orbit is confined to chaotic attractors in both LD and dark cycles and is almost periodic in LD; furthermore, CWO diminishes the Euclidean dimension of the chaotic attractor in LD. Light resets the clock each day by restricting each molecular peak to the proximity of a prescribed time. The theoretical results suggest that chaos plays a central role in the dynamics of the Drosophila circadian clock and that a single molecule, CWO, may sense jitter and repress it by its negative loops.

  15. Clockwork game design

    CERN Document Server

    Burgun, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Only by finding and focusing on a core mechanism can you further your pursuit of elegance in strategy game design.Clockwork Game Design is the most functional and directly applicable theory for game design. It details the clockwork game design pattern, which focuses on building around fundamental functionality. You can then use this understanding to prescribe a system for building and refining your rulesets. A game can achieve clarity of purpose by starting with a strong core, then removing elements that conflict with that core while adding elements that support it.Filled with examples and exe

  16. The Apollonian Clockwork

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriessen, Louis; Schonberger, Elmer

    2006-01-01

    'I think my music deserves to be considered as a whole', Igor Stravinsky remarked at the end of a long and restless career, and that is exactly what the authors of The Apollonian Clockwork do. In 1982, convinced that there is no essential difference between 'early' and 'late' Stravinsky, Louis

  17. Rethinking the Clockwork of Work: Why Schedule Control May Pay Off at Work and at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Erin L; Moen, Phyllis

    2007-11-01

    Many employees face work-life conflicts and time deficits that negatively affect their health, well-being, effectiveness on the job, and organizational commitment. Many organizations have adopted flexible work arrangements but not all of them increase schedule control, that is, employees' control over when, where, and how much they work. This article describes some limitations of flexible work policies, proposes a conceptual model of how schedule control impacts work-life conflicts, and describes specific ways to increase employees' schedule control, including best practices for implementing common flexible work policies and Best Buy's innovative approach to creating a culture of schedule control.

  18. The molecular clockwork of the fire ant Solenopsis invicta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Krista K; Kutowoi, Alexander; Wurm, Yannick; Shoemaker, Dewayne; Meier, Rudolf; Bloch, Guy

    2012-01-01

    The circadian clock is a core molecular mechanism that allows organisms to anticipate daily environmental changes and adapt the timing of behaviors to maximize efficiency. In social insects, the ability to maintain the appropriate temporal order is thought to improve colony efficiency and fitness. We used the newly sequenced fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) genome to characterize the first ant circadian clock. Our results reveal that the fire ant clock is similar to the clock of the honeybee, a social insect with an independent evolutionary origin of sociality. Gene trees for the eight core clock genes, period, cycle, clock, cryptochrome-m, timeout, vrille, par domain protein 1 & clockwork orange, show ant species grouping closely with honeybees and Nasonia wasps as an outgroup to the social Hymenoptera. Expression patterns for these genes suggest that the ant clock functions similar to the honeybee clock, with period and cry-m mRNA levels increasing during the night and cycle and clockwork orange mRNAs cycling approximately anti-phase to period. Gene models for five of these genes also parallel honeybee models. In particular, the single ant cryptochrome is an ortholog of the mammalian-type (cry-m), rather than Drosophila-like protein (cry-d). Additionally, we find a conserved VPIFAL C-tail region in clockwork orange shared by insects but absent in vertebrates. Overall, our characterization of the ant clock demonstrates that two social insect lineages, ants and bees, share a similar, mammalian-like circadian clock. This study represents the first characterization of clock genes in an ant and is a key step towards understanding socially-regulated plasticity in circadian rhythms by facilitating comparative studies on the organization of circadian clockwork.

  19. The molecular clockwork of the fire ant Solenopsis invicta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista K Ingram

    Full Text Available The circadian clock is a core molecular mechanism that allows organisms to anticipate daily environmental changes and adapt the timing of behaviors to maximize efficiency. In social insects, the ability to maintain the appropriate temporal order is thought to improve colony efficiency and fitness. We used the newly sequenced fire ant (Solenopsis invicta genome to characterize the first ant circadian clock. Our results reveal that the fire ant clock is similar to the clock of the honeybee, a social insect with an independent evolutionary origin of sociality. Gene trees for the eight core clock genes, period, cycle, clock, cryptochrome-m, timeout, vrille, par domain protein 1 & clockwork orange, show ant species grouping closely with honeybees and Nasonia wasps as an outgroup to the social Hymenoptera. Expression patterns for these genes suggest that the ant clock functions similar to the honeybee clock, with period and cry-m mRNA levels increasing during the night and cycle and clockwork orange mRNAs cycling approximately anti-phase to period. Gene models for five of these genes also parallel honeybee models. In particular, the single ant cryptochrome is an ortholog of the mammalian-type (cry-m, rather than Drosophila-like protein (cry-d. Additionally, we find a conserved VPIFAL C-tail region in clockwork orange shared by insects but absent in vertebrates. Overall, our characterization of the ant clock demonstrates that two social insect lineages, ants and bees, share a similar, mammalian-like circadian clock. This study represents the first characterization of clock genes in an ant and is a key step towards understanding socially-regulated plasticity in circadian rhythms by facilitating comparative studies on the organization of circadian clockwork.

  20. Central Circadian Control of Female Reproductive Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke H Miller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, it has become clear just how much of our physiology is under the control of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and the cell-intrinsic molecular clock that ticks with a periodicity of approximately 24 hours. The SCN prepares our digestive system for meals, our adrenal axis for the stress of waking up in the morning, and the genes expressed in our muscles when we prepare to exercise, Long before molecular studies of genes such as Clock, Bmal1, and the Per homologs were possible, it was obvious that female reproductive function was under strict circadian control at every level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis, and in the establishment and successful maintenance of pregnancy. This review highlights our current understanding of the role that the SCN plays in regulating female reproductive physiology, with a special emphasis on the advances made possible through the use of circadian mutant mice.

  1. The Circadian Clock-controlled Transcriptome of Developing Soybean Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Hudson

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A number of metabolic and physiological processes in plants are controlled by the circadian clock, which enables a plant to anticipate daily changes in the environment. Relatively little is known about circadian rhythms in developing seeds, which may be important for determining the extent and timing of nutrient storage in grain. Microarray expression profiling was used to identify genes expressed in developing soybean ( seeds that are controlled by the circadian clock. Genes with predicted functions in protein synthesis, fatty acid metabolism, and photosynthesis totaling 1.8% of the mRNAs detected in seed were found to be expressed in a circadian rhythm. Known circadian and light-controlled promoter elements were identified as over-represented in the promoters of clock-controlled seed genes, with the over-represented elements varying according to the phase of circadian expression. A subset of circadian-regulated genes were found to be expressed in different phases in developing seeds with respect to leaves from the same plants, many of which have roles in photosynthesis and carbon metabolism. These results help to characterize the genes and processes in seeds that may be regulated by the circadian clock, and provide some insight into organ-specific phasing of clock controlled gene expression.

  2. Identification of a novel circadian clock modulator controlling BMAL1 expression through a ROR/REV-ERB-response element-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyeon; Lee, Seungbeom; Chung, Sooyoung; Park, Noheon; Son, Gi Hoon; An, Hongchan; Jang, Jaebong; Chang, Dong-Jo; Suh, Young-Ger; Kim, Kyungjin

    2016-01-15

    Circadian rhythms, biological oscillations with a period of about 24 h, are maintained by an innate genetically determined time-keeping system called the molecular circadian clockwork. Despite the physiological and clinical importance of the circadian clock, development of small molecule modulators targeting the core clock machinery has only recently been initiated. BMAL1, a core clock gene, is controlled by a ROR/REV-ERB-response element (RORE)-dependent mechanism, which plays an important role in stabilizing the period of the molecular circadian clock. Therefore, we aimed to identify a novel small molecule modulator that regulates Bmal1 gene expression in RORE-dependency, thereby influencing the molecular feedback loop of the circadian clock. For this purpose, we carried out a cell-based screen of more than 1000 drug-like compounds, using a luciferase reporter driven by the proximal region of the mouse Bmal1 promoter. One compound, designated KK-S6, repressed the RORE-dependent transcriptional activity of the mBmal1 promoter and reduced endogenous BMAL1 protein expression. More importantly, KK-S6 significantly altered the amplitude of circadian oscillations of Bmal1 and Per2 promoter activities in a dose-dependent manner, but barely affected the period length. KK-S6 effectively decreased mRNA expression of metabolic genes acting downstream of REV-ERBα, Pai-1 and Citrate synthase, that contain RORE cis-element in their promoter. KK-S6 likely acts in a RORE-dependent manner by reinforcing the REV-ERBα activity, though not by the same mechanism as known REV-ERB agonists. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that KK-S6 functions as a novel modulator of the amplitude of molecular circadian rhythms by influencing RORE-mediated BMAL1 expression. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clockwork mechanism for flavor hierarchies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ketan M.

    2017-12-01

    We incorporate a clockwork mechanism into the standard model flavor sector and show that the observed pattern of fermion masses and mixing can be obtained without any unnaturally small or large parameter in the fundamental theory. By introducing Nf pairs of vectorlike fermions, as clockwork gears, for each generation of the standard model fermions and setting up a characteristic clockwork potential, it is shown that the intergenerational mass hierarchies are determined by Nf. For a given type of fermions, strong or mild hierarchy in the masses and mixing parameters can be obtained by taking the large or small value of Nf. The mechanism is shown to lead to a generalized version of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism as an effective description.

  4. An epithelial circadian clock controls pulmonary inflammation and glucocorticoid action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Julie; Ince, Louise; Matthews, Laura; Mei, Junjie; Bell, Thomas; Yang, Nan; Saer, Ben; Begley, Nicola; Poolman, Toryn; Pariollaud, Marie; Farrow, Stuart; DeMayo, Francesco; Hussell, Tracy; Worthen, G Scott; Ray, David; Loudon, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    The circadian system is an important regulator of immune function. Human inflammatory lung diseases frequently show time-of-day variation in symptom severity and lung function, but the mechanisms and cell types underlying these effects remain unclear. We show that pulmonary antibacterial responses are modulated by a circadian clock within epithelial club (Clara) cells. These drive circadian neutrophil recruitment to the lung via the chemokine CXCL5. Genetic ablation of the clock gene Bmal1 (also called Arntl or MOP3) in bronchiolar cells disrupts rhythmic Cxcl5 expression, resulting in exaggerated inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide and an impaired host response to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Adrenalectomy blocks rhythmic inflammatory responses and the circadian regulation of CXCL5, suggesting a key role for the adrenal axis in driving CXCL5 expression and pulmonary neutrophil recruitment. Glucocorticoid receptor occupancy at the Cxcl5 locus shows circadian oscillations, but this is disrupted in mice with bronchiole-specific ablation of Bmal1, leading to enhanced CXCL5 expression despite normal corticosteroid secretion. The therapeutic effects of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone depend on intact clock function in the airway. We now define a regulatory mechanism that links the circadian clock and glucocorticoid hormones to control both time-of-day variation and the magnitude of pulmonary inflammation and responses to bacterial infection.

  5. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... As an experimental model system, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been seminal in shaping our understanding of the circadian clockwork. The wealth of genetic tools at our disposal over the past four decades has enabled discovery of the genetic and molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity.

  6. Circadian control of the sleep-wake cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, Domien G. M.; Gordijn, Marijke C. M.

    2007-01-01

    It is beyond doubt that the timing of sleep is under control of the circadian pacemaker. Humans are a diurnal species; they sleep mostly at night, and they do so at approximately 24-h intervals. If they do not adhere to this general pattern, for instance when working night shifts or when travelling

  7. Gauged U(1) clockwork theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Min

    2018-03-01

    We consider the gauged U (1) clockwork theory with a product of multiple gauge groups and discuss the continuum limit of the theory to a massless gauged U (1) with linear dilaton background in five dimensions. The localization of the lightest state of gauge fields on a site in the theory space naturally leads to exponentially small effective couplings of external matter fields localized away from the site. We discuss the implications of our general discussion with some examples, such as mediators of dark matter interactions, flavor-changing B-meson decays as well as D-term SUSY breaking.

  8. The role of the circadian system in fractal neurophysiological control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman-Polletta, Benjamin R; Scheer, Frank A J L; Butler, Matthew P; Shea, Steven A; Hu, Kun

    2013-11-01

    Many neurophysiological variables such as heart rate, motor activity, and neural activity are known to exhibit intrinsic fractal fluctuations - similar temporal fluctuation patterns at different time scales. These fractal patterns contain information about health, as many pathological conditions are accompanied by their alteration or absence. In physical systems, such fluctuations are characteristic of critical states on the border between randomness and order, frequently arising from nonlinear feedback interactions between mechanisms operating on multiple scales. Thus, the existence of fractal fluctuations in physiology challenges traditional conceptions of health and disease, suggesting that high levels of integrity and adaptability are marked by complex variability, not constancy, and are properties of a neurophysiological network, not individual components. Despite the subject's theoretical and clinical interest, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying fractal regulation remain largely unknown. The recent discovery that the circadian pacemaker (suprachiasmatic nucleus) plays a crucial role in generating fractal patterns in motor activity and heart rate sheds an entirely new light on both fractal control networks and the function of this master circadian clock, and builds a bridge between the fields of circadian biology and fractal physiology. In this review, we sketch the emerging picture of the developing interdisciplinary field of fractal neurophysiology by examining the circadian system's role in fractal regulation. © 2013 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2013 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  9. Clockwork graviton contributions to muon g -2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Deog Ki; Kim, Du Hwan; Shin, Chang Sub

    2018-02-01

    The clockwork mechanism for gravity introduces a tower of massive graviton modes, clockwork gravitons, with a very compressed mass spectrum, whose interaction strengths are much stronger than those of massless gravitons. In this work, we compute the lowest order contributions of the clockwork gravitons to the anomalous magnetic moment, g -2 , of muon in the context of an extra dimensional model with a five-dimensional Planck mass, M5. We find that the total contributions are rather insensitive to the detailed model parameters and are determined mostly by the value of M5. To account for the current muon g -2 anomaly, M5 should be around 0.2 TeV, and the size of the extra dimension has to be quite large, l5≳10-7 m . For M5≳1 TeV , the clockwork graviton contributions are too small to explain the current muon g -2 anomaly. We also compare the clockwork graviton contributions with other extra dimensional models such as Randall-Sundrum models or large extra dimensional models. We find that the leading contributions in the small curvature limit are universal, but the cutoff-independent subleading contributions vary for different background geometries and the clockwork geometry gives the smallest subleading contributions.

  10. Antimatter, clockwork orange, laser divestment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, John F.

    2005-06-01

    In 1972 Ente Nazionale Idrocarburi sponsored a program to holographically record the images of Venetian sculptural treasures for archival purposes. At Laboratorio San Gregorio, where the initial holography took place, G. Musumeci and K. Hempel suggested an experiment to determine whether the concentrated beam from the ruby holographic laser could ablate black-patina crusts from decaying marble. Initial success of a laser-divestment test on a Palazzo Ducale capital launched a search for funding to enable a full-scale laser-conservation demonstration. Later, at a Caltech reunion one of the author's physics professors (Carl Anderson, the discoverer of mu mesons and the positron), noting the prominence of the Venice Film Festival suggested our approaching the motion picture industry. Many years earlier Anderson's Caltech classmate, Frank Capra, had supported the research that led to the discovery of cosmic-ray-generated antimatter on Pikes Peak. (After Caltech, Capra had become a director at Columbia Studios.) Anderson's chance comment led to an introduction to producer Jack Warner at a festival screening of his "A Clockwork Orange" in Asolo. He and his friends contributed US$5000 toward the laser conservation of a marble relief of "The Last Supper" in the Porta della Carta of Venice. This work was conducted in 1980 under the direction of Arch. G. Calcagno. In 1981 it was found that the granite veneer or the newly completed Warner Center Tower had been stained during transit from the quarry. The Venice laser successfully restored the veneer, thereby returning the Warner Brothers' favor.

  11. CULLIN-3 controls TIMELESS oscillations in the Drosophila circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Grima

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic circadian clocks rely on transcriptional feedback loops. In Drosophila, the PERIOD (PER and TIMELESS (TIM proteins accumulate during the night, inhibit the activity of the CLOCK (CLK/CYCLE (CYC transcriptional complex, and are degraded in the early morning. The control of PER and TIM oscillations largely depends on post-translational mechanisms. They involve both light-dependent and light-independent pathways that rely on the phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and proteasomal degradation of the clock proteins. SLMB, which is part of a CULLIN-1-based E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, is required for the circadian degradation of phosphorylated PER. We show here that CULLIN-3 (CUL-3 is required for the circadian control of PER and TIM oscillations. Expression of either Cul-3 RNAi or dominant negative forms of CUL-3 in the clock neurons alters locomotor behavior and dampens PER and TIM oscillations in light-dark cycles. In constant conditions, CUL-3 deregulation induces behavioral arrhythmicity and rapidly abolishes TIM cycling, with slower effects on PER. CUL-3 affects TIM accumulation more strongly in the absence of PER and forms protein complexes with hypo-phosphorylated TIM. In contrast, SLMB affects TIM more strongly in the presence of PER and preferentially associates with phosphorylated TIM. CUL-3 and SLMB show additive effects on TIM and PER, suggesting different roles for the two ubiquitination complexes on PER and TIM cycling. This work thus shows that CUL-3 is a new component of the Drosophila clock, which plays an important role in the control of TIM oscillations.

  12. Pacemaker-neuron–dependent disturbance of the molecular clockwork by a Drosophila CLOCK mutant homologous to the mouse Clock mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Euna; Cho, Eunjoo; Kang, Doo Hyun; Jeong, Eun Hee; Chen, Zheng; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks are composed of transcriptional/translational feedback loops (TTFLs) at the cellular level. In Drosophila TTFLs, the transcription factor dCLOCK (dCLK)/CYCLE (CYC) activates clock target gene expression, which is repressed by the physical interaction with PERIOD (PER). Here, we show that amino acids (AA) 657–707 of dCLK, a region that is homologous to the mouse Clock exon 19-encoded region, is crucial for PER binding and E-box–dependent transactivation in S2 cells. Consistently, in transgenic flies expressing dCLK with an AA657–707 deletion in the Clock (Clkout) genetic background (p{dClk-Δ};Clkout), oscillation of core clock genes’ mRNAs displayed diminished amplitude compared with control flies, and the highly abundant dCLKΔ657–707 showed significantly decreased binding to PER. Behaviorally, the p{dClk-Δ};Clkout flies exhibited arrhythmic locomotor behavior in the photic entrainment condition but showed anticipatory activities of temperature transition and improved free-running rhythms in the temperature entrainment condition. Surprisingly, p{dClk-Δ};Clkout flies showed pacemaker-neuron–dependent alterations in molecular rhythms; the abundance of dCLK target clock proteins was reduced in ventral lateral neurons (LNvs) but not in dorsal neurons (DNs) in both entrainment conditions. In p{dClk-Δ};Clkout flies, however, strong but delayed molecular oscillations in temperature cycle-sensitive pacemaker neurons, such as DN1s and DN2s, were correlated with delayed anticipatory activities of temperature transition. Taken together, our study reveals that the LNv molecular clockwork is more sensitive than the clockwork of DNs to dysregulation of dCLK by AA657–707 deletion. Therefore, we propose that the dCLK/CYC-controlled TTFL operates differently in subsets of pacemaker neurons, which may contribute to their specific functions. PMID:27489346

  13. "Clockwork": Philip Pullman's Posthuman Fairy Tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Richard

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the connections between posthumanism and narrative form in Philip Pullman's "Clockwork." Beginning with an account of Pullman's materialism, it argues that the novel represents consciousness and agency as emergent properties of matter, a position that manifests itself first in the tale's figurative language and later in the…

  14. Control of Circadian Behavior by Transplanted Suprachiasmatic Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-02

    Ihara NL (in press) The tau mutation destabilizes the circadian system of golden hamste,’s Fifth Sapporo Symposium on Biological Rhythms Hokkaido...Shimomura K and Ihara NL (in press) The tau mutation destabilizes the circadian system of golden hamsters Fifth Sapporo Symposium oh Biological Rhythms...Switzerland, April 5 University of Pisa, Dipartimento di Scienze del Comportamento Animale e dell’Uomo, invited lecture: "Circadian Organization in the

  15. Circadian clock genes universally control key agricultural traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circadian clocks are endogenous timers that enable plants to synchronize biological processes with daily and seasonal environmental conditions in order to allocate resources during the most beneficial times of day and year. The circadian clock regulates a number of central plant activities, includin...

  16. Central control of circadian phase in arousal-promoting neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie E Mahoney

    Full Text Available Cells of the dorsomedial/lateral hypothalamus (DMH/LH that produce hypocretin (HCRT promote arousal in part by activation of cells of the locus coeruleus (LC which express tyrosine hydroxylase (TH. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN drives endogenous daily rhythms, including those of sleep and wakefulness. These circadian oscillations are generated by a transcriptional-translational feedback loop in which the Period (Per genes constitute critical components. This cell-autonomous molecular clock operates not only within the SCN but also in neurons of other brain regions. However, the phenotype of such neurons and the nature of the phase controlling signal from the pacemaker are largely unknown. We used dual fluorescent in situ hybridization to assess clock function in vasopressin, HCRT and TH cells of the SCN, DMH/LH and LC, respectively, of male Syrian hamsters. In the first experiment, we found that Per1 expression in HCRT and TH oscillated in animals held in constant darkness with a peak phase that lagged that in AVP cells of the SCN by several hours. In the second experiment, hamsters induced to split their locomotor rhythms by exposure to constant light had asymmetric Per1 expression within cells of the middle SCN at 6 h before activity onset (AO and in HCRT cells 9 h before and at AO. We did not observe evidence of lateralization of Per1 expression in the LC. We conclude that the SCN communicates circadian phase to HCRT cells via lateralized neural projections, and suggests that Per1 expression in the LC may be regulated by signals of a global or bilateral nature.

  17. The 360 Degree Fulldome Production "Clockwork Ocean"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baschek, B.; Heinsohn, R.; Opitz, D.; Fischer, T.; Baschek, T.

    2016-02-01

    The investigation of submesoscale eddies and fronts is one of the leading oceanographic topics at the Ocean Sciences Meeting 2016. In order to observe these small and short-lived phenomena, planes equipped with high-resolution cameras and fast vessels were deployed during the Submesoscale Experiments (SubEx) leading to some of the first high-resolution observations of these eddies. In a future experiment, a zeppelin will be used the first time in marine sciences. The relevance of submesoscale processes for the oceans and the work of the eddy hunters is described in the fascinating 9-minute long 360 degree fulldome production Clockwork Ocean. The fully animated movie is introduced in this presentation taking the observer from the bioluminescence in the deep ocean to a view of our blue planet from space. The immersive media is used to combine fascination for a yet unknown environment with scientific education of a broad audience. Detailed background information is available at the parallax website www.clockwork-ocean.com. The Film is also available for Virtual Reality glasses and smartphones to reach a broader distribution. A unique Mobile Dome with an area of 70 m² and seats for 40 people is used for science education at events, festivals, for politicians and school classes. The spectators are also invited to participate in the experiments by presenting 360 degree footage of the measurements. The premiere of Clockwork Ocean was in July 2015 in Hamburg, Germany and will be worldwide available in English and German as of fall 2015. Clockwork Ocean is a film of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht produced by Daniel Opitz and Ralph Heinsohn.

  18. Circadian oscillations of molecular clock components in the cerebellar cortex of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten

    2012-01-01

    The central circadian clock of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. At the molecular level, the circadian clockwork of the SCN constitutes a self-sustained autoregulatory feedback mechanism reflected by the rhythmic expression of clock genes. However......, recent studies have shown the presence of extrahypothalamic oscillators in other areas of the brain including the cerebellum. In the present study, the authors unravel the cerebellar molecular clock by analyzing clock gene expression in the cerebellum of the rat by use of radiochemical in situ...... hybridization and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The authors here show that all core clock genes, i.e., Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Clock, Arntl, and Nr1d1, as well as the clock-controlled gene Dbp, are expressed in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of the cerebellar cortex. Among...

  19. The Clock Gene Rev-Erbα Regulates Methamphetamine Actions on Circadian Timekeeping in the Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaberry, Nora L; Mateo, Maria; Mendoza, Jorge

    2017-09-01

    Circadian rhythms are strongly affected by drugs. In rodents, chronic methamphetamine (METH) intake changes circadian activity rhythms, mainly by altering light synchronization that generates the expression of a free-running rhythm with a period longer than 24 h and a second behavioral component that is independent of the main suprachiasmatic (SCN) clock. Although a number of clock genes do not appear to be involved in the effects of METH on circadian behavior, the molecular clockwork controlling these changes is still unclear. Therefore, we investigated the role of the clock gene Rev-Erbα in METH-induced behavioral and molecular responses using knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. Chronic intake of METH alters period circadian behavior of wild-type mice. However, in mice lacking the clock gene Rev-Erbα METH had no effect on their behavioral rhythms. Furthermore, PER2 bioluminescence rhythms in two extra-SCN brain oscillators, the dorsomedial hypothalamus and the habenula, were altered by METH in wild type but not in KO mice. Together, the present results implicate Rev-Erbα in the modulation of the circadian responses to METH and may provide a better comprehension into the mechanisms underlying circadian alterations provoked by drug addiction.

  20. Dietary iron controls circadian hepatic glucose metabolism through heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcox, Judith A; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-Hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu; McClain, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  1. The circadian clock in immune cells controls the magnitude of Leishmania parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, Silke; Dubeau-Laramée, Geneviève; Ohm, Hyejee; Labrecque, Nathalie; Olivier, Martin; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2017-09-07

    The intracellular parasite Leishmania uses neutrophils and macrophages as host cells upon infection. These immune cells harbour their own intrinsic circadian clocks, known to influence many aspects of their functions. Therefore, we tested whether the host circadian clocks regulate the magnitude of Leishmania major infection in mice. The extent of parasitic infection varied over 24 h in bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro and in two different in vivo models, footpad and peritoneal cavity infection. In vivo this was paralleled by time of day-dependent neutrophil and macrophage infiltration to the infection site and rhythmic chemokine expression. Thus, rhythmic parasitic infection observed in vivo was likely initiated by the circadian expression of chemoattractants and the subsequent rhythmic infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages. Importantly, all rhythms were abolished in clock-deficient macrophages and when mice lacking the circadian clock in immune cells were infected. Therefore we demonstrated a critical role for the circadian clocks in immune cells in modulating the magnitude of Leishmania infection. To our knowledge this is the first report showing that the circadian clock controls infection by protozoan parasites in mammals. Understanding the timed regulation of host-parasite interactions will allow developing better prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to fight off vector-borne diseases.

  2. The flavo-enzyme xanthine oxidase is under circadian control in the marine alga Gonyaulax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tzu-Shing; Roenneberg, Till

    2002-02-01

    The activity of xanthine oxidoreductases (xanthine oxidase, XO, EC 1.2.3.2 and xanthine dehydrogenase, XDH, EC 1.1.1.204) in partially purified extracts of Gonyaulax polyedra was measured over 24 h both in a light:dark cycle and in constant light. This is the first demonstration of xanthine oxidoreductase in a unicellular alga. The activity of the O2-dependent form (XO) was found to be 15 times higher in light than in darkness. The same time-of-day specific differences persisted in constant light, demonstrating a control of XO by the circadian clock. In contrast, the activity of the NAD-dependent form (XDH) is not under circadian control. Because pharmacological inhibition of XO also blocks the effect of blue light on the Gonyaulax circadian clock, the possible relationship between XO and light reception in this unicellular alga will be discussed.

  3. Circadian blood pressure patterns and blood pressure control in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Daniele, Nicola; Fegatelli, Danilo Alunni; Rovella, Valentina; Castagnola, Veronica; Gabriele, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo

    2017-12-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), and CKD progression is associated with suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control. Here we evaluate the impact of CKD on the attainment of BP control and the circadian BP profile in older subjects. In this observational study, we studied 547 patients referred to the hypertension clinic, of whom 224 (40.9%) had CKD. Blood pressure (BP) control and circadian BP patterns were evaluated by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Circadian BP variability was measured as the within-subject SD of BP, the percentage of measurements exceeding normal values, hypotension, and dipping status. The attainment of adequate BP control was similar in subjects with or without CKD (around 31%). Logistic regression analysis indicated that CKD was not a determinant of adequate BP control (OR 1.004; 95% CI 0.989-1.019; p = 0.58). Patients with CKD presented as twice as higher prevalence of reverse dipper (night-time peak) for systolic BP and episodes of hypotension during daytime, independently of BP control. Knowledge of the circadian pattern of BP in hypertensive subjects with CKD could inform better than attainment of BP target about risky condition for CKD progression and cognitive decline and allow a more personalized antihypertensive treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Microarray analysis of natural socially regulated plasticity in circadian rhythms of honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Southey, Bruce R; Shemesh, Yair; Rubin, Elad B; Cohen, Mira; Robinson, Gene E; Bloch, Guy

    2012-02-01

    Honey bee workers care for ("nurse") the brood around the clock without circadian rhythmicity, but then they forage outside with strong circadian rhythms and a consolidated nightly rest. This chronobiological plasticity is associated with variation in the expression of the canonical "clock genes" that regulate the circadian clock: nurse bees show no brain rhythms of expression, while foragers do. These results suggest that the circadian system is organized differently in nurses and foragers. Nurses switch to activity with circadian rhythms shortly after being removed from the hive, suggesting that at least some clock cells in their brain continue to measure time while in the hive. We performed a microarray genome-wide survey to determine general patterns of brain gene expression in nurses and foragers sampled around the clock. We found 160 and 541 transcripts that exhibited significant sinusoidal oscillations in nurses and foragers, respectively, with peaks of expression distributed throughout the day in both task groups. Consistent with earlier studies, transcripts of genes involved in circadian rhythms, including Clockwork Orange that has not been studied before in bees, oscillated in foragers but not in nurses. The oscillating transcripts also were enriched for genes involved in the visual system, "development" and "response to stimuli" (foragers), "muscle contraction" and "microfilament motor gene expression" (nurses), and "generation of precursor metabolites" and "energy" (both). Transcripts of genes encoding P450 enzymes oscillated in both nurses and foragers but with a different phase. This study identified new putative clock-controlled genes in the honey bee and suggests that some brain functions show circadian rhythmicity even in nurse bees that are active around the clock.

  5. Microarray Analysis of Natural Socially-Regulated Plasticity in Circadian Rhythms of Honey Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; Southey, Bruce R.; Shemesh, Yair; Rubin, Elad B.; Cohen, Mira; Robinson, Gene E.; Bloch, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Honey bee workers care for ("nurse") the brood around the clock without circadian rhythmicity, but then they forage outside with strong circadian rhythms and a consolidated nightly rest. This chronobiological plasticity is associated with variation in the expression of the canonical “clock genes” that regulate the circadian clock: nurse bees show no brain rhythms of expression, while foragers do. These results suggest that the circadian system is organized differently in nurses and foragers. Nurses switch to activity with circadian rhythms shortly after removed from the hive suggesting that at least some clock cells in their brain continue to measure time while in the hive. We performed a microarray genome-wide survey to determine general patterns of brain gene expression in nurses and foragers sampled around the clock. We found 160 and 541 transcripts that exhibited significant sinusoidal oscillations in nurses and foragers, respectively, with peaks of expression distributed throughout the day in both task groups. Consistent with earlier studies, transcripts of genes involved in circadian rhythms, including Clockwork Orange that has not been studied before in bees, oscillated in foragers but not in nurses. The oscillating transcripts also were enriched for genes involved in the visual system, “development” and “response to stimuli” (foragers), “muscle contraction” and “microfilament motor gene expression” (nurses), and “generation of precursor metabolites” and “energy” (both). Transcripts of genes encoding P450 enzymes oscillated in both nurses and foragers but with a different phase. This study identified new putative clock-controlled genes in the honey bee and suggests that some brain functions show circadian rhythmicity even in nurse bees that are active around the clock. PMID:22306970

  6. Circadian control of dendrite morphology in the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Weber

    Full Text Available In the first optic neuropil (lamina of the fly's visual system, monopolar cells L1 and L2 and glia show circadian rhythms in morphological plasticity. They change their size and shape during the day and night. The most pronounced changes have been detected in circadian size of the L2 axons. Looking for a functional significance of the circadian plasticity observed in axons, we examined the morphological plasticity of the L2 dendrites. They extend from axons and harbor postsynaptic sites of tetrad synaptic contacts from the photoreceptor terminals.The plasticity of L2 dendrites was evaluated by measuring an outline of the L2 dendritic trees. These were from confocal images of cross sections of L2 cells labeled with GFP. They were in wild-type and clock mutant flies held under different light conditions and sacrified at different time points. We found that the L2 dendrites are longest at the beginning of the day in both males and females. This rhythm observed under a day/night regime (LD was maintained in constant darkness (DD but not in continuous light (LL. This rhythm was not present in the arrhythmic per(01 mutant in LD or in DD. In the clock photoreceptor cry(b mutant the rhythm was maintained but its pattern was different than that observed in wild-type flies.The results obtained showed that the L2 dendrites exhibit circadian structural plasticity. Their morphology is controlled by the per gene-dependent circadian clock. The L2 dendrites are longest at the beginning of the day when the daytime tetrad presynaptic sites are most numerous and L2 axons are swollen. The presence of the rhythm, but with a different pattern in cry(b mutants in LD and DD indicates a new role of cry in the visual system. The new role is in maintaining the circadian pattern of changes of the L2 dendrite length and shape.

  7. CLOCKWORK ORANGE Enhances PERIOD Mediated Rhythms in Transcriptional Repression by Antagonizing E-box Binding by CLOCK-CYCLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Yu, Wangjie; Hardin, Paul E

    2016-11-01

    The Drosophila circadian oscillator controls daily rhythms in physiology, metabolism and behavior via transcriptional feedback loops. CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) heterodimers initiate feedback loop function by binding E-box elements to activate per and tim transcription. PER-TIM heterodimers then accumulate, bind CLK-CYC to inhibit transcription, and are ultimately degraded to enable the next round of transcription. The timing of transcriptional events in this feedback loop coincide with, and are controlled by, rhythms in CLK-CYC binding to E-boxes. PER rhythmically binds CLK-CYC to initiate transcriptional repression, and subsequently promotes the removal of CLK-CYC from E-boxes. However, little is known about the mechanism by which CLK-CYC is removed from DNA. Previous studies demonstrated that the transcription repressor CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO) contributes to core feedback loop function by repressing per and tim transcription in cultured S2 cells and in flies. Here we show that CWO rhythmically binds E-boxes upstream of core clock genes in a reciprocal manner to CLK, thereby promoting PER-dependent removal of CLK-CYC from E-boxes, and maintaining repression until PER is degraded and CLK-CYC displaces CWO from E-boxes to initiate transcription. These results suggest a model in which CWO co-represses CLK-CYC transcriptional activity in conjunction with PER by competing for E-box binding once CLK-CYC-PER complexes have formed. Given that CWO orthologs DEC1 and DEC2 also target E-boxes bound by CLOCK-BMAL1, a similar mechanism may operate in the mammalian clock.

  8. CLOCKWORK ORANGE Enhances PERIOD Mediated Rhythms in Transcriptional Repression by Antagonizing E-box Binding by CLOCK-CYCLE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Drosophila circadian oscillator controls daily rhythms in physiology, metabolism and behavior via transcriptional feedback loops. CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC heterodimers initiate feedback loop function by binding E-box elements to activate per and tim transcription. PER-TIM heterodimers then accumulate, bind CLK-CYC to inhibit transcription, and are ultimately degraded to enable the next round of transcription. The timing of transcriptional events in this feedback loop coincide with, and are controlled by, rhythms in CLK-CYC binding to E-boxes. PER rhythmically binds CLK-CYC to initiate transcriptional repression, and subsequently promotes the removal of CLK-CYC from E-boxes. However, little is known about the mechanism by which CLK-CYC is removed from DNA. Previous studies demonstrated that the transcription repressor CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO contributes to core feedback loop function by repressing per and tim transcription in cultured S2 cells and in flies. Here we show that CWO rhythmically binds E-boxes upstream of core clock genes in a reciprocal manner to CLK, thereby promoting PER-dependent removal of CLK-CYC from E-boxes, and maintaining repression until PER is degraded and CLK-CYC displaces CWO from E-boxes to initiate transcription. These results suggest a model in which CWO co-represses CLK-CYC transcriptional activity in conjunction with PER by competing for E-box binding once CLK-CYC-PER complexes have formed. Given that CWO orthologs DEC1 and DEC2 also target E-boxes bound by CLOCK-BMAL1, a similar mechanism may operate in the mammalian clock.

  9. A Screening of UNF Targets Identifies Rnb, a Novel Regulator of Drosophila Circadian Rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Anatoly; Jaumouillé, Edouard; Machado Almeida, Pedro; Koch, Rafael; Rodriguez, Joseph; Abruzzi, Katharine C; Nagoshi, Emi

    2017-07-12

    Behavioral circadian rhythms are controlled by multioscillator networks comprising functionally different subgroups of clock neurons. Studies have demonstrated that molecular clocks in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster are regulated differently in clock neuron subclasses to support their specific functions (Lee et al., 2016; Top et al., 2016). The nuclear receptor unfulfilled ( unf ) represents a regulatory node that provides the small ventral lateral neurons (s-LNvs) unique characteristics as the master pacemaker (Beuchle et al., 2012). We previously showed that UNF interacts with the s-LNv molecular clocks by regulating transcription of the core clock gene period ( per ) (Jaumouillé et al., 2015). To gain more insight into the mechanisms by which UNF contributes to the functioning of the circadian master pacemaker, we identified UNF target genes using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Our data demonstrate that a previously uncharacterized gene CG7837 , which we termed R and B ( Rnb ), acts downstream of UNF to regulate the function of the s-LNvs as the master circadian pacemaker. Mutations and LNv-targeted adult-restricted knockdown of Rnb impair locomotor rhythms. RNB localizes to the nucleus, and its loss-of-function blunts the molecular rhythms and output rhythms of the s-LNvs, particularly the circadian rhythms in PDF accumulation and axonal arbor remodeling. These results establish a second pathway by which UNF interacts with the molecular clocks in the s-LNvs and highlight the mechanistic differences in the molecular clockwork within the pacemaker circuit. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Circadian behavior is generated by a pacemaker circuit comprising diverse classes of pacemaker neurons, each of which contains a molecular clock. In addition to the anatomical and functional diversity, recent studies have shown the mechanistic differences in the molecular clockwork among the pacemaker neurons in Drosophila Here, we identified the molecular characteristics

  10. Circadian and Wakefulness-Sleep Modulation of Cognition in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth P Wright

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive and affective processes vary over the course of the 24 hour day. Time of day dependent changes in human cognition are modulated by an internal circadian timekeeping system with a near-24-hour period. The human circadian timekeeping system interacts with sleep-wakefulness regulatory processes to modulate brain arousal, neurocognitive and affective function. Brain arousal is regulated by ascending brain stem, basal forebrain and hypothalamic arousal systems and inhibition or disruption of these systems reduces brain arousal, impairs cognition, and promotes sleep. The internal circadian timekeeping system modulates cognition and affective function by projections from the master circadian clock, located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, to arousal and sleep systems and via clock gene oscillations in brain tissues. Understanding the basic principles of circadian and wakefulness-sleep physiology can help to recognize how the circadian system modulates human cognition and influences learning, memory and emotion. Developmental changes in sleep and circadian processes and circadian misalignment in circadian rhythm sleep disorders have important implications for learning, memory and emotion. Overall, when wakefulness occurs at appropriate internal biological times, circadian clockwork benefits human cognitive and emotion function throughout the lifespan. Yet, when wakefulness occurs at inappropriate biological times because of environmental pressures (e.g., early school start times, long work hours that include work at night, shift work, jet lag or because of circadian rhythm sleep disorders, the resulting misalignment between circadian and wakefulness-sleep physiology leads to impaired cognitive performance, learning, emotion, and safety.

  11. Neurophysiological mechanisms of circadian cognitive control in RLS patients - an EEG source localization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Brandt, Moritz D; Schrempf, Wiebke; Beste, Christian; Stock, Ann-Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    The circadian variation of sensory and motor symptoms with increasing severity in the evening and at night is a key diagnostic feature/symptom of the restless legs syndrome (RLS). Even though many neurological diseases have shown a strong nexus between motor and cognitive symptoms, it has remained unclear whether cognitive performance of RLS patients declines in the evening and which neurophysiological mechanisms are affected by the circadian variation. In the current study, we examined daytime effects (morning vs. evening) on cognitive performance in RLS patients (n = 33) compared to healthy controls (n = 29) by analyzing flanker interference effects in combination with EEG and source localization techniques. RLS patients showed larger flanker interference effects in the evening than in the morning (p = .023), while healthy controls did not display a comparable circadian variation. In line with this, the neurophysiological data showed smaller N1 amplitudes in RLS patients compared to controls in the interfering task condition in the evening (p = .042), but not in the morning. The results demonstrate diurnal cognitive changes in RLS patients with intensified impairments in the evening. It seems that not all dopamine-regulated cognitive processes are altered in RLS and thus show daytime-dependent impairments. Instead, the daytime-related cognitive impairment emerges from attentional selection processes within the extra-striate visual cortex, but not from later cognitive processes such as conflict monitoring and response selection.

  12. Neurophysiological mechanisms of circadian cognitive control in RLS patients - an EEG source localization study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The circadian variation of sensory and motor symptoms with increasing severity in the evening and at night is a key diagnostic feature/symptom of the restless legs syndrome (RLS. Even though many neurological diseases have shown a strong nexus between motor and cognitive symptoms, it has remained unclear whether cognitive performance of RLS patients declines in the evening and which neurophysiological mechanisms are affected by the circadian variation. In the current study, we examined daytime effects (morning vs. evening on cognitive performance in RLS patients (n = 33 compared to healthy controls (n = 29 by analyzing flanker interference effects in combination with EEG and source localization techniques. RLS patients showed larger flanker interference effects in the evening than in the morning (p = .023, while healthy controls did not display a comparable circadian variation. In line with this, the neurophysiological data showed smaller N1 amplitudes in RLS patients compared to controls in the interfering task condition in the evening (p = .042, but not in the morning. The results demonstrate diurnal cognitive changes in RLS patients with intensified impairments in the evening. It seems that not all dopamine-regulated cognitive processes are altered in RLS and thus show daytime-dependent impairments. Instead, the daytime-related cognitive impairment emerges from attentional selection processes within the extra-striate visual cortex, but not from later cognitive processes such as conflict monitoring and response selection.

  13. Two Lesser Dystopias: "We" and "A Clockwork Orange."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnsley, John H.

    1984-01-01

    Both the Russian novel "We" and the Anthony Burgess novel "A Clockwork Orange" offer frightening glimpses of a future society. But the contrast between these visions is striking. "We" is concerned with the misuse of technology, Burgess's book with the misuse of psychology. Both warn about the misuse of state power.…

  14. Dystonia not dystopia: effects of the legal high, 'Clockwork Orange'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Helen Elizabeth; Hawksley, Oliver

    2015-12-10

    A 27-year-old man presented to hospital after smoking a legal high named 'Clockwork Orange'. He suffered dystonia, acute kidney injury, rhabdomyolysis, lactic acidosis and a troponin rise. He was treated with procyclidine and intravenous fluids. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Control of daily transcript oscillations in Drosophila by light and the circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Wijnen

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional circuits of circadian clocks control physiological and behavioral rhythms. Light may affect such overt rhythms in two ways: (1 by entraining the clock circuits and (2 via clock-independent molecular pathways. In this study we examine the relationship between autonomous transcript oscillations and light-driven transcript responses. Transcript profiles of wild-type and arrhythmic mutant Drosophila were recorded both in the presence of an environmental photocycle and in constant darkness. Systematic autonomous oscillations in the 12- to 48-h period range were detectable only in wild-type flies and occurred preferentially at the circadian period length. However, an extensive program of light-driven expression was confirmed in arrhythmic mutant flies. Many light-responsive transcripts are preferentially expressed in the compound eyes and the phospholipase C component of phototransduction, NORPA (no receptor potential, is required for their light-dependent regulation. Although there is evidence for the existence of multiple molecular clock circuits in cyanobacteria, protists, plants, and fungi, Drosophila appears to possess only one such system. The sustained photic expression responses identified here are partially coupled to the circadian clock and may reflect a mechanism for flies to modulate functions such as visual sensitivity and synaptic transmission in response to seasonal changes in photoperiod.

  16. Circadian plasticity in photoreceptor cells controls visual coding efficiency in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Barth

    Full Text Available In the fly Drosophila melanogaster, neuronal plasticity of synaptic terminals in the first optic neuropil, or lamina, depends on early visual experience within a critical period after eclosion. The current study revealed two additional and parallel mechanisms involved in this type of synaptic terminal plasticity. First, an endogenous circadian rhythm causes daily oscillations in the volume of photoreceptor cell terminals. Second, daily visual experience precisely modulates the circadian time course and amplitude of the volume oscillations that the photoreceptor-cell terminals undergo. Both mechanisms are separable in their molecular basis. We suggest that the described neuronal plasticity in Drosophila ensures continuous optimal performance of the visual system over the course of a 24 h-day. Moreover, the sensory system of Drosophila cannot only account for predictable, but also for acute, environmental changes. The volumetric changes in the synaptic terminals of photoreceptor cells are accompanied by circadian and light-induced changes of presynaptic ribbons as well as extensions of epithelial glial cells into the photoreceptor terminals, suggesting that the architecture of the lamina is altered by both visual exposure and the circadian clock. Clock-mutant analysis and the rescue of PER protein rhythmicity exclusively in all R1-6 cells revealed that photoreceptor-cell plasticity is autonomous and sufficient to control visual behavior. The strength of a visually guided behavior, the optomotor turning response, co-varies with synaptic-terminal volume oscillations of photoreceptor cells when elicited at low light levels. Our results show that behaviorally relevant adaptive processing of visual information is performed, in part, at the level of visual input level.

  17. Control of Circadian Behavior by Transplanted Suprachiasmatic Nuclei and by the Tau Gene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Menaker, Micahel

    1997-01-01

    The mammalian retina was found to contain an independent circadian oscillator which regulates the synthesis of melatonin and has effects, through a presently unknown pathway, on the circadian rhythm...

  18. Dissecting Daily and Circadian Expression Rhythms of Clock-Controlled Genes in Human Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Karolina; Ackermann, Katrin; Revell, Victoria L; Lao, Oscar; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    The identification and investigation of novel clock-controlled genes (CCGs) has been conducted thus far mainly in model organisms such as nocturnal rodents, with limited information in humans. Here, we aimed to characterize daily and circadian expression rhythms of CCGs in human peripheral blood during a sleep/sleep deprivation (S/SD) study and a constant routine (CR) study. Blood expression levels of 9 candidate CCGs (SREBF1, TRIB1, USF1, THRA1, SIRT1, STAT3, CAPRIN1, MKNK2, and ROCK2), were measured across 48 h in 12 participants in the S/SD study and across 33 h in 12 participants in the CR study. Statistically significant rhythms in expression were observed for STAT3, SREBF1, TRIB1, and THRA1 in samples from both the S/SD and the CR studies, indicating that their rhythmicity is driven by the endogenous clock. The MKNK2 gene was significantly rhythmic in the S/SD but not the CR study, which implies its exogenously driven rhythmic expression. In addition, we confirmed the circadian expression of PER1, PER3, and REV-ERBα in the CR study samples, while BMAL1 and HSPA1B were not significantly rhythmic in the CR samples; all 5 genes previously showed significant expression in the S/SD study samples. Overall, our results demonstrate that rhythmic expression patterns of clock and selected clock-controlled genes in human blood cells are in part determined by exogenous factors (sleep and fasting state) and in part by the endogenous circadian timing system. Knowledge of the exogenous and endogenous regulation of gene expression rhythms is needed prior to the selection of potential candidate marker genes for future applications in medical and forensic settings. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. Alteration of the circadian clock in children with Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Marta; Nevsímalová, Sona; Príhodová, Iva; Sládek, Martin; Sumová, Alena

    2012-02-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is associated with sleep disturbances and disrupted melatonin production. The study aimed to ascertain whether the sleep and melatonin production anomalies in SMS patients may be due to an alteration of the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock. Five SMS patients (3-17 yr old) and five healthy age-matched control subjects were involved in the study. Saliva and buccal scrub samples were collected every 4 h during a 24-h period. Daily profiles of melatonin were determined in saliva using a direct double-antibody radioimmunoassay. Daily profiles of clock gene mRNA levels (Per1, Per2, and Rev-erbα) were determined in buccal scrub samples by RT-PCR. In controls, melatonin levels were elevated during the nighttime and very low during the daytime. Daily profiles of clock genes, Per1, Per2, and Rev-erbα, mRNA levels in buccal mucosa exhibited significant and mutually synchronized circadian variations (Per1 and Rev-erbα: P < 0.001; Per2: P < 0.05); the mRNA levels were elevated during the daytime and decreased during the nighttime. In SMS patients, melatonin profiles were significantly altered compared with controls, being phase reversed, phase advanced, depressed, or abolished. Only Per1 and Rev-erbα mRNA profiles exhibited significant circadian rhythms (P < 0.05); the Per2 expression exhibited high variability, and the profile was out of phase with the other clock genes. Our findings suggest that the anomalies in melatonin profiles of SMS patients might be due to a disturbance of the molecular circadian clockwork.

  20. Femtosecond Timekeeping: Slip-Free Clockwork for Optical Timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, D.; Droste, S.; Baumann, E.; Roslund, J.; Churin, D.; Cingoz, A.; Deschênes, J.-D.; Khader, I. H.; Swann, W. C.; Nelson, C.; Newbury, N. R.; Coddington, I.

    2018-04-01

    The generation of true optical time standards will require the conversion of the highly stable optical-frequency output of an optical atomic clock to a high-fidelity time output. We demonstrate a comb-based clockwork that phase-coherently integrates ˜7 ×1020 optical cycles of an input optical frequency to create a coherent time output. We verify the underlying stability of the optical timing system by comparing two comb-based clockworks with a common input optical frequency and show time drift over the 37-day measurement period. Both clockworks also generate traditional timing signals including an optical pulse per second and a 10-MHz rf reference. The optical pulse-per-second time outputs remain synchronized to 240 attoseconds (240 as) at 1000 s. The phase-coherent 10-MHz rf outputs are stable to near a part in 1019 . Fault-free timekeeping from an optical clock to femtosecond level over months is an important step in replacing the current microwave time standard by an optical standard.

  1. Regulation of Drosophila circadian rhythms by miRNA let-7 is mediated by a regulatory cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenfeng; Liu, Zhenxing; Li, Tianjiao; Zhang, Ruifeng; Xue, Yongbo; Zhong, Yang; Bai, Weiwei; Zhou, Dasen; Zhao, Zhangwu

    2014-11-24

    MicroRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulations are increasingly recognized as important components of the circadian rhythm. Here we identify microRNA let-7, part of the Drosophila let-7-Complex, as a regulator of circadian rhythms mediated by a circadian regulatory cycle. Overexpression of let-7 in clock neurons lengthens circadian period and its deletion attenuates the morning activity peak as well as molecular oscillation. Let-7 regulates the circadian rhythm via repression of CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO). Conversely, upregulated cwo in cwo-expressing cells can rescue the phenotype of let-7-Complex overexpression. Moreover, circadian prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) and CLOCK-regulated 20-OH ecdysteroid signalling contribute to the circadian expression of let-7 through the 20-OH ecdysteroid receptor. Thus, we find a regulatory cycle involving PTTH, a direct target of CLOCK, and PTTH-driven miRNA let-7.

  2. Sleep and circadian variability in people with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder versus healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Helen J; Park, Margaret; Wyatt, James K; Rizvydeen, Muneer; Fogg, Louis F

    2017-06-01

    To compare sleep and circadian variability in adults with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD) to healthy controls. Forty participants (22 DSWPD, 18 healthy controls) completed a ten-day protocol, consisting of DLMO assessments on two consecutive nights, a five-day study break, followed by two more DLMO assessments. All participants were instructed to sleep within one hour of their self-reported average sleep schedule for the last four days of the study break. We analyzed the participants' wrist actigraphy data during these four days to examine intraindividual variability in sleep timing, duration and efficiency. We also examined shifts in the DLMO from before and after the study break. Under the same conditions, people with DSWPD had significantly more variable wake times and total sleep time than healthy controls (p ≤ 0.015). Intraindividual variability in sleep onset time and sleep efficiency was similar between the two groups (p ≥ 0.30). The DLMO was relatively stable across the study break, with only 11% of controls but 27% of DSWPDs showed more than a one hour shift in the DLMO. Only in the DSWPD sample was greater sleep variability associated with a larger shift in the DLMO (r = 0.46, p = 0.03). These results suggest that intraindividual variability in sleep can be higher in DSWPD versus healthy controls, and this may impact variability in the DLMO. DSWPD patients with higher intraindividual variability in sleep are more likely to have a shifting DLMO, which could impact sleep symptoms and the optimal timing of light and/or melatonin treatment for DSWPD. Circadian Phase Assessments at Home, http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01487252, NCT01487252. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 11. Circadian Rhythms - Circadian Timing Systems: How are they Organized? Koustubh M Vaze Vijay Kumar Sharma. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 11 November 2013 pp 1032-1050 ...

  4. Independent Control of Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Flowering Time by the Circadian Clock in Arabidopsis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez, Miguel A.; Trénor, Marta; Weigel, Detlef

    2002-01-01

    Flowering of the facultative long-day plant Arabidopsis is controlled by several endogenous and environmental factors, among them gibberellins (GAs) and day length. The promotion of flowering by long days involves an endogenous clock that interacts with light cues provided by the environment. Light, and specifically photoperiod, is also known to regulate the biosynthesis of GAs, but the effects of GAs and photoperiod on flowering are at least partially separable. Here, we have used a short-period mutant, toc1, to investigate the role of the circadian clock in the control of flowering time by GAs and photoperiod. We show that toc1 affects expression of several floral regulators and a GA biosynthetic gene, but that these effects are independent. PMID:12481060

  5. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    significance. (right) Vijay Kumar Sharma is a Professor at the. Evolutionary and. Organismal Biology Unit,. JNCASR, Bangalore. His major research interests presently are in understand- ing circadian organization of fruit flies and ants, adaptive significance of circadian clocks, neurogenetics of circadian egg-laying rhythm.

  6. Circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled genes in the rat retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Willem; Cailotto, Cathy; Dijk, Frederike; Bergen, Arthur; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2005-01-01

    The circadian expression patterns of genes encoding for proteins that make up the core of the circadian clock were measured in rat retina using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Transcript levels of several genes previously used for normalization of qPCR assays were determined and the effect of

  7. Circadian light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bierman Andrew

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present paper reflects a work in progress toward a definition of circadian light, one that should be informed by the thoughtful, century-old evolution of our present definition of light as a stimulus for the human visual system. This work in progress is based upon the functional relationship between optical radiation and its effects on nocturnal melatonin suppression, in large part because the basic data are available in the literature. Discussed here are the fundamental differences between responses by the visual and circadian systems to optical radiation. Brief reviews of photometry, colorimetry, and brightness perception are presented as a foundation for the discussion of circadian light. Finally, circadian light (CLA and circadian stimulus (CS calculation procedures based on a published mathematical model of human circadian phototransduction are presented with an example.

  8. The influence of intermittent fasting on the circadian pattern of melatonin while controlling for caloric intake, energy expenditure, light exposure, and sleep schedules: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljohara S Almeneessier

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In this preliminary report, under controlled conditions of light exposure, meal composition, energy expenditure, and sleep-wake schedules, intermittent fasting has no significant influence on the circadian pattern of melatonin.

  9. A circadian rhythm orchestrated by histone deacetylase 3 controls hepatic lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Dan; Liu, Tao; Sun, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    HDAC3 is absent. Although amounts of HDAC3 are constant, its genomic recruitment in liver corresponds to the expression pattern of the circadian nuclear receptor Rev-erbα. Rev-erbα colocalizes with HDAC3 near genes regulating lipid metabolism, and deletion of HDAC3 or Rev-erbα in mouse liver causes......Disruption of the circadian clock exacerbates metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes. We show that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) recruitment to the genome displays a circadian rhythm in mouse liver. Histone acetylation is inversely related to HDAC3 binding, and this rhythm is lost when...... hepatic steatosis. Thus, genomic recruitment of HDAC3 by Rev-erbα directs a circadian rhythm of histone acetylation and gene expression required for normal hepatic lipid homeostasis....

  10. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 7. Circadian Rhythms - From Daily Rhythms to Biological Clocks. Koustubh M Vaze Vijay Kumar Sharma. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 7 July 2013 pp 662- ... Keywords. Circadian rhythms; biological clocks; geophysical cycles; entrainment.

  11. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    hunger and sleep at the same time as the body would not be in the right state to metabolise food efficiently. Thus, synchronization of internal rhythms is an essential aspect of physiology, and circadian rhythms benefit living beings by bringing about such temporal order. In other words, circadian rhythms are thought to.

  12. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in patients with multiple sclerosis and its association with fatigue: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Najafi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are a presentation of sleep disorders in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. This study aims to compare this problem in MS patients with healthy people and to determine its association with chronic fatigue in MS patients. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was performed on 120 MS patients and 60 healthy subjects matched for age and sex, in 2009 in MS Clinic Alzahra Hospital. Sleep quality, rhythm and fatigue severity were assessed using PSQI (Pittsburgh sleep quality index and FSS (Fatigue severity Scale questionnaires, respectively. Its reliability and validity has been confirmed in several studies (Cronbach′s alpha = 0.83. This index has seven sections including patient′s assessment of his/her sleep, sleep duration, efficacy of routine sleep, sleep disorders, use of hypnotic medication, and dysfunction in daily activities. Results: Circadian rhythm sleep disorder was more frequent in MS patients relative to healthy subjects (P: 0.002. It was higher in MS patients with severe fatigue relative to MS patients with mild fatigue (P: 0.05. Fatigue severity was 49.9 ± 8.2 and 22.5 ± 7.4 in the first and second group, respectively. PSQI index was 7.9 ± 4.5 in patients with severe fatigue and 5.9 ± 4.5 in patients with mild fatigue and 4.5 ± 2.4 in the control group (P: 0.0001. Conclusion: Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are more frequent in MS patients and those with fatigue. Recognition and management of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in MS patients, especially those with fatigue may be helpful in improving care of these patients.

  13. Juvenile Delinquency in Novel Clockwork Orange By Anthony Burgess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bena Yusuf Pelawi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to reveal the role of literary work, especially a novel in reflecting the social fenomena, the juvenile delinquency in the twentieth century. The data source was an English novel ‘Clockwork Orange’ written by Anthony Burgess. The research applied library research by using reflection theory introduced by Georg Lukacs. Analysis was presented in three parts, those were the identification of major character, social setting, and the reflection of juvenile delinquency.The findings were as follows. First, the major character was Alex as his hig intensity in all the events that build the whole story. Second, the social setting described the life of teenagers, especially the juvenile delinquency as social fenomena in society. Third, the role of literary work in revealing the problem above faced by the twentieth century society. Finally, it can be concluded that the literary work has played a very important role in revealing the social fenomena.

  14. Freeze-In Dark Matter from a sub-Higgs Mass Clockwork Sector via the Higgs Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jinsu; McDonald, John

    2018-01-01

    The clockwork mechanism allows extremely weak interactions and small mass scales to be understood in terms the structure of a theory. A natural application of the clockwork mechanism is to the freeze-in mechanism for dark matter production. Here we consider a Higgs portal freeze-in dark matter model based on a scalar clockwork sector with a mass scale which is less than the Higgs boson mass. The dark matter scalar is the lightest scalar of the clockwork sector. Freeze-in dark matter is produc...

  15. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 2 ... Adaptation; fitness; circadian resonance; latitudinal clines; experimental evolution. ... Chronobiology Laboratory Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Unit Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research Jakkur, PO Box 6436, ...

  16. Circadian control of insulin secretion is independent of the temporal distribution of feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Strubbe, JH

    1998-01-01

    To investigate whether there is a circadian regulation of insulin secretion, rats were adapted to a feeding regimen of six meals equally distributed over 24 h. Under these conditions basal glucose and insulin levels increased during the light phase and decreased during the dark phase. Maximal blood

  17. Influence of age, circadian and homeostatic processes on inhibitory motor control: a Go/Nogo task study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Sagaspe

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The contribution of circadian system and sleep pressure influences on executive performance as a function of age has never been studied. The aim of our study was to determine the age-related evolution of inhibitory motor control (i.e., ability to suppress a prepotent motor response and sustained attention under controlled high or low sleep pressure conditions. METHODS: 14 healthy young males (mean age = 23 ± 2.7; 20-29 years and 11 healthy older males (mean age = 68 ± 1.4; 66-70 years were recruited. The volunteers were placed for 40 hours in "constant routine". In the "Sleep Deprivation SD" condition, the volunteer was kept awake for 40 hours to obtain a high sleep pressure condition interacting with the circadian process. In the "NAP" condition, the volunteer adopted a short wake/sleep cycle (150/75 min resulting in a low sleep pressure condition to counteract the homeostatic pressure and investigate the circadian process. Performances were evaluated by a simple reaction time task and a Go/Nogo task repeated every 3H45. RESULTS: In the SD condition, inhibitory motor control (i.e., ability to inhibit an inappropriate response was impaired by extended wakefulness equally in both age groups (P<.01. Sustained attention (i.e. ability to respond accurately to appropriate stimuli on the executive task decreased under sleep deprivation in both groups, and even more in young participants (P<.05. In the NAP condition, age did not influence the time course of inhibitory motor control or sustained attention. In the SD and NAP conditions, older participants had a less fluctuating reaction time performance across time of day than young participants (P<.001. CONCLUSION: Aging could be a protective factor against the effects of extended wakefulness especially on sustained attention failures due to an attenuation of sleep pressure with duration of time awake.

  18. Influence of age, circadian and homeostatic processes on inhibitory motor control: a Go/Nogo task study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaspe, Patricia; Taillard, Jacques; Amiéva, Hélène; Beck, Arnaud; Rascol, Olivier; Dartigues, Jean-François; Capelli, Aurore; Philip, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of circadian system and sleep pressure influences on executive performance as a function of age has never been studied. The aim of our study was to determine the age-related evolution of inhibitory motor control (i.e., ability to suppress a prepotent motor response) and sustained attention under controlled high or low sleep pressure conditions. 14 healthy young males (mean age = 23 ± 2.7; 20-29 years) and 11 healthy older males (mean age = 68 ± 1.4; 66-70 years) were recruited. The volunteers were placed for 40 hours in "constant routine". In the "Sleep Deprivation SD" condition, the volunteer was kept awake for 40 hours to obtain a high sleep pressure condition interacting with the circadian process. In the "NAP" condition, the volunteer adopted a short wake/sleep cycle (150/75 min) resulting in a low sleep pressure condition to counteract the homeostatic pressure and investigate the circadian process. Performances were evaluated by a simple reaction time task and a Go/Nogo task repeated every 3H45. In the SD condition, inhibitory motor control (i.e., ability to inhibit an inappropriate response) was impaired by extended wakefulness equally in both age groups (Page did not influence the time course of inhibitory motor control or sustained attention. In the SD and NAP conditions, older participants had a less fluctuating reaction time performance across time of day than young participants (PAging could be a protective factor against the effects of extended wakefulness especially on sustained attention failures due to an attenuation of sleep pressure with duration of time awake.

  19. Circadian Rhythms in Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Life on earth is subject to daily and predictable fluctuations in light intensity, temperature, and humidity created by rotation of the earth. Circadian rhythms, generated by a circadian clock, control temporal programs of cellular physiology to facilitate adaptation to daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms are nearly ubiquitous and are found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we introduce the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We review the current understanding of the cyanobacterial clock, emphasizing recent work that has generated a more comprehensive understanding of how the circadian oscillator becomes synchronized with the external environment and how information from the oscillator is transmitted to generate rhythms of biological activity. These results have changed how we think about the clock, shifting away from a linear model to one in which the clock is viewed as an interactive network of multifunctional components that are integrated into the context of the cell in order to pace and reset the oscillator. We conclude with a discussion of how this basic timekeeping mechanism differs in other cyanobacterial species and how information gleaned from work in cyanobacteria can be translated to understanding rhythmic phenomena in other prokaryotic systems. PMID:26335718

  20. Spatial Clockwork Recurrent Neural Network for Muscle Perimysium Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuanpu; Zhang, Zizhao; Sapkota, Manish; Yang, Lin

    2016-10-01

    Accurate segmentation of perimysium plays an important role in early diagnosis of many muscle diseases because many diseases contain different perimysium inflammation. However, it remains as a challenging task due to the complex appearance of the perymisum morphology and its ambiguity to the background area. The muscle perimysium also exhibits strong structure spanned in the entire tissue, which makes it difficult for current local patch-based methods to capture this long-range context information. In this paper, we propose a novel spatial clockwork recurrent neural network (spatial CW-RNN) to address those issues. Specifically, we split the entire image into a set of non-overlapping image patches, and the semantic dependencies among them are modeled by the proposed spatial CW-RNN. Our method directly takes the 2D structure of the image into consideration and is capable of encoding the context information of the entire image into the local representation of each patch. Meanwhile, we leverage on the structured regression to assign one prediction mask rather than a single class label to each local patch, which enables both efficient training and testing. We extensively test our method for perimysium segmentation using digitized muscle microscopy images. Experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the novel spatial CW-RNN over other existing state of the arts.

  1. The Aging Clock and Circadian Control of Metabolism and Genome Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria P. Belancio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that aging is characterized by a gradual decline in the efficiency and accuracy of biological processes, leading to deterioration of physiological functions and development of age-associated diseases. Age-dependent accumulation of genomic instability and development of metabolic syndrome are well-recognized components of the aging phenotype, both of which have been extensively studied. Existing findings strongly support the view that the integrity of the cellular genome and metabolic function can be influenced by light at night (LAN and associated suppression of circadian melatonin production. While LAN is reported to accelerate aging by promoting age-associated carcinogenesis in several animal models, the specific molecular mechanism(s of its action are not fully understood. Here, we review literature supporting a connection between LAN-induced central circadian disruption of peripheral circadian rhythms and clock function, LINE-1 retrotransposon-associated genomic instability, metabolic deregulation, and aging. We propose that aging is a progressive decline in the stability, continuity and synchronization of multi-frequency oscillations in biological processes to a temporally disorganized state. By extension, healthy aging is the ability to maintain the most consistent, stable and entrainable rhythmicity and coordination of these oscillations, at the molecular, cellular, and systemic levels.

  2. Circadian clocks, epigenetics, and cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Masri, Selma

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between circadian rhythm and cancer has been suggested for more than a decade based on the observations that shift work and cancer incidence are linked. Accumulating evidence implicates the circadian clock in cancer survival and proliferation pathways. At the molecular level, multiple control mechanisms have been proposed to link circadian transcription and cell-cycle control to tumorigenesis.The circadian gating of the cell cycle and subsequent control of cell proliferation is an area of active investigation. Moreover, the circadian clock is a transcriptional system that is intricately regulated at the epigenetic level. Interestingly, the epigenetic landscape at the level of histone modifications, DNA methylation, and small regulatory RNAs are differentially controlled in cancer cells. This concept raises the possibility that epigenetic control is a common thread linking the clock with cancer, though little scientific evidence is known to date.This review focuses on the link between circadian clock and cancer, and speculates on the possible connections at the epigenetic level that could further link the circadian clock to tumor initiation or progression.

  3. Circadian rhythm and its role in malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Saqib

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Circadian rhythms are daily oscillations of multiple biological processes directed by endogenous clocks. The circadian timing system comprises peripheral oscillators located in most tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus. Circadian genes and the proteins produced by these genes constitute the molecular components of the circadian oscillator which form positive/negative feedback loops and generate circadian rhythms. The circadian regulation extends beyond clock genes to involve various clock-controlled genes (CCGs including various cell cycle genes. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes could have important consequences on the transactivation of downstream targets that control the cell cycle and on the ability of cells to undergo apoptosis. This may lead to genomic instability and accelerated cellular proliferation potentially promoting carcinogenesis. Different lines of evidence in mice and humans suggest that cancer may be a circadian-related disorder. The genetic or functional disruption of the molecular circadian clock has been found in various cancers including breast, ovarian, endometrial, prostate and hematological cancers. The acquisition of current data in circadian clock mechanism may help chronotherapy, which takes into consideration the biological time to improve treatments by devising new therapeutic approaches for treating circadian-related disorders, especially cancer.

  4. Periodic variation in bile acids controls circadian changes in uric acid via regulation of xanthine oxidase by the orphan nuclear receptor PPARα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemitsu, Takumi; Tsurudome, Yuya; Kusunose, Naoki; Oda, Masayuki; Matsunaga, Naoya; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2017-12-29

    Xanthine oxidase (XOD), also known as xanthine dehydrogenase, is a rate-limiting enzyme in purine nucleotide degradation, which produces uric acid. Uric acid concentrations in the blood and liver exhibit circadian oscillations in both humans and rodents; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that XOD expression and enzymatic activity exhibit circadian oscillations in the mouse liver. We found that the orphan nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) transcriptionally activated the mouse XOD gene and that bile acids suppressed XOD transactivation. The synthesis of bile acids is known to be under the control of the circadian clock, and we observed that the time-dependent accumulation of bile acids in hepatic cells interfered with the recruitment of the co-transcriptional activator p300 to PPARα, thereby repressing XOD expression. This time-dependent suppression of PPARα-mediated transactivation by bile acids caused an oscillation in the hepatic expression of XOD, which, in turn, led to circadian alterations in uric acid production. Finally, we also demonstrated that the anti-hyperuricemic effect of the XOD inhibitor febuxostat was enhanced by administering it at the time of day before hepatic XOD activity increased. These results suggest an underlying mechanism for the circadian alterations in uric acid production and also underscore the importance of selecting an appropriate time of day for administering XOD inhibitors. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1 (BMAL1) controls circadian cell proliferation and susceptibility to UVB-induced DNA damage in the epidermis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Liu, Qiang; Ruiz, Rolando; Gordon, William; Espitia, Francisco; Cam, Eric; Millar, Sarah E.; Smyth, Padhraic; Ihler, Alexander; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Andersen, Bogi

    2012-01-01

    The role of the circadian clock in skin and the identity of genes participating in its chronobiology remain largely unknown, leading us to define the circadian transcriptome of mouse skin at two different stages of the hair cycle, telogen and anagen. The circadian transcriptomes of telogen and anagen skin are largely distinct, with the former dominated by genes involved in cell proliferation and metabolism. The expression of many metabolic genes is antiphasic to cell cycle-related genes, the former peaking during the day and the latter at night. Consistently, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, a byproduct of oxidative phosphorylation, and S-phase are antiphasic to each other in telogen skin. Furthermore, the circadian variation in S-phase is controlled by BMAL1 intrinsic to keratinocytes, because keratinocyte-specific deletion of Bmal1 obliterates time-of-day–dependent synchronicity of cell division in the epidermis leading to a constitutively elevated cell proliferation. In agreement with higher cellular susceptibility to UV-induced DNA damage during S-phase, we found that mice are most sensitive to UVB-induced DNA damage in the epidermis at night. Because in the human epidermis maximum numbers of keratinocytes go through S-phase in the late afternoon, we speculate that in humans the circadian clock imposes regulation of epidermal cell proliferation so that skin is at a particularly vulnerable stage during times of maximum UV exposure, thus contributing to the high incidence of human skin cancers. PMID:22753467

  6. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Keywords. Circadian rhythms, biological clocks, geophysical cycles, en- trainment. Living organisms ranging from bacteria to human beings exhibit 24-h rhythms in various behaviours and physiological processes. Matching of the period of such rhythms with that of the daily environmental cycles gives an impression that.

  7. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    rhythms especially their endogenous, self-sustained nature, ability to entrain to environmental cycles and. PRCs, greatly resemble those of self-sustained physical oscillators; which led them to propose that circadian rhythms function like physical oscillators and named such biological oscillators as 'endogenous self- ...

  8. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 2. Circadian Rhythms: Why do Living Organisms Have Them? Koustubh M Vaze K L Nikhil Vijay Kumar Sharma. Series Article Volume 19 Issue 2 February 2014 pp 175-189 ...

  9. Carbon partitioning in Arabidopsis thaliana is a dynamic process controlled by the plants metabolic status and its circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölling, Katharina; Thalmann, Matthias; Müller, Antonia; Jenny, Camilla; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2015-10-01

    Plant growth involves the coordinated distribution of carbon resources both towards structural components and towards storage compounds that assure a steady carbon supply over the complete diurnal cycle. We used (14) CO2 labelling to track assimilated carbon in both source and sink tissues. Source tissues exhibit large variations in carbon allocation throughout the light period. The most prominent change was detected in partitioning towards starch, being low in the morning and more than double later in the day. Export into sink tissues showed reciprocal changes. Fewer and smaller changes in carbon allocation occurred in sink tissues where, in most respects, carbon was partitioned similarly, whether the sink leaf assimilated it through photosynthesis or imported it from source leaves. Mutants deficient in the production or remobilization of leaf starch exhibited major alterations in carbon allocation. Low-starch mutants that suffer from carbon starvation at night allocated much more carbon into neutral sugars and had higher rates of export than the wild type, partly because of the reduced allocation into starch, but also because of reduced allocation into structural components. Moreover, mutants deficient in the plant's circadian system showed considerable changes in their carbon partitioning pattern suggesting control by the circadian clock. © 2015 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Redundancy of stomatal control for the circadian photosynthetic rhythm in Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyka, T P; Duarte, H M; Lüttge, U E

    2005-03-01

    In continuous light, the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier has a circadian rhythm of gas exchange with peaks occurring during the subjective night. The rhythm of gas exchange is coupled to a weak, reverse phased rhythm of quantum yield of photosystem II (Phi (PSII)). To test if the rhythm of Phi (PSII) persists in the absence of stomatal control, leaves were coated with a thin layer of translucent silicone grease which prevented CO2 and H2O exchange. In spite of this treatment, the rhythm of Phi (PSII) occurred with close to normal phase timing and with a much larger amplitude than in uncoated leaves. The mechanism underlying the Phi (PSII) rhythm in coated leaves can be explained by a circadian activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). At peaks of PEPC activity, the small amount of CO2 contained in the coated leaf could have become depleted, preventing the carboxylase activity of Rubisco and causing decreases in electron transport rates (observed as deep troughs of Phi (PSII) at 23-h in LL and at ca. 24-h intervals afterwards). Peaks of Phi (PSII) would be caused by a downregulation of PEPC leading to improved supply of CO2 to Rubisco. Substrate limitation of photochemistry at 23 h (trough of Phi (PSII)) was also suggested by the weak response of ETR in coated leaves to stepwise light enhancement. These results show that photosynthetic rhythmicity in K. daigremontiana is independent of stomatal regulation and may originate in the mesophyll.

  11. Photoperiodism and enzyme activity: towards a model for the control of circadian metabolic rhythms in the crassulacean Acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, O; Morel, C

    1974-04-01

    Metabolic readjustments after a change from long days to short days appear, in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, to be achieved through the operation of two main mechanisms: variation in enzyme capacity, and circadian rhythmicity. After a lag time, capacity in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and capacity in aspartate aminotransferase increase exponentially and appear to be allometrically linked during 50 to 60 short days; then a sudden fall takes place in the activity of the former. Malic enzyme and alanine aminotransferase behave differently. Thus, the operation of the two sections of the pathway (before and after the malate step) give rise to a continuously changing functional compartmentation in the pathway. Circadian rhythmicity, on the other hand, produces time compartmentation through phase shifts and variation in amplitude, independently for each enzyme. These characteristics suggest that the operation of a so-called biological clock would be involved. We propose the hypothesis that feedback regulation would be more accurate and efficient when applied to an already oscillating, clock-controlled enzyme system.

  12. Metabolism and the Circadian Clock Converge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms occur in almost all species and control vital aspects of our physiology, from sleeping and waking to neurotransmitter secretion and cellular metabolism. Epidemiological studies from recent decades have supported a unique role for circadian rhythm in metabolism. As evidenced by individuals working night or rotating shifts, but also by rodent models of circadian arrhythmia, disruption of the circadian cycle is strongly associated with metabolic imbalance. Some genetically engineered mouse models of circadian rhythmicity are obese and show hallmark signs of the metabolic syndrome. Whether these phenotypes are due to the loss of distinct circadian clock genes within a specific tissue versus the disruption of rhythmic physiological activities (such as eating and sleeping) remains a cynosure within the fields of chronobiology and metabolism. Becoming more apparent is that from metabolites to transcription factors, the circadian clock interfaces with metabolism in numerous ways that are essential for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:23303907

  13. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: the role of nuclear receptors and circadian rhythmicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Oben, Jude; Tarquini, Roberto; De Cosmo, Salvatore

    2014-09-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the accumulation of triglycerides in the hepatocytes in the absence of excess alcohol intake, and is caused by an imbalance between hepatic synthesis and breakdown of fats, as well as fatty acid storage and disposal. Liver metabolic pathways are driven by circadian biological clocks, and hepatic health is maintained by proper timing of circadian patterns of metabolic gene expression with the alternation of anabolic processes corresponding to feeding/activity during wake times, and catabolic processes characterizing fasting/resting during sleep. A number of nuclear receptors in the liver are expressed rhythmically, bind hormones and metabolites, sense energy flux and expenditure, and connect the metabolic pathways to the molecular clockwork throughout the 24-h day. In this review, we describe the role played by the nuclear receptors in the genesis of NAFLD in relationship with the circadian clock circuitry. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Peroxiredoxins are conserved markers of circadian rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Rachel S.; Green, Edward W.; Zhao, Yuwei; van Ooijen, Gerben; Olmedo, Maria; Qin, Ximing; Xu, Yao; Pan, Min; Valekunja, Utham K.; Feeney, Kevin A.; Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Hastings, Michael H.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Merrow, Martha; Millar, Andrew J.; Johnson, Carl H.; Kyriacou, Charalambos P.; O’Neill, John S.; Reddy, Akhilesh B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Cellular life emerged ~3.7 billion years ago. With scant exception, terrestrial organisms have evolved under predictable daily cycles due to the Earth’s rotation. The advantage conferred upon organisms that anticipate such environmental cycles has driven the evolution of endogenous circadian rhythms that tune internal physiology to external conditions. The molecular phylogeny of mechanisms driving these rhythms has been difficult to dissect because identified clock genes and proteins are not conserved across the domains of life: Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota. Here we show that oxidation-reduction cycles of peroxiredoxin proteins constitute a universal marker for circadian rhythms in all domains of life, by characterising their oscillations in a variety of model organisms. Furthermore, we explore the interconnectivity between these metabolic cycles and transcription-translation feedback loops of the clockwork in each system. Our results suggest an intimate co-evolution of cellular time-keeping with redox homeostatic mechanisms following the Great Oxidation Event ~2.5 billion years ago. PMID:22622569

  15. Hypothalamic Integration of Metabolic, Endocrine, and Circadian Signals in Fish: Involvement in the Control of Food Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, María J.; Cerdá-Reverter, José M.; Soengas, José L.

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of food intake in fish is a complex process carried out through several different mechanisms in the central nervous system (CNS) with hypothalamus being the main regulatory center. As in mammals, a complex hypothalamic circuit including two populations of neurons: one co-expressing neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and the second one population co-expressing pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is involved in the integration of information relating to food intake control. The production and release of these peptides control food intake, and the production results from the integration of information of different nature such as levels of nutrients and hormones as well as circadian signals. The present review summarizes the knowledge and recent findings about the presence and functioning of these mechanisms in fish and their differences vs. the known mammalian model. PMID:28694769

  16. The Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbα Controls Circadian Thermogenic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Everett, Logan J.; Loro, Emanuele; Briggs, Erika R.; Bugge, Anne; Hou, Catherine; Ferrara, Christine; Seale, Patrick; Pryma, Daniel A.; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian oscillation of body temperature is a basic, evolutionary-conserved feature of mammalian biology1. Additionally, homeostatic pathways allow organisms to protect their core temperatures in response to cold exposure2. However, the mechanism responsible for coordinating daily body temperature rhythm and adaptability to environmental challenges is unknown. Here we show that the nuclear receptor Rev-erbα, a powerful transcriptional repressor, links circadian and thermogenic networks through the regulation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) function. Mice exposed to cold fare dramatically better at 5 AM (Zeitgeber time 22) when Rev-erbα is barely expressed than at 5 PM (ZT10) when Rev-erbα is abundant. Deletion of Rev-erbα markedly improves cold tolerance at 5 PM, indicating that overcoming Rev-erbα-dependent repression is a fundamental feature of the thermogenic response to cold. Physiological induction of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) by cold temperatures is preceded by rapid down-regulation of Rev-erbα in BAT. Rev-erbα represses UCP1 in a brown adipose cell-autonomous manner and BAT UCP1 levels are high in Rev-erbα-null mice even at thermoneutrality. Genetic loss of Rev-erbα also abolishes normal rhythms of body temperature and BAT activity. Thus, Rev-erbα acts as a thermogenic focal point required for establishing and maintaining body temperature rhythm in a manner that is adaptable to environmental demands. PMID:24162845

  17. Control of Rest:Activity by a Dopaminergic Ultradian Oscillator and the Circadian Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Bourguignon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available There is long-standing evidence for rhythms in locomotor activity, as well as various other aspects of physiology, with periods substantially shorter than 24 h in organisms ranging from fruit flies to humans. These ultradian oscillations, whose periods frequently fall between 2 and 6 h, are normally well integrated with circadian rhythms; however, they often lack the period stability and expression robustness of the latter. An adaptive advantage of ultradian rhythms has been clearly demonstrated for the common vole, suggesting that they may have evolved to confer social synchrony. The cellular substrate and mechanism of ultradian rhythm generation have remained elusive so far, however recent findings—the subject of this review—now indicate that ultradian locomotor rhythms rely on an oscillator based on dopamine, dubbed the dopaminergic ultradian oscillator (DUO. These findings also reveal that the DUO period can be lengthened from <4 to >48 h by methamphetamine treatment, suggesting that the previously described methamphetamine-sensitive (circadian oscillator represents a long-period manifestation of the DUO.

  18. The nuclear receptor Rev-erbα controls circadian thermogenic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Feng, Dan; Emmett, Matthew J; Everett, Logan J; Loro, Emanuele; Briggs, Erika R; Bugge, Anne; Hou, Catherine; Ferrara, Christine; Seale, Patrick; Pryma, Daniel A; Khurana, Tejvir S; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2013-11-21

    Circadian oscillation of body temperature is a basic, evolutionarily conserved feature of mammalian biology. In addition, homeostatic pathways allow organisms to protect their core temperatures in response to cold exposure. However, the mechanism responsible for coordinating daily body temperature rhythm and adaptability to environmental challenges is unknown. Here we show that the nuclear receptor Rev-erbα (also known as Nr1d1), a powerful transcriptional repressor, links circadian and thermogenic networks through the regulation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) function. Mice exposed to cold fare considerably better at 05:00 (Zeitgeber time 22) when Rev-erbα is barely expressed than at 17:00 (Zeitgeber time 10) when Rev-erbα is abundant. Deletion of Rev-erbα markedly improves cold tolerance at 17:00, indicating that overcoming Rev-erbα-dependent repression is a fundamental feature of the thermogenic response to cold. Physiological induction of uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) by cold temperatures is preceded by rapid downregulation of Rev-erbα in BAT. Rev-erbα represses Ucp1 in a brown-adipose-cell-autonomous manner and BAT Ucp1 levels are high in Rev-erbα-null mice, even at thermoneutrality. Genetic loss of Rev-erbα also abolishes normal rhythms of body temperature and BAT activity. Thus, Rev-erbα acts as a thermogenic focal point required for establishing and maintaining body temperature rhythm in a manner that is adaptable to environmental demands.

  19. The circadian clock and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrington, Hannah J; Farrow, Stuart N; Loudon, Andrew S; Ray, David W

    2014-01-01

    It is characteristic of asthma that symptoms worsen overnight, particularly in the early hours of the morning. Nocturnal symptoms in asthma are common and are an important indicator for escalation of treatment. An extensive body of research has demonstrated that nocturnal symptoms of cough and dyspnea are accompanied by circadian variations in airway inflammation and physiologic variables, including airflow limitation and airways hyper-responsiveness. The molecular apparatus that underpins circadian variations, controlled by so called 'clock' genes, has recently been characterised. Clock genes control circadian rhythms both centrally, in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the brain and peripherally, within every organ of the body. Here, we will discuss how clock genes regulate circadian rhythms. We will focus particularly on the peripheral lung clock and the peripheral immune clock and discuss how these might relate to both the pathogenesis and treatment of asthma.

  20. Gnaz couples the circadian and dopaminergic system to G protein-mediated signaling in mouse photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Vancura

    Full Text Available The mammalian retina harbors a circadian clockwork that regulates vision and promotes healthiness of retinal neurons, mainly through directing the rhythmic release of the neurohormones dopamine-acting on dopamine D4 receptors-and melatonin-acting on MT1 and MT2 receptors. The gene Gnaz-a unique Gi/o subfamily member-was seen in the present study to be expressed in photoreceptors where its protein product Gαz shows a daily rhythm in its subcellular localization. Apart from subcellular localization, Gnaz displays a daily rhythm in expression-with peak values at night-in preparations of the whole retina, microdissected photoreceptors and photoreceptor-related pinealocytes. In retina, Gnaz rhythmicity was observed to persist under constant darkness and to be abolished in retina deficient for Clock or dopamine D4 receptors. Furthermore, circadian regulation of Gnaz was disturbed in the db/db mouse, a model of diabetic retinopathy. The data of the present study suggest that Gnaz links the circadian clockwork-via dopamine acting on D4 receptors-to G protein-mediated signaling in intact but not diabetic retina.

  1. Dystonia not dystopia: effects of the legal high, ‘Clockwork Orange’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Helen Elizabeth; Hawksley, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    A 27-year-old man presented to hospital after smoking a legal high named ‘Clockwork Orange’. He suffered dystonia, acute kidney injury, rhabdomyolysis, lactic acidosis and a troponin rise. He was treated with procyclidine and intravenous fluids. PMID:26660763

  2. [Circadian rhythms and systems biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbeter, Albert; Gérard, Claude; Leloup, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Cellular rhythms represent a field of choice for studies in system biology. The examples of circadian rhythms and of the cell cycle show how the experimental and modeling approaches contribute to clarify the conditions in which periodic behavior spontaneously arises in regulatory networks at the cellular level. Circadian rhythms originate from intertwined positive and negative feedback loops controlling the expression of several clock genes. Models can be used to address the dynamical bases of physiological disorders related to dysfunctions of the mammalian circadian clock. The cell cycle is driven by a network of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Modeled in the form of four modules coupled through multiple regulatory interactions, the Cdk network operates in an oscillatory manner in the presence of sufficient amounts of growth factor. For circadian rhythms and the cell cycle, as for other recently observed cellular rhythms, periodic behavior represents an emergent property of biological systems related to their regulatory structure.

  3. Redundant function of REV-ERBalpha and beta and non-essential role for Bmal1 cycling in transcriptional regulation of intracellular circadian rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Liu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clockwork is composed of a core PER/CRY feedback loop and additional interlocking loops. In particular, the ROR/REV/Bmal1 loop, consisting of ROR activators and REV-ERB repressors that regulate Bmal1 expression, is thought to "stabilize" core clock function. However, due to functional redundancy and pleiotropic effects of gene deletions, the role of the ROR/REV/Bmal1 loop has not been accurately defined. In this study, we examined cell-autonomous circadian oscillations using combined gene knockout and RNA interference and demonstrated that REV-ERBalpha and beta are functionally redundant and are required for rhythmic Bmal1 expression. In contrast, the RORs contribute to Bmal1 amplitude but are dispensable for Bmal1 rhythm. We provide direct in vivo genetic evidence that the REV-ERBs also participate in combinatorial regulation of Cry1 and Rorc expression, leading to their phase-delay relative to Rev-erbalpha. Thus, the REV-ERBs play a more prominent role than the RORs in the basic clock mechanism. The cellular genetic approach permitted testing of the robustness of the intracellular core clock function. We showed that cells deficient in both REV-ERBalpha and beta function, or those expressing constitutive BMAL1, were still able to generate and maintain normal Per2 rhythmicity. Our findings thus underscore the resilience of the intracellular clock mechanism and provide important insights into the transcriptional topologies underlying the circadian clock. Since REV-ERB function and Bmal1 mRNA/protein cycling are not necessary for basic clock function, we propose that the major role of the ROR/REV/Bmal1 loop and its constituents is to control rhythmic transcription of clock output genes.

  4. Development of SCN connectivity and the circadian control of arousal: a diminishing role for humoral factors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Gall

    Full Text Available The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN is part of a wake-promoting circuit comprising the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH and locus coeruleus (LC. Although widely considered a "master clock," the SCN of adult rats is also sensitive to feedback regarding an animal's behavioral state. Interestingly, in rats at postnatal day (P2, repeated arousing stimulation does not increase neural activation in the SCN, despite doing so in the LC and DMH. Here we show that, by P8, the SCN is activated by arousing stimulation and that selective destruction of LC terminals with DSP-4 blocks this activational effect. We next show that bidirectional projections among the SCN, DMH, and LC are nearly absent at P2 but present at P8. Despite the relative lack of SCN connectivity with downstream structures at P2, day-night differences in sleep-wake activity are observed, suggesting that the SCN modulates behavior at this age via humoral factors. To test this hypothesis, we lesioned the SCN at P1 and recorded sleep-wake behavior at P2: Day-night differences in sleep and wake were eliminated. We next performed precollicular transections at P2 and P8 that isolate the SCN and DMH from the brainstem and found that day-night differences in sleep-wake behavior were retained at P2 but eliminated at P8. Finally, the SCN or DMH was lesioned at P8: When recorded at P21, rats with either lesion exhibited similarly fragmented wake bouts and no evidence of circadian modulation of wakefulness. These results suggest an age-related decline in the SCN's humoral influence on sleep-wake behavior that coincides with the emergence of bidirectional connectivity among the SCN, DMH, and LC.

  5. The Circadian Molecular Clock Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis by Controlling the Timing of Cell-Cycle Entry and Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Bouchard-Cannon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The subgranular zone (SGZ of the adult hippocampus contains a pool of quiescent neural progenitor cells (QNPs that are capable of entering the cell cycle and producing newborn neurons. The mechanisms that control the timing and extent of adult neurogenesis are not well understood. Here, we show that QNPs of the adult SGZ express molecular-clock components and proliferate in a rhythmic fashion. The clock proteins PERIOD2 and BMAL1 are critical for proper control of neurogenesis. The absence of PERIOD2 abolishes the gating of cell-cycle entrance of QNPs, whereas genetic ablation of bmal1 results in constitutively high levels of proliferation and delayed cell-cycle exit. We use mathematical model simulations to show that these observations may arise from clock-driven expression of a cell-cycle inhibitor that targets the cyclin D/Cdk4-6 complex. Our findings may have broad implications for the circadian clock in timing cell-cycle events of other stem cell populations throughout the body.

  6. The circadian clock in cancer development and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most aspects of mammalian function display circadian rhythms driven by an endogenous clock. The circadian clock is operated by genes and comprises a central clock in the brain that responds to environmental cues and controls subordinate clocks in peripheral tissues via circadian output pathways. The...

  7. Kubrick's Neobaroque Spectacle: An Aesthetic Analysis of Artificiality and Violence in A Clockwork Orange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Purić

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article examines Stanley Kubrick’s film A Clockwork Orange through the concept of neobaroque. Starting with the basic elements of mise-en-scène such as costumes, scenography, and positioning of the body inside the shots, the aesthetic analysis of the film will move towards more abstract concepts such as spectacle and violence. By identifying these elements inside the film, the film itself could be understood, I argue, as a neobaroque film. Neobaroque film neither refers to a genre or a period in film history. It is an aesthetic term, with implicit references to changes in modern society, denoting a specific but also dynamic constellation of expressive and thematic elements in a given film. Occasional references to Baroque art are included not to make closer ties between two periods or forms of expression, but to suggest and show more clearly where neobaroque concepts stand in relation to the Baroque ones. A Clockwork Orange is not of the only neobaroque film. However, one thing that singles out A Clockwork Orange, is the number of traits, or neobaroque topoi, which are condensed in it. In this article, I will point out the most prominent ones, which are firmly embedded in the aesthetics of the film.  

  8. Mathematical model of the Drosophila circadian clock: loop regulation and transcriptional integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan M; Bona, Jerry L; Kadener, Sebastian

    2009-11-04

    Eukaryotic circadian clocks include interconnected positive and negative feedback loops. The clock-cycle dimer (CLK-CYC) and its homolog, CLK-BMAL1, are key transcriptional activators of central components of the Drosophila and mammalian circadian networks, respectively. In Drosophila, negative loops include period-timeless and vrille; positive loops include par domain protein 1. Clockwork orange (CWO) is a recently discovered negative transcription factor with unusual effects on period, timeless, vrille, and par domain protein 1. To understand the actions of this protein, we introduced a new system of ordinary differential equations to model regulatory networks. The model is faithful in the sense that it replicates biological observations. CWO loop actions elevate CLK-CYC; the transcription of direct targets responds by integrating opposing signals from CWO and CLK-CYC. Loop regulation and integration of opposite transcriptional signals appear to be central mechanisms as they also explain paradoxical effects of period gain-of-function and null mutations.

  9. Circadian rhythm in succinate dehydrogenase activity in Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Patricia Álvarez Barón

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurospora crassa is a widely studied model of circadian rhythmicity. In this fungus, metabolism is controlled by multiple factors which include development, medium characteristics and the circadian clock. The study of the circadian control of metabolism in this fungus could be masked by the use of restrictive media that inhibit growth and development. In this report, the presence of a circadian rhythm in the activity of the enzyme Succinate Dehydrogenase in Neurospora crassa is demonstrated. Rhythmic and arrhythmic Neurospora strains were grown in complete medium without conidiation restriction. A circadian change in the enzymatic activity was found with high values in hours corresponding to the night and a low level during the day. This finding highlights the importance of deeper studies in the circadian control of metabolism in this fungus, given the existence of multiple pathways of regulation of metabolic enzymes and a circadian clock control at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  10. Expressions of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin-1 are under the circadian control in the mouse large intestine: implications in intestinal permeability and susceptibility to colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh-oka Kyoko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The circadian clock drives daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. A recent study suggests that intestinal permeability is also under control of the circadian clock. However, the precise mechanisms remain largely unknown. Because intestinal permeability depends on tight junction (TJ that regulates the epithelial paracellular pathway, this study investigated whether the circadian clock regulates the expression levels of TJ proteins in the intestine. METHODS: The expression levels of TJ proteins in the large intestinal epithelium and colonic permeability were analyzed every 4, 6, or 12 hours between wild-type mice and mice with a mutation of a key clock gene Period2 (Per2; mPer2(m/m. In addition, the susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis was compared between wild-type mice and mPer2(m/m mice. RESULTS: The mRNA and protein expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 exhibited daily variations in the colonic epithelium in wild-type mice, whereas they were constitutively high in mPer2(m/m mice. Colonic permeability in wild-type mice exhibited daily variations, which was inversely associated with the expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 proteins, whereas it was constitutively low in mPer2(m/m mice. mPer2(m/m mice were more resistant to the colonic injury induced by DSS than wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Occludin and Claudin-1 expressions in the large intestine are under the circadian control, which is associated with temporal regulation of colonic permeability and also susceptibility to colitis.

  11. The influence of intermittent fasting on the circadian pattern of melatonin while controlling for caloric intake, energy expenditure, light exposure, and sleep schedules: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeneessier, Aljohara S; Bahammam, Ahmed S; Sharif, Munir M; Bahammam, Salman A; Nashwan, Samar Z; Pandi Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Cardinali, Daniel P; Alzoghaibi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    We hypothesized that if we control for food composition, caloric intake, light exposure, sleep schedule, and exercise, intermittent fasting would not influence the circadian pattern of melatonin. Therefore, we designed this study to assess the effect of intermittent fasting on the circadian pattern of melatonin. Eight healthy volunteers with a mean age of 26.6 ± 4.9 years and body mass index of 23.7 ± 3.5 kg/m 2 reported to the Sleep Disorders Center (the laboratory) on four occasions: (1) adaptation, (2) 4 weeks before Ramadan while performing Islamic intermittent fasting for 1 week (fasting outside Ramadan [FOR]), (3) 1 week before Ramadan (nonfasting baseline [BL]), and (4) during the 2 nd week of Ramadan while fasting ( Ramadan ). The plasma levels of melatonin were measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays at 22:00, 02:00, 04:00, 06:00, and 11:00 h. The light exposure, meal composition, energy expenditure, and sleep schedules remained the same while the participants stayed at the laboratory. The melatonin levels followed the same circadian pattern during the three monitoring periods (BL, FOR, and Ramadan ). The peak melatonin level was at 02:00 h and the trough level was at 11:00 h in all studied periods. Lower melatonin levels at 22:00 h were found during fasting compared to BL. Cosinor analysis revealed no significant changes in the acrophase of melatonin levels. In this preliminary report, under controlled conditions of light exposure, meal composition, energy expenditure, and sleep-wake schedules, intermittent fasting has no significant influence on the circadian pattern of melatonin.

  12. α1B-Adrenergic receptor signaling controls circadian expression of Tnfrsf11b by regulating clock genes in osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Hirai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are endogenous and biological oscillations that occur with a period of <24 h. In mammals, the central circadian pacemaker is localized in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and is linked to peripheral tissues through neural and hormonal signals. In the present study, we investigated the physiological function of the molecular clock on bone remodeling. The results of loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments both indicated that the rhythmic expression of Tnfrsf11b, which encodes osteoprotegerin (OPG, was regulated by Bmal1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also showed that REV-ERBα negatively regulated Tnfrsf11b as well as Bmal1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We systematically investigated the relationship between the sympathetic nervous system and the circadian clock in osteoblasts. The administration of phenylephrine, a nonspecific α1-adrenergic receptor (AR agonist, stimulated the expression of Tnfrsf11b, whereas the genetic ablation of α1B-AR signaling led to the alteration of Tnfrsf11b expression concomitant with Bmal1 and Per2 in bone. Thus, this study demonstrated that the circadian regulation of Tnfrsf11b was regulated by the clock genes encoding REV-ERBα (Nr1d1 and Bmal1 (Bmal1, also known as Arntl, which are components of the core loop of the circadian clock in osteoblasts.

  13. [Study of prevention and control of delirium in ventilated patients by simulating blockage of circadian rhythm with sedative in intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junyan; Dong, Chenming; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Hongsong; Song, Ruixia; Yang, Zhaohui; Feng, Fang; Qi, Yan; Yang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    To explore the effect of giving sedatives according to the circadian rhythm in prevention of occurrence of delirium and the prognosis of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation in intensive care unit (ICU). A prospective double-blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted. The patients admitted to Department of Critical Care Medicine of the Second Hospital of Lanzhou University from July 2014 to February 2015, undergoing invasive mechanical ventilation over 12 hours were enrolled. All the patients were given fentanyl for analgesia, and they were randomly divided into simulated circadian clock group (study group, n = 35) and non-simulated circadian clock group (control group, n = 35). The patients in each group were subdivided into three subgroups according to the kinds of sedative drugs, namely dexmedetomidine group (n = 8), propofol group (n = 14), and dexmedetomidine combined with propofol group (combination group, n = 13). Visual analogue scale (VAS) standard and Richmond agitation-sedation scale (RASS) were used to control the analgesic and to quantify the depth of sedation by titrating the dose of sedative drugs, the simulated circadian clock was set to control the RASS score at 0-1 during the day, and -1 to -2 at night in study group. The RASS score in the control group was set at -1 to -2 day and night. The urine 6-hydroxy acid melatonin (aMT6s) levels at different time points in the first diurnal rhythm (06:00, 12:00, 18:00, 24:00) were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The incidence of delirium, severe hypotension, severe bradycardia and other adverse reactions, duration of mechanical ventilation and the time of extubation, length of ICU stay, amount of sedative and analgesic drugs used were recorded. The correlation between delirium and other indexes was analyzed by using Spearman correlation analysis. (1) There were no significant differences in gender, age, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHEII

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  15. A central role for ubiquitination within a circadian clock protein modification code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina eStojkovic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms, endogenous cycles of about 24 h in physiology, are generated by a master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus and other clocks located in the brain and peripheral tissues. Circadian disruption is known to increase the incidence of various illnesses, such as mental disorders, metabolic syndrome and cancer. At the molecular level, periodicity is established by a set of clock genes via autoregulatory translation-transcription feedback loops. This clock mechanism is regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination, which set the pace of the clock. Ubiquitination in particular has been found to regulate the stability of core clock components, but also other clock protein functions. Mutation of genes encoding ubiquitin ligases can cause either elongation or shortening of the endogenous circadian period. Recent research has also started to uncover roles for deubiquitination in the molecular clockwork. Here we review the role of the ubiquitin pathway in regulating the circadian clock and we propose that ubiquitination is a key element in a clock protein modification code that orchestrates clock mechanisms and circadian behavior over the daily cycle.

  16. The Circadian Clock Gene Bmal1 Controls Thyroid Hormone-Mediated Spectral Identity and Cone Photoreceptor Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onkar B. Sawant

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks regulate various aspects of photoreceptor physiology, but their contribution to photoreceptor development and function is unclear. Cone photoreceptors are critical for color vision. Here, we define the molecular function of circadian activity within cone photoreceptors and reveal a role for the clock genes Bmal1 and Per2 in regulating cone spectral identity. ChIP analysis revealed that BMAL1 binds to the promoter region of the thyroid hormone (TH-activating enzyme type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase (Dio2 and thus regulates the expression of Dio2. TH treatment resulted in a partial rescue of the phenotype caused by the loss of Bmal1, thus revealing a functional relationship between Bmal1 and Dio2 in establishing cone photoreceptor identity. Furthermore, Bmal1 and Dio2 are required to maintain cone photoreceptor functional integrity. Overall, our results suggest a mechanism by which circadian proteins can locally regulate the availability of TH and influence tissue development and function.

  17. Identification of the molecular components of a Tigriopus californicus (Crustacea, Copepoda) circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbit, Katherine T; Christie, Andrew E

    2014-12-01

    Copepods of the genus Tigriopus have been proposed as marine models for investigations of environmental perturbation. One rapidly increasing anthropogenic stressor for intertidal organisms is light pollution. Given the sensitivity of circadian rhythms to exogenous light, the genes/proteins of a Tigriopus circadian pacemaker represent a potential system for investigating the influences of artificial light sources on circadian behavior in an intertidal species. Here, the molecular components of a putative Tigriopus californicus circadian clock were identified using publicly accessible transcriptome data; the recently deduced circadian proteins of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus were used as a reference. Transcripts encoding homologs of all commonly recognized ancestral arthropod core clock proteins were identified (i.e. CLOCK, CRYPTOCHROME 2, CYCLE, PERIOD and TIMELESS), as were ones encoding proteins likely to modulate the core clock (i.e. CASEIN KINASE II, CLOCKWORK ORANGE, DOUBLETIME, PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 1, PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A, SHAGGY, SUPERNUMERARY LIMBS and VRILLE) or to act as inputs to it (i.e. CRYPTOCHROME 1). PAR DOMAIN PROTEIN 1 was the only circadian-associated protein not identified in Tigriopus; it appears absent in Calanus too. These data represent just the third full set of molecular components for a crustacean circadian pacemaker (Daphnia pulex and C. finmarchicus previously), and only the second obtained from transcribed sequences (C. finmarchicus previously). Given Tigriopus' proposed status as a model for investigating the influences of anthropogenic stressors in the marine environment, these data provide the first suite of gene/protein targets for understanding how light pollution may influence circadian physiology and behavior in an intertidal organism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Aging has the opposite effect on cAMP and cGMP circadian variations in rat Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Andric, Silvana A; Kostic, Tatjana S

    2017-05-01

    The Leydig cell physiology displays a circadian rhythm driven by a complex interaction of the reproductive axis hormones and circadian system. The final output of this regulatory process is circadian pattern of steroidogenic genes expression and testosterone production. Aging gradually decreases robustness of rhythmic testosterone secretion without change in pattern of LH secretion. Here, we analyzed effect of aging on circadian variation of cAMP and cGMP signaling in Leydig cells. Results showed opposite effect of aging on cAMP and cGMP daily variation. Reduced amplitude of cAMP circadian oscillation was probably associated with changed expression of genes involved in cAMP production (increased circadian pattern of Adcy7, Adcy9, Adcy10 and decreased Adcy3); cAMP degradation (increased Pde4a, decreased Pde8b, canceled rhythm of Pde4d, completely reversed circadian pattern of Pde7b and Pde8a); and circadian expression of protein kinase A subunits (Prkac/PRKAC and Prkar2a). Aging stimulates expression of genes responsible for cGMP production (Nos2, Gucy1a3 and Gucy1b3/GUCYB3) and degradation (Pde5a, Pde6a and Pde6h) but the overall net effect is elevation of cGMP circadian oscillations in Leydig cells. In addition, the expression of cGMP-dependent kinase, Prkg1/PRKG1 is up-regulated. It seems that aging potentiate cGMP- and reduce cAMP-signaling in Leydig cells. Since both signaling pathways affect testosterone production and clockwork in the cells, further insights into these signaling pathways will help to unravel disorders linked to the circadian timing system, aging and reproduction.

  19. Circadian oscillators in the mouse brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin F; Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The circadian timekeeper of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SCN), and is characterized by rhythmic expression of a set of clock genes with specific 24-h daily profiles. An increasing amount of data suggests that additional circadian oscillators...... residing outside the SCN have the capacity to generate peripheral circadian rhythms. We have recently shown the presence of SCN-controlled oscillators in the neocortex and cerebellum of the rat. The function of these peripheral brain clocks is unknown, and elucidating this could involve mice...... and granular cell layers of the cerebellar cortex of the mouse brain. Among these, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Arntl, and Nr1d1 exhibit circadian rhythms suggesting that local running circadian oscillators reside within neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellar cortex. The temporal expression profiles of clock genes...

  20. Circadian Systems and Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    1999-01-01

    Circadian systems direct many metabolic parameters and, at the same time, they appear to be exquisitely shielded from metabolic variations. Although the recent decade of circadian research has brought insights into how circadian periodicity may be generated at the molecular level, little is known

  1. Circadian Clock, Cancer, and Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a global regulatory system that interfaces with most other regulatory systems and pathways in mammalian organisms. Investigations of the circadian clock–DNA damage response connections have revealed that nucleotide excision repair, DNA damage checkpoints, and apoptosis are appreciably influenced by the clock. Although several epidemiological studies in humans and a limited number of genetic studies in mouse model systems have indicated that clock disruption may predispose mammals to cancer, well-controlled genetic studies in mice have not supported the commonly held view that circadian clock disruption is a cancer risk factor. In fact, in the appropriate genetic background, clock disruption may instead aid in cancer regression by promoting intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the clock may affect the efficacy of cancer treatment (chronochemotherapy) by modulating the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of chemotherapeutic drugs as well as the activity of the DNA repair enzymes that repair the DNA damage caused by anticancer drugs. PMID:25302769

  2. Plant circadian clocks increase photosynthesis, growth, survival, and competitive advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Antony N; Salathia, Neeraj; Hall, Anthony; Kévei, Eva; Tóth, Réka; Nagy, Ferenc; Hibberd, Julian M; Millar, Andrew J; Webb, Alex A R

    2005-07-22

    Circadian clocks are believed to confer an advantage to plants, but the nature of that advantage has been unknown. We show that a substantial photosynthetic advantage is conferred by correct matching of the circadian clock period with that of the external light-dark cycle. In wild type and in long- and short-circadian period mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, plants with a clock period matched to the environment contain more chlorophyll, fix more carbon, grow faster, and survive better than plants with circadian periods differing from their environment. This explains why plants gain advantage from circadian control.

  3. CIRCADIAN CONTROL OF VISUAL INFORMATION-PROCESSING IN THE OPTIC LOBE OF THE GIANT COCKROACH BLABERUS-GIGANTEUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULT, R; MASTEBROEK, HAK

    1993-01-01

    Extracellular spike activity from three different types of visual interneurons found in the optic lobe of the giant cockroach Blaberus giganteus was recorded. The spike rate of all three types of neurons fluctuated in a circadian manner in constant darkness (DD). Two types, so-called ''on'' neurons

  4. Circadian control of kisspeptin and a gated GnRH response mediate the preovulatory luteinizing hormone surge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Wilbur P; Jarjisian, Stephan G; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    In spontaneously ovulating rodents, the preovulatory LH surge is initiated on the day of proestrus by a timed, stimulatory signal originating from the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present studies explored whether kisspeptin is part of the essential neural circuit...

  5. Circadian Clock Involvement in Zooplankton Diel Vertical Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfker, N Sören; Meyer, Bettina; Last, Kim S; Pond, David W; Hüppe, Lukas; Teschke, Mathias

    2017-07-24

    Biological clocks are a ubiquitous ancient and adaptive mechanism enabling organisms to anticipate environmental cycles and to regulate behavioral and physiological processes accordingly [1]. Although terrestrial circadian clocks are well understood, knowledge of clocks in marine organisms is still very limited [2-5]. This is particularly true for abundant species displaying large-scale rhythms like diel vertical migration (DVM) that contribute significantly to shaping their respective ecosystems [6]. Here we describe exogenous cycles and endogenous rhythms associated with DVM of the ecologically important and highly abundant planktic copepod Calanus finmarchicus. In the laboratory, C. finmarchicus shows circadian rhythms of DVM, metabolism, and most core circadian clock genes (clock, period1, period2, timeless, cryptochrome2, and clockwork orange). Most of these genes also cycle in animals assessed in the wild, though expression is less rhythmic at depth (50-140 m) relative to shallow-caught animals (0-50 m). Further, peak expressions of clock genes generally occurred at either sunset or sunrise, coinciding with peak migration times. Including one of the first field investigations of clock genes in a marine species [5, 7], this study couples clock gene measurements with laboratory and field data on DVM. While the mechanistic connection remains elusive, our results imply a high degree of causality between clock gene expression and one of the planet's largest daily migrations of biomass. We thus suggest that circadian clocks increase zooplankton fitness by optimizing the temporal trade-off between feeding and predator avoidance, especially when environmental drivers are weak or absent [8]. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Circadian and Circalunar Clock Interactions in a Marine Annelid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Zantke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Life is controlled by multiple rhythms. Although the interaction of the daily (circadian clock with environmental stimuli, such as light, is well documented, its relationship to endogenous clocks with other periods is little understood. We establish that the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii possesses endogenous circadian and circalunar (monthly clocks and characterize their interactions. The RNAs of likely core circadian oscillator genes localize to a distinct nucleus of the worm’s forebrain. The worm’s forebrain also harbors a circalunar clock entrained by nocturnal light. This monthly clock regulates maturation and persists even when circadian clock oscillations are disrupted by the inhibition of casein kinase 1δ/ε. Both circadian and circalunar clocks converge on the regulation of transcript levels. Furthermore, the circalunar clock changes the period and power of circadian behavior, although the period length of the daily transcriptional oscillations remains unaltered. We conclude that a second endogenous noncircadian clock can influence circadian clock function.

  7. Melatonin is required for the circadian regulation of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Avni V; Mosser, Eric A; Oikonomou, Grigorios; Prober, David A

    2015-03-18

    Sleep is an evolutionarily conserved behavioral state whose regulation is poorly understood. A classical model posits that sleep is regulated by homeostatic and circadian mechanisms. Several factors have been implicated in mediating the homeostatic regulation of sleep, but molecules underlying the circadian mechanism are unknown. Here we use animals lacking melatonin due to mutation of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (aanat2) to show that melatonin is required for circadian regulation of sleep in zebrafish. Sleep is dramatically reduced at night in aanat2 mutants maintained in light/dark conditions, and the circadian regulation of sleep is abolished in free-running conditions. We find that melatonin promotes sleep downstream of the circadian clock as it is not required to initiate or maintain circadian rhythms. Additionally, we provide evidence that melatonin may induce sleep in part by promoting adenosine signaling, thus potentially linking circadian and homeostatic control of sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Circadian control of permethrin-resistance in the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, Y.-Y.; Liu, Y.; Teng, H.-J.; Šauman, Ivo; Sehnal, František; Lee, H.-J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 9 (2010), s. 1219-1223 ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07032 Grant - others:Centers for Disease Control, Department of Health(TW) DOH96-DC-1206; National Science Council(TW) NSC 95-2313-B-002-084 MY3 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : insecticide resistence * median knock-down time * clock gene Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.310, year: 2010

  9. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  10. Putative pacemakers in the eyestalk and brain of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii show circadian oscillations in levels of mRNA for crustacean hyperglycemic hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janikua Nelson-Mora

    Full Text Available Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH synthesizing cells in the optic lobe, one of the pacemakers of the circadian system, have been shown to be present in crayfish. However, the presence of CHH in the central brain, another putative pacemaker of the multi-oscillatory circadian system, of this decapod and its circadian transcription in the optic lobe and brain have yet to be explored. Therefore, using qualitative and quantitative PCR, we isolated and cloned a CHH mRNA fragment from two putative pacemakers of the multi-oscillatory circadian system of Procambarus clarkii, the optic lobe and the central brain. This CHH transcript synchronized to daily light-dark cycles and oscillated under dark, constant conditions demonstrating statistically significant daily and circadian rhythms in both structures. Furthermore, to investigate the presence of the peptide in the central brain of this decapod, we used immunohistochemical methods. Confocal microscopy revealed the presence of CHH-IR in fibers and cells of the protocerebral and tritocerebal clusters and neuropiles, particularly in some neurons located in clusters 6, 14, 15 and 17. The presence of CHH positive neurons in structures of P. clarkii where clock proteins have been reported suggests a relationship between the circadian clockwork and CHH. This work provides new insights into the circadian regulation of CHH, a pleiotropic hormone that regulates many physiological processes such as glucose metabolism and osmoregulatory responses to stress.

  11. Putative pacemakers in the eyestalk and brain of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii show circadian oscillations in levels of mRNA for crustacean hyperglycemic hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Mora, Janikua; Prieto-Sagredo, Julio; Loredo-Ranjel, Rosaura; Fanjul-Moles, María Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) synthesizing cells in the optic lobe, one of the pacemakers of the circadian system, have been shown to be present in crayfish. However, the presence of CHH in the central brain, another putative pacemaker of the multi-oscillatory circadian system, of this decapod and its circadian transcription in the optic lobe and brain have yet to be explored. Therefore, using qualitative and quantitative PCR, we isolated and cloned a CHH mRNA fragment from two putative pacemakers of the multi-oscillatory circadian system of Procambarus clarkii, the optic lobe and the central brain. This CHH transcript synchronized to daily light-dark cycles and oscillated under dark, constant conditions demonstrating statistically significant daily and circadian rhythms in both structures. Furthermore, to investigate the presence of the peptide in the central brain of this decapod, we used immunohistochemical methods. Confocal microscopy revealed the presence of CHH-IR in fibers and cells of the protocerebral and tritocerebal clusters and neuropiles, particularly in some neurons located in clusters 6, 14, 15 and 17. The presence of CHH positive neurons in structures of P. clarkii where clock proteins have been reported suggests a relationship between the circadian clockwork and CHH. This work provides new insights into the circadian regulation of CHH, a pleiotropic hormone that regulates many physiological processes such as glucose metabolism and osmoregulatory responses to stress.

  12. Targeted Recruitment of the Basal Transcriptional Machinery by LNK Clock Components Controls the Circadian Rhythms of Nascent RNAs in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuan; Gil, Sergio; Grasser, Klaus D; Mas, Paloma

    2018-04-04

    The rhythms of steady-state mRNA expression pervade nearly all circadian systems. However, the mechanisms behind the rhythmic transcriptional synthesis and its correlation with circadian expression remain fully unexplored, particularly in plants. Here, we discovered a multi-functional protein complex that orchestrates the rhythms of transcriptional activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression of the circadian oscillator genes TOC1 (TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1/PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR1) and PRR5 (PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR5) initially relies on the modular function of the clock-related factor RVE8: its MYB domain provides the DNA binding specificity, while its LCL domain recruits the clock components, LNKs, to target promoters. LNKs, in turn, specifically interact with RNA Polymerase II and the transcript elongation FACT complex to rhythmically co-occupy the target loci. The functional interaction of these components is central for chromatin status, transcript initiation and elongation, as well as proper rhythms in nascent RNAs. Our findings thus explain how genome readout of environmental information ultimately results in rhythmic changes of gene expression. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a clockwork light source to enable cervical inspection by village health workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steventon Richard

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer can often be prevented by screening and may be curable if identified and treated in its early stages. However, 80% of new cases occur in less-developed countries where cervical cancer screening programmes are small-scale or non-existent. This is a human tragedy of great proportion, with many of those affected being young mothers. There is some evidence that cancerous or precancerous lesions may be detected by visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA and field studies indicate that this technique is effective, safe and acceptable to women. However, the provision of a light source for inspection of the cervix presents a major problem in less-developed countries, where candles and torches often provide the only means of illumination. Our objective was to develop a light source based on clockwork technology, that required no batteries or external power source. Methods We adapted the design of a commercially available clockwork torch to provide a light source for cervical inspection. The light source was then tested under laboratory conditions in a comparison with other illumination methods typically used in this application. Results The light source gave illuminance levels greater than those produced by any other method tested, and also had considerable advantages in terms of ease of use and safety. Conclusion This design is small, compact, effective and safe to use and promises a better and more affordable means of visualising the cervix. Further field trials of VIA are now required which incorporate this light source.

  14. Circadian expression of the clock gene Per2 is altered in the ruin lizard (Podarcis sicula) when temperature changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Maria Chiara; Jacobmeier, Birgit; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Foà, Augusto; Albrecht, Urs

    2005-02-18

    When exposed to the cold, the body temperature of the ruin lizard (Podarcis sicula), an ectothermic vertebrate, comes into equilibrium with that low environmental temperature. During this time, the behavioral output of the circadian clock, locomotor activity, disappears. We tested the activity of the circadian clockwork at low temperature (6 degrees C) by following the expression of one of its essential components, the Period2 (Per2) gene. Here we show that lizard Per2 (lPer2) expression, which is rhythmic and paralleling the behavioral rhythm of locomotor activity at higher temperature (29 degrees C), becomes constantly high at low temperature. When lizards are re-exposed to high temperature, rhythmic lPer2 expression is re-established after 2 days of adaptation and coincides with onset of locomotor activity. The alteration of the lPer2 expression pattern at low temperature indicates that the activity of the molecular feedback loop is modified under these conditions.

  15. Clock-dependent and system-driven oscillators interact in the suprachiasmatic nuclei to pace mammalian circadian rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Abitbol

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks drive biological rhythms with a period of approximately 24 hours and keep in time with the outside world through daily resetting by environmental cues. While this external entrainment has been extensively investigated in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN, the role of internal systemic rhythms, including daily fluctuations in core temperature or circulating hormones remains debated. Here, we show that lactating mice, which exhibit dampened systemic rhythms, possess normal molecular clockwork but impaired rhythms in both heat shock response gene expression and electrophysiological output in their SCN. This suggests that body rhythms regulate SCN activity downstream of the clock. Mathematical modeling predicts that systemic feedback upon the SCN functions as an internal oscillator that accounts for in vivo and ex vivo observations. Thus we are able to propose a new bottom-up hierarchical organization of circadian timekeeping in mammals, based on the interaction in the SCN between clock-dependent and system-driven oscillators.

  16. Beyond a Clockwork Orange: Acquiring Second Language Vocabulary Through Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Marlise; Cobb, Tom; Meara, Paul

    1998-01-01

    This replication study demonstrated that Jordanian college students studying English recognized the meanings of new words and built associations between them after comprehension-focused extensive reading. Controlled book-length reading generated more incidental word learning and a higher pickup rate than shorter tasks. Word frequency did not make…

  17. Acquiring Second Language Vocabulary through Reading: A Replication of the Clockwork Orange Study Using Second Language Acquirers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Michael; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Adult second language acquirers were asked to read the first two chapters of "A Clockwork Orange," a novel containing a number of slang words of Russian origin. Subsequent testing revealed modest but significant incidental acquisition of nadsat words. (Author/VWL)

  18. Diurnal Preference Predicts Phase Differences in Expression of Human Peripheral Circadian Clock Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Andrew; Gellerman, David; Ay, Ahmet; Woods, Kerri Pruitt; Filipowicz, Allan Michael; Jain, Kriti; Bearden, Neil; Ingram, Krista Kenyon

    2015-06-05

    Circadian rhythms play an integral role in human behavior, physiology and health. Individual differences in daily rhythms (chronotypes) can affect individual sleep-wake cycles, activity patterns and behavioral choices. Diurnal preference, the tendency towards morningness or eveningness among individuals, has been associated with interpersonal variation in circadian clock-related output measures, including body temperature, melatonin levels and clock gene mRNA in blood, oral mucosa, and dermal fibroblast cell cultures. Here we report gene expression data from two principal clock genes sampled from hair follicle cells, a peripheral circadian clock. Hair follicle cells from fourteen individuals of extreme morning or evening chronotype were sampled at three time points. RNA was extracted and quantitative PCR assays were used to measure mRNA expression patterns of two clock genes, Per3 and Nr1d2. We found significant differences in clock gene expression over time between chronotype groups, independent of gender or age of participants. Extreme evening chronotypes have a delay in phase of circadian clock gene oscillation relative to extreme morning types. Variation in the molecular clockwork of chronotype groups represents nearly three-hour phase differences (Per3: 2.61 hours; Nr1d2: 3.08 hours, both: 2.86) in circadian oscillations of these clock genes. The measurement of gene expression from hair follicles at three time points allows for a direct, efficient method of estimating phase shifts of a peripheral circadian clock in real-life conditions. The robust phase differences in temporal expression of clock genes associated with diurnal preferences provide the framework for further studies of the molecular mechanisms and gene-by-environment interactions underlying chronotype-specific behavioral phenomena, including social jetlag.

  19. Impacts of nurses’ circadian rhythm sleep disorders, fatigue, and depression on medication administration errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelbaset M. Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Medication administration errors, fatigue and depression were all significantly affected by circadian sleep disorders. An administration’s control of work flow to provide convenient sleep hours will help in improving sleep circadian rhythms and consequently minimize these problems.

  20. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Akinci

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The circadian rhythm sleep disorders define the clinical conditions where sleep and ndash;wake rhythm is disrupted despite optimum environmental and social conditions. They occur as a result of the changes in endogenous circadian hours or non-compatibility of environmental factors or social life with endogenous circadian rhythm. The sleep and ndash;wake rhythm is disrupted continuously or in repeating phases depending on lack of balance between internal and external cycles. This condition leads to functional impairments which cause insomnia, excessive sleepiness or both in people. Application of detailed sleep anamnesis and sleep diary with actigraphy record, if possible, will be sufficient for diagnosis. The treatment aims to align endogenous circadian rhythm with environmental conditions. The purpose of this article is to review pathology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of circadian rhythm disorder. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 178-189

  1. Proteomics of the photoneuroendocrine circadian system of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Casper; Rovsing, Louise

    2010-01-01

    The photoneuroendocrine circadian system of the brain consists of (a) specialized photoreceptors in the retina, (b) a circadian generator located in the forebrain that contains "clock genes," (c) specialized nuclei in the forebrain involved in neuroendocrine secretion, and (d) the pineal gland....../night variations in gene expression in the circadian system as well as in the whole brain and peripheral tissues have, during the last decade, been performed. However, studies of circadian changes in the proteome have been less investigated. In this survey, the anatomy and function of the circadian......-generating system in mammals is described, and recent proteomic studies that investigate day/night changes in the retina, SCN, and pineal gland are reviewed. Further circadian changes controlled by the SCN in gene and protein expression in the liver are discussed....

  2. A Clockwork Orange (1971: suffers Alex DeLarge antisocial personality disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura María GARCÍA LORENZO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Many movies have featured characters in which we can identify characteristics related to a personality disorder. However, only a few have obtained such an accurate portrait that allows us to make without any difficulty a concrete diagnosis based in the medical criteria used for real patients. A clockwork orange (1971 by Stanley Kubrick is one of those. This paper aims to identify in the behavior of his main character, Alex DeLarge, the characteristic features of an antisocial personality disorder. For this purpose, the standard criteria are applied and thus a conclusion is made out of them.In the first part we make a short introduction about Kubrick’s works and this movie, along with some basic notes on the analyzed disorder.

  3. Image listening and enhancement of the grotesque in A Clockwork Orang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wander Lourenço da Silva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the aesthetic result from the relation between images and sound elements of the film A Clockwork Orange by Stanley Kubrick. The theoretical framework comes from the concepts of aesthetic categories treated by Sánches Vázquez, the concept of ugly by Umberto Eco, the categories of sound and listening modes included in the Theory of Production Film Sound (Film Sound proposed by Michel Chion, and formulations of aesthetics in the light of semiotics of C. S. Peirce. It is concluded that the sound code helps to highlight the ambiguity present in most of the film, especially in times of application of state and system violence. Analyzing some scenes according to the wiretaps reduced, causal, and semantics, it could be said that music, by adding elements to the scene to contrasting aesthetic imagery, produces a sense of the grotesque highlight the mixture of pleasure and horror, and sometimes by comic presence.

  4. SCA1+ Cells from the Heart Possess a Molecular Circadian Clock and Display Circadian Oscillations in Cellular Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan C. Du Pré

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell antigen 1-positive (SCA1+ cells (SPCs have been investigated in cell-based cardiac repair and pharmacological research, although improved cardiac function after injection has been variable and the mode of action remains unclear. Circadian (24-hr rhythms are biorhythms regulated by molecular clocks that play an important role in (pathophysiology. Here, we describe (1 the presence of a molecular circadian clock in SPCs and (2 circadian rhythmicity in SPC function. We isolated SPCs from human fetal heart and found that these cells possess a molecular clock based on typical oscillations in core clock components BMAL1 and CRY1. Functional analyses revealed that circadian rhythmicity also governs SPC proliferation, stress tolerance, and growth factor release, with large differences between peaks and troughs. We conclude that SPCs contain a circadian molecular clock that controls crucial cellular functions. Taking circadian rhythms into account may improve reproducibility and outcome of research and therapies using SPCs.

  5. A note on the WGC, effective field theory and clockwork within string theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Luis E.; Montero, Miguel

    2018-02-01

    It has been recently argued that Higgsing of theories with U(1) n gauge interactions consistent with the Weak Gravity Conjecture (WGC) may lead to effective field theories parametrically violating WGC constraints. The minimal examples typically involve Higgs scalars with a large charge with respect to a U(1) (e.g. charges ( Z, 1) in U(1)2 with Z ≫ 1). This type of Higgs multiplets play also a key role in clockwork U(1) theories. We study these issues in the context of heterotic string theory and find that, even if there is no new physics at the standard magnetic WGC scale Λ ˜ g IR M P , the string scale is just slightly above, at a scale ˜ √{k_{IR}}Λ. Here k IR is the level of the IR U(1) worldsheet current. We show that, unlike the standard magnetic cutoff, this bound is insensitive to subsequent Higgsing. One may argue that this constraint gives rise to no bound at the effective field theory level since k IR is model dependent and in general unknown. However there is an additional constraint to be taken into account, which is that the Higgsing scalars with large charge Z should be part of the string massless spectrum, which becomes an upper bound k IR ≤ k 0 2 , where k 0 is the level of the UV currents. Thus, for fixed k 0, Z cannot be made parametrically large. The upper bound on the charges Z leads to limitations on the size and structure of hierarchies in an iterated U(1) clockwork mechanism.

  6. Role of PPARα in the Control of Torpor through FGF21-NPY Pathway: From Circadian Clock to Seasonal Change in Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Ishida

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In nature, hibernating animals encounter fasting, cold temperature and short day seasonally. Torpor is a state of decreased physiological activity in an animal, usually characterized by a reduced body temperature and rate of metabolism to adapt such a severe environment. Ablation of the central clock synchronizer, the suprachiasmatic nucleus in brain, abolishes torpor, a hibernation-like state, implicating the circadian clock involved in this seasonal change. Biologists knows well the energy source of daily heterotherms/hibernators changed from glucose to lipids in winter. Here we review several lines of evidence of a master transcriptional regulator in lipid catabolism, PPARα, in the control of torpor through FGF21-NPY pathway. This indicate the importance of circadian—and photoperiod—regulation of PPARα to tell seasons in our body.

  7. Regulated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis: A global analysis of differential control by hormones and the circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Pamela J. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2010-03-18

    The long-term goal of this research was to better understand the influence of mRNA stability on gene regulation, particularly in response to hormones and the circadian clock. The primary aim of this project was to examine this using DNA microarrays, small RNA analysis and other approaches. We accomplished these objectives, although we were only able to detect small changes in mRNA stability in response to these stimuli. However, the work also contributed to a major breakthrough allowing the identification of small RNAs on a genomic scale in eukaryotes. Moreover, the project prompted us to develop a new way to analyze mRNA decay genome wide. Thus, the research was hugely successful beyond our objectives.

  8. Modeling of regulatory networks: theory and applications in the study of the Drosophila circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, Elizabeth Y; Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan M

    2011-01-01

    Biological networks can be very complex. Mathematical modeling and simulation of regulatory networks can assist in resolving unanswered questions about these complex systems, which are often impossible to explore experimentally. The network regulating the Drosophila circadian clock is particularly amenable to such modeling given its complexity and what we call the clockwork orange (CWO) anomaly. CWO is a protein whose function in the network as an indirect activator of genes per, tim, vri, and pdp1 is counterintuitive--in isolated experiments, CWO inhibits transcription of these genes. Although many different types of modeling frameworks have recently been applied to the Drosophila circadian network, this chapter focuses on the application of continuous deterministic dynamic modeling to this network. In particular, we present three unique systems of ordinary differential equations that have been used to successfully model different aspects of the circadian network. The last model incorporates the newly identified protein CWO, and we explain how this model's unique mathematical equations can be used to explore and resolve the CWO anomaly. Finally, analysis of these equations gives rise to a new network regulatory rule, which clarifies the unusual role of CWO in this dynamical system. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gremlin-2 is a BMP antagonist that is regulated by the circadian clock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeung, Ching-Yan Chloé; Gossan, Nicole; Lu, Yinhui

    2014-01-01

    knowledge of tendon gene regulation is essential for a complete understanding of FCT biology. Here we show autonomous circadian rhythms in mouse tendon and primary human tenocytes, controlled by an intrinsic molecular circadian clock. Time-series microarrays identified the first circadian transcriptome...

  10. Domestication selected for deceleration of the circadian clock in cultivated tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Niels A.; Wijnen, Cris L.; Srinivasan, Arunkumar; Ryngajllo, M.; Ofner, I.; Lin, Tao; Ranjan, Aashish; West, Donelly; Maloof, J.N.; Sinha, Neelima R.; Huang, Sanwen; Zamir, Dani; Jimenez-Gomez, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a critical regulator of plant physiology and development, controlling key agricultural traits in crop plants1. In addition, natural variation in circadian rhythms is important for local adaptation2, 3, 4. However, quantitative modulation of circadian rhythms due to artificial

  11. On the genetic basis of temperature compensation of circadian clocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    (Feldman and Hoyle 1973), the molecular mechanisms regulating circadian rhythms began to become clear. The consensus view is that the molecular mechanism underlying circadian rhythms involves two interlocked feedback loops based on transcription-translation controls (Sharma 2003a). Since the identification of ...

  12. Circadian rhythm and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, A

    2016-12-01

    Circadian rhythm is an internal biological clock which initiates and monitors various physiological processes with a fixed time-related schedule. The master circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus. The circadian clock undergoes significant changes throughout the life span, at both the physiological and molecular levels. This cyclical physiological process, which is very complex and multifactorial, may be associated with metabolic alterations, atherosclerosis, impaired cognition, mood disturbances and even development of cancer. Sex differences do exist, and the well-known sleep disturbances associated with menopause are a good example. Circadian rhythm was detected in the daily pattern of hot flushes, with a peak in the afternoons. Endogenous secretion of melatonin decreases with aging across genders, and, among women, menopause is associated with a significant reduction of melatonin levels, affecting sleep. Although it might seem that hot flushes and melatonin secretion are likely related, there are not enough data to support such a hypothesis.

  13. The effect of MElatonin on Depressive symptoms, Anxiety, CIrcadian and Sleep disturbances in patients after acute coronary syndrome (MEDACIS): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Michael Tvilling; Isbrand, Anders; Andersen, Ulla Overgaard; Andersen, Lars Juel; Taskiran, Mustafa; Simonsen, Erik; Gögenur, Ismail

    2017-02-23

    Depression following acute coronary syndrome (ACS) constitutes a serious and debilitating problem. Approximately one in five patients will develop significant depression following ACS and less severe depressive symptoms are even more frequent. Furthermore, anxiety symptoms and sleep-wake disturbances are frequent. The objective of the MEDACIS trial is to investigate whether prophylactic treatment with melatonin has a preventive effect on depression, depressive and anxiety symptoms, sleep, and circadian disturbances following ACS. "The effect of MElatonin and Depressive symptoms, Anxiety, CIrcadian and Sleep disturbances in patients after acute coronary syndrome" trial (MEDACIS) is a multicenter, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. A total of 240 patients with ACS and no depressive symptoms will be included in the trial for treatment with either 25 mg melatonin or placebo for a 12-week period. Development and severity of depressive symptoms will be evaluated using Major Depression Inventory every 2 weeks with the purpose of investigating the potential preventive effect of melatonin on depressive symptoms. Previously, only selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been investigated in a primary preventive setup in patients following ACS. However, SSRIs are associated with several side effects. An ideal intervention would constitute the highest degree of prevention of depressive symptoms with the lowest risk of side effects. In this regard, melatonin may have advantages due to its low toxicity as well as its proven anxiolytic and hypnotic effects. ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT02451293 . Registered on 12 May 2015. EudraCT nr. 2015-002116-32.

  14. Cultural Aspect in Anthony Burgess’ Novel A Clockwork Orange: The Translation of Russian “Nadsat” into Lithuanian

    OpenAIRE

    Blonskytė, Marija

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to compare two Lithuanian translations of A Clockwork Orange in respect of its main stylistic component the Russian “Nadsat”, to examine the intercultural translation problems arising in this translation and strategies invoked by the translators, and make decisions about the quality of the target texts. To reach this aim, descriptive and comparative methods as well as quantitative analysis are applied. The theoretical part of the thesis describes the cultural asp...

  15. Non-circadian expression masking clock-driven weak transcription rhythms in U2OS cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hoffmann

    Full Text Available U2OS cells harbor a circadian clock but express only a few rhythmic genes in constant conditions. We identified 3040 binding sites of the circadian regulators BMAL1, CLOCK and CRY1 in the U2OS genome. Most binding sites even in promoters do not correlate with detectable rhythmic transcript levels. Luciferase fusions reveal that the circadian clock supports robust but low amplitude transcription rhythms of representative promoters. However, rhythmic transcription of these potentially clock-controlled genes is masked by non-circadian transcription that overwrites the weaker contribution of the clock in constant conditions. Our data suggest that U2OS cells harbor an intrinsically rather weak circadian oscillator. The oscillator has the potential to regulate a large number of genes. The contribution of circadian versus non-circadian transcription is dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and may determine the apparent complexity of the circadian transcriptome.

  16. Glia-related circadian plasticity in the visual system of Diptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta eGórska-Andrzejak

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The circadian changes in morphology of the first visual neuropil or lamina of Diptera represents an example of the neuronal plasticity controlled by the circadian clock (circadian plasticity. It is observed in terminals of the compound eye photoreceptor cells, the peripheral oscillators expressing the clock genes. However, it has been found also in their postsynaptic partners, the L1 and L2 monopolar cells, in which the activity of the clock genes have not yet been detected. The circadian input that the L1 and L2 receive seems to originate not only from the retina photoreceptors and from the circadian pacemaker neurons located in the brain, but also from the glial cells that express the clock genes and thus contain circadian oscillators. This paper summarizes the morphological and biochemical rhythms in glia of the optic lobe, shows how they contribute to circadian plasticity, and discusses how glial clocks may modulate circadian rhythms in the lamina.

  17. Circadian rhythms of hedonic drinking behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainier, Claire; Mateo, Maria; Felder-Schmittbuhl, Marie-Paule; Mendoza, Jorge

    2017-05-04

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the site of the main circadian clock, synchronized by the light-dark cycle, which generates behavioral rhythms like feeding, drinking and activity. Notwithstanding, the main role of the SCN clock on the control of all circadian rhythms has been questioned due to the presence of clock activity in many brain areas, including those implicated in the regulation of feeding and reward. Moreover, whether circadian rhythms of particular motivated behaviors exist is unknown. Here, we evaluated the spontaneous daily and circadian behavior of consumption of a sweet caloric solution (5-10% sucrose), and the effects of sucrose intake on the expression of clock genes in the mouse brain. Mice showed a daily (in a light-dark cycle) and a circadian (in constant darkness conditions) rhythm in the intake and sucrose preference with a rise for both parameters at night (or subjective night). In addition, we observed changes in the circadian day-night expression of the clock gene Per2 in the SCN, cortex and striatum of animals ingesting sucrose compared to control mice on pure water. Finally, daily rhythms of sucrose intake and preference were abolished in Per2 Brdm1 - and double Per1 -/- Per2 Brdm1 -mutant animals. These data indicate that the expression of circadian rhythms of hedonic feeding behaviors may be controlled by brain circadian clocks and Per gene expression. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neurobiology of circadian systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Pierre; Steimer, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Time is a dimension tightly associated with the biology of living species. There are cycles of varied lengths in biological activities, from very short (ultradian) rhythms to rhythms with a period of approximately one day (circadian) and rhythms with longer cycles, of a week, a month, a season, or even longer. These rhythms are generated by endogenous biological clocks, i.e. time-keeping structures, rather than being passive reactions to external fluctuations. In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the major pacemaker. The pineal gland, which secretes melatonin, is the major pacemaker in other phyla. There also exist biological clocks generating circadian rhythms in peripheral tissues, for example the liver. A series of clock genes generates the rhythm through positive and negative feedback effect of proteins on their own synthesis, and this system oscillates with a circadian period. External factors serve as indicators of the astronomical (solar) time and are called zeitgebers, literally time-givers. Light is the major zeitgeber, which resets daily the SCN circadian clock. In the absence of zeitgebers, the circadian rhythm is said to be free running; it has a period that differs from 24 hours. The SCN, together with peripheral clocks, enables a time-related homeostasis, which can become disorganized in its regulation by external factors (light, social activities, food intake), in the coordination and relative phase position of rhythms, or in other ways. Disturbances of rhythms are found in everyday life (jet lag, shift work), in sleep disorders, and in several psychiatric disorders including affective disorders. As almost all physiological and behavioural functions in humans occur on a rhythmic basis, the possibility that advances, delays or desynchronization of circadian rhythms might participate in neurological and psychiatric disorders has been a theme of research. In affective disorders, a decreased circadian amplitude of several rhythms as well as a

  19. Crosstalk between the circadian clock and innate immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Zhang

    Full Text Available The circadian clock integrates temporal information with environmental cues in regulating plant development and physiology. Recently, the circadian clock has been shown to affect plant responses to biotic cues. To further examine this role of the circadian clock, we tested disease resistance in mutants disrupted in CCA1 and LHY, which act synergistically to regulate clock activity. We found that cca1 and lhy mutants also synergistically affect basal and resistance gene-mediated defense against Pseudomonas syringae and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Disrupting the circadian clock caused by overexpression of CCA1 or LHY also resulted in severe susceptibility to P. syringae. We identified a downstream target of CCA1 and LHY, GRP7, a key constituent of a slave oscillator regulated by the circadian clock and previously shown to influence plant defense and stomatal activity. We show that the defense role of CCA1 and LHY against P. syringae is at least partially through circadian control of stomatal aperture but is independent of defense mediated by salicylic acid. Furthermore, we found defense activation by P. syringae infection and treatment with the elicitor flg22 can feedback-regulate clock activity. Together this data strongly supports a direct role of the circadian clock in defense control and reveal for the first time crosstalk between the circadian clock and plant innate immunity.

  20. Circadian timekeeping is disturbed in rheumatoid arthritis at molecular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesa-Petteri Kouri

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA have disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. These are reflected in altered circadian rhythm of circulating serum cortisol, melatonin and IL-6 levels and in chronic fatigue. We hypothesized that the molecular machinery responsible for the circadian timekeeping is perturbed in RA. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of circadian clock in RA. METHODS: Gene expression of thirteen clock genes was analyzed in the synovial membrane of RA and control osteoarthritis (OA patients. BMAL1 protein was detected using immunohistochemistry. Cell autonomous clock oscillation was started in RA and OA synovial fibroblasts using serum shock. The effect of pro-inflammatory stimulus on clock gene expression in synovial fibroblasts was studied using IL-6 and TNF-α. RESULTS: Gene expression analysis disclosed disconcerted circadian timekeeping and immunohistochemistry revealed strong cytoplasmic localization of BMAL1 in RA patients. Perturbed circadian timekeeping is at least in part inflammation independent and cell autonomous, because RA synovial fibroblasts display altered circadian expression of several clock components, and perturbed circadian production of IL-6 and IL-1β after clock resetting. However, inflammatory stimulus disturbs the rhythm in cultured fibroblasts. Throughout the experiments ARNTL2 and NPAS2 appeared to be the most affected clock genes in human immune-inflammatory conditions. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the molecular machinery controlling the circadian rhythm is disturbed in RA patients.

  1. The circadian response of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Zele

    Full Text Available Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC signal environmental light level to the central circadian clock and contribute to the pupil light reflex. It is unknown if ipRGC activity is subject to extrinsic (central or intrinsic (retinal network-mediated circadian modulation during light entrainment and phase shifting. Eleven younger persons (18-30 years with no ophthalmological, medical or sleep disorders participated. The activity of the inner (ipRGC and outer retina (cone photoreceptors was assessed hourly using the pupil light reflex during a 24 h period of constant environmental illumination (10 lux. Exogenous circadian cues of activity, sleep, posture, caffeine, ambient temperature, caloric intake and ambient illumination were controlled. Dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO was determined from salivary melatonin assay at hourly intervals, and participant melatonin onset values were set to 14 h to adjust clock time to circadian time. Here we demonstrate in humans that the ipRGC controlled post-illumination pupil response has a circadian rhythm independent of external light cues. This circadian variation precedes melatonin onset and the minimum ipRGC driven pupil response occurs post melatonin onset. Outer retinal photoreceptor contributions to the inner retinal ipRGC driven post-illumination pupil response also show circadian variation whereas direct outer retinal cone inputs to the pupil light reflex do not, indicating that intrinsically photosensitive (melanopsin retinal ganglion cells mediate this circadian variation.

  2. Influence of weeks of circadian misalignment on leptin levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Nguyen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available June Nguyen, Kenneth P Wright JrDepartment of Integrative Physiology, Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USAAbstract: The neurobiology of circadian, wakefulness–sleep, and feeding systems interact to influence energy homeostasis. Sleep and circadian disruptions are reported to be associated with increased risk of diabetes and obesity, yet the roles of energy balance hormones in these associations are largely unknown. Therefore, in the current study we aimed to assess the influence of several weeks of circadian misalignment (sleep and wakefulness occurring at an inappropriate biological time on the anorexigenic adipocyte hormone leptin. We utilized data from a previous study designed to assess physiological and cognitive consequences of changes in day length and light exposure as may occur during space flight, including exploration class space missions and exposure to the Martian Sol (day length. We hypothesized that circadian misalignment during an exploration class spaceflight simulation would reduce leptin levels. Following a three-week ~8 hours per night home sleep schedule, 14 healthy participants lived in the laboratory for more than one month. After baseline data collection, participants were scheduled to either 24.0 or 24.6 hours of wakefulness–sleep schedules for 25 days. Changes in the phase of the circadian melatonin rhythm, sleep, and leptin levels were assessed. Half of participants analyzed exhibited circadian misalignment with an average change in phase angle from baseline of ~4 hours and these participants showed reduced leptin levels, sleep latency, stage 2 and total sleep time (7.3 to 6.6 hours and increased wakefulness after sleep onset (all P < 0.05. The control group remained synchronized and showed significant increases in sleep latency and leptin levels. Our findings indicate that weeks of circadian misalignment, such as that which occurs in circadian sleep disorders, alters leptin

  3. Development of diabetes does not alter behavioral and molecular circadian rhythms in a transgenic rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jingyi; Thomas, Anthony P; Schroeder, Analyne M; Rakshit, Kuntol; Colwell, Christopher S; Matveyenko, Aleksey V

    2017-08-01

    Metabolic state and circadian clock function exhibit a complex bidirectional relationship. Circadian disruption increases propensity for metabolic dysfunction, whereas common metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are associated with impaired circadian rhythms. Specifically, alterations in glucose availability and glucose metabolism have been shown to modulate clock gene expression and function in vitro; however, to date, it is unknown whether development of diabetes imparts deleterious effects on the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian clock and SCN-driven outputs in vivo. To address this question, we undertook studies in aged diabetic rats transgenic for human islet amyloid polypeptide, an established nonobese model of T2DM (HIP rat), which develops metabolic defects closely recapitulating those present in patients with T2DM. HIP rats were also cross-bred with a clock gene reporter rat model (Per1:luciferase transgenic rat) to permit assessment of the SCN and the peripheral molecular clock function ex vivo. Utilizing these animal models, we examined effects of diabetes on 1 ) behavioral circadian rhythms, 2 ) photic entrainment of circadian activity, 3 ) SCN and peripheral tissue molecular clock function, and 4 ) melatonin secretion. We report that circadian activity, light-induced entrainment, molecular clockwork, as well as melatonin secretion are preserved in the HIP rat model of T2DM. These results suggest that despite the well-characterized ability of glucose to modulate circadian clock gene expression acutely in vitro, SCN clock function and key behavioral and physiological outputs appear to be preserved under chronic diabetic conditions characteristic of nonobese T2DM. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Circadian photosensitive phase and photoperiodic control of testis activity in the mink, a short-day mammal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boissin-Agasse, L.; Boissin, J.; Ortavant, R.

    1982-02-01

    Evidence of a circadian photosensitive phase in male mink, whose annual reproductive cycle is characterized by the recrudescence of testicular development in autumn, was based on the study of testicular response after interrupting the dark period by light breaks offered at various times. In this mammal, the experimental short days 4L:20D and 8L:16D stimulated testicular growth. Short photoperiods, including a main light period of 3.5 h and an additional 0.5 h light break 7.5 h after the beginning of the main photoperiod, were as effective as 8L:16D in stimulating testicular development. On the other hand, when a 0.5 h light break occurred 11.5 or 15.5 h after the beginning of the main photoperiod, the same inhibiting effect on testicular activity was obtained as for long photoperiods. However, when 0.5 h light breaks were given 19.5 after the beginning of the main light period, some minks recognized, as, the onset of the shorter of the two light periods offered. Thus our results proved the existence of a special phase in the day cycle in which light inhibited testicular development in the mink which appears to be a short-day animal. One explanation of the difference between long-day and short-day animals would be the following: if for long-day animals exposure to light during the photosensitive phase led to gonadostimulation, in short-day mammals, like mink, it exerted an inhibiting influence on testicular growth.

  5. Physiological effects of light on the human circadian pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, T. L.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The physiology of the human circadian pacemaker and its influence and on the daily organization of sleep, endocrine and behavioral processes is an emerging interest in science and medicine. Understanding the development, organization and fundamental properties underlying the circadian timing system may provide insight for the application of circadian principles to the practice of clinical medicine, both diagnostically (interpretation of certain clinical tests are dependent on time of day) and therapeutically (certain pharmacological responses vary with the time of day). The light-dark cycle is the most powerful external influence acting upon the human circadian pacemaker. It has been shown that timed exposure to light can both synchronize and reset the phase of the circadian pacemaker in a predictable manner. The emergence of detectable circadian rhythmicity in the neonatal period is under investigation (as described elsewhere in this issue). Therefore, the pattern of light exposure provided in the neonatal intensive care setting has implications. One recent study identified differences in both amount of sleep time and weight gain in infants maintained in a neonatal intensive care environment that controlled the light-dark cycle. Unfortunately, neither circadian phase nor the time of day has been considered in most clinical investigations. Further studies with knowledge of principles characterizing the human circadian timing system, which governs a wide array of physiological processes, are required to integrate these findings with the practice of clinical medicine.

  6. Postoperative circadian disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    parameters, and if pharmacological administration of chronobiotics could improve postoperative recovery. Circadian rhythm disturbances were found in all the examined endogenous rhythms. A delay was found in the endogenous rhythm of plasma melatonin and excretion of the metabolite of melatonin (AMT6s...... in patients with lower than median pain levels for a three days period after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In the series of studies included in this thesis we have systematically shown that circadian disturbances are found in the secretion of hormones, the sleep-wake cycle, core body temperature rhythm...

  7. Circadian rhythms of hemostatic factors in tetraplegia: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over study of melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostovski, E; Dahm, A E A; Mowinckel, M C; Stranda, A; Skretting, G; Østerud, B; Sandset, P M; Iversen, P O

    2015-04-01

    This is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over study of melatonin in complete tetraplegia. Tetraplegic patients have an increased risk of venous thrombosis despite prophylaxis, blunted variations in melatonin and altered circadian variation of several hemostatic markers. To examine whether melatonin could modify the regulation of hemostasis, we measured plasma melatonin and several markers of hemostasis in tetraplegic subjects with or without melatonin supplement. The study was conducted in the Section for Spinal Cord Injury, Sunnaas Hospital, Nesoddtangen, Norway. Six subjects with long-standing complete tetraplegia were included in this cross-over study with 2 mg of melatonin or placebo given 4 days before sampling. We also included six able-bodied men without any intervention. Plasma samples were then collected frequently during a 24-h awake/sleep cycle. The plasma concentrations of melatonin and the various markers were analyzed using linear mixed models. The 24-h profiles of prothrombin fragment 1+2 and von Willebrand factor, but not D-dimer, activated FVII, tissue factor pathway inhibitor and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, differed (Ptetraplegia. Financial support was provided from the Throne Holst Foundation.

  8. Circadian clocks - the fall and rise of physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    2005-01-01

    Circadian clocks control the daily life of most light-sensitive organisms- from cyanobacteria to humans. Molecular processes generate cellular rhythmicity, and cellular clocks in animals coordinate rhythms through interaction ( known as coupling). This hierarchy of clocks generates a complex,

  9. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  10. CIRCADIAN RHYTMICITY AND DEPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pregelj

    2008-11-01

    There is a grooving evidence that dysfunction in circadian rhythm regulation andmelatonergic system function is involved in depression pathogenesis. It is known thatclinically used antidepressants have influence on melatonergic system, probably throughchanged ratio between melatonergic type 1 and 2 receptors. With the clinical use of newcompounds like agomelatine that directly regulates melatonergic system new opportunities in depression treatment emerged

  11. Circadian Patterns in Twitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Thij, M.C.; Kampstra, P.; Bhulai, S.; Laux, F.; Pardalos, P.M.; Crolotte, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study activity on the microblogging platform Twitter. We analyse two separate aspects of activity on Twitter. First, we analyse the daily and weekly number of posts, through which we find clear circadian (daily) patterns emerging in the use of Twitter for multiple languages. We see

  12. The promoter activities of sucrose phosphate synthase genes in rice, OsSPS1 and OsSPS11, are controlled by light and circadian clock, but not by sucrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madoka eYonekura

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although sucrose plays a role in sugar sensing and its signaling pathway, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of the expressions of plant sucrose-related genes. Our previous study on the expression of the sucrose phosphate synthase gene family in rice (OsSPSs suggested the involvement of sucrose sensing and/or circadian rhythm in the transcriptional regulation of OsSPS. To examine whether the promoters of OsSPSs can be controlled by sugars and circadian clock, we produced transgenic rice plants harboring a promoter–luciferase construct for OsSPS1 or OsSPS11 and analyzed the changes in the promoter activities by monitoring bioluminescence from intact transgenic plants in real time. Transgenic plants fed sucrose, glucose, or mannitol under continuous light conditions showed no changes in bioluminescence intensity; meanwhile, the addition of sucrose increased the concentration of sucrose in the plants, and the mRNA levels of OsSPS remained constant. These results suggest that these OsSPS promoters may not be regulated by sucrose levels in the tissues. Next, we investigated the changes in the promoter activities under 12-h light/12-h dark cycles and continuous light conditions. Under the light–dark cycle, both OsSPS1 and OsSPS11 promoter activities were low in the dark and increased rapidly after the beginning of the light period. When the transgenic rice plants were moved to the continuous light condition, both POsSPS1::LUC and POsSPS11::LUC reporter plants exhibited circadian bioluminescence rhythms; bioluminescence peaked during the subjective day with a 27-h period: in the early morning as for OsSPS1 promoter and midday for OsSPS11 promoter. These results indicate that these OsSPS promoters are controlled by both light illumination and circadian clock and that the regulatory mechanism of promoter activity differs between the 2 OsSPS genes.

  13. The Circadian Clock Gene Period1 Connects the Molecular Clock to Neural Activity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Takashi; Block, Gene D; Colwell, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    The neural activity patterns of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons are dynamically regulated throughout the circadian cycle with highest levels of spontaneous action potentials during the day. These rhythms in electrical activity are critical for the function of the circadian timing system and yet the mechanisms by which the molecular clockwork drives changes in the membrane are not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine how the clock gene Period1 (Per1) regulates the electrical activity in the mouse SCN by transiently and selectively decreasing levels of PER1 through use of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide. We found that this treatment effectively reduced SCN neural activity. Direct current injection to restore the normal membrane potential partially, but not completely, returned firing rate to normal levels. The antisense treatment also reduced baseline [Ca(2+)]i levels as measured by Fura2 imaging technique. Whole cell patch clamp recording techniques were used to examine which specific potassium currents were altered by the treatment. These recordings revealed that the large conductance [Ca(2+)]i-activated potassium currents were reduced in antisense-treated neurons and that blocking this current mimicked the effects of the anti-sense on SCN firing rate. These results indicate that the circadian clock gene Per1 alters firing rate in SCN neurons and raise the possibility that the large conductance [Ca(2+)]i-activated channel is one of the targets. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Review Article Clockworks in the Central and Peripheral Organs: from Clock-related Genes to the Physiological and Pathological Rhythms

    OpenAIRE

    Moriya, Takahiro; Shinohara, Kazuyuki

    2003-01-01

    Daily rhythms such as sleep-wake, feeding, and the core body temperature, persist with a period of approximately 24 hr even in the absence of environmental time cues, suggesting the existence of an endogenous time-keeping system, the circadian clock. In mammals, the circadian clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SCN). Recently, a number of studies have revealed that circadian oscillations in the SCN are driven by the intracellular transcriptional and post-trans...

  15. A circadian rhythm regulating hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluhm, Burton H; Burnham, A Michele; Dunkle, Larry D

    2010-01-01

    Many metabolic and developmental processes in fungi are controlled by biological rhythms. Circadian rhythms approximate a daily (24 h) cycle and have been thoroughly studied in the model fungus, Neurospora crassa. However relatively few examples of true circadian rhythms have been documented among other filamentous fungi. In this study we describe a circadian rhythm underlying hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii, an important pathogen of soybean. After growth in light or light : dark cycles, colonies transferred to darkness produced zonate bands of melanized hyphae interspersed with bands of hyaline hyphae. Rhythmic production of bands was remarkably persistent in the absence of external cues, lasting at least 7 d after transfer to darkness, and was compensated over a range of temperatures. As in N. crassa, blue light but not red light was sufficient to entrain the circadian rhythm in C. kikuchii, and a putative ortholog of white collar-1, one of the genes required for light responses in N. crassa, was identified in C. kikuchii. Circadian regulation of melanization is conserved in other members of the genus: Similar rhythms were identified in another field isolate of C. kikuchii as well as field isolates of C. beticola and C. sorghi, but not in wild-type strains of C. zeae-maydis or C. zeina. This report represents the first documented circadian rhythm among Dothideomycete fungi and provides a new opportunity to dissect the molecular basis of circadian rhythms among filamentous fungi.

  16. Circadian clock-mediated regulation of blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, Lauren G; Gumz, Michelle L

    2017-12-02

    Most bodily functions vary over the course of a 24h day. Circadian rhythms in body temperature, sleep-wake cycles, metabolism, and blood pressure (BP) are just a few examples. These circadian rhythms are controlled by the central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus and peripheral clocks located throughout the body. Light and food cues entrain these clocks to the time of day and this synchronicity contributes to the regulation of a variety of physiological processes with effects on overall health. The kidney, brain, nervous system, vasculature, and heart have been identified through the use of mouse models and clinical trials as peripheral clock regulators of BP. The dysregulation of this circadian pattern of BP, with or without hypertension, is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The mechanism of this dysregulation is unknown and is a growing area of research. In this review, we highlight research of human and mouse circadian models that has provided insight into the roles of these molecular clocks and their effects on physiological functions. Additional tissue-specific studies of the molecular clock mechanism are needed, as well as clinical studies including more diverse populations (different races, female patients, etc.), which will be critical to fully understand the mechanism of circadian regulation of BP. Understanding how these molecular clocks regulate the circadian rhythm of BP is critical in the treatment of circadian BP dysregulation and hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Photoperiodic plasticity in circadian clock neurons in insects

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    Sakiko eShiga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since Bünning’s observation of circadian rhythms and photoperiodism in the runner bean Phaseolus multiflorus in 1936, many studies have shown that photoperiodism is based on the circadian clock system. In insects, involvement of circadian clock genes or neurons has been recently shown in the photoperiodic control of developmental arrests, diapause. Based on molecular and neuronal studies in Drosophila melanogaster, photoperiodic changes have been reported for expression patterns of the circadian clock genes, subcellular distribution of clock proteins, fiber distribution, or the number of plausible clock neurons in different species. Photoperiod sets peaks of per or tim mRNA abundance at lights-off in Sarcophaga crassipalpis, Chymomyza costata and Protophormia terraenovae. Abundance of per and Clock mRNA changes by photoperiod in Pyrrhocoris apterus. Subcellular Per distribution in circadian clock neurons changes with photoperiod in P. terraenovae. Although photoperiodism is not known in Leucophaea maderae, under longer day length, more stomata and longer commissural fibers of circadian clock neurons have been found. These plastic changes in the circadian clock neurons could be an important constituent for photoperiodic clock mechanisms to integrate repetitive photoperiodic information and produce different outputs based on day length.

  18. Neural Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation of Natural and Drug Reward

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    Lauren M. DePoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are endogenously generated near 24-hour variations of physiological and behavioral functions. In humans, disruptions to the circadian system are associated with negative health outcomes, including metabolic, immune, and psychiatric diseases, such as addiction. Animal models suggest bidirectional relationships between the circadian system and drugs of abuse, whereby desynchrony, misalignment, or disruption may promote vulnerability to drug use and the transition to addiction, while exposure to drugs of abuse may entrain, disrupt, or perturb the circadian timing system. Recent evidence suggests natural (i.e., food and drug rewards may influence overlapping neural circuitry, and the circadian system may modulate the physiological and behavioral responses to these stimuli. Environmental disruptions, such as shifting schedules or shorter/longer days, influence food and drug intake, and certain mutations of circadian genes that control cellular rhythms are associated with altered behavioral reward. We highlight the more recent findings associating circadian rhythms to reward function, linking environmental and genetic evidence to natural and drug reward and related neural circuitry.

  19. Maternal feeding controls fetal biological clock.

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    Hidenobu Ohta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is widely accepted that circadian physiological rhythms of the fetus are affected by oscillators in the maternal brain that are coupled to the environmental light-dark (LD cycle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To study the link between fetal and maternal biological clocks, we investigated the effects of cycles of maternal food availability on the rhythms of Per1 gene expression in the fetal suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and liver using a transgenic rat model whose tissues express luciferase in vitro. Although the maternal SCN remained phase-locked to the LD cycle, maternal restricted feeding phase-advanced the fetal SCN and liver by 5 and 7 hours respectively within the 22-day pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that maternal feeding entrains the fetal SCN and liver independently of both the maternal SCN and the LD cycle. This indicates that maternal-feeding signals can be more influential for the fetal SCN and particular organ oscillators than hormonal signals controlled by the maternal SCN, suggesting the importance of a regular maternal feeding schedule for appropriate fetal molecular clockwork during pregnancy.

  20. Circadian misalignment, reward-related brain function, and adolescent alcohol involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Brant P; Clark, Duncan B

    2013-04-01

    Developmental changes in sleep and circadian rhythms that occur during adolescence may contribute to reward-related brain dysfunction, and consequently increase the risk of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). This review (i) describes marked changes in circadian rhythms, reward-related behavior and brain function, and alcohol involvement that occur during adolescence, (ii) offers evidence that these parallel developmental changes are associated, and (iii) posits a conceptual model by which misalignment between sleep-wake timing and endogenous circadian timing may increase the risk of adolescent AUDs by altering reward-related brain function. The timing of sleep shifts later throughout adolescence, in part due to developmental changes in endogenous circadian rhythms, which tend to become more delayed. This tendency for delayed sleep and circadian rhythms is at odds with early school start times during secondary education, leading to misalignment between many adolescents' sleep-wake schedules and their internal circadian timing. Circadian misalignment is associated with increased alcohol use and other risk-taking behaviors, as well as sleep loss and sleep disturbance. Growing evidence indicates that circadian rhythms modulate the reward system, suggesting that circadian misalignment may impact adolescent alcohol involvement by altering reward-related brain function. Neurocognitive function is also subject to sleep and circadian influence, and thus circadian misalignment may also impair inhibitory control and other cognitive processes relevant to alcohol use. Specifically, circadian misalignment may further exacerbate the cortical-subcortical imbalance within the reward circuit, an imbalance thought to explain increased risk-taking and sensation-seeking during adolescence. Adolescent alcohol use is highly contextualized, however, and thus studies testing this model will also need to consider factors that may influence both circadian misalignment and alcohol use. This review

  1. Sleep structure in blindness is influenced by circadian desynchrony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubin, Sébrina; Jennum, Poul; Nielsen, Tore

    2018-01-01

    -running circadian rhythms, we controlled for circadian phase by a measure of melatonin onset timing. When circadian rhythm was entrained and melatonin onset occurred at normal times, sleep structure did not differ between blind and sighted individuals. On the other hand, an abnormal timing of the circadian phase......, including delayed, shifted and unclassifiable melatonin onsets, led to larger rapid eye movement sleep latencies and increased wake times. No differences were observed for stages of non-rapid eye movement sleep, either between congenital and late blind and sighted individuals, or across the different......We examined the structure, duration and quality of sleep, including non-rapid eye movement sleep and rapid eye movement sleep, in 11 blind individuals without conscious light perception and 11 age- and sex-matched sighted controls. Because blindness is associated with a greater incidence of free...

  2. Circadian clock and vascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda, Norihiko; Maemura, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular functions, including blood pressure and vascular functions, show diurnal oscillation. Circadian variations have been clearly shown in the occurrence of cardiovascular events such as acute myocardial infarction. Circadian rhythm strongly influences human biology and pathology. The identification and characterization of mammalian clock genes revealed that they are expressed almost everywhere throughout the body in a circadian manner. In contrast to the central clock in the suprac...

  3. Circadian variations in clinical symptoms and concentrations of inflammatory cytokines, melatonin, and cortisol in polymyalgia rheumatica before and during prednisolone treatment: a controlled, observational, clinical experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbo, Henrik; Kall, Lisbeth

    2016-07-26

    In contrast to rheumatoid arthritis (RA), no systematic investigation of diurnal variation has been carried out in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). The aim of the study was to provide the often-requested documentation of the 24-h time course of clinical symptoms in PMR and relate them to concentrations during the day of melatonin, inflammatory cytokines, and cortisol. Furthermore, the effects of 14 days of prednisolone treatment were studied. Ten glucocorticoid-naive patients newly diagnosed with PMR and seven non-PMR control subjects were studied for 24 h before treatment and during the 14th day of treatment with 20 mg/day of prednisolone. Global pain and generalized muscle stiffness were monitored by using visual analogue scales, and blood was drawn repeatedly. In untreated patients, pain and stiffness peaked in the early morning, showing a plateau between 04:00 and 08:00, and then declined to a nadir at 16:00 (2P melatonin and cortisol were consistently higher in patients (2P melatonin, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α concentrations (2P melatonin, several pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and cortisol are increased throughout the day and show diurnal variation, as also seen in healthy subjects. The time courses and the inhibitory effects of prednisolone indicate that in PMR, as proposed for RA, melatonin stimulates cytokine production, which in turn accounts at least partly for the symptoms. Furthermore, overall, cortisol may downregulate cytokine production and symptoms. Stimulation of IL-10 secretion may participate in the anti-inflammatory effects of prednisolone. These findings support use of chronotherapy in PMR and encourage study of circadian variations in other inflammatory autoimmune diseases.

  4. Rhythms of mammalian body temperature can sustain peripheral circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven A; Zumbrunn, Gottlieb; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Preitner, Nicolas; Schibler, Ueli

    2002-09-17

    Low-amplitude temperature oscillations can entrain the phase of circadian rhythms in several unicellular and multicellular organisms, including Neurospora and Drosophila. Because mammalian body temperature is subject to circadian variations of 1 degrees C-4 degrees C, we wished to determine whether these temperature cycles could serve as a Zeitgeber for circadian gene expression in peripheral cell types. In RAT1 fibroblasts cultured in vitro, circadian gene expression could be established by a square wave temperature rhythm with a (Delta)T of 4 degrees C (12 hr 37 degrees C/12 hr 33 degrees C). To examine whether natural body temperature rhythms can also affect circadian gene expression, we first measured core body temperature cycles in the peritoneal cavities of mice by radiotelemetry. We then reproduced these rhythms with high precision in the liquid medium of cultured fibroblasts for several days by means of a homemade computer-driven incubator. While these "in vivo" temperature rhythms were incapable of establishing circadian gene expression de novo, they could maintain previously induced rhythms for multiple days; by contrast, the rhythms of control cells kept at constant temperature rapidly dampened. Moreover, circadian oscillations of environmental temperature could reentrain circadian clocks in the livers of mice, probably via the changes they imposed upon both body temperature and feeding behavior. Interestingly, these changes in ambient temperature did not affect the phase of the central circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. We postulate that both endogenous and environmental temperature cycles can participate in the synchronization of peripheral clocks in mammals.

  5. The demand control model and circadian saliva cortisol variations in a Swedish population based sample (The PART study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Torre Bartolomé

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of the relationship between job strain and blood or saliva cortisol levels have been small and based on selected occupational groups. Our aim was to examine the association between job strain and saliva cortisol levels in a population-based study in which a number of potential confounders could be adjusted for. Methods The material derives from a population-based study in Stockholm on mental health and its potential determinants. Two data collections were performed three years apart with more than 8500 subjects responding to a questionnaire in both waves. In this paper our analyses are based on 529 individuals who held a job, participated in both waves as well as in an interview linked to the second wave. They gave saliva samples at awakening, half an hour later, at lunchtime and before going to bed on a weekday in close connection with the interview. Job control and job demands were assessed from the questionnaire in the second wave. Mixed models were used to analyse the association between the demand control model and saliva cortisol. Results Women in low strain jobs (high control and low demands had significantly lower cortisol levels half an hour after awakening than women in high strain (low control and high demands, active (high control and high demands or passive jobs (low control and low demands. There were no significant differences between the groups during other parts of the day and furthermore there was no difference between the job strain, active and passive groups. For men, no differences were found between demand control groups. Conclusion This population-based study, on a relatively large sample, weakly support the hypothesis that the demand control model is associated with saliva cortisol concentrations.

  6. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity

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    Marcos G. Frank

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity.

  7. Circadian dysregulation in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Videnovic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder that affects over one million individuals in the US alone. PD is characterized by a plethora of motor and non-motor manifestations, resulting from a progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and disbalance of several other neurotransmitters. A growing body of evidence points to significant alterations of the circadian system in PD. This is not surprising given the pivotal role that dopamine plays in circadian regulation as well as the role of circadian influences in dopamine metabolism. In this review we present basic and clinical investigations that examined the function of the circadian system in PD.

  8. Circadian adaptations to meal timing: Neuroendocrine mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica F Patton

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology are generated by central and peripheral circadian oscillators entrained by periodic environmental or physiological stimuli. A master circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus is directly entrained by daily light-dark cycles, and coordinates the timing of other oscillators by direct and indirect neural, hormonal and behavioral outputs. The daily rhythm of food intake provides stimuli that entrain most peripheral and central oscillators, some of which can drive a daily rhythm of food anticipatory activity if food is restricted to one daily mealtime. The location of food-entrainable oscillators (FEOs that drive food anticipatory rhythms, and the food-related stimuli that entrain these oscillators, remain to be clarified. Here, we critically examine the role of peripheral metabolic hormones as potential internal entrainment stimuli or outputs for FEOs controlling food anticipatory rhythms in rats and mice. Hormones for which data are available include corticosterone, ghrelin, leptin, insulin, glucagon, and glucagon-like peptide 1. All of these hormones exhibit daily rhythms of synthesis and secretion that are synchronized by meal timing. There is some evidence that ghrelin and leptin modulate the expression of food anticipatory rhythms, but none of the hormones examined so far are necessary for entrainment. Ghrelin and leptin likely modulate food-entrained rhythms by actions in hypothalamic circuits utilizing melanocortin and orexin signaling, although again food-entrained behavioral rhythms can persist in lesion and gene knockout models in which these systems are disabled. Actions of these hormones on circadian oscillators in central reward circuits remain to be evaluated. Food-entrained activity rhythms are likely mediated by a distributed system of circadian oscillators sensitive to multiple feeding related inputs. Metabolic hormones appear to play a modulatory role within this

  9. Circadian adaptations to meal timing: neuroendocrine mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Danica F; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2013-10-14

    Circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology are generated by central and peripheral circadian oscillators entrained by periodic environmental or physiological stimuli. A master circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is directly entrained by daily light-dark (LD) cycles, and coordinates the timing of other oscillators by direct and indirect neural, hormonal and behavioral outputs. The daily rhythm of food intake provides stimuli that entrain most peripheral and central oscillators, some of which can drive a daily rhythm of food anticipatory activity if food is restricted to one daily mealtime. The location of food-entrainable oscillators (FEOs) that drive food anticipatory rhythms, and the food-related stimuli that entrain these oscillators, remain to be clarified. Here, we critically examine the role of peripheral metabolic hormones as potential internal entrainment stimuli or outputs for FEOs controlling food anticipatory rhythms in rats and mice. Hormones for which data are available include corticosterone, ghrelin, leptin, insulin, glucagon, and glucagon-like peptide 1. All of these hormones exhibit daily rhythms of synthesis and secretion that are synchronized by meal timing. There is some evidence that ghrelin and leptin modulate the expression of food anticipatory rhythms, but none of the hormones examined so far are necessary for entrainment. Ghrelin and leptin likely modulate food-entrained rhythms by actions in hypothalamic circuits utilizing melanocortin and orexin signaling, although again food-entrained behavioral rhythms can persist in lesion and gene knockout models in which these systems are disabled. Actions of these hormones on circadian oscillators in central reward circuits remain to be evaluated. Food-entrained activity rhythms are likely mediated by a distributed system of circadian oscillators sensitive to multiple feeding related inputs. Metabolic hormones appear to play a modulatory role within this system.

  10. Thermoregulation is impaired in an environment without circadian time cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. A.; Sulzman, F. M.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    Thirteen adult male squirrel monkeys were restrained to a metabolism chair for periods of two or more weeks within an isolation chamber having controlled environmental lighting and ambient temperature. The monkeys were subjected to mild 6-hour cold exposures at all circadian phases of the day. It was found that a prominent circadian rhythm in body temperature, regulated against mild cold exposure, was present in those monkeys synchronized in a 24-hour light-dark cycle. Cold exposures were found to produce decreased core body temperatures when the circadian rhythms were free running or when environmental time indicators were not present. It is concluded that the thermoregulating system depends on the internal synchronization of the circadian time-keeping system.

  11. Circadian Tick-Talking Across the Neuroendocrine System and Suprachiasmatic Nuclei Circuits: The Enigmatic Communication Between the Molecular and Electrical Membrane Clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, M D C

    2015-07-01

    As with many processes in nature, appropriate timing in biological systems is of paramount importance. In the neuroendocrine system, the efficacy of hormonal influence on major bodily functions, such as reproduction, metabolism and growth, relies on timely communication within and across many of the brain's homeostatic systems. The activity of these circuits is tightly orchestrated with the animal's internal physiological demands and external solar cycle by a master circadian clock. In mammals, this master clock is located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where the ensemble activity of thousands of clock neurones generates and communicates circadian time cues to the rest of the brain and body. Many regions of the brain, including areas with neuroendocrine function, also contain local daily clocks that can provide feedback signals to the SCN. Although much is known about the molecular processes underpinning endogenous circadian rhythm generation in SCN neurones and, to a lesser extent, extra-SCN cells, the electrical membrane clock that acts in partnership with the molecular clockwork to communicate circadian timing across the brain is poorly understood. The present review focuses on some circadian aspects of reproductive neuroendocrinology and processes involved in circadian rhythm communication in the SCN, aiming to identify key gaps in our knowledge of cross-talk between our daily master clock and neuroendocrine function. The intention is to highlight our surprisingly limited understanding of their interaction in the hope that this will stimulate future work in these areas. © 2015 The Author. Journal of Neuroendocrinology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  12. Circadian disorganization alters intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Robin M; Forsyth, Christopher B; Green, Stefan J; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H; Turek, Fred W; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases.

  13. Circadian Clocks : Running on Redox

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, Martha; Roenneberg, Till

    2001-01-01

    The circadian clock in all organisms is so intimately linked to light reception that it appears as if evolution has simply wired a timer into the mechanism that processes photic information. Several recent studies have provided new insights into the role of light input pathways in the circadian

  14. The neurobiology of circadian rhythms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zee, Eddy A.; Boersma, Gretha J.; Hut, Roelof A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review There is growing awareness of the importance of circadian rhythmicity in various research fields. Exciting developments are ongoing in the field of circadian neurobiology linked to sleep, food intake, and memory. With the current knowledge of critical clock genes' (genes found to

  15. Circadian rhythms in microalgae production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, de L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thesis: Circadian rhythms in microalgae production

    Lenneke de Winter

    The sun imposes a daily cycle of light and dark on nearly all organisms. The circadian clock evolved to help organisms program their activities at an appropriate time during this daily

  16. Avian Circadian Organization: A Chorus of Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassone, Vincent M

    2013-01-01

    In birds, biological clock function pervades all aspects of biology, controlling daily changes in sleep: wake, visual function, song, migratory patterns and orientation, as well as seasonal patterns of reproduction, song and migration. The molecular bases for circadian clocks are highly conserved, and it is likely the avian molecular mechanisms are similar to those expressed in mammals, including humans. The central pacemakers in the avian pineal gland, retinae and SCN dynamically interact to maintain stable phase relationships and then influence downstream rhythms through entrainment of peripheral oscillators in the brain controlling behavior and peripheral tissues. Birds represent an excellent model for the role played by biological clocks in human neurobiology; unlike most rodent models, they are diurnal, they exhibit cognitively complex social interactions, and their circadian clocks are more sensitive to the hormone melatonin than are those of nocturnal rodents. PMID:24157655

  17. CLOCK Acetylates ASS1 to Drive Circadian Rhythm of Ureagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ran; Mo, Yan; Zha, Haihong; Qu, Zhipeng; Xie, Pancheng; Zhu, Zheng-Jiang; Xu, Ying; Xiong, Yue; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2017-10-05

    In addition to responding to environmental entrainment with diurnal variation, metabolism is also tightly controlled by cell-autonomous circadian clock. Extensive studies have revealed key roles of transcription in circadian control. Post-transcriptional regulation for the rhythmic gating of metabolic enzymes remains elusive. Here, we show that arginine biosynthesis and subsequent ureagenesis are collectively regulated by CLOCK (circadian locomotor output cycles kaput) in circadian rhythms. Facilitated by BMAL1 (brain and muscle Arnt-like protein), CLOCK directly acetylates K165 and K176 of argininosuccinate synthase (ASS1) to inactivate ASS1, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of arginine biosynthesis. ASS1 acetylation by CLOCK exhibits circadian oscillation in human cells and mouse liver, possibly caused by rhythmic interaction between CLOCK and ASS1, leading to the circadian regulation of ASS1 and ureagenesis. Furthermore, we also identified NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] 1 alpha subcomplex subunit 9 (NDUFA9) and inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase 2 (IMPDH2) as acetylation substrates of CLOCK. Taken together, CLOCK modulates metabolic rhythmicity by acting as a rhythmic acetyl-transferase for metabolic enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The human endogenous circadian system causes greatest platelet activation during the biological morning independent of behaviors.

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    Frank A J L Scheer

    Full Text Available Platelets are involved in the thromboses that are central to myocardial infarctions and ischemic strokes. Such adverse cardiovascular events have day/night patterns with peaks in the morning (~9 AM, potentially related to endogenous circadian clock control of platelet activation. The objective was to test if the human endogenous circadian system influences (1 platelet function and (2 platelet response to standardized behavioral stressors. We also aimed to compare the magnitude of any effects on platelet function caused by the circadian system with that caused by varied standardized behavioral stressors, including mental arithmetic, passive postural tilt and mild cycling exercise.We studied 12 healthy adults (6 female who lived in individual laboratory suites in dim light for 240 h, with all behaviors scheduled on a 20-h recurring cycle to permit assessment of endogenous circadian function independent from environmental and behavioral effects including the sleep/wake cycle. Circadian phase was assessed from core body temperature. There were highly significant endogenous circadian rhythms in platelet surface activated glycoprotein (GP IIb-IIIa, GPIb and P-selectin (6-17% peak-trough amplitudes; p ≤ 0.01. These circadian peaks occurred at a circadian phase corresponding to 8-9 AM. Platelet count, ATP release, aggregability, and plasma epinephrine also had significant circadian rhythms but with later peaks (corresponding to 3-8 PM. The circadian effects on the platelet activation markers were always larger than that of any of the three behavioral stressors.These data demonstrate robust effects of the endogenous circadian system on platelet activation in humans--independent of the sleep/wake cycle, other behavioral influences and the environment. The 9 AM timing of the circadian peaks of the three platelet surface markers, including platelet surface activated GPIIb-IIIa, the final common pathway of platelet aggregation, suggests that endogenous

  19. System identification of the Arabidopsis plant circadian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Mathias; Somers, David E.; Kim, Pan-Jun

    2015-02-01

    The circadian system generates an endogenous oscillatory rhythm that governs the daily activities of organisms in nature. It offers adaptive advantages to organisms through a coordination of their biological functions with the optimal time of day. In this paper, a model of the circadian system in the plant Arabidopsis (species thaliana) is built by using system identification techniques. Prior knowledge about the physical interactions of the genes and the proteins in the plant circadian system is incorporated in the model building exercise. The model is built by using primarily experimentally-verified direct interactions between the genes and the proteins with the available data on mRNA and protein abundances from the circadian system. Our analysis reveals a great performance of the model in predicting the dynamics of the plant circadian system through the effect of diverse internal and external perturbations (gene knockouts and day-length changes). Furthermore, we found that the circadian oscillatory rhythm is robust and does not vary much with the biochemical parameters except those of a light-sensitive protein P and a transcription factor TOC1. In other words, the circadian rhythmic profile is largely a consequence of the network's architecture rather than its particular parameters. Our work suggests that the current experimental knowledge of the gene-to-protein interactions in the plant Arabidopsis, without considering any additional hypothetical interactions, seems to suffice for system-level modeling of the circadian system of this plant and to present an exemplary platform for the control of network dynamics in complex living organisms.

  20. Cryptochromes define a novel circadian clock mechanism in monarch butterflies that may underlie sun compass navigation.

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    Haisun Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock plays a vital role in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus migration by providing the timing component of time-compensated sun compass orientation, a process that is important for successful navigation. We therefore evaluated the monarch clockwork by focusing on the functions of a Drosophila-like cryptochrome (cry, designated cry1, and a vertebrate-like cry, designated cry2, that are both expressed in the butterfly and by placing these genes in the context of other relevant clock genes in vivo. We found that similar temporal patterns of clock gene expression and protein levels occur in the heads, as occur in DpN1 cells, of a monarch cell line that contains a light-driven clock. CRY1 mediates TIMELESS degradation by light in DpN1 cells, and a light-induced TIMELESS decrease occurs in putative clock cells in the pars lateralis (PL in the brain. Moreover, monarch cry1 transgenes partially rescue both biochemical and behavioral light-input defects in cry(b mutant Drosophila. CRY2 is the major transcriptional repressor of CLOCK:CYCLE-mediated transcription in DpN1 cells, and endogenous CRY2 potently inhibits transcription without involvement of PERIOD. CRY2 is co-localized with clock proteins in the PL, and there it translocates to the nucleus at the appropriate time for transcriptional repression. We also discovered CRY2-positive neural projections that oscillate in the central complex. The results define a novel, CRY-centric clock mechanism in the monarch in which CRY1 likely functions as a blue-light photoreceptor for entrainment, whereas CRY2 functions within the clockwork as the transcriptional repressor of a negative transcriptional feedback loop. Our data further suggest that CRY2 may have a dual role in the monarch butterfly's brain-as a core clock element and as an output that regulates circadian activity in the central complex, the likely site of the sun compass.

  1. How does general anaesthesia affect the circadian clock?

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    Poulsen, Raewyn C; Warman, Guy R; Sleigh, Jamie; Ludin, Nicola M; Cheeseman, James F

    2018-02-01

    Post-operative patients experience sleep disturbances. Animal studies demonstrate that general anaesthesia (GA) can disrupt circadian rhythms and cause changes in the molecular clock, indicating that anaesthesia contributes to post-operative circadian disruption. Here we review the effect of anaesthesia on the circadian clock and its rhythms in order to summarise current findings outline commonalities between studies and propose mechanisms by which effects may be mediated. 1) GA has strong effects on the main neurotransmitter systems linked with circadian control (Gamma aminobutyric acid/N-methyl-D-aspartate (GABA/NMDA)) and may act by interfering with light-entrainment of the clock. 2) Expression of the core clock gene per2 is inhibited by GA (possibly via a NMDA/glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) pathway). 3) GA's effect on circadian rhythms appears greatest when administered during animals' active phases 4) GA may have different effects when administered under free-running and entrained conditions. 5) Anaesthesia may mimic the mechanism involved in adaptation of the clock to changes in daylength. There is agreement that GA can strongly affect the circadian clock. How anaesthesia-induced changes in the molecular clock lead to changes in behaviour remains unclear. The answer, and what it may mean for patients post-operatively, will rely on systematic studies at molecular, behavioural, and clinical levels using standardised protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Circadian redox signaling in plant immunity and abiotic stress.

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    Spoel, Steven H; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2014-06-20

    Plant crops are critically important to provide quality food and bio-energy to sustain a growing human population. Circadian clocks have been shown to deliver an adaptive advantage to plants, vastly increasing biomass production by efficient anticipation to the solar cycle. Plant stress, on the other hand, whether biotic or abiotic, prevents crops from reaching maximum productivity. Stress is associated with fluctuations in cellular redox and increased phytohormone signaling. Recently, direct links between circadian timekeeping, redox fluctuations, and hormone signaling have been identified. A direct implication is that circadian control of cellular redox homeostasis influences how plants negate stress to ensure growth and reproduction. Complex cellular biochemistry leads from perception of stress via hormone signals and formation of reactive oxygen intermediates to a physiological response. Circadian clocks and metabolic pathways intertwine to form a confusing biochemical labyrinth. Here, we aim to find order in this complex matter by reviewing current advances in our understanding of the interface between these networks. Although the link is now clearly defined, at present a key question remains as to what extent the circadian clock modulates redox, and vice versa. Furthermore, the mechanistic basis by which the circadian clock gates redox- and hormone-mediated stress responses remains largely elusive.

  3. Nutrigenetics and Nutrimiromics of the Circadian System: The Time for Human Health

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    Micó, Víctor; Díez-Ricote, Laura; Daimiel, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Even though the rhythmic oscillations of life have long been known, the precise molecular mechanisms of the biological clock are only recently being explored. Circadian rhythms are found in virtually all organisms and affect our lives. Thus, it is not surprising that the correct running of this clock is essential for cellular functions and health. The circadian system is composed of an intricate network of genes interwined in an intrincated transcriptional/translational feedback loop. The precise oscillation of this clock is controlled by the circadian genes that, in turn, regulate the circadian oscillations of many cellular pathways. Consequently, variations in these genes have been associated with human diseases and metabolic disorders. From a nutrigenetics point of view, some of these variations modify the individual response to the diet and interact with nutrients to modulate such response. This circadian feedback loop is also epigenetically modulated. Among the epigenetic mechanisms that control circadian rhythms, microRNAs are the least studied ones. In this paper, we review the variants of circadian-related genes associated to human disease and nutritional response and discuss the current knowledge about circadian microRNAs. Accumulated evidence on the genetics and epigenetics of the circadian system points to important implications of chronotherapy in the clinical practice, not only in terms of pharmacotherapy, but also for dietary interventions. However, interventional studies (especially nutritional trials) that include chronotherapy are scarce. Given the importance of chronobiology in human health such studies are warranted in the near future. PMID:26927084

  4. Circadian phase has profound effects on differential expression analysis.

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    Polly Yingshan Hsu

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are physiological and behavioral cycles with a period of approximately 24 hours that are generated by an endogenous clock, or oscillator. Found in diverse organisms, they are precisely controlled and provide growth and fitness benefits. Numerous microarray studies examining circadian control of gene expression have reported that a substantial fraction of the genomes of many organisms is clock-controlled. Here we show that a long-period mutant in Arabidopsis, rve8-1, has a global alteration in phase of all clock-controlled genes. After several days in constant environmental conditions, at which point the mutant and control plants have very different circadian phases, we found 1557 genes to be differentially expressed in rve8-1, almost all of which are clock-regulated. However, after adjusting for this phase difference, only a handful show overall expression level differences between rve8-1 and wild type. Thus the apparent differential expression is mainly due to the phase difference between these two genotypes. These findings prompted us to examine the effect of phase on gene expression within a single genotype. Using samples of wild-type plants harvested at thirty-minute intervals, we demonstrated that even this small difference in circadian phase significantly influences the results of differential expression analysis. Our study demonstrates the robust influence of the circadian clock on the transcriptome and provides a cautionary note for all biologists performing genome-level expression analysis.

  5. Circadian control of glucose metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, A.; la Fleur, Susanne; Fliers, Eric

    The incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has risen to epidemic proportions. The pathophysiology of T2DM is complex and involves insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and visceral adiposity. It has been known for decades that a disruption of biological rhythms (which

  6. Circadian control of glucose metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, Andries; La Fleur, Susanne; Fliers, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has risen to epidemic proportions. The pathophysiology of T2DM is complex and involves insulin resistance, pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction and visceral adiposity. It has been known for decades that a disruption of biological rhythms

  7. Nocturia: The circadian voiding disorder

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    Jin Wook Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nocturia is a prevalent condition of waking to void during the night. The concept of nocturia has evolved from being a symptomatic aspect of disease associated with the prostate or bladder to a form of lower urinary tract disorder. However, recent advances in circadian biology and sleep science suggest that it might be important to consider nocturia as a form of circadian dysfunction. In the current review, nocturia is reexamined with an introduction to sleep disorders and recent findings in circadian biology in an attempt to highlight the importance of rediscovering nocturia as a problem of chronobiology.

  8. Circadian Phase Preference in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

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    Kerri L. Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric bipolar disorder (BD rates have notably increased over the past three decades. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with BD, efforts are needed to identify factors useful in earlier detection to help address this serious public health concern. Sleep is particularly important to consider given the sequelae of disrupted sleep on normative functioning and that sleep is included in diagnostic criteria for both Major Depressive and Manic Episodes. Here, we examine one component of sleep—i.e., circadian phase preference with the behavioral construct of morningness/eveningness (M/E. In comparing 30 BD and 45 typically developing control (TDC participants, ages 7–17 years, on the Morningness-Eveningness Scale for Children (MESC, no between-group differences emerged. Similar results were found when comparing three groups (BD−ADHD; BD+ADHD; TDC. Consistent with data available on circadian phase preference in adults with BD, however, we found that BD adolescents, ages 13 years and older, endorsed significantly greater eveningness compared to their TDC peers. While the current findings are limited by reliance on subjective report and the high-rate of comorbid ADHD among the BD group, this finding that BD teens demonstrate an exaggerated shift towards eveningness than would be developmentally expected is important. Future studies should compare the circadian rhythms across the lifespan for individuals diagnosed with BD, as well as identify the point at which BD youth part ways with their healthy peers in terms of phase preference. In addition, given our BD sample was overall euthymic, it may be that M/E is more state vs. trait specific in latency age youth. Further work would benefit from assessing circadian functioning using a combination of rating forms and laboratory-based measures. Improved understanding of sleep in BD may identify behavioral targets for inclusion in prevention and intervention protocols.

  9. Small heterodimer partner (NROB2) coordinates nutrient signaling and the circadian clock in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circadian rhythm regulates multiple metabolic processes and in turn is readily entrained by feeding-fasting cycles. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the peripheral clock senses nutrition availability remain largely unknown. Bile acids are under circadian control and also increase postprand...

  10. Circadian rhythms and new options for novel anticancer therapies

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    Prosenc Zmrzljak U

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ursula Prosenc ZmrzljakFaculty of Medicine, Center for Functional Genomics and Bio-Chips, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, SloveniaAbstract: The patterns of activity/sleep, eating/fasting, etc show that our lives are under the control of an internal clock. Cancer is a systemic disease that affects sleep, feeding, and metabolism. All these processes are regulated by the circadian clock on the one hand, but on the other hand, they can serve as signals to tighten up the patient's circadian clock by robust daily routine. Usually, anticancer treatments take place in hospitals, where the patient's daily rest/activity pattern is changed. However, it has been shown that oncology patients with a disturbed circadian clock have poorer survival outcomes. The administration of different anticancer therapies can disturb the circadian cycle, but many cases show that circadian rhythms in tumors are deregulated per se. This fact can be used to plan anticancer therapies in such a manner that they will be most effective in antitumor action, but least toxic for the surrounding healthy tissue. Metabolic processes are highly regulated to prevent waste of energy and to ensure sufficient detoxification; as a consequence, xenobiotic metabolism is under tight circadian control. This gives the rationale for planning the administration of anticancer therapies in a chronomodulated manner. We review some of the potentially useful clinical praxes of anticancer therapies and discuss different possible approaches to be used in drug development and design in the future.Keywords: circadian rhythms, cancer, chronotherapy, detoxification metabolism

  11. Genome-wide analyses of the transcriptomes of salicylic acid-deficient versus wild-type plants uncover Pathogen and Circadian Controlled 1 (PCC1) as a regulator of flowering time in Arabidopsis.

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    Segarra, Silvia; Mir, Ricardo; Martínez, Cristina; León, José

    2010-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been characterized as an activator of pathogen-triggered resistance of plants. SA also regulates developmental processes such as thermogenesis in floral organs and stress-induced flowering. To deepen our knowledge of the mechanism underlying SA regulation of flowering time in Arabidopsis, we compared the transcriptomes of SA-deficient late flowering genotypes with wild-type plants. Down- or up-regulated genes in SA-deficient plants were screened for responsiveness to ultraviolet (UV)-C light, which accelerates flowering in Arabidopsis. Among them, only Pathogen and Circadian Controlled 1 (PCC1) was up-regulated by UV-C light through a SA-dependent process. Moreover, UV-C light-activated expression of PCC1 was also dependent on the flowering activator CONSTANS (CO). PCC1 gene has a circadian-regulated developmental pattern of expression with low transcript levels after germination that increased abruptly by day 10. RNAi plants with very low expression of PCC1 gene were late flowering, defective in UV-C light acceleration of flowering and contained FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) transcript levels below 5% of that detected in wild-type plants. Although PCC1 seems to function between CO and FT in the photoperiod-dependent flowering pathway, transgenic plants overexpressing a Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR)-fused version of CO strongly activated FT but not PCC1 after dexamethasone treatment.

  12. Circadian Rhythm Management System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The value of measuring sleep-wake cycles is significantly enhanced by measuring other physiological signals that depend on circadian rhythms (such as heart rate and...

  13. A putative flowering-time-related Dof transcription factor gene, JcDof3, is controlled by the circadian clock in Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Yang, Ming-Feng; Zhang, Wen-Peng; Chen, Fan; Shen, Shi-Hua

    2011-12-01

    Plant-specific DNA-binding transcription factors with one finger (Dof) perform important roles in several biological processes. A yeast one-hybrid cDNA library of Jatropha curcas was used to identify Dof-type transcription factors. JcDof3, isolated from the library as a full-length cDNA, encoded a protein of 518 amino acids and contained a highly conserved Dof domain. Yeast one-hybrid systems and subcellular localization assays confirmed that JcDof3 was a typical transcription factor. In contrast to arrhythmic expression at basal level in etiolated cotyledons under continuous dark conditions, the circadian oscillations of JcDof3 transcripts were observed under long day, short day or continuous light regimes. A phylogenetic analysis showed that JcDof3 was clustered into the same clade with CYCLING DOF FACTOR (CDF), which interacts with F-box protein to regulate photoperiodic flowering. Moreover, a yeast two-hybrid assay showed that JcDof3 also interacted with F-box proteins. Our results suggest that JcDof3 is a circadian clock regulated gene, and might be involved in the flowering time regulation of J. curcas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Disrupting circadian homeostasis of sympathetic signaling promotes tumor development in mice.

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    Susie Lee

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation in all rapidly renewing mammalian tissues follows a circadian rhythm that is often disrupted in advanced-stage tumors. Epidemiologic studies have revealed a clear link between disruption of circadian rhythms and cancer development in humans. Mice lacking the circadian genes Period1 and 2 (Per or Cryptochrome1 and 2 (Cry are deficient in cell cycle regulation and Per2 mutant mice are cancer-prone. However, it remains unclear how circadian rhythm in cell proliferation is generated in vivo and why disruption of circadian rhythm may lead to tumorigenesis.Mice lacking Per1 and 2, Cry1 and 2, or one copy of Bmal1, all show increased spontaneous and radiation-induced tumor development. The neoplastic growth of Per-mutant somatic cells is not controlled cell-autonomously but is dependent upon extracellular mitogenic signals. Among the circadian output pathways, the rhythmic sympathetic signaling plays a key role in the central-peripheral timing mechanism that simultaneously activates the cell cycle clock via AP1-controlled Myc induction and p53 via peripheral clock-controlled ATM activation. Jet-lag promptly desynchronizes the central clock-SNS-peripheral clock axis, abolishes the peripheral clock-dependent ATM activation, and activates myc oncogenic potential, leading to tumor development in the same organ systems in wild-type and circadian gene-mutant mice.Tumor suppression in vivo is a clock-controlled physiological function. The central circadian clock paces extracellular mitogenic signals that drive peripheral clock-controlled expression of key cell cycle and tumor suppressor genes to generate a circadian rhythm in cell proliferation. Frequent disruption of circadian rhythm is an important tumor promoting factor.

  15. The intestinal microbiota regulates body composition through NFIL3and the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhao; Kuang, Zheng; Yu, Xiaofei; Ruhn, Kelly A; Kubo, Masato; Hooper, Lora V

    2017-09-01

    The intestinal microbiota has been identified as an environmental factor that markedly affects energy storage and body-fat accumulation in mammals, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the microbiota regulates body composition through the circadian transcription factor NFIL3. Nfil3 transcription oscillates diurnally in intestinal epithelial cells, and the amplitude of the circadian oscillation is controlled by the microbiota through group 3 innate lymphoid cells, STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3), and the epithelial cell circadian clock. NFIL3 controls expression of a circadian lipid metabolic program and regulates lipid absorption and export in intestinal epithelial cells. These findings provide mechanistic insight into how the intestinal microbiota regulates body composition and establish NFIL3 as an essential molecular link among the microbiota, the circadian clock, and host metabolism. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Temperature Compensation of the Circadian Clock

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    David M. Virshup

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An approximately 24-h biological timekeeping mechanism called the circadian clock is present in virtually all light-sensitive organisms from cyanobacteria to humans. The clock system regulates our sleep–wake cycle, feeding–fasting, hormonal secretion, body temperature, and many other physiological functions. Signals from the master circadian oscillator entrain peripheral clocks using a variety of neural and hormonal signals. Even centrally controlled internal temperature fluctuations can entrain the peripheral circadian clocks. But, unlike other chemical reactions, the output of the clock system remains nearly constant with fluctuations in ambient temperature, a phenomenon known as temperature compensation. In this brief review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the posttranslational modifications, especially a phosphoswitch mechanism controlling the stability of PER2 and its implications for the regulation of temperature compensation.

  17. Entrainment of the Circadian Clock in Neural Stem Cells by Epidermal Growth Factor is Closely Associated with ERK1/2-mediated Induction of Multiple Clock-related Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogi, Asuka; Yomoda, Ryo; Kimura, Syunya; Tsushima, Chisato; Takouda, Jun; Sawauchi, Miho; Maekawa, Tomoko; Ohta, Hidenobu; Nishino, Satoshi; Kurita, Masatake; Mano, Nariyasu; Osumi, Noriko; Moriya, Takahiro

    2018-03-06

    The mitotic activity of certain tissues in the body is closely associated with circadian clock function. However, the effects of growth factors on the molecular clockwork are not fully understood. Stimulation of neural stem cells (NSCs) with epidermal growth factor (EGF), a well-known mitogen, is known to cause synchronized cell cycle progression with a period of approximately 24 h, closely associated with the Per2 gene expression rhythm. Here, we examined the effects of EGF on the molecular clockwork of NSCs. Treatment of cultured NSCs derived from embryonic mouse forebrain with EGF (20 ng/mL) caused a phase shift in the PER2::LUCIFERASE bioluminescence rhythm in a stimulation time-dependent manner. The EGF phase-response curve differed from that of forskolin (FK)-a well-known chemical resetting stimulus-both in the advance/delay ratio and stimulation time-dependency. PCR array analysis followed by quantitative PCR validation demonstrated that EGF treatment transiently induced multiple clock-related genes including Per1, Per2, Dec1, e4bp4, and Noct, whereas FK treatment induced a limited number of genes (Per1 and Dec1), suggesting that the mode of entrainment of NSC molecular clock was different for EGF and FK. EGF led to gene induction in the presence of cycloheximide, suggesting that de novo protein synthesis is unnecessary. Pretreatment with the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 significantly suppressed the acute induction of Per2, Dec1, and Noct by EGF and also abolished the EGF-induced phase shift of the PER2::LUCIFERASE rhythm in NSCs. These results suggest a unique effect of EGF on the molecular clockwork of NSCs. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Emerging roles for microRNA in the regulation of Drosophila circadian clock.

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    Xue, Yongbo; Zhang, Yong

    2018-01-16

    The circadian clock, which operates within an approximately 24-h period, is closely linked to the survival and fitness of almost all living organisms. The circadian clock is generated through a negative transcription-translation feedback loop. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs comprised of approximately 22 nucleotides that post-transcriptionally regulate target mRNA by either inducing mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. In recent years, miRNAs have been found to play important roles in the regulation of the circadian clock, especially in Drosophila. In this review, we will use fruit flies as an example, and summarize the progress achieved in the study of miRNA-mediated clock regulation. Three main aspects of the circadian clock, namely, the free-running period, locomotion phase, and circadian amplitude, are discussed in detail in the context of how miRNAs are involved in these regulations. In addition, approaches regarding the discovery of circadian-related miRNAs and their targets are also discussed. Research in the last decade suggests that miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation is crucial to the generation and maintenance of a robust circadian clock in animals. In flies, miRNAs are known to modulate circadian rhythmicity and the free-running period, as well as circadian outputs. Further characterization of miRNAs, especially in the circadian input, will be a vital step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the functions underlying miRNA-control of the circadian clock.

  19. Circadian Plasticity in the Brain of Insects and Rodents

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    Wojciech Krzeptowski

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In both vertebrate and invertebrate brains, neurons, glial cells and synapses are plastic, which means that the physiology and structure of these components are modified in response to internal and external stimuli during development and in mature brains. The term plasticity has been introduced in the last century to describe experience-dependent changes in synapse strength and number. These changes result from local functional and morphological synapse modifications; however, these modifications also occur more commonly in pre- and postsynaptic neurons. As a result, neuron morphology and neuronal networks are constantly modified during the life of animals and humans in response to different stimuli. Nevertheless, it has been discovered in flies and mammals that the number of synapses and size and shape of neurons also oscillate during the day. In most cases, these rhythms are circadian since they are generated by endogenous circadian clocks; however, some rhythmic changes in neuron morphology and synapse number and structure are controlled directly by environmental cues or by both external cues and circadian clocks. When the circadian clock is involved in generating cyclic changes in the nervous system, this type of plasticity is called circadian plasticity. It seems to be important in processing sensory information, in learning and in memory. Disruption of the clock may affect major brain functions.

  20. Nutrition and the Circadian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Gregory D M; Cade, Janet E; Grant, Peter J; Hardie, Laura J

    2016-01-01

    The human circadian system anticipates and adapts to daily environmental changes to optimise behaviour according to time of day and temporally partition incompatible physiological processes. At the helm of this system is a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN are primarily synchronised to the 24 hour day by the light/dark cycle; however, feeding/fasting cycles are the primary time cues for clocks in peripheral tissues. Aligning feeding/fasting cycles with clock-regulated metabolic changes optimises metabolism, and studies of other animals suggest that feeding at inappropriate times disrupts circadian system organisation and thereby contributes to adverse metabolic consequences and chronic disease development. ‘High-fat diets’ (HFDs) produce particularly deleterious effects on circadian system organisation in rodents by blunting feeding/fasting cycles. Time-of-day-restricted feeding, where food availability is restricted to a period of several hours, offsets many adverse consequences of HFDs in these animals; however, further evidence is required to assess whether the same is true in humans. Several nutritional compounds have robust effects on the circadian system. Caffeine, for example, can speed synchronisation to new time zones after jetlag. An appreciation of the circadian system has many implications for nutritional science and may ultimately help reduce the burden of chronic diseases. PMID:27221157

  1. Circadian clock and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirvani, Minou; Khuu, Cuong; Utheim, Tor Paaske; Sand, Lars Peter; Sehic, Amer

    2018-02-01

    The circadian clock is comprised of a master component situated in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and subordinate clock genes in almost every cell of the body. The circadian clock genes and their encoded proteins govern the organism to follow the natural signals of time, and adapt to external changes in the environment. The majority of physiological processes in mammals exhibit variable circadian rhythms, which are generated and coordinated by an oscillation in the expression of the clock genes. A number of studies have reported that alteration in the expression level of clock genes is correlated with several pathological conditions, including cancer. However, little is known about the role of clock genes in homeostasis of the oral epithelium and their disturbances in oral carcinogenesis. The present review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the implications of clock genes in oral cancer. It has been demonstrated that the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma undergoes circadian oscillation in relation to tumor volume and proliferation rate. The circadian clock gene period ( PER)1 has been associated with oral cancer pathogenesis and it is suggested that changes in the expression of PER1 may exhibit an important role in the development, invasion, and metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. However, its role remains elusive and there is a need for further research in order to understand the underlying mechanisms of the clock genes in oral cancer pathogenesis.

  2. Circadian Enhancers Coordinate Multiple Phases of Rhythmic Gene Transcription In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bin; Everett, Logan J.; Jager, Jennifer; Briggs, Erika; Armour, Sean M.; Feng, Dan; Roy, Ankur; Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Sun, Zheng; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian transcriptomes display complex circadian rhythms with multiple phases of gene expression that cannot be accounted for by current models of the molecular clock. We have determined the underlying mechanisms by measuring nascent RNA transcription around the clock in mouse liver. Unbiased examination of eRNAs that cluster in specific circadian phases identified functional enhancers driven by distinct transcription factors (TFs). We further identify on a global scale the components of the TF cistromes that function to orchestrate circadian gene expression. Integrated genomic analyses also revealed novel mechanisms by which a single circadian factor controls opposing transcriptional phases. These findings shed new light on the diversity and specificity of TF function in the generation of multiple phases of circadian gene transcription in a mammalian organ. PMID:25416951

  3. Circadian period integrates network information through activation of the BMP signaling pathway.

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    Esteban J Beckwith

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms use biological clocks to maintain their internal temporal order and anticipate daily environmental changes. In Drosophila, circadian regulation of locomotor behavior is controlled by ∼150 neurons; among them, neurons expressing the PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF set the period of locomotor behavior under free-running conditions. To date, it remains unclear how individual circadian clusters integrate their activity to assemble a distinctive behavioral output. Here we show that the BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN (BMP signaling pathway plays a crucial role in setting the circadian period in PDF neurons in the adult brain. Acute deregulation of BMP signaling causes period lengthening through regulation of dClock transcription, providing evidence for a novel function of this pathway in the adult brain. We propose that coherence in the circadian network arises from integration in PDF neurons of both the pace of the cell-autonomous molecular clock and information derived from circadian-relevant neurons through release of BMP ligands.

  4. Adjustment of the Arabidopsis circadian oscillator by sugar signalling dictates the regulation of starch metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Motohide; Ohara, Takayuki; Hearn, Timothy J; Frank, Alexander; da Silva, Viviane C H; Caldana, Camila; Webb, Alex A R; Satake, Akiko

    2017-08-16

    Arabidopsis plants store part of the carbon fixed by photosynthesis as starch to sustain growth at night. Two competing hypotheses have been proposed to explain this diel starch turnover based on either the measurement of starch abundance with respect to circadian time, or the sensing of sugars to feedback to the circadian oscillator to dynamically adjust the timing of starch turnover. We report a phase oscillator model that permitted derivation of the ideal responses of the circadian regulation of starch breakdown to maintain sucrose homeostasis. Testing the model predictions using a sugar-unresponsive mutant of Arabidopsis demonstrated that the dynamics of starch turnover arise from the circadian clock measuring and responding to the rate of change of cellular sucrose. Our theory and experiments suggest that starch turnover is controlled by the circadian clock acting as a dynamic homeostat responding to sucrose signals to maintain carbon homeostasis.

  5. The effects of chronic marijuana use on circadian entrainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehurst, Lauren N; Fogler, Kethera; Hall, Kate; Hartmann, Matthew; Dyche, Jeff

    2015-05-01

    Animal literature suggests a connection between marijuana use and altered circadian rhythms. However, the effect has not yet been demonstrated in humans. The present study examined the effect of chronic marijuana use on human circadian function. Participants consisted of current users who reported smoking marijuana daily for at least a year and non-marijuana user controls. Participants took a neurocognitive assessment, wore actigraphs and maintained sleep diaries for three weeks. While no significant cognitive changes were found between groups, data revealed that chronic marijuana use may act as an additional zeitgeber and lead to increased entrainment in human users.

  6. The clockwork orange Drosophila protein functions as both an activator and a repressor of clock gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richier, Benjamin; Michard-Vanhée, Christine; Lamouroux, Annie; Papin, Christian; Rouyer, François

    2008-04-01

    The Drosophila clock relies on transcriptional feedback loops that generate daily oscillations of the clock gene expression at mRNA and protein levels. In the evening, the CLOCK (CLK) and CYCLE (CYC) basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) PAS-domain transcription factors activate the expression of the period (per) and timeless (tim) genes. Posttranslational modifications delay the accumulation of PER and TIM, which inhibit CLK/CYC activity in the late night. We show here that a null mutant of the clockwork orange (cwo) gene encoding a bHLH orange-domain putative transcription factor displays long-period activity rhythms. cwo loss of function increases cwo mRNA levels but reduces mRNA peak levels of the 4 described CLK/CYC targets, inducing an almost complete loss of their cycling. In addition, the absence of CWO induces alterations of PER and CLK phosphorylation cycles. Our results indicate that, in vivo, CWO modulates clock gene expression through both repressor and activator transcriptional functions.

  7. Circadian molecular clock in lung pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Isaac K.; Yao, Hongwei; Sellix, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted daily or circadian rhythms of lung function and inflammatory responses are common features of chronic airway diseases. At the molecular level these circadian rhythms depend on the activity of an autoregulatory feedback loop oscillator of clock gene transcription factors, including the BMAL1:CLOCK activator complex and the repressors PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME. The key nuclear receptors and transcription factors REV-ERBα and RORα regulate Bmal1 expression and provide stability to the oscillator. Circadian clock dysfunction is implicated in both immune and inflammatory responses to environmental, inflammatory, and infectious agents. Molecular clock function is altered by exposomes, tobacco smoke, lipopolysaccharide, hyperoxia, allergens, bleomycin, as well as bacterial and viral infections. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) regulates the timing of the clock through acetylation of BMAL1 and PER2 and controls the clock-dependent functions, which can also be affected by environmental stressors. Environmental agents and redox modulation may alter the levels of REV-ERBα and RORα in lung tissue in association with a heightened DNA damage response, cellular senescence, and inflammation. A reciprocal relationship exists between the molecular clock and immune/inflammatory responses in the lungs. Molecular clock function in lung cells may be used as a biomarker of disease severity and exacerbations or for assessing the efficacy of chronotherapy for disease management. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of clock-controlled cellular and molecular functions in the lungs and highlight the repercussions of clock disruption on the pathophysiology of chronic airway diseases and their exacerbations. Furthermore, we highlight the potential for the molecular clock as a novel chronopharmacological target for the management of lung pathophysiology. PMID:26361874

  8. Mitochondrial H2O2 signaling is controlled by the concerted action of peroxiredoxin III and sulfiredoxin: Linking mitochondrial function to circadian rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Sue Goo; Kil, In Sup

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondria produce hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) during energy metabolism in most mammalian cells as well as during the oxidation of cholesterol associated with the synthesis of steroid hormones in steroidogenic cells. Some of the H 2 O 2 produced in mitochondria is released into the cytosol, where it serves as a key regulator of various signaling pathways. Given that mitochondria are equipped with several H 2 O 2 -eliminating enzymes, however, it had not been clear how mitochondrial H 2 O 2 can escape destruction by these enzymes for such release. Peroxiredoxin III (PrxIII) is the most abundant and efficient H 2 O 2 -eliminating enzyme in mitochondria of most cell types. We found that PrxIII undergoes reversible inactivation through hyperoxidation of its catalytic cysteine residue to cysteine sulfinic acid, and that release of mitochondrial H 2 O 2 likely occurs as a result of such PrxIII inactivation. The hyperoxidized form of PrxIII (PrxIII-SO 2 H) is reduced and reactivated by sulfiredoxin (Srx). We also found that the amounts of PrxIII-SO 2 H and Srx undergo antiphasic circadian oscillation in mitochondria of the adrenal gland, heart, and brown adipose tissue of mice maintained under normal conditions. Cytosolic Srx was found to be imported into mitochondria via a mechanism that requires formation of a disulfide-linked complex with heat shock protein 90, which is likely promoted by H 2 O 2 released from mitochondria. The imported Srx was found to be degraded by Lon protease in a manner dependent on PrxIII hyperoxidation state. The coordinated import and degradation of Srx underlie Srx oscillation and consequent PrxIII-SO 2 H oscillation in mitochondria. The rhythmic change in the amount of PrxIII-SO 2 H suggests that mitochondrial release of H 2 O 2 is also likely a circadian event that conveys temporal information on steroidogenesis in the adrenal gland and on energy metabolism in heart and brown adipose tissue to cytosolic signaling pathways. Copyright

  9. Mini Review: Circadian Clocks, Stress and Immunity

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    Rebecca eDumbell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, molecular circadian clocks are present in most cells of the body, and this circadian network plays an important role in synchronizing physiological processes and behaviors to the appropriate time of day. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal endocrine axis regulates the response to acute and chronic stress, acting through its final effectors – glucocorticoids – released from the adrenal cortex. Glucocorticoid secretion, characterized by its circadian rhythm, has an important role in synchronizing peripheral clocks and rhythms downstream of the master circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Finally, glucocorticoids are powerfully anti-inflammatory, and recent work has implicated the circadian clock in various aspects and cells of the immune system, suggesting a tight interplay of stress and circadian systems in the regulation of immunity. This mini-review summarizes our current understanding of the role of the circadian clock network in both, the HPA axis and the immune system, and discusses their interactions.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Vertebrate Diurnal/Circadian Transcriptomes.

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    Greg Boyle

    Full Text Available From photosynthetic bacteria to mammals, the circadian clock evolved to track diurnal rhythms and enable organisms to anticipate daily recurring changes such as temperature and light. It orchestrates a broad spectrum of physiology such as the sleep/wake and eating/fasting cycles. While we have made tremendous advances in our understanding of the molecular details of the circadian clock mechanism and how it is synchronized with the environment, we still have rudimentary knowledge regarding its connection to help regulate diurnal physiology. One potential reason is the sheer size of the output network. Diurnal/circadian transcriptomic studies are reporting that around 10% of the expressed genome is rhythmically controlled. Zebrafish is an important model system for the study of the core circadian mechanism in vertebrate. As Zebrafish share more than 70% of its genes with human, it could also be an additional model in addition to rodent for exploring the diurnal/circadian output with potential for translational relevance. Here we performed comparative diurnal/circadian transcriptome analysis with established mouse liver and other tissue datasets. First, by combining liver tissue sampling in a 48h time series, transcription profiling using oligonucleotide arrays and bioinformatics analysis, we profiled rhythmic transcripts and identified 2609 rhythmic genes. The comparative analysis revealed interesting features of the output network regarding number of rhythmic genes, proportion of tissue specific genes and the extent of transcription factor family expression. Undoubtedly, the Zebrafish model system will help identify new vertebrate outputs and their regulators and provides leads for further characterization of the diurnal cis-regulatory network.

  11. Dysglycemia induces abnormal circadian blood pressure variability

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    Kumarasamy Sivarajan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediabetes (PreDM in asymptomatic adults is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability (abnormal CBPV. Hypothesis Systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. Methods Dahl salt-sensitive (S rats (n = 19 after weaning were fed either an American (AD or a standard (SD diet. The AD (high-glycemic-index, high-fat simulated customary human diet, provided daily overabundant calories which over time lead to body weight gain. The SD (low-glycemic-index, low-fat mirrored desirable balanced human diet for maintaining body weight. Body weight and serum concentrations for fasting glucose (FG, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin, and proinflammatory cytokines [monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α] were measured. Rats were surgically implanted with C40 transmitters and blood pressure (BP-both systolic; SBP and diastolic; DBP and heart rate (HR were recorded by telemetry every 5 minutes during both sleep (day and active (night periods. Pulse pressure (PP was calculated (PP = SBP-DBP. Results [mean(SEM]: The AD fed group displayed significant increase in body weight (after 90 days; p Conclusion These data validate our stated hypothesis that systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. This study, for the first time, demonstrates a cause and effect relationship between caloric excess, enhanced systemic inflammation, dysglycemia, loss of blood pressure control and abnormal CBPV. Our results provide the fundamental basis for examining the relationship between dysglycemia and perturbation of the underlying mechanisms (adipose tissue dysfunction induced local and systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and alteration of adipose tissue precursors for the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin system which generate abnormal CBPV.

  12. Melatonin, Light and Circadian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-25

    bifida occulta , and sarcoidosis, all show loss of the melatonin circadian rhythm, with psoriasis vulgaris, spina bifida occulta , and sarcoidosis...autonomic neuro- pathy show decreased nocturnal melatonin (Checkley and Palazidou, 1988). Klinefelter’s syndrome, Turners syndrome, psoriasis vulgaris, spina

  13. ADHD, circadian rhythms and seasonality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wynchank, Dora S.; Bijlenga, Denise; Lamers, Femke; Bron, Tannetje I.; Winthorst, Wim H.; Vogel, Suzan W.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Beekman, Aartjan T.; Kooij, J. Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated whether the association between Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) was mediated by the circadian rhythm. Method: Data of 2239 persons from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) were used. Two groups

  14. Ischemic stroke destabilizes circadian rhythms

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    Borjigin Jimo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central circadian pacemaker is a remarkably robust regulator of daily rhythmic variations of cardiovascular, endocrine, and neural physiology. Environmental lighting conditions are powerful modulators of circadian rhythms, but regulation of circadian rhythms by disease states is less clear. Here, we examine the effect of ischemic stroke on circadian rhythms in rats using high-resolution pineal microdialysis. Methods Rats were housed in LD 12:12 h conditions and monitored by pineal microdialysis to determine baseline melatonin timing profiles. After demonstration that the circadian expression of melatonin was at steady state, rats were subjected to experimental stroke using two-hour intralumenal filament occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. The animals were returned to their cages, and melatonin monitoring was resumed. The timing of onset, offset, and duration of melatonin secretion were calculated before and after stroke to determine changes in circadian rhythms of melatonin secretion. At the end of the monitoring period, brains were analyzed to determine infarct volume. Results Rats demonstrated immediate shifts in melatonin timing after stroke. We observed a broad range of perturbations in melatonin timing in subsequent days, with rats exhibiting onset/offset patterns which included: advance/advance, advance/delay, delay/advance, and delay/delay. Melatonin rhythms displayed prolonged instability several days after stroke, with a majority of rats showing a day-to-day alternation between advance and delay in melatonin onset and duration. Duration of melatonin secretion changed in response to stroke, and this change was strongly determined by the shift in melatonin onset time. There was no correlation between infarct size and the direction or amplitude of melatonin phase shifting. Conclusion This is the first demonstration that stroke induces immediate changes in the timing of pineal melatonin secretion, indicating

  15. The Importance of the Circadian Clock in Regulating Plant Metabolism

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    Jin A Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are the primary energy source for plant development. Plants synthesize sucrose in source organs and transport them to sink organs during plant growth. This metabolism is sensitive to environmental changes in light quantity, quality, and photoperiod. In the daytime, the synthesis of sucrose and starch accumulates, and starch is degraded at nighttime. The circadian clock genes provide plants with information on the daily environmental changes and directly control many developmental processes, which are related to the path of primary metabolites throughout the life cycle. The circadian clock mechanism and processes of metabolism controlled by the circadian rhythm were studied in the model plant Arabidopsis and in the crops potato and rice. However, the translation of molecular mechanisms obtained from studies of model plants to crop plants is still difficult. Crop plants have specific organs such as edible seed and tuber that increase the size or accumulate valuable metabolites by harvestable metabolic components. Human consumers are interested in the regulation and promotion of these agriculturally significant crops. Circadian clock manipulation may suggest various strategies for the increased productivity of food crops through using environmental signal or overcoming environmental stress.

  16. The circadian clock regulates auxin signaling and responses in Arabidopsis.

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    Michael F Covington

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock plays a pervasive role in the temporal regulation of plant physiology, environmental responsiveness, and development. In contrast, the phytohormone auxin plays a similarly far-reaching role in the spatial regulation of plant growth and development. Went and Thimann noted 70 years ago that plant sensitivity to auxin varied according to the time of day, an observation that they could not explain. Here we present work that explains this puzzle, demonstrating that the circadian clock regulates auxin signal transduction. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, we found many auxin-induced genes are under clock regulation. We verified that endogenous auxin signaling is clock regulated with a luciferase-based assay. Exogenous auxin has only modest effects on the plant clock, but the clock controls plant sensitivity to applied auxin. Notably, we found both transcriptional and growth responses to exogenous auxin are gated by the clock. Thus the circadian clock regulates some, and perhaps all, auxin responses. Consequently, many aspects of plant physiology not previously thought to be under circadian control may show time-of-day-specific sensitivity, with likely important consequences for plant growth and environmental responses.

  17. Circadian remodeling of neuronal circuits involved in rhythmic behavior.

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    María Paz Fernández

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Clock output pathways are central to convey timing information from the circadian clock to a diversity of physiological systems, ranging from cell-autonomous processes to behavior. While the molecular mechanisms that generate and sustain rhythmicity at the cellular level are well understood, it is unclear how this information is further structured to control specific behavioral outputs. Rhythmic release of pigment dispersing factor (PDF has been proposed to propagate the time of day information from core pacemaker cells to downstream targets underlying rhythmic locomotor activity. Indeed, such circadian changes in PDF intensity represent the only known mechanism through which the PDF circuit could communicate with its output. Here we describe a novel circadian phenomenon involving extensive remodeling in the axonal terminals of the PDF circuit, which display higher complexity during the day and significantly lower complexity at nighttime, both under daily cycles and constant conditions. In support to its circadian nature, cycling is lost in bona fide clockless mutants. We propose this clock-controlled structural plasticity as a candidate mechanism contributing to the transmission of the information downstream of pacemaker cells.

  18. Are circadian rhythms new pathways to understand Autism Spectrum Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffray, M-M; Nicolas, A; Speranza, M; Georgieff, N

    2016-11-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a frequent neurodevelopmental disorder. ASD is probably the result of intricate interactions between genes and environment altering progressively the development of brain structures and functions. Circadian rhythms are a complex intrinsic timing system composed of almost as many clocks as there are body cells. They regulate a variety of physiological and behavioral processes such as the sleep-wake rhythm. ASD is often associated with sleep disorders and low levels of melatonin. This first point raises the hypothesis that circadian rhythms could have an implication in ASD etiology. Moreover, circadian rhythms are generated by auto-regulatory genetic feedback loops, driven by transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL1, who drive transcription daily patterns of a wide number of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) in different cellular contexts across tissues. Among these, are some CCGs coding for synapses molecules associated to ASD susceptibility. Furthermore, evidence emerges about circadian rhythms control of time brain development processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cancer/testis antigen PIWIL2 suppresses circadian rhythms by regulating the stability and activity of BMAL1 and CLOCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yilu; Zheng, Xulei; Hu, Wei; Bian, Shasha; Zhang, Zhiwei; Tao, Dachang; Liu, Yunqiang; Ma, Yongxin

    2017-08-15

    Circadian rhythms are regulated by transcriptional and post-translational feedback loops generated by appropriate functions of clock proteins. Rhythmic degradation of the circadian clock proteins is critical for maintenance of the circadian oscillations. Notably, circadian clock does not work during spermatogenesis and can be disrupted in tumors. However, the underlying mechanism that suppresses circadian rhythms in germ cells and cancer cells remains largely unknown. Here we report that the cancer/testis antigen PIWIL2 can repress circadian rhythms both in the testis and cancer cells. By facilitating SRC binding with PI3K, PIWIL2 activates the PI3K-AKT pathway to phosphorylate and deactivate GSK3β, suppressing GSK3β-induced phosphorylation and degradation of circadian protein BMAL1 and CLOCK. Meanwhile, PIWIL2 can bind with E-Box sequences associated with the BMAL1/CLOCK complex to negatively regulate the transcriptional activation activity of promoters of clock-controlled genes. Taken together, our results first described a function for the germline-specific protein PIWIL2 in regulation of the circadian clock, providing a molecular link between spermatogenesis as well as tumorigenesis to the dysfunction of circadian rhythms.

  20. Laranja Mecânica: violência ou violação? Clockwork Orange: violence or violation?

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    Paulo Menezes

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available O artigo investiga o filme Laranja Mecânica de Stanley Kubrick, realizado em 1971. Ao contrário das análises tradicionais, que buscam ver nesse filme um libelo contra a violência - ou, curiosamente, uma apologia desta mesma violência -, propõe-se uma interpretação que caminha em direção dos fundamentos visuais que constroem no espectador essa percepção de "violência", ressaltando-se aí primordialmente os valores que são colocados em questão pelas imagens que o filme nos mostra. Propõe-se, portanto, um redirecionamento analítico de um filme muito visto e discutido, explicitando-se outros elementos em jogo, bem como a maneira pelas quais esses elementos são expostos aos olhos do público, construindo-se, então, uma nova dimensão de significados inesperadosThe article analyzes the film Clockwork Orange by Stanley Kubrick, made in 1971. In opposition to the traditional analyses which try to see this film as a libel against violence - or curiously, an apology for this same violence -, the purpose here is to give an interpretation which follows the visual fundaments that render the spectator this perception of "violence", emphasizing there mainly the values put into evidence by the images the film shows us. Consequently an analytical redirectioning of well-watched and discussed film is suggested, and other fundamental elements are brought to light as well as the manner by which these elements are exposed to the audience, in order to build up a new dimension of unexpected meanings.

  1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide neurons mediate sleep-specific circadian output in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, Michael; Hughes, Michael E; Raccuglia, Davide; Felix, Mario; Li, Michael; Barnett, Gregory; Duah, Janelle; Nitabach, Michael N

    2014-11-17

    Imbalances in amount and timing of sleep are harmful to physical and mental health. Therefore, the study of the underlying mechanisms is of great biological importance. Proper timing and amount of sleep are regulated by both the circadian clock and homeostatic sleep drive. However, very little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates sleep. In this study, we describe a novel role for diuretic hormone 31 (DH31), the fly homolog of the vertebrate neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide, as a circadian wake-promoting signal that awakens the fly in anticipation of dawn. Analysis of loss-of-function and gain-of-function Drosophila mutants demonstrates that DH31 suppresses sleep late at night. DH31 is expressed by a subset of dorsal circadian clock neurons that also express the receptor for the circadian neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF). PDF secreted by the ventral pacemaker subset of circadian clock neurons acts on PDF receptors in the DH31-expressing dorsal clock neurons to increase DH31 secretion before dawn. Activation of PDF receptors in DH31-positive DN1 specifically affects sleep and has no effect on circadian rhythms, thus constituting a dedicated locus for circadian regulation of sleep. We identified a novel signaling molecule (DH31) as part of a neuropeptide relay mechanism for circadian control of sleep. Our results indicate that outputs of the clock controlling sleep and locomotor rhythms are mediated via distinct neuronal pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanism of the circadian clock in physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    It has been well established that the circadian clock plays a crucial role in the regulation of almost every physiological process. It also plays a critical role in pathophysiological states including those of obesity and diabetes. Recent evidence has highlighted the potential for targeting the circadian clock as a potential drug target. New studies have also demonstrated the existence of “clock-independent effects” of the circadian proteins, leading to exciting new avenues of research in the circadian clock field in physiology. The goal of this review is to provide an introduction to and overview of the circadian clock in physiology, including mechanisms, targets, and role in disease states. The role of the circadian clocks in the regulation of the cardiovascular system, renal function, metabolism, the endocrine system, immune, and reproductive systems will be discussed. PMID:23576606

  3. The hepatic circadian clock fine-tunes the lipogenic response to feeding through RORα/γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxiang; Papazyan, Romeo; Damle, Manashree; Fang, Bin; Jager, Jennifer; Feng, Dan; Peed, Lindsey C.; Guan, Dongyin; Sun, Zheng; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2017-01-01

    Liver lipid metabolism is under intricate temporal control by both the circadian clock and feeding. The interplay between these two mechanisms is not clear. Here we show that liver-specific depletion of nuclear receptors RORα and RORγ, key components of the molecular circadian clock, up-regulate expression of lipogenic genes only under fed conditions at Zeitgeber time 22 (ZT22) but not under fasting conditions at ZT22 or ad libitum conditions at ZT10. RORα/γ controls circadian expression of Insig2, which keeps feeding-induced SREBP1c activation under check. Loss of RORα/γ causes overactivation of the SREBP-dependent lipogenic response to feeding, exacerbating diet-induced hepatic steatosis. These findings thus establish ROR/INSIG2/SREBP as a molecular pathway by which circadian clock components anticipatorily regulate lipogenic responses to feeding. This highlights the importance of time of day as a consideration in the treatment of liver metabolic disorders. PMID:28747429

  4. Hierarchical organization of the circadian timing system

    OpenAIRE

    Steensel, Mariska van

    2006-01-01

    In order to cope with and to predict 24-hour rhythms in the environment, most, if not all, organisms have a circadian timing system. The most important mammalian circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus at the base of the hypothalamus in the brain. Over the years, it has become clear that the circadian system is complex and that additional oscillators exist, both within and outside the central nervous system. The aim of this thesis was to obtain insight in the hierarchica...

  5. Evidence for a biological dawn and dusk in the human circadian timing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, T A; Aeschbach, D; Duncan, W C

    2001-01-01

    Because individuals differ in the phase angle at which their circadian rhythms are entrained to external time cues, averaging group data relative to clock time sometimes obscures abrupt changes that are characteristic of waveforms of the rhythms in individuals. Such changes may have important implications for the temporal organization of human circadian physiology. To control for variance in phase angle of entrainment, we used dual internal reference points – onset and offset of the nocturnal period of melatonin secretion – to calculate average profiles of circadian rhythm data from five previously published studies. Onset and/or offset of melatonin secretion were found to coincide with switch-like transitions between distinct diurnal and nocturnal periods of circadian rhythms in core body temperature, sleepiness, power in the theta band of the wake EEG, sleep propensity and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep propensity. Transitions between diurnal and nocturnal periods of sleep–wake and cortisol circadian rhythms were found to lag the other transitions by 1–3 h. When the duration of the daily light period was manipulated experimentally, melatonin-onset-related transitions in circadian rhythms appeared to be entrained to the light-to-dark transition, while melatonin-offset-related transitions appeared to be entrained to the dark-to-light transition. These results suggest a model of the human circadian timing system in which two states, one diurnal and one nocturnal, alternate with one another, and in which transitions between the states are switch-like and are separately entrained to dawn and dusk. This description of the human circadian system is similar to the Pittendrigh–Daan model of the rodent circadian system, and it suggests that core features of the system in other mammals are conserved in humans. PMID:11559786

  6. Assembly of a comprehensive regulatory network for the mammalian circadian clock: a bioinformatics approach.

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    Robert Lehmann

    Full Text Available By regulating the timing of cellular processes, the circadian clock provides a way to adapt physiology and behaviour to the geophysical time. In mammals, a light-entrainable master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN controls peripheral clocks that are present in virtually every body cell. Defective circadian timing is associated with several pathologies such as cancer and metabolic and sleep disorders. To better understand the circadian regulation of cellular processes, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline encompassing the analysis of high-throughput data sets and the exploitation of published knowledge by text-mining. We identified 118 novel potential clock-regulated genes and integrated them into an existing high-quality circadian network, generating the to-date most comprehensive network of circadian regulated genes (NCRG. To validate particular elements in our network, we assessed publicly available ChIP-seq data for BMAL1, REV-ERBα/β and RORα/γ proteins and found strong evidence for circadian regulation of Elavl1, Nme1, Dhx6, Med1 and Rbbp7 all of which are involved in the regulation of tumourigenesis. Furthermore, we identified Ncl and Ddx6, as targets of RORγ and REV-ERBα, β, respectively. Most interestingly, these genes were also reported to be involved in miRNA regulation; in particular, NCL regulates several miRNAs, all involved in cancer aggressiveness. Thus, NCL represents a novel potential link via which the circadian clock, and specifically RORγ, regulates the expression of miRNAs, with particular consequences in breast cancer progression. Our findings bring us one step forward towards a mechanistic understanding of mammalian circadian regulation, and provide further evidence of the influence of circadian deregulation in cancer.

  7. Circadian clock dysfunction and psychiatric disease: could fruit flies have a say?

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    Mauro Agostino Zordan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence of a link between the circadian system and psychiatric diseases. Studies in humans and mammals suggest that environmental and/or genetic disruption of the circadian system lead to an increased liability to psychiatric disease. Disruption of clock genes and/or the clock network might be related to the etiology of these pathologies; also, some genes, known for their circadian clock functions, might be associated to mental illnesses through clock-independent pleiotropy. Here we examine the features which we believe make Drosophila melanogaster a model apt to study the role of the circadian clock in psychiatric disease. Despite differences in the organization of the clock system, the molecular architecture of the Drosophila and mammalian circadian oscillators are comparable and many components are evolutionarily related. In addition, Drosophila has a rather complex nervous system, which shares much at the cell and neurobiological level with humans, i.e. a tripartite brain, the main neurotransmitter systems, and behavioral traits: circadian behavior, learning and memory, motivation, addiction, social behavior. There is evidence that the Drosophila brain shares some homologies with the vertebrate cerebellum, basal ganglia and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, the dysfunctions of which have been tied to mental illness. We discuss Drosophila in comparison to mammals with reference to the: organization of the brain and neurotransmitter systems; architecture of the circadian clock; clock-controlled behaviors. We sum up current knowledge on behavioral endophenotypes which are amenable to modeling in flies, such as defects involving sleep, cognition, or social interactions and discuss the relationship of the circadian system to these traits. Finally, we consider if Drosophila could be a valuable asset to understand the relationship between circadian clock malfunction and psychiatric disease.

  8. Circadian Clock Dysfunction and Psychiatric Disease: Could Fruit Flies have a Say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zordan, Mauro Agostino; Sandrelli, Federica

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence of a link between the circadian system and psychiatric diseases. Studies in humans and mammals suggest that environmental and/or genetic disruption of the circadian system leads to an increased liability to psychiatric disease. Disruption of clock genes and/or the clock network might be related to the etiology of these pathologies; also, some genes, known for their circadian clock functions, might be associated to mental illnesses through clock-independent pleiotropy. Here, we examine the features which we believe make Drosophila melanogaster a model apt to study the role of the circadian clock in psychiatric disease. Despite differences in the organization of the clock system, the molecular architecture of the Drosophila and mammalian circadian oscillators are comparable and many components are evolutionarily related. In addition, Drosophila has a rather complex nervous system, which shares much at the cell and neurobiological level with humans, i.e., a tripartite brain, the main neurotransmitter systems, and behavioral traits: circadian behavior, learning and memory, motivation, addiction, social behavior. There is evidence that the Drosophila brain shares some homologies with the vertebrate cerebellum, basal ganglia, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, the dysfunctions of which have been tied to mental illness. We discuss Drosophila in comparison to mammals with reference to the: organization of the brain and neurotransmitter systems; architecture of the circadian clock; clock-controlled behaviors. We sum up current knowledge on behavioral endophenotypes, which are amenable to modeling in flies, such as defects involving sleep, cognition, or social interactions, and discuss the relationship of the circadian system to these traits. Finally, we consider if Drosophila could be a valuable asset to understand the relationship between circadian clock malfunction and psychiatric disease.

  9. Sleep inertia, sleep homeostatic, and circadian influences on higher-order cognitive functions

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Tina M.; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.; Ronda, Joseph M.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep inertia, sleep homeostatic, and circadian processes modulate cognition, including reaction time, memory, mood, and alertness. How these processes influence higher-order cognitive functions is not well known. Six participants completed a 73-daylong study that included two 14-daylong 28h forced desynchrony protocols, to examine separate and interacting influences of sleep inertia, sleep homeostasis, and circadian phase on higher-order cognitive functions of inhibitory control and selectiv...

  10. Evidence for the circadian gene period as a proximate mechanism of protandry in a pollinating fig wasp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hai-Feng; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Dunn, Derek W; Niu, Li-Ming; Wang, Bo; Jia, Ling-Yi; Huang, Da-Wei

    2014-03-01

    Protandry in insects is the tendency for adult males to emerge before females and usually results from intra-sexual selection. However, the genetic basis of this common phenomenon is poorly understood. Pollinating fig wasp (Agaonidae) larvae develop in galled flowers within the enclosed inflorescences ('figs') of fig trees. Upon emergence, males locate and mate with the still galled females. After mating, males release females from their galls to enable dispersal. Females cannot exit galls or disperse from a fig without male assistance. We sampled male and female Ceratosolen solmsi (the pollinator of Ficus hispida) every 3 h over a 24 h emergence period, and then measured the expression of five circadian genes: period (per), clock (clk), cycle (cyc), pigment-dispersing factor (pdf) and clockwork orange (cwo). We found significant male-biased sexual dimorphism in the expression of all five genes. per showed the greatest divergence between the sexes and was the only gene rhythmically expressed. Expression of per correlated closely with emergence rates at specific time intervals in both male and female wasps. We suggest that this rhythmical expression of per may be a proximate mechanism of protandry in this species.

  11. Circadian typology and emotional intelligence in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antúnez, Juan Manuel; Navarro, José Francisco; Adan, Ana

    2013-10-01

    Several aspects related to health, such as satisfaction with life, perceived well-being, and psychopathological symptomatology have been associated with circadian typology and with emotional intelligence. Nevertheless, the relationships between circadian typology and emotional intelligence have not been explored yet. The purpose of the present study is to examine the relationships between circadian typology and emotional intelligence, taking into account the possible interactions between sex and physical exercise, and controlling for age. A sample of 1011 participants (649 women), aged between 18 and 50 yrs (26.92 ± 6.53) completed the reduced Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (rMEQ) and the Trait Meta-Mood Scale-24 (TMMS-24). The TMMS-24 considers three dimensions of emotional intelligence: emotional attention, emotional clarity, and emotional repair. Women showed higher values for emotional attention, whereas men showed higher values for emotional repair (p emotional repair (p = 0.001) regardless of circadian typology or sex. Circadian typology presents differences in all scores of emotional intelligence dimensions. Morning-type had lower emotional attention than evening- and neither-type; neither-type had lower emotional repair than morning-type, and lower emotional clarity than both evening- and morning-type (p emotional attention, and only morning-type men showed a low emotional attention score. From the results of emotional intelligence we can conclude that morning typology may be a protective factor in terms of general health, whereas we should be aware that the neither-type may present a possible vulnerability to develop psychological problems.

  12. Stability, precision, and near-24-hour period of the human circadian pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeisler, C. A.; Duffy, J. F.; Shanahan, T. L.; Brown, E. N.; Mitchell, J. F.; Rimmer, D. W.; Ronda, J. M.; Silva, E. J.; Allan, J. S.; Emens, J. S.; hide

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of circadian period in humans was thought to differ from that of other species, with the period of the activity rhythm reported to range from 13 to 65 hours (median 25.2 hours) and the period of the body temperature rhythm reported to average 25 hours in adulthood, and to shorten with age. However, those observations were based on studies of humans exposed to light levels sufficient to confound circadian period estimation. Precise estimation of the periods of the endogenous circadian rhythms of melatonin, core body temperature, and cortisol in healthy young and older individuals living in carefully controlled lighting conditions has now revealed that the intrinsic period of the human circadian pacemaker averages 24.18 hours in both age groups, with a tight distribution consistent with other species. These findings have important implications for understanding the pathophysiology of disrupted sleep in older people.

  13. Development of a circadian light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David B.; Ferguson, Ian T.

    2002-11-01

    Solid state lighting presents a new paradigm for lighting - controllability. Certain characteristics of the lighting environment can be manipulated, because of the possibility of using multiple LEDs of different emission wavelengths as the illumination source. This will provide a new, versatile, general illumination source due to the ability to vary the spectral power distribution. New effects beyond the visual may be achieved that are not possible with conventional light sources. Illumination has long been the primary function of lighting but as the lighting industry has matured the psychological aspects of lighting have been considered by designers; for example, choosing a particular lighting distribution or color variation in retail applications. The next step in the evolution of light is to consider the physiological effects of lighting that cause biological changes in a person within the environment. This work presents the development of a source that may have important bearing on this area of lighting. A circadian light source has been developed to provide an illumination source that works by modulating its correlated color temperature to mimic the changes in natural daylight through the day. In addition, this source can cause or control physiological effects for a person illuminated by it. The importance of this is seen in the human circadian rhythm's peak response corresponding to blue light at ~460 nm which corresponds to the primary spectral difference in increasing color temperature. The device works by adding blue light to a broadband source or mixing polychromatic light to mimic the variation of color temperature observed for the Planckian Locus on the CIE diagram. This device can have several applications including: a tool for researchers in this area, a general illumination lighting technology, and a light therapy device.

  14. Prediction of the protein components of a putative Calanus finmarchicus (Crustacea, Copepoda) circadian signaling system using a de novo assembled transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Andrew E; Fontanilla, Tiana M; Nesbit, Katherine T; Lenz, Petra H

    2013-09-01

    Diel vertical migration and seasonal diapause are critical life history events for the copepod Calanus finmarchicus. While much is known about these behaviors phenomenologically, little is known about their molecular underpinnings. Recent studies in insects suggest that some circadian genes/proteins also contribute to the establishment of seasonal diapause. Thus, it is possible that in Calanus these distinct timing regimes share some genetic components. To begin to address this possibility, we used the well-established Drosophila melanogaster circadian system as a reference for mining clock transcripts from a 200,000+ sequence Calanus transcriptome; the proteins encoded by the identified transcripts were also deduced and characterized. Sequences encoding homologs of the Drosophila core clock proteins CLOCK, CYCLE, PERIOD and TIMELESS were identified, as was one encoding CRYPTOCHROME 2, a core clock protein in ancestral insect systems, but absent in Drosophila. Calanus transcripts encoding proteins known to modulate the Drosophila core clock were also identified and characterized, e.g. CLOCKWORK ORANGE, DOUBLETIME, SHAGGY and VRILLE. Alignment and structural analyses of the deduced Calanus proteins with their Drosophila counterparts revealed extensive sequence conservation, particularly in functional domains. Interestingly, reverse BLAST analyses of these sequences against all arthropod proteins typically revealed non-Drosophila isoforms to be most similar to the Calanus queries. This, in combination with the presence of both CRYPTOCHROME 1 (a clock input pathway protein) and CRYPTOCHROME 2 in Calanus, suggests that the organization of the copepod circadian system is an ancestral one, more similar to that of insects like Danaus plexippus than to that of Drosophila. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-12-07

    Dec 7, 2008 ... system for the study of circadian rhythms primarily due to the availability of molecular genetic tools that enabled iden- tification of genes, proteins and neuronal groups that are es- sential components of the circadian machinery. Further, D. melanogaster exhibits robust and relatively easily measur-.

  16. Hierarchical organization of the circadian timing system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensel, Mariska van

    2006-01-01

    In order to cope with and to predict 24-hour rhythms in the environment, most, if not all, organisms have a circadian timing system. The most important mammalian circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus at the base of the hypothalamus in the brain. Over the years, it has become

  17. The Neurospora circadian clock : simple or complex?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Crosthwaite, Susan K.; Lakin-Thomas, Patricia L.; Merrow, Martha; Økland, Merete

    2001-01-01

    The fungus Neurospora crassa is being used by a number of research groups as a model organism to investigate circadian (daily) rhythmicity. In this review we concentrate on recent work relating to the complexity of the circadian system in this organism. We discuss: the advantages of Neurospora as a

  18. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-12-07

    Dec 7, 2008 ... large variety of tissues in the fly such as the eye, brain, pro- boscis, antennae, wings, abdomen, Malpighian tubules and testes (Plautz et al. 1997; Giebultowicz 2001). Although cell-autonomous circadian function is attributed to several tissues in Drosophila, circadian pacemaker neurons located in the brain ...

  19. Development of cortisol circadian rhythm in infancy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerth, C. de; Zijl, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Cortisol is the final product of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. It is secreted in a pulsatile fashion that displays a circadian rhythm. Infants are born without a circadian rhythm in cortisol and they acquire it during their first year of life. Studies do not

  20. The after-hours circadian mutant has reduced phenotypic plasticity in behaviors at multiple timescales and in sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Silvia; Balzani, Edoardo; Lassi, Glenda; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Plano, Andrea; Espinoza, Stefano; Mus, Liudmila; Tinarelli, Federico; Nolan, Patrick M; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Balci, Fuat; Nieus, Thierry; Tucci, Valter

    2017-12-19

    Circadian clock is known to adapt to environmental changes and can significantly influence cognitive and physiological functions. In this work, we report specific behavioral, cognitive, and sleep homeostatic defects in the after hours (Afh) circadian mouse mutant, which is characterized by lengthened circadian period. We found that the circadian timing irregularities in Afh mice resulted in higher interval timing uncertainty and suboptimal decisions due to incapability of processing probabilities. Our phenotypic observations further suggested that Afh mutants failed to exhibit the necessary phenotypic plasticity for adapting to temporal changes at multiple time scales (seconds-to-minutes to circadian). These behavioral effects of Afh mutation were complemented by the specific disruption of the Per/Cry circadian regulatory complex in brain regions that govern food anticipatory behaviors, sleep, and timing. We derive statistical predictions, which indicate that circadian clock and sleep are complementary processes in controlling behavioral/cognitive performance during 24 hrs. The results of this study have pivotal implications for understanding how the circadian clock modulates sleep and behavior.

  1. Shift work: health, performance and safety problems, traditional countermeasures, and innovative management strategies to reduce circadian misalignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith MR

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mark R Smith, Charmane I EastmanBiological Rhythms Research Laboratory, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: There are three mechanisms that may contribute to the health, performance, and safety problems associated with night-shift work: (1 circadian misalignment between the internal circadian clock and activities such as work, sleep, and eating, (2 chronic, partial sleep deprivation, and (3 melatonin suppression by light at night. The typical countermeasures, such as caffeine, naps, and melatonin (for its sleep-promoting effect, along with education about sleep and circadian rhythms, are the components of most fatigue risk-management plans. We contend that these, while better than nothing, are not enough because they do not address the underlying cause of the problems, which is circadian misalignment. We explain how to reset (phase-shift the circadian clock to partially align with the night-work, day-sleep schedule, and thus reduce circadian misalignment while preserving sleep and functioning on days off. This involves controlling light and dark using outdoor light exposure, sunglasses, sleep in the dark, and a little bright light during night work. We present a diagram of a sleep-and-light schedule to reduce circadian misalignment in permanent night work, or a rotation between evenings and nights, and give practical advice on how to implement this type of plan.Keywords: circadian rhythms, night work, bright light, phase-shifting, sleep, melatonin

  2. Circadian neuroendocrine physiology and electromagnetic field studies: Precautions and complexities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warman, G.R.; Tripp, H.M.; Harman, V.L.; Arendt, J.

    2003-01-01

    The suppression of melatonin by exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) 'the melatonin hypothesis' has been invoked as a possible mechanism through which exposure to these fields may result in an increased incidence of cancer. While the effect of light on melatonin is well established, data showing a similar effect due to EMF exposure are sparse and, where present, are often poorly controlled. The current review focuses on the complexities associated with using melatonin as a marker and the dynamic nature of normal melatonin regulation by the circadian neuroendocrine axis. These are issues which the authors believe contribute significantly to the lack of consistency of results in the current literature. Recommendations on protocol design are also made which, if followed, should enable researchers to eliminate or control for many of the confounding factors associated with melatonin being an output from the circadian clock. (author)

  3. Circadian neuroendocrine physiology and electromagnetic field studies: Precautions and complexities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warman, G.R.; Tripp, H.M.; Harman, V.L.; Arendt, J

    2003-07-01

    The suppression of melatonin by exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) 'the melatonin hypothesis' has been invoked as a possible mechanism through which exposure to these fields may result in an increased incidence of cancer. While the effect of light on melatonin is well established, data showing a similar effect due to EMF exposure are sparse and, where present, are often poorly controlled. The current review focuses on the complexities associated with using melatonin as a marker and the dynamic nature of normal melatonin regulation by the circadian neuroendocrine axis. These are issues which the authors believe contribute significantly to the lack of consistency of results in the current literature. Recommendations on protocol design are also made which, if followed, should enable researchers to eliminate or control for many of the confounding factors associated with melatonin being an output from the circadian clock. (author)

  4. Chronic cocaine causes long-term alterations in circadian period and photic entrainment in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowie, A C; Amicarelli, M J; Prosser, R A; Glass, J D

    2015-01-22

    The disruptive effects of cocaine on physiological, behavioral and genetic processes are well established. However, few studies have focused on the actions of cocaine on the adult circadian timekeeping system, and none have explored the circadian implications of long-term (weeks to months) cocaine exposure. The present study was undertaken to explore the actions of such long-term cocaine administration on core circadian parameters in mice, including rhythm period, length of the nocturnal activity period and photic entrainment. For cocaine dosing over extended periods, cocaine was provided in drinking water using continuous and scheduled regimens. The impact of chronic cocaine on circadian regulation was evidenced by disruptions of the period of circadian entrainment and intrinsic free-running circadian period. Specifically, mice under a skeleton photoperiod (1-min pulse of dim light delivered daily) receiving continuous ad libitum cocaine entrained rapidly to the light pulse at activity onset. Conversely, water controls entrained more slowly at activity offset through a process of phase-delays, which resulted in their activity rhythms being entrained 147° out of phase with the cocaine group. This pattern persisted after cocaine withdrawal. Next, mice exposed to scheduled daily cocaine presentations exhibited free-running periods under constant darkness that were significantly longer than water controls and which also persisted after cocaine withdrawal. These cocaine-induced perturbations of clock timing could produce chronic psychological and physiological stress, contributing to increased cocaine use and dependence. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mini screening of kinase inhibitors affecting period-length of mammalian cellular circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagita, Kazuhiro; Yamanaka, Iori; Koinuma, Satoshi; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Uchiyama, Yasuo

    2009-06-27

    In mammalian circadian rhythms, the transcriptional-translational feedback loop (TTFL) consisting of a set of clock genes is believed to elicit the circadian clock oscillation. The TTFL model explains that the accumulation and degradation of mPER and mCRY proteins control the period-length (tau) of the circadian clock. Although recent studies revealed that the Casein Kinase I epsilon delta (CKI epsilon delta) regulates the phosphorylation of mPER proteins and the circadian period-length, other kinases are also likely to contribute the phosphorylation of mPER. Here, we performed small scale screening using 84 chemical compounds known as kinase inhibitors to identify candidates possibly affecting the circadian period-length in mammalian cells. Screening by this high-throughput real-time bioluminescence monitoring system revealed that the several chemical compounds apparently lengthened the cellular circadian clock oscillation. These compounds are known as inhibitors against kinases such as Casein Kinase II (CKII), PI3-kinase (PI3K) and c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) in addition to CKI epsilon delta. Although these kinase inhibitors may have some non-specific effects on other factors, our mini screening identified new candidates contributing to period-length control in mammalian cells.

  6. Mapping the clockworks: what does the Clock Drawing Test assess in normal and pathological aging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Jardim de Paula

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Clock Drawing Test (CDT is a cognitive screening tool used in clinical and research settings. Despite its role on the assessment of global cognitive functioning, the specific cognitive components required for test performance are still unclear. We aim to assess the role of executive functioning, global cognitive status, visuospatial abilities, and semantic knowledge on Shulman’s CDT performance. Fifty-three mild cognitive impairment, 60 Alzheimer’s dementia, and 57 normal elderly controls performed the CDT, the Frontal Assessment Battery, the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Stick Design Test, and a naming test (TN-LIN. An ordinal regression assessed specific neuropsychological influences on CDT performance. All the cognitive variables were related to the CDT, accounting for 53% of variance. The strongest association was between the CDT and executive functions, followed by global cognitive status, visuospatial processing, and semantic knowledge. Our result confirms the multidimensional nature of the test and the major role of executive functions on performance.

  7. Interdependence of nutrient metabolism and the circadian clock system: Importance for metabolic health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Latre, Aleix; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    , can destroy synchrony between peripheral clocks and the central pacemaker in the brain as well as between peripheral clocks themselves. In addition, we review several studies looking at clock gene SNPs in humans and the metabolic phenotypes or tendencies associated with particular clock gene mutations. Major conclusions Targeted use of specific nutrients based on chronotype has the potential for immense clinical utility in the future. Macronutrients and micronutrients have the ability to function as zeitgebers for the clock by activating or modulating specific clock proteins or accessory proteins (such as nuclear receptors). Circadian clock control by nutrients can be tissue-specific. With a better understanding of the mechanisms that support nutrient-induced circadian control in specific tissues, human chronotype and SNP information might eventually be used to tailor nutritional regimens for metabolic disease treatment and thus be an important part of personalized medicine's future. PMID:26977390

  8. Effects of microgravity on circadian rhythms in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Fuller, C. A.; Lazarev, A. O.; Rietveld, W. J.; Tschernyshev, V. B.; Tumurova, E. G.; Wassmer, G.; Zotov, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    The desert beetle Trigonoscelis gigas Reitt. was used as a biological model in studies that examined the effects of space flight on the circadian timing system. Results from studies aboard the Bion-10, Bion-11, and Photon-11 missions are reported. The control study is an ongoing Mir experiment. The studies indicate that the free-running period in beetles may be longer during space flight.

  9. Mathematical Models of the Circadian Sleep-Wake Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    may also be involved in adjustments of sleep -wake periodicity to conscious or subconscious habits , to shiftwork, and to Wever’s forced- sleep schedules...probably keeps running under LD control. Such force of external conditions and daily habits may affect the threshold system such that sleep ...A0 A145 712 MAIHEMATICAL MODELS Or ItE CIRCADIAN SLEEP -WAKE CYCLE i/ ll HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL BOSTON MA DEPT OF PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOPllVSICS U C MOORE

  10. Spectral sensitivity of the circadian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro, Mariana G.; Bullough, John D.; Rea, Mark S.

    2004-01-01

    Light exposure regulates several circadian functions in normal humans including the sleep-wake cycle. Individuals with Alzheimer"s Disease (AD) often do not have regular patterns of activity and rest, but, rather, experience random periods of sleep and agitation during both day and night. Bright light during the day and darkness at night has been shown to consolidate activity periods during the day and rest periods at night in AD patients. The important characteristics of bright light exposure (quantity, spectrum, distribution, timing and duration) for achieving these results in AD patients is not yet understood. Recent research has shown that moderate (~18 lx at the cornea) blue (~470 nm) light is effective at suppressing melatonin in normal humans. It was hypothesized that blue light applied just before AD patients retire to their beds for the night would have a measurable impact on their behavior. A pilot study was conducted for 30 days in a senior health care facility using four individuals diagnosed with mild to moderate levels of dementia. Four AD patients were exposed to arrays of blue light from light emitting diodes (max wavelength = 470 nm) in two-hour sessions (18:00 to 20:00 hours) for 10 days. As a control, they were exposed to red light (max wavelength = 640 nm) in two-hour sessions for 10 days prior to the blue light exposure. Despite the modest sample size, exposure to blue LEDs has shown to affect sleep quality and median body temperature peak of these AD patients. Median body temperature peak was delayed by approximately 2 hours after exposure to blue LEDs compared to exposure to red LEDs and sleep quality was improved. This pilot study demonstrated that light, especially LEDs, can be an important contribution to helping AD patients regulate their circadian functions.

  11. Polyporus and Bupleuri radix effectively alter peripheral circadian clock phase acutely in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hiroaki; Sukigara, Haruna; Tahara, Yu; Saito, Keisuke; Yamazaki, Mayu; Shiraishi, Takuya; Kikuchi, Yosuke; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2017-07-01

    In mammals, daily physiological events are precisely regulated by an internal circadian clock system. An important function of this system is to readjust the phase of the clock daily. In Japan, traditional herb medicines, so-called crude drugs (Shoyaku), are widely used for many diseases, and some are reported to affect circadian clock impairment, suggesting that some of them might have an ability to modify clock gene expression rhythms. Therefore, from selected 40 crude drugs, finding candidates that control the circadian clock phases was the first purpose of this study. As there are several crude drugs used for liver- and/or kidney-related diseases, the second aim of the present study was to find some crude drugs affecting liver/kidney circadian clock in vivo. To assess phase changes in the daily circadian rhythm, bioluminescence from the core clock gene product Period 2 was continuously monitored in mouse embryonic fibroblasts in vitro and in some peripheral tissues (kidney, liver, and submandibular gland) of PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE knock-in mice in vivo. In our screening, Polyporus and Bupleuri radix were found to be good candidates to effectively manipulate the peripheral circadian clock phase acutely, with stimulation time-of-day dependency in vitro as well as in vivo. Interestingly, Polyporus and Bupleuri radix are traditional herb medicines use for treating edema and promoting diuresis, and for chronic hepatitis, respectively. These crude drugs may be therefore good modulators of the circadian peripheral clocks including liver and kidney, and circadian clock genes become new molecular targets for these crude drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling the emergence of circadian rhythms in a clock neuron network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Diambra

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms in pacemaker cells persist for weeks in constant darkness, while in other types of cells the molecular oscillations that underlie circadian rhythms damp rapidly under the same conditions. Although much progress has been made in understanding the biochemical and cellular basis of circadian rhythms, the mechanisms leading to damped or self-sustained oscillations remain largely unknown. There exist many mathematical models that reproduce the circadian rhythms in the case of a single cell of the Drosophila fly. However, not much is known about the mechanisms leading to coherent circadian oscillation in clock neuron networks. In this work we have implemented a model for a network of interacting clock neurons to describe the emergence (or damping of circadian rhythms in Drosophila fly, in the absence of zeitgebers. Our model consists of an array of pacemakers that interact through the modulation of some parameters by a network feedback. The individual pacemakers are described by a well-known biochemical model for circadian oscillation, to which we have added degradation of PER protein by light and multiplicative noise. The network feedback is the PER protein level averaged over the whole network. In particular, we have investigated the effect of modulation of the parameters associated with (i the control of net entrance of PER into the nucleus and (ii the non-photic degradation of PER. Our results indicate that the modulation of PER entrance into the nucleus allows the synchronization of clock neurons, leading to coherent circadian oscillations under constant dark condition. On the other hand, the modulation of non-photic degradation cannot reset the phases of individual clocks subjected to intrinsic biochemical noise.

  13. Direct Repression of Evening Genes by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 in the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamioka, Mari; Takao, Saori; Suzuki, Takamasa; Taki, Kyomi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Nakamichi, Norihito

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is a biological timekeeping system that provides organisms with the ability to adapt to day-night cycles. Timing of the expression of four members of the Arabidopsis thaliana PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR(PRR) family is crucial for proper clock function, and transcriptional control of PRRs remains incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that direct regulation of PRR5 by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) determines the repression state of PRR5 in the morning. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses indicated that CCA1 associates with three separate regions upstream of PRR5 CCA1 and its homolog LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) suppressed PRR5 promoter activity in a transient assay. The regions bound by CCA1 in the PRR5 promoter gave rhythmic patterns with troughs in the morning, when CCA1 and LHY are at high levels. Furthermore,ChIP-seq revealed that CCA1 associates with at least 449 loci with 863 adjacent genes. Importantly, this gene set contains genes that are repressed but upregulated incca1 lhy double mutants in the morning. This study shows that direct binding by CCA1 in the morning provides strong repression of PRR5, and repression by CCA1 also temporally regulates an evening-expressed gene set that includes PRR5. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  14. [Circadian markers and genes in bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeim, S; Boudebesse, C; Etain, B; Belliviera, F

    2015-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is a severe and complex multifactorial disease, characterized by alternance of acute episodes of depression and mania/hypomania, interspaced by euthymic periods. The etiological determinants of bipolar disorder yet, are still poorly understood. For the last 30 years, chronobiology is an important field of investigation to better understand the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. We conducted a review using Medline, ISI Database, EMBase, PsyInfo up to January 2015, using the following keywords combinations: "mood disorder", "bipolar disorder", "depression", "unipolar disorder", "major depressive disorder", "affective disorder", for psychiatric conditions; and "circadian rhythms", "circadian markers", "circadian gene", "clock gene", "melatonin" for circadian rhythms. The search critera was presence of word in any field of the article. Quantitative and qualitative circadian abnormalities are associated with bipolar disorders both during acute episodes and euthymic periods, suggesting that these altered circadian rhythms may represent biological trait markers of the disorder. These circadian dysfunctions were assessed by various validated tools including polysomnography, actigraphy, sleep diaries, chronotype assessments and blood melatonin/cortisol measures. Other altered endogenous circadian activities have also been reported in bipolar patients, such as hormones secretion, core body temperature or fibroblasts activity. Moreover, these markers were also altered in healthy relatives of bipolar patients, suggesting a degree of heritability. Several genetic association studies have also showed associations between multiple circadian genes and bipolar disorder, such as CLOCK, ARTNL1, GSK3β, PER3, NPAS2, NR1D1, TIMELESS, RORA, RORB, and CSNK1ε. Thus, these circadian gene variants may contribute to the genetic susceptibility of the disease. Furthermore, the study of the clock system may help to better understand some phenotypic aspects like the

  15. STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS AND DRUG RESISTANCE OF BREAST TUMOR CELL LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Оgloblina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 10 % of genome mRNA expression is rhythmic and these 24-hrs rhythms are under control of the circadian clock. Epidemiologic studies have revealed a clear link between the disruption of circadian rhythms and cancer development in humans. Growing evidence shows that circadian disruption is associated with development of malignant tumors, including breast cancer. Aim of this study was to investigate: the expression of circadian clock genes in human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A and breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, ZR-75-1, BT-474 and if the multidrug resistance phenotype of cancer cells is associated with changes in circadian clock genes expression. We have found that Per1 expression significantly reduced in cancer cells. No correlation was detected between the expression of circadian clock genes and cancer breast cell lines drug resistance. Interestingly, the expression of Bmal1, Per1 and Cry1 were increased in multi-drug resistant MCF-7_D cells compare with the parent cells MCF-7 cells, however, if these changes in the expression contribute to the drug-resistance or not is not clear. These results argue for further study.

  16. Circadian modulation of gene expression, but not glutamate uptake, in mouse and rat cortical astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Beaulé

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks control daily rhythms including sleep-wake, hormone secretion, and metabolism. These clocks are based on intracellular transcription-translation feedback loops that sustain daily oscillations of gene expression in many cell types. Mammalian astrocytes display circadian rhythms in the expression of the clock genes Period1 (Per1 and Period2 (Per2. However, a functional role for circadian oscillations in astrocytes is unknown. Because uptake of extrasynaptic glutamate depends on the presence of Per2 in astrocytes, we asked whether glutamate uptake by glia is circadian.We measured glutamate uptake, transcript and protein levels of the astrocyte-specific glutamate transporter, Glast, and the expression of Per1 and Per2 from cultured cortical astrocytes and from explants of somatosensory cortex. We found that glutamate uptake and Glast mRNA and protein expression were significantly reduced in Clock/Clock, Per2- or NPAS2-deficient glia. Uptake was augmented when the medium was supplemented with dibutyryl-cAMP or B27. Critically, glutamate uptake was not circadian in cortical astrocytes cultured from rats or mice or in cortical slices from mice.We conclude that glutamate uptake levels are modulated by CLOCK, PER2, NPAS2, and the composition of the culture medium, and that uptake does not show circadian variations.

  17. PPARα is a potential therapeutic target of drugs to treat circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Hidenori; Oishi, Katsutaka; Kudo, Takashi; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ishida, Norio

    2007-01-01

    Recent progress at the molecular level has revealed that nuclear receptors play an important role in the generation of mammalian circadian rhythms. To examine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is involved in the regulation of circadian behavioral rhythms in mammals, we evaluated the locomotor activity of mice administered with the hypolipidemic PPARα ligand, bezafibrate. Circadian locomotor activity was phase-advanced about 3 h in mice given bezafibrate under light-dark (LD) conditions. Transfer from LD to constant darkness did not change the onset of activity in these mice, suggesting that bezafibrate advanced the phase of the endogenous clock. Surprisingly, bezafibrate also advanced the phase in mice with lesions of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN; the central clock in mammals). The circadian expression of clock genes such as period2, BMAL1, and Rev-erbα was also phase-advanced in various tissues (cortex, liver, and fat) without affecting the SCN. Bezafibrate also phase-advanced the activity phase that is delayed in model mice with delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) due to a Clock gene mutation. Our results indicated that PPARα is involved in circadian clock control independently of the SCN and that PPARα could be a potent target of drugs to treat circadian rhythm sleep disorders including DSPS

  18. Effect of circadian phase on memory acquisition and recall: operant conditioning vs. classical conditioning.

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    Madeleine V Garren

    Full Text Available There have been several studies on the role of circadian clocks in the regulation of associative learning and memory processes in both vertebrate and invertebrate species. The results have been quite variable and at present it is unclear to what extent the variability observed reflects species differences or differences in methodology. Previous results have shown that following differential classical conditioning in the cockroach, Rhyparobia maderae, in an olfactory discrimination task, formation of the short-term and long-term memory is under strict circadian control. In contrast, there appeared to be no circadian regulation of the ability to recall established memories. In the present study, we show that following operant conditioning of the same species in a very similar olfactory discrimination task, there is no impact of the circadian system on either short-term or long-term memory formation. On the other hand, ability to recall established memories is strongly tied to the circadian phase of training. On the basis of these data and those previously reported for phylogenetically diverse species, it is suggested that there may be fundamental differences in the way the circadian system regulates learning and memory in classical and operant conditioning.

  19. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination.

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    Astha Malik

    proliferation during differentiation, but they generated normal percentages of neuronal cells. Neuronal fate commitment therefore appears to be controlled through a non-clock function of BMAL1. This study provides insight into how cell autonomous circadian clocks and clock genes regulate adult neural stem cells with implications for treating neurodegenerative disorders and impaired brain functions by manipulating neurogenesis.

  20. Expression conservation within the circadian clock of a monocot: natural variation at barley Ppd-H1 affects circadian expression of flowering time genes, but not clock orthologs

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    Campoli Chiara

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The circadian clock is an endogenous mechanism that coordinates biological processes with daily changes in the environment. In plants, circadian rhythms contribute to both agricultural productivity and evolutionary fitness. In barley, the photoperiod response regulator and flowering-time gene Ppd-H1 is orthologous to the Arabidopsis core-clock gene PRR7. However, relatively little is known about the role of Ppd-H1 and other components of the circadian clock in temperate crop species. In this study, we identified barley clock orthologs and tested the effects of natural genetic variation at Ppd-H1 on diurnal and circadian expression of clock and output genes from the photoperiod-response pathway. Results Barley clock orthologs HvCCA1, HvGI, HvPRR1, HvPRR37 (Ppd-H1, HvPRR73, HvPRR59 and HvPRR95 showed a high level of sequence similarity and conservation of diurnal and circadian expression patterns, when compared to Arabidopsis. The natural mutation at Ppd-H1 did not affect diurnal or circadian cycling of barley clock genes. However, the Ppd-H1 mutant was found to be arrhythmic under free-running conditions for the photoperiod-response genes HvCO1, HvCO2, and the MADS-box transcription factor and vernalization responsive gene Vrn-H1. Conclusion We suggest that the described eudicot clock is largely conserved in the monocot barley. However, genetic differentiation within gene families and differences in the function of Ppd-H1 suggest evolutionary modification in the angiosperm clock. Our data indicates that natural variation at Ppd-H1 does not affect the expression level of clock genes, but controls photoperiodic output genes. Circadian control of Vrn-H1 in barley suggests that this vernalization responsive gene is also controlled by the photoperiod-response pathway. Structural and functional characterization of the barley circadian clock will set the basis for future studies of the adaptive significance of the circadian clock in

  1. Circadian regulation of sunflower heliotropism, floral orientation, and pollinator visits.

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    Atamian, Hagop S; Creux, Nicky M; Brown, Evan A; Garner, Austin G; Blackman, Benjamin K; Harmer, Stacey L

    2016-08-05

    Young sunflower plants track the Sun from east to west during the day and then reorient during the night to face east in anticipation of dawn. In contrast, mature plants cease movement with their flower heads facing east. We show that circadian regulation of directional growth pathways accounts for both phenomena and leads to increased vegetative biomass and enhanced pollinator visits to flowers. Solar tracking movements are driven by antiphasic patterns of elongation on the east and west sides of the stem. Genes implicated in control of phototropic growth, but not clock genes, are differentially expressed on the opposite sides of solar tracking stems. Thus, interactions between environmental response pathways and the internal circadian oscillator coordinate physiological processes with predictable changes in the environment to influence growth and reproduction. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Altered expression of circadian clock genes in polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III.

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    Angelousi, Anna; Nasiri-Ansari, Narjes; Spilioti, Eliana; Mantzou, Emilia; Kalotyxou, Vasiliki; Chrousos, George; Kaltsas, Gregory; Kassi, Eva

    2018-01-01

    Circadian timing system is a highly conserved, ubiquitous molecular "clock" which creates internal circadian rhythmicity. Dysregulation of clock genes expression is associated with various diseases including immune dysregulation. In this study we investigated the circadian pattern of Clock-related genes in patients with polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III (PAS type III). Nineteen patients diagnosed with PAS type III and 12 healthy controls were enrolled. mRNA and protein expression of Clock-related genes (CLOCK, BMAL1, ROR and Per-1,-2,-3), as well as the GR-a and the GILZ genes were determined by real-time quantitative PCR and western blot analysis from blood samples drawn at 8 pm and 8am. Serum cortisol and TSH, as well as plasma ACTH, were measured by chemiluminescence. There were no statistical significant differences in the metabolic profile, cortisol, ACTH and TSH levels between patients and controls. Patients with PAS type III expressed higher transcript levels of CLOCK, BMAL1 and Per-1 in the evening than in the morning (p = 0.03, p = 0.029, p = 0.013, respectively), while the ratios (R pm/am ) of GR-a, CLOCK, BMAL1, and Per-3 mRNA levels were statistically different between patients and controls. Cortisol circadian variation (F pm/am ) was positively correlated with GILZ mRNA circadian pattern (R pm/am ) in the patient group and with the GR-a mRNA (R pm/am ) in the control group. Our findings suggest that there is an aberrant circadian rhythm of Clock-related genes in patients with PAS type III. The disruption of the expression of 4 circadian Clock-related genes could indicate a possible association with the pathogenesis of the disease.

  3. Circadian and dark-pulse activation of orexin/hypocretin neurons

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    Marston Oliver J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporal control of brain and behavioral states emerges as a consequence of the interaction between circadian and homeostatic neural circuits. This interaction permits the daily rhythm of sleep and wake, regulated in parallel by circadian cues originating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN and arousal-promoting signals arising from the orexin-containing neurons in the tuberal hypothalamus (TH. Intriguingly, the SCN circadian clock can be reset by arousal-promoting stimuli while activation of orexin/hypocretin neurons is believed to be under circadian control, suggesting the existence of a reciprocal relationship. Unfortunately, since orexin neurons are themselves activated by locomotor promoting cues, it is unclear how these two systems interact to regulate behavioral rhythms. Here mice were placed in conditions of constant light, which suppressed locomotor activity, but also revealed a highly pronounced circadian pattern in orexin neuronal activation. Significantly, activation of orexin neurons in the medial and lateral TH occurred prior to the onset of sustained wheel-running activity. Moreover, exposure to a 6 h dark pulse during the subjective day, a stimulus that promotes arousal and phase advances behavioral rhythms, activated neurons in the medial and lateral TH including those containing orexin. Concurrently, this stimulus suppressed SCN activity while activating cells in the median raphe. In contrast, dark pulse exposure during the subjective night did not reset SCN-controlled behavioral rhythms and caused a transient suppression of neuronal activation in the TH. Collectively these results demonstrate, for the first time, pronounced circadian control of orexin neuron activation and implicate recruitment of orexin cells in dark pulse resetting of the SCN circadian clock.

  4. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep Deprivation, and Human Performance

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    Goel, Namni; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi; Dinges, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Much of the current science on, and mathematical modeling of, dynamic changes in human performance within and between days is dominated by the two-process model of sleep–wake regulation, which posits a neurobiological drive for sleep that varies homeostatically (increasing as a saturating exponential during wakefulness and decreasing in a like manner during sleep), and a circadian process that neurobiologically modulates both the homeostatic drive for sleep and waking alertness and performance. Endogenous circadian rhythms in neurobehavioral functions, including physiological alertness and cognitive performance, have been demonstrated using special laboratory protocols that reveal the interaction of the biological clock with the sleep homeostatic drive. Individual differences in circadian rhythms and genetic and other components underlying such differences also influence waking neurobehavioral functions. Both acute total sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction increase homeostatic sleep drive and degrade waking neurobehavioral functions as reflected in sleepiness, attention, cognitive speed, and memory. Recent evidence indicating a high degree of stability in neurobehavioral responses to sleep loss suggests that these trait-like individual differences are phenotypic and likely involve genetic components, including circadian genes. Recent experiments have revealed both sleep homeostatic and circadian effects on brain metabolism and neural activation. Investigation of the neural and genetic mechanisms underlying the dynamically complex interaction between sleep homeostasis and circadian systems is beginning. A key goal of this work is to identify biomarkers that accurately predict human performance in situations in which the circadian and sleep homeostatic systems are perturbed. PMID:23899598

  5. Principles for circadian orchestration of metabolic pathways

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    Thurley, Kevin; Herbst, Christopher; Wesener, Felix; Koller, Barbara; Wallach, Thomas; Maier, Bert; Kramer, Achim

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms govern multiple aspects of animal metabolism. Transcriptome-, proteome- and metabolome-wide measurements have revealed widespread circadian rhythms in metabolism governed by a cellular genetic oscillator, the circadian core clock. However, it remains unclear if and under which conditions transcriptional rhythms cause rhythms in particular metabolites and metabolic fluxes. Here, we analyzed the circadian orchestration of metabolic pathways by direct measurement of enzyme activities, analysis of transcriptome data, and developing a theoretical method called circadian response analysis. Contrary to a common assumption, we found that pronounced rhythms in metabolic pathways are often favored by separation rather than alignment in the times of peak activity of key enzymes. This property holds true for a set of metabolic pathway motifs (e.g., linear chains and branching points) and also under the conditions of fast kinetics typical for metabolic reactions. By circadian response analysis of pathway motifs, we determined exact timing separation constraints on rhythmic enzyme activities that allow for substantial rhythms in pathway flux and metabolite concentrations. Direct measurements of circadian enzyme activities in mouse skeletal muscle confirmed that such timing separation occurs in vivo. PMID:28159888

  6. FAD Regulates CRYPTOCHROME Protein Stability and Circadian Clock in Mice.

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    Hirano, Arisa; Braas, Daniel; Fu, Ying-Hui; Ptáček, Louis J

    2017-04-11

    The circadian clock generates biological rhythms of metabolic and physiological processes, including the sleep-wake cycle. We previously identified a missense mutation in the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding pocket of CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2), a clock protein that causes human advanced sleep phase. This prompted us to examine the role of FAD as a mediator of the clock and metabolism. FAD stabilized CRY proteins, leading to increased protein levels. In contrast, knockdown of Riboflavin kinase (Rfk), an FAD biosynthetic enzyme, enhanced CRY degradation. RFK protein levels and FAD concentrations oscillate in the nucleus, suggesting that they are subject to circadian control. Knockdown of Rfk combined with a riboflavin-deficient diet altered the CRY levels in mouse liver and the expression profiles of clock and clock-controlled genes (especially those related to metabolism including glucose homeostasis). We conclude that light-independent mechanisms of FAD regulate CRY and contribute to proper circadian oscillation of metabolic genes in mammals. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. FAD Regulates CRYPTOCHROME Protein Stability and Circadian Clock in Mice

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    Arisa Hirano

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock generates biological rhythms of metabolic and physiological processes, including the sleep-wake cycle. We previously identified a missense mutation in the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD binding pocket of CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2, a clock protein that causes human advanced sleep phase. This prompted us to examine the role of FAD as a mediator of the clock and metabolism. FAD stabilized CRY proteins, leading to increased protein levels. In contrast, knockdown of Riboflavin kinase (Rfk, an FAD biosynthetic enzyme, enhanced CRY degradation. RFK protein levels and FAD concentrations oscillate in the nucleus, suggesting that they are subject to circadian control. Knockdown of Rfk combined with a riboflavin-deficient diet altered the CRY levels in mouse liver and the expression profiles of clock and clock-controlled genes (especially those related to metabolism including glucose homeostasis. We conclude that light-independent mechanisms of FAD regulate CRY and contribute to proper circadian oscillation of metabolic genes in mammals.

  8. The Role of Mammalian Glial Cells in Circadian Rhythm Regulation

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    Donají Chi-Castañeda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are biological oscillations with a period of about 24 hours. These rhythms are maintained by an innate genetically determined time-keeping system called the circadian clock. A large number of the proteins involved in the regulation of this clock are transcription factors controlling rhythmic transcription of so-called clock-controlled genes, which participate in a plethora of physiological functions in the organism. In the brain, several areas, besides the suprachiasmatic nucleus, harbor functional clocks characterized by a well-defined time pattern of clock gene expression. This expression rhythm is not restricted to neurons but is also present in glia, suggesting that these cells are involved in circadian rhythmicity. However, only certain glial cells fulfill the criteria to be called glial clocks, namely, to display molecular oscillators based on the canonical clock protein PERIOD, which depends on the suprachiasmatic nucleus for their synchronization. In this contribution, we summarize the current information about activity of the clock genes in glial cells, their potential role as oscillators as well as clinical implications.

  9. Circadian integration of metabolism and energetics.

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    Bass, Joseph; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2010-12-03

    Circadian clocks align behavioral and biochemical processes with the day/night cycle. Nearly all vertebrate cells possess self-sustained clocks that couple endogenous rhythms with changes in cellular environment. Genetic disruption of clock genes in mice perturbs metabolic functions of specific tissues at distinct phases of the sleep/wake cycle. Circadian desynchrony, a characteristic of shift work and sleep disruption in humans, also leads to metabolic pathologies. Here, we review advances in understanding the interrelationship among circadian disruption, sleep deprivation, obesity, and diabetes and implications for rational therapeutics for these conditions.

  10. Disruption of the circadian period of body temperature by the anesthetic propofol.

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    Touitou, Yvan; Mauvieux, Benoit; Reinberg, Alain; Dispersyn, Garance

    2016-01-01

    The circadian time structure of an organism can be desynchronized in a large number of instances, including the intake of specific drugs. We have previously found that propofol, which is a general anesthetic, induces a desynchronization of the circadian time structure in rats, with a 60-80 min significant phase advance of body temperature circadian rhythm. We thus deemed it worthwhile to examine whether this phase shift of body temperature was related to a modification of the circadian period Tau. Propofol was administered at three different Zeitgeber Times (ZTs): ZT6 (middle of the rest period), ZT10 (2 h prior to the beginning of activity period), ZT16 (4 h after the beginning of the activity period), with ZT0 being the beginning of the rest period (light onset) and ZT12 being the beginning of the activity period (light offset). Control rats (n = 20) were injected at the same ZTs with 10% intralipid, which is a control lipidic solution. Whereas no modification of the circadian period of body temperature was observed in the control rats, propofol administration resulted in a significant shortening of the period by 96 and 180 min at ZT6 and ZT10, respectively. By contrast, the period was significantly lengthened by 90 min at ZT16. We also found differences in the time it took for the rats to readjust their body temperature to the original 24-h rhythm. At ZT16, the speed of readjustment was more rapid than at the two other ZTs that we investigated. This study hence shows (i) the disruptive effects of the anesthetic propofol on the body temperature circadian rhythm, and it points out that (ii) the period Tau for body temperature responds to this anesthetic drug according to a Tau-response curve. By sustaining postoperative sleep-wake disorders, the disruptive effects of propofol on circadian time structure might have important implications for the use of this drug in humans.

  11. Assessment of a new dynamic light regimen in a nuclear power control room without windows on quickly rotating shiftworkers--effects on health, wakefulness, and circadian alignment: a pilot study.

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    Lowden, Arne; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to test whether a new dynamic light regime would improve alertness, sleep, and adaptation to rotating shiftwork. The illumination level in a control room without windows at a nuclear power station was ~200 lux (straight-forward horizontal gaze) using a weak yellow light of 200 lux, 3000 K (Philips Master TLD 36 W 830). New lighting equipment was installed in one area of the control room above the positions of the reactor operators. The new lights were shielded from the control group by a distance of >6 m, and the other operators worked at desks turned away from the new light. The new lights were designed to give three different light exposures: (i) white/blue strong light of 745 lux, 6000 K; (ii) weak yellow light of 650 lux, 4000 K; and (iii) yellow moderate light of 700 lux, 4000 K. In a crossover design, the normal and new light exposures were given during a sequence of three night shifts, two free days, two morning shifts, and one afternoon shift (NNN + MMA), with 7 wks between sessions. The operators consisted of two groups; seven reactor operators from seven work teams were at one time exposed to the new equipment and 16 other operators were used as controls. The study was conducted during winter with reduced opportunities of daylight exposure during work, after night work, or before morning work. Operators wore actigraphs, filled in a sleep/wake diary, including ratings of sleepiness on the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) every 2 h, and provided saliva samples for analysis of melatonin at work (every 2nd h during one night shift and first 3 h during one morning shift). Results from the wake/sleep diary showed the new light treatment increased alertness during the 2nd night shift (interaction group × light × time, p light condition after the 3rd night shift (group × light, p Effects on circadian phase were difficult to establish given the small sample size and infrequent sampling of saliva melatonin. Nonetheless, it seems

  12. Atypical expression of circadian clock genes in denervated mouse skeletal muscle.

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    Nakao, Reiko; Yamamoto, Saori; Horikawa, Kazumasa; Yasumoto, Yuki; Nikawa, Takeshi; Mukai, Chiaki; Oishi, Katsutaka

    2015-05-01

    The central circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus synchronizes peripheral clocks through neural and humoral signals in most mammalian tissues. Here, we analyzed the effects of unilateral sciatic denervation on the expression of circadian clock- and clock-controlled genes in the gastrocnemius muscles of mice twice per day on days 0, 3, 7, 9, 11 and 14 after denervation and six times on each of days 7 and 28 after denervation to assess the regulation mechanism of the circadian clock in skeletal muscle. Sciatic denervation did not affect systemic circadian rhythms since core body temperature (Day 7), corticosterone secretion (Days 7 and 28), and hepatic clock gene expression remained intact (Days 7 and 28). Expression levels of most circadian clock-related genes such as Arntl, Per1, Rora, Nr1d1 and Dbp were reduced in accordance with the extent of muscle atrophy, although circadian Per2 expression was significantly augmented (Day 28). Cosinor analysis revealed that the circadian expression of Arntl (Days 7 and 28) and Dbp (Day 28) was phase advanced in denervated muscle. The mRNA expression of Clock was significantly increased in denervated muscle on Day 3 when the severe atrophy was absent, and it was not affected by atrophic progression for 28 days. Sciatic denervation did not affect the expression of these genes in the contralateral muscle (Days 7 and 28), suggesting that humoral changes were not involved in denervation-induced muscle clock disruption. We then analyzed genome-wide gene expression using microarrays to determine the effects of disrupting the molecular clock in muscle on circadian rhythms at Day 7. Among 478 circadian genes, 313 lost rhythmicity in the denervated muscles. These denervation-sensitive genes included the lipid metabolism-related genes, Nrip1, Bbs1, Ptgis, Acot1, Scd2, Hpgd, Insig1, Dhcr24, Ldlr and Mboat1. Our findings revealed that sciatic denervation disrupts the circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled

  13. Combined Pharmacological and Genetic Manipulations Unlock Unprecedented Temporal Elasticity and Reveal Phase-Specific Modulation of the Molecular Circadian Clock of the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

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    Patton, Andrew P; Chesham, Johanna E; Hastings, Michael H

    2016-09-07

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master circadian oscillator encoding time-of-day information. SCN timekeeping is sustained by a cell-autonomous transcriptional-translational feedback loop, whereby expression of the Period and Cryptochrome genes is negatively regulated by their protein products. This loop in turn drives circadian oscillations in gene expression that direct SCN electrical activity and thence behavior. The robustness of SCN timekeeping is further enhanced by interneuronal, circuit-level coupling. The aim of this study was to combine pharmacological and genetic manipulations to push the SCN clockwork toward its limits and, by doing so, probe cell-autonomous and emergent, circuit-level properties. Circadian oscillation of mouse SCN organotypic slice cultures was monitored as PER2::LUC bioluminescence. SCN of three genetic backgrounds-wild-type, short-period CK1ε(Tau/Tau) mutant, and long-period Fbxl3(Afh/Afh) mutant-all responded reversibly to pharmacological manipulation with period-altering compounds: picrotoxin, PF-670462 (4-[1-Cyclohexyl-4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-imidazol-5-yl]-2-pyrimidinamine dihydrochloride), and KNK437 (N-Formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidine-gamma-butyrolactam). This revealed a remarkably wide operating range of sustained periods extending across 25 h, from ≤17 h to >42 h. Moreover, this range was maintained at network and single-cell levels. Development of a new technique for formal analysis of circadian waveform, first derivative analysis (FDA), revealed internal phase patterning to the circadian oscillation at these extreme periods and differential phase sensitivity of the SCN to genetic and pharmacological manipulations. For example, FDA of the CK1ε(Tau/Tau) mutant SCN treated with the CK1ε-specific inhibitor PF-4800567 (3-[(3-Chlorophenoxy)methyl]-1-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amine hydrochloride) revealed that period acceleration in the mutant is due to inappropriately phased

  14. Sleep Deprivation Influences Circadian Gene Expression in the Lateral Habenula.

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    Zhang, Beilin; Gao, Yanxia; Li, Yang; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is governed by homeostasis and the circadian clock. Clock genes play an important role in the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms but are also involved in regulating sleep homeostasis. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) has been implicated in sleep-wake regulation, since LHb gene expression demonstrates circadian oscillation characteristics. This study focuses on the participation of LHb clock genes in regulating sleep homeostasis, as the nature of their involvement is unclear. In this study, we observed changes in sleep pattern following sleep deprivation in LHb-lesioned rats using EEG recording techniques. And then the changes of clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1) in the LHb after 6 hours of sleep deprivation were detected by using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). We found that sleep deprivation increased the length of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREMS) and decreased wakefulness. LHb-lesioning decreased the amplitude of reduced wake time and increased NREMS following sleep deprivation in rats. qPCR results demonstrated that Per2 expression was elevated after sleep deprivation, while the other two genes were unaffected. Following sleep recovery, Per2 expression was comparable to the control group. This study provides the basis for further research on the role of LHb Per2 gene in the regulation of sleep homeostasis.

  15. On the role of exponential smoothing in circadian dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Luke L A

    2014-01-01

    The effects lighting has on health through modulation of circadian rhythms are becoming increasingly well documented. Data are still needed to show how light exposures are influenced by architecture and lighting design and circadian dosimetry analyses should provide duration, phase and amplitude measures of 24 h exposure profiles. Exponential smoothing is used to derive suitable metrics from 24 h light measurements collected from private dwellings. A further application of these modified exposure time series as physiological models of the light drive is discussed. Unlike previous light drive models, the dose rate persists into periods of darkness following exposures. Comparisons to long duration exposure studies suggest this type of persistent light drive model could be incorporated into contemporary physiological models of the human circadian oscillator. © 2014 Crown copyright. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology. This article is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland and Public Health England.

  16. The hepatic circadian clock modulates xenobiotic metabolism in mice.

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    DeBruyne, Jason P; Weaver, David R; Dallmann, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The circadian clock generates daily cycles of gene expression that regulate physiological processes. The liver plays an important role in xenobiotic metabolism and also has been shown to possess its own cell-based clock. The liver clock is synchronized by the master clock in the brain, and a portion of rhythmic gene expression can be driven by behavior of the organism as a whole even when the hepatic clock is suppressed. So far, however, there is relatively little evidence indicating whether the liver clock is functionally important in modulating xenobiotic metabolism. Thus, mice lacking circadian clock function in the whole body or specifically in liver were challenged with pentobarbital and acetaminophen, and pentobarbital sleep time (PBST) and acetaminophen toxicity, respectively, was assessed at different times of day in mutant and control mice. The results suggest that the liver clock is essential for rhythmic changes in xenobiotic detoxification. Surprisingly, it seems that the way in which the clock is disrupted determines the rate of xenobiotic metabolism in the liver. CLOCK-deficient mice are remarkably resistant to acetaminophen and exhibit a longer PBST, while PERIOD-deficient mice have a short PBST. These results indicate an essential role of the tissue-intrinsic peripheral circadian oscillator in the liver in regulating xenobiotic metabolism. © 2014 The Author(s).

  17. Biomarkers for circadian rhythm disruption independent of time of day.

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    Kirsten C G Van Dycke

    Full Text Available Frequent shift work causes disruption of the circadian rhythm and might on the long-term result in increased health risk. Current biomarkers evaluating the presence of circadian rhythm disturbance (CRD, including melatonin, cortisol and body temperature, require 24-hr ("around the clock" measurements, which is tedious. Therefore, these markers are not eligible to be used in large-scale (human studies. The aim of the present study was to identify universal biomarkers for CRD independent of time of day using a transcriptomics approach. Female FVB mice were exposed to six shifts in a clockwise (CW and counterclockwise (CCW CRD protocol and sacrificed at baseline and after 1 shift, 6 shifts, 5 days recovery and 14 days recovery, respectively. At six time-points during the day, livers were collected for mRNA microarray analysis. Using a classification approach, we identified a set of biomarkers able to classify samples into either CRD or non-disrupted based on the hepatic gene expression. Furthermore, we identified differentially expressed genes 14 days after the last shift compared to baseline for both CRD protocols. Non-circadian genes differentially expressed upon both CW and CCW protocol were considered useful, universal markers for CRD. One candidate marker i.e. CD36 was evaluated in serum samples of the CRD animals versus controls. These biomarkers might be useful to measure CRD and can be used later on for monitoring the effectiveness of intervention strategies aiming to prevent or minimize chronic adverse health effects.

  18. The effects of hydrogen peroxide on the circadian rhythms of Microcystis aeruginosa.

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    Haifeng Qian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is one of the principal bloom-forming cyanobacteria present in a wide range of freshwater ecosystems. M. aeruginosa produces cyanotoxins, which can harm human and animal health. Many metabolic pathways in M. aeruginosa, including photosynthesis and microcystin synthesis, are controlled by its circadian rhythms. However, whether xenobiotics affect the cyanobacterial circadian system and change its growth, physiology and biochemistry is unknown. We used real-time PCR to study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 on the expression of clock genes and some circadian genes in M. aeruginosa during the light/dark (LD cycle. RESULTS: The results revealed that H(2O(2 changes the expression patterns of clock genes (kaiA, kaiB, kaiC and sasA and significantly decreases the transcript levels of kaiB, kaiC and sasA. H(2O(2 treatment also decreased the transcription of circadian genes, such as photosynthesis-related genes (psaB, psbD1 and rbcL and microcystin-related genes (mcyA, mcyD and mcyH, and changed their circadian expression patterns. Moreover, the physiological functions of M. aeruginosa, including its growth and microcystin synthesis, were greatly influenced by H(2O(2 treatment during LD. These results indicate that changes in the cyanobacterial circadian system can affect its physiological and metabolic pathways. CONCLUSION: Our findings show that a xenobiotic can change the circadian expression patterns of its clock genes to influence clock-controlled gene regulation, and these influences are evident at the level of cellular physiology.

  19. The Relative Impact of Sleep and Circadian Drive on Motor Skill Acquisition and Memory Consolidation.

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    Tucker, Matthew A; Morris, Christopher J; Morgan, Alexandra; Yang, Jessica; Myers, Samantha; Pierce, Joanna Garcia; Stickgold, Robert; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2017-04-01

    Sleep during the biological night facilitates memory consolidation. Here we determined the impact of sleep and wake on motor skill learning (acquisition) and subsequent off-line skill improvement (memory consolidation), independent of circadian phase, and compared this to the impact of the endogenous circadian system, independent of whether sleep occurred during the biological night or day. Participants completed two 8-day sleep laboratory visits, adhering on one visit to a circadian aligned ("normal") sleep schedule for the full duration of the protocol, and on the other to a circadian misaligned (12-hour inverted) schedule, with alignment during the first 3 days, a 12-hour 'slam shift' on Day 4, followed by circadian misalignment during the last 4 days of the protocol. Participants were repeatedly trained and tested on different versions of the finger-tapping motor sequence task across each visit. Sleep facilitated offline memory consolidation regardless of whether it occurred during the biological day or night, while circadian phase had no significant impact. These sleep-related benefits remained after accounting for general motor speed, measured in the absence of learning. In addition, motor skill acquisition was facilitated when the training session followed shortly after sleep, without significant impact of circadian phase (biological morning vs. evening). This effect was largely driven by heightened acquisition in participants who slept during the day and were trained shortly thereafter, that is, when acquisition occurred during the biological evening. These benefits were also retained after controlling for general motor speed. Sleep benefits both the acquisition and consolidation of motor skill regardless of whether they occur during the biological day or night. After controlling for general motor speed, a critical adjustment that few studies perform, these sleep benefits remain intact. Our findings have clear implications for night shift workers who obtain

  20. Entrainment of the Neurospora circadian clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, M; Boesl, C; Ricken, J; Messerschmitt, M; Goedel, M; Roenneberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has been systematically investigated for circadian entrainment behavior. Many aspects of synchronization can be investigated in this simple, cellular system, ranging from systematic entrainment and drivenness to masking. Clock gene expression during entrainment and entrainment

  1. Targeting the Circadian Clock to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two compounds that target components of the circadian clock killed several types of cancer cells in the lab and slowed the growth of brain cancer in mice without harming healthy cells, as this Cancer Currents post reports.

  2. Cell-permeable Circadian Clock Proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Carl

    2002-01-01

    .... These 'biological clocks' are important to human physiology. For example, psychiatric and medical studies have shown that circadian rhythmicity is involved in some forms of depressive illness, 'jet lag', drug tolerance/efficacy, memory, and insomnia...

  3. Circadian Rhythm Management System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The value of measuring sleep-wake cycles is significantly enhanced by measuring other physiological signals that depend on circadian rhythms (such as heart rate and...

  4. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep, and Disorders of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattis, Joanna; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-04-01

    Sleep-wake cycles are known to be disrupted in people with neurodegenerative disorders. These findings are now supported by data from animal models for some of these disorders, raising the question of whether the disrupted sleep/circadian regulation contributes to the loss of neural function. As circadian rhythms and sleep consolidation also break down with normal aging, changes in these may be part of what makes aging a risk factor for disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mechanisms underlying the connection between circadian/sleep dysregulation and neurodegeneration remain unclear, but several recent studies provide interesting possibilities. While mechanistic analysis is under way, it is worth considering treatment of circadian/sleep disruption as a means to alleviate symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mathematical Modeling of Circadian/Performance Countermeasures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We developed and refined our current mathematical model of circadian rhythms to incorporate melatonin as a marker rhythm. We used an existing physiologically based...

  6. Integration of microRNA miR-122 in hepatic circadian gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatfield, David; Le Martelot, Gwendal; Vejnar, Charles E.; Gerlach, Daniel; Schaad, Olivier; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Ruskeepää, Anna-Liisa; Oresic, Matej; Esau, Christine C.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Schibler, Ueli

    2009-01-01

    In liver, most metabolic pathways are under circadian control, and hundreds of protein-encoding genes are thus transcribed in a cyclic fashion. Here we show that rhythmic transcription extends to the locus specifying miR-122, a highly abundant, hepatocyte-specific microRNA. Genetic loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments have identified the orphan nuclear receptor REV-ERBα as the major circadian regulator of mir-122 transcription. Although due to its long half-life mature miR-122 accumulates at nearly constant rates throughout the day, this miRNA is tightly associated with control mechanisms governing circadian gene expression. Thus, the knockdown of miR-122 expression via an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) strategy resulted in the up- and down-regulation of hundreds of mRNAs, of which a disproportionately high fraction accumulates in a circadian fashion. miR-122 has previously been linked to the regulation of cholesterol and lipid metabolism. The transcripts associated with these pathways indeed show the strongest time point-specific changes upon miR-122 depletion. The identification of Pparβ/δ and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) coactivator Smarcd1/Baf60a as novel miR-122 targets suggests an involvement of the circadian metabolic regulators of the PPAR family in miR-122-mediated metabolic control. PMID:19487572

  7. Circadian profiling reveals higher histamine plasma levels and lower diamine oxidase serum activities in 24% of patients with suspected histamine intolerance compared to food allergy and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzer, T C; Tietz, E; Waldmann, E; Schink, M; Neurath, M F; Zopf, Y

    2018-04-01

    Histamine intolerance is thought to trigger manifold clinical symptoms after ingesting histamine-rich food due to reduced activity of diamine oxidase (DAO). No study has hitherto systematically assessed daily fluctuations of histamine levels and DAO activities in symptomatic patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the presence of histamine intolerance, to therefore establish day profiles of histamine levels and DAO activities, and to compare the results between patients with suspected histamine intolerance, food allergy and healthy controls. We determined day profiles of histamine plasma levels and DAO serum activities in 33 patients with suspected histamine intolerance, in 21 patients with proven food allergy and in 10 healthy control patients. Clinical symptoms, food intolerances and further clinical and laboratory chemical parameters were evaluated. Twenty-four percent (8 of 33) suspected histamine-intolerant patients showed elevated histamine levels during the day. That might be caused by constantly and significantly reduced DAO activities in these patients compared to food-allergic and control patients. The remaining 25 patients presented normal histamine levels and DAO activities, but an increased prevalence of multiple food intolerances compared to the other subgroup of suspected histamine-intolerants. There was no correlation between subjective complaints and serological histamine parameters in patients with suspected histamine intolerance. We determined by daily profiling that decreased DAO activities correlated with elevated histamine levels in a subgroup of suspected histamine-intolerants. This finding discriminates these patients from food intolerant individuals with similar clinical symptoms and strongly suggests the presence of histamine intolerance. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  8. Evolution of circadian organization in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Menaker

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian organization means the way in which the entire circadian system above the cellular level is put together physically and the principles and rules that determine the interactions among its component parts which produce overt rhythms of physiology and behavior. Understanding this organization and its evolution is of practical importance as well as of basic interest. The first major problem that we face is the difficulty of making sense of the apparently great diversity that we observe in circadian organization of diverse vertebrates. Some of this diversity falls neatly into place along phylogenetic lines leading to firm generalizations: i in all vertebrates there is a "circadian axis" consisting of the retinas, the pineal gland and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, ii in many non-mammalian vertebrates of all classes (but not in any mammals the pineal gland is both a photoreceptor and a circadian oscillator, and iii in all non-mammalian vertebrates (but not in any mammals there are extraretinal (and extrapineal circadian photoreceptors. An interesting explanation of some of these facts, especially the differences between mammals and other vertebrates, can be constructed on the assumption that early in their evolution mammals passed through a "nocturnal bottleneck". On the other hand, a good deal of the diversity among the circadian systems of vertebrates does not fall neatly into place along phylogenetic lines. In the present review we will consider how we might better understand such "phylogenetically incoherent" diversity and what sorts of new information may help to further our understanding of the evolution of circadian organization in vertebrates

  9. Molecular components of the mammalian circadian clock

    OpenAIRE

    Buhr, Ethan D.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Mammals synchronize their circadian activity primarily to the cycles of light and darkness in the environment. This is achieved by ocular photoreception relaying signals to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus. Signals from the SCN cause the synchronization of independent circadian clocks throughout the body to appropriate phases. Signals that can entrain these peripheral clocks include humoral signals, metabolic factors, and body temperature. At the level of individual tissu...

  10. Endogenous circadian system and circadian misalignment impact glucose tolerance via separate mechanisms in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher J; Yang, Jessica N; Garcia, Joanna I; Myers, Samantha; Bozzi, Isadora; Wang, Wei; Buxton, Orfeu M; Shea, Steven A; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2015-04-28

    Glucose tolerance is lower in the evening and at night than in the morning. However, the relative contribution of the circadian system vs. the behavioral cycle (including the sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles) is unclear. Furthermore, although shift work is a diabetes risk factor, the separate impact on glucose tolerance of the behavioral cycle, circadian phase, and circadian disruption (i.e., misalignment between the central circadian pacemaker and the behavioral cycle) has not been systematically studied. Here we show--by using two 8-d laboratory protocols--in healthy adults that the circadian system and circadian misalignment have distinct influences on glucose tolerance, both separate from the behavioral cycle. First, postprandial glucose was 17% higher (i.e., lower glucose tolerance) in the biological evening (8:00 PM) than morning (8:00 AM; i.e., a circadian phase effect), independent of the behavioral cycle effect. Second, circadian misalignment itself (12-h behavioral cycle inversion) increased postprandial glucose by 6%. Third, these variations in glucose tolerance appeared to be explained, at least in part, by different mechanisms: during the biological evening by decreased pancreatic β-cell function (27% lower early-phase insulin) and during circadian misalignment presumably by decreased insulin sensitivity (elevated postprandial glucose despite 14% higher late-phase insulin) without change in early-phase insulin. We explored possible contributing factors, including changes in polysomnographic sleep and 24-h hormonal profiles. We demonstrate that the circadian system importantly contributes to the reduced glucose tolerance observed in the evening compared with the morning. Separately, circadian misalignment reduces glucose tolerance, providing a mechanism to help explain the increased diabetes risk in shift workers.

  11. Combination of Light and Melatonin Time Cues for Phase Advancing the Human Circadian Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Tina M.; Markwald, Rachel R.; Chinoy, Evan D.; Snider, Jesse A.; Bessman, Sara C.; Jung, Christopher M.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Photic and non-photic stimuli have been shown to shift the phase of the human circadian clock. We examined how photic and non-photic time cues may be combined by the human circadian system by assessing the phase advancing effects of one evening dose of exogenous melatonin, alone and in combination with one session of morning bright light exposure. Design: Randomized placebo-controlled double-blind circadian protocol. The effects of four conditions, dim light (∼1.9 lux, ∼0.6 Watts/m2)-placebo, dim light-melatonin (5 mg), bright light (∼3000 lux, ∼7 Watts/m2)-placebo, and bright light-melatonin on circadian phase was assessed by the change in the salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) prior to and following treatment under constant routine conditions. Melatonin or placebo was administered 5.75 h prior to habitual bedtime and 3 h of bright light exposure started 1 h prior to habitual wake time. Setting: Sleep and chronobiology laboratory environment free of time cues. Participants: Thirty-six healthy participants (18 females) aged 22 ± 4 y (mean ± SD). Results: Morning bright light combined with early evening exogenous melatonin induced a greater phase advance of the DLMO than either treatment alone. Bright light alone and melatonin alone induced similar phase advances. Conclusion: Information from light and melatonin appear to be combined by the human circadian clock. The ability to combine circadian time cues has important implications for understanding fundamental physiological principles of the human circadian timing system. Knowledge of such principles is important for designing effective countermeasures for phase-shifting the human circadian clock to adapt to jet lag, shift work, and for designing effective treatments for circadian sleep-wakefulness disorders. Citation: Burke TM; Markwald RR; Chinoy ED; Snider JA; Bessman SC; Jung CM; Wright Jr KP. Combination of light and melatonin time cues for phase advancing the human circadian

  12. Magel2, a Prader-Willi syndrome candidate gene, modulates the activities of circadian rhythm proteins in cultured cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devos Julia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Magel2 gene is most highly expressed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, where its expression cycles in a circadian pattern comparable to that of clock-controlled genes. Mice lacking the Magel2 gene have hypothalamic dysfunction, including circadian defects that include reduced and fragmented total activity, excessive activity during the subjective day, but they have a normal circadian period. Magel2 is a member of the MAGE family of proteins that have various roles in cellular function, but the specific function of Magel2 is unknown. Methods We used a variety of cell-based assays to determine whether Magel2 modifies the properties of core circadian rhythm proteins. Results Magel2 represses the activity of the Clock:Bmal1 heterodimer in a Per2-luciferase assay. Magel2 interacts with Bmal1 and with Per2 as measured by co-immunoprecipitation in co-transfected cells, and exhibits a subcellular distribution consistent with these interactions when visualized by immunofluorescence. As well, Magel2 induces the redistribution of the subcellular localization of Clock towards the cytoplasm, in contrast to the nucleus-directed effect of Bmal1 on Clock subcellular localization. Conclusion Consistent with the blunted circadian rhythm observed in Magel2-null mice, these data suggest that Magel2 normally promotes negative feedback regulation of the cellular circadian cycle, through interactions with key core circadian rhythm proteins.

  13. A class of circadian long non-coding RNAs mark enhancers modulating long-range circadian gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zenghua; Zhao, Meng; Joshi, Parth D; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Weimin; Xu, Yichi; Wang, Haifang; Zhao, Zhihu; Yan, Jun

    2017-06-02

    Circadian rhythm exerts its influence on animal physiology and behavior by regulating gene expression at various levels. Here we systematically explored circadian long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in mouse liver and examined their circadian regulation. We found that a significant proportion of circadian lncRNAs are expressed at enhancer regions, mostly bound by two key circadian transcription factors, BMAL1 and REV-ERBα. These circadian lncRNAs showed similar circadian phases with their nearby genes. The extent of their nuclear localization is higher than protein coding genes but less than enhancer RNAs. The association between enhancer and circadian lncRNAs is also observed in tissues other than liver. Comparative analysis between mouse and rat circadian liver transcriptomes showed that circadian transcription at lncRNA loci tends to be conserved despite of low sequence conservation of lncRNAs. One such circadian lncRNA termed lnc-Crot led us to identify a super-enhancer region interacting with a cluster of genes involved in circadian regulation of metabolism through long-range interactions. Further experiments showed that lnc-Crot locus has enhancer function independent of lnc-Crot's transcription. Our results suggest that the enhancer-associated circadian lncRNAs mark the genomic loci modulating long-range circadian gene regulation and shed new lights on the evolutionary origin of lncRNAs. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Social memory in the rat: circadian variation and effect of circadian rhythm disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmers, L.G.J.E.; Leus, I.E.; Burbach, J.P.H.; Spruijt, B.M.; Ree, van J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythm can impair long-term passive avoidance memory of rats and mice. The present study investigated whether disruption of circadian rhythm can also impair social memory of male rats. Social memory was assessed using the social discrimination test, in which a short-term

  15. Acute myocardial infarction and infarct size: do circadian variations play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibáñez B

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aída Suárez-Barrientos,1 Borja Ibáñez1,21Cardiovascular Institute, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, 2Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The circadian rhythm influences cardiovascular system physiology, inducing diurnal variations in blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, endothelial functions, platelet aggregation, and coronary arterial flow, among other physiological parameters. Indeed, an internal circadian network modulates cardiovascular physiology by regulating heart rate, metabolism, and even myocyte growth and repair ability. Consequently, cardiovascular pathology is also controlled by circadian oscillations, with increased morning incidence of cardiovascular events. The potential circadian influence on the human tolerance to ischemia/reperfusion has not been systematically scrutinized until recently. It has since been proven, in both animals and humans, that infarct size varies during the day depending on the symptom onset time, while circadian fluctuations in spontaneous cardioprotection in humans with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI have also been demonstrated. Furthermore, several studies have proposed that the time of day at which revascularization occurs in patients with STEMI may also influence infarct size and reperfusion outcomes. The potential association of the circadian clock with infarct size advocates the acknowledgment of time of day as a new prognostic factor in patients suffering acute myocardial infarction, which would open up a new field for chronotherapeutic targets and lead to the inclusion of time of day as a variable in clinical trials that test novel cardioprotective strategies.Keywords: cardioprotection, circadian rhythm, reperfusion injury, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

  16. Sleep interruption associated with house staff work schedules alters circadian gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ming Zhu; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie; Kipen, Howard; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Lew, Jenny Pan; Zarbl, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that disruption of circadian rhythm by shift work increases the risk of breast and prostate cancer. Our studies demonstrated that carcinogens disrupt the circadian expression of circadian genes (CGs) and circadian-controlled genes (CCGs) during the early stages of rat mammary carcinogenesis. A chemopreventive regimen of methylselenocysteine (MSC) restored the circadian expression of CGs and CCGs, including PERIOD 2 (PER2) and estrogen receptor β (ERS2), to normal. The present study evaluated whether changes in CG and CCG expression in whole blood can serve as indicators of circadian disruption in shift workers. Fifteen shift workers were recruited to a crossover study. Blood samples were drawn before (6 PM) and after (8 AM) completing a night shift after at least seven days on floating night-shift rotation, and before (8 AM), during (1 PM), and after (6 PM) completing seven days on day shift. The plasma melatonin level and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of PER2, nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group d, member 1 (NR1D1), and ERS2 were measured, and the changes in levels of melatonin and gene expression were evaluated with statistical analyses. The mRNA expression of PER2 was affected by shift (p = 0.0079); the levels were higher in the evening for the night shift, but higher in the morning for the day shift. Increased PER2 expression (p = 0.034) was observed in the evening on the night versus day shifts. The melatonin level was higher in the morning for both day shifts (p = 0.013) and night shifts (p <0.0001). Changes in the level of PER2 gene expression can serve as a biomarker of disrupted circadian rhythm in blood cells. Therefore, they can be a useful intermediate indicator of efficacy in future MSC-mediated chemoprevention studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Van Spyk, Elyse Noelani; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-01-01

    Historically work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as liver, fat and muscle. In recent years, skin is emerging as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging and carcinogenesis. Morphologically skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration -- the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell-type specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of the skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar UV radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. The skin also provides opportunities to interrogate clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model for investigating the

  18. Effects of caffeine on the human circadian clock in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Tina M.; Markwald, Rachel R.; McHill, Andrew W.; Chinoy, Evan D.; Snider, Jesse A.; Bessman, Sara C.; Jung, Christopher M.; O’Neill, John S.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine’s wakefulness-promoting and sleep-disrupting effects are well established, yet whether caffeine affects human circadian timing is unknown. Here we show that evening caffeine consumption delays the human circadian melatonin rhythm in vivo, and chronic application of caffeine lengthens the circadian period of molecular oscillations in vitro primarily via an adenosine receptor/cyclic AMP-dependent mechanism. In a double-blind, placebo controlled, ~49-day long within-subject study, we found the equivalent amount of caffeine as that in a double espresso 3 hours before habitual bedtime induced a phase delay of the circadian melatonin rhythm in humans by ~40 minutes. This magnitude of delay was nearly half of the magnitude of the phase-delaying response induced by exposure to 3-hours of evening bright-light (~3000 lux; ~7 Watts/m2) that began at habitual bedtime. Furthermore, using human osteosarcoma U2OS cells expressing clock gene luciferase reporters, we found a dose-dependent lengthening of circadian period by caffeine. By pharmacological dissection and siRNA knockdown we established that perturbation of adenosine receptor signaling, but not ryanodine receptor or phosphodiesterase activity, is sufficient to account for caffeine’s effects on cellular timekeeping. We also used a cyclic AMP biosensor to show that caffeine increased cyclic AMP levels, indicating that caffeine can influence a core component of the cellular circadian clock. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that caffeine influences human circadian timing and gives new insight into how the world’s most widely consumed psychoactive drug impacts upon human physiology. PMID:26378246

  19. Circadian Oscillations within the Hippocampus Support Hippocampus-dependent Memory Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Lynn Eckel-Mahan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to sustain memories over long periods of time, sometimes even a lifetime, is one of the most remarkable properties of the brain. Much knowledge has been gained over the past few decades regarding the molecular correlates of memory formation. Once a memory is forged, however, the molecular events that provide permanence are as of yet unclear. Studies in multiple organisms have revealed that circadian rhythmicity is important for the formation, stability, and recall of memories [1]. The neuronal events that provide this link need to be explored further. This article will discuss the findings related to the circadian regulation of memory-dependent processes in the hippocampus. Specifically, the circadian-controlled MAP kinase and cAMP signal transduction pathway plays critical roles in the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. A series of studies have revealed the circadian oscillation of this pathway within the hippocampus, an activity that is absent in memory-deficient, transgenic mice lacking Ca2+-stimulated adenylyl cyclases. Interference with these oscillations proceeding the cellular memory consolidation period impairs the persistence of hippocampus-dependent memory. These data suggest that the persistence of long-term memories may depend upon reactivation of this signal transduction pathway in the hippocampus during the circadian cycle. New data reveals the dependence of hippocampal oscillation in MAPK activity on the SCN, again underscoring the importance of this region in maintaining the circadian physiology of memory. Finally, the downstream ramification of these oscillations in terms of gene expression and epigenetics should be considered, as emerging evidence is pointing strongly to a circadian link between epigenetics and long term synaptic plasticity.

  20. Interdependence of nutrient metabolism and the circadian clock system: Importance for metabolic health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleix Ribas-Latre

    2016-03-01

    Major conclusions: Targeted use of specific nutrients based on chronotype has the potential for immense clinical utility in the future. Macronutrients and micronutrients have the ability to function as zeitgebers for the clock by activating or modulating specific clock proteins or accessory proteins (such as nuclear receptors. Circadian clock control by nutrients can be tissue-specific. With a better understanding of the mechanisms that support nutrient-induced circadian control in specific tissues, human chronotype and SNP information might eventually be used to tailor nutritional regimens for metabolic disease treatment and thus be an important part of personalized medicine's future.

  1. Circadian Rhythms in Acute Intermittent Porphyria—a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larion, Sebastian; Caballes, F. Ryan; Hwang, Sun-Il; Lee, Jin-Gyun; Rossman, Whitney Ellefson; Parsons, Judy; Steuerwald, Nury; Li, Ting; Maddukuri, Vinaya; Groseclose, Gale; Finkielstein, Carla V.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2013-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an inherited disorder of heme synthesis wherein a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen [PBG] deaminase [PBGD], with other factors may give rise to biochemical and clinical manifestations of disease. The biochemical hallmarks of active AIP are relative hepatic heme deficiency and uncontrolled up-regulation of hepatic 5-aminolevulinic acid [ALA] synthase-1 [ALAS1] with overproduction of ALA and PBG. The treatment of choice is intravenous heme, which restores the deficient regulatory heme pool of the liver and represses ALAS1. Recently, heme has been shown to influence circadian rhythms by controlling their negative feedback loops. We evaluated whether subjects with AIP exhibited an altered circadian profile. Over a 21 h period, we measured levels of serum cortisol, melatonin, ALA, PBG, and mRNA levels [in peripheral blood mononuclear cells] of selected clock-controlled genes and genes involved in heme synthesis in 10 Caucasian [European-American] women who were either post-menopausal or had been receiving female hormone therapy, 6 of whom have AIP and 4 do not and are considered controls. Four AIP subjects with biochemical activity exhibited higher levels of PBG and lower levels and dampened oscillation of serum cortisol, and a trend for lower levels of serum melatonin, than controls or AIP subjects without biochemical activity. Levels of clock-controlled gene mRNAs showed significant increases over baseline in all subjects at 5 am and 11 pm, whereas mRNA levels of ALAS1, ALAS2, and PBGD were increased only at 11 pm in subjects with active AIP. This pilot study provides evidence for disturbances of circadian markers in women with active AIP that may trigger or sustain some common clinical features of AIP. PMID:23650938

  2. Diurnal and circadian expression profiles of glycerolipid biosynthetic genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Andrés, Fernando; Kanehara, Kazue; Liu, Yu-chi; Coupland, George; Dörmann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Glycerolipid composition in plant membranes oscillates in response to diurnal change. However, its functional significance remained unclear. A recent discovery that Arabidopsis florigen FT binds diurnally oscillating phosphatidylcholine molecules to promote flowering suggests that diurnal oscillation of glycerolipid composition is an important input in flowering time control. Taking advantage of public microarray data, we globally analyzed the expression pattern of glycerolipid biosynthetic genes in Arabidopsis under long-day, short-day, and continuous light conditions. The results revealed that 12 genes associated with glycerolipid metabolism showed significant oscillatory profiles. Interestingly, expression of most of these genes followed circadian profiles, suggesting that glycerolipid biosynthesis is partially under clock regulation. The oscillating expression profile of one representative gene, PECT1, was analyzed in detail. Expression of PECT1 showed a circadian pattern highly correlated with that of the clock-regulated gene GIGANTEA. Thus, our study suggests that a considerable number of glycerolipid biosynthetic genes are under circadian control.

  3. Circadian rhythms in anesthesia and critical care medicine: potential importance of circadian disruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Jason; Gobel, Merit; Bartels, Karsten; Scott, Benjamin; Koeppen, Michael; Eckle, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    The rotation of the earth and associated alternating cycles of light and dark--the basis of our circadian rhythms--are fundamental to human biology and culture. However, it was not until 1971 that researchers first began to describe the molecular mechanisms for the circadian system. During the past few years, groundbreaking research has revealed a multitude of circadian genes affecting a variety of clinical diseases, including diabetes, obesity, sepsis, cardiac ischemia, and sudden cardiac death. Anesthesiologists, in the operating room and intensive care units, manage these diseases on a daily basis as they significantly affect patient outcomes. Intriguingly, sedatives, anesthetics, and the intensive care unit environment have all been shown to disrupt the circadian system in patients. In the current review, we will discuss how newly acquired knowledge of circadian rhythms could lead to changes in clinical practice and new therapeutic concepts. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Circadian rhythms in the pineal organ persist in zebrafish larvae that lack ventral brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldstein-Kral Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, located in the ventral hypothalamus, is a major regulator of circadian rhythms in mammals and birds. However, the role of the SCN in lower vertebrates remains poorly understood. Zebrafish cyclops (cyc mutants lack ventral brain, including the region that gives rise to the SCN. We have used cyc embryos to define the function of the zebrafish SCN in regulating circadian rhythms in the developing pineal organ. The pineal organ is the major source of the circadian hormone melatonin, which regulates rhythms such as daily rest/activity cycles. Mammalian pineal rhythms are controlled almost exclusively by the SCN. In zebrafish and many other lower vertebrates, the pineal has an endogenous clock that is responsible in part for cyclic melatonin biosynthesis and gene expression. Results We find that pineal rhythms are present in cyc mutants despite the absence of an SCN. The arginine vasopressin-like protein (Avpl, formerly called Vasotocin is a peptide hormone expressed in and around the SCN. We find avpl mRNA is absent in cyc mutants, supporting previous work suggesting the SCN is missing. In contrast, expression of the putative circadian clock genes, cryptochrome 1b (cry1b and cryptochrome 3 (cry3, in the brain of the developing fish is unaltered. Expression of two pineal rhythmic genes, exo-rhodopsin (exorh and serotonin-N-acetyltransferase (aanat2, involved in photoreception and melatonin synthesis, respectively, is also similar between cyc embryos and their wildtype (WT siblings. The timing of the peaks and troughs of expression are the same, although the amplitude of expression is slightly decreased in the mutants. Cyclic gene expression persists for two days in cyc embryos transferred to constant light or constant dark, suggesting a circadian clock is driving the rhythms. However, the amplitude of rhythms in cyc mutants kept in constant conditions decreased more quickly than in their

  5. Dynamical mechanism of Bmal 1 / Rev- erbα loop in circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    2015-07-01

    In mammals, the circadian clock is driven by multiple integrated transcriptional feedback loops involving three kinds of central clock-controlled elements (CCEs): E-boxes, D-boxes and ROR-elements. With the aid of CCEs, the concentrations of the active proteins are approximated by the delayed concentrations of mRNAs, which simplifies the circadian system drastically. The regulatory loop composed by BMAL1 and REV-ERB- α plays important roles in circadian clock. With delay differential equations, we gave a mathematical model of this loop and investigated its dynamical mechanisms. Specially, we theoretically provided the sufficient conditions for sustained oscillation of the loop with Hopf bifurcation theory. The total of delays determines the emergence of oscillators, which explains the crucial roles of delays in circadian clock revealed by biological experiments. Numerically, we studied the amplitude and period against the variations of delays and the degradation rates. The different sensitivities of amplitude and period on these factors provide ideas to adjust the amplitude or period of circadian oscillators.

  6. Analysis of circadian properties and healthy levels of blue light from smartphones at night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Hye; Yoo, Heeyeon; Park, Hoo Keun; Do, Young Rag

    2015-06-01

    This study proposes representative figures of merit for circadian and vision performance for healthy and efficient use of smartphone displays. The recently developed figures of merit for circadian luminous efficacy of radiation (CER) and circadian illuminance (CIL) related to human health and circadian rhythm were measured to compare three kinds of commercial smartphone displays. The CIL values for social network service (SNS) messenger screens from all three displays were higher than 41.3 biolux (blx) in a dark room at night, and the highest CIL value reached 50.9 blx. These CIL values corresponded to melatonin suppression values (MSVs) of 7.3% and 11.4%, respectively. Moreover, smartphone use in a bright room at night had much higher CIL and MSV values (58.7 ~ 105.2 blx and 15.4 ~ 36.1%, respectively). This study also analyzed the nonvisual and visual optical properties of the three smartphone displays while varying the distance between the screen and eye and controlling the brightness setting. Finally, a method to possibly attenuate the unhealthy effects of smartphone displays was proposed and investigated by decreasing the emitting wavelength of blue LEDs in a smartphone LCD backlight and subsequently reducing the circadian effect of the display.

  7. CLOCK phosphorylation by AKT regulates its nuclear accumulation and circadian gene expression in peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Amelia K; Zhou, Wenping; Santana, Jeans M; Kyriakides, Cleo; Velazquez, Heino; Sessa, William C

    2018-03-27

    Circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) is a transcription factor which activates transcription of clock-controlled genes (CCG) by heterodimerizing with BMAL1 and binding to E-box elements on DNA. While several phosphorylation sites on CLOCK have already been identified, this study characterizes a novel phosphorylation site at Serine 845 (S836 in humans). Here we show that CLOCK is a novel AKT substrate in vitro and in cells, and this phosphorylation site is a negative regulator of CLOCK nuclear localization by acting as a binding site for 14-3-3 proteins. To examine the role of CLOCK phosphorylation in vivo, Clock S845A knock-in mice were generated using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Clock S845A mice are essentially normal with normal central circadian rhythms and hemodynamics. However, examination of core circadian gene expression from peripheral tissues demonstrated that Clock S845A mice have diminished expression of Per2, Reverba, Dbp and Npas2 in skeletal muscle and Per2, Reverba, Dbp, Per1, Rora and Npas2 in the liver during the circadian cycle. The reduction in Dbp levels is associated with reduced H3K9ac at E-boxes where CLOCK binds despite no change in total CLOCK levels. Thus, CLOCK phosphorylation by AKT on S845 regulates its nuclear translocation and the expression levels of certain core circadian genes in insulin sensitive tissues. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Peripheral circadian misalignment: contributor to systemic insulin resistance and potential intervention to improve bariatric surgical outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Kyle N.; Hanlon, Erin C.; Prachand, Vivek N.

    2016-01-01

    Thirteen percent of the world's population suffers from obesity and 39% from being overweight, which correlates with an increase in numerous secondary metabolic complications, such as Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity and results in significant weight loss and the amelioration of obesity-related comorbidities through changes in enteroendocrine activity, caloric intake, and alterations in gut microbiota composition. The circadian system has recently been found to be a critical regulatory component in the control of metabolism and, thus, may potentially play an important role in inappropriate weight gain. Indeed, some behaviors and lifestyle factors associated with an increased risk of obesity are also risk factors for misalignment in the circadian clock system and for the metabolic syndrome. It is thus possible that alterations in peripheral circadian clocks in metabolically relevant tissues are a contributor to the current obesity epidemic. As such, it is plausible that postsurgical alterations in central circadian alignment, as well as peripheral gene expression in metabolic tissues may represent another mechanism for the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery may represent an opportunity to identify changes in the circadian expression of clock genes that have been altered by environmental factors, allowing for a better understanding of the mechanism of action of surgery. These studies could also reveal an overlooked target for behavioral intervention to improve metabolic outcomes following bariatric surgery. PMID:27465735

  9. Analysis of circadian properties and healthy levels of blue light from smartphones at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Hye; Yoo, Heeyeon; Park, Hoo Keun; Do, Young Rag

    2015-06-18

    This study proposes representative figures of merit for circadian and vision performance for healthy and efficient use of smartphone displays. The recently developed figures of merit for circadian luminous efficacy of radiation (CER) and circadian illuminance (CIL) related to human health and circadian rhythm were measured to compare three kinds of commercial smartphone displays. The CIL values for social network service (SNS) messenger screens from all three displays were higher than 41.3 biolux (blx) in a dark room at night, and the highest CIL value reached 50.9 blx. These CIL values corresponded to melatonin suppression values (MSVs) of 7.3% and 11.4%, respectively. Moreover, smartphone use in a bright room at night had much higher CIL and MSV values (58.7 ~ 105.2 blx and 15.4 ~ 36.1%, respectively). This study also analyzed the nonvisual and visual optical properties of the three smartphone displays while varying the distance between the screen and eye and controlling the brightness setting. Finally, a method to possibly attenuate the unhealthy effects of smartphone displays was proposed and investigated by decreasing the emitting wavelength of blue LEDs in a smartphone LCD backlight and subsequently reducing the circadian effect of the display.

  10. Interplay between Dioxin-Mediated Signaling and Circadian Clock: A Possible Determinant in Metabolic Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The rotation of the earth on its axis creates the environment of a 24 h solar day, which organisms on earth have used to their evolutionary advantage by integrating this timing information into their genetic make-up in the form of a circadian clock. This intrinsic molecular clock is pivotal for maintenance of synchronized homeostasis between the individual organism and the external environment to allow coordinated rhythmic physiological and behavioral function. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR is a master regulator of dioxin-mediated toxic effects, and is, therefore, critical in maintaining adaptive responses through regulating the expression of phase I/II drug metabolism enzymes. AhR expression is robustly rhythmic, and physiological cross-talk between AhR signaling and circadian rhythms has been established. Increasing evidence raises a compelling argument that disruption of endogenous circadian rhythms contributes to the development of disease, including sleep disorders, metabolic disorders and cancers. Similarly, exposure to environmental pollutants through air, water and food, is increasingly cited as contributory to these same problems. Thus, a better understanding of interactions between AhR signaling and the circadian clock regulatory network can provide critical new insights into environmentally regulated disease processes. This review highlights recent advances in the understanding of the reciprocal interactions between dioxin-mediated AhR signaling and the circadian clock including how these pathways relate to health and disease, with emphasis on the control of metabolic function.

  11. Expression of the Circadian Clock Genes Pert, Per2 in Sporadic, Familial Breast Tumors

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    Sherry L. Winter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence implicating aberrant circadian clock expression in the development of cancer. Based on our initial experiments identifying a putative interaction between BRCA1, the clock proteins Per1, Per2, as well as the reported involvement of the circadian clock in the development of cancer, we have performed an expression analysis of the circadian clock genes Per1, Per2 in both sporadic, familial primary breast tumors, normal breast tissues using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Significantly decreased levels of Per1 were observed between sporadic tumors, normal samples (P < .00001, as well as a further significant decrease between familial, sporadic breast tumors for both Per1 (P < .00001, Per2 (P < .00001. Decreased Per1 was also associated with estrogen receptor negativity (53% vs 15%, P = .04. These results suggest a role for both Perl, Per2 in normal breast function, show for the first time that deregulation of the circadian clock may be an important factor in the development of familial breast cancer. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes could have important consequences on the transactivation of downstream targets that control the cell cycle, on the ability of cells to undergo apoptosis, potentially promoting carcinogenesis.

  12. The Circadian Binding of CLOCK Protein to the Promoter of C/ebpα Gene in Mouse Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kumpei; Shimoda, Masami; Ishida, Norio

    2013-01-01

    C/EBPα plays important roles in metabolism as well as in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. Here we describe loss of the circadian oscillation of C/ebpα expression in liver of Clock mutant mice. Reporter assays indicate Clock and Bmal significantly induced C/ebpα gene expression whereas Cry suppressed. Real time reporter assays showed that two mutated E-boxes disrupted C/ebpα promoter dependent-oscillation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation suggests Clock can bind to two E-boxes in the C/ebpα promoter with a circadian manner in vivo. Thus, C/ebpα gene transcription is under circadian control of a core clock component, Clock. The data suggests that circadian disturbances may affect metabolic abnormalities through the C/ebpα pathway in liver. PMID:23505471

  13. Characterization of circadian behavior in the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D Hendricks

    Full Text Available Although much is known about how circadian systems control daily cycles in the physiology and behavior of Drosophila and several vertebrate models, marine invertebrates have often been overlooked in circadian rhythms research. This study focuses on the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, a species that has received increasing attention within the scientific community for its potential as a model research organism. The recently sequenced genome of N. vectensis makes it an especially attractive model for exploring the molecular evolution of circadian behavior. Critical behavioral data needed to correlate gene expression patterns to specific behaviors are currently lacking in N. vectensis.To detect the presence of behavioral oscillations in N. vectensis, locomotor activity was evaluated using an automated system in an environmentally controlled chamber. Animals exposed to a 24 hr photoperiod (12 hr light: 12 hr dark exhibited locomotor behavior that was both rhythmic and predominantly nocturnal. The activity peak occurred in the early half of the night with a 2-fold increase in locomotion. Upon transfer to constant lighting conditions (constant light or constant dark, an approximately 24 hr rhythm persisted in most animals, suggesting that the rhythm is controlled by an endogenous circadian mechanism. Fourier analysis revealed the presence of multiple peaks in some animals suggesting additional rhythmic components could be present. In particular, an approximately 12 hr oscillation was often observed. The nocturnal increase in generalized locomotion corresponded to a 24 hr oscillation in animal elongation.These data confirm the presence of a light-entrainable circadian clock in Nematostella vectensis. Additional components observed in some individuals indicate that an endogenous clock of approximately 12 hr frequency may also be present. By describing rhythmic locomotor behavior in N. vectensis, we have made important progress in developing

  14. Identification of human circadian genes based on time course gene expression profiles by using a deep learning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Peng; Zhong, Tingyan; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Tao; Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Chenglin; Lu, Hui

    2017-12-12

    Circadian genes express periodically in an approximate 24-h period and the identification and study of these genes can provide deep understanding of the circadian control which plays significant roles in human health. Although many circadian gene identification algorithms have been developed, large numbers of false positives and low coverage are still major problems in this field. In this study we constructed a novel computational framework for circadian gene identification using deep neural networks (DNN) - a deep learning algorithm which can represent the raw form of data patterns without imposing assumptions on the expression distribution. Firstly, we transformed time-course gene expression data into categorical-state data to denote the changing trend of gene expression. Two distinct expression patterns emerged after clustering of the state data for circadian genes from our manually created learning dataset. DNN was then applied to discriminate the aperiodic genes and the two subtypes of periodic genes. In order to assess the performance of DNN, four commonly used machine learning methods including k-nearest neighbors, logistic regression, naïve Bayes, and support vector machines were used for comparison. The results show that the DNN model achieves the best balanced precision and recall. Next, we conducted large scale circadian gene detection using the trained DNN model for the remaining transcription profiles. Comparing with JTK_CYCLE and a study performed by Möller-Levet et al. (doi: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1217154110), we identified 1132 novel periodic genes. Through the functional analysis of these novel circadian genes, we found that the GTPase superfamily exhibits distinct circadian expression patterns and may provide a molecular switch of circadian control of the functioning of the immune system in human blood. Our study provides novel insights into both the circadian gene identification field and the study of complex circadian-driven biological

  15. Circadian rhythms in Macaca mulatta monkeys during Bion 11 flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Klimovitsky, V. Y.; Tumurova, E. G.; Fuller, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of primate brain temperature, head and ankle skin temperature, motor activity, and heart rate were studied during spaceflight and on the ground. In space, the circadian rhythms of all the parameters were synchronized with diurnal Zeitgebers. However, in space the brain temperature rhythm showed a significantly more delayed phase angle, which may be ascribed to an increase of the endogenous circadian period.

  16. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, K.; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive (‘circadian resonance hypothesis’). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural

  17. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew S I; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close to or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive ("circadian resonance hypothesis"). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under

  18. Circadian Variation of Breast Milk Components and Implications for Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robert D

    2017-09-01

    Several components of breast milk show circadian variability. It is likely that at least some of these macronutrients, hormones, and micronutrients produce circadian stimuli that enhance the well-being of breast-fed infants. Future research should determine whether high-risk infants benefit if breast milk is given during the same circadian phase as it was expressed.

  19. Circadian timekeeping : from basic clock function to implications for health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, Eliane Alinda

    2016-01-01

    In modern society, circadian rhythms and sleep are often disturbed, which may negatively affect health. This thesis examines these associations and focuses on the basic functioning of sleep and the circadian system in mice and in humans. Circadian rhythms are orchestrated by ~20,000 neurons in the

  20. Masking of a circadian behavior in larval zebrafish involves the thalamo-habenula pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qian; Jesuthasan, Suresh

    2017-06-22

    Changes in illumination can rapidly influence behavior that is normally controlled by the circadian clock. This effect is termed masking. In mice, masking requires melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells that detect blue light and project to the thalamus. It is not known whether masking is wavelength-dependent in other vertebrates, nor is it known whether the thalamus is also involved or how it influences masking. Here, we address these questions in zebrafish. We find that diel vertical migration, a circadian behavior in larval zebrafish, is effectively triggered by blue, but not by red light. Two-photon calcium imaging reveals that a thalamic nucleus and a downstream structure, the habenula, have a sustained response to blue but not to red light. Lesioning the habenula reduces light-evoked climbing. These data suggest that the thalamo-habenula pathway is involved in the ability of blue light to influence a circadian behavior.

  1. Application of an ex vivo cellular model of circadian variation for bipolar disorder research: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamne, Mikhil N; Ponder, Christine A; Wood, Joel A; Mansour, Hader; Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David J; Young, Michael W; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L

    2013-09-01

    Disruption of circadian function has been observed in several human disorders, including bipolar disorder (BD). Research into these disorders can be facilitated by human cellular models that evaluate external factors (zeitgebers) that impact circadian pacemaker activity. Incorporating a firefly luciferase reporter system into human fibroblasts provides a facile, bioluminescent readout that estimates circadian phase, while leaving the cells intact. We evaluated whether this system can be adapted to clinical BD research and whether it can incorporate zeitgeber challenge paradigms. Fibroblasts from patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) (n = 13) and controls (n = 12) were infected ex vivo with a lentiviral reporter incorporating the promoter sequences for Bmal1, a circadian gene to drive expression of the firefly luciferase gene. Following synchronization, the bioluminescence was used to estimate period length. Phase response curves (PRCs) were also generated following forskolin challenge and the phase response patterns were characterized. Period length and PRCs could be estimated reliably from the constructs. There were no significant case-control differences in period length, with a nonsignificant trend for differences in PRCs following the phase-setting experiments. An ex vivo cellular fibroblast-based model can be used to investigate circadian function in BD-I. It can be generated from specific individuals and this could usefully complement ongoing circadian clinical research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Interaction between circadian rhythms and stress

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    C.E. Koch

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Life on earth has adapted to the day-night cycle by evolution of internal, so-called circadian clocks that adjust behavior and physiology to the recurring changes in environmental conditions. In mammals, a master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus receives environmental light information and synchronizes peripheral tissues and central non-SCN clocks to geophysical time. Regulatory systems such as the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and the autonomic nervous system (ANS, both being important for the regulation of stress responses, receive strong circadian input. In this review, we summarize the interaction of circadian and stress systems and the resulting physiological and pathophysiological consequences. Finally, we critically discuss the relevance of rodent stress studies for humans, addressing complications of translational approaches and offering strategies to optimize animal studies from a chronobiological perspective.

  3. Melanopsin resets circadian rhythms in cells by inducing clock gene Period1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shuhei; Uehara, Tomoe; Matsuo, Minako; Kikuchi, Yo; Numano, Rika

    2014-02-01

    The biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes are under the control of internal clocks with the period of approximately 24 hr, circadian rhythms. The expression of clock gene Period1 (Per1) oscillates autonomously in cells and is induced immediately after a light pulse. Per1 is an indispensable member of the central clock system to maintain the autonomous oscillator and synchronize environmental light cycle. Per1 expression could be detected by Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP plasmid DNA in which firefly luciferase and Green Fluorescence Protein were rhythmically expressed under the control of the mouse Per1 promoter in order to monitor mammalian circadian rhythms. Membrane protein, MELANOPSIN is activated by blue light in the morning on the retina and lead to signals transduction to induce Per1 expression and to reset the phase of circadian rhythms. In this report Per1 induction was measured by reporter signal assay in Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP fibroblast cell at the input process of circadian rhythms. To the result all process to reset the rhythms by Melanopsin is completed in single cell like in the retina projected to the central clock in the brain. Moreover, the phase of circadian rhythm in Per1∷luc cells is synchronized by photo-activated Melanopsin, because the definite peak of luciferase activity in one dish was found one day after light illumination. That is an available means that physiological circadian rhythms could be real-time monitor as calculable reporter (bioluminescent and fluorescent) chronological signal in both single and groups of cells.

  4. Hepatic gene therapy rescues high-fat diet responses in circadianClockmutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Kovac, Judit; Kolbe, Isa; Ehrhardt, Lea; Leliavski, Alexei; Husse, Jana; Salinas, Gabriela; Lingner, Thomas; Tsang, Anthony H; Barclay, Johanna L; Oster, Henrik

    2017-06-01

    Circadian Clock gene mutant mice show dampened 24-h feeding rhythms and an increased sensitivity to high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. Restricting HFD access to the dark phase counteracts its obesogenic effect in wild-type mice. The extent to which altered feeding rhythms are causative for the obesogenic phenotype of Clock mutant mice, however, remains unknown. Metabolic parameters of wild-type (WT) and Clock Δ19 mutant mice (MT) were investigated under ad libitum and nighttime restricted HFD feeding. Liver circadian clock function was partially rescued by hydrodynamic tail vein delivery of WT- Clock DNA vectors in mutant mice and transcriptional, metabolic, endocrine and behavioral rhythms studied. Nighttime-restricted feeding restored food intake, but not body weight regulation in MT mice under HFD, suggesting Clock -dependent metabolic dysregulation downstream of circadian appetite control. Liver-directed Clock gene therapy partially restored liver circadian oscillator function and transcriptome regulation without affecting centrally controlled circadian behaviors. Under HFD, MT mice with partially restored liver clock function (MT-LR) showed normalized body weight gain, rescued 24-h food intake rhythms, and WT-like energy expenditure. This was associated with decreased nighttime leptin and daytime ghrelin levels, reduced hepatic lipid accumulation, and improved glucose tolerance. Transcriptome analysis revealed that hepatic Clock rescue in MT mice affected a range of metabolic pathways. Liver Clock gene therapy improves resistance against HFD-induced metabolic impairments in mice with circadian clock disruption. Restoring or stabilizing liver clock function might be a promising target for therapeutic interventions in obesity and metabolic disorders.

  5. Sleep inertia, sleep homeostatic and circadian influences on higher-order cognitive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Tina M; Scheer, Frank A J L; Ronda, Joseph M; Czeisler, Charles A; Wright, Kenneth P

    2015-08-01

    Sleep inertia, sleep homeostatic and circadian processes modulate cognition, including reaction time, memory, mood and alertness. How these processes influence higher-order cognitive functions is not well known. Six participants completed a 73-day-long study that included two 14-day-long 28-h forced desynchrony protocols to examine separate and interacting influences of sleep inertia, sleep homeostasis and circadian phase on higher-order cognitive functions of inhibitory control and selective visual attention. Cognitive performance for most measures was impaired immediately after scheduled awakening and improved during the first ~2-4 h of wakefulness (decreasing sleep inertia); worsened thereafter until scheduled bedtime (increasing sleep homeostasis); and was worst at ~60° and best at ~240° (circadian modulation, with worst and best phases corresponding to ~09:00 and ~21:00 hours, respectively, in individuals with a habitual wake time of 07:00 hours). The relative influences of sleep inertia, sleep homeostasis and circadian phase depended on the specific higher-order cognitive function task examined. Inhibitory control appeared to be modulated most strongly by circadian phase, whereas selective visual attention for a spatial-configuration search task was modulated most strongly by sleep inertia. These findings demonstrate that some higher-order cognitive processes are differentially sensitive to different sleep-wake regulatory processes. Differential modulation of cognitive functions by different sleep-wake regulatory processes has important implications for understanding mechanisms contributing to performance impairments during adverse circadian phases, sleep deprivation and/or upon awakening from sleep. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  6. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, Heather S.L.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Ann Y.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Aben, Katja KH.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H.; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Sieh, Weiva; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N.; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K.; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Vierkant, Robert A.; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Thomsen, Lotte; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Palmieri Weber, Rachel; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Schernhammer, Eva; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Amankwah, Ernest; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Ramus, Susan J.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Goode, Ellen L.; Narod, Steven A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption in circadian gene expression, whether due to genetic variation or environmental factors (e.g., light at night, shiftwork), is associated with increased incidence of breast, prostate, gastrointestinal and hematologic cancers and gliomas. Circadian genes are highly expressed in the ovaries where they regulate ovulation; circadian disruption is associated with several ovarian cancer risk factors (e.g., endometriosis). However, no studies have examined variation in germline circadian genes as predictors of ovarian cancer risk and invasiveness. The goal of the current study was to examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in circadian genes BMAL1, CRY2, CSNK1E, NPAS2, PER3, REV1 and TIMELESS and downstream transcription factors KLF10 and SENP3 as predictors of risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and histopathologic subtypes. The study included a test set of 3,761 EOC cases and 2,722 controls and a validation set of 44,308 samples including 18,174 (10,316 serous) cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Analysis of genotype data from 36 genotyped SNPs and 4600 imputed SNPs indicated that the most significant association was rs117104877 in BMAL1 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.68–0.90, p = 5.59 × 10−4]. Functional analysis revealed a significant down regulation of BMAL1 expression following cMYC overexpression and increasing transformation in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells as well as alternative splicing of BMAL1 exons in ovarian and granulosa cells. These results suggest that variation in circadian genes, and specifically BMAL1, may be associated with risk of ovarian cancer, likely through disruption of hormonal pathways. PMID:26807442

  7. Coordination of the maize transcriptome by a conserved circadian clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmon Frank G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plant circadian clock orchestrates 24-hour rhythms in internal physiological processes to coordinate these activities with daily and seasonal changes in the environment. The circadian clock has a profound impact on many aspects of plant growth and development, including biomass accumulation and flowering time. Despite recent advances in understanding the circadian system of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the contribution of the circadian oscillator to important agronomic traits in Zea mays and other cereals remains poorly defined. To address this deficit, this study investigated the transcriptional landscape of the maize circadian system. Results Since transcriptional regulation is a fundamental aspect of circadian systems, genes exhibiting circadian expression were identified in the sequenced maize inbred B73. Of the over 13,000 transcripts examined, approximately 10 percent displayed circadian expression patterns. The majority of cycling genes had peak expression at subjective dawn and dusk, similar to other plant circadian systems. The maize circadian clock organized co-regulation of genes participating in fundamental physiological processes, including photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall biogenesis, and phytohormone biosynthesis pathways. Conclusions Circadian regulation of the maize genome was widespread and key genes in several major metabolic pathways had circadian expression waveforms. The maize circadian clock coordinated transcription to be coincident with oncoming day or night, which was consistent with the circadian oscillator acting to prepare the plant for these major recurring environmental changes. These findings highlighted the multiple processes in maize plants under circadian regulation and, as a result, provided insight into the important contribution this regulatory system makes to agronomic traits in maize and potentially other C4 plant species.

  8. Interval timing in mice does not rely upon the circadian pacemaker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, PA; Miall, RC; Daan, S

    2003-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is a precise timekeeper that controls and synchronizes the circadian period of countless physiological and behavioural functions and entrains them to the 24 h light/dark cycle. We examined the possibility that it is also indirectly involved in

  9. Signals from the brainstem sleep/wake centers regulate behavioral timing via the circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabra M Abbott

    Full Text Available Sleep-wake cycling is controlled by the complex interplay between two brain systems, one which controls vigilance state, regulating the transition between sleep and wake, and the other circadian, which communicates time-of-day. Together, they align sleep appropriately with energetic need and the day-night cycle. Neural circuits connect brain stem sites that regulate vigilance state with the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, the master circadian clock, but the function of these connections has been unknown. Coupling discrete stimulation of pontine nuclei controlling vigilance state with analytical chemical measurements of intra-SCN microdialysates in mouse, we found significant neurotransmitter release at the SCN and, concomitantly, resetting of behavioral circadian rhythms. Depending upon stimulus conditions and time-of-day, SCN acetylcholine and/or glutamate levels were augmented and generated shifts of behavioral rhythms. These results establish modes of neurochemical communication from brain regions controlling vigilance state to the central circadian clock, with behavioral consequences. They suggest a basis for dynamic integration across brain systems that regulate vigilance states, and a potential vulnerability to altered communication in sleep disorders.

  10. Circadian variation of blood pressure in patients with chronic renal failure on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, P; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Ladefoged, Jens

    1995-01-01

    The circadian pattern of blood pressure variation was investigated in 10 patients with advanced chronic renal failure on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and in an age-matched group of controls without renal disease with similar office blood pressure level. Monitoring was done using...

  11. Circadian aspects of post-operative morbidity and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvaslerud, T.; Hansen, M.V.; Rosenberg, J.

    2010-01-01

    concerning post-operative circadian disturbances. We also present the literature concerning circadian variation in post-operative morbidity and mortality. PubMed and the Cochrane database were searched for papers using a combination of 'circadian,' 'surgery,' 'post-operative,' 'mortality' and 'morbidity....... There is a peak incidence of myocardial ischemia, fatal thromboembolism and sudden unexpected death in the morning hours. A circadian variation exists in post-operative morbidity and mortality. The observed circadian variation in post-operative morbidity and mortality may warrant a chronopharmacological approach...

  12. A circadian clock in Antarctic krill: an endogenous timing system governs metabolic output rhythms in the euphausid species Euphausia superba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Teschke

    Full Text Available Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, shapes the structure of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Its central position in the food web, the ongoing environmental changes due to climatic warming, and increasing commercial interest on this species emphasize the urgency of understanding the adaptability of krill to its environment. Krill has evolved rhythmic physiological and behavioral functions which are synchronized with the daily and seasonal cycles of the complex Southern Ocean ecosystem. The mechanisms, however, leading to these rhythms are essentially unknown. Here, we show that krill possesses an endogenous circadian clock that governs metabolic and physiological output rhythms. We found that expression of the canonical clock gene cry2 was highly rhythmic both in a light-dark cycle and in constant darkness. We detected a remarkable short circadian period, which we interpret as a special feature of the krill's circadian clock that helps to entrain the circadian system to the extreme range of photoperiods krill is exposed to throughout the year. Furthermore, we found that important key metabolic enzymes of krill showed bimodal circadian oscillations (∼9-12 h period in transcript abundance and enzymatic activity. Oxygen consumption of krill showed ∼9-12 h oscillations that correlated with the temporal activity profile of key enzymes of aerobic energy metabolism. Our results demonstrate the first report of an endogenous circadian timing system in Antarctic krill and its likely link to metabolic key processes. Krill's circadian clock may not only be critical for synchronization to the solar day but also for the control of seasonal events. This study provides a powerful basis for the investigation into the mechanisms of temporal synchronization in this marine key species and will also lead to the first comprehensive analyses of the circadian clock of a polar marine organism through the entire photoperiodic cycle.

  13. Ribosomal S6 Kinase Cooperates with Casein Kinase 2 to Modulate the Drosophila Circadian Molecular Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akten, Bikem; Tangredi, Michelle M.; Jauch, Eike; Roberts, Mary A.; Ng, Fanny; Raabe, Thomas; Jackson, F. Rob

    2009-01-01

    There is a universal requirement for post-translational regulatory mechanisms in circadian clock systems. Previous work in Drosophila has identified several kinases, phosphatases and an E3 ligase that are critical for determining the nuclear translocation and/or stability of clock proteins. The present study evaluated the function of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) in the Drosophila circadian system. In mammals, RSK1 is a light- and clock-regulated kinase known to be activated by the MAPK pathway, but there is no direct evidence that it functions as a component of the circadian system. Here, we show that Drosophila S6KII RNA displays rhythms in abundance, indicative of circadian control. Importantly, an S6KII null mutant exhibits a short-period circadian phenotype that can be rescued by expression of the wild-type gene in clock neurons, indicating a role for S6KII in the molecular oscillator. Peak PER clock protein expression is elevated in the mutant, indicative of enhanced stability, whereas per mRNA level is decreased, consistent with enhanced feedback repression. Gene reporter assays show that decreased S6KII is associated with increased PER repression. Surprisingly, we demonstrate a physical interaction between S6KII and the Casein Kinase 2 regulatory subunit (CK2β), suggesting a functional relationship between the two kinases. In support of such a relationship, there are genetic interactions between S6KII and CK2 mutations, in vivo, which indicate that CK2 activity is required for S6KII action. We propose that the two kinases cooperate within clock neurons to fine-tune circadian period, improving the precision of the clock mechanism. PMID:19144847

  14. Cognitive dysfunction, elevated anxiety and reduced cocaine response in circadian clock-deficient cryptochrome knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri eDe Bundel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock comprises a set of genes involved in cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops that orchestrate the expression of a range of downstream genes, driving circadian patterns of behavior. Cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, anxiety disorders and substance abuse disorders have been associated with disruptions in circadian rhythm and circadian clock genes, but the causal relationship of these associations is still poorly understood. In the present study, we investigate the effect of genetic disruption of the circadian clock, through deletion of both paralogs of the core gene cryptochrome (Cry1 and Cry2. Mice lacking Cry1 and Cry2 (Cry1-/-Cry2-/- displayed attenuated dark phase and novelty-induced locomotor activity. Moreover, they showed impaired recognition memory but intact fear memory. Depression-related behaviors in the forced swim test or sucrose preference tests were unaffected but Cry1-/-Cry2-/- mice displayed increased anxiety in the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Finally, hyperlocomotion and striatal phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK induced by a single cocaine administration are strongly reduced in Cry1-/-Cry2-/- mice. Interestingly, only some behavioral measures were affected in mice lacking either Cry1 or Cry2. Notably, recognition memory was impaired in both Cry1-/-Cry2+/+ and Cry1+/+Cry2-/- mice. Moreover, we further observed elevated anxiety in Cry1-/-Cry2+/+ and Cry1+/+Cry2-/- mice. Our data indicate that beyond their role in the control of circadian rhythm, cryptochrome genes have a direct influence in cognitive function, anxiety-related behaviors and sensitivity to psychostimulant drugs.

  15. Machine Learning Helps Identify CHRONO as a Circadian Clock Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Anand; Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Kavakli, Ibrahim H.; Hughes, Michael E.; Baggs, Julie E.; Growe, Jacqueline; Liu, Andrew C.; Kim, Junhyong; Hogenesch, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, researchers have characterized a set of “clock genes” that drive daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. This arduous work has yielded results with far-reaching consequences in metabolic, psychiatric, and neoplastic disorders. Recent attempts to expand our understanding of circadian regulation have moved beyond the mutagenesis screens that identified the first clock components, employing higher throughput genomic and proteomic techniques. In order to further accelerate clock gene discovery, we utilized a computer-assisted approach to identify and prioritize candidate clock components. We used a simple form of probabilistic machine learning to integrate biologically relevant, genome-scale data and ranked genes on their similarity to known clock components. We then used a secondary experimental screen to characterize the top candidates. We found that several physically interact with known clock components in a mammalian two-hybrid screen and modulate in vitro cellular rhythms in an immortalized mouse fibroblast line (NIH 3T3). One candidate, Gene Model 129, interacts with BMAL1 and functionally represses the key driver of molecular rhythms, the BMAL1/CLOCK transcriptional complex. Given these results, we have renamed the gene CHRONO (computationally highlighted repressor of the network oscillator). Bi-molecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation demonstrate that CHRONO represses by abrogating the binding of BMAL1 to its transcriptional co-activator CBP. Most importantly, CHRONO knockout mice display a prolonged free-running circadian period similar to, or more drastic than, six other clock components. We conclude that CHRONO is a functional clock component providing a new layer of control on circadian molecular dynamics. PMID:24737000

  16. Chronotherapeutic drug delivery systems: an approach to circadian rhythms diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, S A; Srikanth, M V; Rao, N Sreenivasa; Uhumwangho, M U; Latha, K; Murthy, K V Ramana

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of writing this review on chronotherapeutic drug delivery systems (ChrDDs) is to review the literatures with special focus on ChrDDs and the various dosage forms, techniques that are used to target the circadian rhythms (CR) of various diseases. Many functions of the human body vary considerably in a day. ChrDDs refers to a treatment method in which in vivo drug availability is timed to match circadian rhythms of disease in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes and minimize side effects. Several techniques have been developed but not many dosage forms for all the diseases are available in the market. ChrDDs are gaining importance in the field of pharmaceutical technology as these systems reduce dosing frequency, toxicity and deliver the drug that matches the CR of that particular disease when the symptoms are maximum to worse. Finally, the ultimate benefit goes to the patient due the compliance and convenience of the dosage form. Some diseases that follow circadian rhythms include cardiovascular diseases, asthma, arthritis, ulcers, diabetes etc. ChrDDs in the market were also discussed and the current technologies used to formulate were also stated. These technologies include Contin® , Chronotopic®, Pulsincaps®, Ceform®, Timerx®, Oros®, Codas®, Diffucaps®, Egalet®, Tablet in capsule device, Core-in-cup tablet technology. A coated drug-core tablet matrix, A bi-layered tablet, Multiparticulate-based chronotherapeutic drug delivery systems, Chronoset and Controlled release microchips.

  17. Young children with Down syndrome show normal development of circadian rhythms, but poor sleep efficiency: a cross-sectional study across the first 60 months of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Fabian; Nyhuis, Casandra C; Anand, Payal; Demara, Bianca I; Ruby, Norman F; Spanò, Goffredina; Clark, Caron; Edgin, Jamie O

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate sleep consolidation and circadian activity rhythms in infants and toddlers with Down syndrome (DS) under light and socially entrained conditions within a familiar setting. Given previous human and animal data suggesting intact circadian regulation of melatonin across the day and night, it was hypothesized that behavioral indices of circadian rhythmicity would likewise be intact in the sample with DS. A cross-sectional study of 66 infants and young children with DS, aged 5-67 months, and 43 typically developing age-matched controls. Sleep and measures of circadian robustness or timing were quantified using continuous in-home actigraphy recordings performed over seven days. Circadian robustness was quantified via time series analysis of rest-activity patterns. Phase markers of circadian timing were calculated alongside these values. Sleep efficiency was also estimated based on the actigraphy recordings. This study provided further evidence that general sleep quality is poor in infants and toddlers with DS, a population that has sleep apnea prevalence as high as 50% during the preschool years. Despite poor sleep quality, circadian rhythm and phase were preserved in children with DS and displayed similar developmental trajectories in cross-sectional comparisons with a typically developing (TD) cohort. In line with past work, lower sleep efficiency scores were quantified in the group with DS relative to TD children. Infants born with DS exhibited the worst sleep fragmentation; however, in both groups, sleep efficiency and consolidation increased across age. Three circadian phase markers showed that 35% of the recruitment sample with DS was phase-advanced to an earlier morning schedule, suggesting significant within-group variability in the timing of their daily activity rhythms. Circadian rhythms of wake and sleep are robust in children born with DS. The present results suggest that sleep fragmentation and any resultant cognitive deficits are likely not

  18. Circadian rhythm disruption as a link between Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Suzan W N; Bijlenga, Denise; Tanke, Marjolein; Bron, Tannetje I; van der Heijden, Kristiaan B; Swaab, Hanna; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Kooij, J J Sandra

    2015-11-01

    Patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have a high prevalence of obesity. This is the first study to investigate whether circadian rhythm disruption is a mechanism linking ADHD symptoms to obesity. ADHD symptoms and two manifestations of circadian rhythm disruption: sleep problems and an unstable eating pattern (skipping breakfast and binge eating later in the day) were assessed in participants with obesity (n= 114), controls (n= 154), and adult ADHD patients (n= 202). Participants with obesity had a higher prevalence of ADHD symptoms and short sleep on free days as compared to controls, but a lower prevalence of ADHD symptoms, short sleep on free days, and an unstable eating pattern as compared to ADHD patients.We found that participants with obesity had a similar prevalence rate of an unstable eating pattern when compared to controls. Moreover, mediation analyses showed that both sleep duration and an unstable eating pattern mediated the association between ADHD symptoms and body mass index (BMI). Our study supports the hypothesis that circadian rhythm disruption is a mechanism linking ADHD symptoms to obesity. Further research is needed to determine if treatment of ADHD and circadian rhythm disruption is effective in the prevention and treatment of obesity in patients with obesity and/or ADHD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. EFFECTS OF CIRCADIAN RHYTHM ON BALANCE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karagul Osman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of circadian rhythm on dynamic balance performance and to determine the role of physical activity level, body temperature, chronotype, and gender in this possible effect. Material and

  20. Circadian clock components in the rat neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2013-01-01

    in the rat neocortex. Among these, Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Bmal1, Nr1d1 and Dbp were found to exhibit daily rhythms. The amplitude of circadian oscillation in neocortical clock gene expression was damped and the peak delayed as compared with the SCN. Lesions of the SCN revealed that rhythmic clock gene...

  1. Circadian Variation in Coronary Stent Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoud, Karim D.; Lennon, Ryan J.; Ting, Henry H.; Rihal, Charanjit S.; Holmes, David R.

    Objectives We sought to determine the circadian, weekly, and seasonal variation of coronary stent thrombosis. Background Other adverse cardiovascular events such as acute myocardial infarction are known to have higher incidences during the early morning hours, Mondays, and winter months. Methods The

  2. Nutrition and the circadian timing system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenvers, Dirk Jan; Jonkers, Cora F.; Fliers, Eric; Bisschop, Peter H. L. T.; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2012-01-01

    Life on earth has evolved under the daily rhythm of light and dark. Consequently, most creatures experience a daily rhythm in food availability. In this review, we first introduce the mammalian circadian timing system, consisting of a central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peripheral

  3. Circadian Metabolism in the Light of Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2015-01-01

    A review. Circadian rhythm, or daily oscillation, of behaviors and biol. processes is a fundamental feature of mammalian physiol. that has developed over hundreds of thousands of years under the continuous evolutionary pressure of energy conservation and efficiency. Evolution has fine-tuned the b...

  4. Circadian rhythms: from genes to behaviour

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    located in the third ventricle of the hypothalamus by two independent groups: F. K. Stephan and Irvin ... levels of biological organization, and we have tried to represent this aspect of our discipline in this special ... nature of circadian rhythm research, because at the core of all these studies lies a genetic architecture which.

  5. Circadian rhythms in handwriting kinematics and legibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jasper, Isabelle; Gordijn, Marijke; Haeussler, Andreas; Hermsdoerfer, Joachim

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the circadian rhythmicity in handwriting kinematics and legibility and to compare the performance between Dutch and German writers. Two subject groups underwent a 40 h sleep deprivation protocol under Constant Routine conditions either in Groningen (10

  6. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    More recently, detailed investigation leading to the anatomical, neurochemical and electrophysiological characterization of the various neuronal subgroups that comprise the circadian machinery has revealed pathways through which these neurons come together to act as a neuronal circuit. Thus the D. melanogaster ...

  7. Circadian and infradian rhythms in mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsutake, G; Otsuka, K; Cornélissen, G; Herold, M; Günther, R; Dawes, C; Burch, J B; Watson, D; Halberg, F

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess any variation in positive, negative and total affect recorded longitudinally; to compare the results with those from prior transverse or hybrid population studies, based on the same or a different method of mood rating; and to test for any association of mood with cardiovascular, hormonal and geophysical variables monitored concomitantly. The study approach was as follows. A clinically healthy 34-year-old man filled out the positive and negative affective scale (PANAS) questionnaire five times a day for 86 days. Systolic (S) and diastolic (D) blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were also measured automatically at 30-minute intervals with an ambulatory monitor from May 19 to June 29, 2000, while different endpoints of heart rate variability (HRV) were also determined at 5-minute intervals from beat-to-beat electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring for 42 days between May 3 and June 14, 2000, with only short interruptions while the subject took a shower and changed ECG tapes. Saliva samples were collected at the times of mood ratings for one month for later determination of melatonin and cortisol concentrations. Intervals of 24 hours of the record of each variable displaced in increments of 24 hours were analyzed by chronobiologic serial section at a trial period of 24 hours to assess the circadian characteristics as they changed from one day to another. Estimates of the midline-estimating statistic of rhythm (MESOR) and circadian amplitude and acrophase obtained on consecutive days were correlated among variables to assess any associations. The findings were as follows. Overall, a circadian rhythm was demonstrated for all variables. A positive association was noteworthy between the circadian amplitude of negative affect and the MESOR of both SBP (r= 0.363; P= 0.029) and DBP (r= 0.389; P= 0.019), suggesting that BP is raised in the presence of large swings in negative affect. Needing further validation was a weak association between

  8. Selective entrainment of the Drosophila circadian clock to daily gradients in environmental temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goda Tadahiro

    2009-08-01

    dark phases, respectively. Conclusion The present study systematically examined the entrainment of clock-controlled behavior to daily environmental temperature gradients. As a result, a number of key properties of circadian temperature entrainment were identified. Collectively, these properties represent a circadian temperature entrainment mechanism that is optimized in its ability to detect the time-of-day information encoded in natural environmental temperature profiles. The molecular events synchronized to the daily phases of ascending and descending temperature are expected to play an important role in the mechanism of circadian entrainment to daily temperature cycles.

  9. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks

  10. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Biochemistry Biophysics Department, Oregon State University (United States); Moreau, Régis [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Hagen, Tory, E-mail: Tory.Hagen@oregonstate.edu [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Biochemistry Biophysics Department, Oregon State University (United States)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks.

  11. Altered dynamics in the circadian oscillation of clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of patients suffering from idiopathic hypersomnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Lippert

    Full Text Available From single cell organisms to the most complex life forms, the 24-hour circadian rhythm is important for numerous aspects of physiology and behavior such as daily periodic fluctuations in body temperature and sleep-wake cycles. Influenced by environmental cues - mainly by light input -, the central pacemaker in the thalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN controls and regulates the internal clock mechanisms which are present in peripheral tissues. In order to correlate modifications in the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythm with the pathophysiology of idiopathic hypersomnia, this study aimed to investigate the dynamics of the expression of circadian clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of idiopathic hypersomniacs (IH in comparison to those of healthy controls (HC. Ten clinically and polysomnographically proven IH patients were recruited from the department of sleep medicine of the University Hospital of Muenster. Clinical diagnosis was done by two consecutive polysomnographies (PSG and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT. Fourteen clinical healthy volunteers served as control group. Dermal fibroblasts were obtained via punch biopsy and grown in cell culture. The expression of circadian clock genes was investigated by semiquantitative Reverse Transcriptase-PCR qRT-PCR analysis, confirming periodical oscillation of expression of the core circadian clock genes BMAL1, PER1/2 and CRY1/2. The amplitude of the rhythmically expressed BMAL1, PER1 and PER2 was significantly dampened in dermal fibroblasts of IH compared to HC over two circadian periods whereas the overall expression of only the key transcriptional factor BMAL1 was significantly reduced in IH. Our study suggests for the first time an aberrant dynamics in the circadian clock in IH. These findings may serve to better understand some clinical features of the pathophysiology in sleep - wake rhythms in IH.

  12. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallis, M M; DeRoshia, C W

    2005-06-01

    Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and

  13. Circadian System and Melatonin Hormone: Risk Factors for Complications during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Valenzuela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a complex and well-regulated temporal event in which several steps are finely orchestrated including implantation, decidualization, placentation, and partum and any temporary alteration has serious effects on fetal and maternal health. Interestingly, alterations of circadian rhythms (i.e., shiftwork have been correlated with increased risk of preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, and preeclampsia. In the last few years evidence is accumulating that the placenta may have a functional circadian system and express the clock genes Bmal1, Per1-2, and Clock. On the other hand, there is evidence that the human placenta synthesizes melatonin, hormone involved in the regulation of the circadian system in other tissues. Moreover, is unknown the role of this local production of melatonin and whether this production have a circadian pattern. Available information indicates that melatonin induces in placenta the expression of antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase, prevents the injury produced by oxidative stress, and inhibits the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF a gene that in other tissues is controlled by clock genes. In this review we aim to analyze available information regarding clock genes and clock genes controlled genes such as VEGF and the possible role of melatonin synthesis in the placenta.

  14. Association between circadian clock genes and diapause incidence in Drosophila triauraria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Yamada

    Full Text Available Diapause is an adaptive response triggered by seasonal photoperiodicity to overcome unfavorable seasons. The photoperiodic clock is a system that controls seasonal physiological processes, but our knowledge about its physiological mechanisms and genetic architecture remains incomplete. The circadian clock is another system that controls daily rhythmic physiological phenomena. It has been argued that there is a connection between the two clocks. To examine the genetic connection between them, we analyzed the associations of five circadian clock genes (period, timeless, Clock, cycle and cryptochrome with the occurrence of diapause in Drosophila triauraria, which shows a robust reproductive diapause with clear photoperiodicity. Non-diapause strains found in low latitudes were compared in genetic crosses with the diapause strain, in which the diapause trait is clearly dominant. Single nucleotide polymorphism and deletion analyses of the five circadian clock genes in backcross progeny revealed that allelic differences in timeless and cryptochrome between the strains were additively associated with the differences in the incidence of diapause. This suggests that there is a molecular link between certain circadian clock genes and the occurrence of diapause.

  15. CREBH Maintains Circadian Glucose Homeostasis by Regulating Hepatic Glycogenolysis and Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunbae; Zheng, Ze; Walker, Paul D; Kapatos, Gregory; Zhang, Kezhong

    2017-07-15

    Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein, hepatocyte specific (CREBH), is a liver-enriched, endoplasmic reticulum-tethered transcription factor known to regulate the hepatic acute-phase response and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we demonstrate that CREBH functions as a circadian transcriptional regulator that plays major roles in maintaining glucose homeostasis. The proteolytic cleavage and posttranslational acetylation modification of CREBH are regulated by the circadian clock. Functionally, CREBH is required in order to maintain circadian homeostasis of hepatic glycogen storage and blood glucose levels. CREBH regulates the rhythmic expression of the genes encoding the rate-limiting enzymes for glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, including liver glycogen phosphorylase (PYGL), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PCK1), and the glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit (G6PC). CREBH interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) to synergize its transcriptional activities in hepatic gluconeogenesis. The acetylation of CREBH at lysine residue 294 controls CREBH-PPARα interaction and synergy in regulating hepatic glucose metabolism in mice. CREBH deficiency leads to reduced blood glucose levels but increases hepatic glycogen levels during the daytime or upon fasting. In summary, our studies revealed that CREBH functions as a key metabolic regulator that controls glucose homeostasis across the circadian cycle or under metabolic stress. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Daily circadian misalignment impairs human cognitive performance task-dependently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellappa, Sarah L; Morris, Christopher J; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2018-02-14

    Shift work increases the risk for human errors, such that drowsiness due to shift work has contributed to major industrial disasters, including Space Shuttle Challenger, Chernobyl and Alaska Oil Spill disasters, with extraordinary socio-economical costs. Overnight operations pose a challenge because our circadian biology inhibits cognitive performance at night. Yet how the circadian system modulates cognition over multiple days under realistic shift work conditions remains to be established. Importantly, because task-specific cognitive brain regions show different 24-h circadian dynamics, we hypothesize that circadian misalignment impacts cognition task-dependently. Using a biologically-driven paradigm mimicking night shift work, with a randomized, cross-over design, we show that misalignment between the circadian pacemaker and behavioral/environmental cycles increases cognitive vulnerability on sustained attention, cognitive throughput, information processing and visual-motor performance over multiple days, compared to circadian alignment (day shifts). Circadian misalignment effects are task-dependent: while they acutely impair sustained attention with recovery after 3-days, they progressively hinder daily learning. Individuals felt sleepier during circadian misalignment, but they did not rate their performance as worse. Furthermore, circadian misalignment effects on sustained attention depended on prior sleep history. Collectively, daily circadian misalignment may provide an important biological framework for developing countermeasures against adverse cognitive effects in shift workers.

  17. Interspecific studies of circadian genes period and timeless in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Shumaila; Pegoraro, Mirko; Nouroz, Faisal; Tauber, Eran; Kyriacou, Charalambos P

    2018-03-30

    The level of rescue of clock function in genetically arrhythmic Drosophila melanogaster hosts using interspecific clock gene transformation was used to study the putative intermolecular coevolution between interacting clock proteins. Among them PER and TIM are the two important negative regulators of the circadian clock feedback loop. We transformed either the D. pseudoobscura per or tim transgenes into the corresponding arrhythmic D. melanogaster mutant (per01 or tim01) and observed >50% rhythmicity but the period of activity rhythm was either longer (D. pseudoobscura-per) or shorter than 24 h (D. pseudoobscura-tim) compared to controls. By introducing both transgenes simultaneously into double mutants, we observed that the period of the activity rhythm was rescued by the pair of hemizygous transgenes (~24 h). These flies also showed a more optimal level of temperature compensation for the period. Under LD 12:12 these flies have a D. pseudoobscura like activity profile with the absence of morning anticipation as well as a very prominent earlier evening peak of activity rhythm. These observation are consistent with the view that TIM and PER form a heterospecific coevolved module at least for the circadian period of activity rhythms. However the strength of rhythmicity was reduced by having both transgenes present, so while evidence for a coevolution between PER and TIM is observed for some characters it is not for others. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Circadian rhythm of rectal temperature during sleep deprivation with modafinil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launay, Jean-Claude; Savourey, Gustave; Guinet, Angélique; Lallement, Guy; Besnard, Yves; Bittel, Jacques

    2002-10-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) induces many adverse psychological and physiological effects, particularly on vigilance and the thermoregulatory system. The drug modafinil appears to suppress or diminish the harmful effects on vigilance. However, the effects of modafinil combined with SD on the circadian rhythm of core temperature are not well established. We studied the circadian rhythm of rectal temperature (CRTre) during 62 h of SD alone or with three dosage levels of modafinil. Six men underwent repeated SD experiments lasting 7 d each, including a 24-h control period, 62 h of SD, and a 24-h recovery period. Experiments were repeated four times in mixed order for placebo and three levels of modafinil (50, 150, or 300 mg x 24 h(-1)). The Tre was recorded each minute throughout the experiment and the CRTre was studied by the single cosinor method. Independent of modafinil, SD increased the mesor (p modafinil, but not the higher doses, induced a lower mesor (p modafinil on core temperature. The hyperthermic effect reported in the literature for SD with modafinil may actually result from the sleep deprivation alone.

  19. Melatonin promotes circadian rhythm-induced proliferation through Clock/histone deacetylase 3/c-Myc interaction in mouse adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenjiang; Gan, Lu; Luo, Dan; Sun, Chao

    2017-05-01

    Melatonin is synthesized in the pineal gland and controls circadian rhythm of peripheral adipose tissue, resulting in changes in body weight. Although core regulatory components of clock rhythmicity have been defined, insight into the mechanisms of circadian rhythm-mediated proliferation in adipose tissue is still limited. Here, we showed that melatonin (20 mg/kg/d) promoted circadian and proliferation processes in white adipose tissue. The circadian amplitudes of brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like 1 (Bmal1, PMyc (PMyc and then directly stimulated c-Myc transcription. Moreover, Clock physically interacted with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) and formed a complex with c-Myc to promote adipocyte proliferation. Melatonin also attenuated circadian disruption and promoted adipocyte proliferation in chronic jet-lagged mice and obese mice. Thus, our study found that melatonin promoted adipocyte proliferation by forming a Clock/HDAC3/c-Myc complex and subsequently driving the circadian amplitudes of proliferation genes. Our data reveal a novel mechanism that links circadian rhythm to cell proliferation in adipose tissue. These findings also identify a new potential means for melatonin to prevent and treat sleep deprivation-caused obesity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Physiological links of circadian clock and biological clock of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Chang, Hung-Chun

    2017-07-01

    Circadian rhythms orchestrate biochemical and physiological processes in living organisms to respond the day/night cycle. In mammals, nearly all cells hold self-sustained circadian clocks meanwhile couple the intrinsic rhythms to systemic changes in a hierarchical manner. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus functions as the master pacemaker to initiate daily synchronization according to the photoperiod, in turn determines the phase of peripheral cellular clocks through a variety of signaling relays, including endocrine rhythms and metabolic cycles. With aging, circadian desynchrony occurs at the expense of peripheral metabolic pathologies and central neurodegenerative disorders with sleep symptoms, and genetic ablation of circadian genes in model organisms resembled the aging-related features. Notably, a number of studies have linked longevity nutrient sensing pathways in modulating circadian clocks. Therapeutic strategies that bridge the nutrient sensing pathways and circadian clock might be rational designs to defy aging.

  1. Involvement of circadian clock in crowing of red jungle fowls (Gallus gallus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shuichi; Hori, Shuho; Hirose, Makiko; Iwahara, Mari; Yatsushiro, Azusa; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Okamoto, Chinobu; Yayou, Ken-Ichi; Shimmura, Tsuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    The rhythmic locomotor behavior of flies and mice provides a phenotype for the identification of clock genes, and the underlying molecular mechanism is well studied. However, interestingly, when examining locomotor rhythm in the wild, several key laboratory-based assumptions on circadian behavior are not supported in natural conditions. The rooster crowing 'cock-a-doodle-doo' is a symbol of the break of dawn in many countries. Previously, we used domestic inbred roosters and showed that the timing of roosters' crowing is regulated by the circadian clock under laboratory conditions. However, it is still unknown whether the regulation of crowing by circadian clock is observed under natural conditions. Therefore, here we used red jungle fowls and first confirmed that similar crowing rhythms with domesticated chickens are observed in red jungle fowls under the laboratory conditions. Red jungle fowls show predawn crowing before light onset under 12:12 light : dim light conditions and the free-running rhythm of crowing under total dim light conditions. We next examined the crowing rhythms under semi-wild conditions. Although the crowing of red jungle fowls changed seasonally under semi-wild conditions, predawn crowing was observed before sunrise in all seasons. This evidence suggests that seasonally changed crowing of red jungle fowls is under the control of a circadian clock. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  2. Robustness of circadian clocks to daylight fluctuations: hints from the picoeucaryote Ostreococcus tauri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Thommen

    Full Text Available The development of systemic approaches in biology has put emphasis on identifying genetic modules whose behavior can be modeled accurately so as to gain insight into their structure and function. However, most gene circuits in a cell are under control of external signals and thus, quantitative agreement between experimental data and a mathematical model is difficult. Circadian biology has been one notable exception: quantitative models of the internal clock that orchestrates biological processes over the 24-hour diurnal cycle have been constructed for a few organisms, from cyanobacteria to plants and mammals. In most cases, a complex architecture with interlocked feedback loops has been evidenced. Here we present the first modeling results for the circadian clock of the green unicellular alga Ostreococcus tauri. Two plant-like clock genes have been shown to play a central role in the Ostreococcus clock. We find that their expression time profiles can be accurately reproduced by a minimal model of a two-gene transcriptional feedback loop. Remarkably, best adjustment of data recorded under light/dark alternation is obtained when assuming that the oscillator is not coupled to the diurnal cycle. This suggests that coupling to light is confined to specific time intervals and has no dynamical effect when the oscillator is entrained by the diurnal cycle. This intriguing property may reflect a strategy to minimize the impact of fluctuations in daylight intensity on the core circadian oscillator, a type of perturbation that has been rarely considered when assessing the robustness of circadian clocks.

  3. Circadian Rhythms in Fear Conditioning: An Overview of Behavioral, Brain System, and Molecular Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of fear memories is a powerful and highly evolutionary conserved mechanism that serves the behavioral adaptation to environmental threats. Accordingly, classical fear conditioning paradigms have been employed to investigate fundamental molecular processes of memory formation. Evidence suggests that a circadian regulation mechanism allows for a timestamping of such fear memories and controlling memory salience during both their acquisition and their modification after retrieval. These mechanisms include an expression of molecular clocks in neurons of the amygdala, hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex and their tight interaction with the intracellular signaling pathways that mediate neural plasticity and information storage. The cellular activities are coordinated across different brain regions and neural circuits through the release of glucocorticoids and neuromodulators such as acetylcholine, which integrate circadian and memory-related activation. Disturbance of this interplay by circadian phase shifts or traumatic experience appears to be an important factor in the development of stress-related psychopathology, considering these circadian components are of critical importance for optimizing therapeutic approaches to these disorders.

  4. Association study of 21 circadian genes with bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Hader A; Talkowski, Michael E; Wood, Joel; Chowdari, Kodavali V; McClain, Lora; Prasad, Konasale; Montrose, Debra; Fagiolini, Andrea; Friedman, Edward S; Allen, Michael H; Bowden, Charles L; Calabrese, Joseph; El-Mallakh, Rif S; Escamilla, Michael; Faraone, Stephen V; Fossey, Mark D; Gyulai, Laszlo; Loftis, Jennifer M; Hauser, Peter; Ketter, Terence A; Marangell, Lauren B; Miklowitz, David J; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Patel, Jayendra; Sachs, Gary S; Sklar, Pamela; Smoller, Jordan W; Laird, Nan; Keshavan, Matcheri; Thase, Michael E; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris; Lewis, David; Monk, Tim; Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David J; Devlin, Bernie; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L

    2009-11-01

    Published studies suggest associations between circadian gene polymorphisms and bipolar I disorder (BPI), as well as schizoaffective disorder (SZA) and schizophrenia (SZ). The results are plausible, based on prior studies of circadian abnormalities. As replications have not been attempted uniformly, we evaluated representative, common polymorphisms in all three disorders. We assayed 276 publicly available 'tag' single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 21 circadian genes among 523 patients with BPI, 527 patients with SZ/SZA, and 477 screened adult controls. Detected associations were evaluated in relation to two published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Using gene-based tests, suggestive associations were noted between EGR3 and BPI (p = 0.017), and between NPAS2 and SZ/SZA (p = 0.034). Three SNPs were associated with both sets of disorders (NPAS2: rs13025524 and rs11123857; RORB: rs10491929; p < 0.05). None of the associations remained significant following corrections for multiple comparisons. Approximately 15% of the analyzed SNPs overlapped with an independent study that conducted GWAS for BPI; suggestive overlap between the GWAS analyses and ours was noted at ARNTL. Several suggestive, novel associations were detected with circadian genes and BPI and SZ/SZA, but the present analyses do not support associations with common polymorphisms that confer risk with odds ratios greater than 1.5. Additional analyses using adequately powered samples are warranted to further evaluate these results.

  5. Relationships between the circadian system and Alzheimer's disease-like symptoms in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani M Long

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks coordinate physiological, neurological, and behavioral functions into circa 24 hour rhythms, and the molecular mechanisms underlying circadian clock oscillations are conserved from Drosophila to humans. Clock oscillations and clock-controlled rhythms are known to dampen during aging; additionally, genetic or environmental clock disruption leads to accelerated aging and increased susceptibility to age-related pathologies. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD, are associated with a decay of circadian rhythms, but it is not clear whether circadian disruption accelerates neuronal and motor decline associated with these diseases. To address this question, we utilized transgenic Drosophila expressing various Amyloid-β (Aβ peptides, which are prone to form aggregates characteristic of AD pathology in humans. We compared development of AD-like symptoms in adult flies expressing Aβ peptides in the wild type background and in flies with clocks disrupted via a null mutation in the clock gene period (per01. No significant differences were observed in longevity, climbing ability and brain neurodegeneration levels between control and clock-deficient flies, suggesting that loss of clock function does not exacerbate pathogenicity caused by human-derived Aβ peptides in flies. However, AD-like pathologies affected the circadian system in aging flies. We report that rest/activity rhythms were impaired in an age-dependent manner. Flies expressing the highly pathogenic arctic Aβ peptide showed a dramatic degradation of these rhythms in tune with their reduced longevity and impaired climbing ability. At the same time, the central pacemaker remained intact in these flies providing evidence that expression of Aβ peptides causes rhythm degradation downstream from the central clock mechanism.

  6. On the origin and the consequences of circadian abnormalities in patients with cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnese, Sara; Middleton, Benita; Mani, Ali R; Skene, Debra J; Morgan, Marsha Y

    2010-08-01

    Plasma melatonin profile abnormalities have been described in patients with cirrhosis and generally attributed to impaired hepatic melatonin metabolism. The possibility that they might reflect circadian clock dysfunction has not been explored. In addition, the relationship between plasma melatonin profiles and the sleep disturbances observed in these patients remains unclear. The aims of this study were: (i) to evaluate circadian clock function and hepatic melatonin metabolism in cirrhotic patients, and (ii) to study the relationship between plasma melatonin profiles and sleep-wake behavior. The study population comprised 20 patients with cirrhosis (mean (range) age, 59 (39-77) years) and 9 healthy volunteers (60 (38-84) years). Plasma melatonin/cortisol concentrations were measured hourly, for 24 h, in light/posture-controlled conditions. Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, the main melatonin metabolite, was measured simultaneously to determine clearance. The ability of light to suppress nocturnal melatonin synthesis was assessed. Habitual sleep quality/timing was evaluated using a questionnaire, actigraphy, and sleep diaries. There was evidence of central circadian disruption in patients compared with healthy controls: peak plasma melatonin/cortisol times were delayed (04:48+/-02:36 vs. 02:48+/-00:54, P=0.01; 10:18+/-02:54 vs. 08:54+/-01:24, P=0.06) and the plasma melatonin response to light was reduced (12%+/-19% vs. 24%+/-15%, P=0.09). However, the mean 24 h plasma melatonin clearance did not differ significantly between patients and healthy volunteers (0.22+/-0.10 vs. 0.28+/-0.17 l/kg per h, P=0.36). Finally, although patients showed a degree of misalignment between sleep and circadian timings, there was no association between circadian abnormalities and impaired sleep quality. Plasma melatonin profile abnormalities, predominantly central in origin, are observed in patients with mild to moderately decompensated cirrhosis. However, they are substantially unrelated to

  7. Neuroendocrine underpinnings of sex differences in circadian timing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lily; Silver, Rae

    2016-06-01

    There are compelling reasons to study the role of steroids and sex differences in the circadian timing system. A solid history of research demonstrates the ubiquity of circadian changes that impact virtually all behavioral and biological responses. Furthermore, steroid hormones can modulate every attribute of circadian responses including the period, amplitude and phase. Finally, desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity, and either enhancing or damping amplitude of various circadian responses can produce different effects in the sexes. Studies of the neuroendocrine underpinnings of circadian timing systems and underlying sex differences have paralleled the overall development of the field as a whole. Early experimental studies established the ubiquity of circadian rhythms by cataloging daily and seasonal changes in whole organism responses. The next generation of experiments demonstrated that daily changes are not a result of environmental synchronizing cues, and are internally orchestrated, and that these differ in the sexes. This work was followed by the revelation of molecular circadian rhythms within individual cells. At present, there is a proliferation of work on the consequences of these daily oscillations in health and in disease, and awareness that these may differ in the sexes. In the present discourse we describe the paradigms used to examine circadian oscillation, to characterize how these internal timing signals are synchronized to local environmental conditions, and how hormones of gonadal and/or adrenal origin modulate circadian responses. Evidence pointing to endocrinologically and genetically mediated sex differences in circadian timing systems can be seen at many levels of the neuroendocrine and endocrine systems, from the cell, the gland and organ, and to whole animal behavior, including sleep/wake or rest/activity cycles, responses to external stimuli, and responses to drugs. We review evidence indicating that the analysis of the circadian

  8. Circadian phase, dynamics of subjective sleepiness and sensitivity to blue light in young adults complaining of a delayed sleep schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moderie, Christophe; Van der Maren, Solenne; Dumont, Marie

    2017-06-01

    To assess factors that might contribute to a delayed sleep schedule in young adults with sub-clinical features of delayed sleep phase disorder. Two groups of 14 young adults (eight women) were compared: one group complaining of a delayed sleep schedule and a control group with an earlier bedtime and no complaint. For one week, each subject maintained a target bedtime reflecting their habitual sleep schedule. Subjects were then admitted to the laboratory for the assessment of circadian phase (dim light melatonin onset), subjective sleepiness, and non-visual light sensitivity. All measures were timed relative to each participant's target bedtime. Non-visual light sensitivity was evaluated using subjective sleepiness and salivary melatonin during 1.5-h exposure to blue light, starting one hour after target bedtime. Compared to control subjects, delayed subjects had a later circadian phase and a slower increase of subjective sleepiness in the late evening. There was no group difference in non-visual sensitivity to blue light, but we found a positive correlation between melatonin suppression and circadian phase within the delayed group. Our results suggest that a late circadian phase, a slow build-up of sleep need, and an increased circadian sensitivity to blue light contribute to the complaint of a delayed sleep schedule. These findings provide targets for strategies aiming to decreasing the severity of a sleep delay and the negative consequences on daytime functioning and health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The circadian variation of premature atrial contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjørn Strøier; Kumarathurai, Preman; Nielsen, Olav W

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to assess a possible circadian variation of premature atrial contractions (PACs) in a community-based population and to determine if the daily variation could be used to assess a more vulnerable period of PACs in predicting later incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF...... subgroups were studied based on a cut-off point of ≥720 PACs/day termed frequent PACs (n = 66) and not frequent PACs with ... variation in heart rate. After adjusting for relevant risk factors, the risk of AF was equal in all time intervals throughout the day. CONCLUSION: Premature atrial contractions showed a circadian variation in subjects with frequent PACs. No specific time interval of the day was more predictive of AF than...

  10. Sleep, circadian rhythms, and athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thun, Eirunn; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Flo, Elisabeth; Harris, Anette; Pallesen, Ståle

    2015-10-01

    Sleep deprivation and time of day are both known to influence performance. A growing body of research has focused on how sleep and circadian rhythms impact athletic performance. This review provides a systematic overview of this research. We searched three different databases for articles on these issues and inspected relevant reference lists. In all, 113 articles met our inclusion criteria. The most robust result is that athletic performance seems to be best in the evening around the time when the core body temperature typically is at its peak. Sleep deprivation was negatively associated with performance whereas sleep extension seems to improve performance. The effects of desynchronization of circadian rhythms depend on the local time at which performance occurs. The review includes a discussion of differences regarding types of skills involved as well as methodological issues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Circadian clock, cell cycle and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansu Özbayer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a few rhythms of our daily lives that we are under the influence. One of them is characterized by predictable changes over a 24-hour timescale called circadian clock. This cellular clock is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the anterior hypothalamus. The clock consist of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop compose of four genes/proteins; BMAL1, Clock, Cyrptochrome, and Period. BMAL 1 and Clock are transcriptional factors and Period and Cyrptochrome are their targets. Period and Cyrptochrome dimerize in the cytoplasm to enter the nucleus where they inhibit Clock/BMAL activity.It has been demonstrate that circadian clock plays an important role cellular proliferation, DNA damage and repair mechanisms, checkpoints, apoptosis and cancer.

  12. Circadian time structure of circulating plasma lipid peroxides, antioxidant enzymes and other small molecules in peptic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ranjana; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Masood, Tariq; Tripathi, Anil Kumar; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Singh, Raj Kumar; Schwartzkopff, Othild; Cornelissen, Germaine

    2015-12-07

    The circadian rhythm, as part of a broad time structure (chronome) of lipid peroxides and antioxidant defense mechanisms may relate to prevention, efficacy and management of preventive and curative chronotherapy. Fifty newly diagnosed patients with peptic ulcers, 30-45 years of age, and 60 age-matched clinically healthy volunteers were synchronized for one week with diurnal activity from about 06:00 to about 22:00 and nocturnal rest. Breakfast was served around 08:30, lunch around 13:30 and dinner around 20:30. Drugs known to affect the free-radical systems were not taken. Blood samples were collected at 6-hour intervals for 24h under standardized, presumably 24-hour synchronized conditions. Plasma lipid peroxides, in the form of malondialdehyde (MDA), blood superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxide (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT) activities, and serum total protein, albumin, ascorbic acid, total serum cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol concentrations were determined. By population-mean cosinor analysis, a marked circadian variation was demonstrated for all variables in healthy subjects and in ulcer patients (p<0.001). As compared to controls, patients had a lower MESOR of MDA, SOD, GPx, GR, ascorbic acid, and HDL-C. They also had smaller circadian amplitude of SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, ascorbic acid, T-C, and HDL-C, but larger circadian amplitude of MDA and albumin. As compared to healthy subjects, the circadian acrophase of ulcer patients occurred later for MDA and GR and earlier for GPx. Mapping circadian rhythms, important chronome components that include trends with age and extra-circadian components characterizing antioxidants and pro-oxidants, is needed for exploring their putative role as markers in the treatment and management of peptic ulcers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Toward a complex system understanding of bipolar disorder: A chaotic model of abnormal circadian activity rhythms in euthymic bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaeghi, Fatemeh; Hashemi Golpayegani, Mohammad Reza; Jafari, Sajad; Murray, Greg

    2016-08-01

    In the absence of a comprehensive neural model to explain the underlying mechanisms of disturbed circadian function in bipolar disorder, mathematical modeling is a helpful tool. Here, circadian activity as a response to exogenous daily cycles is proposed to be the product of interactions between neuronal networks in cortical (cognitive processing) and subcortical (pacemaker) areas of the brain. To investigate the dynamical aspects of the link between disturbed circadian activity rhythms and abnormalities of neurotransmitter functioning in frontal areas of the brain, we developed a novel mathematical model of a chaotic system which represents fluctuations in circadian activity in bipolar disorder as changes in the model's parameters. A novel map-based chaotic system was developed to capture disturbances in circadian activity across the two extreme mood states of bipolar disorder. The model uses chaos theory to characterize interplay between neurotransmitter functions and rhythm generation; it aims to illuminate key activity phenomenology in bipolar disorder, including prolonged sleep intervals, decreased total activity and attenuated amplitude of the diurnal activity rhythm. To test our new cortical-circadian mathematical model of bipolar disorder, we utilized previously collected locomotor activity data recorded from normal subjects and bipolar patients by wrist-worn actigraphs. All control parameters in the proposed model have an important role in replicating the different aspects of circadian activity rhythm generation in the brain. The model can successfully replicate deviations in sleep/wake time intervals corresponding to manic and depressive episodes of bipolar disorder, in which one of the excitatory or inhibitory pathways is abnormally dominant. Although neuroimaging research has strongly implicated a reciprocal interaction between cortical and subcortical regions as pathogenic in bipolar disorder, this is the first model to mathematically represent this

  14. Circadian molecular clocks tick along ontogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sumová, Alena; Bendová, Zdeňka; Sládek, Martin; El-Hennamy, Rehab; Matějů, Kristýna; Polidarová, Lenka; Sosniyenko, Serhiy; Illnerová, Helena

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, Suppl.3 (2008), S139-S148 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/08/0503; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110605; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSH-2004-115-4-018741 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : circadian clock * ontogenesis * suprachiasmatic nucleus Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  15. Glaucoma alters the circadian timing system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Drouyer

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a widespread ocular disease and major cause of blindness characterized by progressive, irreversible damage of the optic nerve. Although the degenerative loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC and visual deficits associated with glaucoma have been extensively studied, we hypothesize that glaucoma will also lead to alteration of the circadian timing system. Circadian and non-visual responses to light are mediated by a specialized subset of melanopsin expressing RGCs that provide photic input to mammalian endogenous clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. In order to explore the molecular, anatomical and functional consequences of glaucoma we used a rodent model of chronic ocular hypertension, a primary causal factor of the pathology. Quantitative analysis of retinal projections using sensitive anterograde tracing demonstrates a significant reduction (approximately 50-70% of RGC axon terminals in all visual and non-visual structures and notably in the SCN. The capacity of glaucomatous rats to entrain to light was challenged by exposure to successive shifts of the light dark (LD cycle associated with step-wise decreases in light intensity. Although glaucomatous rats are able to entrain their locomotor activity to the LD cycle at all light levels, they require more time to re-adjust to a shifted LD cycle and show significantly greater variability in activity onsets in comparison with normal rats. Quantitative PCR reveals the novel finding that melanopsin as well as rod and cone opsin mRNAs are significantly reduced in glaucomatous retinas. Our findings demonstrate that glaucoma impacts on all these aspects of the circadian timing system. In light of these results, the classical view of glaucoma as pathology unique to the visual system should be extended to include anatomical and functional alterations of the circadian timing system.

  16. Principles for circadian orchestration of metabolic pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Thurley, Kevin; Herbst, Christopher; Wesener, Felix; Koller, Barbara; Wallach, Thomas; Maier, Bert; Kramer, Achim; Westermark, Pål O

    2017-01-01

    Circadian (24-h) rhythms influence the behavior and physiology of many organisms. These rhythms are generated at the gene expression level, causing the waxing and waning of protein abundances. Metabolic enzymes are affected, but the principles for the propagation of enzyme rhythmicity to cellular metabolism as quantified by fluxes through metabolic pathways and metabolite concentrations are not understood. We used the mathematics of chemical kinetics to systematically investigate how rhythms ...

  17. The circadian clock, reward and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs eAlbrecht

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available During our daily activities, we experience variations in our cognitive performance, which is often accompanied by cravings for small rewards, such as consuming coffee or chocolate. This indicates that the time of day, cognitive performance and reward may be related to one another. This review will summarize data that describes the influence of the circadian clock on addiction and mood-related behavior and put the data into perspective in relation to memory processes.

  18. Clinical Trial of Exercise on Circadian Clock Resetting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Czeisler, Charles

    2001-01-01

    ...: test the hypothesis that multiple nightly bouts of exercise will induce significant delays in the endogenous circadian rhythms of core body temperature, plasma melatonin, reaction time, alertness...

  19. Endotoxin Disrupts Circadian Rhythms in Macrophages via Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusi Wang

    Full Text Available The circadian clock is a transcriptional network that functions to regulate the expression of genes important in the anticipation of changes in cellular and organ function. Recent studies have revealed that the recognition of pathogens and subsequent initiation of inflammatory responses are strongly regulated by a macrophage-intrinsic circadian clock. We hypothesized that the circadian pattern of gene expression might be influenced by inflammatory stimuli and that loss of circadian function in immune cells can promote pro-inflammatory behavior. To investigate circadian rhythms in inflammatory cells, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from mPer2luciferase transgenic mice and circadian oscillations were studied in response to stimuli. Using Cosinor analysis, we found that LPS significantly altered the circadian period in peritoneal macrophages from mPer2luciferase mice while qPCR data suggested that the pattern of expression of the core circadian gene (Bmal1 was disrupted. Inhibition of TLR4 offered protection from the LPS-induced impairment in rhythm, suggesting a role for toll-like receptor signaling. To explore the mechanisms involved, we inhibited LPS-stimulated NO and superoxide. Inhibition of NO synthesis with L-NAME had no effect on circadian rhythms. In contrast, inhibition of superoxide with Tempol or PEG-SOD ameliorated the LPS-induced changes in circadian periodicity. In gain of function experiments, we found that overexpression of NOX5, a source of ROS, could significantly disrupt circadian function in a circadian reporter cell line (U2OS whereas iNOS overexpression, a source of NO, was ineffective. To assess whether alteration of circadian rhythms influences macrophage function, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from Bmal1-KO and Per-TKO mice. Compared to WT macrophages, macrophages from circadian knockout mice exhibited altered balance between NO and ROS release, increased uptake of oxLDL and increased adhesion and migration

  20. Imaging Multidimensional Therapeutically Relevant Circadian Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Singletary

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks gate cellular proliferation and, thereby, therapeutically target availability within proliferative pathways. This temporal coordination occurs within both cancerous and noncancerous proliferating tissues. The timing within the circadian cycle of the administration of drugs targeting proliferative pathways necessarily impacts the amount of damage done to proliferating tissues and cancers. Concurrently measuring target levels and associated key pathway components in normal and malignant tissues around the circadian clock provides a path toward a fuller understanding of the temporal relationships among the physiologic processes governing the therapeutic index of antiproliferative anticancer therapies. The temporal ordering among these relationships, paramount to determining causation, is less well understood using two- or three-dimensional representations. We have created multidimensional multimedia depictions of the temporal unfolding of putatively causative and the resultant therapeutic effects of a drug that specifically targets these ordered processes at specific times of the day. The systems and methods used to create these depictions are provided, as well as three example supplementary movies.

  1. Circadian and sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Golombek, Diego

    2013-05-01

    Impaired sleep and alertness, initially recognized by James Parkinson in his famous monograph "An Essay on the Shaking Palsy" in 1817, is one of the most common and disabling nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). It is only recently, however, that sleep disturbances in PD have received the attention of medical and research community. Dopamine, the major neurotransmitter implicated in the pathogenesis of PD, plays a pivotal role in the regulation of sleep and circadian homeostasis. Sleep dysfunction affects up to 90% of patients with PD, and may precede the onset of the disease by decades. Sleep dysfunction in PD may be categorized into disturbances of overnight sleep and daytime alertness. Etiology of impaired sleep and alertness in PD is multifactorial. Co-existent primary sleep disorders, medication side effects, overnight re-emergence of motor symptoms, and primary neurodegeneration itself, are main causes of sleep disruption and excessive daytime sleepiness among patients with PD. Increasing body of evidence suggests that the circadian system becomes dysregulated in PD, which may lead to poor sleep and alertness. Treatment options are limited and frequently associated with unwanted side effects. Further studies that will examine pathophysiology of sleep dysfunction in PD, and focus on novel treatment approaches are therefore very much needed. In this article we review the role of dopamine in regulation of sleep and alertness and discuss main sleep and circadian disturbances associated with PD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Links between circadian rhythms and psychiatric disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilia N Karatsoreos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Determining the cause of psychiatric disorders is a goal of modern neuroscience, and will hopefully lead to the discovery of treatments to either prevent or alleviate the suffering caused by these diseases. One roadblock to attaining this goal is the realization that neuropsychiatric diseases are rarely due to a single gene polymorphism, environmental exposure, or developmental insult. Rather, it is a complex interaction between these various influences that likely leads to the development of clinically relevant syndromes. Our lab is exploring the links between environmental exposures and neurobehavioral function by investigating how disruption of the circadian (daily clock alters the structure and function of neural circuits, with the hypothesis that disrupting this crucial homeostatic system can directly contribute to altered vulnerability of the organism to other factors that interact to produce psychiatric illness. This review explores some historical and more recent findings that link disrupted circadian clocks to neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression, mania, and schizophrenia. We take a comparative approach by exploring the effects observed in human populations, as well as some experimental models used in the laboratory to unravel mechanistic and causal relationships between disruption of the circadian clock and behavioral abnormalities. This is a rich area of research that we predict will contribute greatly to our understanding of how genes, environment, and development interact to modulate an individual’s vulnerability to psychiatric disorders.

  3. Factors influencing circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, R C; Bozigian, H P; Davies, M H; Merrick, B A; Park, K S; McMillan, D A

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of changes in lighting schedules and food consumption on circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels in male mice. Under a normal lighting schedule (light: 06.00-18.00 h), male mice exhibited a circadian rhythm in acetaminophen lethality (peak: 18.00 h; nadir: 06.00, 10.00 h) and an inverse rhythm in hepatic glutathione concentrations (peak: 06.00, 10.00 h; nadir: 18.00 h). Under a reversed lighting schedule (light: 18.00-06.00 h) the glutathione rhythm was reversed and the rhythm in acetaminophen lethality was altered showing greater sensitivity to the drug. Under continuous light, there was a shift in the acetaminophen lethality and the hepatic glutathione rhythms. Under continuous dark, both rhythms were abolished. Under a normal lighting regimen, hepatic glutathione levels were closely correlated with food consumption; i.e., both were increased during the dark phase and decreased during the light phase. Fasting the mice for 12 h abolished the rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels; moreover, the lethality was increased and the hepatic glutathione levels were decreased. These experiments show that both lighting schedules and feeding can alter the circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels in male mice.

  4. Work related injuries; impact of circadian rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Hosseini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Work related injuries make up a major part of traumatic injuries, which inflict a financial burden and huge costs on the family and society. Work related injuries result in loss of a work force of a country on one hand and cause the family to lose its financial support on the other. Therefore, this type of injury has attracted much attention. Although numerous variables play a role in occurrence of these accidents, the effect of physiologic factors cannot be overlooked in this regard. For example interference of night working shifts with the natural circadian rhythm of the body is among these factors. Age, decreased physical strength, tiredness and extent of light are among other factors that affect the level of consciousness in an individual and may lead to work related traumas. In recent years, the role of circadian rhythm in occurrence of work related traumas has been widely considered. Circadian rhythm is formed as a result of a number of clock genes in suprachiasmatic nucleus and other organs of the body. Circadian rhythm is associated with significant changes in hormone secretion and level of consciousness in an individual. Rhythms desynchrony is a phenomenon seen in those that work during the night and sleep during the day and is accompanied by increased risk of work related accidents. For example in a systematic review assessing 13 studies, it was revealed that working night shifts is associated with increased risk of work related accidents. However, there is still controversy regarding the net effect of night shifts in incidence of work related accidents. One question that has not been answered yet is that if an individual works night shifts for a long time, is their circadian rhythm affected or not? On the other hand, can using strategies that improve level of consciousness (such as using blue light in the work place decrease the incidence of these accidents? Are changes in sleep and wake conditions alone able to alter the expression

  5. Maternal and Early-Life Circadian Disruption Have Long-Lasting Negative Consequences on Offspring Development and Adult Behavior in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarr, Benjamin L; Grant, Azure D; Perez, Luz; Zucker, Irving; Kriegsfeld, Lance J

    2017-06-12

    Modern life involves chronic circadian disruption through artificial light and these disruptions are associated with numerous mental and physical health maladies. Because the developing nervous system is particularly vulnerable to perturbation, we hypothesized that early-life circadian disruption would negatively impact offspring development and adult function. Pregnant mice were subjected to chronic circadian disruption from the time of uterine implantation through weaning. To dissociate in utero from postnatal effects, a subset of litters was cross-fostered at birth from disrupted dams to control dams and vice versa. Postnatal circadian disruption was associated with reduced adult body mass, social avoidance, and hyperactivity. In utero disruption resulted in more pronounced social avoidance and hyperactivity, phenotypes not abrogated by cross-fostering to control mothers. To examine whether circadian disruption affects development by acting as an early life stressor, we examined birthweight, litter size, maternal cannibalism, and epigenetic modifications. None of these variables differed between control and disrupted dams, or resembled patterns seen following early-life stress. Our findings indicate that developmental chronic circadian disruption permanently affects somatic and behavioral development in a stage-of-life-dependent manner, independent of early life stress mechanisms, underscoring the importance of temporal structure during development, both in utero and early postnatal life.

  6. Rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy show reduced cGMP-dependent protein kinase activity in hypothalamus correlating with circadian rhythms alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipo, Vicente; Piedrafita, Blanca; Barios, Juan A; Agustí, Ana; Ahabrach, Hanan; Romero-Vives, María; Barrio, Luis C; Rey, Beatriz; Gaztelu, Jose M; Llansola, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Patients with liver cirrhosis show disturbances in sleep and in its circadian rhythms which are an early sign of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). The mechanisms of these disturbances are poorly understood. Rats with porta-caval shunt (PCS), a model of MHE, show sleep disturbances reproducing those of cirrhotic patients. The aims of this work were to characterize the alterations in circadian rhythms in PCS rats and analyze the underlying mechanisms. To reach these aims, we analyzed in control and PCS rats: (a) daily rhythms of spontaneous and rewarding activity and of temperature, (b) timing of the onset of activity following turning-off the light, (c) synchronization to light after a phase advance and (d) the molecular mechanisms contributing to these alterations in circadian rhythms. PCS rats show altered circadian rhythms of spontaneous and rewarding activities (wheel running). PCS rats show more rest bouts during the active phase, more errors in the onset of motor activity and need less time to re-synchronize after a phase advance than control rats. Circadian rhythm of body temperature is also slightly altered in PCS rats. The internal period length (tau) of circadian rhythm of motor activity is longer in PCS rats. We analyzed some mechanisms by which hypothalamus modulate circadian rhythms. PCS rats show increased content of cGMP in hypothalamus while the activity of cGMP-dependent protein kinase was reduced by 41% compared to control rats. Altered cGMP-PKG pathway in hypothalamus would contribute to altered circadian rhythms and synchronization to light.

  7. Circadian variations in melatonin and cortisol in patients with cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, G; Sharma, V P; Verma, N S

    2016-05-01

    In cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI), afferent and efferent circuits that influence the basal production of melatonin and cortisol may be disrupted and hence disrupt the basal functions of human physiology. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess circadian changes, if any, in serum cortisol and melatonin in patients with CSCI. Serum levels of cortisol and melatonin were measured at 6-h intervals of the day (0600, 1200, 1800 and 0000 hours) in 22 CSCI patients, as well as 22 healthy controls. Significantly higher melatonin levels were observed in the patient group in morning hours, whereas a significantly lower level of melatonin was found during the night time in the patient group than in the control group. Moreover, significantly higher values were obtained in the evening and night time serum cortisol levels among the patients compared with controls. Further, when the mean values of cortisol throughout the day were tested among patient and control groups similar circadian rhythm was found. The only difference being that serum cortisol declined much more in controls in evening and night samples as compared with CSCI patients. We conclude that circadian variations exist in the circulating levels of serum cortisol and melatonin in patients with CSCI. Low levels of melatonin secretion during night may contribute to the pervasive sleep disruption and increased pain perception.

  8. Stochastic models of cellular circadian rhythms in plants help to understand the impact of noise on robustness and clock structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa eGuerriero

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic behavior is essential for plants; for example, daily (circadian rhythms control photosynthesis and seasonal rhythms regulate their life cycle. The core of the circadian clock is a genetic network that coordinates the expression of specific clock genes in a circadian rhythm reflecting the 24-hour day/night cycle.Circadian clocks exhibit stochastic noise due to the low copy numbers of clock genes and the consequent cell-to-cell variation: this intrinsic noise plays a major role in circadian clocks by inducing more robust oscillatory behavior. Another source of noise is the environment, which causes variation in temperature and light intensity: this extrinsic noise is part of the requirement for the structural complexity of clock networks.Advances in experimental techniques now permit single-cell measurements and the development of single-cell models. Here we present some modeling studies showing the importance of considering both types of noise in understanding how plants adapt to regular and irregular light variations. Stochastic models have proven useful for understanding the effect of regular variations. By contrast, the impact of irregular variations and the interaction of different noise sources are less studied.

  9. Stochastic models of cellular circadian rhythms in plants help to understand the impact of noise on robustness and clock structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Maria L.; Akman, Ozgur E.; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Rhythmic behavior is essential for plants; for example, daily (circadian) rhythms control photosynthesis and seasonal rhythms regulate their life cycle. The core of the circadian clock is a genetic network that coordinates the expression of specific clock genes in a circadian rhythm reflecting the 24-h day/night cycle. Circadian clocks exhibit stochastic noise due to the low copy numbers of clock genes and the consequent cell-to-cell variation: this intrinsic noise plays a major role in circadian clocks by inducing more robust oscillatory behavior. Another source of noise is the environment, which causes variation in temperature and light intensity: this extrinsic noise is part of the requirement for the structural complexity of clock networks. Advances in experimental techniques now permit single-cell measurements and the development of single-cell models. Here we present some modeling studies showing the importance of considering both types of noise in understanding how plants adapt to regular and irregular light variations. Stochastic models have proven useful for understanding the effect of regular variations. By contrast, the impact of irregular variations and the interaction of different noise sources are less well studied. PMID:25374576

  10. Circadian modification network of a core clock driver BMAL1 to harmonize physiology from brain to peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaru, Teruya; Takamatsu, Ken

    2018-01-03

    Circadian clocks dictate various physiological functions by brain SCN (a central clock) -orchestrating the temporal harmony of peripheral clocks of tissues/organs in the whole body, with adaptability to environments by resetting their timings. Dysfunction of this circadian adaptation system (CAS) occasionally causes/exacerbates diseases. CAS is based on cell-autonomous molecular clocks, which oscillate via a core transcriptional/translational feedback loop with clock genes/proteins, e.g., BMAL1: CLOCK circadian transcription driver and CRY1/2 and PER1/2 suppressors, and is modulated by various regulatory loops including clock protein modifications. Among mutants with a single clock gene, BMAL1-deficient mice exhibit the most drastic loss of circadian functions. Here, we highlight on numerous circadian protein modifications of mammalian BMAL1, e.g., multiple phosphorylations, SUMOylation, ubiquitination, acetylation, O-GlcNAcylation and S-nitrosylation, which mutually interplay to control molecular clocks and coordinate physiological functions from the brain to peripheral tissues through the input and output of the clocks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An endogenous circadian rhythm in sleep inertia results in greatest cognitive impairment upon awakening during the biological night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Frank A J L; Shea, Thomas J; Hilton, Michael F; Shea, Steven A

    2008-08-01

    Sleep inertia is the impaired cognitive performance immediately upon awakening, which decays over tens of minutes. This phenomenon has relevance to people who need to make important decisions soon after awakening, such as on-call emergency workers. Such awakenings can occur at varied times of day or night, so the objective of the study was to determine whether or not the magnitude of sleep inertia varies according to the phase of the endogenous circadian cycle. Twelve adults (mean, 24 years; 7 men) with no medical disorders other than mild asthma were studied. Following 2 baseline days and nights, subjects underwent a forced desynchrony protocol composed of seven 28-h sleep/wake cycles, while maintaining a sleep/wakefulness ratio of 1:2 throughout. Subjects were awakened by a standardized auditory stimulus 3 times each sleep period for sleep inertia assessments. The magnitude of sleep inertia was quantified as the change in cognitive performance (number of correct additions in a 2-min serial addition test) across the first 20 min of wakefulness. Circadian phase was estimated from core body temperature (fitted temperature minimum assigned 0 degrees ). Data were segregated according to: (1) circadian phase (60 degrees bins); (2) sleep stage; and (3) 3rd of the night after which awakenings occurred (i.e., tertiary 1, 2, or 3). To control for any effect of sleep stage, the circadian rhythm of sleep inertia was initially assessed following awakenings from Stage 2 (62% of awakening occurred from this stage; n = 110). This revealed a significant circadian rhythm in the sleep inertia of cognitive performance (p = 0.007), which was 3.6 times larger during the biological night (circadian bin 300 degrees , approximately 2300-0300 h in these subjects) than during the biological day (bin 180 degrees , approximately 1500-1900 h). The circadian rhythm in sleep inertia was still present when awakenings from all sleep stages were included (p = 0.004), and this rhythm could not be

  12. Circadian Modulation of Short-Term Memory in "Drosophila"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Lisa C.; Roman, Gregg

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous biological clocks are widespread regulators of behavior and physiology, allowing for a more efficient allocation of efforts and resources over the course of a day. The extent that different processes are regulated by circadian oscillators, however, is not fully understood. We investigated the role of the circadian clock on short-term…

  13. Why and how do we model circadian rhythms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, DGM

    In our attempts to understand the circadian system, we unavoidably rely on abstractions. Instead of describing the behavior of the circadian system in all its complexity, we try to derive basic features from which we form a global concept on how the system works. Such a basic concept is a model of

  14. Circadian variation of urinary albumin excretion in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, C. E.; van der Post, J. A.; van Acker, B. A.; Boer, K.; Koopman, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The hypothesis was tested that circadian variations in urinary albumin excretion of pregnant women in the third trimester of normal pregnancy are different from nonpregnant individuals. DESIGN: Circadian variability in urinary albumin excretion was studied both in pregnant women and in

  15. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uduak S. Udoh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases.

  16. Discrepancy between circadian rhythms of inulin and creatinine clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Acker, B. A.; Koomen, G. C.; Koopman, M. G.; Krediet, R. T.; Arisz, L.

    1992-01-01

    To elucidate the disparity between circadian rhythmicity of inulin and creatinine clearance, we simultaneously measured inulin and creatinine clearances every 3 hours during 1 day in 14 normal subjects and in 8 patients with nephrotic syndrome. All patients and normal subjects had a circadian rhythm

  17. Diurnal Oscillations of Soybean Circadian Clock and Drought Responsive Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolino-Gomes, Juliana; Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Fuganti-Pagliarini, Renata; Bendix, Claire; Nakayama, Thiago Jonas; Celaya, Brandon; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa; de Oliveira, Maria Cristina Neves; Harmon, Frank G.; Nepomuceno, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i) drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii) several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans. PMID:24475115

  18. Identification of circadian clock modulators from existing drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, T Katherine; Nakane, Yusuke; Ota, Wataru; Kobayashi, Akane; Ishiguro, Masateru; Kadofusa, Naoya; Ikegami, Keisuke; Yagita, Kazuhiro; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Sudo, Masaki; Nishiwaki-Ohkawa, Taeko; Sato, Ayato; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2018-04-17

    Chronic circadian disruption due to shift work or frequent travel across time zones leads to jet-lag and an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. The development of new pharmaceuticals to treat circadian disorders, however, is costly and hugely time-consuming. We therefore performed a high-throughput chemical screen of existing drugs for circadian clock modulators in human U2OS cells, with the aim of repurposing known bioactive compounds. Approximately 5% of the drugs screened altered circadian period, including the period-shortening compound dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA; also known as prasterone). DHEA is one of the most abundant circulating steroid hormones in humans and is available as a dietary supplement in the USA Dietary administration of DHEA to mice shortened free-running circadian period and accelerated re-entrainment to advanced light-dark (LD) cycles, thereby reducing jet-lag. Our drug screen also revealed the involvement of tyrosine kinases, ABL1 and ABL2, and the BCR serine/threonine kinase in regulating circadian period. Thus, drug repurposing is a useful approach to identify new circadian clock modulators and potential therapies for circadian disorders. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  19. Circadian profile of cardiac autonomic nervous modulation in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Richardt, Gert; Potratz, Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Circadian Profile of Heart Rate Variability. INTRODUCTION: Although heart rate variability (HRV) has been established as a tool to study cardiac autonomic activity, almost no data are available on the circadian patterns of HRV in healthy subjects aged 20 to 70 years. METHODS AND RESULTS...

  20. Bidirectional Interactions between Circadian Entrainment and Cognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritton, Howard J.; Kantorowski, Ana; Sarter, Martin; Lee, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms influence a variety of physiological and behavioral processes; however, little is known about how circadian rhythms interact with the organisms' ability to acquire and retain information about their environment. These experiments tested whether rats trained outside their endogenous active period demonstrate the same rate of…

  1. Interaction between stress responses and circadian metabolism in metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhao; Kim, Hyunbae; Ali, Arushana; Zheng, Ze; Zhang, Kezhong

    2017-09-01

    Circadian rhythms play crucial roles in orchestrating diverse physiological processes that are critical for health and disease. Dysregulated circadian rhythms are closely associated with various human metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Modern lifestyles are frequently associated with an irregular circadian rhythm, which poses a significant risk to public health. While the central clock has a set periodicity, circadian oscillators in peripheral organs, particularly in the liver, can be entrained by metabolic alterations or stress cues. At the molecular level, the signal transduction pathways that mediate stress responses interact with, and are often integrated with, the key determinants of circadian oscillation, to maintain metabolic homeostasis under physiological or pathological conditions. In the liver, a number of nuclear receptors or transcriptional regulators, which are regulated by metabolites, hormones, the circadian clock, or environmental stressors, serve as direct links between stress responses and circadian metabolism. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the interactions between stress responses (the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, the oxidative stress response, and the inflammatory response) and circadian metabolism, and the role of these interactions in the development of metabolic diseases.

  2. Coordination between Differentially Regulated Circadian Clocks Generates Rhythmic Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, Deniz; Young, Michael W

    2017-09-11

    Specialized groups of neurons in the brain are key mediators of circadian rhythms, receiving daily environmental cues and communicating those signals to other tissues in the organism for entrainment and to organize circadian physiology. In Drosophila , the "circadian clock" is housed in seven neuronal clusters, which are defined by their expression of the main circadian proteins, Period, Timeless, Clock, and Cycle. These clusters are distributed across the fly brain and are thereby subject to the respective environments associated with their anatomical locations. While these core components are universally expressed in all neurons of the circadian network, additional regulatory proteins that act on these components are differentially expressed, giving rise to "local clocks" within the network that nonetheless converge to regulate coherent behavioral rhythms. In this review, we describe the communication between the neurons of the circadian network and the molecular differences within neurons of this network. We focus on differences in protein-expression patterns and discuss how such variation can impart functional differences in each local clock. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of how communication within the circadian network intersects with intracellular biochemical mechanisms to ultimately specify behavioral rhythms. We propose that additional efforts are required to identify regulatory mechanisms within each neuronal cluster to understand the molecular basis of circadian behavior. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  3. Biomarkers for circadian rhythm disruption independent of time of day

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.C.G. van Dycke (Kirsten); J.L.A. Pennings (Jeroen L.A.); C.T.M. van Oostrom (Conny); L.W.M. Van Kerkhof (Linda W.M.); H. van Steeg (Harry); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); W. Rodenburg (Wendy)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractFrequent shift work causes disruption of the circadian rhythm and might on the long-term result in increased health risk. Current biomarkers evaluating the presence of circadian rhythm disturbance (CRD), including melatonin, cortisol and body temperature, require 24-hr ("around the

  4. The importance of hormonal circadian rhythms in daily feeding patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, Iris J.M.M.; Boer, de Imke J.M.; Hofstede, Gert Jan; Fleur, la Susanne E.; Bokkers, Eddy

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between hormonal circadian rhythms and feeding behaviour is not well understood. This study aimed to deepen our understanding of mechanisms underlying circadian feeding behaviour in animals, using pigs, Sus scrofa, as a case study. Pigs show an alternans feeding pattern, that is,

  5. Diurnal oscillations of soybean circadian clock and drought responsive genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marcolino-Gomes

    Full Text Available Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans.

  6. Associations between circadian and stress response cortisol in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, S.S.H.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Weerth, C. de

    2017-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning is characterized by the baseline production of cortisol following a circadian rhythm, as well as by the superimposed production of cortisol in response to a stressor. However, it is relatively unknown whether the basal cortisol circadian rhythm

  7. Development and entrainment of the colonic circadian clock during ontogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polidarová, Lenka; Olejníková, Lucie; Paušlyová, Lucia; Sládek, Martin; Soták, Matúš; Pácha, Jiří; Sumová, Alena

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 306, č. 4 (2014), G346-G356 ISSN 0193-1857 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1108 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian clock * clock gene * ontogenesis * circadian entrainment Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.798, year: 2014

  8. Heritable circadian period length in a wild bird population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helm, B.; Visser, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Timing is essential, but circadian clocks, which play a crucial role in timekeeping, are almost unaddressed in evolutionary ecology. A key property of circadian clocks is their free-running period length (τ), i.e. the time taken for a full cycle under constant conditions. Under laboratory

  9. Temporal phase relation of circadian neural oscillations as the basis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... to its known regulation of seasonal gonadal cycles, the relative position of two circadian neural oscillations may also affect the rate of gonadal development during the attainment of puberty in mice. Moreover, the present study provides an experimental paradigm to test the coincidence model of circadian oscillations.

  10. Circadian sleep and feeding patterns in the rat: possible dependence on lipogenesis and lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danguir, J; Nicolaidis, S

    1980-03-01

    Sleep and feeding patterns were continuously recorded in rats under intravenous saline (control) and alternating insulin-epinephrine (experimental) infusions. The infusion of insulin (lipogenetic hormone) during the normally light period (0800-1600) replaced by epinephrine (lipolytic hormone) during the normally lipogenetic dark period (1600-0800) resulted in a complete inversion of the normal circadian distribution of sleep and feeding patterns and also of their correlation. Insulin infusion resulted in low blood glucose and glycerol levels whereas epinephrine increased these physiological parameters. Different control conditions showed that the fluctuations of sleep and feeding were dependent on the rate of utilization of the circulating metabolites at the cellular level. These results together with previous data suggest that the relation between sleep and feeding and their concomitant circadian fluctuation are possibly modulated by a common factor, namely the metabolic rate that is influenced by the lipogenesis/lipolysis rate.

  11. Circadian adaptation to night-shift work by judicious light and darkness exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Diane B; James, Francine O

    2002-12-01

    In this combined field and laboratory investigation, the authors tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to promote circadian adaptation to night-shift work. Fifteen nurses working permanent night schedules (> or = 8 shifts/ 15 days) were recruited from area hospitals. Following avacation period of > or = 10 days on a regular daytime schedule, workers were admitted to the laboratory for the assessment of circadian phase via a 36-h constant routine. They returned to work approximately 12 night shifts on their regular schedules under one of two conditions. Treatment group workers (n = 10, mean age +/- SD = 41.7 +/- 8.8 years) received an intervention including 6 h of intermittent bright-light exposure in the workplace (approximately 3,243 lux) and shielding from bright morning outdoor light with tinted goggles (15% visual light transmission). Control group workers (n = 9, mean age +/- SD = 42.0 +/- 7.2 years) were observed in their habitual work environments. On work days, participants maintained regular sleep/wake schedules including a single 8-h sleep/darkness episode beginning 2 h after the end of the night shift. A second 36-h constant routine was performed following the series of night shifts. In the presence of the intervention, circadian rhythms of core body temperature and salivary melatonin cycles were delayed by an average (+/- SEM) of -9.32 +/- 1.06 h and -11.31 +/- 1.13 h, respectively. These were significantly greater than the phase delays of -4.09 +/- 1.94 h and -5.08 +/- 2.32 h displayed by the control group (p = 0.03 and p = 0.02, respectively). The phase angle between circadian markers and the shifted schedule was reestablished to its baseline position only in the treatment group of workers. These results support the efficacy of a practical intervention for promoting circadian adaptation to night-shift work under field conditions. They also underline the importance of controlling the overall pattern of exposure to light and darkness in

  12. CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 Inhibits Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Song

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is an integral part of plant development, and the timing and progressing rate of senescence could substantially affect the yield and quality of crops. It has been known that a circadian rhythm synchronized with external environmental cues is critical for the optimal coordination of various physiological and metabolic processes. However, the reciprocal interactions between the circadian clock and leaf senescence in plants remain unknown. Here, through measuring the physiological and molecular senescence related markers of several circadian components mutants, we found that CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 inhibits leaf senescence. Further molecular and genetic studies revealed that CCA1 directly activates GLK2 and suppresses ORE1 expression to counteract leaf senescence. As plants age, the expression and periodic amplitude of CCA1 declines and thus weakens the inhibition of senescence. Our findings reveal an age-dependent circadian clock component of the process of leaf senescence.

  13. Sex Differences in Circadian Timing Systems: Implications for Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Matthew; Silver, Rae

    2014-01-01

    Virtually every eukaryotic cell has an endogenous circadian clock and a biological sex. These cell-based clocks have been conceptualized as oscillators whose phase can be reset by internal signals such as hormones, and external cues such as light. The present review highlights the inter-relationship between circadian clocks and sex differences. In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) serves as a master clock synchronizing the phase of clocks throughout the body. Gonadal steroid receptors are expressed in almost every site that receives direct SCN input. Here we review sex differences in the circadian timing system in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG), the hypothalamicadrenal-pituitary (HPA) axis, and sleep-arousal systems. We also point to ways in which disruption of circadian rhythms within these systems differs in the sexes and is associated with dysfunction and disease. Understanding sex differentiated circadian timing systems can lead to improved treatment strategies for these conditions. PMID:24287074

  14. Recent Advances in Circadian Rhythms in Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong eChen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence shows that intrinsic circadian clocks are tightly related to cardiovascular functions. The diurnal changes in blood pressure and heart rate are well known circadian rhythms. Endothelial function, platelet aggregation and thrombus formation exhibit circadian changes as well. The onset of many cardiovascular diseases (CVDs or events, such as myocardial infarction, stroke, arrhythmia, and sudden cardiac death, also exhibits temporal trends. Furthermore, there is strong evidence from animal models and epidemiological studies showing that disruption of circadian rhythms is a significant risk factor for many CVDs, and the intervention of CVDs may have a time dependent effect. In this mini review, we summarized recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between circadian rhythm and cardiovascular physiology and diseases including blood pressure regulation and myocardial infarction.

  15. Modelling of intercellular synchronization in the Drosophila circadian clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun-Wei, Wang; Ai-Min, Chen; Jia-Jun, Zhang; Zhan-Jiang, Yuan; Tian-Shou, Zhou

    2009-01-01

    In circadian rhythm generation, intercellular signaling factors are shown to play a crucial role in both sustaining intrinsic cellular rhythmicity and acquiring collective behaviours across a population of circadian neurons. However, the physical mechanism behind their role remains to be fully understood. In this paper, we propose an indirectly coupled multicellular model for the synchronization of Drosophila circadian oscillators combining both intracellular and intercellular dynamics. By simulating different experimental conditions, we find that such an indirect coupling way can synchronize both heterogeneous self-sustained circadian neurons and heterogeneous mutational damped circadian neurons. Moreover, they can also be entrained to ambient light-dark (LD) cycles depending on intercellular signaling. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  16. Rhythmic Degradation Explains and Unifies Circadian Transcriptome and Proteome Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Lück

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The rich mammalian cellular circadian output affects thousands of genes in many cell types and has been the subject of genome-wide transcriptome and proteome studies. The results have been enigmatic because transcript peak abundances do not always follow the peaks of gene-expression activity in time. We posited that circadian degradation of mRNAs and proteins plays a pivotal role in setting their peak times. To establish guiding principles, we derived a theoretical framework that fully describes the amplitudes and phases of biomolecules with circadian half-lives. We were able to explain the circadian transcriptome and proteome studies with the same unifying theory, including cases in which transcripts or proteins appeared before the onset of increased production rates. Furthermore, we estimate that 30% of the circadian transcripts in mouse liver and Drosophila heads are affected by rhythmic posttranscriptional regulation.

  17. Calcium and SOL Protease Mediate Temperature Resetting of Circadian Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Zhao, Xiaohu; Busza, Ania; Ling, Jinli; O’Neill, John S.; Emery, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks integrate light and temperature input to remain synchronized with the day/night cycle. Although light input to the clock is well studied, the molecular mechanisms by which circadian clocks respond to temperature remain poorly understood. We found that temperature phase shifts Drosophila circadian clocks through degradation of the pacemaker protein TIM. This degradation is mechanistically distinct from photic CRY-dependent TIM degradation. Thermal TIM degradation is triggered by cytosolic calcium increase and CALMODULIN binding to TIM and is mediated by the atypical calpain protease SOL. This thermal input pathway and CRY-dependent light input thus converge on TIM, providing a molecular mechanism for the integration of circadian light and temperature inputs. Mammals use body temperature cycles to keep peripheral clocks synchronized with their brain pacemaker. Interestingly, downregulating the mammalian SOL homolog SOLH blocks thermal mPER2 degradation and phase shifts. Thus, we propose that circadian thermosensation in insects and mammals share common principles. PMID:26590423

  18. Sleep-wake profiles and circadian rhythms of core temperature and melatonin in young people with affective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joanne S; Robillard, Rébecca; Hermens, Daniel F; Naismith, Sharon L; Gordon, Christopher; Scott, Elizabeth M; Hickie, Ian B

    2017-11-01

    While disturbances of the sleep-wake cycle are common in people with affective disorders, the characteristics of these disturbances differ greatly between individuals. This heterogeneity is likely to reflect multiple underlying pathophysiologies, with different perturbations in circadian systems contributing to the variation in sleep-wake cycle disturbances. Such disturbances may be particularly relevant in adolescents and young adults with affective disorders as circadian rhythms undergo considerable change during this key developmental period. This study aimed to identify profiles of sleep-wake disturbance in young people with affective disorders and investigate associations with biological circadian rhythms. Fifty young people with affective disorders and 19 control participants (aged 16-31 years) underwent actigraphy monitoring for approximately two weeks to derive sleep-wake cycle parameters, and completed an in-laboratory assessment including evening dim-light saliva collection for melatonin assay and overnight continuous core body temperature measurement. Cluster analysis based on sleep-wake cycle parameters identified three distinct patient groups, characterised by 'delayed sleep-wake', 'disrupted sleep', and 'long sleep' respectively. The 'delayed sleep-wake' group had both delayed melatonin onset and core temperature nadir; whereas the other two cluster groups did not differ from controls on these circadian markers. The three groups did not differ on clinical characteristics. These results provide evidence that only some types of sleep-wake disturbance in young people with affective disorders are associated with fundamental circadian perturbations. Consequently, interventions targeting endogenous circadian rhythms to promote a phase shift may be particularly relevant in youth with affective disorders presenting with delayed sleep-wake cycles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Circadian rhythms constrain leaf and canopy gas exchange in an Amazonian forest

    OpenAIRE

    Doughty, Christopher E.; Goulden, Michael L.; Miller, Scott D.; da Rocha, Humberto R.

    2006-01-01

    We used a controlled-environment leaf gas-exchange system and the micrometeorological technique eddy covariance to determine whether circadian rhythms constrain the rates of leaf and canopy gas exchange in an Amazonian forest over a day. When exposed to continuous and constant light for 20 to 48 hours leaves of eleven of seventeen species reduced their photosynthetic rates and closed their stomata during the normally dark period and resumed active gas exchange during the normally light period...

  20. Genomic and Physiological Characterization of the Mutant time for coffee within the Arabidopsis thaliana Circadian Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Villarreal, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    ircadian clocks are internal timekeepers that provide organisms with a sense of time. These oscillators, which are entrained by external stimuli, predict the daily day/night transitions and have a periodicity of about 24 hours. The Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock is composed of interconnected transcriptional-translational feedback loops. The morning expressed elements CCA1 and LHY, which are clock controlled and light inducible, repress the transcription of the evening element TOC1. At d...

  1. Circadian dysregulation of clock genes: clues to rapid treatments in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunney, B G; Li, J Z; Walsh, D M; Stein, R; Vawter, M P; Cartagena, P; Barchas, J D; Schatzberg, A F; Myers, R M; Watson, S J; Akil, H; Bunney, W E

    2015-02-01

    Conventional antidepressants require 2-8 weeks for a full clinical response. In contrast, two rapidly acting antidepressant interventions, low-dose ketamine and sleep deprivation (SD) therapy, act within hours to robustly decrease depressive symptoms in a subgroup of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. Evidence that MDD may be a circadian-related illness is based, in part, on a large set of clinical data showing that diurnal rhythmicity (sleep, temperature, mood and hormone secretion) is altered during depressive episodes. In a microarray study, we observed widespread changes in cyclic gene expression in six regions of postmortem brain tissue of depressed patients matched with controls for time-of-death (TOD). We screened 12 000 transcripts and observed that the core clock genes, essential for controlling virtually all rhythms in the body, showed robust 24-h sinusoidal expression patterns in six brain regions in control subjects. In MDD patients matched for TOD with controls, the expression patterns of the clock genes in brain were significantly dysregulated. Some of the most robust changes were seen in anterior cingulate (ACC). These findings suggest that in addition to structural abnormalities, lesion studies, and the large body of functional brain imaging studies reporting increased activation in the ACC of depressed patients who respond to a wide range of therapies, there may be a circadian dysregulation in clock gene expression in a subgroup of MDDs. Here, we review human, animal and neuronal cell culture data suggesting that both low-dose ketamine and SD can modulate circadian rhythms. We hypothesize that the rapid antidepressant actions of ketamine and SD may act, in part, to reset abnormal clock genes in MDD to restore and stabilize circadian rhythmicity. Conversely, clinical relapse may reflect a desynchronization of the clock, indicative of a reactivation of abnormal clock gene function. Future work could involve identifying specific small

  2. Circadian Kisspeptin expression in human term placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pedro, M A; Morán, J; Díaz, I; Murias, L; Fernández-Plaza, C; González, C; Díaz, E

    2015-11-01

    Kisspeptin is an essential gatekeeper of reproductive function. During pregnancy high circulating levels of kisspeptin have been described, however the clear role of this neuropeptide in pregnancy remains unknown. We tested the existence of rhythmic kisspeptin expression in human full-term placenta from healthy pregnant women at six different time points during the day. The data obtained by Western blotting were fitted to a mathematical model (Fourier series), demonstrating, for the first time, the existence of a circadian rhythm in placental kisspeptin expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Circadian system from conception till adulthood

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sumová, Alena; Sládek, Martin; Polidarová, Lenka; Nováková, Marta; Houdek, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 199, č. 2012 (2012), s. 83-103 ISSN 0079-6123 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0321; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0668; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA MZd(CZ) NT11474; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ontogenesis * suprachiasmatic nucleus * peripheral circadian clocks * clock gene Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.191, year: 2012

  4. Sleep and circadian rhythms in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampi, C

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed critical review of the knowledge accumulated in the last three decades concerning research on sleep, work-rest schedules, and circadian rhythms in space. The focus of the paper is preceded by a brief review of the basic principles of the human circadian system and the physiology of the sleep-wake cycle, relevant to understanding the problem of astronaut work-rest scheduling. Much of what is known is based on anecdotal reports, mission log books, and debriefing of astronauts after flights. The broad literature reviewed, which includes studies from American and Soviet space missions, as well as some studies conducted under simulated weightlessness, offers just a handful of objective studies on the physiology of sleep and circadian rhythms in space. Nevertheless, the data are remarkably consistent, and indicate that sleep can be of reasonably good quality in space. The risk of sleep loss and associated performance degradation appears to be a manageable one. However, one clear conclusion arises from this review: whatever the type of mission of flight plan, its success will depend on whether the principles of circadian and sleep-wake regulation have been taken into account during the planning phase of work-rest schedules. That is, satisfactory sleep and alertness is more likely to occur if crews maintain a reasonable (i.e., constant) relation with their normal terrestrial rhythm. This is not as easy a task as it may appear; indeed, unexpected, high-intensity operational demands have been the major cause of acute problems of sleep loss and performance degradation in space. Moreover, the growing complexity of space missions indicate that emergencies will never disappear. Therefore, one of the most important research challenges for future space missions is the development of strategies that could permit astronauts to function closest to maximal efficiency during intensive and prolonged work. Countermeasures for optimizing astronaut

  5. Towards assessing the impact of circadian lighting in elderly housing from a holistic perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sen, Sumit; Flyvholm, Anton; Xylakis, Emmanouil

    2017-01-01

    Circadian lighting has the potential to be used as a welfare technology, and improve the health and well-being of the general public. A research-based dynamic circadian lighting scheme can be developed using LED lighting. Testing and evaluating circadian lighting however requires a holistic...... for designing the evaluation of circadian adjusted lighting....

  6. Circadian Biology: Uncoupling Human Body Clocks by Food Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Celine; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2017-07-10

    Synchrony of circadian rhythms between tissues/organs appears critical for health. A new study reports that meal timing, a modifiable temporal cue for the circadian system, can selectively uncouple circadian rhythms in metabolic physiology from the central circadian clock in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Air Travel, Circadian Rhythms/Hormones, and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Ruiz, J; Sulli, A; Cutolo, M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2017-08-01

    Biological rhythms are fundamental for homeostasis and have recently been involved in the regulatory processes of various organs and systems. Circadian cycle proteins and hormones have a direct effect on the inflammatory response and have shown pro- or anti-inflammatory effects in animal models of autoimmune diseases. The cells of the immune system have their own circadian rhythm, and the light-dark cycle directly influences the inflammatory response. On the other hand, patients with autoimmune diseases characteristically have sleep disorders and fatigue, and in certain disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a frank periodicity in the signs and symptoms is recognized. The joint symptoms predominate in the morning, and apparently, subjects with RA have relative adrenal insufficiency, with a cortisol peak unable to control the late night load of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Transatlantic flights represent a challenge in the adjustment of biological rhythms, since they imply sleep deprivation, time zone changes, and potential difficulties for drug administration. In patients with autoimmune diseases, the use of DMARDs and prednisone at night is probably best suited to lessen morning symptoms. It is also essential to sleep during the trip to improve adaptation to the new time zone and to avoid, as far as possible, works involving flexible or nocturnal shifts. The study of proteins and hormones related to biological rhythms will demonstrate new pathophysiological pathways of autoimmune diseases, which will emphasize the use of general measures for sleep respect and methods for drug administration at key daily times to optimize their anti-inflammatory and immune modulatory effects.

  8. Differential menopause- versus aging-induced changes in oxidative stress and circadian rhythm gene markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Zuñiga, Oriol A; Cruz-Teno, Cristina; Haro, Carmen; Quintana-Navarro, Gracia M; Camara-Martos, Fernando; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Garaulet, Marta; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco; Camargo, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    Menopause is characterized by the depletion of estrogen that has been proposed to cause oxidative stress. Circadian rhythm is an internal biological clock that controls physiological processes. It was analyzed the gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the lipids and glucose levels in plasma of a subgroup of 17 pre-menopausal women, 19 men age-matched as control group for the pre-menopausal women, 20 post-menopausal women and 20 men age-matched as control group for the post-menopausal women; all groups were matched by body mass index. Our study showed a decrease in the expression of the oxidative stress-related gene GPX1, and an increase in the expression of SOD1 as consequence of menopause. In addition, we found that the circadian rhythm-related gene PER2 decreased as consequence of menopause. On the other hand, we observed a decrease in the expression of the oxidative stress-related gene GPX4 and an increase in the expression of CAT as a consequence of aging, independently of menopause. Our results suggest that the menopause-induced oxidative stress parallels a disruption in the circadian clock in women, and part of the differences in oxidative stress observed between pre- and post-menopausal women was due to aging, independent of menopause. Clinical Trials.gov.Identifier: NCT00924937. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of melatonin and cortisol circadian rhythms in the pathogenesis of infantile colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnce, Tolga; Akman, Hakkı; Çimrin, Dilek; Aydın, Adem

    2018-03-05

    Despite the high prevalence of infantile colic, the pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. Cortisol and melatonin hormones affect gastrointestinal system development in several ways, and interestingly, both cortisol and melatonin's circadian rhythms begin around the 3rd month in which infantile colic symptoms start to decrease. We hypothesized that infantile colic might associate with desynchronization of normal circadian rhythms of these hormones. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of melatonin and cortisol in the pathogenesis of infantile colic. Patients who were diagnosed as infantile colic according to Wessel's "rule of three" were enrolled in the colic group. We measured the saliva melatonin and cortisol levels of colic group and control group infants. In both groups, the saliva samples were taken in mornings and at evenings, at the time of diagnosis and 6th month. Fifty-five infants finished the study. Melatonin circadian rhythm developed earlier in the control group than the infantile colic group in our study. We found no significant difference between the daily mean cortisol levels. However, infants with colic had flatter daily cortisol slope than controls which pointed out the probability that they had a less clearly defined cortisol rhythm than infants without colic. We found an association between melatonin levels and infantile colic. However, more research is needed to fully understand the role of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and hormone's role on infantile colic physiopathology.

  10. Effects of selective breeding for increased wheel-running behavior on circadian timing of substrate oxidation and ingestive behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonas, I.; Vaanholt, L. M.; Doornbos, M.; Garland, T.; Scheurink, A. J. W.; Nyakas, C.; van Dijk, G.; Garland Jr., T.

    2010-01-01

    Fluctuations in substrate preference and utilization across the circadian cycle may be influenced by the degree of physical activity and nutritional status. In the present study, we assessed these relationships in control mice and in mice from a line selectively bred for high voluntary wheel-running

  11. Participation of the Olfactory Bulb in Circadian Organization during Early Postnatal Life in Rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Navarrete

    Full Text Available Experimental evidence indicates that during pre-visual stages of development in mammals, circadian regulation is still not under the control of the light-entrainable hypothalamic pacemaker, raising the possibility that the circadian rhythmicity that occurs during postnatal development is under the control of peripheral oscillators, such as the main olfactory bulb (MOB. We evaluated the outcome of olfactory bulbectomy on the temporal pattern of core body temperature and gross locomotor activity in newborn rabbits. From postnatal day 1 (P1, pups were randomly assigned to one of the following conditions: intact pups (INT, intact pups fed by enteral gavage (INT+ENT, sham operated pups (SHAM, pups with unilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-UNI, and pups with bilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-BI. At the beginning of the experiment, from P1-8, the animals in all groups were fed at 11:00, from P9-13 the feeding schedule was delayed 6 h (17:00, and finally, from P14-15 the animals were subjected to fasting conditions. The rabbit pups of the INT, INT+ENT, SHAM and OBx-UNI groups exhibited a clear circadian rhythmicity in body temperature and locomotor activity, with a conspicuous anticipatory rise hours prior to the nursing or feeding schedule, which persisted even during fasting conditions. In addition, phase delays in the nursing or feeding schedule induced a clear phase shift in both parameters. In contrast, the OBx-BI group exhibited atypical rhythmicity in both parameters under entrained conditions that altered the anticipatory component, as well as deficient phase control of both rhythms. The present results demonstrate that the expression of circadian rhythmicity at behavioral and physiological levels during early stages of rabbit development largely depends on the integrity of the main olfactory bulb.

  12. Synchrony and desynchrony in circadian clocks: impacts on learning and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Harini C.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks evolved under conditions of environmental variation, primarily alternating light dark cycles, to enable organisms to anticipate daily environmental events and coordinate metabolic, physiological, and behavioral activities. However, modern lifestyle and advances in technology have increased the percentage of individuals working in phases misaligned with natural circadian activity rhythms. Endogenous circadian oscillators modulate alertness, the acquisition of learning, memory formation, and the recall of memory with examples of circadian modulation of memory observed across phyla from invertebrates to humans. Cognitive performance and memory are significantly diminished when occurring out of phase with natural circadian rhythms. Disruptions in circadian regulation can lead to impairment in the formation of memories and manifestation of other cognitive deficits. This review explores the types of interactions through which the circadian clock modulates cognition, highlights recent progress in identifying mechanistic interactions between the circadian system and the processes involved in memory formation, and outlines methods used to remediate circadian perturbations and reinforce circadian adaptation. PMID:26286653

  13. Circadian influences on dopamine circuits of the brain: regulation of striatal rhythms of clock gene expression and implications for psychopathology and disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Verwey

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clock proteins form an autoregulatory feedback loop that is central to the endogenous generation and transmission of daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. Increasingly, circadian rhythms in clock gene expression are being reported in diverse tissues and brain regions that lie outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, the master circadian clock in mammals. For many of these extra-SCN rhythms, however, the region-specific implications are still emerging. In order to gain important insights into the potential behavioral, physiological, and psychological relevance of these daily oscillations, researchers have begun to focus on describing the neurochemical, hormonal, metabolic, and epigenetic contributions to the regulation of these rhythms. This review will highlight important sites and sources of circadian control within dopaminergic and striatal circuitries of the brain and will discuss potential implications for psychopathology and disease. For example, rhythms in clock gene expression in the dorsal striatum are sensitive to changes in dopamine release, which has potential implications for Parkinson’s disease and drug addiction. Rhythms in the ventral striatum and limbic forebrain are sensitive to psychological and physical stressors, which may have implications for major depressive disorder. Collectively, a rich circadian tapestry has emerged that forces us to expand traditional views and to reconsider the psychopathological, behavioral, and physiological importance of these region-specific rhythms in brain areas that are not immediately linked with the regulation of circadian rhythms.

  14. The circadian regulation of sleep: impact of a functional ADA-polymorphism and its association to working memory improvements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin F Reichert

    Full Text Available Sleep is regulated in a time-of-day dependent manner and profits working memory. However, the impact of the circadian timing system as well as contributions of specific sleep properties to this beneficial effect remains largely unexplored. Moreover, it is unclear to which extent inter-individual differences in sleep-wake regulation depend on circadian phase and modulate the association between sleep and working memory. Here, sleep electroencephalography (EEG was recorded during a 40-h multiple nap protocol, and working memory performance was assessed by the n-back task 10 times before and after each scheduled nap sleep episode. Twenty-four participants were genotyped regarding a functional polymorphism in adenosine deaminase (rs73598374, 12 G/A-, 12 G/G-allele carriers, previously associated with differences in sleep-wake regulation. Our results indicate that genotype-driven differences in sleep depend on circadian phase: heterozygous participants were awake longer and slept less at the end of the biological day, while they exhibited longer non rapid eye movement (NREM sleep and slow wave sleep concomitant with reduced power between 8-16 Hz at the end of the biological night. Slow wave sleep and NREM sleep delta EEG activity covaried positively with overall working memory performance, independent of circadian phase and genotype. Moreover, REM sleep duration benefitted working memory particularly when occurring in the early morning hours and specifically in heterozygous individuals. Even though based on a small sample size and thus requiring replication, our results suggest genotype-dependent differences in circadian sleep regulation. They further indicate that REM sleep, being under strong circadian control, boosts working memory performance according to genotype in a time-of-day dependent manner. Finally, our data provide first evidence that slow wave sleep and NREM sleep delta activity, majorly regulated by sleep homeostatic mechanisms, is

  15. The non-classical nuclear import carrier Transportin 1 modulates circadian rhythms through its effect on PER1 nuclear localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korge, Sandra; Maier, Bert; Brüning, Franziska; Ehrhardt, Lea; Korte, Thomas; Mann, Matthias; Herrmann, Andreas; Robles, Maria S; Kramer, Achim

    2018-01-01

    Circadian clocks are molecular timekeeping mechanisms that allow organisms to anticipate daily changes in their environment. The fundamental cellular basis of these clocks is delayed negative feedback gene regulation with PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME containing protein complexes as main inhibitory elements. For a correct circadian period, it is essential that such clock protein complexes accumulate in the nucleus in a precisely timed manner, a mechanism that is poorly understood. We performed a systematic RNAi-mediated screen in human cells and identified 15 genes associated with the nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation machinery, whose expression is important for circadian clock dynamics. Among them was Transportin 1 (TNPO1), a non-classical nuclear import carrier, whose knockdown and knockout led to short circadian periods. TNPO1 was found in endogenous clock protein complexes and particularly binds to PER1 regulating its (but not PER2's) nuclear localization. While PER1 is also transported to the nucleus by the classical, Importin β-mediated pathway, TNPO1 depletion slowed down PER1 nuclear import rate as revealed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments. In addition, we found that TNPO1-mediated nuclear import may constitute a novel input pathway of how cellular redox state signals to the clock, since redox stress increases binding of TNPO1 to PER1 and decreases its nuclear localization. Together, our RNAi screen knocking down import carriers (but also export carriers) results in short and long circadian periods indicating that the regulatory pathways that control the timing of clock protein subcellular localization are far more complex than previously assumed. TNPO1 is one of the novel players essential for normal circadian periods and potentially for redox regulation of the clock.

  16. Circadian rhythms affect electroretinogram, compound eye color, striking behavior and locomotion of the praying mantis Hierodula patellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Aaron E; Prete, Frederick R; Mantes, Edgar S; Urdiales, Andrew F; Bogue, Wil

    2014-11-01

    Many behaviors and physiological processes oscillate with circadian rhythms that are synchronized to environmental cues (e.g. light onset), but persist with periods of ~24 h in the absence of such cues. We used a multilevel experimental approach to assess whether circadian rhythms modulate several aspects of the visual physiology and behavior of the praying mantis Hierodula patellifera. We used electroretinograms (ERGs) to assess compound eye sensitivity, colorimetric photographic analyses to assess compound eye color changes (screening pigment migration), behavioral assays of responsiveness to computer-generated prey-like visual stimuli and analyses of locomotor activity patterns on a modified treadmill apparatus. Our results indicate that circadian clocks control and/or modulate each of the target behaviors. Strong rhythms, persisting under constant conditions, with periods of ~24 h were evident in photoreceptor sensitivity to light, appetitive responsiveness to prey-like stimuli and gross locomotor activity. In the first two cases, responsiveness was highest during the subjective night and lowest during the subjective day. Locomotor activity was strongly clustered around the transition time from day to night. In addition, pigment migration and locomotor behavior responded strongly to light:dark cycles and anticipated the light-dark transition, suggesting that the circadian clocks modulating both were entrained to environmental light cues. Together, these data indicate that circadian rhythms operate at the cellular, cellular systems and organismal level in H. patellifera. Our results represent an intriguing first step in uncovering the complexities of circadian rhythms in the Mantodea. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. The circadian regulation of sleep: impact of a functional ADA-polymorphism and its association to working memory improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Carolin F; Maire, Micheline; Gabel, Virginie; Hofstetter, Marcel; Viola, Antoine U; Kolodyazhniy, Vitaliy; Strobel, Werner; Goetz, Thomas; Bachmann, Valérie; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Cajochen, Christian; Schmidt, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is regulated in a time-of-day dependent manner and profits working memory. However, the impact of the circadian timing system as well as contributions of specific sleep properties to this beneficial effect remains largely unexplored. Moreover, it is unclear to which extent inter-individual differences in sleep-wake regulation depend on circadian phase and modulate the association between sleep and working memory. Here, sleep electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded during a 40-h multiple nap protocol, and working memory performance was assessed by the n-back task 10 times before and after each scheduled nap sleep episode. Twenty-four participants were genotyped regarding a functional polymorphism in adenosine deaminase (rs73598374, 12 G/A-, 12 G/G-allele carriers), previously associated with differences in sleep-wake regulation. Our results indicate that genotype-driven differences in sleep depend on circadian phase: heterozygous participants were awake longer and slept less at the end of the biological day, while they exhibited longer non rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and slow wave sleep concomitant with reduced power between 8-16 Hz at the end of the biological night. Slow wave sleep and NREM sleep delta EEG activity covaried positively with overall working memory performance, independent of circadian phase and genotype. Moreover, REM sleep duration benefitted working memory particularly when occurring in the early morning hours and specifically in heterozygous individuals. Even though based on a small sample size and thus requiring replication, our results suggest genotype-dependent differences in circadian sleep regulation. They further indicate that REM sleep, being under strong circadian control, boosts working memory performance according to genotype in a time-of-day dependent manner. Finally, our data provide first evidence that slow wave sleep and NREM sleep delta activity, majorly regulated by sleep homeostatic mechanisms, is linked to working

  18. Blue light therapy improves circadian dysfunction as well as motor symptoms in two mouse models of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Bin Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Huntington's disease (HD exhibit movement disorders, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive impairments as the disease progresses. Abnormal sleep/wake cycles are common among HD patients with reports of delayed sleep onset, fatigue during the day, and a delayed pattern of melatonin secretion all of which suggest circadian dysfunction. Mouse models of HD confirm disrupted circadian rhythms with pathophysiology found in the central circadian clock (suprachiasmatic nucleus. Importantly, circadian dysfunction manifests early in disease, even before the classic motor symptoms, in both patients and mouse models. Therefore, we hypothesize that the circadian dysfunction may interact with the disease pathology and exacerbate the HD symptoms. If correct, early intervention may benefit patients and delay disease progression. One test of this hypothesis is to determine whether light therapy designed to strengthen this intrinsic timing system can delay the disease progression in mouse models. Therefore, we determined the impact of blue wavelength-enriched light on two HD models: the BACHD and Q175 mice. Both models received 6 h of blue-light at the beginning of their daily light cycle for 3 months. After treatment, both genotypes showed improvements in their locomotor activity rhythm without significant change to their sleep behavior. Critically, treated mice of both lines exhibited improved motor performance compared to untreated controls. Focusing on the Q175 genotype, we sought to determine whether the treatment altered signaling pathways in brain regions known to be impacted by HD using NanoString gene expression assays. We found that the expression of several HD relevant markers was altered in the striatum and cortex of the treated mice. Our study demonstrates that strengthening the circadian system can delay the progression of HD in pre-clinical models. This work suggests that lighting conditions should be considered when managing

  19. Cyclic and circadian variations in cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, W J

    2001-09-01

    The incidence of many biologic phenomena displays a reproducible and cyclic variation. Cardiovascular disease, the most common cause of death in the United States and other developed countries, also has an intrinsic variation in events. These events are more common in winter, at the beginning of each month, on Mondays (in working people), and during the early morning hours of each day. Recent meta-analyses have quantitated the excess risk of cardiovascular events in the hours around and just after awakening. Between 6 AM and noon, there is a 40% higher risk of heart attack, a 29% increased risk of cardiac death, and a 49% increased risk of stroke (compared with what would be expected if these events happened at random and were evenly distributed throughout the day). These observations have major consequences for emergency medical personnel and medical transport systems. The reasons for these observations are less clear. The circadian pattern of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate may be a major contributor, and long-term "hard end-point" studies designed to test specific pharmacologic interventions targeting the early morning rise in BP and heart rate are underway. Individuals who work night shifts and those whose BP has a different circadian pattern have a higher risk of cardiovascular events, but may be less likely to have an increased risk of cardiovascular events in the morning.

  20. Drugs of Abuse Can Entrain Circadian Rhythms

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    Ann E. K. Kosobud

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms prepare organisms for predictable events during the Earth's 24-h day. These rhythms are entrained by a variety of stimuli. Light is the most ubiquitous and best known zeitgeber, but a number of others have been identified, including food, social cues, locomotor activity, and, most recently drugs of abuse. Given the diversity of zeitgebers, it is probably not surprising that genes capable of clock functions are located throughout almost all organs and tissues. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse can directly entrain some circadian rhythms. We have report here that entrainment by drugs of abuse is independent of the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the light/dark cycle, is not dependent on direct locomotor stimulation, and is shared by a variety of classes of drugs of abuse. We suggest that drug-entrained rhythms reflect variations in underlying neurophysiological states. This could be the basis for known daily variations in drug metabolism, tolerance, and sensitivity to drug reward. These rhythms could also take the form of daily periods of increased motivation to seek and take drugs, and thus contribute to abuse, addiction and relapse.

  1. The skeletal muscle circadian clock: current insights

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    Nakao R

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Reiko Nakao,1 Takeshi Nikawa,2 Katsutaka Oishi1,3,4 1Biological Clock Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST, Tsukuba, 2Department of Nutritional Physiology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School, Tokushima, 3Department of Applied Biological Science, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, 4Department of Computational and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Japan Abstract: Skeletal muscle functions in locomotion, postural support, and energy metabolism. The loss of skeletal muscle mass and function leads to diseases such as sarcopenia and metabolic disorders. Inactivity (lack of exercise and an imbalanced diet (increased fat or decreased protein intake are thought to be involved in the prevalence of such pathologies. On the other hand, recent epidemiological studies of humans have suggested that circadian disruption caused by shift work, jet lag, and sleep disorders is associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Experimental studies of mice deficient in clock genes have also identified skeletal muscle defects, suggesting a molecular link between circadian clock machinery and skeletal muscle physiology. Furthermore, accumulating evidence about chronotherapy, including chronopharmacology, chrononutrition, and chronoexercise, has indicated that timing is important to optimize medical intervention for various diseases. The present review addresses current understanding of the functional roles of the molecular clock with respect to skeletal muscle and the potential of chronotherapy for diseases associated with skeletal muscle. Keywords: biological rhythm, metabolic syndrome, physical activity, neural signal, chronotherapy

  2. A novel algorithm for detecting human circadian rhythms using a thoracic temperature sensor

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    Aly Chkeir

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms undergo high perturbations due to cancer progression and worsening of metabolic diseases. This paper proposes an original method for detecting such perturbations using a novel thoracic temperature sensor. Such an infrared sensor records the skin temperature every five minutes, although some data might be missing. In this pilot study, five control subjects were evaluated over four days of recordings. In order to overcome the problem of missing data, first four different interpolation methods were compared. Using interpolation helps covering the gaps and extending the recordings frequency, subsequently prolonging sensor battery life. Afterwards, a Cosinor model was proposed to characterize circadian rhythms, and extract relevant parameters, with their confidence limits. A divergence study is then performed to detect changes in these parameters. The results are promising, supporting the enlargement of the sample size and warranting further assessment in cancer patients.

  3. Insulin post-transcriptionally modulates Bmal1 protein to affect the hepatic circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Fabin; Sun, Xiujie; Ma, Xiang; Wu, Rong; Zhang, Deyi; Chen, Yaqiong; Xu, Qian; Wu, Yuting; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Although food availability is a potent synchronizer of the peripheral circadian clock in mammals, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we show that hepatic Bmal1, a core transcription activator of the molecular clock, is post-transcriptionally regulated by signals from insulin, an important hormone that is temporally controlled by feeding. Insulin promotes postprandial Akt-mediated Ser42-phosphorylation of Bmal1 to induce its dissociation from DNA, interaction with 14-3-3 protein and subsequently nuclear exclusion, which results in the suppression of Bmal1 transcriptional activity. Inverted feeding cycles not only shift the phase of daily insulin oscillation, but also elevate the amplitude due to food overconsumption. This enhanced and reversed insulin signalling initiates the reset of clock gene rhythms by altering Bmal1 nuclear accumulation in mouse liver. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of insulin signalling in regulating peripheral circadian rhythms. PMID:27576939

  4. Resetting of circadian melatonin and cortisol rhythms in humans by ordinary room light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, D. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether a weak photic stimulus can reset the endogenous circadian rhythms of plasma melatonin and plasma cortisol in human subjects. A stimulus consisting of three cycles of 5 h exposures to ordinary room light (approximately 180 lux), centered 1.5 h after the endogenous temperature nadir, significantly phase-advanced the plasma melatonin rhythm in eight healthy young men compared with the phase delays observed in eight control subjects who underwent the same protocol but were exposed to darkness (p melatonin and plasma cortisol maintained stable temporal relationships with the endogenous core body temperature cycle, consistent with the conclusion that exposure to ordinary indoor room light had shifted a master circadian pacemaker.

  5. Free access to a running-wheel advances the phase of behavioral and physiological circadian rhythms and peripheral molecular clocks in mice.

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    Yuki Yasumoto

    Full Text Available Behavioral and physiological circadian rhythms are controlled by endogenous oscillators in animals. Voluntary wheel-running in rodents is thought to be an appropriate model of aerobic exercise in humans. We evaluated the effects of chronic voluntary exercise on the circadian system by analyzing temporal profiles of feeding, core body temperature, plasma hormone concentrations and peripheral expression of clock and clock-controlled genes in mice housed under sedentary (SED conditions or given free access to a running-wheel (RW for four weeks. Voluntary wheel-running activity advanced the circadian phases of increases in body temperature, food intake and corticosterone secretion in the mice. The circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled genes was tissue- and gene-specifically affected in the RW mice. The temporal expression of E-box-dependent circadian clock genes such as Per1, Per2, Nr1d1 and Dbp were slightly, but significantly phase-advanced in the liver and white adipose tissue, but not in brown adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Peak levels of Per1, Per2 and Nr1d1 expression were significantly increased in the skeletal muscle of RW mice. The circadian phase and levels of hepatic mRNA expression of the clock-controlled genes that are involved in cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism significantly differed between SED and RW mice. These findings indicated that endogenous clock-governed voluntary wheel-running activity provides feedback to the central circadian clock that systemically governs behavioral and physiological rhythms.

  6. Circadian melatonin and cortisol levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients in winter time: a north and south Europe comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, M; Maestroni, G J M; Otsa, K; Aakre, O; Villaggio, B; Capellino, S; Montagna, P; Fazzuoli, L; Veldi, T; Peets, T; Hertens, E; Sulli, A

    2005-02-01

    Altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and altered melatonin production might modulate the circadian symptoms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. To investigate the influence of different winter photoperiods on the circadian rhythms of serum melatonin, cortisol, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), and interleukin 6 (IL6) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis from a north Europe country (Estonia) and a south Europe country (Italy). The patients from Estonia (n = 19) and Italy (n = 7) had similar disease severity and duration and were compared with healthy age and sex matched controls in the two countries. Blood samples were collected during the period January to February at 8 pm, 10 pm, midnight, 2 am, 4 am, 6 am, 8 am, and 3 pm. Melatonin was measured by radioimmunoassay using (125)I-melatonin. Serum cortisol, TNFalpha, and IL6 cytokines were assayed by standard methods. Higher circadian melatonin concentrations from 10 pm and an earlier peak were observed in Estonian patients than in their age and sex matched controls (pmelatonin concentrations were significantly higher in the Estonian patients than in the Italian patients. No significant differences were observed for serum cortisol. Serum TNFalpha was higher (pmelatonin levels. In a north European country (Estonia), the circadian rhythm of serum concentrations of melatonin and TNFalpha in patients with rheumatoid arthritis were significantly higher than in matched controls or in rheumatoid patients from a south Europe country (Italy).

  7. Determination of whole body circadian phase in lung cancer patients: melatonin vs. cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Giuliani, Francesco; Sothern, Robert B

    2012-02-01

    A quantifiable and reliable technique for the determination of body circadian phase applicable to non-laboratory studies would allow the evaluation of circadian dysregulation. In this study we evaluated feasible methodologies to individualize whole body circadian phase in lung cancer patients. Cortisol and melatonin serum levels were measured in blood samples collected every 4 h for 24 h from eleven male controls and nine men suffering from non-small cell lung cancer. Circadian rhythmicity was evaluated and the 4-hourly fractional variations (FV) were calculated to evaluate the dynamics of the rise and fall in serum levels. Overall cortisol serum levels were higher in cancer patients (pmelatonin, but not significantly (p=0.261). Original serum levels of cortisol and melatonin each showed a prominent 24 h oscillation in both study groups, with highest values at night for melatonin and near awakening for cortisol. Using all data after normalization to percent of individual mean, ANOVA detected a significant time-effect (pcortisol in cancer patients and higher for melatonin, but these differences were not significant. FV levels of cortisol and melatonin each showed a prominent 24 h oscillation in both study groups, with highest values prior to darkness onset for melatonin and near mid-dark for cortisol. ANOVA also detected a significant time-effect (pmelatonin and ∼5 h for cortisol. A chronobiological evaluation of serum levels and fractional variations for cortisol and especially melatonin is a valuable methodology to define body circadian phase in lung cancer patients. It is possible to describe the complex process of hormone secretion with a methodology that allows the definition of both temporal characteristics and dynamic components. This kind of analysis might be useful in the study of hormone secretion(s) in cancer patients and other diseases and to guide therapeutic interventions. While lung cancer patients may have a negative prognostic value based upon

  8. Sleep, circadian rhythm and body weight: parallel developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2016-11-01

    Circadian alignment is crucial for body-weight management, and for metabolic health. In this context, circadian alignment consists of alignment of sleep, meal patterns and physical activity. During puberty a significant reduction in sleep duration occurs, and pubertal status is inversely associated with sleep duration. A consistent inverse association between habitual sleep duration and body-weight development occurs, independent of possible confounders. Research on misalignment reveals that circadian misalignment affects sleep-architecture and subsequently disturbs glucose-insulin metabolism, substrate oxidation, leptin- and ghrelin concentrations, appetite, food reward, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis activity and gut-peptide concentrations enhancing positive energy balance and metabolic disturbance. Not only aligning meals and sleep in a circadian way is crucial, also regular physical activity during the day strongly promotes the stability and amplitude of circadian rhythm, and thus may serve as an instrument to restore poor circadian rhythms. Endogenicity may play a role in interaction of these environmental variables with a genetic predisposition. In conclusion, notwithstanding the separate favourable effects of sufficient daily physical activity, regular meal patterns, sufficient sleep duration and quality sleep on energy balance, the overall effect of the amplitude and stability of the circadian rhythm, perhaps including genetic predisposition, may integrate the separate effects in an additive way.

  9. Establishment of human cell lines showing circadian rhythms of bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Aki; Shimada, Hiroko; Numazawa, Kahori; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Ikeda, Masaaki; Kawashima, Minae; Kato, Nobumasa; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Ebisawa, Takashi

    2008-11-28

    We have established human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines stably expressing the luciferase gene, driven by the human Bmal1 promoter, to obtain human-derived cells that show circadian rhythms of bioluminescence after dexamethasone treatment. The average circadian period of bioluminescence for the obtained clones was 24.07+/-0.48 h. Lithium (10 mM) in the medium significantly lengthened the circadian period of bioluminescence, which is consistent with previous reports, while 2 mM or 5 mM lithium had no effect. This is the first report on the establishment of human-derived cell lines that proliferate infinitely and show circadian rhythms of bioluminescence, and also the first to investigate the effects of low-dose lithium on the circadian rhythms of human-derived cells in vitro. The established cells will be useful for various in vitro studies of human circadian rhythms and for the development of new therapies for human disorders related to circadian rhythm disturbances.

  10. Circadian Rhythm and Sleep Disruption: Causes, Metabolic Consequences, and Countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skene, Debra J.; Arendt, Josephine; Cade, Janet E.; Grant, Peter J.; Hardie, Laura J.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian (∼24-hour) timing systems pervade all kingdoms of life and temporally optimize behavior and physiology in humans. Relatively recent changes to our environments, such as the introduction of artificial lighting, can disorganize the circadian system, from the level of the molecular clocks that regulate the timing of cellular activities to the level of synchronization between our daily cycles of behavior and the solar day. Sleep/wake cycles are intertwined with the circadian system, and global trends indicate that these, too, are increasingly subject to disruption. A large proportion of the world's population is at increased risk of environmentally driven circadian rhythm and sleep disruption, and a minority of individuals are also genetically predisposed to circadian misalignment and sleep disorders. The consequences of disruption to the circadian system and sleep are profound and include myriad metabolic ramifications, some of which may be compounded by adverse effects on dietary choices. If not addressed, the deleterious effects of such disruption will continue to cause widespread health problems; therefore, implementation of the numerous behavioral and pharmaceutical interventions that can help restore circadian system alignment and enhance sleep will be important. PMID:27763782

  11. An overview of sleep and circadian dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Susanna; Smith, Simon S; Gordon, Richard; O'Sullivan, John D

    2018-03-01

    Sleep and circadian alterations are amongst the very first symptoms experienced in Parkinson's disease, and sleep alterations are present in the majority of patients with overt clinical manifestation of Parkinson's disease. However, the magnitude of sleep and circadian dysfunction in Parkinson's disease, and its influence on the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease remains often unclear and a matter of debate. In particular, the confounding influences of dopaminergic therapy on sleep and circadian dysfunction are a major challenge, and need to be more carefully addressed in clinical studies. The scope of this narrative review is to summarise the current knowledge around both sleep and circadian alterations in Parkinson's disease. We provide an overview on the frequency of excessive daytime sleepiness, insomnia, restless legs, obstructive apnea and nocturia in Parkinson's disease, as well as addressing sleep structure, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and circadian features in Parkinson's disease. Sleep and circadian disorders have been linked to pathological conditions that are often co-morbid in Parkinson's disease, including cognitive decline, memory impairment and neurodegeneration. Therefore, targeting sleep and circadian alterations could be one of the earliest and most promising opportunities to slow disease progression. We hope that this review will contribute to advance the discussion and inform new research efforts to progress our knowledge in this field. © 2018 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. Melatonin secretion is impaired in women with preeclampsia and an abnormal circadian blood pressure rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchlariotou, Sofia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Giannopoulou, Myrto; Arampatzis, Spyridon; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Mertens, Peter R; Zintzaras, Elias; Messinis, Ioannis E; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2014-08-01

    Non-dipping circadian blood pressure (BP) is a common finding in preeclampsia, accompanied by adverse outcomes. Melatonin plays pivotal role in biological circadian rhythms. This study investigated the relationship between melatonin secretion and circadian BP rhythm in preeclampsia. Cases were women with preeclampsia treated between January 2006 and June 2007 in the University Hospital of Larissa. Volunteers with normal pregnancy, matched for chronological and gestational age, served as controls. Twenty-four hour ambulatory BP monitoring was applied. Serum melatonin and urine 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels were determined in day and night time samples by enzyme-linked immunoassays. Measurements were repeated 2 months after delivery. Thirty-one women with preeclampsia and 20 controls were included. Twenty-one of the 31 women with preeclampsia were non-dippers. Compared to normal pregnancy, in preeclampsia there were significantly lower night time melatonin (48.4 ± 24.7 vs. 85.4 ± 26.9 pg/mL, pmelatonin secretion rhythm reappeared. In contrast, in cases with retained non-dipping status (n=10) melatonin secretion rhythm remained impaired: daytime versus night time melatonin (33.5 ± 13.0 vs. 28.0 ± 13.8 pg/mL, p=0.386). Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels were, overall, similar to serum melatonin. Circadian BP and melatonin secretion rhythm follow parallel course in preeclampsia, both during pregnancy and, at least 2 months after delivery. Our findings may be not sufficient to implicate a putative therapeutic effect of melatonin, however, they clearly emphasize that its involvement in the pathogenesis of a non-dipping BP in preeclampsia needs intensive further investigation.

  13. Lmo mutants reveal a novel role for circadian pacemaker neurons in cocaine-induced behaviors.

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    Linus T-Y Tsai

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila has been developed recently as a model system to investigate the molecular and neural mechanisms underlying responses to drugs of abuse. Genetic screens for mutants with altered drug-induced behaviors thus provide an unbiased approach to define novel molecules involved in the process. We identified mutations in the Drosophila LIM-only (LMO gene, encoding a regulator of LIM-homeodomain proteins, in a genetic screen for mutants with altered cocaine sensitivity. Reduced Lmo function increases behavioral responses to cocaine, while Lmo overexpression causes the opposite effect, reduced cocaine responsiveness. Expression of Lmo in the principal Drosophila circadian pacemaker cells, the PDF-expressing ventral lateral neurons (LN(vs, is sufficient to confer normal cocaine sensitivity. Consistent with a role for Lmo in LN(vfunction,Lmomutants also show defects in circadian rhythms of behavior. However, the role for LN(vs in modulating cocaine responses is separable from their role as pacemaker neurons: ablation or functional silencing of the LN(vs reduces cocaine sensitivity, while loss of the principal circadian neurotransmitter PDF has no effect. Together, these results reveal a novel role for Lmo in modulating acute cocaine sensitivity and circadian locomotor rhythmicity, and add to growing evidence that these behaviors are regulated by shared molecular mechanisms. The finding that the degree of cocaine responsiveness is controlled by the Drosophila pacemaker neurons provides a neuroanatomical basis for this overlap. We propose that Lmo controls the responsiveness of LN(vs to cocaine, which in turn regulate the flies' behavioral sensitivity to the drug.

  14. Circadian variation in 5-hydroxytryptamine levels in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbier, I; von Mayersbach, H

    1976-01-01

    This study investigates, on a circadian basis, the variation in blood serotonin for a group of 64 healthy persons (volunteers of a Bundeswehr-Ausbildungskompanie); a pronounced circadian rhythm of 5-HT has been found. The variation in daily absolute levels is influenced by novelty stress; by this we refer to the stress resulting from initial contact between the person sampling blood and the patient. Obviously this diminishes as blood is repeatedly withdrawn from the same individual. Exposure to this situation results in an overall decrease in serotonin levels and a modification of the circadian pattern.

  15. Circadian rhythm in Alzheimer disease after trazodone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippe, Talyta C; Gonçalves, Bruno S B; Louzada, Luciana L; Quintas, Juliana L; Naves, Janeth O S; Camargos, Einstein F; Nóbrega, Otávio T

    2015-01-01

    A circadian rhythm is a cycle of approximately 24 h, responsible for many physiological adjustments, and ageing of the circadian clock contributes to cognitive decline. Rhythmicity is severely impaired in Alzheimer disease (AD) and few therapeutic attempts succeeded in improving sleep disorders in such context. This study evaluated sleep parameters by actigraphy in 30 AD patients before and after trazodone use for 2 weeks, and we show a significant improvement in relative rhythm amplitude (RRA), compatible with a more stable daytime behavioral pattern. So, trazodone appears to produce a stabilization of the circadian rhythms in individuals with AD.

  16. Sleep Deprivation and Circadian Disruption: Stress, Allostasis, and Allostatic Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Bruce S; Karatsoreos, Ilia N

    2015-03-01

    Sleep has important homeostatic functions, and circadian rhythms organize physiology and behavior on a daily basis to insure optimal function. Sleep deprivation and circadian disruption can be stressors, enhancers of other stressors that have consequences for the brain and many body systems. Whether the origins of circadian disruption and sleep disruption and deprivation are from anxiety, depression, shift work, long-distance air travel, or a hectic lifestyle, there are consequences that impair brain functions and contribute to the cumulative wear and tear on body systems caused by too much stress and/or inefficient management of the systems that promote adaptation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clocks do not tick in unison: isolation of Clock and vrille shed new light on the clockwork model of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesto, João Silveira Moledo; Rivas, Gustavo Bueno da Silva; Pavan, Marcio Galvão; Meireles-Filho, Antonio Carlos Alves; Amoretty, Paulo Roberto de; Souza, Nataly Araújo de; Bruno, Rafaela Vieira; Peixoto, Alexandre Afranio

    2015-10-06

    Behavior rhythms of insect vectors directly interfere with the dynamics of pathogen transmission to humans. The sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis is the main vector of visceral leishmaniasis in America and concentrates its activity around dusk. Despite the accumulation of behavioral data, very little is known about the molecular bases of the clock mechanism in this species. This study aims to characterize, within an evolutionary perspective, two important circadian clock genes, Clock and vrille. We have cloned and isolated the coding sequence of L. longipalpis' genes Clock and vrille. The former is structured in eight exons and encodes a protein of 696 amino acids, and the latter comprises three exons and translates to a protein of 469 amino acids. When compared to other insects' orthologues, L. longipalpis CLOCK shows a high degree of conservation in the functional domains bHLH and PAS, but a much shorter glutamine-rich (poly-Q) C-terminal region. As for L. longipalpis VRILLE, a high degree of conservation was found in the bZIP domain. To support these observations and provide an elegant view of the evolution of both genes in insects, phylogenetic analyses based on maximum-likelihood and Bayesian inferences were performed, corroborating the previously known insect systematics. The isolation and phylogenetic analyses of Clock and vrille orthologues in L. longipalpis bring novel and important data to characterize this species' circadian clock. Interestingly, the poly-Q shortening observed in CLOCK suggests that its transcription activity might be impaired and we speculate if this effect could be compensated by other clock factors such as CYCLE.

  18. A train of blue light pulses delivered through closed eyelids suppresses melatonin and phase shifts the human circadian system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiro MG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mariana G Figueiro, Andrew Bierman, Mark S ReaLighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USAAbstract: A model of circadian phototransduction was published in 2005 to predict the spectral sensitivity of the human circadian system to narrow-band and polychromatic light sources by combining responses to light from the spectral-opponent “blue” versus “yellow” cone bipolar pathway with direct responses to light by the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. In the model, depolarizing “blue” responses, but not hyperpolarizing “yellow” responses, from the “blue” versus “yellow” pathway are combined with the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell responses. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell neurons are known to be much slower to respond to light than the cone pathway, so an implication of the model is that periodic flashes of “blue” light, but not “yellow” light, would be effective for stimulating the circadian system. A within-subjects study was designed to test the implications of the model regarding retinal exposures to brief flashes of light. The study was also aimed at broadening the foundation for clinical treatment of circadian sleep disorders by delivering flashing light through closed eyelids while people were asleep. In addition to a dark control night, the eyelids of 16 subjects were exposed to three light-stimulus conditions in the phase delay portion of the phase response curve while they were asleep: (1 2-second flashes of 111 W/m2 of blue (λmax ≈ 480 nm light once every minute for 1 hour, (2 131 W/m2 of green (λmax ≈ 527 nm light, continuously on for 1 hour, and (3 2-second flashes of the same green light once every minute for 1 hour. Inferential statistics showed that the blue flash light-stimulus condition significantly delayed circadian phase and significantly suppressed nocturnal melatonin. The results of this study further our

  19. Altered circadian rhythm and metabolic gene profile in rats subjected to advanced light phase shifts.

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    Laura Herrero

    Full Text Available The circadian clock regulates metabolic homeostasis and its disruption predisposes to obesity and other metabolic diseases. However, the effect of phase shifts on metabolism is not completely understood. We examined whether alterations in the circadian rhythm caused by phase shifts induce metabolic changes in crucial genes that would predispose to obesity. Three-month-old rats were maintained on a standard diet under lighting conditions with chronic phase shifts consisting of advances, delays or advances plus delays. Serum leptin, insulin and glucose levels decreased only in rats subjected to advances. The expression of the clock gene Bmal 1 increased in the hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT, brown adipose tissue (BAT and liver of the advanced group compared to control rats. The advanced group showed an increase in hypothalamic AgRP and NPY mRNA, and their lipid metabolism gene profile was altered in liver, WAT and BAT. WAT showed an increase in inflammation and ER stress and brown adipocytes suffered a brown-to-white transformation and decreased UCP-1 expression. Our results indicate that chronic phase advances lead to significant changes in neuropeptides, lipid metabolism, inflammation and ER stress gene profile in metabolically relevant tissues such as the hypothalamus, liver, WAT and BAT. This highlights a link between alteration of the circadian rhythm and metabolism at the transcriptional level.

  20. Effect of pinealectomy and prolonged melatonin administration on circadian testicular function in food restricted rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrowska, Z.; Zwirska-Korczala, K.; Kajdaniuk, D.; Gorski, J.; Buntner, B.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of pinealectomy and exogenous melatonin on the circadian testosterone variations was investigated (using the radioimmunoassay method) after 3 weeks of 50% food restriction in sexually mature male Wistar rats at 3-h intervals under 12:12 light-dark cycle. The circadian periodicity of testosterone secretion was maintained after caloric deprivation, however its mean 24-h concentration was lower and rhythm disturbances appeared in the form of acrophase shifts from 18.00 to 0.50 h. In pinealectomized animals the mean 24-h testosterone level and amplitude values were significantly increased without the rhythm disturbances. As compared to the control animals, underfed pinealectomized rats had a partial recovery of reduced testosterone levels during the 24-h cycle and showed a normalization of the rhythm acrophase. Melatonin administration was found to inhibit the testosterone mesor value in pinealectomized rats with acrophase shifts from 16.58 to 14.51 h. In comparison with the pinealectomized ones the underfed pinealectomized rats had a greater reduction of the mesor and amplitude values after the melatonin administration. These findings indicate that long-term food restriction sensitizes the circadian testicular axis to antigonadotropic action of the pineal gland. (author). 42 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  1. Theory of Inpatient Circadian Care (TICC): A Proposal for a Middle-Range Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo-Sanchez, Andrés; Niño, Carmen L; Sánchez, Leonardo; Echeverri, Sonia; Gutiérrez, Diana P; Duque, Andrés F; Pianeta, Oscar; Jaramillo-Gómez, Jenny A; Pilonieta, Martin A; Cataño, Nhora; Arboleda, Humberto; Agostino, Patricia V; Alvarez-Baron, Claudia P; Vargas, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The circadian system controls the daily rhythms of a variety of physiological processes. Most organisms show physiological, metabolic and behavioral rhythms that are coupled to environmental signals. In humans, the main synchronizer is the light/dark cycle, although non-photic cues such as food availability, noise, and work schedules are also involved. In a continuously operating hospital, the lack of rhythmicity in these elements can alter the patient’s biological rhythms and resilience. This paper presents a Theory of Inpatient Circadian Care (TICC) grounded in circadian principles. We conducted a literature search on biological rhythms, chronobiology, nursing care, and middle-range theories in the databases PubMed, SciELO Public Health, and Google Scholar. The search was performed considering a period of 6 decades from 1950 to 2013. Information was analyzed to look for links between chronobiology concepts and characteristics of inpatient care. TICC aims to integrate multidisciplinary knowledge of biomedical sciences and apply it to clinical practice in a formal way. The conceptual points of this theory are supported by abundant literature related to disease and altered biological rhythms. Our theory will be able to enrich current and future professional practice. PMID:25767632

  2. Silencing Nicotiana attenuata LHY and ZTL alters circadian rhythms in flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, Felipe; Joo, Youngsung; Cortés Llorca, Lucas; Rothe, Eva; Baldwin, Ian T; Kim, Sang-Gyu

    2016-02-01

    The rhythmic opening/closing and volatile emissions of flowers are known to attract pollinators at specific times. That these rhythms are maintained under constant light or dark conditions suggests a circadian clock involvement. Although a forward and reverse genetic approach has led to the identification of core circadian clock components in Arabidopsis thaliana, the involvement of these clock components in floral rhythms has remained untested, probably because of the weak diurnal rhythms in A. thaliana flowers. Here, we addressed the role of these core clock components in the flowers of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, whose flowers open at night, emit benzyl acetone (BA) scents and move vertically through a 140° arc. We first measured N. attenuata floral rhythms under constant light conditions. The results suggest that the circadian clock controls flower opening, BA emission and pedicel movement, but not flower closing. We generated transgenic N. attenuata lines silenced in the homologous genes of Arabidopsis LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and ZEITLUPE (ZTL), which are known to be core clock components. Silencing NaLHY and NaZTL strongly altered floral rhythms in different ways, indicating that conserved clock components in N. attenuata coordinate these floral rhythms. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Circadian variation of the effects of immobility on symptoms of restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Martin; Dumont, Marie; Paquet, Jean; Desautels, Alex; Fantini, Maria Livia; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2005-07-01

    It is now well established that symptoms of restless legs syndrome (RLS) are worsened by immobility and that their severity fluctuates according to a circadian pattern with a maximum occurring in the late evening or during the night. However, no study has ever attempted to dissociate these two effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nycthemeral variations in the effects of duration of immobility on symptoms of RLS. A 28-hour modified constant routine protocol. Sleep Disorders Center, Montreal Sacré-Coeur Hospital. Seven patients with primary RLS (3 men, 4 women; mean age: 43.9 years) and seven controls matched for age (42.4 years) and gender. None. A 40-minute Suggested Immobilization Test (SIT) was repeated every 2 hours during the 28-hour protocol in order to quantify both subjective leg discomfort and periodic leg movements (PLM). Regarding leg discomfort, a two-way ANOVA performed on patients' data revealed a significant interaction (p = 0.037) between Time within the SIT and Time of day. Simple effect analyses performed to decompose the interaction showed that the increase in leg discomfort with duration of immobility was found only on SIT 7, 8, 9, 10 and 12, which corresponds to the period between 21:20 and 08:00. In addition, in patients, a significant circadian variation (p immobility is closely linked to their intrinsic circadian variation.

  4. Circadian and feeding rhythms differentially affect rhythmic mRNA transcription and translation in mouse liver

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    Atger, Florian; Gobet, Cédric; Marquis, Julien; Martin, Eva; Wang, Jingkui; Weger, Benjamin; Lefebvre, Grégory; Descombes, Patrick; Naef, Felix; Gachon, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal oscillations of gene expression are a hallmark of rhythmic physiology across most living organisms. Such oscillations are controlled by the interplay between the circadian clock and feeding rhythms. Although rhythmic mRNA accumulation has been extensively studied, comparatively less is known about their transcription and translation. Here, we quantified simultaneously temporal transcription, accumulation, and translation of mouse liver mRNAs under physiological light–dark conditions and ad libitum or night-restricted feeding in WT and brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1)-deficient animals. We found that rhythmic transcription predominantly drives rhythmic mRNA accumulation and translation for a majority of genes. Comparison of wild-type and Bmal1 KO mice shows that circadian clock and feeding rhythms have broad impact on rhythmic gene expression, Bmal1 deletion affecting surprisingly both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Translation efficiency is differentially regulated during the diurnal cycle for genes with 5′-Terminal Oligo Pyrimidine tract (5′-TOP) sequences and for genes involved in mitochondrial activity, many harboring a Translation Initiator of Short 5′-UTR (TISU) motif. The increased translation efficiency of 5′-TOP and TISU genes is mainly driven by feeding rhythms but Bmal1 deletion also affects amplitude and phase of translation, including TISU genes. Together this study emphasizes the complex interconnections between circadian and feeding rhythms at several steps ultimately determining rhythmic gene expression and translation. PMID:26554015

  5. Synchronizing an aging brain: can entraining circadian clocks by food slow Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Brianne A

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a global epidemic. Unfortunately, we are still without effective treatments or a cure for this disease, which is having devastating consequences for patients, their families, and societies around the world. Until effective treatments are developed, promoting overall health may hold potential for delaying the onset or preventing neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. In particular, chronobiological concepts may provide a useful framework for identifying the earliest signs of age-related disease as well as inexpensive and noninvasive methods for promoting health. It is well reported that AD is associated with disrupted circadian functioning to a greater extent than normal aging. However, it is unclear if the central circadian clock (i.e., the suprachiasmatic nucleus) is dysfunctioning, or whether the synchrony between the central and peripheral clocks that control behavior and metabolic processes are becoming uncoupled. Desynchrony of rhythms can negatively affect health, increasing morbidity and mortality in both animal models and humans. If the uncoupling of rhythms is contributing to AD progression or exacerbating symptoms, then it may be possible to draw from the food-entrainment literature to identify mechanisms for re-synchronizing rhythms to improve overall health and reduce the severity of symptoms. The following review will briefly summarize the circadian system, its potential role in AD, and propose using a feeding-related neuropeptide, such as ghrelin, to synchronize uncoupled rhythms. Synchronizing rhythms may be an inexpensive way to promote healthy aging and delay the onset of neurodegenerative disease such as AD.

  6. Effects of short-term quetiapine treatment on emotional processing, sleep and circadian rhythms.

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    Rock, Philippa L; Goodwin, Guy M; Wulff, Katharina; McTavish, Sarah F B; Harmer, Catherine J

    2016-03-01

    Quetiapine is an atypical antipsychotic that can stabilise mood from any index episode of bipolar disorder. This study investigated the effects of seven-day quetiapine administration on sleep, circadian rhythms and emotional processing in healthy volunteers. Twenty healthy volunteers received 150 mg quetiapine XL for seven nights and 20 matched controls received placebo. Sleep-wake actigraphy was completed for one week both pre-dose and during drug treatment. On Day 8, participants completed emotional processing tasks. Actigraphy revealed that quetiapine treatment increased sleep duration and efficiency, delayed final wake time and had a tendency to reduce within-day variability. There were no effects of quetiapine on subjective ratings of mood or energy. Quetiapine-treated participants showed diminished bias towards positive words and away from negative words during recognition memory. Quetiapine did not significantly affect facial expression recognition, emotional word categorisation, emotion-potentiated startle or emotional word/faces dot-probe vigilance reaction times. These changes in sleep timing and circadian rhythmicity in healthy volunteers may be relevant to quetiapine's therapeutic actions. Effects on emotional processing did not emulate the effects of antidepressants. The effects of quetiapine on sleep and circadian rhythms in patients with bipolar disorder merit further investigation to elucidate its mechanisms of action. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. An agent-based model of cellular dynamics and circadian variability in human endotoxemia.

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    Tung T Nguyen

    Full Text Available As cellular variability and circadian rhythmicity play critical roles in immune and inflammatory responses, we present in this study an agent-based model of human endotoxemia to examine the interplay between circadian controls, cellular variability and stochastic dynamics of inflammatory cytokines. The model is qualitatively validated by its ability to reproduce circadian dynamics of inflammatory mediators and critical inflammatory responses after endotoxin administration in vivo. Novel computational concepts are proposed to characterize the cellular variability and synchronization of inflammatory cytokines in a population of heterogeneous leukocytes. Our results suggest that there is a decrease in cell-to-cell variability of inflammatory cytokines while their synchronization is increased after endotoxin challenge. Model parameters that are responsible for IκB production stimulated by NFκB activation and for the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines have large impacts on system behaviors. Additionally, examining time-dependent systemic responses revealed that the system is least vulnerable to endotoxin in the early morning and most vulnerable around midnight. Although much remains to be explored, proposed computational concepts and the model we have pioneered will provide important insights for future investigations and extensions, especially for single-cell studies to discover how cellular variability contributes to clinical implications.

  8. cGMP-dependent protein kinase I, the circadian clock, sleep and learning.

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    Feil, Robert; Hölter, Sabine M; Weindl, Karin; Wurst, Wolfgang; Langmesser, Sonja; Gerling, Andrea; Feil, Susanne; Albrecht, Urs

    2009-07-01

    The second messenger cGMP controls cardiovascular and gastrointestinal homeostasis in mammals. However, its physiological relevance in the nervous system is poorly understood.1 Now, we have reported that the cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PRKG1) is implicated in the regulation of the timing and quality of sleep and wakefulness.2Prkg1 mutant mice showed altered distribution of sleep and wakefulness as well as reduction in rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) duration and in non-REMS consolidation. Furthermore, the ability to sustain waking episodes was compromised. These observations were also reflected in wheel-running and drinking activity. A decrease in electroencephalogram power in the delta frequency range (1-4 Hz) under baseline conditions was observed, which was normalized after sleep deprivation. Together with the finding that circadian clock amplitude is reduced in Prkg1 mutants these results indicate a decrease of the wake-promoting output of the circadian system affecting sleep. Because quality of sleep might affect learning we tested Prkg1 mutants in several learning tasks and find normal spatial learning but impaired object recognition memory in these animals. Our findings indicate that Prkg1 impinges on circadian rhythms, sleep and distinct aspects of learning.

  9. Manipulating the circadian and sleep cycles to protect against metabolic disease

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    Kazunari eNohara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Modernization of human society parallels an epidemic of metabolic disorders including obesity. Apart from excess caloric intake, a 24/7 lifestyle poses another important challenge to our metabolic health. Recent research under both laboratory and epidemiological settings has indicated that abnormal temporal organization of sleep and wakeful activities including food intake is a significant risk factor for metabolic disease. The circadian clock system is our intrinsic biological timer that regulates internal rhythms such as the sleep/wake cycle and also responses to external stimuli including light and food. Initially thought to be mainly involved in the timing of sleep, the clock and/or clock genes may also play a role in sleep architecture and homeostasis. Importantly, an extensive body of evidence has firmly established a master regulatory role of the clock in energy balance. Together, a close relationship between well-timed circadian/sleep cycles and metabolic health is emerging. Exploiting this functional connection, an important holistic strategy toward curbing the epidemic of metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity involves corrective measures on the circadian clock and sleep. In addition to behavioral and environmental interventions including meal timing and light control, pharmacological agents targeting sleep and circadian clocks promise convenient and effective applications. Recent studies, for example, have reported small molecules targeting specific clock components and displaying robust beneficial effects on sleep and metabolism. Furthermore, a group of clock-amplitude enhancing small molecules (CEMs identified via high-throughput chemical screens are of particular interest for future in vivo studies of their metabolic and sleep efficacies. Elucidating the functional relationship between clock, sleep and metabolism will also have far-reaching implications for various chronic human diseases and aging.

  10. Temporal requirements of the fragile X mental retardation protein in modulating circadian clock circuit synaptic architecture

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    Cheryl L Gatto

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Loss of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 gene function is the most common cause of inherited mental retardation and autism spectrum disorders, characterized by attention disorder, hyperactivity and disruption of circadian activity cycles. Pursuit of effective intervention strategies requires determining when the FMR1 product (FMRP is required in the regulation of neuronal circuitry controlling these behaviors. In the well-characterized Drosophila disease model, loss of the highly conserved dFMRP causes circadian arrhythmicity and conspicuous abnormalities in the circadian clock circuitry. Here, a novel Sholl Analysis was used to quantify over-elaborated synaptic architecture in dfmr1-null small ventrolateral neurons (sLNvs, a key subset of clock neurons. The transgenic Gene-Switch system was employed to drive conditional neuronal dFMRP expression in the dfmr1-null mutant background in order to dissect temporal requirements within the clock circuit. Introduction of dFMRP during early brain development, including the stages of neurogenesis, neuronal fate specification and early pathfinding, provided no rescue of dfmr1 mutant phenotypes. Similarly, restoring normal dFMRP expression in the adult failed to restore circadian circuit architecture. In sharp contrast, supplying dFMRP during a transient window of very late brain development, wherein synaptogenesis and substantial subsequent synaptic reorganization (e.g. use-dependent pruning occur, provided strong morphological rescue to reestablish normal sLNvs synaptic arbors. We conclude that dFMRP plays a developmentally restricted role in sculpting synaptic architecture in these neurons that cannot be compensated for by later reintroduction of the protein at maturity.

  11. Circadian Rhythmicity of Antioxidant Markers in Rats Exposed to 1.8 GHz Radiofrequency Fields

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    Honglong Cao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The potential health risks of exposure to Radiofrequency Fields (RF emitted by mobile phones are currently of considerable public interest, such as the adverse effects on the circadian rhythmicities of biological systems. To determine whether circadian rhythms of the plasma antioxidants (Mel, GSH-Px and SOD are affected by RF, we performed a study on male Sprague Dawley rats exposed to the 1.8 GHz RF. Methods: All animals were divided into seven groups. The animals in six groups were exposed to 1.8 GHz RF (201.7 μW/cm2 power density, 0.05653 W/kg specific absorption rate at a specific period of the day (3, 7, 11, 15, 19 and 23 h GMT, respectively, for 2 h/day for 32 consecutive days. The rats in the seventh group were used as sham-exposed controls. At the end of last RF exposure, blood samples were collected from each rat every 4 h (total period of 24 h and also at similar times from sham-exposed animals. The concentrations of three antioxidants (Mel, GSH-Px and SOD were determined. The data in RF-exposed rats were compared with those in sham-exposed animals. Results: circadian rhythms in the synthesis of Mel and antioxidant enzymes, GSH-Px and SOD, were shifted in RF-exposed rats compared to sham-exposed animals: the Mel, GSH-Px and SOD levels were significantly decreased when RF exposure was given at 23 and 3 h GMT. Conclusion: The overall results indicate that there may be adverse effects of RF exposure on antioxidant function, in terms of both the daily antioxidative levels, as well as the circadian rhythmicity.

  12. [Smith-Magenis syndrome is an association of behavioral and sleep/wake circadian rhythm disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, A; Nicolas, A; Sanlaville, D; Cochat, P; De Leersnyder, H; Rigard, C; Franco, P; des Portes, V; Edery, P; Demily, C

    2015-06-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a genetic disorder characterized by the association of facial dysmorphism, oral speech delay, as well as behavioral and sleep/wake circadian rhythm disorders. Most SMS cases (90%) are due to a 17p11.2 deletion encompassing the RAI1 gene; other cases stem from mutations of the RAI1 gene. Behavioral issues may include frequent outbursts, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, self-injuries with onychotillomania and polyembolokoilamania (insertion of objects into bodily orifices), etc. It is noteworthy that the longer the speech delay and the more severe the sleep disorders, the more severe the behavioral issues are. Typical sleep/wake circadian rhythm disorders associate excessive daytime sleepiness with nocturnal agitation. They are related to an inversion of the physiological melatonin secretion cycle. Yet, with an adapted therapeutic strategy, circadian rhythm disorders can radically improve. Usually an association of beta-blockers in the morning (stops daily melatonin secretion) and melatonin in the evening (mimics the evening deficient peak) is used. Once the sleep disorders are controlled, effective treatment of the remaining psychiatric features is needed. Unfortunately, as for many orphan diseases, objective guidelines have not been drawn up. However, efforts should be focused on improving communication skills. In the same vein, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, aggressiveness, and anxiety should be identified and specifically treated. This whole appropriate medical management is underpinned by the diagnosis of SMS. Diagnostic strategies include fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) when a microdeletion is sought and Sanger sequencing when a point mutation is suspected. Thus, the diagnosis of SMS can be made from a simple blood sample and should be questioned in subjects of any age presenting with an association of facial dysmorphism, speech delay with

  13. Deletion of circadian gene Per1 alleviates acute ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Ping; Zhan, Yibei; Xia, Lin; Hua, Zichun; Zhang, Jianfa

    2013-01-01

    The severity of ethanol-induced liver injury is associated with oxidative stress and lipid accumulation in the liver. Core circadian clock is known to mediate antioxidative enzyme activity and lipid metabolism. However, the link between circadian clock and ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity remains unclear. Here we showed that extents of acute ethanol-induced liver injury and steatosis in mice exhibit circadian variations consistent with hepatic expression of Period (Per) genes. Mice lacking clock gene Per1 displayed less susceptible to ethanol-induced liver injury, as evidenced by lower serum transaminase activity and less severe histopathological changes. Ethanol-induced lipid peroxidation was alleviated in Per1−/− mice. However, Per1 deletion had no effect on antioxidants depletion caused by ethanol administration. Ethanol-induced triglycerides (TG) accumulation in the serum and liver was significantly decreased in Per1−/− mice compared with that in wild-type (WT) mice. Analysis of gene expression in the liver revealed peroxisome proliferators activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) and its target genes related to TG synthesis are remarkably down-regulated in Per1−/− mice. HepG2 cells were treated with ethanol at 150 mM for 3 days. Per1 overexpression augmented lipid accumulation after treatment with ethanol in HepG2 cells, but had no effect on ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Expression of genes related to lipogenesis, including PPARγ and its target genes, was up-regulated in cells overexpressing Per1. In conclusion, these results indicated that circadian rhythms of ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity are controlled by clock gene Per1, and deletion of Per1 protected mice from ethanol-induced liver injury by decreasing hepatic lipid accumulation