WorldWideScience

Sample records for controls affect arsenite

  1. Multiple controls affect arsenite oxidase gene expression in Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coppée Jean-Yves

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both the speciation and toxicity of arsenic are affected by bacterial transformations, i.e. oxidation, reduction or methylation. These transformations have a major impact on environmental contamination and more particularly on arsenic contamination of drinking water. Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans has been isolated from an arsenic- contaminated environment and has developed various mechanisms for coping with arsenic, including the oxidation of As(III to As(V as a detoxification mechanism. Results In the present study, a differential transcriptome analysis was used to identify genes, including arsenite oxidase encoding genes, involved in the response of H. arsenicoxydans to As(III. To get insight into the molecular mechanisms of this enzyme activity, a Tn5 transposon mutagenesis was performed. Transposon insertions resulting in a lack of arsenite oxidase activity disrupted aoxR and aoxS genes, showing that the aox operon transcription is regulated by the AoxRS two-component system. Remarkably, transposon insertions were also identified in rpoN coding for the alternative N sigma factor (σ54 of RNA polymerase and in dnaJ coding for the Hsp70 co-chaperone. Western blotting with anti-AoxB antibodies and quantitative RT-PCR experiments allowed us to demonstrate that the rpoN and dnaJ gene products are involved in the control of arsenite oxidase gene expression. Finally, the transcriptional start site of the aoxAB operon was determined using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and a putative -12/-24 σ54-dependent promoter motif was identified upstream of aoxAB coding sequences. Conclusion These results reveal the existence of novel molecular regulatory processes governing arsenite oxidase expression in H. arsenicoxydans. These data are summarized in a model that functionally integrates arsenite oxidation in the adaptive response to As(III in this microorganism.

  2. Effects of arsenite and UVA-1 radiation on calcineurin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musson, Ruben E.A., E-mail: rm@ream.nl [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Mullenders, Leon H.F. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Smit, Nico P.M. [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    Calcineurin is a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent serine/threonine phosphatase and the target of the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin and tacrolimus, which are used in transplant recipients to prevent rejection. Unfortunately, the therapeutic use of this drugs is complicated by a high incidence of skin malignancy, which has set off a number of studies into the role of calcineurin signaling in skin, particularly with respect to cell cycle control and DNA repair. Both UVA1 radiation and arsenic species are known to promote skin cancer development via production of reactive oxygen species. In light of the well-documented sensitivity of calcineurin to oxidative stress, we examined and compared the effects of UVA1 and arsenite on calcineurin signaling. In this paper, we show that physiologically relevant doses of UVA1 radiation and low micromolar concentrations of arsenite strongly inhibit calcineurin phosphatase activity in Jurkat and skin cells and decrease NFAT nuclear translocation in Jurkat cells. The effects on calcineurin signaling could be partly prevented by inhibition of NADPH oxidase in Jurkat cells or increased dismutation of superoxide in Jurkat and skin cells. In addition, both UVA1 and arsenite decreased NF-{kappa}B activity, although at lower concentrations, arsenite enhanced NF-{kappa}B activity. These data indicate that UVA1 and arsenite affect a signal transduction route of growingly acknowledged importance in skin and that calcineurin may serve as a potential link between ROS exposure and impaired tumor suppression.

  3. Inhibition of mitotic-specific histone phophorylation by sodium arsenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobo, J.M. [Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Valdez, J.G.; Gurley, L.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Synchronized cultures of Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) were used to measure the effects of 10{mu}M sodium arsenite on histone phosphorylation. This treatment caused cell proliferation to be temporarily arrested, after which the cells spontaneously resumed cell proliferation in a radiomimetric manner. Immediately following treatment, it was found that sodium arsenite affected only mitotic-specific HI and H3 phosphorylations. Neither interphase, nor mitotic, H2A and H4 phosphorylations were affected, nor was interphase HI Phosphorylation affected. The phosphorylation of HI was inhibited only in mitosis, reducing HI phosphorylation to 38.1% of control levels, which was the level of interphase HI phosphorylation. The phosphorylation of both H3 variants was inhibited in mitosis, the less hydrophobic H3 to 19% and the more hydrophobic H3 to 24% of control levels. These results suggest that sodium arsenite may inhibite cell proliferation by interfering with the cyclin B/p34{sup cdc2} histone kinase activity which is thought to play a key role in regulating the cell cycle. It has been proposed by our laboratory that HI and H3 phosphorylations play a role in restructuring interphase chromatin into metaphase chromosomes. Interference of this process by sodium arsenite may lead to structurally damaged chromosomes resulting in the increased cancer risks known to be produced by arsenic exposure from the environment.

  4. Sorption of Arsenite onto Mackinawite Coated Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, T. J.; Hayes, K. F.; Abriola, L. M.

    2004-05-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a widespread problem affecting aquifers in the United States as well as abroad. Recent strengthening of the US EPA MCL for arsenic has prompted the need for technology capable of removing both arsenite and arsenate from solution. Arsenite, the more toxic form of arsenic, is more difficult to remove from anoxic zones in the subsurface. Studies by others have demonstrated the affinity of some types of iron sulfides for arsenite, such as troilite, pyrite, amorphous iron sulfide and mackinawite. However, these studies have not provided a comprehensive investigation of the macroscopic behavior of arsenite in the presence of crystalline mackinawite in a form that can be readily applied to real-world treatment technologies. This study examines the behavior of arsenite in the presence of mackinawite coated sand. PH edge results demonstrate that arsenite sorption onto mackinawite coated sand increases with increasing pH, reaching maximum removal at pH 10. Arsenite removal, albeit slight, occurring below pH 5 is independent of pH indicative of a different removal mechanism. Isotherm studies show that at low concentrations, removal is Langmuirian in nature. Arsenite sorption abruptly converts to linear behavior at high concentrations, possibly attributed to the saturation of the monolayer. Ionic strength effects were assessed by comparing pH edge data developed for three different concentrations of NaCl background electrolyte solution. Increases in ionic strength enhance the removal of arsenite from solution, suggesting possible inner-sphere surface complexation removal mechanisms. Information gathered in this study can be used to further develop surface complexation models to describe and predict reactivity of arsenite in the presence of mackinawite coated sands in anoxic regions. Mackinawite coated sands investigated here may provide a feasible reactive medium for implementation in above-ground sorption reactors or subsurface

  5. Effects of cultivation conditions on the uptake of arsenite and arsenic chemical species accumulated by Pteris vittata in hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatayama, Masayoshi; Sato, Takahiko; Shinoda, Kozo; Inoue, Chihiro

    2011-03-01

    The physiological responses of the arsenic-hyperaccumulator, Pteris vittata, such as arsenic uptake and chemical transformation in the fern, have been investigated. However, a few questions remain regarding arsenic treatment in hydroponics. Incubation conditions such as aeration, arsenic concentration, and incubation period might affect those responses of P. vittata in hydroponics. Arsenite uptake was low under anaerobic conditions, as previously reported. However, in an arsenite uptake experiment, phosphorous (P) starvation-dependent uptake of arsenate was observed under aerobic conditions. Time course-dependent analysis of arsenite oxidation showed that arsenite was gradually oxidized to arsenate during incubation. Arsenite oxidation was not observed in any of the control conditions, such as exposure to a nutrient solution or to culture medium only, or with the use of dried root; arsenite oxidation was only observed when live root was used. This result suggests that sufficient aeration allows the rhizosphere system to oxidize arsenite and enables the fern to efficiently take up arsenite as arsenate. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses showed that long-duration exposure to arsenic using a hydroponic system led to the accumulation of arsenate as the dominant species in the root tips, but not in the whole roots, partly because up-regulation of arsenate uptake by P starvation of the fern was caused and retained by long-time incubation. Analysis of concentration-dependent arsenate uptake by P. vittata showed that the uptake switched from a high-affinity transport system to a low-affinity system at high arsenate concentrations, which partially explains the increased arsenate abundance in the whole root. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Arsenite transport in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Waqar; Isayenkov, Stanislav V; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Maathuis, Frans J M

    2009-07-01

    Arsenic is a metalloid which is toxic to living organisms. Natural occurrence of arsenic and human activities have led to widespread contamination in many areas of the world, exposing a large section of the human population to potential arsenic poisoning. Arsenic intake can occur through consumption of contaminated crops and it is therefore important to understand the mechanisms of transport, metabolism and tolerance that plants display in response to arsenic. Plants are mainly exposed to the inorganic forms of arsenic, arsenate and arsenite. Recently, significant progress has been made in the identification and characterisation of proteins responsible for movement of arsenite into and within plants. Aquaporins of the NIP (nodulin26-like intrinsic protein) subfamily were shown to transport arsenite in planta and in heterologous systems. In this review, we will evaluate the implications of these new findings and assess how this may help in developing safer and more tolerant crops.

  7. Quantitative transcriptome, proteome, and sulfur metabolite profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae response to arsenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Michael; Lagniel, Gilles; Kristiansson, Erik; Junot, Christophe; Nerman, Olle; Labarre, Jean; Tamás, Markus J

    2007-06-19

    Arsenic is ubiquitously present in nature, and various mechanisms have evolved enabling cells to evade toxicity and acquire tolerance. Herein, we explored how Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) respond to trivalent arsenic (arsenite) by quantitative transcriptome, proteome, and sulfur metabolite profiling. Arsenite exposure affected transcription of genes encoding functions related to protein biosynthesis, arsenic detoxification, oxidative stress defense, redox maintenance, and proteolytic activity. Importantly, we observed that nearly all components of the sulfate assimilation and glutathione biosynthesis pathways were induced at both gene and protein levels. Kinetic metabolic profiling evidenced a significant increase in the pools of sulfur metabolites as well as elevated cellular glutathione levels. Moreover, the flux in the sulfur assimilation pathway as well as the glutathione synthesis rate strongly increased with a concomitant reduction of sulfur incorporation into proteins. By combining comparative genomics and molecular analyses, we pinpointed transcription factors that mediate the core of the transcriptional response to arsenite. Taken together, our data reveal that arsenite-exposed cells channel a large part of assimilated sulfur into glutathione biosynthesis, and we provide evidence that the transcriptional regulators Yap1p and Met4p control this response in concert.

  8. Aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil) protect against sodium arsenite-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbadegesin, M A; Odunola, O A

    2010-11-25

    We evaluated the effects of aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil) on sodium arsenite-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats. We observed that treatment of the animals with the extracts before or just after sodium arsenite administration significantly (p basilicum before the administration of sodium arsenite resulted in the attenuation of the sodium arsenite-induced aspartate and alanine aminotransferase activities: ALT (from 282.6% to 167.7% and 157.8%), AST (from 325.1% to 173.5% and 164.2%) for the group administered sodium arsenite alone, the aqueous extracts plus sodium arsenite, and ethanolic extracts plus sodium arsenite respectively, expressed as percentage of the negative control. These findings support the presence of hepatoprotective activity in the O.basilicum extracts.

  9. Diversity of arsenite oxidizing bacterial communities in arsenic-rich deltaic aquifers in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devanita eGhosh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available High arsenic (As concentration in groundwater has affected human health, particularly in South-East Asia putting millions of people at risk. Biogeochemical cycling of As carried out by different bacterial groups are suggested to control the As fluxes in aquifers. A functional diversity approach in link with As precipitation was adopted to study bacterial community structures and their variation within the As contaminated Bengal Delta Plain (BDP aquifers of India. Groundwater samples collected from two shallow aquifers in Karimpur II (West Bengal, India, during years 2010 and 2011, were investigated to trace the effects of inter-annual variability in precipitation on community structure and diversity of bacterial assemblages. The study focused on amplification, clone library generation and sequencing of the arsenite oxidase large sub-unit gene aioA and 16S rRNA marker, with respect to changes in elemental concentrations. New set of primers were designed to amplify the aioA gene as a phylogenetic marker to study taxonomically diverse arsenite oxidizing bacterial groups in these aquifers. Overall narrow distribution of bacterial communities based on aioA and 16S rRNA sequences observed was due to poor nutrient status and anoxic conditions in these As contaminated aquifers. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum detected, within which Acidovorax, Hydrogenophaga, Albidiferax, Bosea and Polymorphum were the major arsenite oxidizing bacterial genera. The structure of bacterial assemblages including those of arsenite oxidizing bacteria were affected by an increase in major elemental concentrations (e.g., As, iron, sulfur, and silica within two sampling sessions, which was supported by PCA analysis. One of the significant findings of this study is detection of novel lineages of 16S rRNA-like bacterial sequences indicating presence of indigenous bacterial communities across both wells of BDP that can play important role in biogeochemical cycling of

  10. Arsenite exposure compromises early embryonic development in the Golden hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unis, Dave; Osborne, Cassandra; Diawara, Moussa M

    2009-11-01

    The toxicity of arsenite to 8-cell stage hamster embryos was evaluated. Females were superovulated and mated; embryos were collected and grown for 72 h in culture medium containing vehicle control, 25, 50, 250, 500, or 750 nM arsenite. Morphological observations were taken at 0 and 24h increments. A TUNEL assay was used for determining DNA damage. Survival was expressed by the ability to undergo zona escape. The control group had 78% survival and no evidence of deformities. Embryos in the 25, 50 and 250 nM groups had survival rates of 63%, 55% and 27%, respectively. Arsenite exposure caused total embryo lethality, major deformities, complete failure to undergo zona lysis, and significantly higher number of cells with fragmented DNA in embryos at the 500 and 750 nM concentrations. The study underscores the sensitivity of preimplantation stage embryos to the presence of even relatively small amounts of arsenic in luminal fluid.

  11. Effect of curcumin on kidney histopathological changes, lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant capacity of serum in sodium arsenite-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Hamid Reza; Eskandari, Najmeh

    2017-02-01

    Sodium arsenite is an environmental pollutant with the ability to generate free radicals and curcumin acts as a potent antioxidant. This study investigates the effect of curcumin on kidney histopathology, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant capacity of serum in the mice treated with sodium arsenite. Adult male mice were divided into four groups: control, sodium arsenite, curcumin and curcumin+sodium arsenite. The treatments were delivered for 5 weeks. After the treatment period, blood samples were collected and the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity of serum were determined. Left kidney was dissected, weighed and used for histopathological and histomorphometrical studies. Sodium arsenite-treated mice showed a significant decrease in the diameter of glomerulus and proximal tubule, glomerular area, total antioxidant capacity of serum as well as a significant increase in serum concentration of MDA compared to the control group. However, no significant difference was found in kidney weight, area and diameter of Bowman's capsule as well as the diameter of distal tubule in mice treated with sodium arsenite compared to the control. In curcumin+sodium arsenite group, curcumin significantly reversed the adverse effects of sodium arsenite on the diameter of glomerulus and proximal tubule, glomerular area, total antioxidant capacity of serum and serum concentration of MDA compared to the sodium arsenite group. The application of curcumin alone significantly increased the total antioxidant capacity of serum compared to the control. Curcumin compensated the adverse effects of sodium arsenite on kidney tissue, lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant capacity of serum.

  12. Auxin and its transport play a role in plant tolerance to arsenite-induced oxidative stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Aparna; Rathinasabapathi, Bala

    2013-10-01

    The role of auxin in plant development is well known; however, its possible function in root response to abiotic stress is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate a novel role of auxin transport in plant tolerance to oxidative stress caused by arsenite. Plant response to arsenite [As(III)] was evaluated by measuring root growth and markers for stress on seedlings treated with control or As(III)-containing medium. Auxin transporter mutants aux1, pin1 and pin2 were significantly more sensitive to As(III) than the wild type (WT). Auxin transport inhibitors significantly reduced plant tolerance to As(III) in the WT, while exogenous supply of indole-3-acetic acid improved As(III) tolerance of aux1 and not that of WT. Uptake assays using H(3) -IAA showed As(III) affected auxin transport in WT roots. As(III) increased the levels of H2 O2 in WT but not in aux1, suggesting a positive role for auxin transport through AUX1 on plant tolerance to As(III) stress via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signalling. Compared to the WT, the mutant aux1 was significantly more sensitive to high-temperature stress and salinity, also suggesting auxin transport influences a common element shared by plant tolerance to arsenite, salinity and high-temperature stress.

  13. Silymarin protects plasma membrane and acrosome integrity in sperm treated with sodium arsenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Eskandari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure to arsenic is associated with impairment of male reproductive function by inducing oxidative stress. Silymarin with an antioxidant property scavenges free radicals. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate if silymarin can prevent the adverse effects of sodium arsenite on ram sperm plasma membrane and acrosome integrity. Materials and Methods: Ram epidydimal spermatozoa were divided into five groups: spermatozoa at 0 hr, spermatozoa at 180 min (control, spermatozoa treated with silymarin (20 μM + sodium arsenite (10 μM for 180 min, spermatozoa treated with sodium arsenite (10 μM for 180 min and spermatozoa treated with silymarin (20 μM for 180 min. Double staining of Hoechst and propidium iodide was performed to evaluate sperm plasma membrane integrity, whereas comassie brilliant blue staining was used to assess acrosome integrity. Results: Plasma membrane (p< 0.001 and acrosome integrity (p< 0.05 of the spermatozoa were significantly reduced in sodium arsenite group compared to the control. In silymarin + sodium arsenite group, silymarin was able to significantly (p< 0.001 ameliorate the adverse effects of sodium arsenite on these sperm parameters compared to sodium arsenite group. The incubation of sperm for 180 min (control group showed a significant (p< 0.001 decrease in acrosome integrity compared to the spermatozoa at 0 hour. The application of silymarin alone for 180 min could also significantly (p< 0.05 increase sperm acrosome integrity compared to the control. Conclusion: Silymarin as a potent antioxidant could compensate the adverse effects of sodium arsenite on the ram sperm plasma membrane and acrosome integrity.

  14. Altered Hepatic Transport by Fetal Arsenite Exposure in Diet-Induced Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzel, Eric J; Li, Hui; Foy, Caroline E; Perrera, Alec B; Parker, Patricia; Renquist, Benjamin J; Cherrington, Nathan J; Camenisch, Todd D

    2016-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease can result in changes to drug metabolism and disposition potentiating adverse drug reactions. Furthermore, arsenite exposure during development compounds the severity of diet-induced fatty liver disease. This study examines the effects of arsenite potentiated diet-induced fatty liver disease on hepatic transport in male mice. Changes were detected for Mrp2/3/4 hepatic transporter gene expression as well as for Oatp1a4/2b1/1b2. Plasma concentrations of Mrp and Oatp substrates were increased in arsenic exposure groups compared with diet-only controls. In addition, murine embryonic hepatocytes and adult primary hepatocytes show significantly altered transporter expression after exposure to arsenite alone: a previously unreported phenomenon. These data indicate that developmental exposure to arsenite leads to changes in hepatic transport which could increase the risk for ADRs during fatty liver disease.

  15. Transporters of arsenite in rice and their role in arsenic accumulation in rice grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian Feng; Yamaji, Naoki; Mitani, Namiki; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Su, Yu-Hong; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2008-07-22

    Arsenic poisoning affects millions of people worldwide. Human arsenic intake from rice consumption can be substantial because rice is particularly efficient in assimilating arsenic from paddy soils, although the mechanism has not been elucidated. Here we report that two different types of transporters mediate transport of arsenite, the predominant form of arsenic in paddy soil, from the external medium to the xylem. Transporters belonging to the NIP subfamily of aquaporins in rice are permeable to arsenite but not to arsenate. Mutation in OsNIP2;1 (Lsi1, a silicon influx transporter) significantly decreases arsenite uptake. Furthermore, in the rice mutants defective in the silicon efflux transporter Lsi2, arsenite transport to the xylem and accumulation in shoots and grain decreased greatly. Mutation in Lsi2 had a much greater impact on arsenic accumulation in shoots and grain in field-grown rice than Lsi1. Arsenite transport in rice roots therefore shares the same highly efficient pathway as silicon, which explains why rice is efficient in arsenic accumulation. Our results provide insight into the uptake mechanism of arsenite in rice and strategies for reducing arsenic accumulation in grain for enhanced food safety.

  16. An Affect Control Theory of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Daniel B.

    2010-01-01

    Affect control theory is a theory of interaction that takes into account cultural meanings. Affect control research has previously considered interaction with technology, but there remains a lack of theorizing about inclusion of technology within the theory. This paper lays a foundation for an affect control theory of technology by addressing key…

  17. Developmental mechanisms of arsenite toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Dan [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China); Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Lu Cailing [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China); Wang Ju; Hu Wei; Cao Zongfu; Sun Daguang [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China); Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Xia Hongfei [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China); Ma Xu [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China) and Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China) and Department of Reproductive Genetics, WHO Collaborative Center for Research in Human Reproduction, Beijing (China)], E-mail: genetic@263.net.cn

    2009-02-19

    Arsenic usually accumulates in soil, water and airborne particles, from which it is taken up by various organisms. Exposure to arsenic through food and drinking water is a major public health problem affecting some countries. At present there are limited laboratory data on the effects of arsenic exposure on early embryonic development and the mechanisms behind its toxicity. In this study, we used zebrafish as a model system to investigate the effects of arsenite on early development. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to a range of sodium arsenite concentrations (0-10.0 mM) between 4 and 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Survival and early development of the embryos were not obviously influenced by arsenite concentrations below 0.5 mM. However, embryos exposed to higher concentrations (0.5-10.0 mM) displayed reduced survival and abnormal development including delayed hatching, retarded growth and changed morphology. Alterations in neural development included weak tactile responses to light (2.0-5.0 mM, 30 hpf), malformation of the spinal cord and disordered motor axon projections (2.0 mM, 48 hpf). Abnormal cardiac function was observed as bradycardia (0.5-2.0 mM, 60 hpf) and altered ventricular shape (2.0 mM, 48 hpf). Furthermore, altered cell proliferation (2.0 mM, 24 hpf) and apoptosis status (2.0 mM, 24 and 48 hpf), as well as abnormal genomic DNA methylation patterning (2.0 mM, 24 and 48 hpf) were detected in the arsenite-treated embryos. All of these indicate a possible relationship between arsenic exposure and developmental failure in early embryogenesis. Our studies suggest that the negative effects of arsenic on vertebrate embryogenesis are substantial.

  18. Anaerobic oxidation of arsenite in Mono Lake water and by a facultative, arsenite-oxidizing chemoautotroph, strain MLHE-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.; Hoeft, S.E.; Santini, J.M.; Bano, N.; Hollibaugh, R.A.; Hollibaugh, J.T.

    2002-01-01

    Arsenite [As(III)]-enriched anoxic bottom water from Mono Lake, California, produced arsenate [As(V)] during incubation with either nitrate or nitrite. No such oxidation occurred in killed controls or in live samples incubated without added nitrate or nitrite. A small amount of biological As(III) oxidation was observed in samples amended with Fe(III) chelated with nitrolotriacetic acid, although some chemical oxidation was also evident in killed controls. A pure culture, strain MLHE-1, that was capable of growth with As(III) as its electron donor and nitrate as its electron acceptor was isolated in a defined mineral salts medium. Cells were also able to grow in nitrate-mineral salts medium by using H2 or sulfide as their electron donor in lieu of As(III). Arsenite-grown cells demonstrated dark 14CO2 fixation, and PCR was used to indicate the presence of a gene encoding ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Strain MLHE-1 is a facultative chemoautotroph, able to grow with these inorganic electron donors and nitrate as its electron acceptor, but heterotrophic growth on acetate was also observed under both aerobic and anaerobic (nitrate) conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of its 16S ribosomal DNA sequence placed strain MLHE-1 within the haloalkaliphilic Ectothiorhodospira of the ??-Proteobacteria. Arsenite oxidation has never been reported for any members of this subgroup of the Proteobacteria.

  19. In vitro effect of sodium arsenite on Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Guoqiang; Wang, Bo; Lei, Ying; Liu, Chunli; Wang, Zhuo; Shi, Hongjuan; Yang, Rentan; Qin, Wenjuan; Jiang, Yufeng; Lv, Hailong

    2016-06-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by the metacestodes of Echinococcus granulosus is an important cosmopolitan zoonosis. Surgery is the main treatment option for CE. Meanwhile, chemotherapy is used as an significant adjunct to surgery. However, the benzimidazole carbamate group and the existing scolicidal agents may not be as effective as hoped. In this study, we aimed to explore the in vitro effect of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) on Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces, the causative agents of CE. Protoscoleces of E. granulosus were incubated in vitro with 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20μM NaAsO2. Viability and changes in morphology were investigated by 0.1% eosin staining. The ultrastructural alterations were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Additionally, caspase-3 activity was measured by colorimetric assay. Obvious protoscolicidal effect was seen with NaAsO2 at concentrations of 16μM and 20μM. Protoscolex mortality was 83.24% (16μM) and 100% (20μM) after 6 days post-incubation. SEM showed that the primary site of drug damage was the tegument of the protoscoleces. TEM analysis demonstrated that the internal tissues were severely affected and revealed an increase in the number of lipid droplets and vacuoles after treatment with 16μM NaAsO2. Meanwhile, the caspase-3 activity significantly increased in protoscoleces after 24h of NaAsO2 incubation compared to the untreated controls. Our study demonstrated the clear in vitro scolicidal effect of NaAsO2 against E. granulosus protoscoleces. However, the in vivo efficacy, specific mechanism, and any possible side effects of NaAsO2 remain to be investigated.

  20. Organization and regulation of the arsenite oxidase operon of the moderately acidophilic and facultative chemoautotrophic Thiomonas arsenitoxydans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyemi, Djamila; Moinier, Danielle; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2013-11-01

    Thiomonas arsenitoxydans is an acidophilic and facultatively autotrophic bacterium that can grow by oxidizing arsenite to arsenate. A comparative genomic analysis showed that the T. arsenitoxydans aioBA cluster encoding the two subunits of arsenite oxidase is distinct from the other clusters, with two specific genes encoding a cytochrome c and a metalloregulator belonging to the ArsR/SmtB family. These genes are cotranscribed with aioBA, suggesting that these cytochromes c are involved in arsenite oxidation and that this operon is controlled by the metalloregulator. The growth of T. arsenitoxydans in the presence of thiosulfate and arsenite, or arsenate, is biphasic. Real-time PCR experiments showed that the operon is transcribed during the second growth phase in the presence of arsenite or arsenate, whereas antimonite had no effect. These results suggest that the expression of the aioBA operon of T. arsenitoxydans is regulated by the electron donor present in the medium, i.e., is induced in the presence of arsenic but is repressed by more energetic substrates. Our data indicate that the genetic organization and regulation of the aioBA operon of T. arsenitoxydans differ from those of the other arsenite oxidizers.

  1. Adsorption and oxidation of arsenite by iron minerals in the presence of microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelomov, Leonid; Corsini, Anna; Andreoni, Vincenza

    2010-05-01

    It is known the two most commonly occurring forms of As in the environment are anionic arsenate [AsO43-, As(V)] and arsenite [AsO33-, As(III)]. Arsenite has been found to be the more mobile and toxic species in soil environments (Tamaki and Frankenberger, 1992). Arsenic speciation and toxicity are functions of pH, redox potential, the presence and type of adsorbing surfaces, and microbial populations. Biotransformation of arsenic species (reduction or oxidation) is mainly enzymatic process, while biosorption is metabolism independent process that governed by physico-chemical interactions on the cell surface. Special ternary bio-mineral systems, consisting of iron minerals (synthetic goethite, and magnetite, which was prepared by oxidation from special commercial product - nano-iron), special strains of arsenite-oxidizing microorganisms (Ancylobacter dichlorometanicus) and arsenite solution, were constructed and processes of arsenic compounds adsorption and oxidation were studied. As control experiments without microorganisms or without minerals were carried out. For determination of arsenic species, adsorbed on the surface of the minerals, desorption experiments were carried out also. Desorption ability of several chemicals, used for arsenic extraction from soils, was tested. Magnetite and goethite, with very small size of particles, have high chemical affinity to arsenite at wide range of pH values, but at pH above 9 adsorption of arsenite decreased in comparison with pH below of the isoelectric points of the minerals. We carried out experiments at initial pH 7,2. Experiments on kinetics of adsorption showed that equilibrium time for adsorption is 2 hours. In the ternary bio-mineral systems consisting of fresh-prepared magnetite,the effect of arsenite-oxidizing microorganisms on the oxidation process was negligible in all cases, because magnetite demonstrated very high oxidation ability in comparison with bacteria. During 4 hours all arsenite, adsorbed on the

  2. Linking microbial oxidation of arsenic with detection and phylogenetic analysis of arsenite oxidase genes in diverse geothermal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamura, N; Macur, R E; Korf, S; Ackerman, G; Taylor, W P; Kozubal, M; Reysenbach, A-L; Inskeep, W P

    2009-02-01

    The identification and characterization of genes involved in the microbial oxidation of arsenite will contribute to our understanding of factors controlling As cycling in natural systems. Towards this goal, we recently characterized the widespread occurrence of aerobic arsenite oxidase genes (aroA-like) from pure-culture bacterial isolates, soils, sediments and geothermal mats, but were unable to detect these genes in all geothermal systems where we have observed microbial arsenite oxidation. Consequently, the objectives of the current study were to measure arsenite-oxidation rates in geochemically diverse thermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) ranging in pH from 2.6 to 8, and to identify corresponding 16S rRNA and aroA genotypes associated with these arsenite-oxidizing environments. Geochemical analyses, including measurement of arsenite-oxidation rates within geothermal outflow channels, were combined with 16S rRNA gene and aroA functional gene analysis using newly designed primers to capture previously undescribed aroA-like arsenite oxidase gene diversity. The majority of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences found in acidic (pH 2.6-3.6) Fe-oxyhydroxide microbial mats were closely related to Hydrogenobaculum spp. (members of the bacterial order Aquificales), while the predominant sequences from near-neutral (pH 6.2-8) springs were affiliated with other Aquificales including Sulfurihydrogenibium spp., Thermocrinis spp. and Hydrogenobacter spp., as well as members of the Deinococci, Thermodesulfobacteria and beta-Proteobacteria. Modified primers designed around previously characterized and newly identified aroA-like genes successfully amplified new lineages of aroA-like genes associated with members of the Aquificales across all geothermal systems examined. The expression of Aquificales aroA-like genes was also confirmed in situ, and the resultant cDNA sequences were consistent with aroA genotypes identified in the same environments. The aroA sequences

  3. Arsenite Regulates Prolongation of Glycan Residues of Membrane Glycoprotein: A Pivotal Study via Wax Physisorption Kinetics and FTIR Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic exposure results in several human cancers, including those of the skin, lung, and bladder. As skin cancers are the most common form, epidermal keratinocytes (KC are the main target of arsenic exposure. The mechanisms by which arsenic induces carcinogenesis remains unclear, but aberrant cell proliferation and dysregulated energy homeostasis play a significant role. Protein glycosylation is involved in many key physiological processes, including cell proliferation and differentiation. To evaluate whether arsenite exposure affected protein glycosylation, the alteration of chain length of glycan residues in arsenite treated skin cells was estimated. Herein we demonstrated that the protein glycosylation was adenosine triphosphate (ATP-dependent and regulated by arsenite exposure by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR reflectance spectroscopy, synchrotron-radiation-based FTIR (SR-FTIR microspectroscopy, and wax physisorption kinetics coupled with focal-plane-array-based FTIR (WPK-FPA-FTIR imaging. We were able to estimate the relative length of surface protein-linked glycan residues on arsenite-treated skin cells, including primary KC and two skin cancer cell lines, HSC-1 and HaCaT cells. Differential physisorption of wax adsorbents adhered to long-chain (elongated type and short-chain (regular type glycan residues of glycoprotein of skin cell samples treated with various concentration of arsenite was measured. The physisorption ratio of beeswax remain/n-pentacosane remain for KC cells was increased during arsenite exposure. Interestingly, this increase was reversed after oligomycin (an ATP synthase inhibitor pretreatment, suggesting the chain length of protein-linked glycan residues is likely ATP-dependent. This is the first study to demonstrate the elongation and termination of surface protein-linked glycan residues using WPK-FPA-FTIR imaging in eukaryotes. Herein the result may provide a scientific basis to target surface protein

  4. Arsenite Regulates Prolongation of Glycan Residues of Membrane Glycoprotein: A Pivotal Study via Wax Physisorption Kinetics and FTIR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Yen; Huang, Pei-Yu; Chen, Ching-Iue; Lee, Yao-Chang; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2016-03-22

    Arsenic exposure results in several human cancers, including those of the skin, lung, and bladder. As skin cancers are the most common form, epidermal keratinocytes (KC) are the main target of arsenic exposure. The mechanisms by which arsenic induces carcinogenesis remains unclear, but aberrant cell proliferation and dysregulated energy homeostasis play a significant role. Protein glycosylation is involved in many key physiological processes, including cell proliferation and differentiation. To evaluate whether arsenite exposure affected protein glycosylation, the alteration of chain length of glycan residues in arsenite treated skin cells was estimated. Herein we demonstrated that the protein glycosylation was adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent and regulated by arsenite exposure by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy, synchrotron-radiation-based FTIR (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy, and wax physisorption kinetics coupled with focal-plane-array-based FTIR (WPK-FPA-FTIR) imaging. We were able to estimate the relative length of surface protein-linked glycan residues on arsenite-treated skin cells, including primary KC and two skin cancer cell lines, HSC-1 and HaCaT cells. Differential physisorption of wax adsorbents adhered to long-chain (elongated type) and short-chain (regular type) glycan residues of glycoprotein of skin cell samples treated with various concentration of arsenite was measured. The physisorption ratio of beeswax remain/n-pentacosane remain for KC cells was increased during arsenite exposure. Interestingly, this increase was reversed after oligomycin (an ATP synthase inhibitor) pretreatment, suggesting the chain length of protein-linked glycan residues is likely ATP-dependent. This is the first study to demonstrate the elongation and termination of surface protein-linked glycan residues using WPK-FPA-FTIR imaging in eukaryotes. Herein the result may provide a scientific basis to target surface protein-linked glycan

  5. Arsenite suppression of BMP signaling in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Marjorie A.; Qin, Qin [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States); Hu, Qin; Zhao, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Rice, Robert H., E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Arsenic, a human skin carcinogen, suppresses differentiation of cultured keratinocytes. Exploring the mechanism of this suppression revealed that BMP-6 greatly increased levels of mRNA for keratins 1 and 10, two of the earliest differentiation markers expressed, a process prevented by co-treatment with arsenite. BMP also stimulated, and arsenite suppressed, mRNA for FOXN1, an important transcription factor driving early keratinocyte differentiation. Keratin mRNAs increased slowly after BMP-6 addition, suggesting they are indirect transcriptional targets. Inhibition of Notch1 activation blocked BMP induction of keratins 1 and 10, while FOXN1 induction was largely unaffected. Supporting a requirement for Notch1 signaling in keratin induction, BMP increased levels of activated Notch1, which was blocked by arsenite. BMP also greatly decreased active ERK, while co-treatment with arsenite maintained active ERK. Inhibition of ERK signaling mimicked BMP by inducing keratin and FOXN1 mRNAs and by increasing active Notch1, effects blocked by arsenite. Of 6 dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) targeting ERK, two were induced by BMP unless prevented by simultaneous exposure to arsenite and EGF. Knockdown of DUSP2 or DUSP14 using shRNAs greatly reduced FOXN1 and keratins 1 and 10 mRNA levels and their induction by BMP. Knockdown also decreased activated Notch1, keratin 1 and keratin 10 protein levels, both in the presence and absence of BMP. Thus, one of the earliest effects of BMP is induction of DUSPs, which increases FOXN1 transcription factor and activates Notch1, both required for keratin gene expression. Arsenite prevents this cascade by maintaining ERK signaling, at least in part by suppressing DUSP expression. - Highlights: • BMP induces FOXN1 transcription. • BMP induces DUSP2 and DUSP14, suppressing ERK activation. • Arsenite suppresses levels of phosphorylated Smad1/5 and FOXN1 and DUSP mRNA. • These actions rationalize arsenite suppression of keratinocyte

  6. Complexation of arsenite with phytochelatins reduces arsenite efflux and translocation from roots to shoots in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Ju; Wood, B Alan; Raab, Andrea; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Feldmann, Jörg

    2010-04-01

    Complexation of arsenite [As(III)] with phytochelatins (PCs) is an important mechanism employed by plants to detoxify As; how this complexation affects As mobility was little known. We used high-resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and accurate mass electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry coupled to HPLC to identify and quantify As(III)-thiol complexes and free thiol compounds in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) exposed to arsenate [As(V)]. As(V) was efficiently reduced to As(III) in roots. In wild-type roots, 69% of As was complexed as As(III)-PC4, As(III)-PC3, and As(III)-(PC2)2. Both the glutathione (GSH)-deficient mutant cad2-1 and the PC-deficient mutant cad1-3 were approximately 20 times more sensitive to As(V) than the wild type. In cad1-3 roots, only 8% of As was complexed with GSH as As(III)-(GS)3 and no As(III)-PCs were detected, while in cad2-1 roots, As(III)-PCs accounted for only 25% of the total As. The two mutants had a greater As mobility, with a significantly higher accumulation of As(III) in shoots and 4.5 to 12 times higher shoot-to-root As concentration ratio than the wild type. Roots also effluxed a substantial proportion of the As(V) taken up as As(III) to the external medium, and this efflux was larger in the two mutants. Furthermore, when wild-type plants were exposed to l-buthionine sulfoximine or deprived of sulfur, both As(III) efflux and root-to-shoot translocation were enhanced. The results indicate that complexation of As(III) with PCs in Arabidopsis roots decreases its mobility for both efflux to the external medium and for root-to-shoot translocation. Enhancing PC synthesis in roots may be an effective strategy to reduce As translocation to the edible organs of food crops.

  7. Protective effect of Juglans nigra on sodium arsenite-induced toxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon E Owumi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consumption of arsenic contaminated water has been implicated in metalloid-induced carcinogenesis. Dietary intake of certain plant products with chemoprotective properties may protect against the onset of diseases and promote maintenance of health. Objectives: We investigated the outcome of black walnut Juglans nigra (JN consumption on sodium arsenite (SA-induced toxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: Wister albino rats were treated as follows: Control, SA only (positive control (2.5 mg/kg body weight, JN only (100 mg/kg weight, and JN+SA coadministered. After 5 weeks animals were sacrificed whole blood, femur, liver and testis harvested were assessed for hepatic transaminases and clastogenicity. Histology of the liver, sperm morphology and quality were also assessed. Data were analyzed (ANOVA and expressed as means ±SD. Results: SA treatment elevated hepatic transaminases level in serum (P < 0.05, induced histological changes in liver: fibroplasia and periportal hepatocytes infiltration by mononuclear cells. These changes were ameliorated by JN (P < 0.05 coadministration. SA induced micronuclei formation (P < 0.05. Again JN decreased (P < 0.05 micronuclei formation by 50%. Sperm count and motility decreased (P < 0.05 in all groups compared to control. Conclusion: JN showed no protection against arsenite effect on sperm quality. Hepatoprotective and anticlastogenic effects were apparent suggesting a chemopreventive potential active against arsenite genotoxicity and chromosomal instability which have implication for metalloid-induced carcinogenesis.

  8. Development of a biosorbent for arsenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Monica Cristina [Ouro Preto Univ. (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacia; Ciminelli, Virginia S.T. [Minas Gerais Univ.(UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    2005-07-01

    The understanding of the interaction mechanism of arsenite with biological molecules, and more specifically the biochemical fundamentals that explain arsenic toxicity, was applied to the development of a bio material capable of selectively removing As (III) from aqueous environments. The results of this original approach to the treatment of arsenic-containing solution demonstrated that a cysteine-rich biomass - a residue from the poultry industry - was highly selective for arsenic removal in its trivalent form, and advantage over the conventional techniques for As uptake, which usually require a previous oxidation stage. Arsenic uptake reaches values of up to 270 {mu}mol As (III){sub I}g of biomass. The observed selectivity towards As(III) was explained by the adsorption mechanism. (author)

  9. Ion Chromatographic Estimation of Arsenite and Arsenate at Trace Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Chavan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Present method shows simple and specific determination of traces of inorganic arsenic in water. This method enables simultaneous determination of arsenite by electrochemical detection and arsenate by suppressed conductivity detection. The applicability of this method was illustrated by determining the inorganic arsenite and arsenate content from bore-well water and river water samples without any special pretreatment. The present method for direct determination of arsenite and arsenate shows good sensitivity, selectivity, precision and accuracy. Detection limits determined using this procedure was found to be 2.0 μg/L for arsenite and 30.0 μg/L for Arsenate. The simplicity, ease of use, low detection limit and low running cost of this method makes it appealing for increasing capability of testing in the lab.

  10. Industrial experiment of copper electrolyte purification by copper arsenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ya-jie; XIAO Fa-xin; WANG Yong; LI Chun-hua; XU Wei; JIAN Hong-sheng; MA Yut-ian

    2008-01-01

    Copper electrolyte was purified by copper arsenite that was prepared with As2O3. And electrolysis experiments of purified electrolyte were carried out at 235 and 305 A/m2, respectively. The results show that the yield of copper arsenite is up to 98.64% when the molar ratio of Cu to As is 1.5 in the preparation of copper arsenite. The removal rates of Sb and Bi reach 74.11% and 65.60% respectively after copper arsenite is added in electrolyte. The concentrations of As, Sb and Bi in electrolyte nearly remain constant during electrolysis of 13 d. The appearances of cathode copper obtained at 235 and 305 A/m2 are slippery and even, and the qualification rate is 100% according to the Chinese standard of high-pure cathode copper(GB/T467-97).

  11. Sodium arsenite-induced inhibition of cell proliferation is related to inhibition of IL-2 mRNA expression in mouse activated T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, Patricia; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C.; Calderon-Aranda, Emma S. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, CINVESTAV, Seccion Toxicologia, P.O. Box 14-740, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Goytia-Acevedo, Raquel C. [Universidad Juarez del Estado de Durango, Facultad de Medicina, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    A proposed mechanism for the As-induced inhibition of cell proliferation is the inhibition of IL-2 secretion. However, the effects of arsenite on IL-2 mRNA expression or on the ERK pathway in activated-T cells have not yet been described. We examined the effect of arsenite on IL-2 mRNA expression, cell activation and proliferation in PHA-stimulated murine lymphocytes. Arsenite (1 and 10 {mu}M) decreased IL-2 mRNA expression, IL-2 secretion and cell proliferation. Arsenite (10 {mu}M) strongly inhibited ERK-phosphorylation. However, the partial inhibition (50%) of IL-2 mRNA produced by 1 {mu}M, consistent with the effects on IL-2 secretion and cell proliferation, could not be explained by the inhibition of ERK-phosphorylation, which was not affected at this concentration. The inhibition of IL-2 mRNA expression caused by 1 {mu}M could be associated to effects on pathways located downstream or parallel to ERK. Arsenite also decreased early activation (surface CD69{sup +} expression) in both CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +}, and decreased total CD8{sup +} count without significantly affecting CD4{sup +}, supporting that the cellular immune response mediated by cytotoxic T cells is an arsenic target. Thus, our results suggest that arsenite decreases IL-2 mRNA levels and T-cell activation and proliferation. However, further studies on the effects of arsenite on IL-2 gene transcription and IL-2 mRNA stability are needed. (orig.)

  12. Positive affect increases secondary control among causally uncertain individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Stephanie J; George, Melanie P

    2015-01-01

    Secondary control (acceptance of and adjustment to negative events) is thought to promote positive affect. We examined the opposite path: could positive affect increase secondary control, particularly among individuals high in causal uncertainty, who stand to benefit from it the most? In two studies, participants completed a causal uncertainty scale, thought about a problem while listening to affect-inducing music or no music, and then completed items that assessed secondary control. In Study 1, the music induced positive or negative affect. In Study 2, the music induced affect that was high or low in activation and positive or negative in valence. In both studies, we found that positive affect-inducing music increased secondary control among high causal uncertainty participants. Furthermore, trait affect did not account for the effects of causal uncertainty, and music did not influence primary control. These findings show that secondary control can fluctuate as a function of state affect.

  13. Photoinduced Oxidation of Arsenite to Arsenate on Ferrihydrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N Bhandari; R Reeder; D Strongin

    2011-12-31

    The photochemistry of an aqueous suspension of the iron oxyhydroxide, ferrihydrite, in the presence of arsenite has been investigated using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and solution phase analysis. Both ATR-FTIR and XANES show that the exposure of ferrihydrite to arsenite in the dark leads to no change in the As oxidation state, but the exposure of this arsenite-bearing surface, which is in contact with pH 5 water, to light leads to the conversion of the majority of the adsorbed arsenite to the As(V) bearing species, arsenate. Analysis of the solution phase shows that ferrous iron is released into solution during the oxidation of arsenite. The photochemical reaction, however, shows the characteristics of a self-terminating reaction in that there is a significant suppression of this redox chemistry before 10% of the total iron making up the ferrihydrite partitions into solution as ferrous iron. The self-terminating behavior exhibited by this photochemical arsenite/ferrihydrite system is likely due to the passivation of the ferrihydrite surface by the strongly bound arsenate product.

  14. Positive and negative affect in illusion of control

    OpenAIRE

    Novović Zdenka; Kovač Aleksandra; Đurić Veljko; Biro Mikloš

    2012-01-01

    Research regarding the illusion of control was dominated by the studies examining the effect of depressive affect on the overestimation of control over uncontrollable events. However, the relative contributions of high Negative Affect (NA) and low Positive Affect (PA), as underlying dimensions of depressive states, has remained unclear. This study researched how both PA and NA had affected the illusion of control. Two weeks before illusion induction, trait PA and NA of 54 first-year uni...

  15. Arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing bacteria associated with arsenic-rich groundwater in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan; Chu, Yu-Ju; Su, Yu-Chen; Hsiao, Sung-Yun; Wei, Chia-Cheng; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Liao, Chung-Min; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Chang, Fi-John

    2011-04-01

    Drinking highly arsenic-contaminated groundwater is a likely cause of blackfoot disease in Taiwan, but microorganisms that potentially control arsenic mobility in the subsurface remain unstudied. The objective of this study was to investigate the relevant arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing microbial community that exists in highly arsenic-contaminated groundwater in Taiwan. We cultured and identified arsenic-transforming bacteria, analyzed arsenic resistance and transformation, and determined the presence of genetic markers for arsenic transformation. In total, 11 arsenic-transforming bacterial strains with different colony morphologies and varying arsenic transformation abilities were isolated, including 10 facultative anaerobic arsenate-reducing bacteria and one strictly aerobic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium. All of the isolates exhibited high levels of arsenic resistance with minimum inhibitory concentrations of arsenic ranging from 2 to 200 mM. Strain AR-11 was able to rapidly oxidize arsenite to arsenate at concentrations relevant to environmental groundwater samples without the addition of any electron donors or acceptors. We provide evidence that arsenic-reduction activity may be conferred by the ars operon(s) that were not amplified by the designed primers currently in use. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis grouped the isolates into the following genera: Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Psychrobacter, Vibrio, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, and Bosea. Among these genera, we present the first report of the genus Psychrobacter being involved in arsenic reduction. Our results further support the hypothesis that bacteria capable of either oxidizing arsenite or reducing arsenate coexist and are ubiquitous in arsenic-contaminated groundwater.

  16. Effect of arsenite on urea production by long-term cultures of adult rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Santoyo, A; Hernández, A; López, M L; Mendoza-Figueroa, T

    1996-01-01

    Urea cycle is a hepatic metabolic pathway involving five enzymes and several intermediary metabolites and can be altered by different chemicals. To investigate the effect of arsenic, an ubiquitous hepatotoxic agent, on urea production we exposed long-term cultures of adult rat hepatocytes, which produce urea, to 1.33 and 6.67 microM arsenite for 2 weeks. In cultures exposed to 6.67 microM, urea production decreased 60-70% and cellular arginase activity decreased 30, 70 and 85% after 4, 7 and 14 days of exposure, respectively. The arginase activity released to the medium increased significantly after 4, 7 and 14 days, with a maximum value after 7 days of exposure that was 27-fold higher than that of the untreated controls. The total arginase activity also decreased 35, 52 and 82% after 4, 7 and 14 days of exposure and protein content decreased 57 and 65% after 7 and 14 days of exposure, respectively. Exposure to 6.67 microM arsenite also produced accumulation of intracytoplasmic lipid droplets, vacuolizations and enlargement of the intercellular spaces. On the other hand, exposure of hepatocytes to 1.33 microM arsenite caused an initial decrease of 20% in urea production, did not change cellular, released and total arginase activity and cellular protein content and produced accumulation of intracytoplasmic lipid droplets. These results show that long-term exposure of cultured rat hepatocytes to 6.67 microM arsenite decreases urea production, cellular and total arginase activity and protein content and increases the release of arginase into the culture medium. These alterations could be useful markers of hepatotoxicity in in vitro assays.

  17. Arsenite in drinking water produces glucose intolerance in pregnant rats and their female offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, María Marta; Bourguignon, Nadia Soledad; Bizzozzero, Marianne; Rodriguez, Diego; Ventura, Clara; Cocca, Claudia; Libertun, Carlos; Lux-Lantos, Victoria Adela

    2017-02-01

    Drinking water is the main source of arsenic exposure. Chronic exposure has been associated with metabolic disorders. Here we studied the effects of arsenic on glucose metabolism, in pregnant and post-partum of dams and their offspring. We administered 5 (A5) or 50 (A50) mg/L of sodium arsenite in drinking water to rats from gestational day 1 (GD1) until two months postpartum (2MPP), and to their offspring from weaning until 8 weeks old. Liver arsenic dose-dependently increased in arsenite-treated rats to levels similar to exposed population. Pregnant A50 rats gained less weight than controls and recovered normal weight at 2MPP. Arsenite-treated pregnant animals showed glucose intolerance on GD16-17, with impaired insulin secretion but normal insulin sensitivity; they showed dose-dependent increased pancreas insulin on GD18. All alterations reverted at 2MPP. Offspring from A50-treated mothers showed lower body weight at birth, 4 and 8 weeks of age, and glucose intolerance in adult females, probably due to insulin secretion and sensitivity alterations. Arsenic alters glucose homeostasis during pregnancy by altering beta-cell function, increasing risk of developing gestational diabetes. In pups, it induces low body weight from birth to 8 weeks of age, and glucose intolerance in females, demonstrating a sex specific response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sodium arsenite induced biochemical perturbations in rats: ameliorating effect of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Mokhtar I; El-Demerdash, Fatma M; Radwan, Fatma M E

    2008-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of curcumin in terms of normalization of altered biochemical parameters following sodium arsenite treatment in rats. Animals were divided into four groups. The first group was used as control. While, groups 2, 3 and 4 were orally treated with curcumin (Cur, 15 mg/kg BW), sodium arsenite (Sa, 5 mg/kg BW) and sodium arsenite plus curcumin, respectively. Results showed that the activities of transaminases and phosphatases were significantly decreased in liver due to Sa administration, whereas increased in plasma. The activity of brain and plasma acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was decreased in rats treated with Sa. Also, Sa significantly decreased plasma total protein (TP), albumin (Alb) and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c), while increased glucose, urea, creatinine, bilirubin, total lipid (TL), cholesterol, triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c). Curcumin alone decreased the levels of glucose, urea, creatinine, TL, cholesterol, TG and LDL-c. Curcumin reduced Sa-induced transaminases, phosphatases, glucose, urea, creatinine, bilirubin, TL, cholesterol and TG. Moreover, curcumin induced Sa-reduced liver transaminases and phosphatases, plasma and brain AChE, and the levels of TP and Alb. Experimental results, therefore suggested that curcumin protects arsenic induced biochemical alterations in rats.

  19. Adaptation of a methanogenic consortium to arsenite inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Freire, Lucia; Moore, Sarah E; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous metalloid known for its adverse effects to human health. Microorganisms are also impacted by As toxicity, including methanogenic archaea, which can affect the performance of process in which biological activity is required (i.e. stabilization of activated sludge in wastewater treatment plants). The novel ability of a mixed methanogenic granular sludge consortium to adapt to the inhibitory effect of arsenic (As) was investigated by exposing the culture to approximately 0.92 mM of As(III) for 160 d in an arsenate (As(V)) reducing bioreactor using ethanol as the electron donor. The results of shaken batch bioassays indicated that the original, unexposed sludge was severely inhibited by arsenite (As(III)) as evidenced by the low 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) determined, i.e., 19 and 90 μM for acetoclastic- and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, respectively. The tolerance of the acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the sludge to As(III) increased 47-fold (IC50 = 910 μM) and 12-fold (IC50= 1100 μM), respectively, upon long-term exposure to As. In conclusion, the methanogenic community in the granular sludge demonstrated a considerable ability to adapt to the severe inhibitory effects of As after a prolonged exposure period.

  20. Sodium arsenite alters cell cycle and MTHFR, MT1/2, and c-Myc protein levels in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ramos, Ruben; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Albores, Arnulfo; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Cebrian, Mariano E

    2009-12-15

    There is limited available information on the effects of arsenic on enzymes participating in the folate cycle. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the effects of sodium arsenite on the protein levels of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and its further relationship with the expression MT1/2 and c-myc in MCF-7 cells. Arsenite treatment (0-10 microM) for 4 h decreased MTHFR levels in a concentration-dependent fashion without significant effects on DHFR. The effects on MTHFR were observed at arsenite concentrations not significantly affecting cell viability. We also observed an increase in S-phase recruitment at all concentrations probed. Lower concentrations ( or =5 microM) or longer treatment periods induced apoptosis. Arsenite also induced dose-dependent increases in MT1/2 and c-Myc protein levels. The levels of MTHFR were inversely correlated to MT1/2 and c-Myc overexpression and increased S-phase recruitment. Our findings indicate that breast epithelial cells are responsive to arsenite and suggest that exposure may pose a risk for breast cancer. The reductions in MTHFR protein levels contribute to understand the mechanisms underlying the induction of genes influencing growth regulation, such as c-myc and MT1/2. However, further research is needed to ascertain if the effects here reported following short-time and high-dose exposure are relevant for human populations chronically exposed to low arsenic concentrations.

  1. Arsenite Oxidation and Arsenite Resistance by Bacillus sp. PNKP-S2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranee Pattanapipitpaisal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic causes human health problems after accumulate in the body for 10-15 years and arsenite [As(III] is generally regarded as being more mobile and toxic than other oxidation states. In this study, two-hundred and three bacterial strains were isolated from groundwater and soil samples collecting in Ubon Ratchathani Province, Thailand. All strains were screened for arsenic tolerant efficiency at 1-10 mM of sodium arsenite. Eighteen selected strains which had the highest resistance to 10 mM of As(III were further studied for their As(III-oxidizing activity and growth in enrichment and growth medium (EG medium supplemented with 0.58 mM of As(III. It was found that strain PNKP-S2 was able to grow in the medium with As(III as a sole energy source and had 89.11% As(III removal within 48 h. The PCR-based 16S rDNA sequencing analysis revealed that the strain PNKP-S2 was closed relative to Bacillus sp. This is the first report on Bacillus sp. chemolithoautotrophic As(III-oxidizer and this strain could be a potential candidate for application in arsenic remediation of contaminated water.

  2. An ArsR/SmtB family member is involved in the regulation by arsenic of the arsenite oxidase operon in Thiomonas arsenitoxydans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinier, Danielle; Slyemi, Djamila; Byrne, Deborah; Lignon, Sabrina; Lebrun, Régine; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2014-10-01

    The genetic organization of the aioBA operon, encoding the arsenite oxidase of the moderately acidophilic and facultative chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiomonas arsenitoxydans, is different from that of the aioBA operon in the other arsenite oxidizers, in that it encodes AioF, a metalloprotein belonging to the ArsR/SmtB family. AioF is stabilized by arsenite, arsenate, or antimonite but not molybdate. Arsenic is tightly attached to AioF, likely by cysteine residues. When loaded with arsenite or arsenate, AioF is able to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the aio operon at two distinct positions. In Thiomonas arsenitoxydans, the promoters of aioX and aioB are convergent, suggesting that transcriptional interference occurs. These results indicate that the regulation of the aioBA operon is more complex in Thiomonas arsenitoxydans than in the other aioBA containing arsenite oxidizers and that the arsenic binding protein AioF is involved in this regulation. On the basis of these data, a model to explain the tight control of aioBA expression by arsenic in Thiomonas arsenitoxydans is proposed.

  3. The role of the rice aquaporin Lsi1 in arsenite efflux from roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang-Jie; Ago, Yukiko; Mitani, Namiki; Li, Ren-Ying; Su, Yu-Hong; Yamaji, Naoki; McGrath, Steve P; Ma, Jian Feng

    2010-04-01

    *When supplied with arsenate (As(V)), plant roots extrude a substantial amount of arsenite (As(III)) to the external medium through as yet unidentified pathways. The rice (Oryza sativa) silicon transporter Lsi1 (OsNIP2;1, an aquaporin channel) is the major entry route of arsenite into rice roots. Whether Lsi1 also mediates arsenite efflux was investigated. *Expression of Lsi1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes enhanced arsenite efflux, indicating that Lsi1 facilitates arsenite transport bidirectionally. *Arsenite was the predominant arsenic species in arsenate-exposed rice plants. During 24-h exposure to 5 mum arsenate, rice roots extruded arsenite to the external medium rapidly, accounting for 60-90% of the arsenate uptake. A rice mutant defective in Lsi1 (lsi1) extruded significantly less arsenite than the wild-type rice and, as a result, accumulated more arsenite in the roots. By contrast, Lsi2 mutation had little effect on arsenite efflux to the external medium. *We conclude that Lsi1 plays a role in arsenite efflux in rice roots exposed to arsenate. However, this pathway accounts for only 15-20% of the total efflux, suggesting the existence of other efflux transporters.

  4. Positive affect increases cognitive control in the antisaccade task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stigchel, S.; Imants, P.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2011-01-01

    To delineate the modulatory effects of induced positive affect on cognitive control, the current study investigated whether positive affect increases the ability to suppress a reflexive saccade in the antisaccade task. Results of the antisaccade task showed that participants made fewer erroneous

  5. Arsenite tolerance and biotransformation potential in estuarine bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nagvenkar, G.S.; Ramaiah, N.

    isolates tested in nutrient broth with 200 ppm Arsenite (A sup(3+)), many of them were able to attain log phase and substantial growth variously between 36 and 96 h. The isolates tolerating is greater than or equal to 200 ppm arsenic (As) were found...

  6. Sorption and desorption of arsenate and arsenite on calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Diederik Jan; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(111)) oil calcite was investigated in a series of batch experiments in calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions covered a broad range of pH, alkalinity, calcium concentration and ionic strength. The initial arsenic...

  7. The genetic basis of anoxygenic photosynthetic arsenite oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, Jamie; Sanchez-Sedillo, Benjamin; Stoneburner, Brendon; Boren, Alison; Miller, Laurence G.; McCann, Shelley; Rosen, Michael R.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Saltikov, Chad W.

    2017-01-01

    “Photoarsenotrophy”, the use of arsenite as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis, is thought to be an ancient form of phototrophy along with the photosynthetic oxidation of Fe(II), H2S, H2, and NO2-. Photoarsenotrophy was recently identified from Paoha Island's (Mono Lake, CA) arsenic-rich hot springs. The genomes of several photoarsenotrophs revealed a gene cluster, arxB2AB1CD, where arxA is predicted to encode for the sole arsenite oxidase. The role of arxA in photosynthetic arsenite oxidation was confirmed by disrupting the gene in a representative photoarsenotrophic bacterium, resulting in the loss of light-dependent arsenite oxidation. In situ evidence of active photoarsenotrophic microbes was supported by arxA mRNA detection for the first time, in red-pigmented microbial mats within the hot springs of Paoha Island. This work expands on the genetics for photosynthesis coupled to new electron donors and elaborates on known mechanisms for arsenic metabolism, thereby highlighting the complexities of arsenic biogeochemical cycling.

  8. Affective Dynamics of Leadership: An Experimental Test of Affect Control Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Tobias; Scholl, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Affect Control Theory (ACT; Heise 1979, 2007) states that people control social interactions by striving to maintain culturally shared feelings about the situation. The theory is based on mathematical models of language-based impression formation. In a laboratory experiment, we tested the predictive power of a new German-language ACT model with…

  9. Affective Dynamics of Leadership: An Experimental Test of Affect Control Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Tobias; Scholl, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Affect Control Theory (ACT; Heise 1979, 2007) states that people control social interactions by striving to maintain culturally shared feelings about the situation. The theory is based on mathematical models of language-based impression formation. In a laboratory experiment, we tested the predictive power of a new German-language ACT model with…

  10. Development of cognitive and affective control networks and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Bhoomika R; Vijay, Nivita; Mishra, Shreyasi

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control and decision making are two important research areas in the realm of higher-order cognition. Control processes such as interference control and monitoring in cognitive and affective contexts have been found to influence the process of decision making. Development of control processes follows a gradual growth pattern associated with the prolonged maturation of underlying neural circuits including the lateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, and the medial prefrontal cortex. These circuits are also involved in the control of processes that influences decision making, particularly with respect to choice behavior. Developmental studies on affective control have shown distinct patterns of brain activity with adolescents showing greater activation of amygdala whereas adults showing greater activity in ventral prefrontal cortex. Conflict detection, monitoring, and adaptation involve anticipation and subsequent performance adjustments which are also critical to complex decision making. We discuss the gradual developmental patterns observed in two of our studies on conflict monitoring and adaptation in affective and nonaffective contexts. Findings of these studies indicate the need to look at the differences in the effects of the development of cognitive and affective control on decision making in children and particularly adolescents. Neuroimaging studies have shown the involvement of separable neural networks for cognitive (medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate) and affective control (amygdala, ventral medial prefrontal cortex) shows that one system can affect the other also at the neural level. Hence, an understanding of the interaction and balance between the cognitive and affective brain networks may be crucial for self-regulation and decision making during the developmental period, particularly late childhood and adolescence. The chapter highlights the need for empirical investigation on the interaction between the different aspects

  11. When Affect Supports Cognitive Control – A Working Memory Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolańczyk Alina

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper delineates a study of executive functions (EFs, construed as procedural working memory (WM, from a motivational perspective. Since WM theories and motivation theories are both concerned with purposive activity, the role of implicit evaluations (affects observed in goal pursuit can be anticipated to arise also in the context of cognitive control, e.g., during the performance of the Stroop task. The role of positive and negative affect in goal pursuit consists in controlling attention resources according to the goal and situational requirements. Positive affect serves to maintain goals and means in the scope of attention (EF1, whereas negative affect activates the inhibition of non-functional contents, e.g., distractors and irrelevant objects (resulting in attention disengagement; EF2. Adaptation to conflict proceeds via sequential triggering of negative and positive affect (EF3. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the focus on action or reflection changes the scope of contents subjected to implicit (affective control. Therefore, I suggest that the motivational system, to a large extent, plays the role of the Central Executive. The paper opens a discussion and proposes studies on affective mechanisms of cognitive control.

  12. Predicting performance expectations from affective impressions: linking affect control theory and status characteristics theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippong, Joseph; Kalkhoff, Will

    2015-03-01

    Affect control theory (ACT) and status characteristics theory (SCT) offer separate and distinct explanations for how individuals interpret and process status- and power-relevant information about interaction partners. Existing research within affect control theory offers evidence that status and power are related to the affective impressions that individuals form of others along the dimensions of evaluation and potency, respectively. Alternately, status characteristics theory suggests that status and power influence interaction through the mediating cognitive construct of performance expectations. Although both theories have amassed an impressive amount of empirical support, research has yet to articulate theoretical and empirical connections between affective impressions and performance expectations. The purpose of our study is to address this gap. Elaborating a link between ACT and SCT in terms of their central concepts can serve as a stepping stone to improving the explanatory capacity of both theories, while providing a potential bridge by which they can be employed jointly.

  13. Cognitive control modulates preferential sensory processing of affective stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Marco; Flaisch, Tobias; Meinzer, Marcus; Schupp, Harald T

    2016-10-01

    Adaptive human behavior crucially relies on the ability of the brain to allocate resources automatically to emotionally significant stimuli. This ability has consistently been demonstrated by studies showing preferential processing of affective stimuli in sensory cortical areas. It is still unclear, however, whether this putatively automatic mechanism can be modulated by cognitive control processes. Here, we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether preferential processing of an affective face distractor is suppressed when an affective distractor has previously elicited a response conflict in a word-face Stroop task. We analyzed this for three consecutive stages in the ventral stream of visual processing for which preferential processing of affective stimuli has previously been demonstrated: the striate area (BA 17), category-unspecific extrastriate areas (BA 18/19), and the fusiform face area (FFA). We found that response conflict led to a selective suppression of affective face processing in category-unspecific extrastriate areas and the FFA, and this effect was accompanied by changes in functional connectivity between these areas and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex. In contrast, preferential processing of affective face distractors was unaffected in the striate area. Our results indicate that cognitive control processes adaptively suppress preferential processing of affective stimuli under conditions where affective processing is detrimental because it elicits response conflict.

  14. Neural systems supporting the control of affective and cognitive conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochsner, Kevin N; Hughes, Brent; Robertson, Elaine R; Cooper, Jeffrey C; Gabrieli, John D E

    2009-09-01

    Although many studies have examined the neural bases of controlling cognitive responses, the neural systems for controlling conflicts between competing affective responses remain unclear. To address the neural correlates of affective conflict and their relationship to cognitive conflict, the present study collected whole-brain fMRI data during two versions of the Eriksen flanker task. For these tasks, participants indicated either the valence (affective task) or the semantic category (cognitive task) of a central target word while ignoring flanking words that mapped onto either the same (congruent) or a different (incongruent) response as the target. Overall, contrasts of incongruent > congruent trials showed that bilateral dorsal ACC, posterior medial frontal cortex, and dorsolateral pFC were active during both kinds of conflict, whereas rostral medial pFC and left ventrolateral pFC were differentially active during affective or cognitive conflict, respectively. Individual difference analyses showed that separate regions of rostral cingulate/ventromedial pFC and left ventrolateral pFC were positively correlated with the magnitude of response time interference. Taken together, the findings that controlling affective and cognitive conflicts depends upon both common and distinct systems have important implications for understanding the organization of control systems in general and their potential dysfunction in clinical disorders.

  15. Arsenite Effects on Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Human and Mouse Primary Hepatocytes Follow a Nonlinear Dose Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemantkumar Chavan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenite is a known carcinogen and its exposure has been implicated in a variety of noncarcinogenic health concerns. Increased oxidative stress is thought to be the primary cause of arsenite toxicity and the toxic effect is thought to be linear with detrimental effects reported at all concentrations of arsenite. But the paradigm of linear dose response in arsenite toxicity is shifting. In the present study we demonstrate that arsenite effects on mitochondrial respiration in primary hepatocytes follow a nonlinear dose response. In vitro exposure of primary hepatocytes to an environmentally relevant, moderate level of arsenite results in increased oxidant production that appears to arise from changes in the expression and activity of respiratory Complex I of the mitochondrial proton circuit. In primary hepatocytes the excess oxidant production appears to elicit adaptive responses that promote resistance to oxidative stress and a propensity to increased proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest a nonlinear dose-response characteristic of arsenite with low-dose arsenite promoting adaptive responses in a process known as mitohormesis, with transient increase in ROS levels acting as transducers of arsenite-induced mitohormesis.

  16. Do job demands and job control affect problem-solving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Peter N; Ahlberg, Gunnel; Johansson, Gun; Stoetzer, Ulrich; Aborg, Carl; Hallsten, Lennart; Lundberg, Ingvar

    2012-01-01

    The Job Demand Control model presents combinations of working conditions that may facilitate learning, the active learning hypothesis, or have detrimental effects on health, the strain hypothesis. To test the active learning hypothesis, this study analysed the effects of job demands and job control on general problem-solving strategies. A population-based sample of 4,636 individuals (55% women, 45% men) with the same job characteristics measured at two times with a three year time lag was used. Main effects of demands, skill discretion, task authority and control, and the combined effects of demands and control were analysed in logistic regressions, on four outcomes representing general problem-solving strategies. Those reporting high on skill discretion, task authority and control, as well as those reporting high demand/high control and low demand/high control job characteristics were more likely to state using problem solving strategies. Results suggest that working conditions including high levels of control may affect how individuals cope with problems and that workplace characteristics may affect behaviour in the non-work domain.

  17. Involvement of HIF-2α-mediated inflammation in arsenite-induced transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuan; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao; Luo, Fei; Wang, Bairu; Li, Yuan; Pang, Ying; Liu, Qizhan, E-mail: drqzliu@hotmail.com

    2013-10-15

    Arsenic is a well established human carcinogen that causes diseases of the lung. Some studies have suggested a link between inflammation and lung cancer; however, it is unknown if arsenite-induced inflammation causally contributes to arsenite-caused malignant transformation of cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying inflammation during neoplastic transformation induced in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells by chronic exposure to arsenite. The results showed that, on acute or chronic exposure to arsenite, HBE cells over-expressed the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). The data also indicated that HIF-2α was involved in arsenite-induced inflammation. Moreover, IL-6 and IL-8 were essential for the malignant progression of arsenite-transformed HBE cells. Thus, these experiments show that HIF-2α mediates arsenite-induced inflammation and that such inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced malignant transformation of HBE cells. The results provide a link between the inflammatory response and the acquisition of a malignant transformed phenotype by cells chronically exposed to arsenite and thus establish a previously unknown mechanism for arsenite-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Arsenite induces inflammation. • Arsenite-induced the increases of IL-6 and IL-8 via HIF-2α. • Inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced carcinogenesis.

  18. Ribosomal protein S7 regulates arsenite-induced GADD45α expression by attenuating MDM2-mediated GADD45α ubiquitination and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Li, Xiaoguang; Dong, Wen; Jin, Rui; Ma, Hanghang; Yang, Pingxun; Hu, Meiru; Li, Yi; Hao, Yi; Yuan, Shengtao; Huang, Junjian; Song, Lun

    2013-05-01

    The stress-responding protein, GADD45α, plays important roles in cell cycle checkpoint, DNA repair and apoptosis. In our recent study, we demonstrate that GADD45α undergoes a dynamic ubiquitination and degradation in vivo, which process can be blocked by the cytotoxic reagent, arsenite, resulting in GADD45α accumulation to activate JNKs cell death pathway, thereby revealing a novel mechanism for the cellular GADD45α functional regulation. But the factors involved in GADD45α stability modulations are unidentified. Here, we demonstrated that MDM2 was an E3 ubiquitin ligase for GADD45α. One of MDM2-binding partner, ribosomal protein S7, interacted with and stabilized GADD45α through preventing the ubiquitination and degradation of GADD45α mediated by MDM2. This novel function of S7 is unrelated to p53 but seems to depend on S7/MDM2 interaction, for the S7 mutant lacking MDM2-binding ability lost its function to stabilize GADD45α. Further investigations indicated that arsenite treatment enhanced S7-MDM2 interaction, resulting in attenuation of MDM2-dependent GADD45α ubiquitination and degradation, thereby leading to GADD45α-dependent cell death pathway activation. Silencing S7 expression suppressed GADD45α-dependent cytotoxicity induced by arsenite. Our findings thus identify a novel function of S7 in control of GADD45α stabilization under both basal and stress conditions and its significance in mediating arsenite-induced cellular stress.

  19. Biotransformation of arsenite and bacterial aox activity in drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses: Arsenic contamination in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-01

    The potential arsenite bioteansformation activity of arsenic was investigated by examining bacterial arsenic arsenite-oxidizing gene such as aoxS, aoxR, aoxA, aoxB, aoxC, and aoxD in high arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from the surface water of floating houses. There is a biogeochemical cycle of activity involving arsenite oxidase aox system and the ars (arsenic resistance system) gene operon and aoxR leader gene activity in Alcaligenes faecalis SRR-11 and aoxS leader gene activity in Achromobacter xylosoxidans TSL-66. Batch experiments showed that SRR-11 and TSL-66 completely oxidized 1 mM of As (III) to As (V) within 35-40 h. The leaders of aoxS and aoxR are important for gene activity, and their effects in arsenic bioremediation and mobility in natural water has a significant ecological role because it allows arsenite oxidase in bacteria to control the biogeochemical cycle of arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Could positive affect help engineer robot control systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirin, Markus; Hertzberg, Joachim; Kuhl, Julius; Stephan, Achim

    2011-11-01

    Emotions have long been seen as counteracting rational thought, but over the last decades, they have been viewed as adaptive processes to optimize human (but also animal) behaviour. In particular, positive affect appears to be a functional aspect of emotions closely related to that. We argue that positive affect as understood in Kuhl's PSI model of the human cognitive architecture appears to have an interpretation in state-of-the-art hybrid robot control architectures, which might help tackle some open questions in the field.

  1. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G., E-mail: lhudson@salud.unm.edu

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the Hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. - Highlights: • Low levels of arsenite enhance UV-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes. • UV-initiated HPRT mutation frequency is enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc supplementation offsets DNA damage and mutation frequency enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc-dependent reduction of arsenite enhanced DNA damage is confirmed in vivo.

  2. Removal of arsenite and arsenate using hydrous ferric oxide incorporated into naturally occurring porous diatomite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Min; Min, Soo-Hong; Kim, Tak-Hyun; Park, Jae Kwang

    2006-03-01

    In this study, a simplified and effective method was tried to immobilize iron oxide onto a naturally occurring porous diatomite. Experimental resultsfor several physicochemical properties and arsenic edges revealed that iron oxide incorporated into diatomite was amorphous hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Sorption trends of Fe (25%)-diatomite for both arsenite and arsenate were similar to those of HFO, reported by Dixit and Hering (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2003, 37, 4182-4189). The pH at which arsenite and arsenate are equally sorbed was 7.5, which corresponds to the value reported for HFO. Judging from the number of moles of iron incorporated into diatomite, the arsenic sorption capacities of Fe (25%)-diatomite were comparable to or higher than those of the reference HFO. Furthermore, the surface complexation modeling showed that the constants of [triple bond]SHAsO4- or [triple bond]SAsO4(2-) species for Fe (25%)-diatomite were larger than those reference values for HFO or goethite. Larger differences in constants of arsenate surface species might be attributed to aluminum hydroxyl ([triple bond]Al-OH) groups that can work better for arsenate removal. The pH-controlled differential column batch reactor (DCBR) and small-scale column tests demonstrated that Fe (25%)-diatomite had high sorption speeds and high sorption capacities compared to those of a conventional sorbent (AAFS-50) that is known to be the first preference for arsenic removal performance in Bangladesh. These results could be explained by the fact that Fe (25%)-diatomite contained well-dispersed HFO having a great affinity for arsenic species and well-developed macropores as shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and pore size distribution (PSD) analyses.

  3. Influences of size-fractionated humic acids on arsenite and arsenate complexation and toxicity to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jinqian; Fan, Wenhong; Wang, Xiangrui; Ma, Qingquan; Li, Xiaomin; Xu, Zhizhen; Wei, Chaoyang

    2017-01-01

    The intrinsic physicochemical properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) may affect the mobility and toxicity of arsenic in aquatic environments. In the present study, the humic acid (HA) was ultra-filtered into five fractions according to molecular weight, and their physicochemical properties were characterized. Complexation of HA fractions with arsenite and arsenate was first determined by differential pulse polarography (DPP). The influences of HA fractions on arsenic toxicity were then examined using Daphnia magna as a model organism. As(V) had a higher affinity with HA than As(III), and their complexation was dependent on the total acidity and fluorescence characteristics of DOM. We demonstrated that the acidity and fluorescence also better explained the As toxicity to daphnids than UV absorbance and hydraulic diameter. Arsenic speciation determined by DPP significantly affected the toxicity of arsenite and arsenate. The results extended the free-ion activity model application to the case of arsenic. The present study clearly indicated that DOM with different molecular weights has distinct physicochemical properties, and could influence the speciation and toxicity of As to different extent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Arsenite exposure accelerates aging process regulated by the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chan-Wei; How, Chun Ming; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic is a known human carcinogen and high levels of arsenic contamination in food, soils, water, and air are of toxicology concerns. Nowadays, arsenic is still a contaminant of emerging interest, yet the effects of arsenic on aging process have received little attention. In this study, we investigated the effects and the underlying mechanisms of chronic arsenite exposure on the aging process in Caenorhabditis elegans. The results showed that prolonged arsenite exposure caused significantly decreased lifespan compared to non-exposed ones. In addition, arsenite exposure (100 μM) caused significant changes of age-dependent biomarkers, including a decrease of defecation frequency, accumulations of intestinal lipofuscin and lipid peroxidation in an age-dependent manner in C. elegans. Further evidence revealed that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was significantly increased in an age-dependent manner upon 100 μM arsenite exposure. Moreover, the mRNA levels of transcriptional makers of aging (hsp-16.1, hsp-16.49, and hsp-70) were increased in aged worms under arsenite exposure (100 μM). Finally, we showed that daf-16 mutant worms were more sensitive to arsenite exposure (100 μM) on lifespan and failed to induce the expression of its target gene sod-3 in aged daf-16 mutant under arsenite exposure (100 μM). Our study demonstrated that chronic arsenite exposure resulted in accelerated aging process in C. elegans. The overproduction of intracellular ROS and the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO play roles in mediating the accelerated aging process by arsenite exposure in C. elegans. This study implicates a potential ecotoxicological and health risk of arsenic in the environment.

  5. Effect of arsenite-oxidizing bacterium B. laterosporus on arsenite toxicity and arsenic translocation in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gui-Di; Xie, Wan-Ying; Zhu, Xi; Huang, Yi; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Qiu, Zong-Qing; Lv, Zhen-Mao; Wang, Wen-Na; Lin, Wen-Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Arsenite [As (III)] oxidation can be accelerated by bacterial catalysis, but the effects of the accelerated oxidation on arsenic toxicity and translocation in rice plants are poorly understood. Herein we investigated how an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium, namely Brevibacillus laterosporus, influences As (III) toxicity and translocation in rice plants. Rice seedlings of four cultivars, namely Guangyou Ming 118 (GM), Teyou Hang II (TH), Shanyou 63 (SY) and Minghui 63 (MH), inoculated with or without the bacterium were grown hydroponically with As (III) to investigate its effects on arsenic toxicity and translocation in the plants. Percentages of As (III) oxidation in the solutions with the bacterium (100%) were all significantly higher than those without (30-72%). The addition of the bacterium significantly decreased As (III) concentrations in SY root, GM root and shoot, while increased the As (III) concentrations in the shoot of SY, MH and TH and in the root of MH. Furthermore, the As (III) concentrations in the root and shoot of SY were both the lowest among the treatments with the bacterium. On the other hand, its addition significantly alleviated the As (III) toxicity on four rice cultivars. Among the treatments amended with B. laterosporus, the bacterium showed the best remediation on SY seedlings, with respect to the subdued As (III) toxicity and decreased As (III) concentration in its roots. These results indicated that As (III) oxidation accelerated by B. laterosporus could be an effective method to alleviate As (III) toxicity on rice seedlings.

  6. Arsenite Sorption by Drinking-Water Treatment Residuals: Redox Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, K. C.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.

    2005-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a major human carcinogen and could pose a serious human health risk at concentrations as low as 50 ppb in drinking water. Elevated As concentrations in soils currently used for residential purposes (located on former agricultural lands amended with arsenical pesticides) have increased the possibility of human contact with soil-As. Studies have shown that As bioavailability in the environment is primarily a function of its chemical speciation, which depends upon the redox potential. Arsenic toxicity and carcinogenicity to living organisms is primarily due to exposure to the reduced species of As - arsenite, i.e., As(III), rather than the oxidized species - arsenate, i.e., As(V); the mobility of As(III) is much higher than As(V). One of the most promising methods to decrease the mobility of arsenite in the soil-water system is promoting its retention onto amorphous Fe/Al hydroxides. Drinking-Water Treatment Residuals (WTRs) are an inexpensive source of such Fe/Al hydroxides, which can be land-applied following the USEPA-regulated biosolids application rules. The WTRs are byproducts of drinking-water purification processes and generally contain sediment, organic carbon, and Al/Fe hydroxides. The hydroxides are typically amorphous and have tremendous affinity for oxyanions (e.g., arsenate). Preliminary work showed that WTRs are characterized by large internal surface area and porosity that partly explains their high affinity for As(V). The current study examines the potential of two WTRs (Fe-based and Al-based) to adsorb arsenite from solution. We hypothesize that As(III) adsorption onto the Fe-based WTR (whose stability is highly redox-sensitive) would be vastly different from the adsorption of As(III) onto the redox-insensitive Al-based WTR. Our main objective is to characterize As(III) sorption by both Fe- and Al-based WTRs by changing critical factors, such as the solid:solution ratio, contact time, and initial As(III) load. Results from this study

  7. Oculomotor tasks affect differently postural control in healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Maria Pia; Ajrezo, Layla; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette

    2015-11-01

    Eye movements affect postural stability in children. The present study focuses on the effect of different types of eye movements on postural stability in healthy children. Both eye movements and postural stability have been recorded in 51 healthy children from 6.3 to 15.5 years old. Eye movements were recorded binocularly with a video oculography (MobilEBT(®)), and postural stability was measured while child was standing on a force platform (TechnoConcept(®)). Children performed three oculomotor tasks: saccades, pursuits and reading a text silently. We measured the number of saccades made in the three oculomotor tasks, the number of words read, and the surface area, the length and mean velocity of the center of pressure (CoP). According to previous studies, postural control improves with age until 10-12 years. Saccades toward a target as well as during a reading task reduce significantly the CoP displacement and its velocity, while during pursuit eye movements all children increase postural parameters (i.e., the surface area, the length and mean velocity of the CoP). These results suggest the presence of an interaction between the oculomotor control and the postural system. Visual attention to perform saccades (to stationary targets or to words) influences postural stability more than the frequency of saccade triggering does.

  8. APOPTOSIS GENE EXPRESSION IN HUMAN EPDERMAL KERATINOCYTES TREATED WITH SODIUM ARSENITE USING REAL TIME PCR ARRAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic exposure via contaminated drinking water is a great public health concern worldwide. Chronic arsenic exposure has been associated with human skin, lung and bladder cancer and other chronic effects. We have previous reported that sodium arsenite stimulated cell proliferati...

  9. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human lymphocytes.Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  10. Synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite on DNA damage in HBE cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Sun, Bin; Wang, Xiaojuan; Nie, Jihua; Chen, Zhihai; An, Yan; Tong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Human epidemiological studies showed that radon and arsenic exposures are major risk factors for lung cancer in Yunnan tin miners. However, biological evidence for this phenomenon is absent. In this study, HBE cells were exposed to different concentrations of sodium arsenite, different radon exposure times, or a combination of these two factors. The results showed a synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite in cell cytotoxicity as determined by cell viability. Elevated intracellular ROS levels and increased DNA damage indexed by comet assay and γ-H2AX were detected. Moreover, DNA HR repair in terms of Rad51 declined when the cells were exposed to both radon and sodium arsenite. The synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite in HBE cells may be attributed to the enhanced DSBs and inhibited HR pathway upon co-exposure.

  11. Effects of affective picture viewing on postural control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beek Peter J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emotion theory holds that unpleasant events prime withdrawal actions, whereas pleasant events prime approach actions. Recent studies have suggested that passive viewing of emotion eliciting images results in postural adjustments, which become manifest as changes in body center of pressure (COP trajectories. From those studies it appears that posture is modulated most when viewing pictures with negative valence. The present experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that pictures with negative valence have a greater impact on postural control than neutral or positive ones. Thirty-four healthy subjects passively viewed a series of emotion eliciting images, while standing either in a bipedal or unipedal stance on a force plate. The images were adopted from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS. We analysed mean and variability of the COP and the length of the associated sway path as a function of emotion. Results The mean position of the COP was unaffected by emotion, but unipedal stance resulted in overall greater body sway than bipedal stance. We found a modest effect of emotion on COP: viewing pictures of mutilation resulted in a smaller sway path, but only in unipedal stance. We obtained valence and arousal ratings of the images with an independent sample of viewers. These subjects rated the unpleasant images as significantly less pleasant than neutral images, and the pleasant images as significantly more pleasant than neutral images. However, the subjects rated the images as overall less pleasant and less arousing than viewers in a closely comparable American study, pointing to unknown differences in viewer characteristics. Conclusion Overall, viewing emotion eliciting images had little effect on body sway. Our finding of a reduction in sway path length when viewing pictures of mutilation was indicative of a freezing strategy, i.e. fear bradycardia. The results are consistent with current knowledge about the

  12. Arsenite-induced autophagy is associated with proteotoxicity in human lymphoblastoid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Zhao, Fei; Pacheco, Samantha; Klimecki, Walter T., E-mail: klimecki@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2012-10-15

    Epidemiological studies of arsenic-exposed populations have provided evidence that arsenic exposure in humans is associated with immunosuppression. Previously, we have reported that arsenite-induced toxicity is associated with the induction of autophagy in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL). Autophagy is a cellular process that functions in the degradation of damaged cellular components, including protein aggregates formed by misfolded or damaged proteins. Accumulation of misfolded or damaged proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen causes ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). In an effort to investigate the mechanism of autophagy induction by arsenite in the LCL model, we examined the potential contribution of ER stress and activation of the UPR. LCL exposed to sodium arsenite for 8-days induced expression of UPR-activated genes, including CHOP and GRP78, at the RNA and the protein level. Evidence for activation of the three arms of the UPR was observed. The arsenite-induced activation of the UPR was associated with an accumulation of protein aggregates containing p62 and LC3, proteins with established roles in the sequestration and autophagic clearance of protein aggregates. Taken together, these data provide evidence that arsenite-induced autophagy is associated with the generation of ER stress, activation of the UPR, and formation of protein aggregates that may be targeted to the lysosome for degradation. -- Highlights: ► Arsenite induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response. ► Arsenite induces the formation of protein aggregates that contain p62 and LC3-II. ► Time-course data suggests that arsenite-induced autophagy precedes ER stress.

  13. Constitutive arsenite oxidase expression detected in arsenic-hypertolerant Pseudomonas xanthomarina S11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koechler, Sandrine; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Goulhen-Chollet, Florence; Heinrich-Salmeron, Audrey; Jost, Bernard; Lièvremont, Didier; Philipps, Muriel; Plewniak, Frédéric; Bertin, Philippe N; Lett, Marie-Claire

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas xanthomarina S11 is an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium isolated from an arsenic-contaminated former gold mine in Salsigne, France. This bacterium showed high resistance to arsenite and was able to oxidize arsenite to arsenate at concentrations up to 42.72 mM As[III]. The genome of this strain was sequenced and revealed the presence of three ars clusters. One of them is located on a plasmid and is organized as an "arsenic island" harbouring an aio operon and genes involved in phosphorous metabolism, in addition to the ars genes. Neither the aioXRS genes nor a specific sigma-54-dependent promoter located upstream of aioBA genes, both involved in regulation of arsenite oxidase expression in other arsenite-oxidizing bacteria, could be identified in the genome. This observation is in accordance with the fact that no difference was observed in expression of arsenite oxidase in P. xanthomarina S11, whether or not the strain was grown in the presence of As[III].

  14. Stress-induced Start Codon Fidelity Regulates Arsenite-inducible Regulatory Particle-associated Protein (AIRAP) Translation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Lolita; Braunstein, Ilana; Stanhill, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Initial steps in protein synthesis are highly regulated processes as they define the reading frame of the translation machinery. Eukaryotic translation initiation is a process facilitated by numerous factors (eIFs), aimed to form a “scanning” mechanism toward the initiation codon. Translation initiation of the main open reading frame (ORF) in an mRNA transcript has been reported to be regulated by upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in a manner of re-initiation. This mode of regulation is governed by the phosphorylation status of eIF2α and controlled by cellular stresses. Another mode of translational initiation regulation is leaky scanning, and this regulatory process has not been extensively studied. We have identified arsenite-inducible regulatory particle-associated protein (AIRAP) transcript to be translationally induced during arsenite stress conditions. AIRAP transcript contains a single uORF in a poor-kozak context. AIRAP translation induction is governed by means of leaky scanning and not re-initiation. This induction of AIRAP is solely dependent on eIF1 and the uORF kozak context. We show that eIF1 is phosphorylated under specific conditions that induce protein misfolding and have biochemically characterized this site of phosphorylation. Our data indicate that leaky scanning like re-initiation is responsive to stress conditions and that leaky scanning can induce ORF translation by bypassing poor kozak context of a single uORF transcript. PMID:24898249

  15. Unilateral anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: chromatic pupillometry in affected, fellow non-affected and healthy control eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina eHerbst

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs express the photopigment melanopsin, which is sensitive to blue light. Previous chromatic pupillometry studies have shown that the post-illumination response is considered an indicator of the melanopsin activation. The aim of this study was to investigate the ipRGC mediated pupil response in patients with a unilateral non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION. Consensual pupil responses during and after exposure to continuous 20 s blue (470 nm or red (660 nm light of high intensity (300 cd/m2 were recorded in each eye for 10 patients. Comparisons were performed both intra-individually (affected versus non-affected eyes and inter-individually (compared with healthy controls. The pupil response was calculated both during the illumination and during the post-illumination phase. The pupil responses to blue and red colours were significantly reduced in the NAION-affected eyes, compared with the fellow non-affected eyes. When comparing the affected eyes with the healthy control eyes, the post-illumination responses were not significantly different. In addition, the post-illumination pupil responses after blue light exposure were increased in the fellow non-affected patients’ eyes, compared with the healthy controls. However, significance was only reached for the late post-illumination response. In conclusion, chromatic pupillometry disclosed reduced post-illumination pupil responses in the NAION-affected eyes, compared with the non-affected fellow eyes, suggesting dysfunction of the ipRGCs. Compared with the responses of the healthy controls, the blue light post-illumination pupil responses were similar in the affected eyes and increased in the fellow non-affected eyes. This suggests a possible adaptive phenomenon, involving the ipRGCs of both eyes after unilateral NAION.

  16. Arsenite oxidation by a poorly-crystalline manganese oxide. 3. Arsenic and manganese desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Brandon J; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Sparks, Donald L

    2011-11-01

    Arsenic (As) mobility in the environment is greatly affected by its oxidation state and the degree to which it is sorbed on metal oxide surfaces. Manganese oxides (Mn oxides) have the ability to decrease overall As mobility both by oxidizing toxic arsenite (As(III)) to less toxic arsenate (As(V)), and by sorbing As. However, the effect of competing ions on the mobility of As sorbed on Mn-oxide surfaces is not well understood. In this study, desorption of As(V) and As(III) from a poorly crystalline phyllomanganate (δ-MnO(2)) by two environmentally significant ions is investigated using a stirred-flow technique and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). As(III) is not observed in solution after desorption under any conditions used in this study, agreeing with previous studies showing As sorbed on Mn-oxides exists only as As(V). However, some As(V) is desorbed from the δ-MnO(2) surface under all conditions studied, while neither desorptive used in this study completely removes As(V) from the δ-MnO(2) surface.

  17. The defensive effect of benfotiamine in sodium arsenite-induced experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjali; Reddy, Krishna; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2010-10-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of benfotiamine, a thiamine derivative, in sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. Sodium arsenite (1.5 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1) i.p., 2 weeks) was administered in rats to produce VED. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating the serum and aortic concentrations of nitrite/nitrate. Further, the integrity of vascular endothelium in thoracic aorta was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and aortic superoxide anion generation. The administration of sodium arsenite markedly produced VED by attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, decreasing serum and aortic concentrations of nitrite/nitrate, and impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium. Further, sodium arsenite produced oxidative stress by increasing serum TBARS and aortic superoxide generation. The treatment with benfotiamine (25, 50, and 100 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1) p.o.) or atorvastatin (30 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1) p.o., a standard agent) prevented sodium arsenite-induced VED and oxidative stress. However, the beneficial effects of benfotiamine in preventing the sodium arsenite-induced VED were attenuated by co-administration with N-omega-nitro-L: -arginine methyl ester (L: -NAME) (25 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1), i.p.), an inhibitor of NOS. Thus, it may be concluded that benfotiamine reduces oxidative stress and activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase to enhance the generation and bioavailability of NO and subsequently improves the integrity of vascular endothelium to prevent sodium arsenite-induced experimental VED.

  18. Physico chemical studies on the composition of complex arsenites of metals Part IV: conductometric and potentiometric studies on the composition of cadmium arsenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Bhadraver

    1962-07-01

    Full Text Available The formation and precipitation of cadmium arsenite has been studied by conductometric and potentiometric titrations between cadmium nitrate and sodium arsenite (meta at different concentrations with either of the substances used as the reagent in titration. In the case of direct titrations (cadmium nitrate added to sodium arsenite in the conductivity cell, one distinct break in the curves is observed corresponding to the formation of the Cd (AsO/sub 2//sub 2/ where the molecular ratio is 2:1. The direct and reverse potentiometric titrations curves give one maxima in dE/dV at point corresponding to the formation of the complex Cd (AsO/sub/2/sub/2 where the molecular ratio of reactants Cd:AsO/sub/2 is 1:2. The composition has been arrived at by comparing the calculated values with observed values by conductometric and potentiometric titrations. The composition of cadmium arsenite arrived at both by conductometry and potentiometry is best representative as Cd(AsO/sub/2/sub/2

  19. Protective effects of phyllanthus emblica leaf extract on sodium arsenite-mediated adverse effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Sadia; Ahsan, Nazmul; Kato, Masashi; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Rashid, Abdur; Akhand, Anwarul Azim

    2015-02-01

    Groundwater contamination of arsenic is the major cause of a serious health hazard in Bangladesh. No specific treatment is yet available to manage the large number of individuals exposed to arsenic. In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of Phyllanthus emblica (Indian gooseberry or Amla) leaf extract (PLE) on arsenic-mediated toxicity in experimental mice. Male Swiss albino mice were divided into three different groups (n=6/group). 'Control' mice received arsenic free water together with normal feed. Mice in the remaining two groups designated 'SA' and 'SA+PLE' were exposed to sodium arsenite (SA, 10 µg/g body weight/day) through drinking water in addition to receiving normal feed and PLE-supplemented feed, respectively. The weight gain of SA-exposed mice was decreased compared with the controls; however, this decrease in body weight gain was prevented when the feed was supplemented with PLE. A secondary effect of arsenic was enlargement of the liver, kidney and spleen of SA-group mice. Deposition of arsenic in those organs was demonstrated by ICP-MS. When PLE was supplemented in the feed the enlargement of the organs was minimized; however, the deposition of arsenic was not significantly reduced. These results indicated that PLE may not block arsenic deposition in tissue directly but rather may play a protective role to reduce arsenic-induced toxicity. Therefore, co-administration of PLE in arsenic-exposed animals might have a future therapeutic application for protecting against arsenic-mediated toxicity.

  20. Beneficial Microbes Affect Endogenous Mechanisms Controlling Root Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbon, Eline H; Liberman, Louisa M

    2016-01-01

    Plants have incredible developmental plasticity, enabling them to respond to a wide range of environmental conditions. Among these conditions is the presence of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in the soil. Recent studies show that PGPR affect Arabidopsis thaliana root growth and

  1. Beneficial Microbes Affect Endogenous Mechanisms Controlling Root Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbon, Eline H; Liberman, Louisa M

    2016-01-01

    Plants have incredible developmental plasticity, enabling them to respond to a wide range of environmental conditions. Among these conditions is the presence of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in the soil. Recent studies show that PGPR affect Arabidopsis thaliana root growth and developm

  2. Bootstrapping agency: How control-relevant information affects motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsh, Noam; Eitam, Baruch; Mark, Ilya; Higgins, E Tory

    2016-10-01

    How does information about one's control over the environment (e.g., having an own-action effect) influence motivation? The control-based response selection framework was proposed to predict and explain such findings. Its key tenant is that control relevant information modulates both the frequency and speed of responses by determining whether a perceptual event is an outcome of one's actions or not. To test this framework empirically, the current study examines whether and how temporal and spatial contiguity/predictability-previously established as being important for one's sense of agency-modulate motivation from control. In 5 experiments, participants responded to a cue, potentially triggering a perceptual effect. Temporal (Experiments 1a-c) and spatial (Experiments 2a and b) contiguity/predictability between actions and their potential effects were experimentally manipulated. The influence of these control-relevant factors was measured, both indirectly (through their effect on explicit judgments of agency) and directly on response time and response frequency. The pattern of results was highly consistent with the control-based response selection framework in suggesting that control relevant information reliably modulates the impact of "having an effect" on different levels of action selection. We discuss the implications of this study for the notion of motivation from control and for the empirical work on the sense of agency. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. A Comparative Study on Rat Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Resident Gut Bacteria (ii) Effect of Arsenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to use facultative gut bacteria as an alternate to animals for the initial gastrointestinal toxicity screening of heavy metals, a comparative study on rat intestinal epithelial cells and resident gut bacteria was undertaken.Methods in vitro growth rate of four gut bacteria, dehydrogenase (DHA) and esterase (EA) activity test, intestinal epithelial and bacterial cell membrane enzymes and in situ effect of arsenite were analysed. Results Growth profile of mixed resident population of gut bacteria and pure isolates of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp., Lactobacillus sp., and Staphylococcus sp.revealed an arsenite (2-20 ppm) concentration-dependent inhibition. The viability pattern of epithelial cells also showed similar changes. DHA and EA tests revealed significant inhibition (40%-72%) with arsenite exposure of 5 and 10 ppm in isolated gut bacteria and epithelial cells. Decrease in membrane alkaline phosphatase and Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase activities was in the range of 33%-55% in four bacteria at the arsenite exposure of 10 ppm, whereas it was 60%-65% in intestinal epithelial villus cells. in situ incubation of arsenite using intestinal loops also showed more or less similar changes in membrane enzymes of resident gut bacterial population and epithelial cells. Conclusion The results indicate that facultative gut bacteria can be used as suitable in vitro model for the preliminary screening of arsenical gastrointestinal cytotoxic effects.

  4. Label-free signal-on aptasensor for sensitive electrochemical detection of arsenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lin; Wu, Jie; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-05-15

    A signal-on aptasensor was fabricated for highly sensitive and selective electrochemical detection of arsenite with a label-free Ars-3 aptamer self-assembled on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) via Au-S bond. The Ars-3 aptamer could adsorb cationic polydiallyldimethylammonium (PDDA) via electrostatic interaction to repel other cationic species. In the presence of arsenite, the change of Ars-3 conformation due to the formation of Ars-3/arsenite complex led to less adsorption of PDDA, and the complex could adsorb more positively charged [Ru(NH3)6](3+) as an electrochemically active indicator on the aptasensor surface, which produced a sensitive "turn-on" response. The target-induced structure switching could be used for sensitive detection of arsenite with a linear range from 0.2 nM to 100 nM and a detection limit down to 0.15 nM. Benefiting from Ars-3 aptamer, the proposed system exhibited excellent specificity against other heavy metal ions. The SPCE-based aptasensor exhibited the advantages of low cost and simple fabrication, providing potential application of arsenite detection in environment.

  5. Is postural control affected by expertise in alpine skiing?

    OpenAIRE

    NOE, F.; Paillard, T

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined the postural performance of two groups of male skiers competing at different levels and the consequences on postural control of the suppression of visual afferences by eye closure.

  6. Beneficial microbes affect endogenous mechanisms controlling root development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbon, Eline H.; Liberman, Louisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants have incredible developmental plasticity, enabling them to respond to a wide range of environmental conditions. Among these conditions is the presence of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in the soil. Recent studies show that PGPR affect root growth and development within Arabidopsis thaliana root. These effects lead to dramatic changes in root system architecture, that significantly impact aboveground plant growth. Thus, PGPR may promote shoot growth via their effect on root developmental programs. This review focuses on contextualizing root developmental changes elicited by PGPR in light of our understanding of plant-microbe interactions and root developmental biology. PMID:26875056

  7. Eye Movements Affect Postural Control in Young and Older Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil M; Bampouras, Theodoros M; Donovan, Tim; Dewhurst, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Visual information is used for postural stabilization in humans. However, little is known about how eye movements prevalent in everyday life interact with the postural control system in older individuals. Therefore, the present study assessed the effects of stationary gaze fixations, smooth pursuits, and saccadic eye movements, with combinations of absent, fixed and oscillating large-field visual backgrounds to generate different forms of retinal flow, on postural control in healthy young and older females. Participants were presented with computer generated visual stimuli, whilst postural sway and gaze fixations were simultaneously assessed with a force platform and eye tracking equipment, respectively. The results showed that fixed backgrounds and stationary gaze fixations attenuated postural sway. In contrast, oscillating backgrounds and smooth pursuits increased postural sway. There were no differences regarding saccades. There were also no differences in postural sway or gaze errors between age groups in any visual condition. The stabilizing effect of the fixed visual stimuli show how retinal flow and extraocular factors guide postural adjustments. The destabilizing effect of oscillating visual backgrounds and smooth pursuits may be related to more challenging conditions for determining body shifts from retinal flow, and more complex extraocular signals, respectively. Because the older participants matched the young group's performance in all conditions, decreases of posture and gaze control during stance may not be a direct consequence of healthy aging. Further research examining extraocular and retinal mechanisms of balance control and the effects of eye movements, during locomotion, is needed to better inform fall prevention interventions.

  8. Evaluation of factors affecting adherence to asthma controller ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adherence to asthma treatment was rated using Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. A ... The prevalence of low adherence rate to asthma controller therapy was 44.8% and the absence of any .... Obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). No. Yes.

  9. Effect of rosiglitazone in sodium arsenite-induced experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Tajpreet; Goel, Rajesh Kumar; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2010-04-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma agonist in sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. The rats were administered sodium arsenite (1.5 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks) to induce VED. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. Further, the integrity of the aortic endothelium was assessed histologically using haematoxylin-eosin staining. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, aortic reactive oxygen species and reduced form of glutathione. The administration of sodium arsenite produced VED by impairing acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation, diminishing the integrity of vascular endothelium and decreasing the serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. In addition, sodium arsenite was noted to produce oxidative stress as it increased serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and aortic reactive oxygen species and consequently decreased glutathione. Treatment with rosiglitazone (3 mg/kg/day, p.o., 2 weeks and 5 mg/kg/day, p.o., 2 weeks) significantly prevented sodium arsenite-induced VED by enhancing acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation, improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the nitrite/nitrate concentration and decreasing the oxidative stress. However, the vascular protective effect of rosiglitazone was markedly abolished by co-administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N-Omega-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) (25 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks). Thus, it may be concluded that rosiglitazone reduces oxidative stress, activates eNOS and enhances the generation of nitric oxide to prevent sodium arsenite-induced VED in rats.

  10. Arsenite treatment induces oxidative stress, upregulates antioxidant system, and causes phytochelatin synthesis in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shruti; Jha, A B; Dubey, R S

    2011-07-01

    The effects of arsenite treatment on generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of oxidative stress, response of antioxidative system, and synthesis of phytochelatins were investigated in two indica rice (Oryza sativa L.) cvs. Malviya-36 and Pant-12 grown in sand cultures for a period of 5-20 days. Arsenite (As(2)O(3); 25 and 50 μM) treatment resulted in increased formation of superoxide anion (O (2) (.-) ), elevated levels of H(2)O(2) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, showing enhanced lipid peroxidation. An enhanced level of ascorbate (AA) and glutathione (GSH) was observed irrespective of the variation in the level of dehydroascorbate (DHA) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) which in turn influenced redox ratios AA/DHA and GSH/GSSG. With progressive arsenite treatment, synthesis of total acid soluble thiols and phytochelatins (PC) increased in the seedlings. Among antioxidative enzymes, the activities of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (EC 1.11.1.6), total ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), chloroplastic ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), monodehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.6.5.4), and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) increased in arsenite treated seedlings, while dehyroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1) activity declined initially during 5-10 days and increased thereafter. Results suggest that arsenite treatment causes oxidative stress in rice seedlings, increases the levels of many enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, and induces synthesis of thiols and PCs, which may serve as important components in mitigating arsenite-induced oxidative damage.

  11. [Effectiveness of arsenite adsorption by ferric and alum water treatment residuals with different grain sizes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lu; Xu, Jia-Rui; Wu, Hao; Wang, Chang-Hui; Pei, Yuan-Sheng

    2013-07-01

    Effectiveness of arsenite adsorption by ferric and alum water treatment residuals (FARs) with different grain sizes was studied. The results indicated that the content of active Fe and Al, the specific surface area and pore volume in FARs with different grain sizes were in the range of 523.72-1 861.72 mmol x kg(-1), 28.15-265.59 m2 x g(-1) and 0.03-0.09 cm3 x g(-1), respectively. The contents of organic matter, fulvic acid, humic acid and humin were in the range of 46.97-91.58 mg x kg(-1), 0.02-32.27 mg x kg(-1), 22.27-34.09 mg x kg(-1) and 10.76-34.22 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Results of SEM and XRD analysis further demonstrated that FARs with different grain sizes were amorphousness. Batch experiments suggested that both the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations could well describe the kinetics adsorption processes of arsenite by FARs. Moreover, the contents of arsenite absorbed by FARs increased with the increase of arsenite concentrations. The theoretical saturated adsorption capacities calculated from Langmuir isotherm model were in the range of 6.72-21.79 mg x g(-1). Interestingly, pH showed little effect on the arsenite adsorption capability of FARs. The capability of FARs had a close relationship with their physicochemical properties. Correlation analysis showed that the active Fe and Al contents and pore volume had major effects on the arsenite adsorption capability of FARs.

  12. Automatic Control of Contextual Interaction Integrated with Affection and Architectural Attentional Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanrong Jiang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is still a challenge for robots to interact with complex environments in a smooth and natural manner. The robot should be aware of its surroundings and inner status to make decisions accordingly and appropriately. Contexts benefit the interaction a lot, such as avoiding frequent interruptions (e.g., the explicit inputting requests and thus are essential for interaction. Other challenges, such as shifting attentional focus to a more important stimulus, etc., are also crucial in interaction control. This paper presents a hybrid automatic control approach for interaction, as well as its integration, with these multiple important factors, aiming at performing natural, human‐like interactions in robots. In particular, a novel approach of architectural attentional control, based on affection is presented, which attempts to shift the attentional focus in a natural manner. Context‐aware computing is combined with interaction to endow the robot with proactive abilities. The long‐term interaction control approaches are described. Emotion and personality are introduced into the interaction and their influence mechanism on interaction is explored. We implemented the proposal in an interactive head robot (IHR and the experimental results indicate the effectiveness.

  13. Perinatal taurine exposure affects adult arterial pressure control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roysommuti, Sanya; Wyss, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Taurine is an abundant free amino acid found in mammalian cells that contributes to many physiologic functions from that of a simple cell osmolyte to a programmer of adult health and disease. Taurine’s contribution extends from conception throughout life, but its most critical exposure period is during perinatal life. In adults, taurine supplementation prevents or alleviates cardiovascular disease and related complications. In contrast, low taurine consumption coincides with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity and type II diabetes. This review focuses on the effects that altered perinatal taurine exposure has on long-term mechanisms that control adult arterial blood pressure and could thereby contribute to arterial hypertension through its ability to program these cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms very early in life. The modifications of these mechanisms can last a lifetime and transfer to the next generation, suggesting that epigenetic mechanisms underlie the changes. The ability of perinatal taurine exposure to influence arterial pressure control mechanisms and hypertension in adult life appears to involve the regulation of growth and development, the central and autonomic nervous system, the renin-angiotensin system, glucose-insulin interaction and changes to heart, blood vessels and kidney function. PMID:23070226

  14. Does the Environment Responsibility Affect the Management Control System?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hichem DKHILI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The literature suggests a problem emerging between management controls systems with the new responsibilities that companies must take into consideration. This study examines a system design management control tool orientation as behaviors that can overcome the uncertainties related to the environment and register the company in a voluntary approach which takes into account the environmental dimensions. A questionnaire survey sent to 306 Tunisian industrial companies was conducted. The results of the exploratory and confirmatory analysis are required. The results of the principal component factor analysis evidenced by Cronbach's alpha and KMO test, helped to cleanse the items selected from the literature. Similarly, the results of structural equations with indices of structural adjustment and parcimonies have devoted a good quality adjustment. Overall, findings suggest that most of the firm’s environment is uncertain, more tools to include in its environmental dimensions. On the other hand, the voluntary integration of an environmental approach is part of a strategy of cost leadership in the Tunisian industrial companies.

  15. Shape of magnifiers affects controllability in children with visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebrand-Schurink, Joyce; Boonstra, F Nienke; van Rens, Ger H M B; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Meulenbroek, Ruud G J; Cox, Ralf F A

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the controllability of cylinder-shaped and dome-shaped magnifiers in young children with visual impairment. This study investigates goal-directed arm movements in low-vision aid use (stand and dome magnifier-like object) in a group of young children with visual impairment (n = 56) compared to a group of children with normal sight (n = 66). Children with visual impairment and children with normal sight aged 4-8 years executed two types of movements (cyclic and discrete) in two orientations (vertical or horizontal) over two distances (10 cm and 20 cm) with two objects resembling the size and shape of regularly prescribed stand and dome magnifiers. The visually impaired children performed slower movements than the normally sighted children. In both groups, the accuracy and speed of the reciprocal aiming movements improved significantly with age. Surprisingly, in both groups, the performance with the dome-shaped object was significantly faster (in the 10 cm condition and 20 cm condition with discrete movements) and more accurate (in the 20 cm condition) than with the stand-shaped object. From a controllability perspective, this study suggests that it is better to prescribe dome-shaped than cylinder-shaped magnifiers to young children with visual impairment. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. 40 CFR 63.1316 - PET and polystyrene affected sources-emissions control provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true PET and polystyrene affected sources... and Resins § 63.1316 PET and polystyrene affected sources—emissions control provisions. (a) The owner... paragraph (b) of this section. The owner or operator of an affected source producing polystyrene using...

  17. Transplacental and early life exposure to inorganic arsenic affected development and behavior in offspring rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Shuhua; Jin, Yaping; Sun, Guifan [China Medical University, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, College of Public Health, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Sun, Wenjuan; Wang, Fengzhi [Shenyang Medical College, Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenyang, Liaoning (China)

    2009-06-15

    To evaluate the developmental neurotoxicity of arsenic in offspring rats by transplacental and early life exposure to sodium arsenite in drinking water, the pregnant rats or lactating dams, and weaned pups were given free access to drinking water, which contained arsenic at concentrations of 0, 10, 50, 100 mg/L from GD 6 until PND 42. A battery of physical and behavioral tests was applied to evaluate the functional outcome of pups. Pups in arsenic exposed groups weighed less than controls throughout lactation and weaning. Body weight of 10, 50 and 100 mg/L arsenic exposed groups decreased significantly on PND 42, 16 and 12, respectively. Physical development (pinna unfolding, fur appearance, incisor eruption, or eye opening) in pups displayed no significant differences between control and arsenic treated groups. The number of incidences within the 100 mg/L arsenic treated group, in tail hung, auditory startle and visual placing showed significant decrease compared to the control group (p<0.05). In square water maze test, the trained numbers to finish the trials successfully in 50 and 100 mg/L arsenic exposed groups increased remarkably compared to control group, and there was a dose-related increase (p<0.01) observed. Taken together, these data show that exposure of inorganic arsenite to pregnant dams and offspring pups at levels up to 100 mg/L in drinking water may affect their learning and memory functions and neuromotor reflex. (orig.)

  18. Adsorption kinetics and isotherms of arsenite and arsenate on hematite nanoparticles and aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Dionne; Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong

    2017-01-15

    Iron (Fe) nanoparticles, e.g., zerovalent iron (ZVI) and iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP), have been used for remediation and environmental management of arsenic (As) contamination. These Fe nanoparticles, although originally nanosized, tend to form aggregates, in particular in the environment. The interactions of As with both nanoparticles and micron-sized aggregates should be considered when these Fe nanomaterials are used for mitigation of As issue. The objective of this study was to compare the adsorption kinetics and isotherm of arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) on bare hematite nanoparticles and aggregates and how this affects the fate of arsenic in the environment. The adsorption kinetic process was investigated with regards to the aggregation of the nanoparticles and the type of sorbed species. Kinetic data were best described by a pseudo second-order model. Both As species had similar rate constants, ranging from 3.82 to 6.45 × 10(-4) g/(μg·h), as rapid adsorption occurred within the first 8 h regardless of particle size. However, hematite nanoparticles and aggregates showed a higher affinity to adsorb larger amounts of As(V) (4122 ± 62.79 μg/g) than As(III) (2899 ± 71.09 μg/g) at equilibrium. We were able to show that aggregation and sedimentation of hematite nanoparticles occurs during the adsorption process and this might cause the immobilization and reduced bioavailability of arsenic. Isotherm studies were described by the Freundlich model and it confirmed that hematite nanoparticles have a significantly higher adsorption capacity for both As(V) and As(III) than hematite aggregates. This information is useful and can assist in predicting arsenic adsorption behavior and assessing the role of iron oxide nanoparticles in the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic.

  19. Arsenite alters heme synthesis in long-term cultures of adult rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-González, M G; Hernández, A; López, M L; Mendoza-Figueroa, T; Albores, A

    1999-06-01

    Arsenite (As[III]) effects on the intermediate steps of heme biosynthesis were studied in adult rat hepatocytes seeded on a feeder layer of 3T3 cells (3T3-hepatocytes) and maintained for 2 weeks with culture medium non-supplemented or supplemented with 150 microM 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The activities of the intracellular enzymes porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D), uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROIII-S), and uroporphyrinogen III decarboxylase (URO-D), and the intermediary uroporphyrins (URO), coproporphyrins (COPRO) and protoporphyrin IX (PROTO) were determined in these cultures. The 3T3-hepatocytes maintained the activities of PBG-D, UROIII-S and URO-D during 2 weeks and ALA addition to the culture medium increased PBG-D (2-3-fold) and UROIII-S (50%) activities and porphyrin production, which accumulated as PROTO. Exposure to 3.9 microM As(III) inhibited UROIII-S activity (down to 34%), and PBG-D and URO-D activities to a lower extent; these effects were magnified by ALA supplementation. As(III) also produced an intracellular accumulation and a decreased excretion of PROTO, and a 31% reduction of the COPRO/URO ratio in the culture medium. Additionally, As(III) caused cytoplasmic vacuolization and lipid accumulation. Our results show that As(III) exposure selectively inhibits several intermediary enzymes of heme metabolism and affects the intra- and extracellular content of porphyrins and their ratio in the culture medium. They also confirm that 3T3-hepatocytes are a suitable in vitro model to study hepatic heme metabolism and its alterations by hepatotoxic chemicals.

  20. From the Cover: Arsenite Uncouples Mitochondrial Respiration and Induces a Warburg-like Effect in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Anthony L; Godebo, Tewodros R; Bhatt, Dhaval P; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Maurer, Laura L; Hirschey, Matthew D; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-08-01

    Millions of people worldwide are chronically exposed to arsenic through contaminated drinking water. Despite decades of research studying the carcinogenic potential of arsenic, the mechanisms by which arsenic causes cancer and other diseases remain poorly understood. Mitochondria appear to be an important target of arsenic toxicity. The trivalent arsenical, arsenite, can induce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, inhibit enzymes involved in energy metabolism, and induce aerobic glycolysis in vitro, suggesting that metabolic dysfunction may be important in arsenic-induced disease. Here, using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and a novel metabolic inhibition assay, we report an in vivo induction of aerobic glycolysis following arsenite exposure. Furthermore, arsenite exposure induced severe mitochondrial dysfunction, including altered pyruvate metabolism; reduced steady-state ATP levels, ATP-linked respiration and spare respiratory capacity; and increased proton leak. We also found evidence that induction of autophagy is an important protective response to arsenite exposure. Because these results demonstrate that mitochondria are an important in vivo target of arsenite toxicity, we hypothesized that deficiencies in mitochondrial electron transport chain genes, which cause mitochondrial disease in humans, would sensitize nematodes to arsenite. In agreement with this, nematodes deficient in electron transport chain complexes I, II, and III, but not ATP synthase, were sensitive to arsenite exposure, thus identifying a novel class of gene-environment interactions that warrant further investigation in the human populace.

  1. Extending brain-training to the affective domain: increasing cognitive and affective executive control through emotional working memory training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Schweizer

    Full Text Available So-called 'brain-training' programs are a huge commercial success. However, empirical evidence regarding their effectiveness and generalizability remains equivocal. This study investigated whether brain-training (working memory [WM] training improves cognitive functions beyond the training task (transfer effects, especially regarding the control of emotional material since it constitutes much of the information we process daily. Forty-five participants received WM training using either emotional or neutral material, or an undemanding control task. WM training, regardless of training material, led to transfer gains on another WM task and in fluid intelligence. However, only brain-training with emotional material yielded transferable gains to improved control over affective information on an emotional Stroop task. The data support the reality of transferable benefits of demanding WM training and suggest that transferable gains across to affective contexts require training with material congruent to those contexts. These findings constitute preliminary evidence that intensive cognitively demanding brain-training can improve not only our abstract problem-solving capacity, but also ameliorate cognitive control processes (e.g. decision-making in our daily emotive environments.

  2. Sodium arsenite induces chromosome endoreduplication and inhibits protein phosphatase activity in human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong-Nan Huang; I-Ching Ho; Ling-Hui Yih [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Taiwan (China)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Arsenic, strongly associated with increased risks of human cancers, is a potent clastogen in a variety of mammalian cell systems. The effect of sodium arsenite (a trivalent arsenic compound) on chromatid separation was studied in human skin fibroblasts (HFW). Human fibroblasts were arrested in S phase by the aid of serum starvation and aphidicolin blocking and then these cells were allowed to synchronously progress into G2 phase. Treatment of the G2-enriched HFW cells with sodium arsenite (0-200 {mu}M) resulted in arrest of cells in the G2 phase, interference with mitotic division, inhibition of spindle assembly, and induction of chromosome endoreduplication in their second mitosis. Sodium arsenite treatment also inhibited the activities of serine/threonine protein phosphatases and enhanced phosphorylation levels of a small heat shock protein (HSP27). These results suggest that sodium arsenite may mimic okadaic acid to induce chromosome endoreduplication through its inhibitory effect on protein phosphatase activity. 61 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Functions and Unique Diversity of Genes and Microorganisms Involved in Arsenite Oxidation from the Tailings of a Realgar Mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian-Chun; E, Guoji; Wang, Jianing; Wang, Nian; Chen, Xiaoming; Mu, Yao; Li, Hao; Yang, Ye; Liu, Yichen; Wang, Yanxin

    2016-12-15

    The tailings of the Shimen realgar mine have unique geochemical features. Arsenite oxidation is one of the major biogeochemical processes that occurs in the tailings. However, little is known about the functional and molecular aspects of the microbial community involved in arsenite oxidation. Here, we fully explored the functional and molecular features of the microbial communities from the tailings of the Shimen realgar mine. We collected six samples of tailings from sites A, B, C, D, E, and F. Microcosm assays indicated that all of the six sites contain both chemoautotrophic and heterotrophic arsenite-oxidizing microorganisms; their activities differed considerably from each other. The microbial arsenite-oxidizing activities show a positive correlation with soluble arsenic concentrations. The microbial communities of the six sites contain 40 phyla of bacteria and 2 phyla of archaea that show extremely high diversity. Soluble arsenic, sulfate, pH, and total organic carbon (TOC) are the key environmental factors that shape the microbial communities. We further identified 114 unique arsenite oxidase genes from the samples; all of them code for new or new-type arsenite oxidases. We also isolated 10 novel arsenite oxidizers from the samples, of which 4 are chemoautotrophic and 6 are heterotrophic. These data highlight the unique diversities of the arsenite-oxidizing microorganisms and their oxidase genes from the tailings of the Shimen realgar mine. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the functional and molecular features of microbial communities from the tailings of a realgar mine. This study focused on the functional and molecular characterizations of microbial communities from the tailings of the Shimen realgar mine. We fully explored, for the first time, the arsenite-oxidizing activities and the functional gene diversities of microorganisms from the tailings, as well as the correlation of the microbial activities/diversities with

  4. Absorption of Arsenite on Several Iron (Hydro-)Oxides and Impact from Pre-processing Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Ying; JI Shanshan; WU Daidai; LI Jun; ZHANG Weirui

    2006-01-01

    The absorption reactions of arsenite on Fe (hydro-)oxides are studied. The three absorbent types are Fe(OH)3 gel and two Fe (hydro-)oxides, in which the Fe(OH)3 gel was dried in a microwave oven under vacuum at 80℃. It is found that pH changes from 9.71 to 10.36 in 6 minutes after the Fe (OH)3 gel was mixed with NaAsO2 solution, as the arsenite replaces the OH- in goethite and Fe(OH)3.At the 40th minute after the start of the reaction, pH decreases, which is most probably because that the monodentate surface complex of absorbed arsenite has changed into mononuclear-bidentate complex and released proton. The decline in pH values indicates not the end of the absorption but a change in the reaction type. Temperature and dissolved gas has little effect on these two types of reactions. The total absorption of arsenite increases after the absorbent is irradiated with ultrasound, which also lead to difficulty in separating the solids from solution. The absorption capacity for arsenite of Fe(OH)3 gel dried in a microwave oven under vacuum is 53.18% and 17.22% respectively better than that of Fe (OH)3 gel and gel dried at 80℃. The possible reasons are that the water molecules in the gel vibrates with high frequency under the effect of microwave irradiation, thereby producing higher porosity and improved surface activity.

  5. Comment: Affect Control Theory and Cultural Priming: A Perspective from Cultural Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornpattananangkul, Narun; Chiao, Joan Y

    2014-04-01

    Affect control theory posits that emotions are constructed by social and cultural forces. Rogers, Schröder, and von Scheve (2014) introduce affect control theory as a conceptual and methodological "hub," linking theories from different disciplines across levels of analysis. To illustrate this further, we apply their framework to cultural priming, an experimental technique in cultural psychology and neuroscience for testing how exposure to cultural symbols (e.g., words and pictures) changes people's behavior, cognition, and emotion. Our analysis supports the use of affect control theory in linking different levels of analysis while leaving some opening questions for improving such a framework in future research.

  6. Affective science perspectives on cancer control: strategically crafting a mutually beneficial research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Rebecca A; Green, Paige A; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2015-05-01

    Cancer control research involves the conduct of basic and applied behavioral and social sciences to reduce cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality and improve quality of life. Given the importance of behavior in cancer control, fundamental research is necessary to identify psychological mechanisms underlying cancer risk, prevention, and management behaviors. Cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are often emotionally laden. As such, affective science research to elucidate questions related to the basic phenomenological nature of emotion, stress, and mood is necessary to understand how cancer control can be hindered or facilitated by emotional experiences. To date, the intersection of basic affective science research and cancer control remains largely unexplored. The goal of this article is to outline key questions in the cancer control research domain that provide an ecologically valid context for new affective science discoveries. We also provide examples of ways in which basic affective discoveries could inform future cancer prevention and control research. These examples are not meant to be exhaustive or prescriptive but instead are offered to generate creative thought about the promise of a cancer research context for answering basic affective science questions. Together, these examples provide a compelling argument for fostering collaborations between affective and cancer control scientists. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Cultivable diversity of thermophilic arsenite/ferrous-oxidizing microorganisms in hot springs of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Lin, Y.; Chang, Y.; Wang, P.; Lin, L.

    2009-12-01

    Elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater and surface water bodies have posed a stringent threat to the deterioration of the water quality for drinking and agriculture purposes around the world. In particular, arsenic liberated from volcanic and sedimentary rocks at high temperatures would be immobilized through adsorption on iron oxide and/or crystallization of iron-bearing minerals downstream at low temperatures. Understanding how microbially-catalytic reactions are involved in the changes of the redox state of arsenic and iron along a flow path would provide important constraints on the arsenic mobility in natural occurrences. The aims of this study were to isolate and characterize thermophilic arsenite- and iron-oxidizing microbes that would facilitate to establish the linkages between microbial distribution and in situ Fe/As cycling processes. Four source waters (LH05, LH08, SYK and MT) from acid-sulfate springs (pH 2-3, 60-97oC) located in the Tatun volcanic area of northern Taiwan were collected and inoculated into media targeting on autotrophic ferrous iron (FC3), arsenite (AC3 ,ACC3, AC7, ACC7), arsenite-resistant hydrogen (AH23), arsenite-resistant hydrogen-sulfur (AH2S3), and arsenite-resistant sulfur oxidations(AS3), and heterotrophic arsenite oxidation(AH3, AH7) at pH 3, and 7 at temperatures of 50, 70 and 80oC. Samples from the Kuantzuling mud springs (KTL) in southwestern Taiwan known with elevated arsenic levels (0.4 ppm) were also collected, inoculated into the heterotrophic medium and incubated at 50, 60, 70 and 80oC. Isolates obtained from KTL were subject to test on the AH7 and ACC7. Two positive enrichments for iron oxidation at 50oC and 70oC were confirmed by the steadily decrease of ferrous iron and increase of precipitates over 4 transfers for samples from the SYK spring. Diverse morphological types of microbes were enriched in all types of arsenite-bearing media at 50oC except for AH23. At 70oC, positive enrichments were found in media

  8. The novel role of fenofibrate in preventing nicotine- and sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Reddy, Krishna; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2010-09-01

    The present study investigated the effect of fenofibrate, an agonist of PPAR-alpha, in nicotine- and sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. Nicotine (2 mg/kg/day, i.p., 4 weeks) and sodium arsenite (1.5 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks) were administered to produce VED in rats. The scanning electron microscopy study in thoracic aorta revealed that administration of nicotine or sodium arsenite impaired the integrity of vascular endothelium. Further, administration of nicotine or sodium arsenite significantly decreased serum and aortic concentrations of nitrite/nitrate and subsequently reduced acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation. Moreover, nicotine or sodium arsenite produced oxidative stress by increasing serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and aortic superoxide generation. However, treatment with fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or atorvastatin (30 mg/kg/day p.o., a standard agent) significantly prevented nicotine- and sodium arsenite-induced VED and oxidative stress by improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the concentrations of serum and aortic nitrite/nitrate, enhancing the acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation and decreasing serum TBARS and aortic superoxide anion generation. Conversely, co-administration of L-NAME (25 mg/kg/day, i.p.), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, markedly attenuated these vascular protective effects of fenofibrate. The administration of nicotine or sodium arsenite altered the lipid profile by increasing serum cholesterol and triglycerides and consequently decreasing high-density lipoprotein levels, which were significantly prevented by treatment with fenofibrate or atorvastatin. It may be concluded that fenofibrate improves the integrity and function of vascular endothelium, and the vascular protecting potential of fenofibrate in preventing the development of nicotine- and sodium arsenite-induced VED may be attributed to its

  9. ArxA, a new clade of arsenite oxidase within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum oxidoreductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargar, Kamrun; Conrad, Alison; Bernick, David L.; Lowe, Todd M.; Stolc, Viktor; Hoeft, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald S.; Stolz, John; Saltikov, Chad W.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenotrophy, growth coupled to autotrophic arsenite oxidation or arsenate respiratory reduction, occurs only in the prokaryotic domain of life. The enzymes responsible for arsenotrophy belong to distinct clades within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum-containing oxidoreductases: specifically arsenate respiratory reductase, ArrA, and arsenite oxidase, AioA (formerly referred to as AroA and AoxB). A new arsenite oxidase clade, ArxA, represented by the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii strain MLHE-1 was also identified in the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp. strain PHS-1. A draft genome sequence of PHS-1 was completed and an arx operon similar to MLHE-1 was identified. Gene expression studies showed that arxA was strongly induced with arsenite. Microbial ecology investigation led to the identification of additional arxA-like sequences in Mono Lake and Hot Creek sediments, both arsenic-rich environments in California. Phylogenetic analyses placed these sequences as distinct members of the ArxA clade of arsenite oxidases. ArxA-like sequences were also identified in metagenome sequences of several alkaline microbial mat environments of Yellowstone National Park hot springs. These results suggest that ArxA-type arsenite oxidases appear to be widely distributed in the environment presenting an opportunity for further investigations of the contribution of Arx-dependent arsenotrophy to the arsenic biogeochemical cycle.

  10. Insulin therapy in poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients: does it affect quality of life?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauw, W.J.C. de; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Gerwen, W.H.E.M. van; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Weel, C. van

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strict glycaemic control in type 2 diabetic patients is recommended in a number of treatment protocols. However, although better glycaemic control prevents or postpones chronic diabetic complications, it remains uncertain how this affects quality of life in the short and long term. AIM:

  11. Effects of arsenic on modification of promyelocytic leukemia (PML): PML responds to low levels of arsenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Seishiro, E-mail: seishiro@nies.go.jp [Research Center for Environmental Risk, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University (Japan); Watanabe, Takayuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University (Japan); Kobayashi, Yayoi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University (Japan); Center for Environmental Health Sciences, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup 3+}) is a two-edged sword. iAs{sup 3+} is a well-known human carcinogen; nevertheless, it has been used as a therapeutic drug for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), which is caused by a fusion protein comprising retinoic acid receptor-α and promyelocytic leukemia (PML). PML, a nuclear transcription factor, has a RING finger domain with densely positioned cysteine residues. To examine PML-modulated cellular responses to iAs{sup 3+}, CHO-K1 and HEK293 cells were each used to establish cell lines that expressed ectopic human PML. Overexpression of PML increased susceptibility to iAs{sup 3+} in CHO-K1 cells, but not in HEK293 cells. Exposure of PML-transfected cells to iAs{sup 3+} caused PML to change from a soluble form to less soluble forms, and this modification of PML was observable even with just 0.1 μM iAs{sup 3+} (7.5 ppb). Western blot and immunofluorescent microscopic analyses revealed that the biochemical changes of PML were caused at least in part by conjugation with small ubiquitin-like modifier proteins (SUMOylation). A luciferase reporter gene was used to investigate whether modification of PML was caused by oxidative stress or activation of antioxidant response element (ARE) in CHO-K1 cells. Modification of PML protein occurred faster than activation of the ARE in response to iAs{sup 3+}, suggesting that PML was not modified as a consequence of oxidative stress-induced ARE activation. - Highlights: • PML was found in nuclear microspecles in response to arsenite. • Arsenite triggers SUMOylation of PML. • Arsenite modifies PML at as low as 0.1 μM. • Modification of PML is not caused by ARE activation.

  12. The Arsenite Oxidation Potential of Native Microbial Communities from Arsenic-Rich Freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Stefano; Crognale, Simona; Casentini, Barbara; Amalfitano, Stefano; Lotti, Francesca; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-07-01

    Microorganisms play an important role in speciation and mobility of arsenic in the environment, by mediating redox transformations of both inorganic and organic species. Since arsenite [As(III)] is more toxic than arsenate [As(V)] to the biota, the microbial driven processes of As(V) reduction and As(III) oxidation may play a prominent role in mediating the environmental impact of arsenic contamination. However, little is known about the ecology and dynamics of As(III)-oxidizing populations within native microbial communities exposed to natural high levels of As. In this study, two techniques for single cell quantification (i.e., flow cytometry, CARD-FISH) were used to analyze the structure of aquatic microbial communities across a gradient of arsenic (As) contamination in different freshwater environments (i.e., groundwaters, surface and thermal waters). Moreover, we followed the structural evolution of these communities and their capacity to oxidize arsenite, when experimentally exposed to high As(III) concentrations in experimental microcosms. Betaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria were the main groups retrieved in groundwaters and surface waters, while Beta and Gammaproteobacteria dominated the bacteria community in thermal waters. At the end of microcosm incubations, the communities were able to oxidize up to 95 % of arsenite, with an increase of Alphaproteobacteria in most of the experimental conditions. Finally, heterotrophic As(III)-oxidizing strains (one Alphaproteobacteria and two Gammaproteobacteria) were isolated from As rich waters. Our findings underlined that native microbial communities from different arsenic-contaminated freshwaters can efficiently perform arsenite oxidation, thus contributing to reduce the overall As toxicity to the aquatic biota.

  13. The influence of environmental conditions on kinetics of arsenite oxidation by manganese-oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Fischel, Matthew H. H.; Fischel, Jason S.; Lafferty, Brandon J.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Manganese-oxides are one of the most important minerals in soil due to their widespread distribution and high reactivity. Despite their invaluable role in cycling many redox sensitive elements, numerous unknowns remain about the reactivity of different manganese-oxide minerals under varying conditions in natural systems. By altering temperature, pH, and concentration of arsenite we were able to determine how manganese-oxide reactivity changes with simulated environmental conditions...

  14. Aquaglyceroporins are involved in uptake of arsenite into murine gastrointestinal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun; Chen, Gang; Jiang, Junkang; Qiu, Lianglin; Hosoi, Kazuo; Yao, Chenjuan

    2009-01-01

    Aquaglyceroporins (AQGPs) are members of aquaporin (AQP) family and belong to a subgroup of this water channel family; they are transmembrane proteins that transport water as well as glycerol and other solutes of small molecules. Recent studies have also identified that AQGPs are important transporters of trivalent metalloid in some mammalian cells. However, the uptake routes of arsenite in mammals are still less defined. In this study, to understand the routes of arsenite intake in mammals, mice were treated with Hg(II), glycerol, and As(III) and uptake of As(III) into the gastrointestinal tissues was measured. The level of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in gastrointestinal tissues after As(III) stimulation was much higher than Hg(II) +As(III) or glycerol+As(III) group. RT-PCR results showed that AQGPs were extensively expressed in gastrointestinal tissues of mice. We also treated Caco-2 cells with Hg(II) and As(III); the level of iAs in a group treated with Hg(II)+As(III) decreased compared with As(III)-treated group. Our results suggested that AQGPs could be important transporters in arsenite uptake into gastrointestinal tissues of mice, but more data are need to prove if AQGPs is the only pathway involved in As transport in mammals or just one of them.

  15. Bioaccumulation and oxidative stress in Daphnia magna exposed to arsenite and arsenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenhong; Ren, Jinqian; Li, Xiaomin; Wei, Chaoyang; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Nan

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic pollution and its toxicity to aquatic organisms have attracted worldwide attention. The bioavailability and toxicity of arsenic are highly related to its speciation. The present study investigated the differences in bioaccumulation and oxidative stress responses in an aquatic organism, Daphnia magna, induced by 2 inorganic arsenic species (As(III) and As(V)). The bioaccumulation of arsenic, Na(+) /K(+) -adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, total superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidative capability, and malondialdehyde content in D. magna were determined after exposure to 500 µg/L of arsenite and arsenate for 48 h. The results showed that the oxidative stress and antioxidative process in D. magna exposed to arsenite and arsenate could be divided into 3 phases, which were antioxidative response, oxidation inhibition, and antioxidative recovery. In addition, differences in bioaccumulation, Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity, and total SOD activity were also found in D. magna exposed to As(III) and As(V). These differences might have been the result of the high affinity of As(III) with sulfhydryl groups in enzymes and the structural similarity of As(V) to phosphate. Therefore, arsenate could be taken up by organisms through phosphate transporters, could substitute for phosphate in biochemical reactions, and could lead to a change in the bioaccumulation of arsenic and activity of enzymes. These characteristics were the possible reasons for the different toxicity mechanisms in the oxidative stress process of arsenite and arsenate.

  16. Arabidopsis NIP3;1 Plays an Important Role in Arsenic Uptake and Root-to-Shoot Translocation under Arsenite Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenzhong; Dai, Wentao; Yan, Huili; Li, Sheng; Shen, Hongling; Chen, Yanshan; Xu, Hua; Sun, Yangyang; He, Zhenyan; Ma, Mi

    2015-05-01

    In Arabidopsis, the nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily of aquaporin proteins consists of nine members, five of which (NIP1;1, NIP1;2, NIP5;1, NIP6;1, and NIP7;1) were previously identified to be permeable to arsenite. However, the roles of NIPs in the root-to-shoot translocation of arsenite in plants remain poorly understood. In this study, using reverse genetic strategies, Arabidopsis NIP3;1 was identified to play an important role in both the arsenic uptake and root-to-shoot distribution under arsenite stress conditions. The nip3;1 loss-of-function mutants displayed obvious improvements in arsenite tolerance for aboveground growth and accumulated less arsenic in shoots than those of the wild-type plants, whereas the nip3;1 nip1;1 double mutant showed strong arsenite tolerance and improved growth of both roots and shoots under arsenite stress conditions. A promoter-β-glucuronidase analysis revealed that NIP3;1 was expressed almost exclusively in roots (with the exception of the root tips), and heterologous expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated that NIP3;1 was able to mediate arsenite transport. Taken together, our results suggest that NIP3;1 is involved in arsenite uptake and root-to-shoot translocation in Arabidopsis, probably as a passive and bidirectional arsenite transporter.

  17. Effects of chronic exposure to sodium arsenite on hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular activities in adult rats: possible an estrogenic mode of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Subarna

    2006-02-01

    -HSD, 17 beta-HSD, and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH were significantly decreased, but those of acid phosphatase (ACP, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH were significantly increased. A decrease in dopamine or an increase in noradrenaline and 5-HT in hypothalamus and pituitary were also noted after arsenic exposure. Histological evaluation revealed extensive degeneration of different varieties of germ cells at stage VII of spermatogenic cycle in arsenic exposed rats. Administration of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG along with sodium arsenite partially prevented the degeneration of germ cells and enhanced paired testicular weights, epididymal sperm count, plasma and intratesticular testosterone concentrations, activities of delta 5, 3beta-HSD, 17 beta-HSD and sorbitol dehydrogenase along with diminution in the activities of ACP, ALP and LDH. Since many of the observed arsenic effects could be enhanced by oestradiol, it is suggested that arsenic might somehow acts through an estrogenic mode of action. Conclusion The results indicate that arsenic causes testicular toxicity by germ cell degeneration and inhibits androgen production in adult male rats probably by affecting pituitary gonadotrophins. Estradiol treatment has been associated with similar effects on pituitary testicular axis supporting the hypothesis that arsenite might somehow act through an estrogenic mode of action.

  18. Spatio-temporal detection of the Thiomonas population and the Thiomonas arsenite oxidase involved in natural arsenite attenuation processes in the Carnoulès Acid Mine Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès eHovasse

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The acid mine drainage (AMD impacted creek of the Carnoulès mine (Southern France is characterized by acid waters with a high heavy metal content. The microbial community inhabiting this AMD was extensively studied using isolation, metagenomic and metaproteomic methods, and the results showed that a natural arsenic (and iron attenuation process involving the arsenite oxidase activity of several Thiomonas strains occurs at this site. A sensitive quantitative Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM-based proteomic approach was developed for detecting and quantifying the two subunits of the arsenite oxidase and RpoA of two different Thiomonas groups. Using this approach combined with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis based on pyrosequencing and FISH, it was established here for the first time that these Thiomonas strains are ubiquitously present in minor proportions in this AMD and that they express the key enzymes involved in natural remediation processes at various locations and time points. In addition to these findings, this study also confirms that targeted proteomics applied at the community level can be used to detect weakly abundant proteins in situ.

  19. Prenatal Exposure to Sodium Arsenite Alters Placental Glucose 1, 3, and 4 Transporters in Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Sarahí Gutiérrez-Torres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic arsenic (iAs exposure induces a decrease in glucose type 4 transporter (GLUT4 expression on the adipocyte membrane, which may be related to premature births and low birth weight infants in women exposed to iAs at reproductive age. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2 exposure on GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 protein expression and on placental morphology. Female Balb/c mice (n=15 were exposed to 0, 12, and 20 ppm of NaAsO2 in drinking water from 8th to 18th day of gestation. Morphological changes and GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 expression were evaluated in placentas by immunohistochemical and image analysis and correlated with iAs and arsenical species concentration, which were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. NaAsO2 exposure induced a significant decrease in fetal and placental weight (P<0.01 and increases in infarctions and vascular congestion. Whereas GLUT1 expression was unchanged in placentas from exposed group, GLUT3 expression was found increased. In contrast, GLUT4 expression was significantly lower (P<0.05 in placentas from females exposed to 12 ppm. The decrease in placental GLUT4 expression might affect the provision of adequate fetal nutrition and explain the low fetal weight observed in the exposed groups.

  20. Short-term exposure of arsenite disrupted thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in the HPT axis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Jie; Li, Hong-Bo; Xiang, Ping; Zhang, Xiaowei; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-10-01

    Arsenic (As) pollution in aquatic environment may adversely impact fish health by disrupting their thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, we explored the effect of short-term exposure of arsenite (AsIII) on thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish. We measured As concentrations, As speciation, and thyroid hormone thyroxine levels in whole zebrafish, oxidative stress (H2O2) and damage (MDA) in the liver, and gene transcription in hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in the brain and liver tissues of zebrafish after exposing to different AsIII concentrations for 48 h. Result indicated that exposure to AsIII increased inorganic As in zebrafish to 0.46-0.72 mg kg(-1), induced oxidative stress with H2O2 being increased by 1.4-2.5 times and caused oxidative damage with MDA being augmented by 1.6 times. AsIII exposure increased thyroxine levels by 1.3-1.4 times and modulated gene transcription in HPT axis. Our study showed AsIII caused oxidative damage, affected thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in HPT axis in zebrafish.

  1. Members of rice plasma membrane intrinsic proteins subfamily are involved in arsenite permeability and tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Mcdermott, Joseph; Liu, Zijuan; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2012-12-01

    Rice accumulates high level of arsenic (As) in its edible parts and thus plays an important role in the transfer of As into the food chain. However, the mechanisms of As uptake and its detoxification in rice are not well understood. Recently, members of the Nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily of plant aquaporins were shown to transport arsenite in rice and Arabidopsis. Here we report that members of the rice plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily are also involved in As tolerance and transport. Based on the homology search with the mammalian AQP9 and yeast Fps1 arsenite transporters, we identified and cloned five rice PIP gene subfamily members. qRT-PCR analysis of PIPs in rice root and shoot tissues revealed a significant down regulation of transcripts encoding OsPIP1;2, OsPIP1;3, OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in response to arsenite treatment. Heterologous expression of OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in Xenopus laevis oocytes significantly increased the uptake of arsenite. Overexpression of OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in Arabidopsis yielded enhanced arsenite tolerance and higher biomass accumulation. Further, these transgenic plants showed no significant accumulation of As in shoot and root tissues in long term uptake assays. Whereas, short duration exposure to arsenite caused both active influx and efflux of As in the roots. The data suggests a bidirectional arsenite permeability of rice PIPs in plants. These rice PIPs genes will be highly useful for engineering important food and biofuel crops for enhanced crop productivity on contaminated soils without increasing the accumulation of toxic As in the biomass or edible tissues.

  2. Syntheses, crystal structures and characterizations of new vanadium arsenites and arsenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Junhui [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); He Zhangzhen; Kong Fang; Xu Xiang [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Sun Chuanfu [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Mao Jianggao, E-mail: mjg@fjirsm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Systematic explorations in vanadium arsenites and arsenates led to the isolation four new compounds, namely, {alpha}-(V{sup IV}O){sub 3}(As{sup III}O{sub 3}){sub 2} (1), {beta}-(V{sup IV}O){sub 3}(As{sup III}O{sub 3}){sub 2} (2), (V{sup IV}O)[V{sup IV}O(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}(As{sup V}O{sub 4}){sub 2} (3), V{sup III}V{sup IV}O{sub 2}(As{sup V}O{sub 4}) (4). Compounds 1, 2 and 4 were synthesized by standard solid-state reactions, and compound 3 is a vanadium arsenate dihydrate synthesized through hydrothermal reactions. Compounds 1 and 2 are isomers, and they represent the first examples of ternary inorganic vanadium(IV) arsenites. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the four compounds display four different structural types. Magnetic property measurements for compound 1 indicated that it exhibits ferromagnetism with the Curie temperature T{sub c}=65 K. Thermal stability and optical properties for compounds 1 and 3 were also investigated. - Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal or solid state reactions of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (or VO{sub 2}) and As{sub 2}O{sub 3} yielded four new ternary compounds with four different types of structures, namely, {alpha}-(VO){sub 3}(AsO{sub 3}){sub 2} (1), {beta}-(VO){sub 3}(AsO{sub 3}){sub 2} (2), (VO)[VO(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} (3), (VO){sub 2}(AsO{sub 4}) (4). {alpha}-(VO){sub 3}(AsO{sub 3}){sub 2} (1), {beta}-(VO){sub 3}(AsO{sub 3}){sub 2} (2) represent the first examples of ternary inorganic vanadium(IV) arsenites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal or solid state reactions of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (or VO{sub 2}) and As{sub 2}O{sub 3} yielded two new arsenites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They represent the first examples of ternary vanadium arsenites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two new ternary vanadium arsenates were also obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They exhibit four different structural types.

  3. Protective effects of the dietary supplementation of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) on sodium arsenite-induced biochemical perturbation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md Rezaul; Haque, Abedul; Islam, Khairul; Ali, Nurshad; Salam, Kazi Abdus; Saud, Zahangir Alam; Hossain, Ekhtear; Fajol, Abul; Akhand, Anwarul Azim; Himeno, Seiichiro; Hossain, Khaled

    2010-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective effect of turmeric powder on arsenic toxicity through mice model. Swiss albino male mice were divided into four groups. The first group was used as control, while groups 2, 3, and 4 were treated with turmeric powder (T, 50 mg/kg body weight/day), sodium arsenite (Sa, 10 mg/kg body weight/day) and turmeric plus Sa (T+Sa), respectively. Results showed that oral administration of Sa reduced the weight gain of the mice compared to the control group and food supplementation of turmeric prevented the reduction of weight gain. Turmeric abrogated the Sa-induced elevation of serum urea, glucose, triglyceride (TG) level and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity except the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Turmeric also prevented the Sa-induced perturbation of serum butyryl cholinesterase activity (BChE). Therefore, ameliorating effect of turmeric on Sa-treated mice suggested the future application of turmeric to reduce or to prevent arsenic toxicity in human.

  4. Sodium meta-arsenite prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.S.; Kim, D.; Lee, E.K. [Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S. [Komipharm International Co. Ltd., 3188, Seongnam-dong, Jungwon-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 462-827 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, C.S. [Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Endocrinology, Internal Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, 1198 Guwol-Dong, Namdong-Gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of); Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Hospital, 1198 Guwol-Dong, Namdong-Gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of); Jun, H.S., E-mail: hsjun@gachon.ac.kr [Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy and Gachon Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Hospital, 1198 Guwol-Dong, Namdong-Gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Sodium meta-arsenite (SA) is an orally available arsenic compound. We investigated the effects of SA on the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice were orally intubated with SA (5 mg/kg/day) from 8 weeks of age for 8 weeks. The cumulative incidence of diabetes was monitored until 30 weeks of age, islet histology was examined, and lymphocytes including T cells, B cells, CD4+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD8+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD4+ IL-4+ cells, and regulatory T cells were analyzed. We also investigated the diabetogenic ability of splenocytes using an adoptive transfer model and the effect of SA on the proliferation, activation, and expression of glucose transporter 1 (Glut1) in splenocytes treated with SA in vitro and splenocytes isolated from SA-treated mice. SA treatment decreased the incidence of diabetes and delayed disease onset. SA treatment reduced the infiltration of immunocytes in islets, and splenocytes from SA-treated mice showed a reduced ability to transfer diabetes. The number of total splenocytes and T cells and both the number and the proportion of CD4+ IFN-γ+ and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells in the spleen were significantly reduced in SA-treated NOD mice compared with controls. The number, but not the proportion, of regulatory T cells was decreased in SA-treated NOD mice. Treatment with SA either in vitro or in vivo inhibited proliferation of splenocytes. In addition, the expression of Glut1 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 was decreased by SA treatment. These results suggest that SA reduces proliferation and activation of T cells, thus preventing autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. - Highlights: • SA prevents the development of diabetes and delays the age of onset in NOD mice. • SA decreases the number but not the proportion of T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces IFN-γ-producing T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. • SA reduces the expression of glucose

  5. Sodium arsenite down-regulates the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein via translational and post-translational mechanisms in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hong; Hao, Yuqing; Wang, Lijing; Jia, Dongwei [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Ruan, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yuanyuanruan@fudan.edu.cn [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium arsenite down-regulates the protein expression level of XIAP in HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium arsenite inhibits the de novo XIAP synthesis and its IRES activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium arsenite decreases XIAP stability and promotes its proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of XIAP attenuates the pro-apoptotic effect of sodium arsenite. -- Abstract: X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is a member of the inhibitors of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, and has been reported to exhibit elevated expression levels in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and promote cell survival, metastasis and tumor recurrence. Targeting XIAP has proven effective for the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation and restoration of cancer cell chemosensitivity. Arsenic (or sodium arsenite) is a potent anti-tumor agent used to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Additionally, arsenic induces cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human HCC cells. In this study, we identified XIAP as a target for sodium arsenite-induced cytotoxicity in HCC. The exposure of HCC cell lines to sodium arsenite resulted in inhibition of XIAP expression in both a dose- and time-dependent manner. Sodium arsenite blocked the de novo XIAP synthesis and the activity of its internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element. Moreover, treatment with sodium arsenite decreased the protein stability of XIAP and induced its ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. Overexpression of XIAP attenuated the pro-apoptotic effect of sodium arsenite in HCC. Taken together, our data demonstrate that sodium arsenite suppresses XIAP expression via translational and post-translational mechanisms in HCC.

  6. Auditory top-down control and affective theory of mind in schizophrenia with and without hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominger, Christian; Bleier, Angelika; Fitz, Werner; Marksteiner, Josef; Fink, Andreas; Papousek, Ilona; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2016-07-01

    Social cognitive impairments may represent a core feature of schizophrenia and above all are a strong predictor of positive psychotic symptoms. Previous studies could show that reduced inhibitory top-down control contributes to deficits in theory of mind abilities and is involved in the genesis of hallucinations. The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between auditory inhibition, affective theory of mind and the experience of hallucinations in patients with schizophrenia. In the present study, 20 in-patients with schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls completed a social cognition task (the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test) and an inhibitory top-down Dichotic Listening Test. Schizophrenia patients with greater severity of hallucinations showed impaired affective theory of mind as well as impaired inhibitory top-down control. More dysfunctional top-down inhibition was associated with poorer affective theory of mind performance, and seemed to mediate the association between impairment to affective theory of mind and severity of hallucinations. The findings support the idea of impaired theory of mind as a trait marker of schizophrenia. In addition, dysfunctional top-down inhibition may give rise to hallucinations and may further impair affective theory of mind skills in schizophrenia.

  7. Hybridization of an invasive shrub affects tolerance and resistance to defoliation by a biological control agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wyatt I.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Gaskin, John F.; Norton, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Evolution has contributed to the successful invasion of exotic plant species in their introduced ranges, but how evolution affects particular control strategies is still under evaluation. For instance, classical biological control, a common strategy involving the utilization of highly specific natural enemies to control exotic pests, may be negatively affected by host hybridization because of shifts in plant traits, such as root allocation or chemical constituents. We investigated introgression between two parent species of the invasive shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) in the western United States, and how differences in plant traits affect interactions with a biological control agent. Introgression varied strongly with latitude of origin and was highly correlated with plant performance. Increased levels of T. ramosissima introgression resulted in both higher investment in roots and tolerance to defoliation and less resistance to insect attack. Because tamarisk hybridization occurs predictably on the western U.S. landscape, managers may be able to exploit this information to maximize control efforts. Genetic differentiation in plant traits in this system underpins the importance of plant hybridization and may explain why some biological control releases are more successful than others.

  8. Developmental Regulation with Progressive Vision Loss: Use of Control Strategies and Affective Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Oliver K.; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Boerner, Kathrin; Horowitz, Amy; Reinhardt, Joann P.; Cimarolli, Verena R.; Brennan-Ing, Mark; Heckhausen, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The present study addresses older adults' developmental regulation when faced with progressive and irreversible vision loss. We used the motivational theory of life span development as a conceptual framework and examined changes in older adults' striving for control over everyday goal achievement, and their association with affective well-being,…

  9. Cognitive-affective neural plasticity following active-controlled mindfulness intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, Micah Galen

    for cognitive and treatment effects with an active control group. We measured behavioral metacognition and whole-brain Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signals using functional MRI during an affective Stroop task before and after intervention in healthy human subjects. Although both groups improved...

  10. Age affects the adjustment of cognitive control after a conflict: evidence from the bivalency effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Mermet, Alodie; Meier, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Age affects cognitive control. When facing a conflict, older adults are less able to activate goal-relevant information and inhibit irrelevant information. However, cognitive control also affects the events after a conflict. The purpose of this study was to determine whether age affects the adjustment of cognitive control following a conflict. To this end, we investigated the bivalency effect, that is, the performance slowing occurring after the conflict induced by bivalent stimuli (i.e., stimuli with features for two tasks). In two experiments, we tested young adults (aged 20-30) and older adults (aged 65-85) in a paradigm requiring alternations between three tasks, with bivalent stimuli occasionally occurring on one task. The young adults showed a slowing for all trials following bivalent stimuli. This indicates a widespread and long-lasting bivalency effect, replicating previous findings. In contrast, the older adults showed a more specific and shorter-lived slowing. Thus, age affects the adjustment of cognitive control following a conflict.

  11. Influence on birthing positions affects women's sense of control in second stage of labour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijze, M.J.; Jonge, A. de; Korstjens, I.; Bude, L.; Lagro-Janssen, T.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to explore whether choices in birthing positions contributes to women's sense of control during birth. DESIGN: survey using a self-report questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses were used to investigate which factors associated with choices in birthing positions affected women's sense

  12. Redefining a Bizarre Situation: Relative Concept Stability in Affect Control Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    I analyze the process by which we react cognitively to information that contradicts our culturally held sentiments in the context of affect control theory. When bizarre, unanticipated events come to our attention and we have no opportunity to act so as to alter them, we must reidentify at least one event component: the actor, the behavior, or the…

  13. Further Analysis of Variables That Affect Self-Control with Aversive Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Christopher J.; Neef, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine variables that affect self-control in the context of academic task completion by elementary school children with autism. In the baseline assessment of Study 1, mathematics problem completion was shown to be an aversive event, and sensitivity to task magnitude, task difficulty, and delay to task completion…

  14. Control, Motivation, Affect, and Strategic Self-Regulation in the College Classroom: A Multidimensional Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Duane F.; Husman, Jenefer

    2008-01-01

    This study of 397 undergraduate students examined relations between self-reported control, goal orientation, future time perspective, affect, and strategic self-regulation. Five patterns were found in three canonical dimensions. The high end of bipolar Dimension 1 linked high self-regulated strategy use and study effort to high self-efficacy,…

  15. Influence on birthing positions affects women's sense of control in second stage of labour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijze, M.J.; Jonge, A. de; Korstjens, I.; Bude, L.; Lagro-Janssen, T.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to explore whether choices in birthing positions contributes to women's sense of control during birth. DESIGN: survey using a self-report questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses were used to investigate which factors associated with choices in birthing positions affected women's sense

  16. The accumulations of HIF-1α and HIF-2α by JNK and ERK are involved in biphasic effects induced by different levels of arsenite in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuan; Li, Yuan [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Li, Huiqiao [Qujing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Qujing 655000, Yunnan (China); Pang, Ying; Zhao, Yue; Jiang, Rongrong; Shen, Lu [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Jianwei; Wang, Xinru [The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Liu, Qizhan, E-mail: drqzliu@hotmail.com [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-01-15

    The biphasic effects of arsenite, in which low levels of arsenite induce cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite induce DNA damage and apoptosis, apparently contribute to arsenite-induced carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of different levels of arsenite on cell proliferation, DNA damage and apoptosis as well as on signal transduction pathways in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. Our results show that a low level of arsenite activates extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), which probably mediate arsenite-inhibited degradation of ubiquitinated hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) in HBE cells. ERK inhibition blocks cell proliferation induced by a low level of arsenite, in part via HIF-2α. In contrast, a high level of arsenite activates c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), which provoke a response to suppress ubiquitinated HIF-1α degradation. Down-regulation of HIF-1α by inhibiting JNK, however, increases the DNA damage but decreases the apoptosis induced by a high level of arsenite. Thus, data in the present study suggest that the accumulations of HIF-1α and HIF-2α by JNK and ERK are involved in different levels of arsenite-induced biphasic effects, with low levels of arsenite inducing cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite inducing DNA damage and apoptosis in HBE cells. -- Highlights: ► Biphasic effects induced by different concentrations of arsenite. ► Different regulation of ERK or JNK signal pathway by arsenite. ► Different regulation of HIF1α or HIF 2α by arsenite.

  17. Selenite modulates the level of phenolics and nutrient element to alleviate the toxicity of arsenite in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Reshu; Awasthi, Surabhi; Tripathi, Preeti; Mishra, Seema; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Niranjan, Abhishek; Mallick, Shekhar; Tripathi, Pratibha; Pande, Veena; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2017-04-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of paddy rice is a serious threat all over the world particularly in South East Asia. Selenium (Se) plays important role in protection of plants against various abiotic stresses including heavy metals. Moreover, arsenite (AsIII) and selenite (SeIV) can be biologically antagonistic due to similar electronic configuration and sharing the common transporter for their uptake in plant. In the present study, the response of oxidative stress, phenolic compounds and nutrient elements was analyzed to investigate Se mediated As tolerance in rice seedlings during AsIII and SeIV exposure in hydroponics. Selenite (25µM) significantly decreased As accumulation in plant than As (25µM) alone treated plants. Level of oxidative stress related parameters viz., reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation, electrical conductivity, nitric oxide and pro-oxidant enzyme (NADPH oxidase), were in the order of As>As+Se>control>Se. Selenium ameliorated As phytotoxicity by increased level of phenolic compounds particularly gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, ferulic acid and rutin and thiol metabolism related enzymes viz., serine acetyl transferase (SAT) and cysteine synthase (CS). Selenium supplementation enhanced the uptake of nutrient elements viz., Fe, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Mo, and improved plant growth. The results concluded that Se addition in As contaminated environment might be an important strategy to reduce As uptake and associated phytotoxicity in rice plant by modulation of phenolic compounds and increased uptake of nutrient elements.

  18. Approaches to Affective Computing and Learning towards Interactive Decision Making in Process Control Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Chong; LI Hong-Guang

    2013-01-01

    Numerous multi-objective decision-making problems related to industrial process control engineering such as control and operation performance evaluation are being resolved through human-computer interactions.With regard to the problems that traditional interactive evolutionary computing approaches suffer i.e.,limited searching ability and human's strong subjectivity in multi-objective-attribute decision-making,a novel affective computing and learning solution adapted to human-computer interaction mechanism is explicitly proposed.Therein,a kind of stimulating response based affective computing model (STAM) is constructed,along with quantitative relations between affective space and human's subjective preferences.Thereafter,affective learning strategies based on genetic algorithms are introduced which are responsible for gradually grasping essentials in human's subjective judgments in decision-making,reducing human's subjective fatigue as well as making the decisions more objective and scientific.Affective learning algorithm's complexity and convergence analysis are shown in Appendices A and B.To exemplify applications of the proposed methods,ad-hoc test functions and PID parameter tuning are suggested as case studies,giving rise to satisfying results and showing validity of the contributions.

  19. Early life trauma is associated with altered white matter integrity and affective control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, Vincent; Amick, Melissa A; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E; Salat, David H

    2016-08-01

    Early life trauma (ELT) has been shown to impair affective control and attention well into adulthood. Neuroimaging studies have further shown that ELT was associated with decreased white matter integrity in the prefrontal areas in children and adults. However, no study to date has looked at the relationship between white matter integrity and affective control in individuals with and without a history of ELT. To examine this, we tested 240 Veterans with (ELT N = 80) and without (NoELT N = 160) a history of childhood sexual abuse, physical abuse or family violence. Affective control was measured with the Affective Go/No-Go (AGN) and attention was indexed with the Test of Variable Attention (TOVA). White matter integrity was measured using fractional anisotropy (FA). Results showed greater number of errors on the AGN in ELT compared to NoELT. There was no difference on the TOVA. While there were no mean differences in FA, there was an interaction between FA and reaction time to positive stimuli on the AGN where the ELT group showed a positive relationship between FA and reaction time in right frontal and prefrontal areas, whereas the NoELT group showed a negative or no association between FA and reaction time. This suggests that ELT may be associated with a distinct brain-behavior relationship that could be related to other determinants of FA than those present in healthy adults.

  20. The role of implicit affective responses and trait self-control in ego resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczny, Jacek; Layton, Rebekah L; Muraven, Mark

    Exertion of self-control requires reliance on ego resources. Impaired performance typically results once those resources have been depleted by previous use. Yet the mechanism behind the depletion processes is little understood. Beliefs, motivation, and physiological changes have been implicated, yet the source behind these remains unknown. We propose that implicit may form the fundamental building blocks that these processes rely upon to operate. Implicit affective responses to energy may trigger management of ego resources after depletion. Findings suggest that inhibitory trait self-control may interact with the depletion effect, indicating the importance of taking individual differences in chronic availability of ego-resources into account. After depletion, individuals high in trait self-control may be less motivated to conserve remaining resources than those low in self-control. This mechanism may also help explain the conservation of resources observed when expecting multiple tasks requiring self-control.

  1. Arsenite release on enzymic transformation of arsonomethyl substrate analogues: a potentially lethal synthesis by glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutenda, E K; Sparkes, M J; Dixon, H B

    1995-09-15

    The isosteric arsenical analogue of glycerol 3-phosphate, 3,4-dihydroxybutylarsonic acid, is a good substrate for rabbit muscle glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Its oxidation is accompanied by release of arsenite. This release seems to be due to a spontaneous elimination of arsenite by 3-oxoalkylarsonic acids, as it is also observed in (1) the oxidation of 3-hydroxypropylarsonic acid by yeast alcohol dehydrogenase, (2) treatment of 3,4-dihydroxybutylarsonic acid with periodate and (3) nonenzymic transamination of the glutamate analogue 2-amino-4-arsonobutyric acid. Enzymic formation of 3-oxoalkylarsonic acids in cells can therefore be lethal, as arsenite is poisonous to most organisms because of its high affinity for dithiols such as dihydrolipoyl groups.

  2. Arsenite induced oxidative damage in mouse liver is associated with increased cytokeratin 18 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsebatt, M.E. [UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Dept. Medicina Genomica y Toxicologia Ambiental, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Mexico (Mexico); Razo, L.M. del; Sanchez-Pena, L.C. [Seccion de Toxicologia, CINVESTAV, Mexico (Mexico); Cerbon, M.A. [Facultad de Quimica, UNAM, Departamento de Biologia, Mexico (Mexico); Zuniga, O.; Ramirez, P. [Facultad de Estudios Superiores Cuautitlan, UNAM, Laboratorio de Toxicologia Celular, Coordinacion General de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, Cuautitlan Izcalli, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-09-15

    Cytokeratins (CK) constitute a family of cytoskeletal intermediate filament proteins that are typically expressed in epithelial cells. An abnormal structure and function are effects that are clearly related to liver diseases as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We have previously observed that sodium arsenite (SA) induced the synthesis of CK18 protein and promotes a dose-related disruption of cytoplasmic CK18 filaments in a human hepatic cell line. Both abnormal gene expression and disturbance of structural organization are toxic effects that are likely to cause liver disease by interfering with normal hepatocyte function. To investigate if a disruption in the CK18 expression pattern is associated with arsenite liver damage, we investigated CK18 mRNA and protein levels in liver slices treated with low levels of SA. Organotypic cultures were incubated with 0.01, 1 and 10 {mu}M of SA in the absence and presence of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Cell viability and inorganic arsenic metabolism were determined. Increased expression of CK18 was observed after exposure to SA. The addition of NAC impeded the oxidative effects of SA exposure, decreasing the production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and significantly diminishing the up regulation of CK18 mRNA and protein. Liver arsenic levels correlated with increased levels of mRNA. Mice treated with intragastric single doses of 2.5 and 5 mg/kg of SA showed an increased expression of CK18. Results suggest that CK18 expression may be a sensible early biomarker of oxidative stress and damage induced by arsenite in vitro and in vivo. Then, during SA exposure, altered CK expression may compromise liver function. (orig.)

  3. Possible vasculoprotective role of linagliptin against sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti, Uma; Kansal, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Puneet; Goyal, Sandeep

    2016-02-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) interrupts the integrity and function of endothelial lining through enhanced markers of oxidative stress and decrease endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression. The main aim of the present study has been designed to investigate the possible vasculoprotective role of linagliptin against sodium arsenite-induced VED. Sodium arsenite (1.5 mg/kg, i.p., 2 weeks) abrogated the acetylcholine-induced, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation by depicting the decrease in serum nitrite/nitrate concentration, reduced glutathione level, and simultaneously enhance the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level, superoxide level, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. These elevated markers interrupt the integrity of endothelial lining of thoracic aorta which was assessed histologically. The study elicits dose dependent effect of linagliptin (1.5 mg/kg, i.p. and 3 mg/kg, i.p.) or atorvastatin (30 mg/kg, p.o.) treatment, improved the endothelium-dependent independent relaxation, improve the integrity of endothelium lining which was assessed histologically by enhancing the serum nitrite/nitrate level, reduced glutathione level and simultaneously decreasing the TBARS level, superoxide anion level and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) level. L-NAME (25 mg/kg, i.p.), eNOS inhibitor, abrogated the ameliorative potential of linagliptin. However, the ameliorative potential of linagliptin has been enhanced by l-arginine (200 mg/kg, i.p.) which elicits that ameliorative potential of linagliptin was through eNOS signaling cascade and it may be concluded that linagliptin 3 mg/kg, i.p. has more significantly activated the eNOS and decreased the oxidative markers than linagliptin 1.5 mg/kg, i.p. and prevented sodium arsenite-induced VED.

  4. Acute Sodium Arsenite-Induced Hematological and Biochemical Changes in Wistar Rats: Protective Effects of Ethanol Extract of Ageratum conyzoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ola-Davies, Olufunke Eunice; Akinrinde, Akinleye Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ageratum conyzoides L. (Asteraceae) is an annual herbaceous plant used in folklore medicine for the treatment of a wide range of diseases. Objective: To investigate the protective effect of the ethanol leaf extract of A. conyzoides (EEAC) against hematological, serum biochemical and histological alterations induced by Sodium arsenite administration to Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into four groups of five rats each. Group I received propylene glycol and Group II rats were given the (EEAC, 100 mg/kg b.w.) orally for 7 days. Group III were given a single oral dose of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2, 2.5 mg/kg b.w.). Animals in Group IV were pretreated with 100 mg/kg EEAC for 7 days followed by a single oral dose of sodium arsenite. Results: Arsenic exposure resulted in significant reductions (P produced significant reversal of the reduction in the erythrocytic indices (packed cell volume, red blood cell, and Hb) caused by sodium arseniteSodium arsenite-induced slight elevations in serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), correlating with the histopathological lesions observedAgeratum conyzoides produced only slight reductions in AST, ALT, and ALP compared to the sodium arsenite group, but significantly reduced the severity of histopathological lesions. Abbreviations Used: EEAC: Ethanol extract of Ageratum conyzoides; RBC: Red blood cell; WBC: White blood cell; Hb: Hemoglobin; ALT: Alanine transaminase; AST: Aspartate transaminase or Aspartate aminotransferase; ALP: Alkaline phosphatase; GGT: Gamma glutamyl transferase. PMID:27114688

  5. Embryotoxicity of arsenite and arsenate. Distribution in pregnant mice and monkeys and effects on embryonic cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, A.; Danielsson, R.G.; Dencker, L. (Department of Toxicology, Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Sweden); Vahter, M. (National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden)

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of /sup 74/As-labelled and arsenite in pregnant mice and a monkey has been studied by autoradiography and gamma counting of isolated tissues, and their in vitro toxicity to a chondrogenic system has been investigated. With both arsenic forms, given as single intravenous injections to the mother, the /sup 74/As-arsenic appeared to pass the mouse placenta relatively freely and approximately to the same extent. The retention time in material tissues including the placenta was, however, around three times longer with arsenite than with arsenate. In early gestation, high activity was registered in the embryonic neuroepithelium, which correlates well with reported CNS malformations in rodents. In late gestation, the distribution pattern was more like that in the adults. Accumulation in skin and squamous epithelia of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oral cavity, oesophagus and oesophageal region of stomach) dominated the distribution picture, especially at a long survival interval. Arsenate, but not arsenite, showed affinity for the calcified areas of the skeleton. A marmoset monkey in late gestation receiving arsenite showed a somewhat lower rate of placental transfer than the mice. Skin and liver had the highest concentrations (at 8 hrs), both in mother and foetuses. This species is known not to methylate arsenic, resulting in stronger binding and longer retention times of arsenic as compared with other species. The stronger binding in maternal tissues may possibly explain the lower rate of placental transfer. Arsenite was shown to inhibit cartilage formation in a chick limb bud mesenchymal spot culture system (ED50 approximately 5-10..mu..M) while arsenate seemed to be without effect at concentrations up to 200 ..mu..M (highest tested). Arsenate, however, showed a potential of the arsenite toxicity.

  6. Embryotoxicity of arsenite and arsenate. Distribution in pregnant mice and monkeys and effects on embryonic cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, A.; Danielsson, R.G.; Dencker, L. (Department of Toxicology, Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Sweden); Vahter, M. (National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden)

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of /sup 74/As-labelled arsenate and arsenite in pregnant mice and a monkey has been studied by autoradiography and gamma counting of isolated tissues, and their in vitro toxicity to a chondrogenic system has been investigated. With both arsenic forms, given as single intravenous injections to the mother, the /sup 74/As-arsenic appeared to pass the mouse placenta relatively freely and approximately to the same extent. The retention time in material tissues including the placenta was, however, around three times longer with arsenite than with arsenate. In early gestation, high activity was registered in the embryonic neuroepithelium, which correlates well with reported CNS malformations in rodents. In late gestation, the distribution pattern was more like that in the adults. Accumulation in skin and squamous epithelia of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oral cavity, oesophagus and oesophageal region of stomach) dominated the distribution pucture, especially at a long survival interval. Arsenate, but not arsenite, showed affinity for the calcified areas of the skeleton. A marmoset monkey in late gestation receiving arsenite showed a somewhat lower rate of placental transfer than the mice. Skin and liver had the highest concentrations (at 8 hrs), both in mother and foetuses. This species is known not to methylate arsenic, resulting in stronger binding and longer retention times of arsenic as compared with other species. The stronger binding in maternal tissues may possibly explain the lower rate of placental transfer. Arsenite was shown to inhibit cartilage formation in a chick limb bud mesenchymal spot culture system (ED50 approximately 5-10..mu..M) while arsenate seemed to be without effect at concentrations up to 200 ..mu..M (highest tested). Arsenate, however, showed a potential of the arsenite toxicity.

  7. A “Turn-On” thiol functionalized fluorescent carbon quantum dot based chemosensory system for arsenite detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooja, D., E-mail: poojaiitr@csio.res.in [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi (India); Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, Sectro-30 C, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Saini, Sonia; Thakur, Anupma; Kumar, Baban; Tyagi, Sachin [Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, Sectro-30 C, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Nayak, Manoj K. [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi (India); Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, Sectro-30 C, Chandigarh 160030 (India)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Environmental friendly carbon quantum dots grafted with thiol moieties. • The functionalized CQDs demonstrated for optical detection of arsenite in water. • High analytical performance in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and detection limit (0.086 ppb). - Abstract: Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) have emerged out as promising fluorescent probes for hazardous heavy metals detection in recent past. In this study, water soluble CQDs were synthesized by facile microwave pyrolysis of citric acid & cysteamine, and functionalized with ditheritheritol to impart thiol functionalities at surface for selective detection of toxic arsenite in water. Microscopic analysis reveals that the synthesized CQDs are of uniform size (diameter ∼5 nm) and confirmed to have surface −SH groups by FT-IR. The functionalized probe is then demonstrated for arsenite detection in water by “Turn-On” read out mechanism, which reduces the possibility of false positive signals associated with “turn off’ probes reported earlier. The blue luminescent functionalized CQDs exhibit increase in fluorescence intensity on arsenite addition in 5–100 ppb wide detection range. The probe can be used for sensitive detection of arsenite in environmental water to a theoretical detection limit (3s) of 0.086 ppb (R{sup 2} = 0.9547) with good reproducibility at 2.6% relative standard deviation. The presented reliable, sensitive, rapid fCQDs probe demonstrated to exhibit high selectivity towards arsenite and exemplified for real water samples as well. The analytical performance of the presented probe is comparable to existing organic & semiconductor based optical probes.

  8. Low Dose and Long Term Toxicity of Sodium Arsenite Caused Caspase Dependent Apoptosis Based on Morphology and Biochemical Character

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hussein Abnosi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although arsenite is toxic it is currently recommended for the treatment of malignancies. In this study the effects of sub-micromolar concentrations of sodium arsenite on the viability, morphology and mechanism of cell death of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMCs over 21 days was investigated.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, BMCs were extracted in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM containing 15% of fetal bovine serum (FBS and expanded till the 3rd passage. The cells were treated with 1, 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 nM of sodium arsenite for 21 days and the viability of the cells estimated using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5 diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT and trypan blue staining. Cells were then treated with the selected dose (25 nM of sodium arsenite to determine their colony forming ability (CFA and population doubling number (PDN. Morphology of the cells was studied using florescent dyes, and the integrity of the DNA was investigated using the comet assay and agarose gel electrophoresis. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL and the caspase 3 assay were then applied to understand the mechanism of cell death. Data was analyzed using one way ANOVA, Tukey test.Results: A significant reduction of viability, PDN and CFA was found following treatment of BMCs with 25 nM sodium arsenite (p<0.05. Cytoplasm shrinkage and a significant decrease in the diameter of the nuclei were also seen. Comet assay and agarose gel electrophoresis revealed DNA breakage, while positive TUNEL and activated caspase 3 confirmed the apoptosis.Conclusion: A low concentration of sodium arsenite (25 nM caused reduction of viability due to induction of apoptosis. Therefore, long term exposure to low dose of this chemical may have unwanted effects on BMCs.

  9. The Respiratory Arsenite Oxidase: Structure and the Role of Residues Surrounding the Rieske Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warelow, Thomas P.; Oke, Muse; Schoepp-Cothenet, Barbara; Dahl, Jan U.; Bruselat, Nicole; Sivalingam, Ganesh N.; Leimkühler, Silke; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Kappler, Ulrike; Naismith, James H.; Santini, Joanne M.

    2013-01-01

    The arsenite oxidase (Aio) from the facultative autotrophic Alphaproteobacterium Rhizobium sp. NT-26 is a bioenergetic enzyme involved in the oxidation of arsenite to arsenate. The enzyme from the distantly related heterotroph, Alcaligenes faecalis, which is thought to oxidise arsenite for detoxification, consists of a large α subunit (AioA) with bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide at its active site and a 3Fe-4S cluster, and a small β subunit (AioB) which contains a Rieske 2Fe-2S cluster. The successful heterologous expression of the NT-26 Aio in Escherichia coli has resulted in the solution of its crystal structure. The NT-26 Aio, a heterotetramer, shares high overall similarity to the heterodimeric arsenite oxidase from A. faecalis but there are striking differences in the structure surrounding the Rieske 2Fe-2S cluster which we demonstrate explains the difference in the observed redox potentials (+225 mV vs. +130/160 mV, respectively). A combination of site-directed mutagenesis and electron paramagnetic resonance was used to explore the differences observed in the structure and redox properties of the Rieske cluster. In the NT-26 AioB the substitution of a serine (S126 in NT-26) for a threonine as in the A. faecalis AioB explains a −20 mV decrease in redox potential. The disulphide bridge in the A. faecalis AioB which is conserved in other betaproteobacterial AioB subunits and the Rieske subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex is absent in the NT-26 AioB subunit. The introduction of a disulphide bridge had no effect on Aio activity or protein stability but resulted in a decrease in the redox potential of the cluster. These results are in conflict with previous data on the betaproteobacterial AioB subunit and the Rieske of the bc1 complex where removal of the disulphide bridge had no effect on the redox potential of the former but a decrease in cluster stability was observed in the latter. PMID:24023621

  10. The respiratory arsenite oxidase: structure and the role of residues surrounding the rieske cluster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Warelow

    Full Text Available The arsenite oxidase (Aio from the facultative autotrophic Alphaproteobacterium Rhizobium sp. NT-26 is a bioenergetic enzyme involved in the oxidation of arsenite to arsenate. The enzyme from the distantly related heterotroph, Alcaligenes faecalis, which is thought to oxidise arsenite for detoxification, consists of a large α subunit (AioA with bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide at its active site and a 3Fe-4S cluster, and a small β subunit (AioB which contains a Rieske 2Fe-2S cluster. The successful heterologous expression of the NT-26 Aio in Escherichia coli has resulted in the solution of its crystal structure. The NT-26 Aio, a heterotetramer, shares high overall similarity to the heterodimeric arsenite oxidase from A. faecalis but there are striking differences in the structure surrounding the Rieske 2Fe-2S cluster which we demonstrate explains the difference in the observed redox potentials (+225 mV vs. +130/160 mV, respectively. A combination of site-directed mutagenesis and electron paramagnetic resonance was used to explore the differences observed in the structure and redox properties of the Rieske cluster. In the NT-26 AioB the substitution of a serine (S126 in NT-26 for a threonine as in the A. faecalis AioB explains a -20 mV decrease in redox potential. The disulphide bridge in the A. faecalis AioB which is conserved in other betaproteobacterial AioB subunits and the Rieske subunit of the cytochrome bc 1 complex is absent in the NT-26 AioB subunit. The introduction of a disulphide bridge had no effect on Aio activity or protein stability but resulted in a decrease in the redox potential of the cluster. These results are in conflict with previous data on the betaproteobacterial AioB subunit and the Rieske of the bc 1 complex where removal of the disulphide bridge had no effect on the redox potential of the former but a decrease in cluster stability was observed in the latter.

  11. A causal role for the anterior mid-cingulate cortex in negative affect and cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolomeo, Serenella; Christmas, David; Jentzsch, Ines; Johnston, Blair; Sprengelmeyer, Reiner; Matthews, Keith; Douglas Steele, J

    2016-06-01

    Converging evidence has linked the anterior mid-cingulate cortex to negative affect, pain and cognitive control. It has previously been proposed that this region uses information about punishment to control aversively motivated actions. Studies on the effects of lesions allow causal inferences about brain function; however, naturally occurring lesions in the anterior mid-cingulate cortex are rare. In two studies we therefore recruited 94 volunteers, comprising 15 patients with treatment-resistant depression who had received bilateral anterior cingulotomy, which consists of lesions made within the anterior mid-cingulate cortex, 20 patients with treatment-resistant depression who had not received surgery and 59 healthy control subjects. Using the Ekman 60 faces paradigm and two Stroop paradigms, we tested the hypothesis that patients who received anterior cingulotomy were impaired in recognizing negative facial affect expressions but not positive or neutral facial expressions, and impaired in Stroop cognitive control, with larger lesions being associated with more impairment. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that larger volume lesions predicted more impairment in recognizing fear, disgust and anger, and no impairment in recognizing facial expressions of surprise or happiness. However, we found no impairment in recognizing expressions of sadness. Also consistent with the hypothesis, we found that larger volume lesions predicted impaired Stroop cognitive control. Notably, this relationship was only present when anterior mid-cingulate cortex lesion volume was defined as the overlap between cingulotomy lesion volume and Shackman's meta-analysis-derived binary masks for negative affect and cognitive control. Given substantial evidence from healthy subjects that the anterior mid-cingulate cortex is part of a network associated with the experience of negative affect and pain, engaging cognitive control processes for optimizing behaviour in the presence of such

  12. 25 CFR 542.4 - How do these regulations affect minimum internal control standards established in a Tribal-State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do these regulations affect minimum internal control... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM INTERNAL CONTROL STANDARDS § 542.4 How do these regulations affect minimum internal control standards established in a Tribal-State compact? (a) If there is...

  13. Does forward head posture affect postural control in human healthy volunteers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anabela G; Johnson, Mark I

    2013-06-01

    Proprioceptive afferent input from neck muscles plays an important role in postural control. Forward head posture has the potential to impair proprioceptive information from neck muscles and contribute to postural control deficits in patients with neck pain. This study investigated whether induced forward head posture affects postural control in healthy participants when compared to natural head posture. Centre of pressure sway area, distance covered and mean velocity were measured during 30s of static standing using a force platform with 25 healthy individuals (mean age ± SD = 20.76 ± 2.19 years) in 8 different conditions. Base of support, eyes open or closed and natural or forward head posture varied within these testing conditions. The majority of comparisons between natural and forward head posture were not statistically significant (p>0.05). This suggests that induced forward head posture in young healthy adults does not challenge them enough to impair postural control. Future studies should evaluate whether forward head posture affects postural control of individuals with chronic neck pain.

  14. The impact of maternal control on children's anxious cognitions, behaviours and affect: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirlwall, Kerstin; Creswell, Cathy

    2010-10-01

    Controlling parenting is associated with child anxiety however the direction of effects remains unclear. The present study implemented a Latin-square experimental design to assess the impact of parental control on children's anxious affect, cognitions and behaviour. A non-clinical sample of 24 mothers of children aged 4-5 years were trained to engage in (a) controlling and (b) autonomy-granting behaviours in interaction with their child during the preparation of a speech. When mothers engaged in controlling parenting behaviours, children made more negative predictions about their performance prior to delivering their speech and reported feeling less happy about the task, and this was moderated by child trait anxiety. In addition, children with higher trait anxiety displayed a significant increase in observed child anxiety in the controlling condition. The pattern of results was maintained when differences in mothers' levels of negativity and habitual levels of control were accounted for. These findings are consistent with theories that suggest that controlling parenting is a risk factor in the development of childhood anxiety.

  15. Photocatalytic oxidation and removal of arsenite by titanium dioxide supported on granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shu Hua; Jia, Yong Feng; Zhao, Shan Lin

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water is a worldwide concern. Photocatalysis can rapidly oxidize arsenite, i.e. As(III), to less labile arsenate, i.e. As(V), which then can be removed by adsorption on to various adsorbents. This study investigated the photocatalytic oxidation of arsenite in aqueous solution by granular activated carbon supporting a titanium dioxide photocatalyst (GAC-TiO2). The effects of photocatalyst dosage, solution pH values, initial concentration of As(III) and co-anions (SO4(2-), PO4(3-), SiO3(2-) and Cl-) on the oxidation of As(III) were studied. The photocatalytic oxidation of As(III) took place in minutes and followed first-order kinetics. The presence of phosphate and silicate significantly decreased As(III) oxidation, while the effect of sulphate, chloride was insignificant. The oxidation efficiency of As(III) was observed to increase with increasing pH. The results suggest that the supported photocatalyst developed in this study is an ideal candidate for pre-oxidation treatment of arsenic-contaminated water.

  16. Effect of sodium arsenite on spermatogenesis,plasma gonadotrophins and testosterone in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MahitoshSarkar; GargiRayChaudhuri; AlokeChattopadhyay; NarendraMohanBiswas

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of arsenic on spermatogenesis.Methods:Mature(4 months old)Wistar rats were intraperitoneally administered sodium arsenite at doses of 4,5 or 6mg·kg-1·day-1 for 26 days.Different varieties of germ cells at stage Ⅶ seminiferous epithelium cycle,namely,type A spermatogonia(ASg),preleptotene spermatocytes(pLSc),midpachytene spermatocytes(mPSc) and step 7 spermatids(7Sd) were quantitatively evaluated, along with radioimmunoassay of plasma follicle-stimulating hormone(FSH),lutuneizing hormone(LH),testosterone and assessment of the epididymal sperm count.Results:In the 5 and 6 mg/kg groups,there were significant dosedependent decreases in the accessory sex organ weights,epididymal sperm count and plasma concentrations of LH,FSH and testosterone with massive degeneration of all the germ cells at stage Ⅶ,The changes were insignificant in the 4 mg/kg group.Conclusion:Arsenite has a suppressive influence on spermatogenesis and gonadotrophin and testosterone release in rats.

  17. In Vitro Protective Potentials of Annona muricata Leaf Extracts Against Sodium Arsenite-induced Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Vazhappilly Cijo; Kumar, Devanga Ragupathi Naveen; Suresh, Palamadai Krishnan; Kumar, Rangasamy Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) is a metalloid which is present widely in the environment and its chronic exposure can contribute to the induction of oxidative stress, resulting in disturbances in various metabolic functions including liver cell death. Hence, there is a need to develop drugs from natural sources, which can reduce arsenic toxicity. While there have been reports regarding the antioxidant and protective potentials of Annona muricataleaf extracts, our study is the first ofits kind to extend these findings by specifically evaluating its ability to render protection against sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) induced toxicity (10 μM) in WRL-68 (human hepatic cells) and human erythrocytes by employing XTT and haemolysis inhibition assays respectively. The methanolic extract exhibited higher activity than the aqueous extract in both assays. The results showed a dose-dependent decrease in arsenic toxicity in both WRL-68 cells and erythrocytes, suggesting the protective nature of Annona muricatato mitigate arsenic toxicity. Hence the bioactive extracts can further be scrutinized for the identification and characterization of their principal contributors.

  18. The use of "stabilization exercises" to affect neuromuscular control in the lumbopelvic region: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Paul

    2014-06-01

    It is well-established that the coordination of muscular activity in the lumbopelvic region is vital to the generation of mechanical spinal stability. Several models illustrating mechanisms by which dysfunctional neuromuscular control strategies may serve as a cause and/or effect of low back pain have been described in the literature. The term "core stability" is variously used by clinicians and researchers, and this variety has led to several rehabilitative approaches suggested to affect the neuromuscular control strategies of the lumbopelvic region (e.g. "stabilization exercise", "motor control exercise"). This narrative review will highlight: 1) the ongoing debate in the clinical and research communities regarding the terms "core stability" and "stabilization exercise", 2) the importance of sub-grouping in identifying those patients most likely to benefit from such therapeutic interventions, and 3) two protocols that can assist clinicians in this process.

  19. Cognitive-affective neural plasticity following active-controlled mindfulness intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Micah; Dietz, Martin; Blair, Karina S; van Beek, Martijn; Rees, Geraint; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Lutz, Antoine; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2012-10-31

    Mindfulness meditation is a set of attention-based, regulatory, and self-inquiry training regimes. Although the impact of mindfulness training (MT) on self-regulation is well established, the neural mechanisms supporting such plasticity are poorly understood. MT is thought to act through interoceptive salience and attentional control mechanisms, but until now conflicting evidence from behavioral and neural measures renders difficult distinguishing their respective roles. To resolve this question we conducted a fully randomized 6 week longitudinal trial of MT, explicitly controlling for cognitive and treatment effects with an active-control group. We measured behavioral metacognition and whole-brain blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals using functional MRI during an affective Stroop task before and after intervention in healthy human subjects. Although both groups improved significantly on a response-inhibition task, only the MT group showed reduced affective Stroop conflict. Moreover, the MT group displayed greater dorsolateral prefrontal cortex responses during executive processing, consistent with increased recruitment of top-down mechanisms to resolve conflict. In contrast, we did not observe overall group-by-time interactions on negative affect-related reaction times or BOLD responses. However, only participants with the greatest amount of MT practice showed improvements in response inhibition and increased recruitment of dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, and right anterior insula during negative valence processing. Our findings highlight the importance of active control in MT research, indicate unique neural mechanisms for progressive stages of mindfulness training, and suggest that optimal application of MT may differ depending on context, contrary to a one-size-fits-all approach.

  20. Arsenite tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) involves coordinated role of metabolic pathways of thiols and amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Preeti; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Singh, Rana Pratap; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh K; Adhikari, Bijan

    2013-02-01

    Thiolic ligands and several amino acids (AAs) are known to build up in plants against heavy metal stress. In the present study, alteration of various AAs in rice and its synchronized role with thiolic ligand was explored for arsenic (As) tolerance and detoxification. To understand the mechanism of As tolerance and stress response, rice seedlings of one tolerant (Triguna) and one sensitive (IET-4786) cultivar were exposed to arsenite (0-25 μM) for 7 days for various biochemical analyses using spectrophotometer, HPLC and ICPMS. Tolerant and sensitive cultivars respond differentially in terms of thiol metabolism, essential amino acids (EEAs) and nonessential amino acids (NEEAs) vis-á-vis As accumulation. Thiol biosynthesis-related enzymes were positively correlated to As accumulation in Triguna. Conversely, these enzymes, cysteine content and GSH/GSSG ratio declined significantly in IET-4786 upon As exposure. The level of identified phytochelatin (PC) species (PC(2), PC(3) and PC(4)) and phytochelatin synthase activity were also more pronounced in Triguna than IET-4786. Nearly all EAAs were negatively affected by As-induced oxidative stress (except phenylalanine in Triguna), but more significantly in IET-4786 than Triguna. However, most of the stress-responsive NEAAs like glutamic acid, histidine, alanine, glycine, tyrosine, cysteine and proline were enhanced more prominently in Triguna than IET-4786 upon As exposure. The study suggests that IET-4786 appears sensitive to As due to reduction of AAs and thiol metabolic pathway. However, a coordinated response of thiolic ligands and stress-responsive AAs seems to play role for As tolerance in Triguna to achieve the effective complexation of As by PCs.

  1. Affective Aspects of Perceived Loss of Control and Potential Implications for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Grissmann

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Most brain-computer interfaces (BCIs focus on detecting single aspects of user states (e.g., motor imagery in the electroencephalogram (EEG in order to use these aspects as control input for external systems. This communication can be effective, but unaccounted mental processes can interfere with signals used for classification and thereby introduce changes in the signal properties which could potentially impede BCI classification performance. To improve BCI performance, we propose deploying an approach that potentially allows to describe different mental states that could influence BCI performance. To test this approach, we analyzed neural signatures of potential affective states in data collected in a paradigm where the complex user state of perceived loss of control (LOC was induced. In this article, source localization methods were used to identify brain dynamics with source located outside but affecting the signal of interest originating from the primary motor areas, pointing to interfering processes in the brain during natural human-machine interaction. In particular, we found affective correlates which were related to perceived LOC. We conclude that additional context information about the ongoing user state might help to improve the applicability of BCIs to real-world scenarios.

  2. N-acetylcysteine and meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid alleviate oxidative stress and hepatic dysfunction induced by sodium arsenite in male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Saad, Ahmed M; Al-Kahtani, Mohammed A; Abdel-Moneim, Ashraf M

    2016-01-01

    Environmental exposure to arsenic represents a serious challenge to humans and other animals. The aim of the present study was to test the protective effect of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) either individually or in combination with a chelating agent, meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), against sodium arsenite oral toxicity in male rats. Five groups were used: control; arsenic group (orally administrated in a concentration of 2 mg/kg body weight [b.w.]); the other three groups were orally administrated sodium arsenite in a concentration of 2 mg/kg b.w. followed by either NAC (10 mg/kg b.w., intraperitoneally [i.p.]), DMSA (50 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) or NAC plus DMSA. Arsenic toxicity caused significant rise in serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and total bilirubin, and a significant decrease in total protein (TP) and albumin levels after 3 weeks of experimental period. In addition, arsenic-treated rats showed significantly higher arsenic content in liver and significant rise in hepatic malondialdehyde level. By contrast, sharp decreases in glutathione content and catalase and glutathione reductase activities were discernible. NAC and/or DMSA counteracted most of these physiologic and biochemical defects. NAC monotherapy was more effective than DMSA in increasing TP, while DMSA was more effective in decreasing alanine aminotransferase. The combined treatment was superior over monotherapies in recovery of TP and glutathione. Biochemical data were well supported by histopathological and ultrastructural findings. In conclusion, the combination therapy of NAC and DMSA may be an ideal choice against oxidative insult induced by arsenic poisoning.

  3. On the (un)controllability of affective priming: strategic manipulation is feasible but can possibly be prevented

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degner, J.

    2009-01-01

    Three studies are presented that explored if and to what extent affective priming effects in a standard affective priming paradigm are susceptible to voluntary control. Specifically, it was tested was whether participants were able to eliminate or amplify affective priming effects when instructed to

  4. The inhibition of tissue respiration and alcoholic fermentation at different catabolic levels by ethyl carbamate (urethan) and arsenite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florijn, E.; Gruber, M.; Leijnse, B.; Huisman, T.H.J.

    1950-01-01

    1. A hypothesis is given concerning the action of urethan and arsenite on malignant growth. Two assumptionsares made:- (a) the enzyme system responsible for energy production in malignant tumours is working at maximal rate, contrary to the corresponding enzyme system in normal tissues. (b) a give

  5. Fate of arsenite and arsenate in flooded and not flooded soils of southwest Bangladesh irrigated with arsenic contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maria; Violante, Antonio; Barberis, Elisabetta

    2007-10-01

    In Bangladesh and West Bengal, India, tons of arsenic are added every year to wide extensions of agricultural soils after irrigation with arsenic polluted groundwater, and the fate of the added arsenic in these water-soil environments is not yet clear. This work was aimed to investigate the accumulation and potential release of arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] in two adjacent soils of Bangladesh, irrigated with arsenic contaminated groundwater and cultivated under flooded or not flooded conditions. Both soils showed a scarce As accumulation, in spite of a good adsorption capacity, higher for As(III) than for As(V). The poorly ordered Fe oxides dominated As adsorption in the topsoil of the flooded soil, whereas the crystalline forms were more important in the well aerated soil. A high percentage of the native arsenic was exchangeable with phosphate and the freshly added arsenate or arsenite were even much more mobile. In our experimental conditions, the high As mobility was not dependent on the surface coverage, and, in the flooded soil, 60-70% of the freshly added arsenite or arsenate were desorbed with an infinite sink method, while in the not flooded soil arsenate was less desorbed than arsenite. Depending on their characteristics, some soils, in particular when cultivated under flooded conditions, can represent only a temporary sink for the added As, that can be easily released to waters and possibly enter the food chain from the water-soil system.

  6. Acetylation and methylation patterns of core histones are modified after heat or arsenite treatment of Drosophila tissue culture cells

    OpenAIRE

    Arrigo, André-Patrick

    1983-01-01

    Exposure of Drosophilamelanogaster tissue culture cells to 37°C (heat shock) or to arsenite induces a severe deacetylation of core histones and blocks the methylation of histone H3 and H4. Heat shock induces the methylation of histone H2b. These results are discussed in view of chromatin structure and function.

  7. Fe/Ti co-pillared clay for enhanced arsenite removal and photo oxidation under UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Guang Dong Electric Power Design Institute, China Energy Engineering Group Co. Ltd., Guangzhou 510663 (China); Cai, Xiaojiao [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Guo, Jingwei [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); The 718th Research Institute of CSIC, Handan 056027 (China); Zhou, Shimin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Na, Ping, E-mail: naping@tju.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An iron and titanium co-pillared montmorillonite (Fe-Ti/MMT) was synthesized for arsenite removal. • Variety of characterization results indicated that Fe and Ti species were pillared in MMT. • A possible mechanism of arsenite adsorption/oxidation with UV light was established. • The participation of Fe component can promote the process of photocatalytic oxidation in Fe-Ti/MMT + As(III) system. • Fe-Ti/MMT can function as both photocatalyst and adsorbent for arsenite removal. - Abstract: A series of iron and titanium co-pillared montmorillonites (Fe-Ti/MMT) were prepared using hydrolysis of inserted titanium and different iron content in montmorillonite (MMT). The Fe-Ti/MMT were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, N{sub 2} adsorption and desorption, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), confirming the effective insertion of Fe species and TiO{sub 2} in the MMT. The Fe-Ti/MMT was used to remove arsenite (As(III)) from aqueous solutions under different conditions. The result of As(III) adsorption under UV irradiation showed that the photo activity can be enhanced by incorporating Fe and Ti in MMT. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that the hydroxyl groups bonded to metal oxide (M–OH) played an important role in the adsorption of As(III)

  8. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Du, Libo [Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Wenlan [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Liu, Yang [Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hudson, Laurie G. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Liu, Ke Jian, E-mail: kliu@salud.unm.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. - Highlights: • Arsenite binding is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 function. • Zinc reverses arsenic inhibition of PARP-1 activity and enhancement of DNA damage. • Arsenite binding and zinc loss alter the conformation of zinc finger

  9. Hypersomnia in children affected by migraine without aura: a questionnaire-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Maria Esposito,1 Michele Roccella,2 Lucia Parisi,2 Beatrice Gallai,3 Marco Carotenuto11Center for Childhood Headache, Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical, and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 3Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, ItalyBackground: The relationship between sleep and headache is meaningful and complex. Children affected by migraines tend to show many sleep disorders, such as insufficient sleep duration and excessive daytime somnolence. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the rate of reported sleep habits and self-reported sleepiness in a large pediatric sample of individuals affected by migraine without aura (MoA.Methods: The study population consisted of 271 children aged between 6 and 13 years affected by MoA. The control group was composed of 305 typically developing children. To assess the sleep habits of all individuals (MoA and control, parents filled out the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children, and to check the degree of subjective perceived daytime sleepiness, all subjects were administered the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale.Results: The two study groups were matched for age (P = 0.124, sex distribution (P = 0.775, and body mass index z-score (P = 0.107. Parents of children affected by MoA reported a higher total score of sleep disorder symptoms (P < 0.001, disorders of initiating and maintaining (P < 0.001, and disorders of arousal (P < 0.001 than did parents of controls. No significant differences were found in disorders of excessive somnolence. Conversely, in the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale, migraine children had higher scores (24.67 ± 3.19 vs 11.94 ± 4.81; P < 0.001 and a reduction in referred total sleep time mean duration (469.83 ± 98.112 vs 527.94 ± 83.02; P < 0.001 than typically

  10. Arsenite oxidation by three types of manganese oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Oxidation of As(Ⅲ) by three types of manganese oxides and the effects of pH, ion strength and tartaric acid on the oxidation were investigated by means of chemical analysis, equilibrium redox, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Three synthesized Mn oxide minerals, birnessite, cryptomelane, and hausmarnite, which widely occur in soil and sediments, could actively oxidize As(Ⅲ) to As(Ⅴ). However, their ability in As(Ⅲ)-oxidation varied greatly depending on their structure, composition and surface properties. Tunnel structured cryptomelane exhibited the highest ability of As (Ⅲ) oxidation, followed by the layer structured birnessite and the lower oxide hausmannite. The maximum amount of As (Ⅴ) produced by the oxidation was in the order (mmol/kg) ofcryptomelane (824.2) > birnessite (480.4) > hausmannite (117.9). As pH increased from the very low value(pH 2.5), the amount of As(Ⅲ) oxidized by the tested Mn oxides was firstly decreased, then negatively peaked in pH 3.0-6.5,and eventually increased remarkably. Oxidation of As(Ⅲ) by the Mn oxides had a buffering effects on the pH variation in the solution.It is proposed that the oxidative reaction processes between As( Ⅲ ) and birnessite(or cryptomelane) are as follows: (1) at lower pH condition: (MnO2)x + H3AsO3 + 0.5H+=0.5H2AsO4- + 0.5HAsO42- +Mn2++ (MnO2)x-1 + H2O; (2) at higher pH condition: (MnO2)x +cryptomelane decreased and was negatively correlated with ion strength. However, ion strength had little influence on As (Ⅲ) oxidation by the hausmannite. The presence of tartaric acid promoted oxidation of As(Ⅲ) by birnessite. As for cryptomelane and hausmannite, the same effect was observed when the concentration of tartaric acid was below 4 mmol/L, otherwise the oxidized As(Ⅲ)decreased. These findings are of great significance in improving our understanding of As geochemical cycling and controlling As contamination.

  11. Deficiencies in mitochondrial dynamics sensitize Caenorhabditis elegans to arsenite and other mitochondrial toxicants by reducing mitochondrial adaptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Anthony L; Godebo, Tewodros R; Smith, Latasha L; Leuthner, Tess C; Maurer, Laura L; Meyer, Joel N

    2017-07-15

    Mitochondrial fission, fusion, and mitophagy are interlinked processes that regulate mitochondrial shape, number, and size, as well as metabolic activity and stress response. The fundamental importance of these processes is evident in the fact that mutations in fission (DRP1), fusion (MFN2, OPA1), and mitophagy (PINK1, PARK2) genes can cause human disease (collectively >1/10,000). Interestingly, however, the age of onset and severity of clinical manifestations varies greatly between patients with these diseases (even those harboring identical mutations), suggesting a role for environmental factors in the development and progression of certain mitochondrial diseases. Using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, we screened ten mitochondrial toxicants (2, 4-dinitrophenol, acetaldehyde, acrolein, aflatoxin B1, arsenite, cadmium, cisplatin, doxycycline, paraquat, rotenone) for increased or decreased toxicity in fusion (fzo-1, eat-3)-, fission (drp-1)-, and mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-deficient nematodes using a larval growth assay. In general, fusion-deficient nematodes were the most sensitive to toxicants, including aflatoxin B1, arsenite, cisplatin, paraquat, and rotenone. Because arsenite was particularly potent in fission- and fusion-deficient nematodes, and hundreds of millions of people are chronically exposed to arsenic, we investigated the effects of these genetic deficiencies on arsenic toxicity in more depth. We found that deficiencies in fission and fusion sensitized nematodes to arsenite-induced lethality throughout aging. Furthermore, low-dose arsenite, which acted in a "mitohormetic" fashion by increasing mitochondrial function (in particular, basal and maximal oxygen consumption) in wild-type nematodes by a wide range of measures, exacerbated mitochondrial dysfunction in fusion-deficient nematodes. Analysis of multiple mechanistic changes suggested that disruption of pyruvate metabolism and Krebs cycle activity underlie the observed arsenite

  12. Components of self-esteem in affective patients and non-psychiatric controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serretti, Alessandro; Olgiati, Paolo; Colombo, Cristina

    2005-09-01

    Decrease in self-esteem (SE) is found in all mood disorders during inter-episode phases. This trait was associated with relapse and suicidality but its genetic basis is still undefined, probably because SE has multiple components. The aim of the current study was to ascertain which of those components were altered in a sample of affective patients. Three hundred and thirty-one outpatients with bipolar (N=199) and major depressive MD (N=132) disorders in remission for at least three months and one hundred controls completed the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSE; [Rosenberg, M., 1965. The measurement of self-esteem, Society and the Adolescent Self-Image. Princeton University Press, pp.16-36]). Principal component analysis was performed to identify RSE factor structure. Extracted factors were compared across case and control groups in the whole sample (N=431) and in a sub-sample (N=301) with low self-esteem (RSE <20). PCA yielded a two-factor solution with self-confidence (SC) and self-deprecation (SD) that was largely consistent with the existing literature. Such factors were both associated with lower scores in affective patients than controls (SC: F=52, p<0.01; SD: F=43, p<0.01). However in the low RSE group only self-confidence was found to be decreased in subjects with mood disorders (SC: F=13.8, p<0.01; SD: F=0.05, p=0.9). These findings suggest that self-esteem deficit in affective disorders might involve specific components. Implications for research and clinical practice are discussed.

  13. Cognitive reappraisal and secondary control coping: associations with working memory, positive and negative affect, and symptoms of anxiety/depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreotti, Charissa; Thigpen, Jennifer E; Dunn, Madeleine J; Watson, Kelly; Potts, Jennifer; Reising, Michelle M; Robinson, Kristen E; Rodriguez, Erin M; Roubinov, Danielle; Luecken, Linda; Compas, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the relations of measures of cognitive reappraisal and secondary control coping with working memory abilities, positive and negative affect, and symptoms of anxiety and depression in young adults (N=124). Results indicate significant relations between working memory abilities and reports of secondary control coping and between reports of secondary control coping and cognitive reappraisal. Associations were also found between measures of secondary control coping and cognitive reappraisal and positive and negative affect and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Further, the findings suggest that reports of cognitive reappraisal may be more strongly predictive of positive affect whereas secondary control coping may be more strongly predictive of negative affect and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Overall, the results suggest that current measures of secondary control coping and cognitive reappraisal capture related but distinct constructs and suggest that the assessment of working memory may be more strongly related to secondary control coping in predicting individual differences in distress.

  14. Clusters Regarding Key Factors Affecting Changes in Accounting, Finance, Administration and Management Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Gabriela Blidisel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, important changes have occurred in public governance, which has evolved in this time from hierarchical bureaucracy to participatory governance, where the role of citizens in public decision-making process is more direct. There were performed reforms in finance, management administration and finances of public sector. Starting from the factors that influenced during the history the accounting, finances, administration and management control, we want to test the factors that affect the changes of these elements in Romanian environment.

  15. Isolation and study of two mutants of Streptomyces cattleya affected in DNA repair and genetic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromic, A; Kirby, R

    1989-01-15

    Two mutants of Streptomyces cattleya affecting DNA repair were isolated. These mutants were analysed using spore survival curves and phage reactivation curves in the presence and absence of caffeine and arsenite. Two DNA repair systems (uvr1 and uvr2) were identified, the latter of which seems to influence genetic instability.

  16. Differential Binding of Monomethylarsonous Acid Compared to Arsenite and Arsenic Trioxide with Zinc Finger Peptides and Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin that enhances the carcinogenic effect of DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet radiation and benzo[a]pyrene. Interaction with zinc finger proteins has been shown to be an important molecular mechanism for arsenic toxicity and cocarcinogenesis. Arsenicals such as arsenite, arsenic trioxide (ATO), and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) have been reported to interact with cysteine residues of zinc finger domains, but little is known about potential differences in their selectivity of interaction. Herein we analyzed the interaction of arsenite, MMA(III), and ATO with C2H2, C3H1, and C4 configurations of zinc fingers using UV–vis, cobalt, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry. We observed that arsenite and ATO both selectively bound to C3H1 and C4 zinc fingers, while MMA(III) interacted with all three configurations of zinc finger peptides. Structurally and functionally, arsenite and ATO caused conformational changes and zinc loss on C3H1 and C4 zinc finger peptide and protein, respectively, whereas MMA(III) changed conformation and displaced zinc on all three types of zinc fingers. The differential selectivity was also demonstrated in zinc finger proteins isolated from cells treated with these arsenicals. Our results show that trivalent inorganic arsenic compounds, arsenite and ATO, have the same selectivity and behavior when interacting with zinc finger proteins, while methylation removes the selectivity. These findings provide insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential effects of inorganic versus methylated arsenicals, as well as the role of in vivo arsenic methylation in arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis. PMID:24611629

  17. Differential binding of monomethylarsonous acid compared to arsenite and arsenic trioxide with zinc finger peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xixi; Sun, Xi; Mobarak, Charlotte; Gandolfi, A Jay; Burchiel, Scott W; Hudson, Laurie G; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-04-21

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin that enhances the carcinogenic effect of DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet radiation and benzo[a]pyrene. Interaction with zinc finger proteins has been shown to be an important molecular mechanism for arsenic toxicity and cocarcinogenesis. Arsenicals such as arsenite, arsenic trioxide (ATO), and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) have been reported to interact with cysteine residues of zinc finger domains, but little is known about potential differences in their selectivity of interaction. Herein we analyzed the interaction of arsenite, MMA(III), and ATO with C2H2, C3H1, and C4 configurations of zinc fingers using UV-vis, cobalt, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry. We observed that arsenite and ATO both selectively bound to C3H1 and C4 zinc fingers, while MMA(III) interacted with all three configurations of zinc finger peptides. Structurally and functionally, arsenite and ATO caused conformational changes and zinc loss on C3H1 and C4 zinc finger peptide and protein, respectively, whereas MMA(III) changed conformation and displaced zinc on all three types of zinc fingers. The differential selectivity was also demonstrated in zinc finger proteins isolated from cells treated with these arsenicals. Our results show that trivalent inorganic arsenic compounds, arsenite and ATO, have the same selectivity and behavior when interacting with zinc finger proteins, while methylation removes the selectivity. These findings provide insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential effects of inorganic versus methylated arsenicals, as well as the role of in vivo arsenic methylation in arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  18. How Work Organization Affects the Prevalence of WMSDs:A Case-control Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lu; CHEN Song Gen; TANG Shi Chuan; WANG Sheng; HE Li Hua; GUO Ze Hua; LI Jing Yun; YU Shan Fa; WANG Zhong Xu

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed at exploring the association between work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) and work organization based on a case-control study. Methods A total of 1938 workers who claimed to suffer from WMSDs were selected from Beijing, Henan, Hubei, and the Guangdong province. The control group consisted of 2009 workers employed in similar industries without severe disease or musculoskeletal discomforts. We used a modified version of the questionnaire developed by the NMQ and the DMQ to investigate individual and work-related factors. Results A total of 13 variables (P Conclusion Work organization may have comprehensive effects on the occurrence of WMSDs. This pattern of associations suggests that further investigation into the mechanism of how work organization affects the prevalence of WMSDs is required.

  19. Natural control of bacteria affecting meat quality by a neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) cake extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Serrone, P; Failla, S; Nicoletti, M

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of an ethylacetate neem cake extract (NCE) against bacteria that affect meat quality, namely Campylobacter jejuni, Carnobacterium spp., Lactobacillus curvatus, Lactobacillus sakei and Leuconostoc sp., is reported. The antibacterial activity was detected using standardised disc diffusion and macrodilution methods. The bacterial growth inhibition zone ranged from 11.33 ± 0.58 to 22.67 ± 0.58 mm (100 μL NCE). There is significant difference between the growth inhibition zone of NCE and the control (ciprofloxacin 100 μg). The percent of bacterial growth reduction range was 79.75 ± 1.53 to 90.73 ± 1.53 (100 μg NCE) as compared with control (without NCE). NCE in different amounts counteracted the growth of all tested bacteria.

  20. Intensive blood pressure control affects cerebral blood flow in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yu-Sok; Davis, Shyrin C A T; Truijen, Jasper;

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with microvascular complications, hypertension, and impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation. Intensive blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients reduces their risk of stroke but may affect cerebral perfusion. Systemic hemodynamic...... variables and transcranial Doppler-determined cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV), cerebral CO2 responsiveness, and cognitive function were determined after 3 and 6 months of intensive BP control in 17 type 2 diabetic patients with microvascular complications (T2DM+), in 18 diabetic patients without (T2DM......-) microvascular complications, and in 16 nondiabetic hypertensive patients. Cerebrovascular reserve capacity was lower in T2DM+ versus T2DM- and nondiabetic hypertensive patients (4.6±1.1 versus 6.0±1.6 [P

  1. Psychological mindsets affect consumption: How different mindsets help (hurt) portion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Derek D; He, Sharlene

    2016-08-01

    The present work discusses how psychological mindsets-orientations that affect how consumers encode, interpret, and respond to information- can help, as well as hurt, portion control. To this end, the current article first provides an overview of the general idea of psychological mindsets. Subsequently, evidence from three distinct areas of mindset research is reviewed: power and powerlessness; fixed and growth; promotion and prevention. For each literature, the relevant mindsets are discussed, and their implications for consumer behavior generally and portion control specifically are illuminated. The paper also provides a discussion of gaps in mindset research with consideration given to how to bridge the theoretical development on mindsets to practical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Affective-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Woolfolk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A randomized controlled trial was conducted to assess the efficacy of an individually administered form of cognitive behavioral treatment for fibromyalgia. In an additive design, 76 patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to either the experimental treatment (affective-cognitive behavioral therapy, 10 individual sessions, one per week administered concurrently with treatment-as-usual or to an unaugmented treatment-as-usual condition. Statistical analysis conducted at the end of treatment (3 months after the baseline assessment and at a followup (9 months after the baseline assessment indicated that the patients receiving the experimental treatment reported less pain and overall better functioning than control patients, both at posttreatment and at followup. The implications of these findings for future research are discussed.

  3. State-dependent alterations in inhibitory control and emotional face identification in seasonal affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjordt, Liv V; Stenbæk, Dea S; Madsen, Kathrine Skak

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depressed individuals often exhibit impaired inhibition to negative input and identification of positive stimuli, but it is unclear whether this is a state or trait feature. We here exploited a naturalistic model, namely individuals with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), to study...... this feature longitudinally. AIM: The goal of this study was to examine seasonal changes in inhibitory control and identification of emotional faces in individuals with SAD. METHOD: Twenty-nine individuals diagnosed with winter-SAD and 30 demographically matched controls with no seasonality symptoms completed...... an emotional Go/NoGo task, requiring inhibition of prepotent responses to emotional facial expressions and an emotional face identification task twice, in winter and summer. RESULTS: In winter, individuals with SAD showed impaired ability to inhibit responses to angry (p = .0006) and sad faces (p = .011...

  4. Controlling a virtual forehand prosthesis using an adaptive and affective Human-Machine Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezazadeh, I Mohammad; Firoozabadi, S M P; Golpayegani, S M R Hashemi; Hu, H

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of an adaptable Human-Machine Interface (HMI) for controlling virtual forearm prosthesis. Direct physical performance measures (obtained score and completion time) for the requested tasks were calculated. Furthermore, bioelectric signals from the forehead were recorded using one pair of electrodes placed on the frontal region of the subject head to extract the mental (affective) measures while performing the tasks. By employing the proposed algorithm and above measures, the proposed HMI can adapt itself to the subject's mental states, thus improving the usability of the interface. The quantitative results from 15 subjects show that the proposed HMI achieved better physical performance measures in comparison to a conventional non-adaptive myoelectric controller (p < 0.001).

  5. Experience sampling-based personalized feedback and positive affect: a randomized controlled trial in depressed patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Hartmann

    Full Text Available Positive affect (PA plays a crucial role in the development, course, and recovery of depression. Recently, we showed that a therapeutic application of the experience sampling method (ESM, consisting of feedback focusing on PA in daily life, was associated with a decrease in depressive symptoms. The present study investigated whether the experience of PA increased during the course of this intervention.Multicentre parallel randomized controlled trial. An electronic random sequence generator was used to allocate treatments.University, two local mental health care institutions, one local hospital.102 pharmacologically treated outpatients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder, randomized over three treatment arms.Six weeks of ESM self-monitoring combined with weekly PA-focused feedback sessions (experimental group; six weeks of ESM self-monitoring combined with six weekly sessions without feedback (pseudo-experimental group; or treatment as usual (control group.The interaction between treatment allocation and time in predicting positive and negative affect (NA was investigated in multilevel regression models.102 patients were randomized (mean age 48.0, SD 10.2 of which 81 finished the entire study protocol. All 102 patients were included in the analyses. The experimental group did not show a significant larger increase in momentary PA during or shortly after the intervention compared to the pseudo-experimental or control groups (χ2(2 = 0.33, p = .846. The pseudo-experimental group showed a larger decrease in NA compared to the control group (χ2(1 = 6.29, p =.012.PA-focused feedback did not significantly impact daily life PA during or shortly after the intervention. As the previously reported reduction in depressive symptoms associated with the feedback unveiled itself only after weeks, it is conceivable that the effects on daily life PA also evolve slowly and therefore were not captured by the experience sampling procedure

  6. Mastoid vibration affects dynamic postural control during gait in healthy older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jung Hung; Mukherjee, Mukul; Kent, Jenny; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular disorders are difficult to diagnose early due to the lack of a systematic assessment. Our previous work has developed a reliable experimental design and the result shows promising results that vestibular sensory input while walking could be affected through mastoid vibration (MV) and changes are in the direction of motion. In the present paper, we wanted to extend this work to older adults and investigate how manipulating sensory input through mastoid vibration (MV) could affect dynamic postural control during walking. Three levels of MV (none, unilateral, and bilateral) applied via vibrating elements placed on the mastoid processes were combined with the Locomotor Sensory Organization Test (LSOT) paradigm to challenge the visual and somatosensory systems. We hypothesized that the MV would affect sway variability during walking in older adults. Our results revealed that MV significantly not only increased the amount of sway variability but also decreased the temporal structure of sway variability only in anterior-posterior direction. Importantly, the bilateral MV stimulation generally produced larger effects than the unilateral. This is an important finding that confirmed our experimental design and the results produced could guide a more reliable screening of vestibular system deterioration.

  7. Mastoid vibration affects dynamic postural control during gait in healthy older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jung Hung; Mukherjee, Mukul; Kent, Jenny; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular disorders are difficult to diagnose early due to the lack of a systematic assessment. Our previous work has developed a reliable experimental design and the result shows promising results that vestibular sensory input while walking could be affected through mastoid vibration (MV) and changes are in the direction of motion. In the present paper, we wanted to extend this work to older adults and investigate how manipulating sensory input through mastoid vibration (MV) could affect dynamic postural control during walking. Three levels of MV (none, unilateral, and bilateral) applied via vibrating elements placed on the mastoid processes were combined with the Locomotor Sensory Organization Test (LSOT) paradigm to challenge the visual and somatosensory systems. We hypothesized that the MV would affect sway variability during walking in older adults. Our results revealed that MV significantly not only increased the amount of sway variability but also decreased the temporal structure of sway variability only in anterior-posterior direction. Importantly, the bilateral MV stimulation generally produced larger effects than the unilateral. This is an important finding that confirmed our experimental design and the results produced could guide a more reliable screening of vestibular system deterioration. PMID:28128341

  8. Virtual Reality for Enhanced Ecological Validity and Experimental Control in the Clinical, Affective, and Social Neurosciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D Parsons

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An essential tension can be found between researchers interested in ecological validity and those concerned with maintaining experimental control. Research in the human neurosciences often involves the use of simple and static stimuli lacking many of the potentially important aspects of real world activities and interactions. While this research is valuable, there is a growing interest in the human neurosciences to use cues about target states in the real world via multimodal scenarios that involve visual, semantic, and prosodic information. These scenarios should include dynamic stimuli presented concurrently or serially in a manner that allows researchers to assess the integrative processes carried out by perceivers over time. Furthermore, there is growing interest in contextually embedded stimuli that can constrain participant interpretations of cues about a target’s internal states. Virtual reality environments proffer assessment paradigms that combine the experimental control of laboratory measures with emotionally engaging background narratives to enhance affective experience and social interactions. The present review highlights the potential of virtual reality environments for enhanced ecological validity in the clinical, affective, and social neurosciences.

  9. Virtual Reality for Enhanced Ecological Validity and Experimental Control in the Clinical, Affective and Social Neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    An essential tension can be found between researchers interested in ecological validity and those concerned with maintaining experimental control. Research in the human neurosciences often involves the use of simple and static stimuli lacking many of the potentially important aspects of real world activities and interactions. While this research is valuable, there is a growing interest in the human neurosciences to use cues about target states in the real world via multimodal scenarios that involve visual, semantic, and prosodic information. These scenarios should include dynamic stimuli presented concurrently or serially in a manner that allows researchers to assess the integrative processes carried out by perceivers over time. Furthermore, there is growing interest in contextually embedded stimuli that can constrain participant interpretations of cues about a target's internal states. Virtual reality environments proffer assessment paradigms that combine the experimental control of laboratory measures with emotionally engaging background narratives to enhance affective experience and social interactions. The present review highlights the potential of virtual reality environments for enhanced ecological validity in the clinical, affective, and social neurosciences.

  10. Virtual Reality for Enhanced Ecological Validity and Experimental Control in the Clinical, Affective and Social Neurosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    An essential tension can be found between researchers interested in ecological validity and those concerned with maintaining experimental control. Research in the human neurosciences often involves the use of simple and static stimuli lacking many of the potentially important aspects of real world activities and interactions. While this research is valuable, there is a growing interest in the human neurosciences to use cues about target states in the real world via multimodal scenarios that involve visual, semantic, and prosodic information. These scenarios should include dynamic stimuli presented concurrently or serially in a manner that allows researchers to assess the integrative processes carried out by perceivers over time. Furthermore, there is growing interest in contextually embedded stimuli that can constrain participant interpretations of cues about a target’s internal states. Virtual reality environments proffer assessment paradigms that combine the experimental control of laboratory measures with emotionally engaging background narratives to enhance affective experience and social interactions. The present review highlights the potential of virtual reality environments for enhanced ecological validity in the clinical, affective, and social neurosciences. PMID:26696869

  11. Antecedent acute cycling exercise affects attention control: an ERP study using attention network test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Kai eChang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the after-effects of an acute bout of moderate-intensity aerobic cycling exercise on neuroelectric and behavioral indices of efficiency of three attentional networks: alerting, orienting, and executive (conflict control. Thirty young, highly fit amateur basketball players performed a multifunctional attentional reaction time task, the attention network test (ANT, with a two-group randomized experimental design after an acute bout of moderate-intensity spinning wheel exercise or without antecedent exercise. The ANT combined warning signals prior to targets, spatial cueing of potential target locations and target stimuli surrounded by congruent or incongruent flankers, which were provided to assess three attentional networks. Event-related brain potentials and task performance were measured during the ANT. Exercise resulted in a larger P3 amplitude in the alerting and executive control subtasks across frontal, central and parietal midline sites that was paralleled by an enhanced reaction speed only on trials with incongruent flankers of the executive control network. The P3 latency and response accuracy were not affected by exercise. These findings suggest that after spinning, more resources are allocated to task-relevant stimuli in tasks that rely on the alerting and executive control networks. However, the improvement in performance was observed in only the executively challenging conflict condition, suggesting that whether the brain resources that are rendered available immediately after acute exercise translate into better attention performance depends on the cognitive task complexity.

  12. Anticipatory modulation of digit placement for grasp control is affected by Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie R Lukos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Successful object manipulation relies on the ability to form and retrieve sensorimotor memories of digit forces and positions used in previous object lifts. Past studies of patients affected by Parkinson's disease (PD have revealed that the basal ganglia play a crucial role in the acquisition and/or retrieval of sensorimotor memories for grasp control. Whereas it is known that PD impairs anticipatory control of digit forces during grasp, learning deficits associated with the planning of digit placement have yet to be explored. This question is motivated by recent work in healthy subjects revealing that anticipatory control of digit placement plays a crucial role for successful manipulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We asked ten PD patients off medication and ten age-matched controls to reach, grasp and lift an object whose center of mass (CM was on the left, right or center. The only task requirement was to minimize object roll during lift. The CM remained the same across consecutive trials (blocked condition or was altered from trial to trial (random condition. We hypothesized that impairment of the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuits in PD patients would reduce their ability to anticipate digit placement appropriate to the CM location. Consequently, we predicted that PD patients would exhibit similar digit placement in the blocked vs. random conditions and produce larger peak object rolls than that of control subjects. In the blocked condition, PD patients exhibited significantly weaker modulation of fingertip contact points to CM location and larger object roll than controls (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively. Nevertheless, both controls and PD patients minimized object roll more in the blocked than in the random condition (p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that, even though PD patients may have a residual ability of anticipatory control of digit contact points and forces, they fail to implement a

  13. Comparative Molecular Docking Studies with ABCC1 and Aquaporin 9 in the Arsenite Complex Efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojan, Shiv; Dhasmana, Anupam; Jamal, Qazi Mohammad Sajid; Haneef, Mohd; Lohani, Mohtashim

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is the most toxic metalloid present in the natural environment in both organic and inorganic arsenic forms. Inorganic arsenic is often more hazardous than the organic form. Arsenite and arsenate compounds are the major inorganic forms which are toxic causing severe human health dysfunction including cancer. Excretion of arsenic from the system is found elusive. Therefore, it is of interest to screen channel proteins with the arsenic complex in the different combination of arsenic, GSH (glutathione) and arsenic, selenium using docking methods. The mode of arsenic removal. The complex structure revealed the mode of arsenic binding efficiency with the receptor aquaporine 9 and ABCC1 channel protein. This provides insights to understand the mechanism of arsenic efflux. These inferences find application in the design, identification and development of novel nutracetucal or any other formulation useful in the balance of arsenic efflux.

  14. Characterization of adsorption of aqueous arsenite and arsenate onto charred dolomite in microcolumn systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Yousef; Al-Muhtaseb, Ala'a H; Mousa, Hasan; Walker, Gavin M; Ahmad, Mohammad N M

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the removal of arsenite, As(III), and arsenate, As(V), from aqueous solutions onto thermally processed dolomite (charred dolomite) via microcolumn was evaluated. The effects of mass of adsorbent (0.5-2 g), initial arsenic concentration (50-2000 ppb) and particle size (dolomite in a microcolumn were investigated. It was found that the adsorption of As(V) and As(III) onto charred dolomite exhibited a characteristic 'S' shape. The adsorption capacity increased as the initial arsenic concentration increased. A slow decrease in the column adsorption capacity was noted as the particle size increased from>0.335 to 0.710-2.00 mm. For the binary system, the experimental data show that the adsorption of As(V) and As(III) was independent of both ions in solution. The experimental data obtained from the adsorption process were successfully correlated with the Thomas Model and Bed Depth Service Time Model.

  15. Comparative Molecular Docking Studies with ABCC1 and Aquaporin 9 in the Arsenite Complex Efflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojan, Shiv; Dhasmana, Anupam; Jamal, Qazi Mohammad Sajid; Haneef, Mohd; Lohani, Mohtashim

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is the most toxic metalloid present in the natural environment in both organic and inorganic arsenic forms. Inorganic arsenic is often more hazardous than the organic form. Arsenite and arsenate compounds are the major inorganic forms which are toxic causing severe human health dysfunction including cancer. Excretion of arsenic from the system is found elusive. Therefore, it is of interest to screen channel proteins with the arsenic complex in the different combination of arsenic, GSH (glutathione) and arsenic, selenium using docking methods. The mode of arsenic removal. The complex structure revealed the mode of arsenic binding efficiency with the receptor aquaporine 9 and ABCC1 channel protein. This provides insights to understand the mechanism of arsenic efflux. These inferences find application in the design, identification and development of novel nutracetucal or any other formulation useful in the balance of arsenic efflux. PMID:25258480

  16. Sodium arsenite reduces severity of dextran sulfate sodium-induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua J. MALAGO; Hortensia NONDOLI

    2008-01-01

    The histopathological features and the associated clinical findings of ulcerative colitis (UC) are due to persistent inflammatory response in the colon mucosa. Interventions that suppress this response benefit UC patients. We tested whether sodium arsenite (SA) benefits rats with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-colitis. The DSS-colitis was induced by 5% DSS in drinking water. SA (10 mg/kg; intraperitoneally) was given 8 h before DSS treatment and then every 48 h for 3 cycles of 7,14 or 21 d. At the end of each cycle rats were sacrificed and colon sections processed for histological examination. DSS induced diarrhea, loose stools, hemoccult positive stools, gross bleeding, loss of body weight, loss of epithelium, crypt damage, depletion of goblet cells and infiltration of inflammatory cells. The severity of these changes increased ir the order of Cycles 1,2 and 3. Treatment of rats with SA significantly reduced this severity and improved the weight gain.

  17. Investigation of the Interaction Between Sodium(meta) Arsenite and Catechin via ESI Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Sheng-yun; WEN Jin-feng; KIM Seung-jin; LEE Yong-ill

    2007-01-01

    Catechin, one of the main components of green tea, is considered to have the remedy effect of arsenic poison,although the chemical mechanism is not well known. In this study, sodium(meta) selenite, which is used as herbisolution to investigate the interaction between toxic inorganic arsenic compound and catechin via ESI tandem mass spectrometry. The interaction products of mono-methylated arsenic with catechin in the presence of methanol were identified in the negative mode. Collission induced dissociation(CID) mass spectrometric measurements indicate that monomethylated arsenic was "alkylated" strongly by conjugation at the sites of C2' and C5' in the phenyl ring B of the catechin. The interaction mechanism between sodium(meta) arsenite and catechin was proposed. The results provide useful information to understand the chemical pathway of the detoxification of the arsenic toxicity by catechin.

  18. The oxidative and adsorptive effectiveness of hydrous manganese dioxide for arsenite removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Ruiping; Yuan Baoling; Li Xing; Xia Shengji; Yang Yanling; Li Guibai

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the effectiveness of hydrous manganese dioxides (δMnO2) removing arsenite (As(Ⅲ)) from aqueous solution. Effects of such factors as permanganate oxidation, pH, humic acid and Ca2+ on As removal and possible mechanisms involved in have been investigated. Permanganate oxidation increases As removal to a certain extent; the higher pH results in the formation of more easily adsorbed As species, contributing to higher As removal; humic acid occupies adsorbing sites and decreases ζ potential of δMnO2, therefore inhibiting As removal; Ca2+ facilitates As adsorption on δMnO2, mainly through increasing ζ potential and decreasing repulsive forces between As and surface sites. δMnO2 exhibits oxidative and adsorptive potential for As(Ⅲ), and may be employed as adsorbents or filter coating for As removal in water treatment process.

  19. Molecular basis of arsenite (As+3-induced acute cytotoxicity in human cervical epithelial carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nauman Arshad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rapid industrialization is discharging toxic heavy metals into the environment, disturbing human health in many ways and causing various neurologic, cardiovascular, and dermatologic abnormalities and certain types of cancer. The presence of arsenic in drinking water from different urban and rural areas of the major cities of Pakistan, for example, Lahore, Faisalabad, and Kasur, was found to be beyond the permissible limit of 10 parts per billion set by the World Health Organization. Therefore the present study was initiated to examine the effects of arsenite (As+3 on DNA biosynthesis and cell death. Methods: After performing cytotoxic assays on a human epithelial carcinoma cell line, expression analysis was done by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and flow cytometry. Results: We show that As+3 ions have a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect through the activation of the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. In contrast to previous research, the present study was designed to explore the early cytotoxic effects produced in human cells during exposure to heavy dosage of As+3 (7.5 µg/ml. Even treatment for 1 h significantly increased the mRNA levels of p21 and p27 and caspases 3, 7, and 9. It was interesting that there was no change in the expression levels of p53, which plays an important role in G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. Conclusion: Our results indicate that sudden exposure of cells to arsenite (As+3 resulted in cytotoxicity and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis resulting from up-regulation of caspases.

  20. Arsenic methylation by an arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase from Spirulina platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuqing; Xue, Ximei; Yan, Yu; Zhu, Yongguan; Yang, Guidi; Ye, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic-contaminated water is a serious hazard for human health. Plankton plays a critical role in the fate and toxicity of arsenic in water by accumulation and biotransformation. Spirulina platensis (S. platensis), a typical plankton, is often used as a supplement or feed for pharmacy and aquiculture, and may introduce arsenic into the food chain, resulting in a risk to human health. However, there are few studies about how S. platensis biotransforms arsenic. In this study, we investigated arsenic biotransformation by S. platensis. When exposed to arsenite (As(III)), S. platensis accumulated arsenic up to 4.1mg/kg dry weight. After exposure to As(III), arsenate (As(V)) was the predominant species making up 64% to 86% of the total arsenic. Monomethylarsenate (MMA(V)) and dimethylarsenate (DMA(V)) were also detected. An arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase from S. platensis (SpArsM) was identified and characterized. SpArsM showed low identity with other reported ArsM enzymes. The Escherichia coli AW3110 bearing SparsM gene resulted in As(III) methylation and conferring resistance to As(III). The in vitro assay showed that SpArsM exhibited As(III) methylation activity. DMA(V) and a small amount of MMA(V) were detected in the reaction system within 0.5hr. A truncated SpArsM derivative lacking the last 34 residues still had the ability to methylate As(III). The three single mutants of SpArsM (C59S, C186S, and C238S) abolished the capability of As(III) methylation, suggesting the three cysteine residues are involved in catalysis. We propose that SpArsM is responsible for As methylation and detoxification of As(III) and may contribute to As biogeochemistry. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. EFFECTS OF ARSENITE IN TELOMERE AND TELOMERASE IN RELATION TO CELL PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN KERATINOCYTES AND LEUKEMIA CELLS IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telomeres are critical in maintaining chromosome and genomic stability. Arsenic, a human carcinogen as well as an anticancer agent, is known for its clastogenicity. To better understand molecular mechanisms of arsenic actions, we investigated arsenite effects on telomere and telo...

  2. EFFECTS OF ARSENITE IN TELOMERE AND TELOMERASE IN RELATION TO CELL PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN KERATINOCYTES AND LEUKEMIA CELLS IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telomeres are critical in maintaining chromosome and genomic stability. Arsenic, a human carcinogen as well as an anticancer agent, is known for its clastogenicity. To better understand molecular mechanisms of arsenic actions, we investigated arsenite effects on telomere and telo...

  3. Pre-meal affective state and laboratory test meal intake in adolescent girls with loss of control eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzenhofer, Lisa M; Hannallah, Louise; Field, Sara E; Shomaker, Lauren B; Stephens, Mark; Sbrocco, Tracy; Kozlosky, Merel; Reynolds, James; Yanovski, Jack A; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

    2013-09-01

    Loss of control eating confers risk for excess weight gain and exacerbated disordered eating. Affect theory proposes that loss of control eating is used to cope with negative mood states. Self-report data suggest that negative affect may contribute to the etiology of loss of control eating, but this theory has not been well-tested using laboratory paradigms. We examined associations between pre-meal affective states and intake during a laboratory test meal. One-hundred and ten adolescent girls with reported loss of control eating whose body mass index fell between the 75th and 97th percentile for age and sex completed state mood ratings prior to a test-meal. Results indicated that pre-meal state negative affect was associated with greater carbohydrate and less protein consumption, as well as greater snack and dessert and less fruit and dairy intake. All girls experienced significant decreases in negative affect from pre- to post-meal, but intake during the meal was unassociated with post-meal affect. In support of affect theory, negative affective states reported among girls with loss of control may be a driving factor for increased energy-dense food intake, which may play a role in excess weight gain. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. CNVs conferring risk of autism or schizophrenia affect cognition in controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefansson, Hreinn; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Steinberg, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    In a small fraction of patients with schizophrenia or autism, alleles of copy-number variants (CNVs) in their genomes are probably the strongest factors contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease. These CNVs may provide an entry point for investigations into the mechanisms of brain function...... to another. Controls carrying the chromosome 15q11.2 deletion between breakpoints 1 and 2 (15q11.2(BP1-BP2) deletion) have a history of dyslexia and dyscalculia, even after adjusting for IQ in the analysis, and the CNV only confers modest effects on other cognitive traits. The 15q11.2(BP1-BP2) deletion...... affects brain structure in a pattern consistent with both that observed during first-episode psychosis in schizophrenia and that of structural correlates in dyslexia....

  5. Affective processing in positive schizotypy: Loose control of social-emotional information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papousek, Ilona; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Mosbacher, Jochen A; Reiser, Eva M; Schulter, Günter; Fink, Andreas

    2014-10-30

    Behavioral studies suggested heightened impact of emotionally laden perceptual input in schizophrenia spectrum disorders, in particular in patients with prominent positive symptoms. De-coupling of prefrontal and posterior cortices during stimulus processing, which is related to loosening of control of the prefrontal cortex over incoming affectively laden information, may underlie this abnormality. Pre-selected groups of individuals with low versus high positive schizotypy (lower and upper quartile of a large screening sample) were tested. During exposure to auditory displays of strong emotions (anger, sadness, cheerfulness), individuals with elevated levels of positive schizotypal symptoms showed lesser prefrontal-posterior coupling (EEG coherence) than their symptom-free counterparts (right hemisphere). This applied to negative emotions in particular and was most pronounced during confrontation with anger. The findings indicate a link between positive symptoms and a heightened impact particularly of threatening emotionally laden stimuli which might lead to exacerbation of positive symptoms and inappropriate behavior in interpersonal situations.

  6. Experience Sampling-Based Personalized Feedback and Positive Affect: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Depressed Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Jessica A.; Wichers, Marieke; Menne-Lothmann, Claudia; Kramer, Ingrid; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Peeters, Frenk; Schruers, Koen R. J.; van Bemmel, Alex L.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Delespaul, Philippe; van Os, Jim; Simons, Claudia J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Positive affect (PA) plays a crucial role in the development, course, and recovery of depression. Recently, we showed that a therapeutic application of the experience sampling method (ESM), consisting of feedback focusing on PA in daily life, was associated with a decrease in depressive symptoms. The present study investigated whether the experience of PA increased during the course of this intervention. Design Multicentre parallel randomized controlled trial. An electronic random sequence generator was used to allocate treatments. Settings University, two local mental health care institutions, one local hospital. Participants 102 pharmacologically treated outpatients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder, randomized over three treatment arms. Intervention Six weeks of ESM self-monitoring combined with weekly PA-focused feedback sessions (experimental group); six weeks of ESM self-monitoring combined with six weekly sessions without feedback (pseudo-experimental group); or treatment as usual (control group). Main outcome The interaction between treatment allocation and time in predicting positive and negative affect (NA) was investigated in multilevel regression models. Results 102 patients were randomized (mean age 48.0, SD 10.2) of which 81 finished the entire study protocol. All 102 patients were included in the analyses. The experimental group did not show a significant larger increase in momentary PA during or shortly after the intervention compared to the pseudo-experimental or control groups (χ2 (2) =0.33, p=.846). The pseudo-experimental group showed a larger decrease in NA compared to the control group (χ2 (1) =6.29, p=.012). Conclusion PA-focused feedback did not significantly impact daily life PA during or shortly after the intervention. As the previously reported reduction in depressive symptoms associated with the feedback unveiled itself only after weeks, it is conceivable that the effects on daily life PA also evolve

  7. Pregnant women affected by thalassemia major: A controlled study of traits and personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Messina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The reproductive and sexual health issues concerning persons affected by thalassemia major are complex. The study was planned to investigate the psychological attitudes and expectations in a group of thalassemic pregnant women attending hospital for regular blood transfusion. Methods: This is a preliminary cross-sectional study involving 20 consecutive thalassemic patients and a control group of 42 healthy pregnant volunteers. The personality structure was evaluated by Rorschach′s test and the presence of psychic symptoms by SCL-90-R and STAI. Results: Narcissism and sexual traumas are significantly higher in thalassemic women with respects to the control group. Also the percent of anxiety and depression observed with the SCL-90-R was significantly higher than in control group (45% vs. 3%, p < 0.001, mean and SD values are 1.65 ΁ 0.15 vs. 0.43 ± 0.18 for anxiety; 55% vs. 12%, p < 0.001, mean and SD values are 1.76 ± 0.18 vs. 0.85 ± 0.25 for depression. The score observed with the STAI shows that the trait of anxiety differed between thalassemic pregnant women and the control group, even though the score values aren′t pathologic in neither group (87% vs. 42%, p < 0.05, mean and SD values are 33 ± 0.8 vs. 22 ± 0.2. Conclusions: This study addresses the need for developing, implementing and evaluating proper psychological support for thalassemic pregnant patients. Moreover, psychological screening and support prior to, during and following pregnancy would be indicated.

  8. Inseparability of Go and Stop in Inhibitory Control: Go Stimulus Discriminability Affects Stopping Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning eMa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory control, the ability to stop or modify preplanned actions under changing task conditions, is an important component of cognitive functions. Two lines of models of inhibitory control have previously been proposed for human response in the classical stop-signal task, in which subjects must inhibit a default go response upon presentation of an infrequent stop signal: (1 the race model, which posits two independent go and stop processes that race to determine the behavioral outcome, go or stop; and (2 an optimal decision-making model, which posits that observers decides whether and when to go based on continually (Bayesian updated information about both the go and stop stimuli. In this work, we probe the relationship between go and stop processing by explicitly manipulating the discrimination difficulty of the go stimulus. While the race model assumes the go and stop processes are independent, and therefore go stimulus discriminability should not affect the stop stimulus processing, we simulate the optimal model to show that it predicts harder go discrimination results in a longer go reaction time (RT, a lower stop error rate, as well as a faster stop-signal RT. We then present novel behavioral data that validate these model predictions. The results thus favor a fundamentally inseparable account of go and stop processing, in a manner consistent with the optimal model, and contradicting the independence assumption of the race model. More broadly, our findings contribute to the growing evidence that the computations underlying inhibitory control are systematically modulated by cognitive influences in a Bayes-optimal manner, thus opening new avenues for interpreting neural responses underlying inhibitory control.

  9. Inseparability of Go and Stop in Inhibitory Control: Go Stimulus Discriminability Affects Stopping Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Yu, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control, the ability to stop or modify preplanned actions under changing task conditions, is an important component of cognitive functions. Two lines of models of inhibitory control have previously been proposed for human response in the classical stop-signal task, in which subjects must inhibit a default go response upon presentation of an infrequent stop signal: (1) the race model, which posits two independent go and stop processes that race to determine the behavioral outcome, go or stop; and (2) an optimal decision-making model, which posits that observers decides whether and when to go based on continually (Bayesian) updated information about both the go and stop stimuli. In this work, we probe the relationship between go and stop processing by explicitly manipulating the discrimination difficulty of the go stimulus. While the race model assumes the go and stop processes are independent, and therefore go stimulus discriminability should not affect the stop stimulus processing, we simulate the optimal model to show that it predicts harder go discrimination should result in longer go reaction time (RT), lower stop error rate, as well as faster stop-signal RT. We then present novel behavioral data that validate these model predictions. The results thus favor a fundamentally inseparable account of go and stop processing, in a manner consistent with the optimal model, and contradicting the independence assumption of the race model. More broadly, our findings contribute to the growing evidence that the computations underlying inhibitory control are systematically modulated by cognitive influences in a Bayes-optimal manner, thus opening new avenues for interpreting neural responses underlying inhibitory control.

  10. ATM/ATR-related checkpoint signals mediate arsenite-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest in primary aortic endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Tsai, Feng-Yuan; Yeh, Szu-Ching; Chang, Louis W. [National Health Research Institutes, Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, Miaoli County (Taiwan)

    2006-12-15

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a high association of inorganic arsenic exposure with vascular disease. Our recent in vitro studies have linked this vascular damage to vascular endothelial dysfunction induced by arsenic exposure. However, cell-cycle arrest induced by arsenic and its involvement in vascular dysfunction remain to be clarified. In this study, we employed primary porcine aortic endothelial cells to investigate regulatory mechanisms of G{sub 2}/M phase arrest induced by arsenite. Our study revealed that lower concentrations of arsenite (1 and 3 {mu}M) increased cell proliferation, whereas higher concentrations of arsenite (10, 20, and 30 {mu}M) inhibited cell proliferation together with correlated increases in G{sub 2}/M phase arrest. We found that this arsenite-induced G{sub 2}/M phase arrest was accompanied by accumulation and/or phosphorylation of checkpoint-related molecules, including p53, Cdc25B, Cdc25C, and securin. Inhibition of activations of these checkpoint-related molecules by caffeine significantly attenuated the 30-{mu}M arsenite-induced G{sub 2}/M phase arrest by 93%. Our data suggest that the DNA damage responsive kinases ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) play critical roles in arsenite-induced G{sub 2}/M phase arrest in aortic endothelial cells possibly via regulation of checkpoint-related signaling molecules including p53, Cdc25B, Cdc25C, and securin. (orig.)

  11. 40 CFR 63.55 - Maximum achievable control technology (MACT) determinations for affected sources subject to case...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... limitations. 63.55 Section 63.55 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR..., Sections 112(g) and 112(j) § 63.55 Maximum achievable control technology (MACT) determinations for affected...

  12. Using interpersonal affect regulation in simulated healthcare consultations: An experimental investigation of self-control resource depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eMartínez-Iñigo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled Interpersonal Affect Regulation –the process of deliberately influencing the internal feeling states of others– occurs in a variety of interpersonal relationships and contexts. An incipient corpus of research shows that interpersonal affect regulation can be characterized as a goal-directed behaviour that uses self-control processes which, according to the strength model of self-regulation, consumes a limited resource that is also used by other self-control processes. Using interpersonal affect-improving and affect-worsening regulation strategies can increase agents´ resource depletion but there is reason to think that effects will partially rely on targets´ feedback in response to the regulation. Using a healthcare paradigm, an experiment was conducted to test the combined effects of interpersonal affect regulation use and patient feedback on healthcare workers’ resource depletion, measured as self-reported actual and expected emotional exhaustion, and persistence on a self-regulation task. Medical students (N = 78 were randomly assigned to a 2(interpersonal affect regulation: affect-worsening vs. affect-improving x 2(patients’ feedback: positive vs. negative factorial between-subjects design and given instructions to play the role of doctors in interactions with two professional actors trained to act as patients. Analysis of covariance showed that affect-worsening was more depleting than affect-improving for all measures, whereas the recovery effects of positive feedback varied depending on strategy type and measure. The findings confirm the characterization of interpersonal affect regulation as potentially depleting, but suggest that the correspondence between the agent´s strategy and the target´s response needs to be taken into consideration. Use of affect-improving and positive feedback showed positive effects on self-rated performance, indicating that interpersonal affect regulation is relevant for organizational as

  13. Using interpersonal affect regulation in simulated healthcare consultations: an experimental investigation of self-control resource depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Íñigo, David; Mercado, Francisco; Totterdell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Controlled Interpersonal Affect Regulation -the process of deliberately influencing the internal feeling states of others- occurs in a variety of interpersonal relationships and contexts. An incipient corpus of research shows that interpersonal affect regulation can be characterized as a goal-directed behavior that uses self-control processes which, according to the strength model of self-regulation, consumes a limited resource that is also used by other self-control processes. Using interpersonal affect-improving and affect-worsening regulation strategies can increase agent's resource depletion but there is reason to think that effects will partially rely on target's feedback in response to the regulation. Using a healthcare paradigm, an experiment was conducted to test the combined effects of interpersonal affect regulation use and patient feedback on healthcare workers' resource depletion, measured as self-reported experienced and expected emotional exhaustion, and persistence on a self-regulation task. Medical students (N = 78) were randomly assigned to a 2(interpersonal affect regulation: affect-worsening vs. affect-improving) × 2(patients' feedback: positive vs. negative) factorial between-subjects design and given instructions to play the role of doctors in interactions with two professional actors trained to act as patients. Analysis of covariance showed that affect-worsening was more depleting than affect-improving for all measures, whereas the recovery effects of positive feedback varied depending on strategy type and measure. The findings confirm the characterization of interpersonal affect regulation as potentially depleting, but suggest that the correspondence between the agent's strategy and the target's response needs to be taken into consideration. Use of affect-improving and positive feedback showed positive effects on self-rated performance, indicating that interpersonal affect regulation is relevant for organizational as well as personal

  14. Specific predictive power of automatic spider-related affective associations for controllable and uncontrollable fear responses toward spiders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Huijding (Jorg); P.J. de Jong (Peter)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis study examined the predictive power of automatically activated spider-related affective associations for automatic and controllable fear responses. The Extrinsic Affective Simon Task (EAST; De Houwer, 2003) was used to indirectly assess automatic spider fear-related associations. Th

  15. Specific predictive power of automatic spider-related affective associations for controllable and uncontrollable fear responses toward spiders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijdlng, J; de Jong, PJ; Huijding, J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the predictive power of automatically activated spider-related affective associations for automatic and controllable fear responses. The Extrinsic Affective Simon Task (EAST; De Houwer, 2003) was used to indirectly assess automatic spider fear-related associations. The EAST and t

  16. Current Limitations in the Control and Spread of Ticks that Affect Livestock: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Estrada-Peña

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ticks are well-known parasites that affect livestock productivity. This paper reviews the current knowledge regarding the spread of ticks with their impact in animal health and the limitations to achieve effective control measures. The forecasted trends in climate play an obvious role in promoting the spread of ticks in several regions. It appears that climate warming is pivotal in the spread and colonization of new territories by Rhipicephalus microplus in several regions of Africa. The reported increase in altitude of this tick species in the mountainous regions of Central and South America appears to be driven by such general trends in climate change. This factor, however, is not the only single contributor to the spread of ticks. The poor management of farms, uncontrolled movements of domestic animals, abundance of wild animals, and absence of an adequate framework to capture the ecological plasticity of certain ticks may explain the complexity of the control measures. In this paper, we review several details regarding the relationships of ticks with the environment, wild fauna and competition with other species of ticks. Our intention is to highlight these relationships with the aim to produce a coherent framework to explore tick ecology and its relationship with animal production systems.

  17. PDGF/VEGF-Related Receptor Affects Transglutaminase Activity to Control Cell Migration During Crustacean Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkunlo, Kingkamon; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Noonin, Chadanat; Söderhäll, Irene

    2017-09-14

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor, a tyrosine kinase (TK) receptor whose ligand is PDGF, is crucial in the transduction of extracellular signals into cells and mediates numerous processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration. We demonstrate the important roles of a receptor TK related to the PDGF/VEGF family protein (PVR) in controlling hematopoietic progenitor cell migration by affecting extracellular transglutaminase (TGase) activity. Pl_PVR1, GenBank accession No. KY444650, is highly expressed in hemocytes and the hematopoietic tissue (HPT). Sunitinib malate was used to block the PVF/PVR downstream pathway in HPT cell culture. The addition of Sunitinib also caused the HPT cells to increase in size and begin spreading. An increase in extracellular TGase activity on the HPT cell membrane was observed in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with Sunitinib malate. The presence of crude Ast1 provided a combinatorial beneficial effect that enhanced the number of spreading cells after inhibition of the Pl_PVR downstream signaling cascade. In addition, an increased immunoreactivity for β-tubulin and elongation of β-tubulin filaments were found in Pl_PVR signaling-inhibited cells. The potential roles of PVF/PVR signaling in controlling progenitor cell activity during hematopoiesis in crayfish were investigated and discussed.

  18. Chronic treatment with ivabradine does not affect cardiovascular autonomic control in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C. Silva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A low resting heart rate (HR would be of great benefit in cardiovascular diseases. Ivabradine – a novel selective inhibitor of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN channels– has emerged as a promising HR lowering drug. Its effects on the autonomic HR control are little known. This study assessed the effects of chronic treatment with ivabradine on the modulatory, reflex and tonic cardiovascular autonomic control and on the renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA. Male Wistar rats were divided in 2 groups, receiving intraperitoneal injections of vehicle (VEH or ivabradine (IVA during 7 or 8 consecutive days. Rats were submitted to vessels cannulation to perform arterial blood pressure (AP and HR recordings in freely moving rats. Time series of resting pulse interval and systolic AP were used to measure cardiovascular variability parameters. We also assessed the baroreflex, chemoreflex and the Bezold-Jarish reflex sensitivities. To better evaluate the effects of ivabradine on the autonomic control of the heart, we performed sympathetic and vagal autonomic blockade. As expected, ivabradine-treated rats showed a lower resting (VEH: 362 ± 16 bpm vs. IVA: 260 ± 14 bpm, p=0.0005 and intrinsic HR (VEH: 369 ± 9 bpm vs. IVA: 326 ± 11bpm, p=0.0146. However, the chronic treatment with ivabradine did not change normalized HR spectral parameters LF (nu (VEH: 24.2 ± 4.6 vs. IVA: 29.8 ± 6.4; p>0.05; HF (nu (VEH: 75.1 ± 3.7 vs. IVA: 69.2 ± 5.8; p>0.05, any cardiovascular reflexes, neither the tonic autonomic control of the HR (sympathovagal index; VEH: 0.91± 0.02 vs. IVA: 0.88 ± 0.03, p=0.3494. We performed the AP, HR and RSNA recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats. The chronic treatment with ivabradine reduced the resting HR (VEH: 364 ± 12 bpm vs. IVA: 207 ± 11 bpm, p<0.0001, without affecting RSNA (VEH: 117 ± 16 vs. IVA: 120 ± 9 spikes/sec, p=0.9100 and mean arterial pressure (VEH: 70 ± 4 vs. IVA: 77 ± 6 mmHg, p=0

  19. Genetic identification of arsenate reductase and arsenite oxidase in redox transformations carried out by arsenic metabolising prokaryotes - A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Nisha; Jagadevan, Sheeja

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination in water is a cause of major concern to human population worldwide, especially in Bangladesh and West Bengal, India. Arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) are the two common forms in which arsenic exists in soil and groundwater, the former being more mobile and toxic. A large number of arsenic metabolising microorganisms play a crucial role in microbial transformation of arsenic between its different states, thus playing a key role in remediation of arsenic contaminated water. This review focuses on advances in biochemical, molecular and genomic developments in the field of arsenic metabolising bacteria - covering recent developments in the understanding of structure of arsenate reductase and arsenite oxidase enzymes, their gene and operon structures and their mechanism of action. The genetic and molecular studies of these microbes and their proteins may lead to evolution of successful strategies for effective implementation of bioremediation programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficient removal of trace arsenite through oxidation and adsorption by magnetic nanoparticles modified with Fe-Mn binary oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Chao; Tong, Meiping

    2013-06-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) modified simultaneously with amorphous Fe and Mn oxides (Mag-Fe-Mn) were synthesized to remove arsenite [As(III)] from water. Mag-Fe-Mn particles were fabricated through heterogeneous nucleation technique by employing the maghemite as the magnetic core and Fe-Mn binary oxide (FMBO) as the coating materials. Powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were utilized to characterize the hybrid material. With a saturation magnetization of 23.2 emu/g, Mag-Fe-Mn particles with size of 20-50 nm could be easily separated from solutions with a simple magnetic process in short time (within 5 min). At pH 7.0, 200 μg/L of As(III) could be easily decreased to below 10 μg/L by Mag-Fe-Mn particles (0.1 g/L) within 20 min. As(III) could be effectively removed by Mag-Fe-Mn particles at initial pH range from 4 to 8 and the residual As was completely oxidized to less toxic arsenate [As(V)]. The co-occurring redox reactions between Mn oxide and As(III) was confirmed by XPS analysis. Chloride, sulfate, bicarbonate, and nitrate at common concentration range had negligible influence on As(III) removal, whereas, silicate and phosphate reduced the As(III) removal by competing with arsenic species for adsorption sites. As(III) removal was not obviously affected by natural organic matter (up to 8 mg/L as TOC). Mag-Fe-Mn could be regenerated with ternary solution of NaOH, NaCl, and NaClO. Throughout five consecutive cycles, the adsorption and desorption efficiencies maintained above 98% and 87%, respectively. Mag-Fe-Mn had a larger adsorption capacity for As(III) (47.76 mg/g) and could remove trace As(III) more thoroughly than MNPs modified solely with either Fe or Mn oxide due to the synergistic effect of the coating Fe and Mn oxides. This research extended the potential applicability of FMBO to a great extent and provided a convenient approach to efficiently remove trace As

  1. In vitro development of resistance to arsenite and chromium-VI in Lactobacilli strains as perspective attenuation of gastrointestinal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upreti, Raj K; Sinha, Vartika; Mishra, Ritesh; Kannan, Ambrose

    2011-05-01

    Inadvertent intake of inorganic arsenic and chromium through drinking water and food causing their toxic insults is a major health problem. Intestinal bacteria including Lactobacilli play important regulatory roles on intestinal homeostasis, and their loss is known to cause gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Probiotic Lactobacilli resistance to arsenite and chromium-VI could be an importantfactorfor the perspective attenuation of Gl-disorders caused by these toxic metals/metalloid. In the present study resistance of arsenite (up to 32 ppm), Cr-VI (up to 64 ppm), and arsenite plus Cr-VI (32 ppm each) were developed under in vitro condition following chronological chronic exposures in Lactobacilli strains. Comparative study of biochemical parameters such as membrane transport enzymes and structural constituents; dehydrogenase and esterase activity tests, which are respective indicators for respiratory and energy producing processes, and the general heterotrophic activity of cells, of resistant strains showed similarities with their respective normal parent strains. The resistant strains were also found to be sensitive to antibiotics. Findings indicate that these resistant probiotic Lactobacilli would be useful in the prophylactic interventions of arsenic and chromium GI-toxicity.

  2. Evaluation of the toxic effects of arsenite, chromate, cadmium, and copper using a battery of four bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kyung-Seok; Lee, Pyeong-Koo [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Geologic Environment Div.; Kong, In Chul [Yeungnam Univ., Kyungbuk (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

    2012-09-15

    The sensitivities of four different kinds of bioassays to the toxicities of arsenite, chromate, cadmium, and copper were compared. The different bioassays exhibited different sensitivities, i.e., they responded to different levels of toxicity of each of the different metals. However, with the exception of the {alpha}-glucosidase enzyme activity, arsenite was the most toxic compound towards all the tested organisms, exhibiting the highest toxic effect on the seeds of Lactuca, with an EC{sub 50} value of 0.63 mg/L. The sensitivities of Lactuca and Raphanus were greater than the sensitivities of two other kinds of seeds tested. Therefore, these were the seeds appropriate for use in a seed germination assay. A high revertant mutagenic ratio (5:1) of Salmonella typhimurium was observed with an arsenite concentration of 0.1 {mu}g/plate, indicative of a high possibility of mutagenicity. These different results suggested that a battery of bioassays, rather than one bioassay alone, is needed as a more accurate and better tool for the bioassessment of environmental pollutants. (orig.)

  3. Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion, autocrine regulation of STAT3 signaling, and miR-21 expression, processes involved in the EMT and malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Fei; Xu, Yuan [Institute of Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); Ling, Min [Jiangsu Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Nanjing 211166, Jiangsu (China); Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao [Institute of Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); Liang, Xiao [Mental Health Center of Xuhui-CDC, Shanghai 200232 (China); Jiang, Rongrong; Wang, Bairu [Institute of Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); Bian, Qian [Jiangsu Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Nanjing 211166, Jiangsu (China); Liu, Qizhan, E-mail: drqzliu@hotmail.com [Institute of Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China)

    2013-11-15

    Arsenite is an established human carcinogen, and arsenite-induced inflammation contributes to malignant transformation of cells, but the molecular mechanisms by which cancers are produced remain to be established. The present results showed that, evoked by arsenite, secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, led to the activation of STAT3, a transcription activator, and to increased levels of a microRNA, miR-21. Blocking IL-6 with anti-IL-6 antibody and inhibiting STAT3 activation reduced miR-21 expression. For human bronchial epithelial cells, cultured in the presence of anti-IL-6 antibody for 3 days, the arsenite-induced EMT and malignant transformation were reversed. Thus, IL-6, acting on STAT3 signaling, which up-regulates miR-21in an autocrine manner, contributes to the EMT induced by arsenite. These data define a link from inflammation to EMT in the arsenite-induced malignant transformation of HBE cells. This link, mediated through miRNAs, establishes a mechanism for arsenite-induced lung carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion. • IL-6 autocrine mediates STAT3 signaling and up-regulates miR-21expression. • Inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced EMT.

  4. Randomized controlled trial of a messaging intervention to increase fruit and vegetable intake in adolescents: Affective versus instrumental messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carfora, Valentina; Caso, Daniela; Conner, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The present research aimed to test the efficacy of affective and instrumental text messages compared with a no-message control as a strategy to increase fruit and vegetable intake (FVI) in adolescents. A randomized controlled trial was used test impact of different text messages compared with no message on FVI over a 2-week period. A total of 1,065 adolescents (14-19 years) from a high school of the South of Italy completed the baseline questionnaire and were randomly allocated to one of three conditions: instrumental messages (N = 238), affective messages (N = 300), and no messages (N = 521). Students in the message conditions received one message each day over a 2-week period. The messages targeted affective (affective benefits) or instrumental (instrumental benefits) information about FVI. Self-reported FVI at 2 weeks was the key dependent variable. Analyses were based on the N = 634 who completed all aspects of the study. Findings showed that messages significantly increased FVI, particularly in the affective condition and this effect was partially mediated by changes in affective attitude and intentions towards FVI. Text messages can be used to increase FVI in adolescents. Text messages based on affective benefits are more effective than text messages based on instrumental benefits. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Text messages have been shown to promote positive change in health behaviours. However, the most appropriate target for such text messages is less clear although targeting attitudes may be effective. What does this study add? This randomized controlled study shows that text messages targeting instrumental or affective attitudes produce changes in fruit and vegetable intake (FVI) in adolescents. Text messages targeting affective attitudes are shown to be more effective than text messages targeting instrumental attitudes. The effect of affective text messages on FVI was partially mediated by changes in

  5. Muscular contraction mode differently affects autonomic control during heart rate matched exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weippert, Matthias; Behrens, Martin; Gonschorek, Ray; Bruhn, Sven; Behrens, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The precise contributions of afferent feedback to cardiovascular and respiratory responses to exercise are still unclear. The aim of this crossover study was to assess whether and how autonomic cardiovascular and respiratory control differed in response to dynamic (DYN) and isometric contractions (ISO) at a similar, low heart rate (HR) level. Therefore, 22 healthy males (26.7 ± 3.6 yrs) performed two kinds of voluntary exercises at similar HR: ISO and DYN of the right quadriceps femoris muscle. Although HR was eqivalent (82 ± 8 bpm for DYN and ISO, respectively), rating of exertion, blood pressures, and rate pressure product were higher, whereas breathing frequency, minute ventilation, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide output were significantly lower during ISO. Tidal volume, end-tidal partial pressures of O2 and CO2, respiratory exchange ratio and capillary blood lactate concentration were comparable between both contraction modes. Heart rate variability (HRV) indicators, SDNN, HF-Power and LF-Power, representing both vagal and sympathetic influences, were significantly higher during ISO. Sample entropy, a non-linear measure of HRV was also significantly affected by contraction mode. It can be concluded that, despite the same net effect on HR, the quality of cardiovascular control during low intensity exercise is significantly different between DYN and ISO. HRV analysis indicated a sympatho-vagal coactivation during ISO. Whether mechanoreceptor feedback alone, a change in central command, or the interaction of both mechanisms is the main contributor of the distinct autonomic responses to the different exercise modes remains to be elucidated.

  6. Muscular Contraction Mode Differently Affects Autonomic Control During Heart Rate Matched Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias eWeippert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The precise contributions of afferent feedback to cardiovascular and respiratory responses to exercise are still unclear. Aim of this crossover study was to assess whether and how autonomic cardiovascular and respiratory control differed in response to dynamic (DYN and isometric contractions (ISO at a similar, low heart rate (HR level. Therefore, 22 healthy males (26.7 ± 3.6 yrs performed two kinds of voluntary exercises at similar HR: ISO and DYN of the right quadriceps femoris muscle. Although HR was eqivalent (82 ± 8 bpm for DYN and ISO, respectively, rating of exertion, blood pressures, and rate pressure product were higher, whereas breathing frequency, minute ventilation, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide output were significantly lower during ISO. Tidal volume, end-tidal partial pressures of O2 and CO2, respiratory exchange ratio and capillary blood lactate concentration were comparable between both contraction modes. Heart rate variability (HRV indicators, SDNN, HF-Power and LF-Power, representing both vagal and sympathetic influences, were significantly higher during ISO. Sample entropy, a nonlinear measure of HRV was also significantly affected by contraction mode. It can be concluded that, despite the same net effect on HR, the quality of cardiovascular control during low intensity exercise is significantly different between DYN and ISO. HRV analysis indicated a sympatho-vagal coactivation during ISO. Whether mechanoreceptor feedback alone, a change in central command, or the interaction of both mechanisms is the main contributor of the distinct autonomic responses to the different exercise modes remains to be elucidated.

  7. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Light Therapy, and Their Combination for Seasonal Affective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, Kelly J.; Roecklein, Kathryn A.; Tierney Lindsey, Kathryn; Johnson, Leigh G.; Lippy, Robert D.; Lacy, Timothy J.; Barton, Franca B.

    2007-01-01

    This first controlled psychotherapy trial for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) compared SAD-tailored cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), light therapy (LT), and their combination to a concurrent wait-list control. Adults (N = 61) with major depression, recurrent with seasonal pattern, were randomized to one of four 6-week conditions: CBT (1.5-hr…

  8. Need for affect, need for cognition, and the intention-fruit consumption relationship: an action-control perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, G.-J.; Keer, M.; van den Putte, B.; Neijens, P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Predictors of action-control profiles are useful targets for health behaviour change interventions, but action-control research has not focused on fruit consumption and has not yet included need for affect and need for cognition, despite the demonstrated usefulness of these variables in a

  9. Biological control of mealybugs with lacewing larvae is affected by the presence and type of supplemental prey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messelink, Gerben J.; Vijverberg, Roland; Leman, Ada; Janssen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of prey and food sources in crops has a major effect on biological pest control by generalist predators. In this study, we tested if and how supplemental prey or food affects the control of the citrus mealybug Planococcus citri (Risso) by larvae of the green lacewing Chrysoperla luc

  10. Need for Affect, Need for Cognition, and the Intention-Fruit Consumption Relationship: An Action-Control Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Gert-Jan; Keer, Mario; van den Putte, Bas; Neijens, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Predictors of action-control profiles are useful targets for health behaviour change interventions, but action-control research has not focused on fruit consumption and has not yet included need for affect and need for cognition, despite the demonstrated usefulness of these variables in a broad range of research. The role of these…

  11. Interleukin-12 (IL-12), but not IL-23, deficiency ameliorates viral encephalitis without affecting viral control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapil, Parul; Atkinson, Roscoe; Ramakrishna, Chandran; Cua, Daniel J; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Stohlman, Stephen A

    2009-06-01

    The relative contributions of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-23 to viral pathogenesis have not been extensively studied. IL-12p40 mRNA rapidly increases after neurotropic coronavirus infection. Infection of mice defective in both IL-12 and IL-23 (p40(-/-)), in IL-12 alone (p35(-/-)), and in IL-23 alone (p19(-/-)) revealed that the symptoms of coronavirus-induced encephalitis are regulated by IL-12. IL-17-producing cells never exceeded background levels, supporting a redundant role of IL-23 in pathogenesis. Viral control, tropism, and demyelination were all similar in p35(-/-), p19(-/-), and wild-type mice. Reduced morbidity in infected IL-12 deficient mice was also not associated with altered recruitment or composition of inflammatory cells. However, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) levels and virus-specific IFN-gamma-secreting CD4 and CD8 T cells were all reduced in the central nervous systems (CNS) of infected p35(-/-) mice. Transcription of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-6, but not tumor necrosis factor, were initially reduced in infected p35(-/-) mice but increased to wild-type levels during peak inflammation. Furthermore, although transforming growth factor beta mRNA was not affected, IL-10 was increased in the CNS in the absence of IL-12. These data suggest that IL-12 does not contribute to antiviral function within the CNS but enhances morbidity associated with viral encephalitis by increasing the ratio of IFN-gamma to protective IL-10.

  12. Carbohydrate intake and glycemic index affect substrate oxidation during a controlled weight cycle in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlhöfer, J; Lagerpusch, M; Enderle, J; Eggeling, B; Braun, W; Pape, D; Müller, M J; Bosy-Westphal, A

    2014-09-01

    Because both, glycemic index (GI) and carbohydrate content of the diet increase insulin levels and could thus impair fat oxidation, we hypothesized that refeeding a low GI, moderate-carbohydrate diet facilitates weight maintenance. Healthy men (n=32, age 26.0±3.9 years; BMI 23.4±2.0 kg/m(2)) followed 1 week of controlled overfeeding, 3 weeks of caloric restriction and 2 weeks of hypercaloric refeeding (+50, -50 and +50% energy requirement) with low vs high GI (41 vs 74) and moderate vs high CHO intake (50% vs 65% energy). We measured adaptation of fasting macronutrient oxidation and the capacity to supress fat oxidation during an oral glucose tolerance test. Changes in fat mass were measured by quantitative magnetic resonance. During overfeeding, participants gained 1.9±1.2 kg body weight, followed by a weight loss of -6.3±0.6 kg and weight regain of 2.8±1.0 kg. Subjects with 65% CHO gained more body weight compared with 50% CHO diet (Pregain in fat mass (r=0.43, Pweight (r=0.35; P=0.051). Both higher GI and higher carbohydrate content affect substrate oxidation and thus the regain in body weight in healthy men. These results argue in favor of a lower glycemic load diet for weight maintenance after weight loss.

  13. Nutrient supplementation may adversely affect maternal oral health--a randomised controlled trial in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjunmaa, Ulla; Järnstedt, Jorma; Dewey, Kathryn G; Ashorn, Ulla; Maleta, Kenneth; Vosti, Stephen A; Ashorn, Per

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional supplementation during pregnancy is increasingly recommended especially in low-resource settings, but its oral health impacts have not been studied. Our aim was to examine whether supplementation with multiple micronutrients (MMN) or small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements affects dental caries development or periodontal health in a rural Malawian population. The study was embedded in a controlled iLiNS-DYAD trial that enrolled 1391 pregnant women groups were similar at baseline in average socio-economic, nutritional and health status. At the end of the intervention, the prevalence of caries was 56.7%, 69.1% and 63.3% (P = 0.004), and periodontitis 34.9%, 29.8% and 31.2% (P = 0.338) in the IFA, MMN and LNS groups, respectively. Compared with the IFA group, women in the MMN group had 0.60 (0.18-1.02) and in the LNS group 0.59 (0.17-1.01) higher mean number of caries lesions. In the absence of baseline oral health data, firm conclusions on causality cannot be drawn. However, although not confirmatory, the findings are consistent with a possibility that provision of MMN or LNS may have increased the caries incidence in this target population. Because of the potential public health impacts, further research on the association between gestational nutrient interventions and oral health in low-income settings is needed.

  14. Impaired postural control in patients affected by tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, P G; Alessandrini, M; Evangelista, M; Napolitano, B; Lanciani, R; Camaioni, D

    2004-12-01

    Sixteen subjects, affected by chronic tension-type headache (TTH) accordingly to the International Headache Society Classification (1988) criteria, in presence of tenderness in pericranial muscles,with a mean age of 37+/-11.8 years, and ten healthy volunteer subjects, age and sex matched, were submitted to postural analysis by Static Posturography (S.Ve.P. Amplaid). Aim of the study was to evaluate whether patients with TTH have disturbed postural control, as compared to normal subjects. Postural analysis considered all posturographic variables but focused on spectral frequency analysis of body sway. In both open (OE) and closed eyes (CE) condition, spectral frequency analysis showed a significantly increased body sway at low (OE= p proprioceptive input seems to be predominant at middle and high frequencies in maintaining posture, our results seem then to suggest a proprioceptive disturbance in TTH patients. The disturbance is likely related to chronic pericranial muscle contraction and tenderness. Posturography and spectral analysis may help not only in the diagnosis of a postural disturbance but even more in the follow-up of TTH patients, during and after a medical and/or a rehabilitative treatment.

  15. Does Congruence Between Incentive System and Locus of Control Affect Team Performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutmainah Siti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Teamwork is an essential element in most organizations; however, little is known about the best fit among incentive system, team composition, and team performance. This study examines whether the congruence between incentive system and locus of control (LoC affects team performance. To reconcile opposite lines of arguments regarding the best incentive system for a team, this paper uses the social identity perspective and person-environment fit theory to understand behavior in a group process. One hundred and five postgraduate students were assigned to three-person work groups, where they completed an independent task under one of two types of incentive—individual and group incentive—after their LoC was measured. Results suggest that group incentive results in an enhanced team performance and team performance is better when there is congruence between incentive system and LoC. Group incentive system combined with external LoC results in the best performance, while individual incentive results in a better team performance when combined with internal LoC.

  16. The threat of a support surface translation affects anticipatory postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanthanourak, Angel L; Cleworth, Taylor W; Adkin, Allan L; Carpenter, Mark G; Tokuno, Craig D

    2016-10-01

    This study examined how postural threat in the form of a potential perturbation affects an individual's ability to perform a heel raise. Seventeen adults completed three conditions: i) low threat, where participants performed a heel raise in response to a "go" tone, ii) high threat, where participants either heard the same "go" tone, for which they performed a heel raise, or experienced a support surface translation in the medio-lateral direction that disturbed their balance, and iii) choice reaction time task, where participants either completed a heel raise in response to the same "go" tone or a toe raise in response to a lower pitched tone. For all heel raise trials, anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) were quantified from center of pressure (COP) recordings and electromyographic (EMG) activity from the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL). Results indicated that participants exhibited larger APAs, as reflected by the greater backward COP displacement (p=0.038) and velocity (p=0.022) as well as a larger TA EMG amplitude (p=0.045), during the high threat condition. During the execution phase of the heel raise, an earlier (p=0.014) and larger (p=0.041) SOL EMG activation were observed during the high threat condition. These results contrast with previous findings of reduced APAs when the postural threat was evoked through changes in surface height. Therefore, the characteristics of the postural threat must be considered to isolate the effects of threat on anticipatory movement control.

  17. Controlled cortical impact before or after fear conditioning does not affect fear extinction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Mercado, Demetrio; McAllister, Lauren M; Lee, Christopher C H; Milad, Mohammed R; Eskandar, Emad N; Whalen, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized in part by impaired extinction of conditioned fear. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is thought to be a risk factor for development of PTSD. We tested the hypothesis that controlled cortical impact (CCI) would impair extinction of fear learned by Pavlovian conditioning, in mice. To mimic the scenarios in which TBI occurs prior to or after exposure to an aversive event, severe CCI was delivered to the left parietal cortex at one of two time points: (1) Prior to fear conditioning, or (2) after conditioning. Delay auditory conditioning was achieved by pairing a tone with a foot shock in "context A". Extinction training involved the presentation of tones in a different context (context B) in the absence of foot shock. Test for extinction memory was achieved by presentation of additional tones alone in context B over the following two days. In pre- or post-injury paradigms, CCI did not influence fear learning and extinction. Furthermore, CCI did not affect locomotor activity or elevated plus maze testing. Our results demonstrate that, within the time frame studied, CCI does not impair the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear or extinction memory.

  18. Austenite grain growth and microstructure control in simulated heat affected zones of microalloyed HSLA steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei [Department of Machine Tools and Factory Management, Technical University of Berlin, Pascalstraße 8 – 9, 10587, Berlin (Germany); Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Kannengiesser, Thomas [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Materials and Joining Technology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Universitetsplatz 2, 39106, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2014-09-08

    The roles of microalloying niobium, titanium and vanadium for controlling austenite grain growth, microstructure evolution and hardness were investigated at different simulated heat affected zones (HAZ) for high strength low alloy (HSLA) S690QL steel. High resolution FEG-SEM has been used to characterize fine bainitic ferrite, martensite and nanosized second phases at simulated coarse and fine grain HAZs. It was found that for Ti bearing steel (Ti/N ratio is 2) austenite grain had the slowest growth rate due to the presence of most stable TiN. The fine cuboidal particles promoted intragranular acicular ferrite (IGF) formation. Nb bearing steel exhibited relatively weaker grain growth retardation compared with titanium bearing steels and a mixed microstructure of bainite and martensite was present for all simulated HAZs. IGF existed at coarse grain HAZ of Ti+V bearing steel but it was totally replaced by bainite at fine grain HAZs. Hardness result was closely related to the morphology of bainitic ferrite, intragranular ferrite and second phases within ferrite. The microstructure and hardness results of different simulated HAZs were in good agreement with welded experimental results.

  19. Evidence for toxicity differences between inorganic arsenite and thioarsenicals in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranmandura, Hua; Ogra, Yasumitsu; Iwata, Katsuya; Lee, Jane; Suzuki, Kazuo T; Weinfeld, Michael; Le, X Chris

    2009-07-15

    Arsenic toxicity is dependent on its chemical species. In humans, the bladder is one of the primary target organs for arsenic-induced carcinogenicity. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying arsenic-induced carcinogenicity, and what arsenic species are responsible for this carcinogenicity. The present study aimed at comparing the toxic effect of DMMTA(V) with that of inorganic arsenite (iAs(III)) on cell viability, uptake efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) toward human bladder cancer EJ-1 cells. The results were compared with those of a previous study using human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Although iAs(III) was known to be toxic to most cells, here we show that iAs(III) (LC(50)=112 microM) was much less cytotoxic than DMMTA(V) (LC(50)=16.7 microM) in human bladder EJ-1 cells. Interestingly, pentavalent sulfur-containing DMMTA(V) generated a high level of intracellular ROS in EJ-1 cells. However, this was not observed in the cells exposed to trivalent inorganic iAs(III) at their respective LC(50) dose. Furthermore, the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine completely inhibited the cytotoxicity of DMMTA(V) but not iAs(III), suggesting that production of ROS was the main cause of cell death from exposure to DMMTA(V), but not iAs(III). Because the cellular uptake of iAs(III) is mediated by aquaporin proteins, and because the resistance of cells to arsenite can be influenced by lower arsenic uptake due to lower expression of aquaporin proteins (AQP 3, 7 and 9), the expression of several members of the aquaporin family was also examined. In human bladder EJ-1 cells, mRNA/proteins of AQP3, 7 and 9 were not detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)/western blotting. In A431 cells, only mRNA and protein of AQP3 were detected. The large difference in toxicity between the two cell lines could be related to their differences in uptake of arsenic species.

  20. Arsenite activates NFκB through induction of C-reactive protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druwe, Ingrid L.; Sollome, James J.; Sanchez-Soria, Pablo; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Camenisch, Todd D.; Vaillancourt, Richard R., E-mail: vaillancourt@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2012-06-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein in humans. Elevated levels of CRP are produced in response to inflammatory cytokines and are associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance. Exposure to inorganic arsenic, a common environmental toxicant, also produces cardiovascular disorders, namely atherosclerosis and is associated with insulin-resistance. Inorganic arsenic has been shown to contribute to cardiac toxicities through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that result in the activation of NFκB. In this study we show that exposure of the hepatic cell line, HepG2, to environmentally relevant levels of arsenite (0.13 to 2 μM) results in elevated CRP expression and secretion. ROS analysis of the samples showed that a minimal amount of ROS are produced by HepG2 cells in response to these concentrations of arsenic. In addition, treatment of FvB mice with 100 ppb sodium arsenite in the drinking water for 6 months starting at weaning age resulted in dramatically higher levels of CRP in both the liver and inner medullary region of the kidney. Further, mouse Inner Medullary Collecting Duct cells (mIMCD-4), a mouse kidney cell line, were stimulated with 10 ng/ml CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. Pretreatment with 10 nM Y27632, a known Rho-kinase inhibitor, prior to CRP exposure attenuated NFκB activation. These data suggest that arsenic causes the expression and secretion of CRP and that CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway, thereby providing a novel pathway by which arsenic can contribute to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► Exposure to arsenic can induce the expression and secretion of CRP. ► Mice treated with NaAsO{sub 2} showed higher levels of CRP in both the liver and kidney. ► mIMCD-3 were stimulated with CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. ► CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway. ► Data

  1. Deficiency of long isoforms of Nfe2l1 sensitizes MIN6 pancreatic β cells to arsenite-induced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qi; Fu, Jingqi; Hu, Yuxin; Li, Yongfang; Yang, Bei; Li, Lu; Sun, Jing; Chen, Chengjie; Sun, Guifan; Xu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qiang; Pi, Jingbo

    2017-08-15

    Increasing evidence indicates that chronic inorganic arsenic exposure is associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), a disease of growing prevalence. Pancreatic β-cells were targeted and damaged by oxidative stress induced by arsenite. We previously showed that nuclear factor erythroid 2 like 2 (Nfe2l2)-deficient pancreatic β-cells were vulnerable to cell damage induced by oxidative stressors including arsenite, due to a muted antioxidant response. Like nuclear factor erythroid 2 like 2 (NFE2L2), NFE2L1 also belongs to the cap 'n' collar (CNC) basic-region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor family, and regulates antioxidant response element (ARE) related genes. Our prior work showed NFE2L1 regulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic β-cells and isolated islets. In the current study, we demonstrated that MIN6 cells with a specific knockdown of long isoforms of Nfe2l1 (L-Nfe2l1) by lentiviral shRNA (Nfe2l1(L)-KD) were vulnerable to arsenite-induced apoptosis and cell damage. The expression levels of antioxidant genes, such as Gclc, Gclm and Ho-1, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were not different in Scramble and Nfe2l1(L)-KD cells, while the expression of arsenic metabolism related-genes, such as Gsto1, Gstm1 and Nqo1, increased in Nfe2l1(L)-KD cells with or without arsenite treatment. The up-regulation of arsenic biotransformation genes was due to activated NFE2L2 in Nfe2l1(L)-KD MIN6 cells. Furthermore, the level of intracellular monomethylarsenic (MMA) was higher in Nfe2l1(L)-KD MIN6 cells than in Scramble cells. These results showed that deficiency of L-Nfe2l1 in pancreatic β-cells increased susceptibility to acute arsenite-induced cytotoxicity by promoting arsenic biotransformation and intracellular MMA levels. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The impact of maternal control on children’s anxious cognitions, behaviours and affect: an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Thirlwall, Kerstin J.; Creswell, Catharine S.

    2010-01-01

    Controlling parenting is associated with child anxiety however the direction of effects remains unclear. The present study implemented a Latin-square experimental design to assess the impact of parental control on children’s anxious affect, cognitions and behaviour. A non-clinical sample of 24 mothers of children aged 4-5 years were trained to engage in (a) controlling and (b) autonomy-granting behaviours in interaction with their child during the preparation of a speech. When mothers engaged...

  3. Thiol groups controls on arsenite binding by organic matter: new experimental and modeling evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrouillet, Charlotte; Davranche, Mélanie; Dia, Aline; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine; Pédrot, Mathieu; Marsac, Rémi; Gruau, Gérard

    2015-12-15

    Although it has been suggested that several mechanisms can describe the direct binding of As(III) to organic matter (OM), more recently, the thiol functional group of humic acid (HA) was shown to be an important potential binding site for As(III). Isotherm experiments on As(III) sorption to HAs, that have either been grafted with thiol or not, were thus conducted to investigate the preferential As(III) binding sites. There was a low level of binding of As(III) to HA, which was strongly dependent on the abundance of the thiols. Experimental datasets were used to develop a new model (the modified PHREEQC-Model VI), which defines HA as a group of discrete carboxylic, phenolic and thiol sites. Protonation/deprotonation constants were determined for each group of sites (pKA=4.28±0.03; ΔpKA=2.13±0.10; pKB=7.11±0.26; ΔpKB=3.52±0.49; pKS=5.82±0.052; ΔpKS=6.12±0.12 for the carboxylic, phenolic and thiols sites, respectively) from HAs that were either grafted with thiol or not. The pKS value corresponds to that of single thiol-containing organic ligands. Two binding models were tested: the Mono model, which considered that As(III) is bound to the HA thiol site as monodentate complexes, and the Tri model, which considered that As(III) is bound as tridentate complexes. A simulation of the available literature datasets was used to validate the Mono model, with logKMS=2.91±0.04, i.e. the monodentate hypothesis. This study highlighted the importance of thiol groups in OM reactivity and, notably, determined the As(III) concentration bound to OM (considering that Fe is lacking or at least negligible) and was used to develop a model that is able to determine the As(III) concentrations bound to OM.

  4. The Effects of Arbuscular-Mycorrhizal Fungi and Phosphorous on Arsenic Uptake by Sunflower Plant in Soils Spiked with Arsenite and Arsenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Bagherifam

    2017-01-01

    Methods:The soil sample (Typic Haplorthids was collected, air dried and passed through 2 mm sieve and then were heated in 80 centigrade degree temperature for two times. A pot experiment was conducted in a completely randomized design with factorial arrangement and three replications in greenhouse condition. The experimental factors included two species spices of inorganic As (50 mg kg-1 of Arsenite and Arsenate, two levels of phosphorus (0 and 60 mg Kg-1 and three spices of arbuscular mycorrhizae (control, Glomus intraradices and Glomus mosseae. Soil samples spiked with Na2HAsO4.7H2O, NaAsO2 (Arsenite and Arsenate and Ca (H2PO42 (phosphorus and incubated in greenhouse condition for 4 week. Sunflower seeds were planted and seedlings harvested after 60 day of sowing and then dry weight of sunflower, concentration of As and phosphorus in shoot and root of plant and root colonization percentage determined using standard methods. Results and Discussion:The results revealed that Glomus intraradices (GI and Glomus mosseae (GM symbiosis significantly (P

  5. Overexpression of rice glutaredoxins (OsGrxs) significantly reduces arsenite accumulation by maintaining glutathione pool and modulating aquaporins in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pankaj Kumar; Verma, Shikha; Meher, Alok Kumar; Pande, Veena; Mallick, Shekhar; Bansiwal, Amit Kumar; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic (As) is an acute poison and class I carcinogen, can cause a serious health risk. Staple crops like rice are the primary source of As contamination in human food. Rice grown on As contaminated areas accumulates higher As in their edible parts. Based on our previous transcriptome data, two rice glutaredoxins (OsGrx_C7 and OsGrx_C2.1) were identified that showed up-regulated expression during As stress. Here, we report OsGrx_C7 and OsGrx_C2.1 from rice involved in the regulation of intracellular arsenite (AsIII). To elucidate the mechanism of OsGrx mediated As tolerance, both OsGrxs were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli (Δars) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strains (Δycf1, Δacr3). The expression of OsGrxs increased As tolerance in E. coli (Δars) mutant strain (up to 4 mM AsV and up to 0.6 mM AsIII). During AsIII exposure, S. cerevisiae (Δacr3) harboring OsGrx_C7 and OsGrx_C2.1 have lower intracellular AsIII accumulation (up to 30.43% and 24.90%, respectively), compared to vector control. Arsenic accumulation in As-sensitive S. cerevisiae mutant (Δycf1) also reduced significantly on exposure to inorganic As. The expression of OsGrxs in yeast maintained intracellular GSH pool and increased extracellular GSH concentration. Purified OsGrxs displays in vitro GSH-disulfide oxidoreductase, glutathione reductase and arsenate reductase activities. Also, both OsGrxs are involved in AsIII extrusion by altering the Fps1 transcripts in yeast and protect the cell by maintaining cellular GSH pool. Thus, our results strongly suggest that OsGrxs play a crucial role in the maintenance of the intracellular GSH pool and redox status of the cell during both AsV and AsIII stress and might be involved in regulating intracellular AsIII levels by modulation of aquaporin expression and functions.

  6. N-acetylcysteine and meso-2,3 dimercaptosuccinic acid alleviate oxidative stress and hepatic dysfunction induced by sodium arsenite in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu El-Saad AM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed M Abu El-Saad,1,4 Mohammed A Al-Kahtani,2 Ashraf M Abdel-Moneim3,4 1Department of Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Dammam University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, Abha, Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, King Faisal University, Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt Abstract: Environmental exposure to arsenic represents a serious challenge to humans and other animals. The aim of the present study was to test the protective effect of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC either individually or in combination with a chelating agent, meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, against sodium arsenite oral toxicity in male rats. Five groups were used: control; arsenic group (orally administrated in a concentration of 2 mg/kg body weight [b.w.]; the other three groups were orally administrated sodium arsenite in a concentration of 2 mg/kg b.w. followed by either NAC (10 mg/kg b.w., intraperitoneally [i.p.], DMSA (50 mg/kg b.w., i.p. or NAC plus DMSA. Arsenic toxicity caused significant rise in serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and total bilirubin, and a significant decrease in total protein (TP and albumin levels after 3 weeks of experimental period. In addition, arsenic-treated rats showed significantly higher arsenic content in liver and significant rise in hepatic malondialdehyde level. By contrast, sharp decreases in glutathione content and catalase and glutathione reductase activities were discernible. NAC and/or DMSA counteracted most of these physiologic and biochemical defects. NAC monotherapy was more effective than DMSA in increasing TP, while DMSA was more effective in decreasing alanine aminotransferase. The combined treatment was superior over monotherapies in recovery of TP and glutathione. Biochemical data were well supported by histopathological and

  7. Factors affecting blood pressure variability: lessons learned from two systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya M Musini

    Full Text Available Systematic reviews can often reveal much more than the original objective of the work. The objectives of this retrospective analysis were to answer three basic questions about blood pressure variability: 1 Does blood pressure entry criterion have an effect on baseline blood pressure variability? 2 Do thiazide diuretics have a significant effect on blood pressure variability? and 3 Does systolic blood pressure vary to the same degree as diastolic blood pressure? This analysis of blood pressure variability is based on resting standardized research setting BP readings from two systematic reviews evaluating blood pressure lowering efficacy of thiazide diuretics from double blind randomized controlled trials in 33,611 patients with primary hypertension. The standard deviation reported in trials was the focus of the research and the unit of analysis. When a threshold systolic or diastolic blood pressure value is used to determine entry into a trial, baseline variability is significantly decreased, systolic from 14.0 to 9.3 mmHg and diastolic from 8.4 to 5.3 mmHg. Thiazides do not change BP variability as the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure did not differ between thiazide and placebo groups at end of treatment. The coefficient of variation of systolic blood pressure was significantly greater than the coefficient of variation of diastolic blood pressure. Entry criterion decreases the baseline blood pressure variability. Treatment with a thiazide diuretic does not affect blood pressure variability. Systolic blood pressure varies to a greater degree than diastolic blood pressure.

  8. A pharmacodynamic analysis of factors affecting recovery from anesthesia with propofol-remifentanil target controlled infusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bon-nyeo KOO; Jeong-rim LEE; Gyu-jeong NOH; Jae-hoon LEE; Young-ran KANG; Dong-woo HAN

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To examine individual patient's demographic parameters and clinical variables related to return of consciousness (ROC) and the pharmacodynamic relationship between propofol effect-site concentration (Ce) and ROC from propofol-remifentanil anesthesia.Methods:Ninety-four patients received propofol-remifentanil anesthesia using the effect-site target-controlled infusion (TCI) system.All clinical events were noted,and variables possibly related to propofol Ce at ROC were examined using linear correlation analyses.Pharmacodynamic modeling incorporating covariates was performed using NONMEM (Nonlinear Mixed Effects Modeling) Ⅶ software.Results:The Ce values of propofol at loss of consciousness (LOC) and ROC were 4.4±1.1 μg/mL and 1.1±0.3 μg/mL respectively.Age was negatively correlated with propofol Ce at ROC (r=-0.48,P<0.01).Including age as a covariate in Ce50 (the effect-site concentration associated with 50% probability of return of consciousness) and λ (the steepness of the concentration-versus-response relationship) significantly improved the performance of the basic model based on the likelihood ratio test,with a significant decrease in the minimum value of the objective function.The Ce50 in 25-,50-,and 75-year-old patients was predicted to be 1.38,1.06,and 0.74 Iμg/mL,respectively.The λ,in 25-,50-,and 75-year-old patients was predicted to be 12.23,8.70,and 5.18,respectively.Conclusion:Age significantly affects the relationship between propofol Ce and ROC,and pharmacodynamic modeling including age could lead to better predictions of ROC during emergence from propofol-remifentanil anesthesia.

  9. Arsenite oxidase from Ralstonia sp. 22: characterization of the enzyme and its interaction with soluble cytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieutaud, Aurélie; van Lis, Robert; Duval, Simon; Capowiez, Line; Muller, Daniel; Lebrun, Régine; Lignon, Sabrina; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Lett, Marie-Claire; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Schoepp-Cothenet, Barbara

    2010-07-02

    We characterized the aro arsenite oxidation system in the novel strain Ralstonia sp. 22, a beta-proteobacterium isolated from soil samples of the Salsigne mine in southern France. The inducible aro system consists of a heterodimeric membrane-associated enzyme reacting with a dedicated soluble cytochrome c(554). Our biochemical results suggest that the weak association of the enzyme to the membrane probably arises from a still unknown interaction partner. Analysis of the phylogeny of the aro gene cluster revealed that it results from a lateral gene transfer from a species closely related to Achromobacter sp. SY8. This constitutes the first clear cut case of such a transfer in the Aro phylogeny. The biochemical study of the enzyme demonstrates that it can accommodate in vitro various cytochromes, two of which, c(552) and c(554,) are from the parent species. Cytochrome c(552) belongs to the sox and not the aro system. Kinetic studies furthermore established that sulfite and sulfide, substrates of the sox system, are both inhibitors of Aro activity. These results reinforce the idea that sulfur and arsenic metabolism are linked.

  10. Arsenite-loaded nanoparticles inhibit PARP-1 to overcome multidrug resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Zongjun; Chi, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Huang, Dengtong; Jin, Jianbin; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the highest incidences in cancers; however, traditional chemotherapy often suffers from low efficiency caused by drug resistance. Herein, we report an arsenite-loaded dual-drug (doxorubicin and arsenic trioxide, i.e., DOX and ATO) nanomedicine system (FeAsOx@SiO2-DOX, Combo NP) with significant drug synergy and pH-triggered drug release for effective treatment of DOX resistant HCC cells (HuH-7/ADM). This nano-formulation Combo NP exhibits the synergistic effect of DNA damage by DOX along with DNA repair interference by ATO, which results in unprecedented killing efficiency on DOX resistant cancer cells. More importantly, we explored the possible mechanism is that the activity of PARP-1 is inhibited by ATO during the treatment of Combo NP, which finally induces apoptosis of HuH-7/ADM cells by poly (ADP-ribosyl) ation suppression and DNA lesions accumulation. This study provides a smart drug delivery strategy to develop a novel synergistic combination therapy for effectively overcome drug- resistant cancer cells.

  11. Development of a biosorbent for arsenite: structural modeling based on X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Monica Cristina; Ciminelli, Virginia S T

    2005-02-01

    This work describes a biological route for direct sorption of aqueous As(III) species, which are the most toxic and mobile arsenic species found in soils. Based upon the biochemical mechanisms that explain arsenic toxicity, we propose that a waste biomass with a high fibrous protein content obtained from chicken feathers can be used for selective As(III) adsorption. Prior to adsorption, the disulfide bridges present in the biomass are reduced by thioglycolate. Our investigations demonstrated that As(III) is specifically adsorbed on the biomass and, contrary to the behavior observed with inorganic sorbents, the lower is the pH the more effective is the removal. Arsenic uptake reaches values of up to 270 micromol As(III)/g of biomass. Analyses by synchrotron light techniques, such as XANES, demonstrated that arsenic is adsorbed in its trivalent state, an advantage over conventional techniques for As uptake, which usually require a previous oxidation stage. EXAFS analyses showed that each As atom is directly bound to three S atoms with an estimated distance of 2.26 A. The uptake mechanism is explained in terms of the structural similarities between the As(III)-biomass complex structure and that of arsenite ions and Ars-Operon system encoded proteins and phytochelatins. The biological route presented here offers the perspective of a direct removal of arsenic in its reduced form.

  12. Bacterial community succession during the enrichment of chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidizing bacteria at high arsenic concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nguyen Ai Le; Akiko Sato; Daisuke Inoue; Kazunari Sei; Satoshi Soda; Michihiko Ike

    2012-01-01

    To generate cost-effective technologies for the removal of arsenic from water,we developed an enrichment culture of chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidizing bacteria (CAOs) that could effectively oxidize widely ranging concentrations of As(Ⅲ) to As(Ⅴ).In addition,we attempted to elucidate the enrichment process and characterize the microbial composition of the enrichment culture.A CAOs enrichment culture capable of stably oxidizing As(Ⅲ) to As(Ⅴ) was successfully constructed through repeated batch cultivation for more than 700 days,during which time the initial As(Ⅲ) concentrations were increased in a stepwise manner from l to 10-12 mmol/L.As(Ⅲ) oxidation activity of the enrichment culture gradually improved,and 10-12 mmol/L As(Ⅲ) was almost completely oxidized within four days.Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that the dominant bacteria in the enrichment culture varied drastically during the enrichment process depending on the As(Ⅲ) concentration.Isolation and characterization of bacteria in the enrichment culture revealed that the presence of multiple CAOs with various As(Ⅲ) oxidation abilities enabled the culture to adapt to a wide range of As(Ⅲ) concentrations.The CAOs enrichment culture constructed here may he useful for pretreatment of water from which arsenic is being removed.

  13. Metalloid tolerance based on phytochelatins is not functionally equivalent to the arsenite transporter Acr3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Robert; Clemens, Stephan; Augustyniak, Daria; Golik, Pawel; Maciaszczyk, Ewa; Tamás, Markus J; Dziadkowiec, Dorota

    2003-05-01

    Active transport of metalloids by Acr3p and Ycf1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and chelation by phytochelatins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, nematodes, and plants represent distinct strategies of metalloid detoxification. In this report, we present results of functional comparison of both resistance mechanisms. The S. pombe and wheat phytochelatin synthase (PCS) genes, when expressed in S. cerevisiae, mediate only modest resistance to arsenite and thus cannot functionally compensate for Acr3p. On the other hand, we show for the first time that phytochelatins also contribute to antimony tolerance as PCS fully complement antimonite sensitivity of ycf1Delta mutant. Remarkably, heterologous expression of PCS sensitizes S. cerevisiae to arsenate, while ACR3 confers much higher arsenic resistance in pcsDelta than in wild-type S. pombe. The analysis of PCS and ACR3 homologues distribution in various organisms and our experimental data suggest that separation of ACR3 and PCS genes may lead to the optimal tolerance status of the cell.

  14. Adsorption of Arsenite by Six Submerged Plants from Nansi Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nansi Lake is the largest and the most important freshwater lake in north China for the South-North Water Transfer Project. Due to long-time and large-scale fish farming of history, the excess fish food and excretion usually release pentavalent arsenic, which is converted into trivalent arsenic (As (III in the lake sediment and released into lake water. Adsorption of arsenite using six submerged plants (Mimulicalyx rosulatus, Potamogeton maackianus, Hydrilla, Watermifoil, Pteris vittata, and Potamogeton crispus as adsorbing materials was investigated. The experimental data obtained have been analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models and the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion kinetics models. According to the results, the As (III equilibrium data agreed well with the Freundlich isotherm model. The adsorption capacity of the plants was in the following order: Potamogeton crispus > Pteris vittata > Potamogeton maackianus > Mimulicalyx rosulatus > Hydrilla > Watermifoil. The sorption system with the six submerged plants was better described by pseudo-second-order than by first-order kinetics. Moreover, the adsorption with Potamogeton crispus could follow intraparticle diffusion (IPD model. The initial adsorption and rate of IPD using Potamogeton crispus and Pteris vittata were higher than those using other plants studied.

  15. Electrochemical determination of arsenite in neutral media on reusable gold nanostructured films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ying; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2009-07-15

    We report a simple and novel method of stirring-only-driven accumulation and electrochemical determination of arsenite (As(III)) with both of the oxidation and reduction peaks associated with As(0)/As(III) using a gold nanofilm electrode in neutral solution. Under stirring, a large amount of As(III) was deposited on the modified electrode and the electrochemical response was greatly amplified. The accumulated As(III) on the electrode showed well-defined redox couple in 0.1M blank phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.0), which could be used for the measurement of As(III). Under optimal conditions, As(III) could be detected in the range from 0.20 to 375 ppb with a detection limit of 0.04 ppb. In particular, with the use of the reduction peak of As(III) the modified electrode exhibits excellent performance for As(III) determination even in the presence of abundant Cu(II). The regeneration of the electrodes is facile with good reproducibility. The electrochemical system was applied to analyze As(III) in lake water, As(III) spiked tap water and drinking water.

  16. Affiliation and control in marital interaction: interpersonal complementarity is present but is not associated with affect or relationship quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundiff, Jenny M; Smith, Timothy W; Butner, Jonathan; Critchfield, Kenneth L; Nealey-Moore, Jill

    2015-01-01

    The principle of complementarity in interpersonal theory states that an actor's behavior tends to "pull, elicit, invite, or evoke" responses from interaction partners who are similar in affiliation (i.e., warmth vs. hostility) and opposite in control (i.e., dominance vs. submissiveness). Furthermore, complementary interactions are proposed to evoke less negative affect and promote greater relationship satisfaction. These predictions were examined in two studies of married couples. Results suggest that complementarity in affiliation describes a robust general pattern of marital interaction, but complementarity in control varies across contexts. Consistent with behavioral models of marital interaction, greater levels of affiliation and lower control by partners-not complementarity in affiliation or control-were associated with less anger and anxiety and greater relationship quality. Partners' levels of affiliation and control combined in ways other than complementarity-mostly additively, but sometimes synergistically-to predict negative affect and relationship satisfaction.

  17. Investigating Affective Experiences in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Students' Perceptions of Control and Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Malakpa, Zoebedeh; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2016-01-01

    Meaningful learning requires the integration of cognitive and affective learning with the psychomotor, i.e., hands-on learning. The undergraduate chemistry laboratory is an ideal place for meaningful learning to occur. However, accurately characterizing students' affective experiences in the chemistry laboratory can be a very difficult task. While…

  18. The ash in forest fire affected soils control the soil losses. Part 1. The pioneer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Pereira, Paulo

    2013-04-01

    composition (Pereira and Úbeda, 2010) and Pereira et al., 2012). Some of the new research challenges related to ash impact in the fire affected soils are related to the ash redistribution after the fire, the impact of ash in soil and water chemistry, the temporal changes of soil erosion, the control ash exert on vegetation recovery and the role to be played by ash in the best management of fire affected land. Those topics needs new ideas and new scientists such as Paulo Pereira show in the Part II of this abstract. Acknowledgements, Lithuanian Research Council. Project LITFIRE, Fire effects on Lithuanian soils and ecosystems (MIP-48/2011) and the research projects GL2008-02879/BTE and LEDDRA 243857. References Bodí, M., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S., and Cerdà, A. 2011b. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. Cerdà, A. 1998a. Postfire dynamics of erosional processes under mediterranean climatic conditions. Z. Geomorphol., 42 (3) 373-398. Cerdà, A. 1998b. Changes in overland flow and infiltration after a rangeland fire in a Mediterranean scrubland. Hydrological Processes, 12, 1031-1042. Cerdà, A., and Doerr, S. H.2010. The effect of ant mounds on overland flow and soil erodibility following a wildfire in eastern Spain. Ecohydrology, 3, 392-401. Cerdà, A., and Doerr, S.H. 2008. The effect of ash and needle cover on surface runoff and erosion in the immediate post-fire period. Catena, 74, 256-263. Pereira, P., and Úbeda, X. 2010. Spatial distribution of heavy metals released from ashes after a wildfire, Journal of Environment Engineering and Landscape Management, 18, 13-22. Pereira, P., Ubeda, X., Martin, D.A. 2012. Fire severity effects on ash chemical composition and extractable elements. Geoderma, 191, 105 - 114. Pérez-Cabello, F., Cerdà, A., de la Riva, J., Echeverría, M.T., García-Martín, A., Ibarra, P., Lasanta, T., Montorio

  19. PARKINSON'S DISEASE PATIENTS WITH DOMINANT HEMIBODY AFFECTED BY THE DISEASE RELY MORE ON VISION TO MAINTAIN UPRIGHT POSTURAL CONTROL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahr, Juliana; Pereira, Marcelo Pinto; Pelicioni, Paulo Henrique Silva; De Morais, Luana Carolina; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2015-12-01

    This study assesses the association between disease onset side (dominant or non-dominant) and vision on postural control of Parkinson's disease patients. Patient volunteers composed two groups, according to the onset side affected: Dominant group (n=9; M age=66.1 yr., SD=7.2; 6 women, 3 men) and Non-dominant group (n=9; M age=67.4 yr., SD=6.4; 6 women, 3 men). The groups' postural control was assessed by posturography during quiet upright stance in two conditions, Eyes open and Eyes closed. Two-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs; group×condition) with repeated measures for the second factor assessed the differences associated with affected hemibody and vision on postural control. Analyses indicated that patients with the dominant side affected also presented significantly greater variation in center of pressure than those with the non-dominant side affected, mainly in the Eyes closed condition. The results demonstrate a higher reliance on vision in the dominant side, possibly to compensate somatosensory system impairments. These results also highlight the importance of analyzing the hemibody affected by the disease when postural control is assessed in this population.

  20. Effects of Arsenite Resistance on the Growth and Functional Gene Expression of Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans in Pure Culture and Coculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huidan Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of iron-oxidizing Leptospirillum ferriphilum YSK and sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans A01 to arsenite under pure culture and coculture was investigated based on biochemical characterization (concentration of iron ion and pH value and related gene expression. L. ferriphilum YSK and At. thiooxidans A01 in pure culture could adapt up to 400 mM and 800 mM As(III after domestication, respectively, although arsenite showed a negative effect on both strains. The coculture showed a stronger sulfur and ferrous ion oxidation activity when exposed to arsenite. In coculture, the pH value showed no significant difference when under 500 mM arsenite stress, and the cell number of At. thiooxidans was higher than that in pure culture benefiting from the interaction with L. ferriphilum. The expression profile showed that the arsenic efflux system in the coculture was more active than that in pure culture, indicating that there is a synergetic interaction between At. thiooxidans A01 and L. ferriphilum YSK. In addition, a model was proposed to illustrate the interaction between arsenite and the ars operon in L. ferriphilum YSK and At. thiooxidans A01. This study will facilitate the effective application of coculture in the bioleaching process by taking advantage of strain-strain communication and coordination.

  1. Effects of Arsenite Resistance on the Growth and Functional Gene Expression of Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans in Pure Culture and Coculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huidan; Liang, Yili; Yin, Huaqun; Xiao, Yunhua; Guo, Xue; Xu, Ying; Hu, Qi; Liu, Hongwei; Liu, Xueduan

    2015-01-01

    The response of iron-oxidizing Leptospirillum ferriphilum YSK and sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans A01 to arsenite under pure culture and coculture was investigated based on biochemical characterization (concentration of iron ion and pH value) and related gene expression. L. ferriphilum YSK and At. thiooxidans A01 in pure culture could adapt up to 400 mM and 800 mM As(III) after domestication, respectively, although arsenite showed a negative effect on both strains. The coculture showed a stronger sulfur and ferrous ion oxidation activity when exposed to arsenite. In coculture, the pH value showed no significant difference when under 500 mM arsenite stress, and the cell number of At. thiooxidans was higher than that in pure culture benefiting from the interaction with L. ferriphilum. The expression profile showed that the arsenic efflux system in the coculture was more active than that in pure culture, indicating that there is a synergetic interaction between At. thiooxidans A01 and L. ferriphilum YSK. In addition, a model was proposed to illustrate the interaction between arsenite and the ars operon in L. ferriphilum YSK and At. thiooxidans A01. This study will facilitate the effective application of coculture in the bioleaching process by taking advantage of strain-strain communication and coordination.

  2. Accumulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HSP32) in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells treated with sodium arsenite, cadmium chloride or proteasomal inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music, Ena; Khan, Saad; Khamis, Imran; Heikkila, John J

    2014-11-01

    The present study examined the effect of sodium arsenite, cadmium chloride, heat shock and the proteasomal inhibitors MG132, withaferin A and celastrol on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1; also known as HSP32) accumulation in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells. Immunoblot analysis revealed that HO-1 accumulation was not induced by heat shock but was enhanced by sodium arsenite and cadmium chloride in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Immunocytochemistry revealed that these metals induced HO-1 accumulation in a granular pattern primarily in the cytoplasm. Additionally, in 20% of the cells arsenite induced the formation of large HO-1-containing perinuclear structures. In cells recovering from sodium arsenite or cadmium chloride treatment, HO-1 accumulation initially increased to a maximum at 12h followed by a 50% reduction at 48 h. This initial increase in HO-1 levels was likely the result of new synthesis as it was inhibited by cycloheximide. Interestingly, treatment of cells with a mild heat shock enhanced HO-1 accumulation induced by low concentrations of sodium arsenite and cadmium chloride. Finally, we determined that HO-1 accumulation was induced in A6 cells by the proteasomal inhibitors, MG132, withaferin A and celastrol. An examination of heavy metal and proteasomal inhibitor-induced HO-1 accumulation in amphibians is of importance given the presence of toxic heavy metals in aquatic habitats.

  3. Control by Preynaptic Correlation: a mechanism affecting information transmission from Ia fibers to motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudomin, P; Burke, R E; Núñez, R; Madrid, J; Dutton, H

    1975-03-01

    1. In the unanesthetized spinal cord of the cat, simultaneous intracellular recordings were made from two motoneurons belonging to the gastronemius motor nucleus. 2. Supramaximal iterative stimulation of small branches of the gastrocnemius nerve produced monosynaptic EPSPs (Ia EPSPs) of varying amplitude superimposed on a fluctuating base line. 3. In most cases the variance of the motoneuron membrane potential was increased above base-line levels with a time course approximately matching the Ia EPSP. This suggests that Ia EPSP fluctuations are greater than can be accounted for by the base-line fluctuations alone. 4. For a given series of Ia EPSPs, the smaller responses in the series had about the same decay phase as the larger EPSPs, suggesting that most of the Ia EPSP fluctuations were not due to systematic changes in postsynaptic conductances produced by ongoing activity, but rather to a presynaptic mechanism. 5. Simultaneous recording from two motoneurons showed that base-line fluctuations were positively correlated. In most cases, however, there was an additional increased correlation above base-line levels resembling the time course of the Ia EPSPs, indicating positive correlation between EPSP fluctuations which is attributed to a presynaptic mechanism. 6. Conditioning volleys to group I muscle afferents or to low-threshold cutaneous afferents reduced the variance of the Ia EPSPs and also their correlation in motoneuron pairs, often without changing the mean Ia EPSPs. 7. It is concluded that, in the unanesthetized spinal cord, in addition to the random process which governs transmitter release intrinsic to a given synaptic terminal, there is another stochastic process affecting, in a correlated manner, transmitter release in large sets of Ia synaptic terminals. Most likely, the correlation in transmitter release is achieved by membrane potential fluctuations imposed on the Ia terminal arborizations by ongoing activity of the segmental mechanism mediating

  4. Spatial affect learning restricted in major depression relative to anxiety disorders and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, Jackie K; Norris, Catherine J; Hoxha, Denada; Irick, John Stockton; Hawkley, Louise C; Cacioppo, John T

    2014-01-01

    Detecting and learning the location of unpleasant or pleasant scenarios, or spatial affect learning, is an essential skill that safeguards well-being (Crawford & Cacioppo, 2002). Potentially altered by psychiatric illness, this skill has yet to be measured in adults with and without major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders (AD). This study enrolled 199 adults diagnosed with MDD and AD (n=53), MDD (n=47), AD (n=54), and no disorders (n=45). Measures included clinical interviews, self-reports, and a validated spatial affect task using affective pictures (IAPS; Lang, Bradley, & Cuthbert, 2005). Participants with MDD showed impaired spatial affect learning of negative stimuli and irrelevant learning of pleasant pictures compared with non-depressed adults. Adults with MDD may use a "GOOD is UP" heuristic reflected by their impaired learning of the opposite correlation (i.e., "BAD is UP") and performance in the pleasant version of the task.

  5. Initial substrate moisture content and storage temperature affect chemical properties of bagged substrates containing controlled release fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagged potting mixes can be stored for weeks or months before being used by consumers. Some bagged potting mixes are amended with controlled release fertilizers (CRF). The objective of this research was to observe how initial substrate moisture content and storage temperature affect the chemical p...

  6. An aquaporin PvTIP4;1 from Pteris vittata may mediate arsenite uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhenyan; Yan, Huili; Chen, Yanshan; Shen, Hongling; Xu, Wenxiu; Zhang, Haiyan; Shi, Lei; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Ma, Mi

    2016-01-01

    The fern Pteris vittata is an arsenic hyperaccumulator. The genes involved in arsenite (As(III)) transport are not yet clear. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of a new P. vittata aquaporin gene, PvTIP4;1, which may mediate As(III) uptake. PvTIP4;1 was identified from yeast functional complement cDNA library of P. vittata. Arsenic toxicity and accumulating activities of PvTIP4;1 were analyzed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis. Subcellular localization of PvTIP4;1-GFP fusion protein in P. vittata protoplast and callus was conducted. The tissue expression of PvTIP4;1 was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. Site-directed mutagenesis of the PvTIP4;1 aromatic/arginine (Ar/R) domain was studied. Heterologous expression in yeast demonstrates that PvTIP4;1 was able to facilitate As(III) diffusion. Transgenic Arabidopsis showed that PvTIP4;1 increases arsenic accumulation and induces arsenic sensitivity. Images and FM4-64 staining suggest that PvTIP4;1 localizes to the plasma membrane in P. vittata cells. A tissue location study shows that PvTIP4;1 transcripts are mainly expressed in roots. Site-directed mutation in yeast further proved that the cysteine at the LE1 position of PvTIP4;1 Ar/R domain is a functional site. PvTIP4;1 is a new represented tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) aquaporin from P. vittata and the function and location results imply that PvTIP4;1 may be involved in As(III) uptake.

  7. The fate of arsenic adsorbed on iron oxides in the presence of arsenite-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhennan; Yin, Naiyi; Du, Huili; Cai, Xiaolin; Cui, Yanshan

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a redox-active metalloid whose toxicity and mobility in soil depend on its oxidation state. Arsenite [As(III)] can be oxidized by microbes and adsorbed by minerals in the soil. However, the combined effects of these abiotic and biotic processes are not well understood. In this study, the fate of arsenic in the presence of an isolated As(III)-oxidizing bacterium (Pseudomonas sp. HN-1, 10(9) colony-forming units (CFUs)·ml(-1)) and three iron oxides (goethite, hematite, and magnetite at 1.6 g L(-1)) was determined using batch experiments. The total As adsorption by iron oxides was lower with bacteria present and was higher with iron oxides alone. The total As adsorption decreased by 78.6%, 36.0% and 79.7% for goethite, hematite and magnetite, respectively, due to the presence of bacteria. As(III) adsorbed on iron oxides could also be oxidized by Pseudomonas sp. HN-1, but the oxidation rate (1.3 μmol h(-1)) was much slower than the rate in the aqueous phase (96.2 μmol h(-1)). Therefore, the results of other studies with minerals only might overestimate the adsorptive capacity of solids in natural systems; the presence of minerals might hinder As(III) oxidation by microbes. Under aerobic conditions, in the presence of iron oxides and As(III)-oxidizing bacteria, arsenic is adsorbed onto iron oxides within the adsorption capacity, and As(V) is the primary form in the solid and aqueous phases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Flexible biological arsenite oxidation utilizing NOx and O2 as alternative electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Wan, Junfeng; Wu, Zihao; Li, Hongli; Li, Haisong; Dagot, Christophe; Wang, Yan

    2017-07-01

    The feasibility of flexible microbial arsenite (As(III)) oxidation coupled with the reduction of different electron acceptors was investigated. The results indicated the acclimated microorganisms could oxidize As(III) with oxygen, nitrate and nitrite as the alternative electron acceptors. A series of batch tests were conducted to measure the kinetic parameters of As(III) oxidation and to evaluate the effects of environmental conditions including pH and temperature on the activity of biological As(III) oxidation dependent on different electron acceptors. Kinetic results showed that oxygen-dependent As(III) oxidation had the highest oxidation rate (0.59 mg As g(-1) VSS min(-1)), followed by nitrate- (0.40 mg As g(-1) VSS min(-1)) and nitrite-dependent As(III) oxidation (0.32 mg As g(-1) VSS min(-1)). The kinetic data of aerobic As(III) oxidation were fitted well with the Monod kinetic model, while the Haldane substrate inhibition model was better applicable to describe the inhibition of anoxic As(III) oxidation. Both aerobic and anoxic As(III) oxidation performed the optimal activity at the near neutral pH. Besides, the optimal temperature for oxygen-, nitrate- and nitrite-dependent As(III) oxidation was 30 ± 1 °C, 40 ± 1 °C and 20 ± 1 °C, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Autecology of an arsenite chemolithotroph: sulfide constraints on function and distribution in a geothermal spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Imperio, Seth; Lehr, Corinne R; Breary, Michele; McDermott, Timothy R

    2007-11-01

    Previous studies in an acid-sulfate-chloride spring in Yellowstone National Park found that microbial arsenite [As(III)] oxidation is absent in regions of the spring outflow channel where H(2)S exceeds approximately 5 microM and served as a backdrop for continued efforts in the present study. Ex situ assays with microbial mat samples demonstrated immediate As(III) oxidation activity when H(2)S was absent or at low concentrations, suggesting the presence of As(III) oxidase enzymes that could be reactivated if H(2)S is removed. Cultivation experiments initiated with mat samples taken from along the H(2)S gradient in the outflow channel resulted in the isolation of an As(III)-oxidizing chemolithotroph from the low-H(2)S region of the gradient. The isolate was phylogenetically related to Acidicaldus and was characterized in vitro for spring-relevant properties, which were then compared to its distribution pattern in the spring as determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative PCR. While neither temperature nor oxygen requirements appeared to be related to the occurrence of this organism within the outflow channel, H(2)S concentration appeared to be an important constraint. This was verified by in vitro pure-culture modeling and kinetic experiments, which suggested that H(2)S inhibition of As(III) oxidation is uncompetitive in nature. In summary, the studies reported herein illustrate that H(2)S is a potent inhibitor of As(III) oxidation and will influence the niche opportunities and population distribution of As(III) chemolithotrophs.

  10. Arsenite tolerance is related to proportional thiolic metabolite synthesis in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Richa; Singh, Pradyumna Kumar; Tripathi, Preeti; Shri, Manju; Dixit, Garima; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Sharma, Yogesh Kumar; Dhankher, Om Prakash; Corpas, Francisco Javier; Barroso, Juan B; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2013-02-01

    Thiol metabolism is the primary detoxification strategy by which rice plants tolerate arsenic (As) stress. In light of this, it is important to understand the importance of harmonised thiol metabolism with As accumulation and tolerance in rice plant. For this aim, tolerant (T) and sensitive (S) genotypes were screened from 303 rice (Oryza sativa) genotypes on exposure to 10 and 25 μM arsenite (As(III)) in hydroponic culture. On further As accumulation estimation, contrasting (13-fold difference) T (IC-340072) and S (IC-115730) genotypes were selected. This difference was further evaluated using biochemical and molecular approaches to understand involvement of thiolic metabolism vis-a-vis As accumulation in these two genotypes. Various phytochelatin (PC) species (PC(2), PC(3) and PC(4)) were detected in both the genotypes with a dominance of PC(3). However, PC concentrations were greater in the S genotype, and it was noticed that the total PC (PC(2) + PC(3 )+ PC(4))-to-As(III) molar ratio (PC-SH:As(III)) was greater in T (2.35 and 1.36 in shoots and roots, respectively) than in the S genotype (0.90 and 0.15 in shoots and roots, respectively). Expression analysis of several metal(loid) stress-related genes showed significant upregulation of glutaredoxin, sulphate transporter, and ascorbate peroxidase in the S genotype. Furthermore, enzyme activity of phytochelatin synthase and cysteine synthase was greater on As accumulation in the S compared with the T genotype. It was concluded that the T genotype synthesizes adequate thiols to detoxify metalloid load, whereas the S genotype synthesizes greater but inadequate levels of thiols to tolerate an exceedingly greater load of metalloids, as evidenced by thiol-to-metalloid molar ratios, and therefore shows a phytotoxicity response.

  11. Arsenite Removal from Simulated Groundwater by Biogenic Schwertmannite: A Column Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yue; ZHOU Li-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of biogenic schwertmannite to act as a sorbent for removing arsenite from groundwater,a series of biogenic schwertmannite-packed column adsorption experiments were conducted on simulated As(Ⅲ)-containing groundwater.Empty bed contact time (EBCT),As(Ⅲ) concentration in effluent,and the removal efficiency of As(Ⅲ) through the column were investigated at pH 8.0 and temperature 25 ± 0.5 ℃.The results showed that the breakthrough curves were mainly dependent on EBCT values when the influent As(Ⅲ) concentration was 500 μg L-1 and the optimum EBCT was 4.0 min.When the effluent As(Ⅲ) concentration reached 10 and 50 μg L-1,the breakthrough volumes for the schwertmannite adsorption column were 4200 and 5600 bed volume (BV),with As(Ⅲ) adsorption capacity of 2.1 and 2.8 mg g-1,respectively.Biogenic schwertmannite could be regenerated by 1.0 mol L-1 NaOH solution,and more than 80% of As(Ⅲ) adsorbed on the surface of schwertmannite could be released after 3 successive regenerations.The breakthrough volume for the regenerated schwertmannite-packed column still maintained 4 000-4 200 BV when the As(Ⅲ) concentration in effluent was below 10 μg L-1.Compared with other sorbents for As(Ⅲ) removal,the biogenic schwertmannitepacked column had a higher breakthrough volume and a much higher adsorption capacity,implying that biogenic schwertmannite was a highly efficient and potential sorbent to purify As(Ⅲ)-contaminated groundwater.

  12. An Oxidoreductase AioE is Responsible for Bacterial Arsenite Oxidation and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Han, Yushan; Shi, Kaixiang; Fan, Xia; Wang, Lu; Li, Mingshun; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we found that arsenite (AsIII) oxidation could improve the generation of ATP/NADH to support the growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4. In this study, we found that aioE is induced by AsIII and located in the arsenic island near the AsIII oxidase genes aioBA and co-transcripted with the arsenic resistant genes arsR1-arsC1-arsC2-acr3-1. AioE belongs to TrkA family corresponding the electron transport function with the generation of NADH and H+. An aioE in-frame deletion strain showed a null AsIII oxidation and a reduced AsIII resistance, while a cytC mutant only reduced AsIII oxidation efficiency. With AsIII, aioE was directly related to the increase of NADH, while cytC was essential for ATP generation. In addition, cyclic voltammetry analysis showed that the redox potential (ORP) of AioBA and AioE were +0.297 mV vs. NHE and +0.255 mV vs. NHE, respectively. The ORP gradient is AioBA > AioE > CytC (+0.217 ~ +0.251 mV vs. NHE), which infers that electron may transfer from AioBA to CytC via AioE. The results indicate that AioE may act as a novel AsIII oxidation electron transporter associated with NADH generation. Since AsIII oxidation contributes AsIII detoxification, the essential of AioE for AsIII resistance is also reasonable. PMID:28128323

  13. Continuous activation of Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzymes leads to arsenite-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Wang, Dapeng; Ma, Yuan; Xu, Xiguo; Zhu, Zhen; Wang, Xiaojuan; Deng, Hanyi; Li, Chunchun; Chen, Min; Tong, Jian; Yamanaka, Kenzo; An, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Long-term exposure to arsenite leads to human lung cancer, but the underlying mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain obscure. The transcription factor of nuclear factor-erythroid-2 p45-related factor (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant response represents a critical cellular defense mechanism and protection against various diseases. Paradoxically, emerging data suggest that the constitutive activation of Nrf2 is associated with cancer development, progression and chemotherapy resistance. However, the role of Nrf2 in the occurrence of cancer induced by long-term arsenite exposure remains to be fully understood. By establishing transformed human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells via chronic low-dose arsenite treatment, we showed that, in acquiring this malignant phenotype, continuous low level of ROS and sustained enhancement of Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzyme levels were observed in the later-stage of arsenite-induced cell transformation. The downregulation of Keap1 level may be responsible for the over-activation of Nrf2 and its target enzymes. To validate these observations, Nrf2 was knocked down in arsenite-transformed HBE cells by SiRNA transfection, and the levels of Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzymes, ROS, cell proliferation, migration, and colony formation were determined following these treatments. Results showed that blocked Nrf2 expression significantly reduced Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzyme levels, restored ROS levels, and eventually suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and colony formation of the transformed cells. In summary, the results of the study strongly suggested that the continuous activation of Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzymes led to the over-depletion of intracellular ROS levels, which contributed to arsenite-induced HBE cell transformation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Controlling robots in the home: Factors that affect the performance of novice robot operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, Conor; Sena, Aran; Kelly, Kevin

    2017-11-01

    For robots to successfully integrate into everyday life, it is important that they can be effectively controlled by laypeople. However, the task of manually controlling mobile robots can be challenging due to demanding cognitive and sensorimotor requirements. This research explores the effect that the built environment has on the manual control of domestic service robots. In this study, a virtual reality simulation of a domestic robot control scenario was developed. The performance of fifty novice users was evaluated, and their subjective experiences recorded through questionnaires. Through quantitative and qualitative analysis, it was found that untrained operators frequently perform poorly at navigation-based robot control tasks. The study found that passing through doorways accounted for the largest number of collisions, and was consistently identified as a very difficult operation to perform. These findings suggest that homes and other human-orientated settings present significant challenges to robot control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Flexible bacterial strains that oxidize arsenite in anoxic or aerobic conditions and utilize hydrogen or acetate as alternative electron donors

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Freire, Lucía; Sun, Wenjie; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a carcinogenic compound widely distributed in the groundwater around the world. The fate of arsenic in groundwater depends on the activity of microorganisms either by oxidizing arsenite (AsIII), or by reducing arsenate (AsV). Because of the higher toxicity and mobility of AsIII compared to AsV, microbial-catalyzed oxidation of AsIII to AsV can lower the environmental impact of arsenic. Although aerobic AsIII-oxidizing bacteria are well known, anoxic oxidation of AsIII with nitrate ...

  16. Preconditions that Affect in Increasing Control Effect and Increased Chance for Tax Fraud Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Mentor Gashi; Nexhit Shala

    2016-01-01

    Abstract:In this research we have submitted seven elements in order to identify the most powerful elements that increases the chances of detecting fraud or tax evasion, from retroactive control. Elements that have submitted in the research are:Professionalism of the officer who realizes control or tax audit; Integrity of  Officer  that realizes control or audit; Information from their competitor, with the aim of informing about tax evasion; Information from a dissatisfied employee or former e...

  17. Anxiety and Affective Control among Distance Language Learners in China and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Stella; Xiao, Junhong

    2010-01-01

    Foreign language anxiety (FLA) has been the focus of many studies into affect in classroom settings. However, the growing numbers of distance language learners worldwide in recent years calls for greater attention to be paid to this increasingly important constituency of language learners. Following on from Hurd's investigation into FLA with…

  18. Mood regulation in seasonal affective disorder patients and healthy controls studied in forced desynchrony

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorengevel, Kathelijne M.; Beersma, Domien G.M.; den Boer, Johan; Hoofdakker, Rutger H. van den

    2003-01-01

    In healthy subjects, both the duration of wakefulness and the circadian pacemaker have been demonstrated to be involved in the regulation of mood. Some features of affective disorders suggest that these two factors also play a role in the dysregulation of mood. In particular, disturbances of the

  19. Anxiety and Affective Control among Distance Language Learners in China and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Stella; Xiao, Junhong

    2010-01-01

    Foreign language anxiety (FLA) has been the focus of many studies into affect in classroom settings. However, the growing numbers of distance language learners worldwide in recent years calls for greater attention to be paid to this increasingly important constituency of language learners. Following on from Hurd's investigation into FLA with…

  20. Dispositional Empathic Concern, Gender, Level of Experience, Teacher Efficacy, Attributions of Controllability and Teacher Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panik, Meredith Anne

    2010-01-01

    Teachers' pity and anger responses to students who fail often are interpreted by the students as indicative of the teachers' attributions for the cause behind the student failure. Students' interpretations of these emotional responses can affect their self-esteem and expectations for future success. The present study explored variables that may…

  1. Yes, but are they happy? Effects of trait self-control on affective well-being and life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Wilhelm; Luhmann, Maike; Fisher, Rachel R; Vohs, Kathleen D; Baumeister, Roy F

    2014-08-01

    Does trait self-control (TSC) predict affective well-being and life satisfaction--positively, negatively, or not? We conducted three studies (Study 1: N = 414, 64% female, Mage = 35.0 years; Study 2: N = 208, 66% female, Mage = 25.24 years; Study 3: N = 234, 61% female, Mage = 34.53 years). The key predictor was TSC, with affective well-being and life satisfaction ratings as key outcomes. Potential explanatory constructs including goal conflict, goal balancing, and emotional distress also were investigated. TSC is positively related to affective well-being and life satisfaction, and managing goal conflict is a key as to why. All studies, moreover, showed that the effect of TSC on life satisfaction is at least partially mediated by affect. Study 1's correlational study established the effect. Study 2's experience sampling approach demonstrated that compared to those low in TSC, those high in TSC experience higher levels of momentary affect even as they experience desire, an effect partially mediated through experiencing lower conflict and emotional distress. Study 3 found evidence for the proposed mechanism--that TSC may boost well-being by helping people avoid frequent conflict and balance vice-virtue conflicts by favoring virtues. Self-control positively contributes to happiness through avoiding and dealing with motivational conflict.

  2. Combined effects of fluoride and arsenite on the expression of Runx-related transcription 2 mRNA in bone of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑冲

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the combined effects of fluoride and arsenite on the expression of Runx-related transcription 2(Runx2)mRNA in bone of Sprague Dawley(SD)rats.Methods Fifty four SD rats were selected[body mass(109.71±10.52)g,half male and half female].3×3 Factorial experimental design was used to evaluate the combined effects of fluoride and arsenite on the expression of Runx2 mRNA by random number table.

  3. The molecular pathway of low concentration of sodium arsenite in inducing differentiation of liver cancer stem cells by down-regulating promyelocytic leukemia protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-long JIN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To study the molecular pathway of low concentration of sodium arsenite in inducing differentiation of liver cancer stem cells. Methods  Western blotting analysis, immunofluorescence assay and quantitative PCR were used to examine the gene and protein expression of promyelocytic leukemia (PML, Oct4 and Sox2 in HCC tissue and cell lines, and the molecule pathway of low concentration of sodium arsenite inducing differentiation of liver cancer stem cells was confirmed by comparing the changes in the gene and protein expression of PML,Oct4 and Sox2 in HCC cells and biological function of LCSCs after the treatment with low concentration of sodium arsenite. Results  0.5μg/ml of sodium arsenite was shown to alter the biological characteristics of LCSCs in HuH7 and primary HCC cells, including the ability to form tumor spheres, resistance to pirarubicin (P<0.01, and the capability of forming tumors after allogeneic transplantation (P<0.05. Both HCC cells and tissues expressed the gene and protein of PML,Oct4 and Sox2, and 0.5μg/ml of sodium arsenite not only downregulated the gene and protein expression of Oct4 (P<0.05 and Sox2 in HCC cells (P<0.05, but also downregulated the protein expression of PML (P<0.05. In contrast, sodium arsenite did not inhibit the gene expression of PML in Hep3B, HepG2, SMCC-7721, HuH7 and primary HCC cells. Furthermore, through down-regulated PML protein expression with arsenite, the biological characteristics of HuH7 and primary HCC cells containing LCSCs was simultaneously altered, and the expression of stem gene Oct4 and Sox2 was downregulated (P<0.05, while HCC cells proliferation was inhibited as well. Conclusions  Both HCC tissues and cells can express the PML gene and PML protein. Low concentrations of sodium arsenite would directly bind to PML protein in HCC cells, resulting in degradation of the PML protein, followed by collapse of PML-NBs, inhibition of transcription of the proliferation

  4. Synergism between arsenite and proteasome inhibitor MG132 over cell death in myeloid leukaemic cells U937 and the induction of low levels of intracellular superoxide anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, Tomás [Laboratorio de Immunotoxicologia (LaITO), IDEHU-CONICET, Hospital de Clínicas, José de San Martín, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cavaliere, Victoria; Costantino, Susana N. [Laboratorio de Inmunología Tumoral (LIT), IDEHU-CONICET, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, UBA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kornblihtt, Laura [Servicio de Hematología, Hospital de Clínicas, José de San Martín (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez, Elida M. [Laboratorio de Inmunología Tumoral (LIT), IDEHU-CONICET, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, UBA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Blanco, Guillermo A., E-mail: gblanco@ffyb.uba.ar [Laboratorio de Immunotoxicologia (LaITO), IDEHU-CONICET, Hospital de Clínicas, José de San Martín, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-02-01

    Increased oxygen species production has often been cited as a mechanism determining synergism on cell death and growth inhibition effects of arsenic-combined drugs. However the net effect of drug combination may not be easily anticipated solely from available knowledge of drug-induced death mechanisms. We evaluated the combined effect of sodium arsenite with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, and the anti-leukaemic agent CAPE, on growth-inhibition and cell death effect in acute myeloid leukaemic cells U937 and Burkitt's lymphoma-derived Raji cells, by the Chou–Talalay method. In addition we explored the association of cytotoxic effect of drugs with changes in intracellular superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup −}) levels. Our results showed that combined arsenite + MG132 produced low levels of O{sub 2}{sup −} at 6 h and 24 h after exposure and were synergic on cell death induction in U937 cells over the whole dose range, although the combination was antagonistic on growth inhibition effect. Exposure to a constant non-cytotoxic dose of 80 μM hydrogen peroxide together with arsenite + MG132 changed synergism on cell death to antagonism at all effect levels while increasing O{sub 2}{sup −} levels. Arsenite + hydrogen peroxide also resulted in antagonism with increased O{sub 2}{sup −} levels in U937 cells. In Raji cells, arsenite + MG132 also produced low levels of O{sub 2}{sup −} at 6 h and 24 h but resulted in antagonism on cell death and growth inhibition. By contrast, the combination arsenite + CAPE showed high levels of O{sub 2}{sup −} production at 6 h and 24 h post exposure but resulted in antagonism over cell death and growth inhibition effects in U937 and Raji cells. We conclude that synergism between arsenite and MG132 in U937 cells is negatively associated to O{sub 2}{sup −} levels at early time points after exposure. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic combined cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects by Chou–Talalay method. ► Cytotoxic effect

  5. Individual Characteristics Influencing Physicians' Perceptions of Job Demands and Control: The Role of Affectivity, Work Engagement and Workaholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Greta; Biolcati, Roberta; Guglielmi, Dina; Vallesi, Caryn; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2016-06-06

    The first purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of individual characteristics, i.e., positive and negative affectivity, in explaining the different perception of job control and job demands in a particularly demanding environment such as the healthcare setting. In addition, we aimed to explore the mediational role of work engagement and workaholism using the Job Demands-Resources Model as a theoretical framework. Data were collected using a sample of 269 Italian head physicians working in nine general hospitals. To test our hypotheses, the collected data were analyzed with structural equation modeling. Moreover, Sobel Test and bootstrapping were employed to assess the mediating hypotheses. Our results indicated that positive affectivity is related to work engagement, which, in its turn, showed a positive association with job control. In addition, workaholism mediated the relationship between negative affectivity and job demands. All in all, this study represents a first attempt to explore the role of trait affectivity as a dispositional characteristic able to foster the level of work engagement and workaholism exhibited by employees and, in turn, to increase the perceived levels of job control and job demands.

  6. Individual Characteristics Influencing Physicians’ Perceptions of Job Demands and Control: The Role of Affectivity, Work Engagement and Workaholism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Mazzetti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The first purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of individual characteristics, i.e., positive and negative affectivity, in explaining the different perception of job control and job demands in a particularly demanding environment such as the healthcare setting. In addition, we aimed to explore the mediational role of work engagement and workaholism using the Job Demands-Resources Model as a theoretical framework. Data were collected using a sample of 269 Italian head physicians working in nine general hospitals. To test our hypotheses, the collected data were analyzed with structural equation modeling. Moreover, Sobel Test and bootstrapping were employed to assess the mediating hypotheses. Our results indicated that positive affectivity is related to work engagement, which, in its turn, showed a positive association with job control. In addition, workaholism mediated the relationship between negative affectivity and job demands. All in all, this study represents a first attempt to explore the role of trait affectivity as a dispositional characteristic able to foster the level of work engagement and workaholism exhibited by employees and, in turn, to increase the perceived levels of job control and job demands.

  7. Individual Characteristics Influencing Physicians’ Perceptions of Job Demands and Control: The Role of Affectivity, Work Engagement and Workaholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Greta; Biolcati, Roberta; Guglielmi, Dina; Vallesi, Caryn; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.

    2016-01-01

    The first purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of individual characteristics, i.e., positive and negative affectivity, in explaining the different perception of job control and job demands in a particularly demanding environment such as the healthcare setting. In addition, we aimed to explore the mediational role of work engagement and workaholism using the Job Demands-Resources Model as a theoretical framework. Data were collected using a sample of 269 Italian head physicians working in nine general hospitals. To test our hypotheses, the collected data were analyzed with structural equation modeling. Moreover, Sobel Test and bootstrapping were employed to assess the mediating hypotheses. Our results indicated that positive affectivity is related to work engagement, which, in its turn, showed a positive association with job control. In addition, workaholism mediated the relationship between negative affectivity and job demands. All in all, this study represents a first attempt to explore the role of trait affectivity as a dispositional characteristic able to foster the level of work engagement and workaholism exhibited by employees and, in turn, to increase the perceived levels of job control and job demands. PMID:27275828

  8. Preconditions that Affect in Increasing Control Effect and Increased Chance for Tax Fraud Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mentor Gashi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:In this research we have submitted seven elements in order to identify the most powerful elements that increases the chances of detecting fraud or tax evasion, from retroactive control. Elements that have submitted in the research are:Professionalism of the officer who realizes control or tax audit; Integrity of  Officer  that realizes control or audit; Information from their competitor, with the aim of informing about tax evasion; Information from a dissatisfied employee or former employee; Information from freight forwarding; Informatat from accountant; Information from the data exchange with the export country. Elements that we presented, are the most powerful elements that increases the chances of detection of tax evasion, such as: professionalism of the officer who implements control or audit, which follows two other elements, which are: Integrity of official that realizes control or audit and the information are data exchange with the export country, these are the three most powerful elements until four other elements outlined in the survey have less impact compared with the three elements mentioned. The purpose of the paper is to Find the most powerful elements that increase the probability of detecting of tax evasion or tax fraud from retroactive controls. Methodology: Survey was realize through questionnaires, which were distributed 232 questionnaires. Questionnaires were distributed mainly to the importing companies, officers that realize controls to businesses, customs agents, accountants and international transport companie. Key words: probability of detecting, tax evasion, control or audit

  9. Does antenatal pelvic floor muscle training affect the outcome of labour? A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agur, Wael; Steggles, Pippin; Waterfield, Malcolm; Freeman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    It is thought that antenatal pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) might produce a strong pelvic floor resulting in prolonged labour, whilst some believe it produces well-controlled muscles that facilitate rotation of the foetal head and shortens the duration of labour. This secondary analysis (of a previously published randomised controlled trial) assesses the labour and delivery details of 268 primigravidae who were originally randomised at approximately 20 weeks gestation to supervised PFMT or a control group. Between the two groups, there was no difference in the duration of the second stage of labour or in the need for instrumental delivery. PFMT does not appear to facilitate or obstruct labour.

  10. Individual differences in behavioral activation and cardiac vagal control influence affective startle modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Friedman, Bruce H

    2017-04-01

    The startle response (SR) has a close relationship with stress responses. Startle modification (SRM) has been widely used to study stress disorders (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder). The framework of the behavioral inhibition and activation systems (BIS/BAS) has been thought to correspond with withdrawal and approach motivational processes underlying affective SRM and can influence stress reactivity. Vagally-mediated cardiac activity as indexed by heart rate variability (HRV) has been associated with SRM and regulatory processes during stress. In the present study, the influence of individual differences in the BIS/BAS and resting HRV on affective SRM were examined. Eighty-six subjects viewed affective pictures while acoustic SR stimuli were delivered. Individual differences in motivation were measured by the BIS/BAS scales. The magnitude of SR was assessed as electromyographic activity of the SR eyeblink during pictures of different valences. Resting HRV was derived from electrocardiography. In contrast to previous studies, the present results showed that startle inhibition and potentiation were related to BAS and HRV, but not to BIS. There was also an interaction of BAS and HRV, indicating that the relationship between HRV and SRM strengthened as BAS scores decreased. The present findings suggest that BAS may relate to both withdrawal and approach, and trait stress reactivity is influenced by BAS and cardiac vagal activity. In addition, BAS moderates the relationship between cardiac vagal activity and SRM. These findings have both theoretical and practical implications for the study of SRM, stress disorders, and health.

  11. Stigma as ego depletion: how being the target of prejudice affects self-control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzlicht, Michael; McKay, Linda; Aronson, Joshua

    2006-03-01

    This research examined whether stigma diminishes people's ability to control their behaviors. Because coping with stigma requires self-regulation, and self-regulation is a limited-capacity resource, we predicted that individuals belonging to stigmatized groups are less able to regulate their own behavior when they become conscious of their stigmatizing status or enter threatening environments. Study 1 uncovered a correlation between stigma sensitivity and self-regulation; the more Black college students were sensitive to prejudice, the less self-control they reported having. By experimentally activating stigma, Studies 2 and 3 provided causal evidence for stigma's ego-depleting qualities: When their stigma was activated, stigmatized participants (Black students and females) showed impaired self-control in two very different domains (attentional and physical self-regulation). These results suggest that (a) stigma is ego depleting and (b) coping with it can weaken the ability to control and regulate one's behaviors in domains unrelated to the stigma.

  12. Biological control of soilborne diseases in organic potato production as affected by varying environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soilborne diseases are persistent problems in potato production and alternative management practices are needed, particularly in organic production, where control options are limited. Selected biocontrol organisms, including two naturally-occurring hypovirulent strains of Rhizoctonia solani (Rhs1a1 ...

  13. tDCS over the left prefrontal cortex enhances cognitive control for positive affective stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Anne Vanderhasselt

    Full Text Available Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS is a neuromodulation technique with promising results for enhancing cognitive information processes. So far, however, research has mainly focused on the effects of tDCS on cognitive control operations for non-emotional material. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the effects on cognitive control considering negative versus positive material. For this sham-controlled, within-subjects study, we selected a homogeneous sample of twenty-five healthy participants. By using behavioral measures and event related potentials (ERP as indexes, we aimed to investigate whether a single session of anodal tDCS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC would have specific effects in enhancing cognitive control for positive and negative valenced stimuli. After tDCS over the left DLPFC (and not sham control stimulation, we observed more negative N450 amplitudes along with faster reaction times when inhibiting a habitual response to happy compared to sad facial expressions. Gender did not influence the effects of tDCS on cognitive control for emotional information. In line with the Valence Theory of side-lateralized activity, this stimulation protocol might have led to a left dominant (relative to right prefrontal cortical activity, resulting in augmented cognitive control specifically for positive relative to negative stimuli. To verify that tDCS induces effects that are in line with all aspects of the well known Valence Theory, future research should investigate the effects of tDCS over the left vs. right DLPFC on cognitive control for emotional information.

  14. Tracking and controlling everything that affects quality is the key to a quality management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Carl; Wray, Bruce; Winslow, Ford; Vilicich, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Every laboratory has a need to track and control the variables that drive the quality of the results. However, each laboratory is unique and what one organization deems to be a critical process to track and control will likely differ from other organizations. Furthermore, there is more than just the end product or result that needs to be tracked and controlled. All of the intermediate products and resources play a significant role in producing the final product and each of these needs to be included in the LIMS. At a high level, this article will present ideas and opinions on the following topics in relation to implementing a LIMS process tracking and control system in a laboratory: The difference between tracking and controlling processes; What to track and control in the lab; The "product" of the laboratory; Preventing mistakes in a laboratory; Comprehensive software platform options; The value of seeing a system as opposed to imagining it; The use of barcodes in the laboratory; and an assessment on using the Risk Based Approach in deciding what to include in the tracking system.

  15. Attentional control affects the relationship between tonic immobility and intrusive memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenaars, Muriel A; Putman, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Cognitive control and tonic immobility (TI) have both been implicated in the development of PTSD, but it is not known how these factors are related. The present study investigated if a specific form of cognitive control (attentional control) would moderate the relationship between TI and intrusive memories. Participants (N = 43) completed the Attentional Control Scale (ACS) before watching an aversive film. They completed the Tonic Immobility Scale (TIS, with an immobility and fear subscale: TIS-TI and TIS-Fear) afterwards and recorded intrusive memories of the film in the subsequent week. TIS-TI was related to intrusion frequency, while ACS was not. However, ACS had a moderating role; the relationship between TIS-TI and intrusion frequency was significant in low ACS but not in high ACS participants. The TIS-Fear subscale was not related to intrusion frequency in low ACS or high ACS participants. Replication of the results is merited in selected extreme groups and males. The results may imply that enhanced attentional control serves as a protective factor against the development of intrusive memories after trauma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Major Recessive Calamities Affecting the Wheat Production in Chuxiong Prefecture and Control Countermeasures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maochang; YANG

    2014-01-01

    The impact of recessive calamities was analyzed,including seasonal drought,cold injury,dry hot wind and aphid in the wheat production of Chuxiong Prefecture,and the countermeasures that prevented and controlled the recessive calamities in a target-oriented way were proposed,including the improvement of basic farmland,the application of organic manure,the promotion of the breed with high stress resistance,the seedling at suitable date,the improvement of control on fertilizing and watering,the enhancement of management on cultivating and controlling disease in time,and the breeding new variety adaptive to local ecosystem,in order to advance the wheat production in a sustainable way.

  17. Evaluation of some significant issues affecting trajectory and control management for air-breathing hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattis, Philip D.; Malchow, Harvey L.

    1992-01-01

    Horizontal takeoff airbreathing-propulsion launch vehicles require near-optimal guidance and control which takes into account performance sensitivities to atmospheric characteristics while satisfying physically-derived operational constraints. A generic trajectory/control analysis tool that deepens insight into these considerations has been applied to two versions of a winged-cone vehicle model. Information that is critical to the design and trajectory of these vehicles is derived, and several unusual characteristics of the airbreathing propulsion model are shown to have potentially substantial effects on vehicle dynamics.

  18. The Efficacy of Arsenite Combined with Rretinoic Acid and Chemotherapy on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia%亚砷酸联合维甲酸化疗治疗急性早幼粒细胞白血病疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻艳

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of arsenite combined retinoic acid and chemotherapy on treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Methods:90 cases of acute early promyelocytic leukemia patients admitted in our hospital from April 2008 to April 2015 were selected to retrospective analyse, and according to the treatment plan was divided into two groups. The control group was treated with retinoic acid combined with chemotherapy, and the observation group was treated jointly arsenite. The curative effects of the two groups were compared. Results: The promyelocytic ratio and total number of white blood cells in the observation group improved than that in the control group ( P < 0.05) . Conclusion:For patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia,the treatment method of chemotherapy combined with arsenite and retinoic acid has a satisfactory effect.%目的::研究急性早幼粒细胞白血病行亚砷酸和维甲酸、化疗联合治疗效果。方法:资料取本院2008年4月至2015年4月急性早幼粒细胞白血病90例患者予回顾分析,按治疗方案分成两组,对照组行维甲酸与化疗,观察组联合亚砷酸,对比两组疗效。结果:观察组早幼粒细胞比例与总白细胞数改善效果比对照组优( P<0.05)。结论:急性早幼粒细胞白血病患者行亚砷酸和维甲酸、化疗联合治疗效果满意。

  19. Soil and Sediment Properties Affecting the Transport and Accumulations of Mercury in a Flood Control Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury accumulations in some fish species from Grenada Lake in north Mississippi exceed the Food and Drug Administration standards for human consumption. This large flood control reservoir serves as a sink for the Skuna and Yalobusha River watersheds whose highly erodible soils contribute to exces...

  20. How control system design affects performance evaluation compression: The role of information accuracy and bonus transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, J. C.; Kramer, S.; Maas, V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Prior research has shown that managers tend to compress ratings when subjectively evaluating employees and that such compression can have negative organizational consequences. We reason that organizations can use the design of their control system to influence the personal costs and benefits

  1. Complexation of arsenite with dissolved organic matter: conditional distribution coefficients and apparent stability constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong

    2010-11-01

    The complexation of arsenic (As) with dissolved organic matter (DOM), although playing an important role in regulating As mobility and transformation, is poorly characterized, as evidenced by scarce reporting of fundamental parameters of As-DOM complexes. The complexation of arsenite (AsIII) with Aldrich humic acid (HA) at different pHs was characterized using a recently developed analytical technique to measure both free and DOM-bound As. Conditional distribution coefficient (KD), describing capacity of DOM in binding AsIII from the mass perspective, and apparent stability constant (Ks), describing stability of resulting AsIII-DOM complexes, were calculated to characterize AsIII-DOM complexation. LogKD of AsIII ranged from 3.7 to 2.2 (decreasing with increase of As/DOM ratio) at pH 5.2, from 3.6 to 2.6 at pH 7, and from 4.3 to 3.2 at pH=9.3, respectively. Two-site ligand binding models can capture the heterogeneity of binding sites and be used to calculate Ks by classifying the binding sites into strong (S1) and weak (S2) groups. LogKs for S1 sites are 7.0, 6.5, and 5.9 for pH 5.2, 7, and 9.3, respectively, which are approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than for weak S2 sites. The results suggest that AsIII complexation with DOM increases with pH, as evidenced by significant spikes in concentrations of DOM-bound AsIII and in KD values at pH 9.3. In contrary to KD, logKs decreased with pH, in particular for S1 sites, probably due to the presence of negatively charged H2AsO3- and the involvement of metal-bridged AsIII-DOM complexation at pH 9.3.

  2. Efflux Transporters Regulate Arsenite Induced Genotoxicity in Double Negative and Double Positive T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huan; Medina, Sebastian; Lauer, Fredine T; Douillet, Christelle; Jian Liu, Ke; Hudson, Laurie G; Stýblo, Miroslav; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Burchiel, Scott W

    2017-04-29

    Arsenite (As+3) exposure is known to cause immunotoxicity in human and animal models. Our previous studies demonstrated that As+3 at 50 to 500 nM concentrations induced both genotoxicity and non-genotoxicity in mouse thymus cells. Developing T cells at CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) stage, the first stage after early T cells are transported from bone marrow to thymus, were found to be more sensitive to As+3 toxicity than the T cells at CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) stage in vitro. Induction of Mdr1 (Abcb1) and Mrp1 (Abcc1), two multidrug resistance transporters and exporters of As+3, was associated with the reversal of As+3-induced double strand breaks and DNA damage. In order to confirm that the thymus cell populations have different sensitivity to As+3in vivo, male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 0, 100 and 500 ppb As+3 in drinking water for 30 d. A significant decrease in DN cell percentage was observed with exposure to 500 ppb As+3. Low to moderate concentrations of As+3 were shown to induce higher genotoxicity in sorted DN cells than DP cells in vitro. Calcein AM uptake and Mdr1/Mrp1 mRNA quantification results revealed that DN cells not only had limited As+3 exporter activity, but also lacked the ability to activate these exporters with As+3 treatments, resulting in a higher accumulation of intracellular As+3. Knockdown study of As+3 exporters in the DN thymic cell line, D1 using siRNA, demonstrated that Mdr1 and Mrp1 regulate intracellular As+3 accumulation and genotoxicity. Taken together, the results indicate that transporter regulation is an important mechanism for differential genotoxicity induced by As+3 in thymocytes at different developmental stages. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Coordination of altered DNA repair and damage pathways in arsenite-exposed keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadeh, Hisham K; Trouba, Kevin J; Amin, Rupesh P; Afshari, Cynthia A; Germolec, Dori

    2002-10-01

    Human exposure to arsenic, a ubiquitous and toxic environmental pollutant, is associated with an increased incidence of skin cancer. However, the mechanism(s) associated with AsIII-mediated toxicity and carcinogenesis at low levels of exposure remains elusive. Aberrations in cell proliferation, oxidative damage, and DNA-repair fidelity have been implicated in sodium arsenite (AsIII)-mediated carcinogenicity and toxicity, but these events have been examined in isolation in the majority of biological models of arsenic exposure. We hypothesized that the simultaneous interaction of these effects may be important in arsenic-mediated neoplasia in the skin. To evaluate this, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) were exposed to nontoxic doses (0.005-5 micro M) of AsIII and monitored for several physiological endpoints at the times when cells were harvested for gene expression measurements (1-24 h). Two-fluor cDNA microarray analyses indicated that AsIII treatment decreased the expression of genes associated with DNA repair (e.g., p53 and Damage-specific DNA-binding protein 2) and increased the expression of genes indicative of the cellular response to oxidative stress (e.g., Superoxide dismutase 1, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase, and Serine/threonine kinase 25). AsIII also modulated the expression of certain transcripts associated with increased cell proliferation (e.g., Cyclin G1, Protein kinase C delta), oncogenes, and genes associated with cellular transformation (e.g., Gro-1 and V-yes). These observations correlated with measurements of cell proliferation and mitotic measurements as AsIII treatment resulted in a dose-dependent increase in cellular mitoses at 24 h and an increase in cell proliferation at 48 h of exposure. Data in this manuscript demonstrates that AsIII exposure simultaneously modulates DNA repair, cell proliferation, and redox-related gene expression in nontransformed, normal NHEK. It is anticipated that data in this report will serve as a

  4. Affective SSVEP BCI to effectively control 3D objects by using a prism array-based display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sungchul; Park, Min-Chul

    2014-06-01

    3D objects with depth information can provide many benefits to users in education, surgery, and interactions. In particular, many studies have been done to enhance sense of reality in 3D interaction. Viewing and controlling stereoscopic 3D objects with crossed or uncrossed disparities, however, can cause visual fatigue due to the vergenceaccommodation conflict generally accepted in 3D research fields. In order to avoid the vergence-accommodation mismatch and provide a strong sense of presence to users, we apply a prism array-based display to presenting 3D objects. Emotional pictures were used as visual stimuli in control panels to increase information transfer rate and reduce false positives in controlling 3D objects. Involuntarily motivated selective attention by affective mechanism can enhance steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) amplitude and lead to increased interaction efficiency. More attentional resources are allocated to affective pictures with high valence and arousal levels than to normal visual stimuli such as white-and-black oscillating squares and checkerboards. Among representative BCI control components (i.e., eventrelated potentials (ERP), event-related (de)synchronization (ERD/ERS), and SSVEP), SSVEP-based BCI was chosen in the following reasons. It shows high information transfer rates and takes a few minutes for users to control BCI system while few electrodes are required for obtaining reliable brainwave signals enough to capture users' intention. The proposed BCI methods are expected to enhance sense of reality in 3D space without causing critical visual fatigue to occur. In addition, people who are very susceptible to (auto) stereoscopic 3D may be able to use the affective BCI.

  5. ARSENATE AND ARSENITE REMOVAL BY ZERO-VALENT IRON: EFFECTS OF PHOSPHATE, SILICATE, CARBONATE, BORATE, SULFATE, CHROMATE, MOLYBDATE, AND NITRATE, RELATIVE TO CHLORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batch tests were performed to evaluate the effects of inorganic anion competition on the kinetics of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) removal by zerovalent iron (Peerless Fe0) in aqueous solution. The oxyanions underwent either sorption-dominated reactions (phosphate, sil...

  6. Predicting the structural development in Danish livestock and how it affects control strategies against FMD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Boklund, Anette

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess if the optimal control strategy against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) spread is invariant to structural development in Danish livestock until 2030. The DTU-DADS model as presented by Halasa et al. uses demographic information of all farms including their loc......The purpose of this study was to assess if the optimal control strategy against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) spread is invariant to structural development in Danish livestock until 2030. The DTU-DADS model as presented by Halasa et al. uses demographic information of all farms including...... their location, size, and production type. The main challenge was to predict the demographic data. Based on data for all herds with animals susceptible to FMD in the Central Husbandry Registry from 1999 to 2010 and supplementary data for swine herds from Danish Agriculture & Food Council (2002 to 2009), all...

  7. The Major Genetic Determinants of HIV-1 Control Affect HLA Class I Peptide Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Walker, Bruce D.; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J.; Pulit, Sara L.; Telenti, Amalio; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Heckerman, David; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Pereyra, Florencia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Graham, Robert R.; Plenge, Robert M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Walker, Bruce D.; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M.; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P.; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Carrington, Mary; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Pereyra, Florencia; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L.; Lemay, Paul; O’Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L.; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Walker, Bruce D.; Haas, David W.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Shafer, Robert W.; Gulick, Roy M.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E.; Daar, Eric S.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L.; Allen, Brady L.; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L.; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J.; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C.; Benson, Anne M.; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F.; Bernard, Annette M.; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J.; Bolan, Robert K.; Boudreaux, Emilie T.; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F.; Brndjar, Jon E.; Brown, Stephen J.; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T.; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M.; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H.; Carmichael, J. Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K.; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T.; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M.; Cimoch, Paul J.; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E.; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A.; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T.; Cristofano, Michael V.; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L.; Dahman, Joseph M.; Daly, Jennifer S.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M.; Deeks, Steven G.; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A.; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E.; Ellerin, Todd B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Fangman, John J.W.; Farel, Claire E.; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; French, Neel K.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Fuller, Jon D.; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C.; Gaultier, Cyril R.; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D.; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A.; Gottlieb, Michael S.; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K.; Gurley, T. Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W. David; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N.; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M.; Henry, W. Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P.; Horton, James M.; Hsu, Ricky K.; Huhn, Gregory D.; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J.; Illeman, Mark L.; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M.; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Johnson, Kristin L.; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Kim, David D.; Kinder, Clifford A.; Kirchner, Jeffrey T.; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P. Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S.; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M.; Lee, David M.; Lee, Jean M.L.; Lee, Marah J.; Lee, Edward T.Y.; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A.; Llibre, Josep M.; Liguori, Michael A.; Little, Susan J.; Liu, Anne Y.; Lopez, Alvaro J.; Loutfy, Mono R.; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y.; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Martin, Harold L.; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M. Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A.; McGovern, Barbara H.; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X.; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E.; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O.; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C.; Nagami, Ellen H.; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G.; Nelson, Margret O.; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L.; O’Connor, David H.; Ojikutu, Bisola O.; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O.; Oldfield, Edward C.; Olender, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA–viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection. PMID:21051598

  8. Does parental consent for birth control affect underage pregnancy rates? The case of Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Sourafel; Paton, David

    2013-12-01

    Previous work based on conjectural responses of minors predicted that the 2003 Texas requirement for parental consent for state-funded birth control to minors would lead to a large increase in underage pregnancies. We use state- and county-level data to test this prediction. The latter allow us to compare the impact of parental consent in counties with and without state-funded family planning clinics. We control for characteristics systematically correlated with the presence of state-funded clinics by combining difference-in-difference estimation with propensity score-weighted regressions. The evidence suggests that the parental consent mandate led to a large decrease in attendance at family planning clinics among teens but did not lead to an increase in underage pregnancies.

  9. Do fertility control policies affect health in old age? Evidence from China's one-child experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Asadul; Smyth, Russell

    2015-05-01

    How do fertility control policies contribute to the welfare of women, and their husbands, particularly as they get older? We consider whether the reduction in fertility resulting from population control policies has had any effect on the health of elderly parents in China. In particular, we examine the influence of this fertility decline, experienced due to China's one-child policy, on several measures of the health of parents in middle and old age. Overall, our results suggest that having fewer children has a positive effect on self-reported parental health but generally no effect on other measures of health. The results also suggest that upstream financial transfers have a positive effect on several measures of parental health.

  10. The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I W; Walker, Bruce D; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J; Pulit, Sara L; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M; Carlson, Jonathan M; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R; Plenge, Robert M; Deeks, Steven G; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Gulick, Roy M; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E; Daar, Eric S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L; Allen, Brady L; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C; Benson, Anne M; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F; Bernard, Annette M; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J; Bolan, Robert K; Boudreaux, Emilie T; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F; Brndjar, Jon E; Brown, Stephen J; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H; Carmichael, J Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M; Cimoch, Paul J; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T; Cristofano, Michael V; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L; Dahman, Joseph M; Daly, Jennifer S; Davis, Benjamin T; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E; Ellerin, Todd B; Eron, Joseph J; Fangman, John J W; Farel, Claire E; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A; French, Neel K; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Fuller, Jon D; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C; Gaultier, Cyril R; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A; Gottlieb, Michael S; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K; Gurley, T Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W David; Harrigan, P Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M; Henry, W Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P; Horton, James M; Hsu, Ricky K; Huhn, Gregory D; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J; Illeman, Mark L; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A; Johnson, Kristin L; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C; Kauffman, Carol A; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K; Kim, Arthur Y; Kim, David D; Kinder, Clifford A; Kirchner, Jeffrey T; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M; Lee, David M; Lee, Jean M L; Lee, Marah J; Lee, Edward T Y; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A; Llibre, Josep M; Liguori, Michael A; Little, Susan J; Liu, Anne Y; Lopez, Alvaro J; Loutfy, Mono R; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K; Marconi, Vincent C; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N; Martin, Harold L; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A; McGovern, Barbara H; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C; Nagami, Ellen H; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G; Nelson, Margret O; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L; O'Connor, David H; Ojikutu, Bisola O; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O; Oldfield, Edward C; Olender, Susan A; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M; Perlmutter, Aaron M; Pierce, Michael N; Pincus, Jonathan M; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J; Rhame, Frank S; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C; Rosenberg, Eric S; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E; Rubin, David S; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R; Sanchez, William C; Sanjana, Veeraf M; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N; Silebi, Vanessa I; Sizemore, James M; Skolnik, Paul R; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F Lisa; Stone, Valerie E; Stone, David R; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A; Tedaldi, Ellen M; Telenti, Amalio; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A; Trinh, Phuong D; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J; Warner, Daniel A; Weber, Robert D; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A; White, David J; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G; van't Wout, Angelique; Wright, David P; Yang, Otto O; Yurdin, David L; Zabukovic, Brandon W; Zachary, Kimon C; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2010-12-10

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection.

  11. From Market to Clan: How Organizational Control Affects Trust in Defense Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    government and contract personnel. Key words: Trust, Organizational control, Transaction - cost Economics Introduction The government and industry... Transaction - cost economics proposes that when the specific identity of the parties has an important cost-bearing significance, the transaction becomes...variable risk preferences, trust and transaction cost economics. Academy of Management Review, 21(1), 73-99. Das, T. K., & Teng, B. (1998). Between trust

  12. Aromatherapy Massage Affects Menopausal Symptoms in Korean Climacteric Women: A Pilot-Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Myung-Haeng Hur; Yun Seok Yang; Myeong Soo Lee

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms in Korean climacteric women. Kupperman's menopausal index was used to compare an experimental group of 25 climacteric women with a wait-listed control group of 27 climacteric women. Aromatherapy was applied topically to subjects in the experimental group in the form of massage on the abdomen, back and arms using lavender, rose geranium, rose and jasmine in almond and primrose oils once a week for 8 weeks (eight...

  13. Visuospatial tasks affect locomotor control more than nonspatial tasks in older people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine C Menant

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that visuospatial processing requiring working memory is particularly important for balance control during standing and stepping, and that limited spatial encoding contributes to increased interference in postural control dual tasks. However, visuospatial involvement during locomotion has not been directly determined. This study examined the effects of a visuospatial cognitive task versus a nonspatial cognitive task on gait speed, smoothness and variability in older people, while controlling for task difficulty.Thirty-six people aged ≥75 years performed three walking trials along a 20 m walkway under the following conditions: (i an easy nonspatial task; (ii a difficult nonspatial task; (iii an easy visuospatial task; and (iv a difficult visuospatial task. Gait parameters were computed from a tri-axial accelerometer attached to the sacrum. The cognitive task response times and percentage of correct answers during walking and seated trials were also computed.No significant differences in either cognitive task type error rates or response times were evident in the seated conditions, indicating equivalent task difficulty. In the walking trials, participants responded faster to the visuospatial tasks than the nonspatial tasks but at the cost of making significantly more cognitive task errors. Participants also walked slower, took shorter steps, had greater step time variability and less smooth pelvis accelerations when concurrently performing the visuospatial tasks compared with the nonspatial tasks and when performing the difficult compared with the easy cognitive tasks.Compared with nonspatial cognitive tasks, visuospatial cognitive tasks led to a slower, more variable and less smooth gait pattern. These findings suggest that visuospatial processing might share common networks with locomotor control, further supporting the hypothesis that gait changes during dual task paradigms are not simply due to limited attentional

  14. Clusters Regarding Key Factors Affecting Changes in Accounting, Finance, Administration and Management Control

    OpenAIRE

    Rodica Gabriela Blidisel; Adina Simona Popa; Raimondo Lo Russo; Maria Moraru

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, important changes have occurred in public governance, which has evolved in this time from hierarchical bureaucracy to participatory governance, where the role of citizens in public decision-making process is more direct. There were performed reforms in finance, management administration and finances of public sector. Starting from the factors that influenced during the history the accounting, finances, administration and management control, we want to test the factors ...

  15. Factors affecting the efficacy of non-fumigant nematicides for controlling root-knot nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakou, Ioannis O; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G; Anastasiades, Ioannis; Tsiropoulos, Nicholas G; Georgiadou, Athena

    2005-10-01

    Second-stage juveniles (J2) and egg masses of root-knot nematodes as well as root debris heavily infected by the latter were exposed for different periods of time to six different doses of the nematicides cadusafos and fenamiphos. The efficacy of the nematicides increased significantly with increasing exposure time. Both nematicides were more effective against J2, although they could not provide acceptable control of J2 inside egg masses or heavily galled root debris. The effect of different application strategies on the efficacy and persistence of certain nematicides was also assessed in a field study. Cadusafos, fenamiphos, fosthiazate and oxamyl were applied in field micro-plots either as a single full dose at the time of crop establishment or as multiple reduced-rate applications at 14-day intervals throughout the cropping period, and their efficacy and persistence were determined using bioassays and analytical studies. Fosthiazate was the most efficient nematicide studied, and this was mainly attributed to its long soil persistence. Oxamyl also provided adequate nematode control for the first 48-56 days after its application, regardless of the application method used and its relatively rapid field dissipation. Fenamiphos and cadusafos failed to provide adequate nematode control, although cadusafos was the most persistent of the nematicides tested. The failure of fenamiphos to provide adequate nematode control was mainly attributed to its rapid degradation by soil micro-organisms, which were stimulated after its repeated low-rate application at 14-day intervals. In contrast cadusafos failure was attributed to the inability of the nematicide to reduce nematode populations even at relatively high concentrations in soil.

  16. Abnormal sensory integration affects balance control in hemiparetic patients within the first year after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa B. Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Impairments in balance can be a consequence of changes in the motor, sensory, and integrative aspects of motor control. Abnormal sensory reweighting, i.e., the ability to select the most appropriate sensory information to achieve postural stability, may contribute to balance impairment. The Sensory Organization Test is a component of Computerized Dynamic Posturography that evaluates the impact of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory inputs, as well as sensory reweighting, under conditions of sensory conflict. The aim of this study is to compare balance control in hemiparetic patients during the first year post-stroke and in age-matched neurologically normal subjects using the Berg Balance Scale and Computerized Dynamic Posturography. METHODS: We compared the Berg Balance Scale and Sensory Organization Test scores in 21 patients with hemiparesis after first-ever ischemic stroke and in 21 age-matched, neurologically normal subjects. An equilibrium score was defined for each Sensory Organization Test condition. RESULTS: Berg Balance Scale scores were significantly lower in the patients than in the neurologically normal subjects. Equilibrium scores were significantly lower in the patients than in the neurologically normal subjects for those Sensory Organization Test conditions that did not provide appropriate somatosensory information and under conditions of sensory conflict. A history of falls was more frequent in patients with lower equilibrium scores. CONCLUSION: During the first year after a stroke, defective sensory reweighting significantly impacts balance control in hemiparetic patients. These results are important for the planning of effective rehabilitation interventions.

  17. Motivation by potential gains and losses affects control processes via different mechanisms in the attentional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Lena M; Walter, Henrik; Steimke, Rosa; Ludwig, Vera U; Gaschler, Robert; Schubert, Torsten; Stelzel, Christine

    2015-05-01

    Attentional control in demanding cognitive tasks can be improved by manipulating the motivational state. Motivation to obtain gains and motivation to avoid losses both usually result in faster reaction times and stronger activation in relevant brain areas such as the prefrontal cortex, but little is known about differences in the underlying neurocognitive mechanisms of these types of motivation in an attentional control context. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we tested whether potential gain and loss as motivating incentives lead to overlapping or distinct neural effects in the attentional network, and whether one of these conditions is more effective than the other. A Flanker task with word stimuli as targets and distracters was performed by 115 healthy participants. Using a mixed blocked and event-related design allowed us to investigate transient and sustained motivation-related effects. Participants could either gain money (potential gain) or avoid losing money (potential loss) in different task blocks. Participants showed a congruency effect with increased reaction times for incongruent compared to congruent trials. Potential gain led to generally faster responses compared to the neutral condition and to stronger improvements than potential loss. Potential loss also led to shorter response times compared to the neutral condition, but participants improved mainly during incongruent and not during congruent trials. The event-related fMRI data revealed a main effect of congruency with increased activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and inferior frontal junction area (IFJ), the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), bilateral insula, intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and visual word form area (VWFA). While potential gain led to increased activity in a cluster of the IFJ and the VWFA only during incongruent trials, potential loss was linked to activity increases in these regions during incongruent and congruent trials. The

  18. Chronic Treatment with Ivabradine Does Not Affect Cardiovascular Autonomic Control in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fernanda C; Paiva, Franciny A; Müller-Ribeiro, Flávia C; Caldeira, Henrique M A; Fontes, Marco A P; de Menezes, Rodrigo C A; Casali, Karina R; Fortes, Gláucia H; Tobaldini, Eleonora; Solbiati, Monica; Montano, Nicola; Dias Da Silva, Valdo J; Chianca, Deoclécio A

    2016-01-01

    A low resting heart rate (HR) would be of great benefit in cardiovascular diseases. Ivabradine-a novel selective inhibitor of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN) channels- has emerged as a promising HR lowering drug. Its effects on the autonomic HR control are little known. This study assessed the effects of chronic treatment with ivabradine on the modulatory, reflex and tonic cardiovascular autonomic control and on the renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Male Wistar rats were divided in 2 groups, receiving intraperitoneal injections of vehicle (VEH) or ivabradine (IVA) during 7 or 8 consecutive days. Rats were submitted to vessels cannulation to perform arterial blood pressure (AP) and HR recordings in freely moving rats. Time series of resting pulse interval and systolic AP were used to measure cardiovascular variability parameters. We also assessed the baroreflex, chemoreflex and the Bezold-Jarish reflex sensitivities. To better evaluate the effects of ivabradine on the autonomic control of the heart, we performed sympathetic and vagal autonomic blockade. As expected, ivabradine-treated rats showed a lower resting (VEH: 362 ± 16 bpm vs. IVA: 260 ± 14 bpm, p = 0.0005) and intrinsic HR (VEH: 369 ± 9 bpm vs. IVA: 326 ± 11 bpm, p = 0.0146). However, the chronic treatment with ivabradine did not change normalized HR spectral parameters LF (nu) (VEH: 24.2 ± 4.6 vs. IVA: 29.8 ± 6.4; p > 0.05); HF (nu) (VEH: 75.1 ± 3.7 vs. IVA: 69.2 ± 5.8; p > 0.05), any cardiovascular reflexes, neither the tonic autonomic control of the HR (tonic sympathovagal index; VEH: 0.91± 0.02 vs. IVA: 0.88 ± 0.03, p = 0.3494). We performed the AP, HR and RSNA recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats. The chronic treatment with ivabradine reduced the resting HR (VEH: 364 ± 12 bpm vs. IVA: 207 ± 11 bpm, p ivabradine directly reduces the HR without changing the RSNA modulation and the reflex and tonic autonomic control of the heart.

  19. Coca (Erythroxylum coca) Control is Affected by Glyphosate Formulations and Adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, E J P; Solomon, Keith R; Carrasquilla, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    The aerial spray program for the eradication of coca in Colombia uses Glyphos, a local formulation of glyphosate tank-mixed with an adjuvant product, Cosmo-Flux. There are some potential risks to amphibians from direct overspraying of shallow waters. In order to evaluate potential alternative mixtures, a field experiment was conducted at the Center of National Training of Police Operations in Tolima province, Colombia. Plants of coca were established with irrigation and grown to 75 cm tall. A randomized split-plot design experiment was laid out and sprayed with a range of glyphosate formulations and different adjuvants using an experimental ground sprayer. Assessments were made of plant vigor, height, and above-ground standing crop (fresh weight) 3 wk after application. Resprouting of plants was assessed at 9 wk after treatment. Unformulated glyphosate applied as the product Rodeo gave poorer control of coca than two formulated products, Roundup Biactive (from Europe) and Colombian Glyphos. In general, these products performed well without added adjuvants, giving control similar to that of the eradication mixture with Cosmo-Flux. There was some evidence that addition of the adjuvant Silwet L-77 and to a lesser extent Mixture B (from the United Kingdom) gave more rapid herbicide symptoms. There were also indications that glyphosate rates of less than 3.69 kg acid equivalents (a.e.)/ha could give control in the range of 95%. Depending on the environmental risk requirements, the experiment indicates that, should other spray mixtures be required, there are potential alternatives. These would require extensive field testing to cover different environmental conditions, different coca varieties, and particularly aerial application, prior to a recommendation. Should the glyphosate product require changing, Roundup Biactive may be considered. Should the adjuvant require changing, then on the basis of this research, Silwet L-77 and Mixture B would be good candidates for

  20. Cognitive-affective neural plasticity following active-controlled mindfulness intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, Micah Galen

    Mindfulness meditation is a set of attention-based, regulatory and self-inquiry training regimes. Although the impact of mindfulness meditation training (MT) on self-regulation is well established, the neural mechanisms supporting such plasticity are poorly understood. MT is thought to act through...... prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and right anterior insula during negative valence processing. Our findings highlight the importance of active control in MT research, indicate unique neural mechanisms for progressive stages of mindfulness training, and suggest that optimal application of MT may differ depending...

  1. FACT plays a major role in histone dynamics affecting VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denninger, Viola; Rudenko, Gloria

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin remodelling is involved in the transcriptional regulation of the RNA polymerase I transcribed variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression sites (ESs) of Trypanosoma brucei. We show that the T. brucei FACT complex contains the Pob3 and Spt16 subunits, and plays a key role in ES silencing. We see an inverse correlation between transcription and condensed chromatin, whereby FACT knockdown results in ES derepression and more open chromatin around silent ES promoters. Derepressed ESs show increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion, and a decrease in histones at silent ES promoters but not telomeres. In contrast, FACT knockdown results in more histones at the active ES, correlated with transcription shut-down. ES promoters are derepressed in cells stalled at the G2/M cell cycle stage after knockdown of FACT, but not in G2/M cells stalled after knockdown of cyclin 6. This argues that the observed ES derepression is a direct consequence of histone chaperone activity by FACT at the G2/M cell cycle stage which could affect transcription elongation, rather than an indirect consequence of a cell cycle checkpoint. These experiments highlight the role of the FACT complex in cell cycle-specific chromatin remodelling within VSG ESs. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Carbon availability affects diurnally controlled processes and cell morphology of Cyanothece 51142.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Stöckel

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photoautotrophs notable for their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as the major source of carbon. The prospect of using cyanobacteria to convert solar energy and high concentrations of CO2 efficiently into biomass and renewable energy sources has sparked substantial interest in using flue gas from coal-burning power plants as a source of inorganic carbon. However, in order to guide further advances in this area, a better understanding of the metabolic changes that occur under conditions of high CO2 is needed. To determine the effect of high CO2 on cell physiology and growth, we analyzed the global transcriptional changes in the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142 grown in 8% CO2-enriched air. We found a concerted response of genes related to photosynthesis, carbon metabolism, respiration, nitrogen fixation, ribosome biosynthesis, and the synthesis of nucleotides and structural cell wall polysaccharides. The overall response to 8% CO2 in Cyanothece 51142 involves different strategies, to compensate for the high C/N ratio during both phases of the diurnal cycle. Our analyses show that high CO2 conditions trigger the production of carbon-rich compounds and stimulate processes such as respiration and nitrogen fixation. In addition, we observed that high levels of CO2 affect fundamental cellular processes such as cell growth and dramatically alter the intracellular morphology. This study provides novel insights on how diurnal and developmental rhythms are integrated to facilitate adaptation to high CO2 in Cyanothece 51142.

  3. HIV Prevention for Juvenile Drug Court Offenders: A Randomized Controlled Trial Focusing on Affect Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolou-Shams, Marina; Houck, Christopher D.; Conrad, Selby M.; Tarantino, Nicholas; Stein, L.A.R.; Brown, Larry K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Juvenile drug court offenders have benefited from evidence-based interventions addressing antisocial behavior, mental health and/or substance use; however, interventions addressing HIV risk behavior are lacking. This study presents pilot findings and lessons learned from a group-based HIV prevention intervention delivered to juvenile drug court offenders. Methods Participants were randomized to a 5-session HIV Prevention (n =29) or Health Promotion (n=28) condition and completed measures of sexual risk taking and substance use at baseline and 3 month post-intervention. Results No between-group differences by time emerged on measures of sexual risk-taking or other HIV-related behaviors and attitudes. Both groups improved their rates of HIV testing and decreased their substance use during sex over time. Conclusions Delivering an HIV prevention intervention to drug court offenders is feasible; however, more intensive interventions that incorporate multiple systems and address co-occurring mental health difficulties may be needed to affect sexual behavioral change among these high-risk court-involved youth. PMID:21474529

  4. The use of “stabilization exercises” to affect neuromuscular control in the lumbopelvic region: a narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Paul

    2014-01-01

    It is well-established that the coordination of muscular activity in the lumbopelvic region is vital to the generation of mechanical spinal stability. Several models illustrating mechanisms by which dysfunctional neuromuscular control strategies may serve as a cause and/or effect of low back pain have been described in the literature. The term “core stability” is variously used by clinicians and researchers, and this variety has led to several rehabilitative approaches suggested to affect the neuromuscular control strategies of the lumbopelvic region (e.g. “stabilization exercise”, “motor control exercise”). This narrative review will highlight: 1) the ongoing debate in the clinical and research communities regarding the terms “core stability” and “stabilization exercise”, 2) the importance of sub-grouping in identifying those patients most likely to benefit from such therapeutic interventions, and 3) two protocols that can assist clinicians in this process. PMID:24932016

  5. EEG theta/beta ratio in relation to fear-modulated response-inhibition, attentional control, and affective traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Peter; van Peer, Jacobien; Maimari, Ioulia; van der Werff, Steven

    2010-02-01

    Power density-ratios of fast and slow frequency spectrum-bands can be calculated from resting-state electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. A well-established phenomenon is that slow wave/fast wave ratios (SW/FW) are increased in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Several researchers have also begun to study relationships between SW/FW and affect. This work suggests that increased SW/FW may reflect reduced frontal cortical control over subcortical affective approach drive. The present study (n=28) aimed to further examine this notion by testing several predictions derived from it. In line with these predictions, SW/FW was found to correlate negatively with fearful modulation of response inhibition in an emotional go/no-go task and with self-reported attentional control. Results also suggested a positive relation between SW/FW and trait approach motivation and a negative relation to anxiety, as predicted. These results are consistent with previous studies and support the notion that SW/FW may provide a useful tool in the study of affect and emotion regulation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reduced autobiographical memory specificity and posttraumatic stress: exploring the contributions of impaired executive control and affect regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgleish, Tim; Rolfe, Jennifer; Golden, Ann-Marie; Dunn, Barnaby D; Barnard, Philip J

    2008-02-01

    Reduced specificity of autobiographical memories retrieved to word cues on the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT) is associated with increased posttraumatic stress in traumatized samples. Theoretical debates concerning the dominant influences on this effect have focused on affect regulation, whereby specific personal information is avoided more by those experiencing greater distress, versus compromised executive control, whereby increased distress is associated with an inability to set aside inappropriately general responses on the AMT. The present study compared these 2 views in a correlational design using a reversed version of the AMT (the AMT-R) for which trauma-exposed participants (N=36) had to generate general memories from the past and avoid specific memories. An emphasis on the role of affect regulation would predict that distress would be associated with reduced specificity (as in the standard AMT), whereas emphasis on the role of executive control would predict that this relationship would be reversed. The data supported the affect regulation account, with greater posttraumatic stress being associated with reduced memory specificity.

  7. Aromatherapy Massage Affects Menopausal Symptoms in Korean Climacteric Women: A Pilot-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Haeng Hur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms in Korean climacteric women. Kupperman's menopausal index was used to compare an experimental group of 25 climacteric women with a wait-listed control group of 27 climacteric women. Aromatherapy was applied topically to subjects in the experimental group in the form of massage on the abdomen, back and arms using lavender, rose geranium, rose and jasmine in almond and primrose oils once a week for 8 weeks (eight times in total. The experimental group reported a significantly lower total menopausal index than wait-listed controls (P < 0.05. There were also significant intergroup differences in subcategories such as vasomotor, melancholia, arthralgia and myalgia (all P < 0.05. These findings suggest that aromatherapy massage may be an effective treatment of menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, depression and pain in climacteric women. However, it could not be verified whether the positive effects were from the aromatherapy, the massage or both. Further rigorous studies should be done with more objective measures.

  8. Instability mechanism and control technology of soft rock roadway affected by mining and high confined water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guichen; Jiang Zuohan; Lv Chuangxin; Huang Chao; Chen Gui; Li Mingyuan

    2015-01-01

    Based on deformation and failure characteristics of the second belt conveyor roadway at level II of Zhuxianzhuang coal mine, laboratory experiments, numerical calculation and field test were adopted to analyze the composition and microstructure of mudstone, the law of mudstone hydration and its strength weakening induced by water, the characteristics of surrounding rock deformation and failure under the action of confined water. Results showed that montmorillonite clay minerals accounted for as much as 76% of mudstone, with a large number of pores existing in the microstructure. Besides, as the molecular structure of montmorillonite changed, mudstone microstructure damage occurred with the macroscopic manifestation of its rheological instability. Weakening degree of confined water on residual strength of mudstone was almost 50%. The instability mechanism of soft rock roadway caused by high confined water is that surrounding rock circulates the process of ‘fracture-seepage-mud ding-closed’ twice, which weakens its strength and leads to roadway instability. A combined support technology, namely the, ‘high-toughness sealing layer+hollow grouting cables+full-length anchoring bolts with deep borehole’ was proposed. Based on field observation, the soft rock roadway was controlled effectively, which also verified the effectiveness of new control technology for surrounding rock.

  9. Concurrent information affects response inhibition processes via the modulation of theta oscillations in cognitive control networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Witold X; Mückschel, Moritz; Dippel, Gabriel; Beste, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Inhibiting responses is a challenge, where the outcome (partly) depends on the situational context. In everyday situations, response inhibition performance might be altered when irrelevant input is presented simultaneously with the information relevant for response inhibition. More specifically, irrelevant concurrent information may either brace or interfere with response-relevant information, depending on whether these inputs are redundant or conflicting. The aim of this study is to investigate neurophysiological mechanisms and the network underlying such modulations using EEG beamforming as method. The results show that in comparison to a baseline condition without concurrent information, response inhibition performance can be aggravated or facilitated by manipulating the extent of conflict via concurrent input. This depends on whether the requirement for cognitive control is high, as in conflicting trials, or whether it is low, as in redundant trials. In line with this, the total theta frequency power decreases in a right hemispheric orbitofrontal response inhibition network including the SFG, MFG, and SMA, when concurrent redundant information facilitates response inhibition processes. Vice versa, theta activity in a left-hemispheric response inhibition network (i.e., SFG, MFG, and IFG) increases, when conflicting concurrent information compromises response inhibition processes. We conclude that concurrent information bi-directionally shifts response inhibition performance and modulates the network architecture underlying theta oscillations which are signaling different levels of the need for cognitive control.

  10. Inhaled lead affects lung pathology and inflammation in sensitized and control guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Tabatabai, Sayed Abas; Farkhondeh, Tahereh

    2016-04-01

    The association between lead exposure and respiratory diseases including asthma is controversial. Some studies indicate that exposure to environmental lead pollution may cause asthma; however, there is not sufficient data in this regard. The effect of lead on lung pathological findings and serum inflammatory mediators in sensitized and non-sensitized guinea pigs exposed to inhaled lead was examined. Eleven animal groups including control, sensitized, three groups of non sensitized animals, three groups during sensitization, and three groups after sensitization exposed to aerosol of three lead concentrations (n = 6 for each group) were studied. Serum inflammatory mediators levels and lung pathological changes were evaluated. All pathological changes and serum ET-1, EPO, NO levels were significantly higher in the sensitized and non sensitized animals exposed to lead than control group (p lead concentration and sensitized group. Serum inflammatory mediators levels and pathological findings in sensitized groups exposed to lead both during and after sensitization were significantly higher than sensitized non exposed group (p lead concentration were significantly higher than those of medium and low concentrations; those of medium concentration were also higher than low concentration (p lead is able to induce respiratory changes similar to asthma. In addition, the results indicated that exposure to environmental lead is able to aggravate asthma severity both during development of asthma or after its manifestation.

  11. Using Ecological Momentary Assessment to Examine Interpersonal and Affective Predictors of Loss of Control Eating in Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Engel, Scott G.; Crosby, Ross D.; Anderson, Micheline; Vannucci, Anna; Cohen, L. Adelyn; Cassidy, Omni; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pediatric loss of control (LOC) eating is predictive of partial- and full-syndrome binge eating disorder. The interpersonal model proposes that LOC eating is used to cope with negative mood states resulting from interpersonal distress, possibly on a momentary level. We therefore examined temporal associations between interpersonal problems, negative affect, and LOC eating among overweight adolescent girls using ecological momentary assessment (EMA). Method Thirty overweight and obese (≥85th body mass index (BMI) percentile; BMI: M = 36.13, SD = 7.49 kg/m2) adolescent females (Age: M = 14.92, SD = 1.54 y; 60.0% African American) who reported at least two LOC episodes in the past month completed self-report momentary ratings of interpersonal problems, state affect, and LOC eating for 2 weeks. A series of 2-level multilevel models with centering within subjects was conducted. Results Between- and within-subjects interpersonal problems (p’s < .05), but not between- (p = .12) or within- (p = .32) subjects negative affect predicted momentary LOC eating. At the between-subjects level, interpersonal problems significantly predicted increases in negative affect (p < 001). Discussion Naturalistic data lend support to the predictive value of interpersonal problems for LOC eating among adolescents. Interventions targeting interpersonal factors on a momentary basis may be useful during this developmental stage. PMID:25046850

  12. Regulation of apoptosis in human melanoma and neuroblastoma cells by statins, sodium arsenite and TRAIL: a role of combined treatment versus monotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vladimir N.; Hei, Tom K.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of melanoma cells by sodium arsenite or statins (simvastatin and lovastatin) dramatically modified activities of the main cell signaling pathways resulting in the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and in a downregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels. Through heme degradation and the production of carbon monoxide and biliverdin, HO-1 plays a protective role in different scenario of oxidative stress followed by mitochondrial apoptosis. Both sodium arsenite and statins could be efficient inducers of apoptosis in some melanoma cell lines, but often exhibited only modest proapoptotic activity in others, due to numerous protective mechanisms. We demonstrated in the present study that treatment by sodium arsenite or statins with an additional inhibition of HO-1 expression (or activation) caused a substantial upregulation of apoptosis in melanoma cells. Sodium arsenite- or statin-induced apoptosis was independent of BRAF status (wild type versus V600E) in melanoma lines. Monotreatment required high doses of statins (20–40 μM) for effective induction of apoptosis. As an alternative approach, pretreatment of melanoma cells with statin at decreased doses (5–20 μM) dramatically enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis, due to suppression of the NF-κB and STAT3-transcriptional targets (including COX-2) and downregulation of cFLIP-L (a caspase-8 inhibitor) protein levels. Furthermore, combined treatment with sodium arsenite and TRAIL or simvastatin and TRAIL efficiently induced apoptotic commitment in human neuroblastoma cells. In summary, our findings on enhancing effects of combined treatment of cancer cells using statin and TRAIL provide the rationale for further preclinical evaluation. PMID:21910007

  13. Litter decay controlled by temperature, not soil properties, affecting future soil carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorich, Edward G; Janzen, Henry; Ellert, Benjamin H; Helgason, Bobbi L; Qian, Budong; Zebarth, Bernie J; Angers, Denis A; Beyaert, Ronald P; Drury, Craig F; Duguid, Scott D; May, William E; McConkey, Brian G; Dyck, Miles F

    2017-04-01

    Widespread global changes, including rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, climate warming and loss of biodiversity, are predicted for this century; all of these will affect terrestrial ecosystem processes like plant litter decomposition. Conversely, increased plant litter decomposition can have potential carbon-cycle feedbacks on atmospheric CO2 levels, climate warming and biodiversity. But predicting litter decomposition is difficult because of many interacting factors related to the chemical, physical and biological properties of soil, as well as to climate and agricultural management practices. We applied (13) C-labelled plant litter to soil at ten sites spanning a 3500-km transect across the agricultural regions of Canada and measured its decomposition over five years. Despite large differences in soil type and climatic conditions, we found that the kinetics of litter decomposition were similar once the effect of temperature had been removed, indicating no measurable effect of soil properties. A two-pool exponential decay model expressing undecomposed carbon simply as a function of thermal time accurately described kinetics of decomposition. (R(2)  = 0.94; RMSE = 0.0508). Soil properties such as texture, cation exchange capacity, pH and moisture, although very different among sites, had minimal discernible influence on decomposition kinetics. Using this kinetic model under different climate change scenarios, we projected that the time required to decompose 50% of the litter (i.e. the labile fractions) would be reduced by 1-4 months, whereas time required to decompose 90% of the litter (including recalcitrant fractions) would be reduced by 1 year in cooler sites to as much as 2 years in warmer sites. These findings confirm quantitatively the sensitivity of litter decomposition to temperature increases and demonstrate how climate change may constrain future soil carbon storage, an effect apparently not influenced by soil properties.

  14. Mapping the urban asthma experience: Using qualitative GIS to understand contextual factors affecting asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddem, Shimrit; Barg, Frances K; Glanz, Karen; Jackson, Tara; Green, Sarah; George, Maureen

    2015-09-01

    Asthma is complex and connected to a number of factors including access to healthcare, crime and violence, and environmental triggers. A mixed method approach was used to examine the experiences of urban people with asthma in controlling their asthma symptoms. The study started with an initial phase of qualitative interviews in West Philadelphia, a primarily poor African American community. Data from qualitative, semi-structured interviews indicated that stress, environmental irritants, and environmental allergens were the most salient triggers of asthma. Based on the interviews, the team identified six neighborhood factors to map including crime, housing vacancy, illegal dumping, tree canopy and parks. These map layers were combined into a final composite map. These combined methodologies contextualized respondents' perceptions in the framework of the actual community and built environment which tells a more complete story about their experience with asthma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Foliar Potassium Fertilizer Additives Affect Soybean Response and Weed Control with Glyphosate

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Kelly A.; Peter P. Motavalli; Stevens, William E.; Kendig, John A.; David Dunn; Manjula Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Research in 2004 and 2005 determined the effects of foliar-applied K-fertilizer sources (0-0-62-0 (%N-%P2O5-%K2O-%S), 0-0-25-17, 3-18-18-0, and 5-0-20-13) and additive rates (2.2, 8.8, and 17.6 kg K ha−1) on glyphosate-resistant soybean response and weed control. Field experiments were conducted at Novelty and Portageville with high soil test K and weed populations and at Malden with low soil test K and weed populations. At Novelty, grain yield increased with fertilizer additives at 8.8 kg K ...

  16. Host outdoor exposure variability affects the transmission and spread of Zika virus: Insights for epidemic control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ajelli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus transmission dynamics in urban environments follow a complex spatiotemporal pattern that appears unpredictable and barely related to high mosquito density areas. In this context, human activity patterns likely have a major role in Zika transmission dynamics. This paper examines the effect of host variability in the amount of time spent outdoors on Zika epidemiology in an urban environment.First, we performed a survey on time spent outdoors by residents of Miami-Dade County, Florida. Second, we analyzed both the survey and previously published national data on outdoors time in the U.S. to provide estimates of the distribution of the time spent outdoors. Third, we performed a computational modeling evaluation of Zika transmission dynamics, based on the time spent outdoors by each person. Our analysis reveals a strong heterogeneity of the host population in terms of time spent outdoors-data are well captured by skewed gamma distributions. Our model-based evaluation shows that in a heterogeneous population, Zika would cause a lower number of infections than in a more homogenous host population (up to 4-fold differences, but, at the same time, the epidemic would spread much faster. We estimated that in highly heterogeneous host populations the timing of the implementation of vector control measures is the major factor for limiting the number of Zika infections.Our findings highlight the need of considering host variability in exposure time for managing mosquito-borne infections and call for the revision of the triggers for vector control strategies, which should integrate mosquito density data and human outdoor activity patterns in specific areas.

  17. Obesity-driven synaptic remodeling affects endocannabinoid control of orexinergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristino, Luigia; Busetto, Giuseppe; Imperatore, Roberta; Ferrandino, Ida; Palomba, Letizia; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Petrosino, Stefania; Orlando, Pierangelo; Bentivoglio, Marina; Mackie, Kenneth; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2013-06-11

    Acute or chronic alterations in energy status alter the balance between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission and associated synaptic plasticity to allow for the adaptation of energy metabolism to new homeostatic requirements. The impact of such changes on endocannabinoid and cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1)-mediated modulation of synaptic transmission and strength is not known, despite the fact that this signaling system is an important target for the development of new drugs against obesity. We investigated whether CB1-expressing excitatory vs. inhibitory inputs to orexin-A-containing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus are altered in obesity and how this modifies endocannabinoid control of these neurons. In lean mice, these inputs are mostly excitatory. By confocal and ultrastructural microscopic analyses, we observed that in leptin-knockout (ob/ob) obese mice, and in mice with diet-induced obesity, orexinergic neurons receive predominantly inhibitory CB1-expressing inputs and overexpress the biosynthetic enzyme for the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol, which retrogradely inhibits synaptic transmission at CB1-expressing axon terminals. Patch-clamp recordings also showed increased CB1-sensitive inhibitory innervation of orexinergic neurons in ob/ob mice. These alterations are reversed by leptin administration, partly through activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in neuropeptide-Y-ergic neurons of the arcuate nucleus, and are accompanied by CB1-mediated enhancement of orexinergic innervation of target brain areas. We propose that enhanced inhibitory control of orexin-A neurons, and their CB1-mediated disinhibition, are a consequence of leptin signaling impairment in the arcuate nucleus. We also provide initial evidence of the participation of this phenomenon in hyperphagia and hormonal dysregulation in obesity.

  18. Factors affecting exposure level for medical staff during orthopedic procedures under fluoroscopic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Staniszewska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extended control of staff exposure in interventional radiology has been legally required over the last few years. This is determined by a number of factors, including the type of procedure, technical conditions and methodology. In orthopedic procedures fluoroscopy is used to control surgical reconstructions. An influence of particular factors on the registered values of doses received by the members of medical team performing osteosynthesis for limb fractures is presented in this paper. Material and Methods: Doses received by individual interventional team members performing specific functions, operator, assisting physicians and scrub nurse, during a series of the procedures were measured. Each person was equipped with 4 dosimetric tools, containing thermoluminescent dosimeters, to measure the equivalent doses for the eyes, hand skin and the neck (outside the shield and to evaluate effective doses. The investigations were performed in operational theatres of 3 hospitals in Łódź. Results: The equivalent doses per one procedure for the eyes and hand skin of the operator were 0.029–0.073 mSv and 0.366–1.604 mSv, respectively. Significantly higher doses were noted during the procedures of intramedullary osteosynthesis, especially for the operator. An average age and body mass index (BMI of patients treated in the monitored hospitals did not differ statistically. Conclusions: Based on the dosimetric measurements the following conclusions can be drawn: in orthopedic procedures of interventional radiology (IR the exposure of the staff is mostly determined by the type of procedure and more precisely by its complexity and by the optimized use of X-ray unit, including pulsed fluoroscopy. It is also revealed that the operator is the most exposed person in the interventional team. Med Pr 2017;68(1:75–83

  19. Does a mineral wristband affect balance? A randomized, controlled, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Eva Ekvall; Beckman, Anders; Persson, Liselott

    2015-06-26

    Having good balance is a facilitating factor in the performance of everyday activities. Good balance is also essential in various sport activities in order to both get results and prevent injury. A common measure of balance is postural sway, which can be measured both antero-posteriorly and medio-laterally. There are several companies marketing wristbands whose intended function is to improve balance, strength and flexibility. Randomized controlled trials have shown that wristbands with holograms have no effect on balance but studies on wristbands with minerals seem to be lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate if the mineral wristband had any effect on postural sway in a group of healthy individuals. Randomized, controlled, double-blind study. The study group consisted of 40 healthy persons. Postural sway was measured antero-posteriorly and medio-laterally on a force plate, to compare: the mineral wristband, a placebo wristband, and without any wristband. The measurements were performed for 30 s, in four situations: with open eyes and closed eyes, standing on a firm surface and on foam. Analyses were made with multilevel technique. The use of wristband with or without minerals did not alter postural sway. Closed eyes and standing on foam both prolonged the dependent measurement, irrespective if it was medio-lateral or antero-posterior. Wearing any wristband (mineral or placebo) gave a small (0.22-0.36 mm/s) but not statistically significant reduction of postural sway compared to not wearing wristband. This study showed no effect on postural sway by using the mineral wristband, compared with a placebo wristband or no wristband. Wearing any wristband at all (mineral or placebo) gave a small but not statistically significant reduction in postural sway, probably caused by sensory input.

  20. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yuta; Yuan, Bo; Kaise, Toshikazu; Takeichi, Makoto; Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko; Kroetz, Deanna L; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2011-12-01

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As(III)) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As(III) on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As(III) on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As(III)-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As(III) were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As(III) than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As(III) in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As(III)-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As(III) cytotoxicity between these cells.

  1. Gastrointestinal protective efficacy of Kolaviron (a bi-flavonoid from Garcinia kola following a single administration of sodium arsenite in rats: Biochemical and histopathological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinleye S Akinrinde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arsenic intoxication is known to produce symptoms including diarrhea and vomiting, which are indications of gastrointestinal dysfunction. Objective: We investigated whether Kolaviron (KV administration protected against sodium arsenite (NaAsO 2 -induced damage to gastric and intestinal epithelium in rats. Materials and Methods: Control rats (Group I were given a daily oral dose of corn oil. Rats in other groups were given a single dose of NaAsO 2 (100 mg/kg; intraperitoneal alone (Group II or after pretreatment for 7 days with KV at 100 mg/kg (Group III and 200 mg/kg (Group IV. Rats were sacrificed afterward and portions of the stomach, small intestine and colon were processed for histopathological examination. Hydrogen peroxide, reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde (MDA concentrations as well as activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPX, glutathione S-transferase (GST and myeloperoxidase (MPO were measured in the remaining portions of the different gastrointestinal tract (GIT segments. Results: NaAsO 2 caused significant increases (P < 0.05 in MDA levels and MPO activity, with significant reductions (P < 0.05 in GST, GPX, CAT and SOD activities in the stomach and intestines. KV significantly reversed the changes (P < 0.05 in a largely dose-dependent manner. The different segments had marked inflammatory cellular infiltration, with hyperplasia of the crypts, which occurred to much lesser degrees with KV administration. Conclusion: The present findings showed that KV might be a potent product for mitigating NaAsO 2 toxicity in the GIT.

  2. Does a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee affect stair ascent strategies in persons with transfemoral amputation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge Whitehead, Jennifer M; Wolf, Erik J; Scoville, Charles R; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-10-01

    Stair ascent can be difficult for individuals with transfemoral amputation because of the loss of knee function. Most individuals with transfemoral amputation use either a step-to-step (nonreciprocal, advancing one stair at a time) or skip-step strategy (nonreciprocal, advancing two stairs at a time), rather than a step-over-step (reciprocal) strategy, because step-to-step and skip-step allow the leading intact limb to do the majority of work. A new microprocessor-controlled knee (Ottobock X2(®)) uses flexion/extension resistance to allow step-over-step stair ascent. We compared self-selected stair ascent strategies between conventional and X2(®) prosthetic knees, examined between-limb differences, and differentiated stair ascent mechanics between X2(®) users and individuals without amputation. We also determined which factors are associated with differences in knee position during initial contact and swing within X2(®) users. Fourteen individuals with transfemoral amputation participated in stair ascent sessions while using conventional and X2(®) knees. Ten individuals without amputation also completed a stair ascent session. Lower-extremity stair ascent joint angles, moment, and powers and ground reaction forces were calculated using inverse dynamics during self-selected strategy and cadence and controlled cadence using a step-over-step strategy. One individual with amputation self-selected a step-over-step strategy while using a conventional knee, while 10 individuals self-selected a step-over-step strategy while using X2(®) knees. Individuals with amputation used greater prosthetic knee flexion during initial contact (32.5°, p = 0.003) and swing (68.2°, p = 0.001) with higher intersubject variability while using X2(®) knees compared to conventional knees (initial contact: 1.6°, swing: 6.2°). The increased prosthetic knee flexion while using X2(®) knees normalized knee kinematics to individuals without amputation during swing (88.4°, p = 0.179) but

  3. Horse impoundments under Control of Horses legislation in the Munster region of Ireland: factors affecting euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinane, M; O'Sullivan, E; Collins, D M; Byrne, A W; More, S J

    2015-01-24

    Recently, considerable international attention has been paid to the problem of unwanted horses. In Ireland, stray horses, particularly in urban areas, are a further problem. The Control of Horses Act 1996 was enacted in response to an ongoing problem of uncontrolled horses in public places. As yet, no research work has been conducted focusing on stray horses in Ireland. This paper describes horses impounded under the Act in the Munster region of Ireland during 2005-2012 and the factors influencing decisions regarding their disposal. A logistic regression model was developed to investigate factors influencing the probability that a horse was euthanised during impoundment. In total, 3625 seizure events were recorded, most towards the end of the study period. Predictors for euthanasia during 2010-2012 included seizure location, sex, age, colour, body condition score and year. This study highlights the problem of stray horses in Ireland, particularly in urban areas. There is a need for rigorous enforcement of newly enacted horse identification legislation, allowing a fully integrated traceability system. More is required to manage the long-established societal problems of stray horses in urban settings, with a uniform approach by all Local Authorities being long overdue.

  4. ADHD candidate gene (DRD4 exon III affects inhibitory control in a healthy sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco-Pallarés Josep

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Dopamine is believed to be a key neurotransmitter in the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Several recent studies point to an association of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4 gene and this condition. More specifically, the 7 repeat variant of a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR polymorphism in exon III of this gene is suggested to bear a higher risk for ADHD. In the present study, we investigated the role of this polymorphism in the modulation of neurophysiological correlates of response inhibition (Go/Nogo task in a healthy, high-functioning sample. Results Homozygous 7 repeat carriers showed a tendency for more accurate behavior in the Go/Nogo task compared to homozygous 4 repeat carriers. Moreover, 7 repeat carriers presented an increased nogo-related theta band response together with a reduced go-related beta decrease. Conclusions These data point to improved cognitive functions and prefrontal control in the 7 repeat carriers, probably due to the D4 receptor's modulatory role in prefrontal areas. The results are discussed with respect to previous behavioral data on this polymorphism and animal studies on the impact of the D4 receptor on cognitive functions.

  5. Controls on methane released through ebullition in peatlands affected by permafrost degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapstein, Sara J.; Turetsky, Merritt R.; McGuire, Anthony; Harden, Jennifer W.; Czimczik, C.I.; Xu, Xiaomei; Chanton, J.P.; Waddington, James Michael

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost thaw in peat plateaus leads to the flooding of surface soils and the formation of collapse scar bogs, which have the potential to be large emitters of methane (CH4) from surface peat as well as deeper, previously frozen, permafrost carbon (C). We used a network of bubble traps, permanently installed 20 cm and 60 cm beneath the moss surface, to examine controls on ebullition from three collapse bogs in interior Alaska. Overall, ebullition was dominated by episodic events that were associated with changes in atmospheric pressure, and ebullition was mainly a surface process regulated by both seasonal ice dynamics and plant phenology. The majority (>90%) of ebullition occurred in surface peat layers, with little bubble production in deeper peat. During periods of peak plant biomass, bubbles contained acetate-derived CH4 dominated (>90%) by modern C fixed from the atmosphere following permafrost thaw. Post-senescence, the contribution of CH4 derived from thawing permafrost C was more variable and accounted for up to 22% (on average 7%), in the most recently thawed site. Thus, the formation of thermokarst features resulting from permafrost thaw in peatlands stimulates ebullition and CH4 release both by creating flooded surface conditions conducive to CH4 production and bubbling as well as by exposing thawing permafrost C to mineralization.

  6. Foliar Potassium Fertilizer Additives Affect Soybean Response and Weed Control with Glyphosate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A. Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research in 2004 and 2005 determined the effects of foliar-applied K-fertilizer sources (0-0-62-0 (%N-%P2O5-%K2O-%S, 0-0-25-17, 3-18-18-0, and 5-0-20-13 and additive rates (2.2, 8.8, and 17.6 kg K ha−1 on glyphosate-resistant soybean response and weed control. Field experiments were conducted at Novelty and Portageville with high soil test K and weed populations and at Malden with low soil test K and weed populations. At Novelty, grain yield increased with fertilizer additives at 8.8 kg K ha−1 in a high-yield, weed-free environment in 2004, but fertilizer additives reduced yield up to 470 kg ha−1 in a low-yield year (2005 depending on the K source and rate. At Portageville, K-fertilizer additives increased grain yield from 700 to 1160 kg ha−1 compared to diammonium sulfate, depending on the K source and rate. At Malden, there was no yield response to K sources. Differences in leaf tissue K (P=0.03, S (P=0.03, B (P=0.0001, and Cu (P=0.008 concentrations among treatments were detected 14 d after treatment at Novelty and Malden. Tank mixtures of K-fertilizer additives with glyphosate may provide an option for foliar K applications.

  7. Does kinesiology taping of the ankles affect proprioceptive control in professional football (soccer) players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Daniel; Firth, Paul

    2017-05-01

    To determine whether the bilateral application of kinesiology tape (KT) to professional footballers' ankles can improve their lower limb proprioception. A single blind randomised crossover study. Participants were randomly assigned to complete a proprioception test in either a taped or not taped condition first. Following a wash out period, participants were then re-tested in the alternate condition. A UK Championship League Football Club, mid-season. Twenty male professional football players over the age of 18, currently match fit with no injuries. Proprioception was assessed by participants undertaking the moving target program on the balance module attached to a Kin-Com 125AP isokinetic dynamometer. A paired sample two tailed t-test was used to assess whether there was a significant difference between the participants test scores in the not taped and taped conditions. The bilateral application of KT to professional footballers' ankles did not bring about a significant change in participants' scores when tested with a fine movement and balance control test. Percentage accuracy score mean difference 4.2 (p = 0.285). The results of this study do not support the use of KT when applied to the ankles of healthy footballers as a method of improving proprioception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Do early quadriceps exercises affect the outcome of ACL reconstruction? A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Triston; Williams, Marie T; Chipchase, Lucy S

    2005-01-01

    A prospective, blinded, randomised controlled trial investigated the effectiveness of quadriceps exercises following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A treatment group (Quadriceps exercise group) performed straight leg raises and isometric quadriceps contractions throughout the first two postoperative weeks, and a second group (No quadriceps exercise group) did not. A battery of outcome measures assessed subjects postoperatively at day one, two weeks, and one, three and six months. A total of 103 patients (Quadriceps exercise n = 48, No quadriceps exercise n = 55) commenced the study with 91 subjects available at final follow up (Quadriceps exercise n = 47, No quadriceps exercise n = 44). Performance of quadriceps exercises significantly improved a number of knee flexion and extension range of motion measurements (p = 0.01 to 0.04). No significant differences were found between the two groups at any postoperative period for quadriceps lag (p = 0.36), functional hop testing (p = 0.49 to 0.51), isokinetic quadriceps strength (p = 0.70 to 0.72), the majority of numerical analogue scores (p = 0.1 to 0.94) and Cincinnati scores (p = 0.10 to 0.84). Subjects performing quadriceps exercises reported significantly higher pain scores with exercise on the first postoperative day (p = 0.02). At six months postoperatively, the Quadriceps exercise subjects reported significantly more favourable Cincinnati scores for symptoms (p = 0.005) and problems with sport (p = 0.05). While average knee laxity was not significantly different between treatment groups over time (p = 0.27 to 0.94), quadriceps exercise performance was associated with a significantly lower incidence of abnormal knee laxity. Isometric quadriceps exercises and straight leg raises can be safely prescribed during the first two postoperative weeks and confer advantages for faster recovery of knee range of motion and stability. It remains to be proven whether the magnitude of differences between groups is

  9. Communal farmers' perceptions of tick-borne diseases affecting cattle and investigation of tick control methods practiced in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungirai, Marvelous; Moyo, Doreen Zandile; De Clercq, Patrick; Madder, Maxime

    2016-02-01

    Tick borne diseases (TBDs) are responsible for huge economic losses in cattle production in most African countries where the majority of cattle owners are the resource poor communal farmers. Governments have initiated and co-ordinate tick control programs with farmers required to contribute funds for their sustenance. The success of these programs will hinge upon the involvement of communal farmers in their design, implementation and evaluation. To this end, 313 communal farmers (approximately 8.4% response rate) were interviewed and 3 focus group discussions were carried out in the southern low-veld part of Zimbabwe with the objectives of investigating communal farmers' perceptions on TBDs affecting cattle, level of participation in government initiated tick control programs, other tick control methods practiced, types of acaricides used and their perceived effectiveness. There was a general awareness of TBDs with 67.7% (n=212) farmers being able to describe tick diseases with names or clinical and post-mortem signs. The diseases or problems frequently associated with ticks were cowdriosis (38%, n=119), mastitis (36.7%, n=115), anaplasmosis (36.1%, n=113), body damage (28.4%, n=89), babesiosis (24.6%, n=77) and poor body condition (16.6%, n=52). Cattle mortalities due to TBDs were reported by 23.8% (n=74) of the farmers. The plunge dip was consistently used by farmers (70.3%, n=220) to control ticks. Other tick control methods practiced were the hand spraying (67.4%, n=211), hand dressing (16.6%, n=52), traditional methods (5.4%, n=17), use of pour-ons (4.5%, n=14) and smearing (2.2%, n=7). The formamidines were the most common class of acaricide used (59.4%, n=186), followed by synthetic pyrethroids (29.1%, n=91), macro cyclic lactones (12.8%, n=40) and organophosphates (4.5%, n=14). Most farmers (75.2%, n=231) perceived these acaricides to be effective in controlling ticks. The results of focus group discussions showed that a number of factors influenced the

  10. A possible relationship between bumblefoot responsive to potassium arsenite and micrococci in the blood of three birds of prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarello, W

    2002-01-01

    Pododermatitis (bumblefoot) is a major health problem of falcons world-wide because healing processes in the talons are difficult and lengthy. A peregrine (Falco peregrinus), a merlin (Falco columbarius) and a saker falcon (Falco cherrug) with bumblefoot at different stages ranging from III to V, were all found to be carriers of micrococcus-like organisms in the blood and two of them were successfully treated with 0.5% potassium arsenite in low dosage given intravenously. A number of considerations are made on the immune dysfunction aspects of bumblefoot in birds of prey and on the emerging role of arsenic-based medicaments in the treatment of animal and human immune dysfunction syndromes.

  11. Cortisol response to an induction of negative affect among adolescents with and without loss of control eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, Rachel M; Shomaker, Lauren B; Kelly, Nichole R; Pickworth, Courtney K; Thompson, Katherine A; Brady, Sheila M; Demidowich, Andrew; Galescu, Ovidiu; Altschul, Anne M; Shank, Lisa M; Yanovski, Susan Z; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Yanovski, Jack A

    2016-12-01

    Adults with binge eating disorder may have an exaggerated or blunted cortisol response to stress. Yet, limited data exist among youth who report loss of control (LOC) eating, a developmental precursor to binge eating disorder. We studied cortisol reactivity among 178 healthy adolescents with and without LOC eating. Following a buffet lunch meal adolescents were randomly assigned to watch a neutral or sad film clip. After, they were offered snacks from a multi-item array to assess eating in the absence of hunger. Salivary cortisol was collected at -80, 0, 30 and 50 min relative to film administration, and state mood ratings were reported before and after the film. Adolescents with LOC had greater increases in negative affect during the experimental paradigm in both conditions (ps > 0.05). Depressive symptoms, but not LOC, related to a greater cortisol response in the sad film condition (ps > 0.05). Depressive symptoms and state LOC were related to different aspects of eating behaviour, independent of film condition or cortisol response (ps > 0.05). A film clip that induced depressed state affect increased salivary cortisol only in adolescents with more elevated depressive symptoms. Adolescents with and without LOC were differentiated by greater increases in state depressed affect during laboratory test meals but had no difference in cortisol reactivity. Future studies are required to determine if adolescents with LOC manifest alterations in stress reactivity to alternative stress-inducing situations. © 2015 World Obesity Federation.

  12. A Raman spectroscopic study of arsenite and thioarsenite species in aqueous solution at 25°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janecky David R

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The Raman spectra of thioarsenite and arsenite species in aqueous solution were obtained at room temperature. Solutions at constant ΣAs + ΣS of 0.1 and 0.5 mol kg-1 were prepared with various ΣS/ΣAs ratios (0.1–9.0 and pH values (~7–13.2. Our data suggest that the speciation of As under the conditions investigated is more complicated than previously thought. The Raman measurements offer evidence for at least six separate S-bearing As species whose principal bands are centered near 365, 385, 390, 400, 415 and 420 cm-1. The data suggest that at least two different species may give rise to bands at 385 cm-1, bringing the probable minimum number of species to seven. Several additional species are possible but could not be resolved definitively. In general, the relative proportions of these species are dependent on total As concentration, ΣS/ΣAs ratio and pH. At very low ΣS/ΣAs ratios we also observe Raman bands attributable to the dissociation products of H3AsO3(aq. Although we were unable to assign precise stoichiometries for the various thioarsenite species, we were able to map out general pH and ΣS/ΣAs conditions under which the various thioarsenite and arsenite species are predominant. This study provides a basis for more detailed Raman spectroscopic and other types of investigations of the nature of thioarsenite species.

  13. Acaricide treatment affects viral dynamics in Varroa destructor-infested honey bee colonies via both host physiology and mite control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Barbara; Forsgren, Eva; Fries, Ingemar; de Miranda, Joachim R

    2012-01-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies are declining, and a number of stressors have been identified that affect, alone or in combination, the health of honey bees. The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, honey bee viruses that are often closely associated with the mite, and pesticides used to control the mite population form a complex system of stressors that may affect honey bee health in different ways. During an acaricide treatment using Apistan (plastic strips coated with tau-fluvalinate), we analyzed the infection dynamics of deformed wing virus (DWV), sacbrood virus (SBV), and black queen cell virus (BQCV) in adult bees, mite-infested pupae, their associated Varroa mites, and uninfested pupae, comparing these to similar samples from untreated control colonies. Titers of DWV increased initially with the onset of the acaricide application and then slightly decreased progressively coinciding with the removal of the Varroa mite infestation. This initial increase in DWV titers suggests a physiological effect of tau-fluvalinate on the host's susceptibility to viral infection. DWV titers in adult bees and uninfested pupae remained higher in treated colonies than in untreated colonies. The titers of SBV and BQCV did not show any direct relationship with mite infestation and showed a variety of possible effects of the acaricide treatment. The results indicate that other factors besides Varroa mite infestation may be important to the development and maintenance of damaging DWV titers in colonies. Possible biochemical explanations for the observed synergistic effects between tau-fluvalinate and virus infections are discussed.

  14. Factors affecting the flight capacity of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a classical biological control agent of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrner, Samuel J; Lelito, Jonathan P; Blaedow, Karen; Heimpel, George E; Aukema, Brian H

    2014-12-01

    The dispersal characteristics of a biological control agent can have direct implications on the ability of that agent to control populations of a target host. Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is a parasitic wasp native to eastern Asia that has been introduced into the United States as part of a classical biological control program against the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). We used computer-monitored flight mills to investigate the role of age, feeding status, mating status, and size on the flight capacity of female T. planipennisi over a 24-h period. We also compared flight capacity between sexes. Flight distance of female T. planipennisi representative of populations released in the biological control program averaged 1.26 km in 24 h with a maximum flight of just over 7 km. Median flight distance, however, was 422 m. The flight capacity of females fed a honey-water solution was 41× that of females provided only water, who flew very little. Larger females were capable of flying farther distances, but age did not affect the flight capacity of females up to 70 d posteclosion. Females dispersed 6× farther than did their smaller, male counterparts. The implications of our findings to host-parasitoid interactions and release protocols for distributing T. planipennisi are discussed.

  15. Behavioral responses to intravenous meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in patients with seasonal affective disorder and control subjects before and after phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, F M; Mueller, E A; Rosenthal, N E; Rogers, S; Hill, J L; Murphy, D L

    1994-05-01

    A comparison of the baseline and post-infusion effects of the serotonin agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) in 10 patients with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and 11 healthy control subjects revealed significantly different subjective response profiles between the groups. Several baseline and m-CPP-stimulated responses in symptoms putatively related to serotonergic function changed significantly after a week's exposure to phototherapy in the SAD patients but not the control subjects. Before phototherapy, depressed patients with SAD reported activation-euphoria responses to m-CPP and significant decreases in carbohydrate hunger, but insignificant changes in feeling slowed or sleepy, while control subjects reported no mood or appetite changes but significant increases in feeling slowed down following m-CPP. After phototherapy, which led to a significant reduction in baseline depressive symptom rating to near-euthymic levels in the SAD patients, almost all of the patients' responses to m-CPP were normalized and no longer differed from the control subjects' responses. These results provide evidence of a possible dysregulation in serotonergic neurotransmission in depressed SAD patients that normalizes following treatment with phototherapy.

  16. Spatial cognition, body representation and affective processes: the role of vestibular information beyond ocular reflexes and control of posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Fred W.; Preuss, Nora; Hartmann, Matthias; Grabherr, Luzia

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies in humans demonstrate the involvement of vestibular information in tasks that are seemingly remote from well-known functions such as space constancy or postural control. In this review article we point out three emerging streams of research highlighting the importance of vestibular input: (1) Spatial Cognition: Modulation of vestibular signals can induce specific changes in spatial cognitive tasks like mental imagery and the processing of numbers. This has been shown in studies manipulating body orientation (changing the input from the otoliths), body rotation (changing the input from the semicircular canals), in clinical findings with vestibular patients, and in studies carried out in microgravity. There is also an effect in the reverse direction; top-down processes can affect perception of vestibular stimuli. (2) Body Representation: Numerous studies demonstrate that vestibular stimulation changes the representation of body parts, and sensitivity to tactile input or pain. Thus, the vestibular system plays an integral role in multisensory coordination of body representation. (3) Affective Processes and Disorders: Studies in psychiatric patients and patients with a vestibular disorder report a high comorbidity of vestibular dysfunctions and psychiatric symptoms. Recent studies investigated the beneficial effect of vestibular stimulation on psychiatric disorders, and how vestibular input can change mood and affect. These three emerging streams of research in vestibular science are—at least in part—associated with different neuronal core mechanisms. Spatial transformations draw on parietal areas, body representation is associated with somatosensory areas, and affective processes involve insular and cingulate cortices, all of which receive vestibular input. Even though a wide range of different vestibular cortical projection areas has been ascertained, their functionality still is scarcely understood. PMID:24904327

  17. Spatial Cognition, Body Representation and Affective Processes: The Role of Vestibular Information beyond Ocular Reflexes and Control of Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred W Mast

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies in humans demonstrate the involvement of vestibular information in tasks that are seemingly remote from well-known functions such as space constancy or postural control. In this review article we point out three emerging streams of research highlighting the importance of vestibular input: 1 Spatial Cognition: Modulation of vestibular signals can induce specific changes in spatial cognitive tasks like mental imagery and the processing of numbers. This has been shown in studies manipulating body orientation (changing the input from the otoliths, body rotation (changing the input from the semicircular canals, in clinical findings with vestibular patients, and in studies carried out in microgravity. There is also an effect in the reverse direction; top-down processes can affect perception of vestibular stimuli. 2 Body Representation: Numerous studies demonstrate that vestibular stimulation changes the representation of body parts, and sensitivity to tactile input or pain. Thus, the vestibular system plays an integral role in multisensory coordination of body representation. 3 Affective Processes and Disorders: Studies in psychiatric patients and patients with a vestibular disorder report a high comorbidity of vestibular dysfunctions and psychiatric symptoms. Recent studies investigated the beneficial effect of vestibular stimulation on psychiatric disorders, and how vestibular input can change mood and affect. These three emerging streams of research in vestibular science are – at least in part – associated with different neuronal core mechanisms. Spatial transformations draw on parietal areas, body representation is associated with somatosensory areas, and affective processes involve insular and cingulate cortices, all of which receive vestibular input. Even though a wide range of different vestibular cortical projection areas has been ascertained, their functionality still is scarcely understood.

  18. Sample Size Calculation: Inaccurate A Priori Assumptions for Nuisance Parameters Can Greatly Affect the Power of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Tavernier

    Full Text Available We aimed to examine the extent to which inaccurate assumptions for nuisance parameters used to calculate sample size can affect the power of a randomized controlled trial (RCT. In a simulation study, we separately considered an RCT with continuous, dichotomous or time-to-event outcomes, with associated nuisance parameters of standard deviation, success rate in the control group and survival rate in the control group at some time point, respectively. For each type of outcome, we calculated a required sample size N for a hypothesized treatment effect, an assumed nuisance parameter and a nominal power of 80%. We then assumed a nuisance parameter associated with a relative error at the design stage. For each type of outcome, we randomly drew 10,000 relative errors of the associated nuisance parameter (from empirical distributions derived from a previously published review. Then, retro-fitting the sample size formula, we derived, for the pre-calculated sample size N, the real power of the RCT, taking into account the relative error for the nuisance parameter. In total, 23%, 0% and 18% of RCTs with continuous, binary and time-to-event outcomes, respectively, were underpowered (i.e., the real power was 90%. Even with proper calculation of sample size, a substantial number of trials are underpowered or overpowered because of imprecise knowledge of nuisance parameters. Such findings raise questions about how sample size for RCTs should be determined.

  19. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Emission Limits for Affected Sources Using the Control Efficiency/Outlet Concentration Compliance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Using the Control Efficiency/Outlet Concentration Compliance Option 3 Table 3 to Subpart KKKK of Part 63... of Part 63—Emission Limits for Affected Sources Using the Control Efficiency/Outlet Concentration... following table as required by § 63.3490(d). If you use the control efficiency/outlet concentration option...

  20. How do international trade obligations affect policy options for obesity prevention? Lessons from recent developments in trade and tobacco control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Tigerstrom, Barbara

    2013-06-01

    Regulatory measures, including taxes and subsidies on food and beverage products, food labelling requirements, regulation of food content and regulation of food marketing, have been proposed to encourage healthier eating and prevent obesity. The objective of this article is to explore the extent to which international trade agreements affect governments' choices to use such regulatory measures. It reviews key provisions of relevant World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements and their implications. Some insights can be gained by examining 2 recent developments in the WTO regarding tobacco control: a current dispute involving Australia's plain packaging law and its effect on trademarks, and a recent decision involving the United States law banning flavoured cigarettes. This decision said that the ban did not restrict trade more than necessary to fulfil its legitimate health objective, but it was discriminatory because it banned imported products (clove cigarettes) while exempting domestic products (menthol cigarettes) with similar characteristics. The conclusion we can draw from this decision is that WTO member states probably enjoy a significant degree of latitude in developing food regulations as part of an obesity prevention strategy, so long as those do not disproportionately affect imported products and therefore raise questions of discrimination. The approach taken in this case encourages the adoption of public health policies that are consistent with strong scientific evidence, but may restrict governments' ability to make political compromises, which could frustrate some proposals. The ongoing development of WTO law will continue to affect policy choices in public health. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorder and Comorbid Affective Disorder: A Pilot Matched Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekiso, Thekiso B; Murphy, Philip; Milnes, Jennie; Lambe, Kathryn; Curtin, Aisling; Farren, Conor K

    2015-11-01

    This study examined whether acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) enhances treatment as usual (TAU) in improving treatment outcomes in patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD) and comorbid affective disorder. Fifty-two participants were included in the study, of whom 26 were patients with AUD and either depression or bipolar disorder treated with ACT group therapy in parallel with TAU (inpatient integrated treatment) and 26 were matched controls who had received TAU alone. Drinking and craving outcomes were total alcohol abstinence, cumulative abstinence duration (CAD) and Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS) scores at 3 and 6 months postintervention. Affective and anxiety outcomes were Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) scores at these follow-ups. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. Retention rates were high: 100% of the ACT group were followed up at 3 and 6 months; 92.3% and 84.6% of the TAU alone group were followed up at 3 and 6 months, respectively. Patients in the ACT group reported significantly higher CAD at 3 and 6 months, significantly lower BDI and BAI scores at 3 and 6 months, and significantly lower OCDS scores at 3 months, than those who received only TAU. No other significant differences in treatment outcomes were found between the groups. ACT provides added benefit to TAU in improving drinking, craving, depression and anxiety outcomes in patients with AUD and comorbid affective disorder. Most treatment improvements were sustained over a 6-month follow-up period. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer-aquitard complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T.; Tick, Geoffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the role of the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion in transient anomalous transport, which is one of the major knowledge gaps in anomalous transport, by combining Monte Carlo simulations and stochastic model analysis. Two alluvial settings containing either short- or long-connected hydrofacies are generated and used as media for flow and transport modeling. Numerical experiments show that 1) the Peclet number affects both the duration of the power-law segment of tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) and the transition rate from anomalous to Fickian transport by determining the solute residence time for a given low-permeability layer, 2) mechanical dispersion has a limited contribution to the anomalous characteristics of late-time transport as compared to molecular diffusion due to an almost negligible velocity in floodplain deposits, and 3) the initial source dimensions only enhance the power-law tail of the BTCs at short travel distances. A tempered stable stochastic (TSS) model is then applied to analyze the modeled transport. Applications show that the time-nonlocal parameters in the TSS model relate to the Peclet number, Pe. In particular, the truncation parameter in the TSS model increases nonlinearly with a decrease in Pe due to the decrease of the mean residence time, and the capacity coefficient increases with an increase in molecular diffusion which is probably due to the increase in the number of immobile particles. The above numerical experiments and stochastic analysis therefore reveal that the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer–aquitard complexes.

  3. Breathing-controlled electrical stimulation could modify the affective component of neuropathic pain after amputation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melton DH

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Sheng Li1,2, Danielle H Melton1, Jeffrey C Berliner11Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Texas Medical School – Houston, Houston, TX; 2UTHealth Motor Recovery Laboratory, Institute for Rehabilitation and Research, Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: In this case, a 31-year-old male suffered phantom neuropathic pain for more than 3 years after an above-the-knee amputation. His shooting phantom pain disappeared after the first session of breathing-controlled electrical stimulation, and reappeared or was triggered 28 days after an experimental error during which he received sustained electrical stimulation. In other words, painful shooting stimuli may not have been “cured” but forgotten and retriggered by a fearful event due to the experimental error. Therefore, this accidental finding provides a unique opportunity to understand sensory and affective components of neuropathic pain, and a novel intervention could modify the affective component of it.Keywords: neuropathic pain, amputation, electrical stimulation, voluntary breathing

  4. Proteome profiles of vaginal fluids from women affected by bacterial vaginosis and healthy controls: outcomes of rifaximin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruciani, Federica; Wasinger, Valerie; Turroni, Silvia; Calanni, Fiorella; Donders, Gilbert; Brigidi, Patrizia; Vitali, Beatrice

    2013-11-01

    This study was designed to characterize the proteome of vaginal fluid (VF) from women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) in comparison with that from healthy women, and to evaluate the effect exerted by rifaximin vaginal tablets. Women with BV (n = 39) and matched healthy controls (n = 41) were included in the study. BV patients were distributed among four groups receiving different doses of rifaximin. Vaginal rinsings were collected at the screening visit from all the participants and at a follow-up visit from BV-affected women. The VF proteome was analysed by tandem mass spectrometry using an Orbitrap mass analyser. A large number of human proteins were differentially expressed in women with BV in comparison with healthy women (n = 118) and in BV-affected women treated with rifaximin (n = 284). In both comparisons, a high proportion of the dysregulated proteins (∼20%) were involved in the innate immune response. Twenty-one of 24 proteins increased in abundance in women with BV versus healthy women and 31/59 proteins decreased after rifaximin treatment, suggesting a general reduction of the immune response resulting from the therapy. Major changes in protein abundance were found following treatment with 25 mg of rifaximin once daily for 5 days. BV is associated with a massive change in the VF proteome, mainly regarding the abundance of proteins involved in the innate immune response. Rifaximin at a dosage of 25 mg for 5 days modulated the vaginal proteome, counteracting the alterations associated with the BV condition.

  5. Study of sodium arsenite induced biochemical changes on certain biomolecules of the freshwater catfish Clarias batrachus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randhir Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic impact of sublethal concentration (1 mg/L; 5% of 96h LC50 value of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2 on certain biomolecules (proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and glycogen of five tissue components (muscles, liver, brain, skin, and gills of the freshwater catfish Clarias batrachus was analysed. The important toxic manifestations include marked decrease in the concentration of proteins (21.72-45.42% in muscles; 3.42-53.94% in liver; 15.39-45.42% in brain; 15.40-4.00% in skin and 11.35-64.13% in gills, DNA (0.55-22.95% in muscles; 8.33-14.06% in liver; 5.30-18.40% in brain; 13.57-52.80% in skin; and 12.38-31.01% in gills, RNA (42.68-76.16% in muscles; 10.68-39.75% in liver; 5.66-29.05% in brain; 7.72-27.93% in skin and 21.47-44.38% in gills and glycogen (24.00-51.72% in muscles; 49.11-72.45% in liver; 11.49-26.03% in brain; 26.13-38.05% in skin and 17.80-37.97% in gills. Excepting liver where the lipid content increases (15.82-24.13%, the fat content also showed depletion in their concentration (10.40-29.83% in muscles; 8.30-34.45% in brain; 8.94-31.47% in skin and 12.75-28.86% in gills, in the rest of the organ systems.Foi analisado o impacto tóxico da concentração subletal (1 mg/L; 5% do valor de LC50 de 96h do arsenito de sódio (NaAsO2 sobre certas biomoléculas (proteinas, ácidos nucleicos, lipídios e glicogênio de cinco tecidos (músculos, fígado, cérebro, pele e brânquias do bagre Clarias batrachus. As manifestações tóxicas importantes incluiram o decréscimo acentuado na concentração de proteinas (21,72-45,42% nos músculos; 3,42-53,94% no fígado; 15,39-45,42% no cérebro; 15,40-4,00% na pele e 11,35-64,13% nas brânquias, DNA (0,55-22,95% nos músculos; 8,33-14,06% no fígado; 5,30-18,40% no cérebro; 13,57-52,80% na pele e 12,38-31,01% nas brânquias, RNA (42,68-76,16% nos músculos; 10,68-39,75% no fígado; 5,66-29,05% no cérebro; 7,72-27,93% na pele e 21,47-44,38% nas brânquias e glicogênio (24,00-51,72% nos músculos; 49

  6. Dynamic modulation of inflammatory pain-related affective and sensory symptoms by optical control of amygdala metabotropic glutamate receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zussy, C; Gómez-Santacana, X; Rovira, X; De Bundel, D; Ferrazzo, S; Bosch, D; Asede, D; Malhaire, F; Acher, F; Giraldo, J; Valjent, E; Ehrlich, I; Ferraguti, F; Pin, J-P; Llebaria, A; Goudet, C

    2016-12-20

    Contrary to acute pain, chronic pain does not serve as a warning signal and must be considered as a disease per se. This pathology presents a sensory and psychological dimension at the origin of affective and cognitive disorders. Being largely refractory to current pharmacotherapies, identification of endogenous systems involved in persistent and chronic pain is crucial. The amygdala is a key brain region linking pain sensation with negative emotions. Here, we show that activation of a specific intrinsic neuromodulatory system within the amygdala associated with type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu4) abolishes sensory and affective symptoms of persistent pain such as hypersensitivity to pain, anxiety- and depression-related behaviors, and fear extinction impairment. Interestingly, neuroanatomical and synaptic analysis of the amygdala circuitry suggests that the effects of mGlu4 activation occur outside the central nucleus via modulation of multisensory thalamic inputs to lateral amygdala principal neurons and dorso-medial intercalated cells. Furthermore, we developed optogluram, a small diffusible photoswitchable positive allosteric modulator of mGlu4. This ligand allows the control of endogenous mGlu4 activity with light. Using this photopharmacological approach, we rapidly and reversibly inhibited behavioral symptoms associated with persistent pain through optical control of optogluram in the amygdala of freely behaving animals. Altogether, our data identify amygdala mGlu4 signaling as a mechanism that bypasses central sensitization processes to dynamically modulate persistent pain symptoms. Our findings help to define novel and more precise therapeutic interventions for chronic pain, and exemplify the potential of optopharmacology to study the dynamic activity of endogenous neuromodulatory mechanisms in vivo.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 20 December 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.223.

  7. The Azospirillum brasilense Che1 chemotaxis pathway controls swimming velocity, which affects transient cell-to-cell clumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber; Russell, Matthew H; Alexandre, Gladys

    2012-07-01

    The Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway of Azospirillum brasilense contributes to chemotaxis and aerotaxis, and it has also been found to contribute to regulating changes in cell surface adhesive properties that affect the propensity of cells to clump and to flocculate. The exact contribution of Che1 to the control of chemotaxis and flocculation in A. brasilense remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Che1 affects reversible cell-to-cell clumping, a cellular behavior in which motile cells transiently interact by adhering to one another at their nonflagellated poles before swimming apart. Clumping precedes and is required for flocculation, and both processes appear to be independently regulated. The phenotypes of a ΔaerC receptor mutant and of mutant strains lacking cheA1, cheY1, cheB1, or cheR1 (alone or in combination) or with che1 deleted show that Che1 directly mediates changes in the flagellar swimming velocity and that this behavior directly modulates the transient nature of clumping. Our results also suggest that an additional receptor(s) and signaling pathway(s) are implicated in mediating other Che1-independent changes in clumping identified in the present study. Transient clumping precedes the transition to stable clump formation, which involves the production of specific extracellular polysaccharides (EPS); however, production of these clumping-specific EPS is not directly controlled by Che1 activity. Che1-dependent clumping may antagonize motility and prevent chemotaxis, thereby maintaining cells in a metabolically favorable niche.

  8. Elevated connexin 43 expression in arsenite-and cadmium-transformed human bladder cancer cells, tumor transplants and selected high grade human bladder cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruowen; Wang, Liping; Garrett, Scott H; Sens, Donald A; Dunlevy, Jane R; Zhou, Xu Dong; Somji, Seema

    2016-10-01

    Connexin 43 has been shown to play a role in cell migration and invasion; however, its role in bladder cancer is not well defined. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that the environmental pollutants arsenite and cadmium can cause malignant transformation of the immortalized urothelial cell line UROtsa. These transformed cells can form tumors in immune-compromised mice. The goal of the present study was to determine if connexin 43 is expressed in the normal human bladder, the arsenite and cadmiun-transformed UROtsa cells as well as human urothelial cancer. The results obtained showed that connexin 43 is not expressed in the epithelial cells of the human bladder but is expressed in immortalized cultures of human urothelial cells and the expression is variable in the arsenite and cadmium- transformed urothelial cell lines derived from these immortalized cells. Tumor heterotransplants generated from the transformed cells expressed connexin 43 and the expression was localized to areas of squamous differentiation. Immuno-histochemical analysis of human bladder cancers also showed that the expression of connexin 43 was localized to areas of the tumor that showed early features of squamous differentiation. Treatment of UROtsa cells with various concentrations of arsenite or cadmium did not significantly alter the expression level of connexin 43. In conclusion, our results show that the expression of connexin 43 is localized to the areas of the tumor that show squamous differentiation, which may be an indicator of poor prognosis. This suggests that connexin 43 has the potential to be developed as a biomarker for bladder cancer that may have the ability to invade and metastasize.

  9. X-ray crystal structure of arsenite-inhibited xanthine oxidase: μ-sulfido,μ-oxo double bridge between molybdenum and arsenic in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongnan; Hall, James; Hille, Russ

    2011-08-17

    Xanthine oxidoreductase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation reaction of sp(2)-hybridized carbon centers of a variety of substrates, including purines, aldehydes, and other heterocyclic compounds. The complex of arsenite-inhibited xanthine oxidase has been characterized previously by UV-vis, electron paramagnetic resonance, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and the catalytically essential sulfido ligand of the square-pyrimidal molybdenum center has been suggested to be involved in arsenite binding through either a μ-sulfido,μ-oxo double bridge or a single μ-sulfido bridge. However, this is contrary to the crystallographically observed single μ-oxo bridge between molybdenum and arsenic in the desulfo form of aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas (an enzyme closely related to xanthine oxidase), whose molybdenum center has an oxo ligand replacing the catalytically essential sulfur, as seen in the functional form of xanthine oxidase. Here we use X-ray crystallography to characterize the molybdenum center of arsenite-inhibited xanthine oxidase and solve the structures of the oxidized and reduced inhibition complexes at 1.82 and 2.11 Å resolution, respectively. We observe μ-sulfido,μ-oxo double bridges between molybdenum and arsenic in the active sites of both complexes. Arsenic is four-coordinate with a distorted trigonal-pyramidal geometry in the oxidized complex and three-coordinate with a distorted trigonal-planar geometry in the reduced complex. The doubly bridged binding mode is in agreement with previous XAS data indicating that the catalytically essential sulfur is also essential for the high affinity of reduced xanthine oxidoreductase for arsenite.

  10. Top-down control of carbon sequestration: grazing affects microbial structure and function in salt marsh soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Peter; Granse, Dirk; Nolte, Stefanie; Do, Hai Thi; Weingartner, Magdalena; Hoth, Stefan; Jensen, Kai

    2017-03-20

    Tidal wetlands have been increasingly recognized as long-term carbon sinks in recent years. Work on carbon sequestration and decomposition processes in tidal wetlands focused so far mainly on effects of global-change factors such as sea-level rise and increasing temperatures. However, little is known about effects of land use, such as livestock grazing, on organic matter decomposition and ultimately carbon sequestration. The present work aims at understanding the mechanisms by which large herbivores can affect organic matter decomposition in tidal wetlands. This was achieved by studying both direct animal-microbe interactions and indirect animal-plant-microbe interactions in grazed and ungrazed areas of two long-term experimental field sites at the German North Sea coast. We assessed bacterial and fungal gene abundance using quantitative PCR, as well as the activity of microbial exo-enzymes by conducting fluorometric assays. We demonstrate that grazing can have a profound impact on the microbial community structure of tidal wetland soils, by consistently increasing the fungi-to-bacteria ratio by 38-42%, and therefore potentially exerts important control over carbon turnover and sequestration. The observed shift in the microbial community was primarily driven by organic matter source, with higher contributions of recalcitrant autochthonous (terrestrial) vs. easily degradable allochthonous (marine) sources in grazed areas favoring relative fungal abundance. We propose a novel and indirect form of animal-plant-microbe interaction: top-down control of aboveground vegetation structure determines the capacity of allochthonous organic matter trapping during flooding and thus the structure of the microbial community. Furthermore, our data provide the first evidence that grazing slows down microbial exo-enzyme activity and thus decomposition through changes in soil redox chemistry. Activities of enzymes involved in C cycling were reduced by 28-40%, while activities of

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Dd of... - Tank Control Levels for Tanks at Existing Affected Sources as Required by 40 CFR 63.685(b)(1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Existing Affected Sources as Required by 40 CFR 63.685(b)(1) 3 Table 3 to Subpart DD of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants from Off-Site Waste and Recovery Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. DD, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart DD of Part 63—Tank Control Levels for Tanks at Existing Affected Sources as Required by 40 CFR...

  12. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Dd of... - Tank Control Levels for Tanks at New Affected Sources as Required by 40 CFR 63.685(b)(2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Affected Sources as Required by 40 CFR 63.685(b)(2) 4 Table 4 to Subpart DD of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants from Off-Site Waste and Recovery Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. DD, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart DD of Part 63—Tank Control Levels for Tanks at New Affected Sources as Required by 40 CFR...

  13. Factors Affecting Recruitment and Attrition in Randomised Controlled Trials of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Pregnancy-Related Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciara Close

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs investigating Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM for pregnancy-related issues have encountered issues with recruitment and attrition. Little is known about the cause of these issues. Methods. Data was gathered from an antenatal CAM randomised controlled trial. During foetal anomaly appointments, women meeting inclusion criteria were invited to participate in the trial. Numbers of women invited and eligible were recorded. Reasons for noninterest were noted and analysed. Focus groups exploring trial experience of participants were also conducted. Findings. Of the 428 women invited to participate, 376 were eligible and just under a quarter participated. Reasons for nonparticipation included concerns about CAM and lack of interest in participation in research. Other factors negatively affecting recruitment included recruitment timing, competition for participants, limited support from staff, and inadequate trial promotion. Factors encouraging recruitment included being interested in research and seeking pain relief. Reasons for dropping out were time constraints, travel issues, work commitments, and pregnancy issues. Several women in the sham and usual care group dropped out due to dissatisfaction with treatment allocation. Conclusion. CAM researchers must explore problems encountered with recruitment and attrition so that evidence-based implementation strategies to address the issues can be developed.

  14. Power training and postmenopausal hormone therapy affect transcriptional control of specific co-regulated gene clusters in skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, Vidal; Törmäkangas, Timo; Ronkainen, Paula H. A.; Taaffe, Dennis R.; Takala, Timo; Koskinen, Satu; Cheng, Sulin; Puolakka, Jukka; Kujala, Urho M.; Suominen, Harri; Sipilä, Sarianna; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2010-01-01

    At the moment, there is no clear molecular explanation for the steeper decline in muscle performance after menopause or the mechanisms of counteractive treatments. The goal of this genome-wide study was to identify the genes and gene clusters through which power training (PT) comprising jumping activities or estrogen containing hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may affect skeletal muscle properties after menopause. We used musculus vastus lateralis samples from early stage postmenopausal (50–57 years old) women participating in a yearlong randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial with PT and HRT interventions. Using microarray platform with over 24,000 probes, we identified 665 differentially expressed genes. The hierarchical clustering method was used to assort the genes. Additionally, enrichment analysis of gene ontology (GO) terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways was carried out to clarify whether assorted gene clusters are enriched with particular functional categories. The analysis revealed transcriptional regulation of 49 GO/KEGG categories. PT upregulated transcription in “response to contraction”—category revealing novel candidate genes for contraction-related regulation of muscle function while HRT upregulated gene expression related to functionality of mitochondria. Moreover, several functional categories tightly related to muscle energy metabolism, development, and function were affected regardless of the treatment. Our results emphasize that during the early stages of the postmenopause, muscle properties are under transcriptional modulation, which both PT and HRT partially counteract leading to preservation of muscle power and potentially reducing the risk for aging-related muscle weakness. More specifically, PT and HRT may function through improving energy metabolism, response to contraction as well as by preserving functionality of the mitochondria. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this

  15. Factors affecting the synergy of thiabendazole, sodium bicarbonate, and heat to control postharvest green mold of citrus fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirra, Mario; D'Aquino, Salvatore; Palma, Amedeo; Angioni, Alberto; Cabras, Paolo

    2008-11-26

    The efficacy of thiabendazole (TBZ) to control postharvest decay caused by Penicillium digitatum of citrus fruit can be enhanced by co-application with sodium bicarbonate (SBC) and/or heat treatment. The impact of these treatments was investigated in citrus fruit, as a function of TBZ and SBC concentration and temperature, and were related to the amount of TBZ residues in fruit (total residues), in fruit surface, in the cuticular wax, and in the inner fruit. The residue levels of TBZ were determined in 'Valencia' oranges following a 1 min dip in an aqueous mixture of SBC at 0.5, 1, or 2 wt %/vol and TBZ at 600 or 400 mg/L (active ingredient, a.i.) at 20 or 40 degrees C and after 0 and 20 days at 17 degrees C and 90% relative humidity. The influence of SBC and heat on the TBZ residue concentration on the fruit surface, in cuticular wax, and on the inner cuticle tissue was determined in 'Salustiana' oranges after a 1 or 3 min dip in TBZ alone at 600 mg/L and 20 or 50 degrees C or for 1 min in TBZ at 600 mg/L and SBC at 2% and 20 degrees C. The efficacy of heat treatments with water, SBC, and TBZ, applied separately or in combination, was investigated on artificially inoculated 'Nova' mandarins and 'Valencia' oranges for the control of postharvest green mold caused by a TBZ-sensitive (TBZ-s) or TBZ-resistant (TBZ-r) isolate of P. digitatum. The residue levels of TBZ in fruit, evaluated as total residues, were not affected by the co-application of SBC in most samples. While TBZ residues in the fruit surface were not significantly affected by the dip temperature or by co-application of SBC, the rates of diffusion and penetration of TBZ into cuticular wax markedly increased in the presence of SBC or when TBZ was applied in combination with heat. TBZ residues in the inner tissue of fruits treated at 20 degrees C were not dependent upon the dip time or by the presence of SBC and were similar to those found in fruit treated with TBZ at 50 degrees C for 1 min, whereas

  16. Nutritional Ketosis Affects Metabolism and Behavior in Sprague-Dawley Rats in Both Control and Chronic Stress Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene L. Brownlow

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional ketosis may enhance cerebral energy metabolism and has received increased interest as a way to improve or preserve performance and resilience. Most studies to date have focused on metabolic or neurological disorders while anecdotal evidence suggests that ketosis may enhance performance in the absence of underlying dysfunction. Moreover, decreased availability of glucose in the brain following stressful events is associated with impaired cognition, suggesting the need for more efficient energy sources. We tested the hypotheses that ketosis induced by endogenous or exogenous ketones could: (a augment cognitive outcomes in healthy subjects; and (b prevent stress-induced detriments in cognitive parameters. Adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats were used to investigate metabolic and behavioral outcomes in 3 dietary conditions: ketogenic (KD, ketone supplemented (KS, or NIH-31 control diet in both control or chronic stress conditions. Acute administration of exogenous ketones resulted in reduction in blood glucose and sustained ketosis. Chronic experiments showed that in control conditions, only KD resulted in pronounced metabolic alterations and improved performance in the novel object recognition test. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis response revealed that KD-fed rats maintained peripheral ketosis despite increases in glucose whereas no diet effects were observed in ACTH or CORT levels. Both KD and KS-fed rats decreased escape latencies on the third day of water maze, whereas only KD prevented stress-induced deficits on the last testing day and improved probe test performance. Stress-induced decrease in hippocampal levels of β-hydroxybutyrate was attenuated in KD group while both KD and KS prevented stress effects on BDNF levels. Mitochondrial enzymes associated with ketogenesis were increased in both KD and KS hippocampal samples and both endothelial and neuronal glucose transporters were affected by stress but only in the

  17. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Yuta [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Yuan, Bo, E-mail: yuanbo@toyaku.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 1550 4th St, RH584E Box 2911 San Francisco, CA 94158-2911 (United States); Kaise, Toshikazu [Laboratory of Environmental Chemodynamics, School of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Takeichi, Makoto [Yoneyama Maternity Hospital, 2-12 Shin-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0065 (Japan); Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Kroetz, Deanna L. [Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 1550 4th St, RH584E Box 2911 San Francisco, CA 94158-2911 (United States); Toyoda, Hiroo [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As{sup III}) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As{sup III} on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As{sup III} were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As{sup III} than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As{sup III} in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As{sup III} cytotoxicity between these cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examination of effect of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion

  18. Factors affecting post-control reinvasion by seed of an invasive species, Phragmites australis, in the central Platte River, Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatowitsch, Susan M.; Larson, Diane L.; Larson, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive plants, such as Phragmites australis, can profoundly affect channel environments of large rivers by stabilizing sediments and altering water flows. Invasive plant removal is considered necessary where restoration of dynamic channels is needed to provide critical habitat for species of conservation concern. However, these programs are widely reported to be inefficient. Post-control reinvasion is frequent, suggesting increased attention is needed to prevent seed regeneration. To develop more effective responses to this invader in the Central Platte River (Nebraska, USA), we investigated several aspects of Phragmites seed ecology potentially linked to post-control reinvasion, in comparison to other common species: extent of viable seed production, importance of water transport, and regeneration responses to hydrology. We observed that although Phragmites seed does not mature until very late in the ice-free season, populations produce significant amounts of viable seed (>50 % of filled seed). Most seed transported via water in the Platte River are invasive perennial species, although Phragmites abundances are much lower than species such as Lythrum salicaria, Cyperus esculentus and Phalaris arundinacea. Seed regeneration of Phragmites varies greatly depending on hydrology, especially timing of water level changes. Flood events coinciding with the beginning of seedling emergence reduced establishment by as much as 59 % compared to flood events that occurred a few weeks later. Results of these investigations suggest that prevention of seed set (i.e., by removal of flowering culms) should be a priority in vegetation stands not being treated annually. After seeds are in the seedbank, preventing reinvasion using prescribed flooding has a low chance of success given that Phragmites can regenerate in a wide variety of hydrologic microsites.

  19. Self-selected unrefined and refined carbohydrate diets do not affect metabolic control in pump-treated diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venhaus, A; Chantelau, E

    1988-03-01

    This study investigated whether unrefined or refined carbohydrate diets have any effect on metabolic control and on insulin requirement in near-normoglycaemic Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic out-patients on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy. Two females and 8 males (aged 27 +/- 9 years; diabetes duration 13 +/- 8 years; duration of insulin pump therapy 22 +/- 5 months; means +/- SD) participated in a randomised cross-over study with two 6-week periods on self-selected refined and unrefined carbohydrate diets respectively. As a result, energy intake differed between the experimental diets (2372 +/- 669 kcal/day on unrefined diet vs 2757 +/- 654 kcal/day on refined diet, p = 0.04), as did the fibre intake (18 +/- 5 g/day with the refined carbohydrate diet vs 35 +/- 13 g/day with the unrefined carbohydrate diet, p = 0.02). The composition of nutrients was approximately 40% carbohydrate, 45% fat, and 13% protein with both diets. Body weight, HbA1c, daily mean blood glucose (7.2 +/- 0.6 mmol/l) and serum lipids remained virtually unchanged during the entire study. Insulin requirement varied between 40.1 +/- 7.9 U/day with the unrefined carbohydrate diet, and 42.5 +/- 10.1 U/day with the refined carbohydrate diet (NS). Thus, neither the refined nor the unrefined carbohydrate diet affected insulin requirement and metabolic control in these near-normoglycaemic, normolipaemic, non-obese, insulin-pump-treated Type 1 diabetic patients.

  20. Reducing resin content and board density without adversely affecting the mechanical properties of particleboard through controlling particle size

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Arabi; Mehdi Faezipour; Heydar Gholizadeh

    2011-01-01

    Density and resin content are two factors that have a significant effect on the production cost of wood composite.However,particle size affects resin content and density,which suggests that the interaction of these three factors can be manipulated to reduce the board density and resin content of particleboard without adversely influencing its mechai cal properties.Some mathematical functional forms based on resin content,board density and slenderness ratio were regressed and an appropriate form was chosen.According to analysis of the results using SHAZAM 9 software,the exponential function best fit the experimental data.Finally,"indifference curves" of mechanical properties were illustrated and analyzed.The results indicated that negative effects of density or resin content reduction on mechanical properties could be compensated for by controlling particles' slenderness ratio.Interestingly,increases in slenderness ratio compensated for the negative effects of decreases in resin content or board density on module of rupture (MOR) and module of elasticity (MOE).Moreover,this "compensation ratio" intensified as resin content or density decreased and/or as the MOR or MOE increased.On the other hand,reduction in slenderness ratio indicated a complementary effect on reducing internal bond (IB) strength,a result of decresses in resin content or density.Moreover,this "complementary ratio" was intensified as resin content or density decreased and/or as IB strength increased.

  1. Factors affecting fuel break effectiveness in the control of large fires on the Los Padres National Forest, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syphard, Alexandra D.; Keeley, Jon E.; Brennan, Teresa J.

    2011-01-01

    As wildfires have increased in frequency and extent, so have the number of homes developed in the wildland-urban interface. In California, the predominant approach to mitigating fire risk is construction of fuel breaks, but there has been little empirical study of their role in controlling large fires.We constructed a spatial database of fuel breaks on the Los Padres National Forest in southern California to better understand characteristics of fuel breaks that affect the behaviour of large fires and to map where fires and fuel breaks most commonly intersect. We evaluated whether fires stopped or crossed over fuel breaks over a 28-year period and compared the outcomes with physical characteristics of the sites, weather and firefighting activities during the fire event. Many fuel breaks never intersected fires, but others intersected several, primarily in historically fire-prone areas. Fires stopped at fuel breaks 46% of the time, almost invariably owing to fire suppression activities. Firefighter access to treatments, smaller fires and longer fuel breaks were significant direct influences, and younger vegetation and fuel break maintenance indirectly improved the outcome by facilitating firefighter access. This study illustrates the importance of strategic location of fuel breaks because they have been most effective where they provided access for firefighting activities.

  2. Wolbachia Affects Reproduction and Population Dynamics of the Coffee Berry Borer (Hypothenemus hampei): Implications for Biological Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Yobana A.; Verle Rodrigues, José C.; Bayman, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Wolbachia are widely distributed endosymbiotic bacteria that influence the reproduction and fitness of their hosts. In recent years the manipulation of Wolbachia infection has been considered as a potential tool for biological control. The coffee berry borer (CBB), Hypothenemus hampei, is the most devastating coffee pest worldwide. Wolbachia infection in the CBB has been reported, but until now the role of Wolbachia in CBB reproduction and fitness has not been tested. To address this issue we reared the CBB in artificial diets with and without tetracycline (0.1% w/v) for ten generations. Tetracycline reduced significantly the relative proportion of Wolbachia in the CBB microbiota from 0.49% to 0.04%. This reduction affected CBB reproduction: females fed with tetracycline had significantly fewer progeny, lower fecundity, and fewer eggs per female. Tetracycline also reduced the population growth rate (λ), net reproductive rate (R0), and mean generation time (T) in CBB; the reduction in population growth was mostly due to variation in fertility, according to life time response experiments (LTREs) analysis. Our results suggest that Wolbachia contribute to the reproductive success of the CBB and their manipulation represents a possible approach to CBB biocontrol mediated by microbiome management. PMID:28085049

  3. Is the Control of Applied Digital Forces During Natural Five-digit Grasping Affected by Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Tsun; Jou, I-Ming; Lin, Chien-Ju; Chieh, Hsiao-Feng; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Su, Fong-Chin

    2015-07-01

    The impaired sensory function of the hand induced by carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is known to disturb dexterous manipulations. However, force control during daily grasping configuration among the five digits has not been a prominent focus of study. Because grasping is so important to normal function and use of a hand, it is important to understand how sensory changes in CTS affect the digit force of natural grasp. We therefore examined the altered patterns of digit forces applied during natural five-digit grasping in patients with CTS and compared them with those seen in control subjects without CTS. We hypothesized that the patients with CTS will grasp by applying larger forces with lowered pair correlations and more force variability of the involved digits than the control subjects. Specifically, we asked: (1) Is there a difference between patients with CTS and control subjects in applied force by digits during lift-hold-lower task? (2) Is there a difference in force correlation coefficient of the digit pairs? (3) Are there force variability differences during the holding phase? We evaluated 15 female patients with CTS and 15 control subjects matched for age, gender, and hand dominance. The applied radial forces (Fr) of the five digits were recorded by respective force transducers on a cylinder simulator during the lift-hold-lower task with natural grasping. The movement phases of the task were determined by a video-based motion capture system. The applied forces of the thumb in patients with CTS (7 ± 0.8 N; 95% CI, 7.2-7.4 N) versus control subjects (5 ± 0.8 N; 95% CI, 5.1-5.3 N) and the index finger in patients with CTS (3 ± 0.3 N; 95% CI, 3.2-3.3 N) versus control subjects (2 ± 0.3 N; 95% CI, 2.2-2.3 N) observed throughout most of the task were larger in the CTS group (p ranges 0.035-0.050 for thumb and 0.016-0.050 for index finger). In addition, the applied force of the middle finger in patients with CTS (1 ± 0.1 N; 95% CI, 1.3-1.4

  4. Tissue distribution and subcellular binding of arsenic in marmoset monkeys after injection of /sup 74/As-arsenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahter, M.; Marafante, E.; Lindgren, A.; Dencker, L.

    1982-10-01

    The distribution and retention of arsenic in Marmoset monkeys, given /sup 74/As-arsenite (0.4 mg As/kg body weight) i.p., were studied by means of whole-body autoradiography and determination of /sup 74/As-levels in tissues and excreta. Only about 30% of the dose was eliminated over 4 days, mainly via the kidneys. All of the arsenic in urine and tissues was found to be in inorganic form. Tissues with highest accumulation 4 days after dosing were liver (about 20% of the dose), squamous epithelium of oral cavity and esophagus, kidney cortex, skin, testes (mainly tubuli seminiferi) and intestinal wall. As a rule the major part of the arsenic in these tissues was found to be associated with cellular organelles. In the liver about 50% of the arsenic was strongly bound to the rough microsomal membranes. In the soluble extract of tissues, arsenic was mainly associated with macromolecular constituents. The long retention time and tight binding of arsenic could partly be explained by the fact that no biotransformation into methylated arsenic occurred, in contrast to all other species studied so far.

  5. Fe-Mn binary oxide incorporated into diatomite as an adsorbent for arsenite removal: preparation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fangfang; Qu, Jiuhui; Liu, Huijuan; Liu, Ruiping; Zhao, Xu

    2009-10-15

    Fe-Mn binary oxide incorporated into diatomite (FMBO-diatomite) was prepared by a simple coating method, and exhibited high oxidation and adsorption ability for arsenite [As(III)]. After being incorporated by Fe-Mn binary oxide, the surface area of diatomite increased 36%, and the pore volume increased five times. The pHzpc of FMBO-diatomite was determined to be 8.1. These characteristics are responsible for the increased As(III) adsorption efficiency. The adsorption equilibria of As(III) on FMBO-diatomite were described well by a Langmuir isotherm model due to the homogeneous distribution of Fe-Mn binary oxide on a diatomite surface. As(III) was oxidized into As(V), and then adsorbed by FMBO-diatomite. The oxidation and adsorption efficiencies for As(III) depended deeply on the pH of solution. When the pH was raised to 8.1, the As(III) adsorption efficiency of FMBO-diatomite was almost equal to the As(III) oxidation efficiency. Silicate and phosphate had negative effects on As(III) adsorption. Also the influence of silicate and phosphate with the pH variation was different.

  6. Photosynthesis is induced in rice plants that associate with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and are grown under arsenate and arsenite stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Sara Adrian Lopez; Domingues, Adilson Pereira; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2015-09-01

    The metalloid arsenic (As) increases in agricultural soils because of anthropogenic activities and may have phytotoxic effects depending on the available concentrations. Plant performance can be improved by arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) association under challenging conditions, such as those caused by excessive soil As levels. In this study, the influence of AM on CO2 assimilation, chlorophyll a fluorescence, SPAD-chlorophyll contents and plant growth was investigated in rice plants exposed to arsenate (AsV) or arsenite (AsIII) and inoculated or not with Rhizophagus irregularis. Under AsV and AsIII exposure, AM rice plants had greater biomass accumulation and relative chlorophyll content, increased water-use efficiency, higher carbon assimilation rate and higher stomatal conductance and transpiration rates than non-AM rice plants did. Chlorophyll a fluorescence analysis revealed significant differences in the response of AM-associated and -non-associated plants to As. Mycorrhization increased the maximum and actual quantum yields of photosystem II and the electron transport rate, maintaining higher values even under As exposure. Apart from the negative effects of AsV and AsIII on the photosynthetic rates and PSII efficiency in rice leaves, taken together, these results indicate that AM is able to sustain higher rice photosynthesis efficiency even under elevated As concentrations, especially when As is present as AsV.

  7. Arsenate and arsenite exposure modulate antioxidants and amino acids in contrasting arsenic accumulating rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Richa; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Tripathi, Preeti; Dixit, Garima; Sharma, Yogesh Kumar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2013-11-15

    Carcinogenic arsenic (As) concentrations are found in rice due to irrigation with contaminated groundwater in South-East Asia. The present study evaluates comparative antioxidant property and specific amino acid accumulation in contrasting rice genotypes corresponding to differential As accumulation during arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) exposures. The study was conducted on two contrasting As accumulating rice genotypes selected from 303 genotype accessions, in hydroponic conditions. Maximum As accumulation was up to 1181 μg g(-1) dw in the roots of high As accumulating genotype (HARG), and 89 μg g(-1) dw in low As accumulating genotype (LARG) under As(III) exposures. The inorganic As was correlated more significantly upon exposures to As(III) than As(V). In the presence of As(V) various antioxidant enzymes guiacol peroxidase (GPX), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were highly stimulated in HARG. The stress responsive amino acids proline, cysteine, glycine, glutamic acid and methionine showed higher accumulation in HARG than LARG. A clear correlation was found between stress responsive amino acids, As accumulation and antioxidative response. The comparisons between the contrasting genotypes helped to determine the significance of antioxidants and specific amino acid response to As stress.

  8. Sodium arsenite mediated immuno-disruption through alteration of transcription profile of cytokines in chicken splenocytes under in vitro system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhashree; Pan, Diganta; Bera, Asit Kumar; Rana, Tanmoy; Bhattacharya, Debasis; Bandyapadyay, Subhasis; De, Sumanta; Sreevatsava, V; Bhattacharya, Somnath; Das, Subrata Kumar; Bandyopadhayay, Sandip

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitously found metalloid that commonly contaminates drinking water and agricultural food. To understand the ecotoxicological effects of arsenic in environment, it is essential to ameliorate the deleterious effects on human and animal health, particularly on the immune response. We investigated the effects of inorganic arsenic (iAs) on the immune response of chicken splenocytes. Both 1 and 10 mM concentrations of sodium arsenite treatment significantly reduced (Ptreatment also revealed time dependent differences. Relative quantification of expression of IFNγ and IL2 revealed that both genes were significantly down regulated (P<0.001) at both concentrations at each time point. iNOS gene was rapidly down regulated in splenocytes at 24 h at the high doses of As treated splenocyte, a gradual decreasing trend at low doses. Down regulation of IL-2 gene expression in response to As was further evidenced by a significant reduction (P<0.001) in the release of IL-2 into the splenocyte culture medium. We suggest that arsenic, a potent immunotoxic agent, modulates non-specific immune responses and alters the expression of cytokines in a dose and time dependent manner.

  9. Genetically Engineering Bacillus subtilis with a Heat-Resistant Arsenite Methyltransferase for Bioremediation of Arsenic-Contaminated Organic Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke; Chen, Chuan; Shen, Qirong; Rosen, Barry P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2015-10-01

    Organic manures may contain high levels of arsenic (As) due to the use of As-containing growth-promoting substances in animal feed. To develop a bioremediation strategy to remove As from organic waste, Bacillus subtilis 168, a bacterial strain which can grow at high temperature but is unable to methylate and volatilize As, was genetically engineered to express the arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase gene (CmarsM) from the thermophilic alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. The genetically engineered B. subtilis 168 converted most of the inorganic As in the medium into dimethylarsenate and trimethylarsine oxide within 48 h and volatized substantial amounts of dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine. The rate of As methylation and volatilization increased with temperature from 37 to 50°C. When inoculated into an As-contaminated organic manure composted at 50°C, the modified strain significantly enhanced As volatilization. This study provides a proof of concept of using genetically engineered microorganisms for bioremediation of As-contaminated organic waste during composting.

  10. [Assessing various aspects of the motivation to eat that can affect food intake and body weight control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellisle, F

    2009-04-01

    control are "emotional eating" and "externality", which represent an individual's vulnerability to eat in response to emotional states or external cues, respectively. These questionnaires have been translated into French and validated for the French population. Average data are available for normal weight and obese French men and women. A gender difference is often reported: women, and even young girls, tend to have higher scores than males for most dimensions. These questionnaires have been extensively used in populations without psychiatric disorders, with the only exception of diagnosed eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia nervosa. The questionnaires have not been used until now in populations with other types of psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disease. Their relevance for such populations is now an important question, since last generation pharmaceutical treatments of such psychiatric disorders seem to adversely affect body weight control. It then becomes critical to know whether the psychological dimensions assessed by such questionnaires reflect the action of pharmacological agents that induce weight gain. A research project is now in progress at Sainte-Anne Hospital to investigate many dimensions of the motivation to eat, as assessed by the questionnaires, in psychiatric patients receiving various types of antipsychotic agents. The results of this original study might provide hints about the mechanisms that lead to body weight gain in patients receiving certain types of antipsychotic pharmacological agents and potentially help in preventing or reversing the weight gain associated with such treatments.

  11. Negative Affect Prior to and Following Overeating-Only, Loss of Control Eating-Only, and Binge Eating Episodes in Obese Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kelly C.; Crosby, Ross D.; Cao, Li; Crow, Scott J.; Engel, Scott G.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Peterson, Carol B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective was to examine the trajectory of five types of negative affect (global negative affect, fear, guilt, hostility, sadness) prior to and following three types of eating episodes (overeating in the absence of loss of control [OE-only], loss of control eating in the absence of overeating [LOC-only], and binge eating) among obese adults using ecological momentary assessment (EMA). Method Fifty obese adults (84% female) completed a two-week EMA protocol during which they were asked to record all eating episodes and rate each episode on continua of overeating and loss of control. Momentary measures of global negative affect, fear, guilt, hostility, and sadness were assessed using an abbreviated version of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). Trajectories for each of the five types of negative affect were modeled prior to and following episodes of OE-only, LOC-only, and binge eating. Results Consistent with previous findings, global negative affect and Guilt increased prior to and decreased following binge eating episodes (all ps<.05). Guilt also decreased following OE-only episodes (p<.05). Discussion These results are consistent with the affect regulation model of binge eating and suggest that binge eating may function to regulate global negative affect, and more specifically, guilt among obese adults. These data suggest that the relationship between negative affect and binge eating may not be unique to individuals with clinical eating disorders and indicate that targeting negative affect may be an effective strategy for the treatment of binge eating in the context of obesity. PMID:25808854

  12. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) associated with Staphylococcus spp. bacteremia, responsive to potassium arsenite 0.5% in a veterinary surgeon and his coworking wife, handling with CFS animal cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarello, W

    2001-10-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in human patients remain a controversial and perplexing condition with emerging zoonotic aspects. Recent advances in human medicine seem to indicate a bacterial etiology and the condition has already been described in horses, dogs, cats and birds of prey in association with micrococci-like organisms in the blood. To evaluate the possibility of a chronic bacteremia, a veterinary surgeon (the author) and his coworking wife, both diagnosed with CFS and meeting the CDC working case definition, were submitted to rapid blood cultures and fresh blood smears investigations. Blood cultures proved Staph-positive and micrococci-like organisms in the blood were repeatedly observed in the 3-year period preceding the arsenical therapy, during which several medicaments, including antibiotics, proved unsuccessful. Following treatment with a low dosage arsenical drug (potassium arsenite 0.5%, im., 1 ml/12 h, for 10 days) both patients experienced complete remission. At the post-treatment control made 1 month later, micrococci had disappeared from the blood, and the CD4/CD8 ratio was raising.

  13. Factors affecting the accuracy of controlled attenuation parameter (CAP in assessing hepatic steatosis in patients with chronic liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Sik Jung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Controlled attenuation parameter (CAP can measure hepatic steatosis. However, factors affecting its accuracy have not been described yet. This study investigated predictors of discordance between liver biopsy (LB and CAP. METHODS: A total of 161 consecutive patients with chronic liver disease who underwent LB and CAP were enrolled prospectively. Histological steatosis was graded as S0 (66% of hepatocytes. Cutoff CAP values were calculated from our cohort (250, 301, and 325 dB/m for ≥ S1, ≥ S2, and S3. Discordance was defined as a discrepancy of at least two steatosis stages between LB and CAP. RESULTS: The median age (102 males and 59 females was 49 years. Repartition of histological steatosis was as follows; S0 26.1% (n = 42, S1 49.7% (n = 80, S2 20.5% (n = 33, and S3 3.7% (n = 6. In multivariate linear regression analysis, CAP value was independently associated with steatosis grade along with body mass index (BMI and interquartile range/median of CAP value (IQR/MCAP (all P<0.05. Discordance was identified in 13 (8.1% patients. In multivariate analysis, histological S3 (odd ratio [OR], 9.573; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.207-75.931; P = 0.033 and CAP value (OR, 1.020; 95% CI, 1.006-1.034; P = 0.006 were significantly associated with discordance, when adjusting for BMI, IQR/MCAP, and necroinflammation, reflected by histological activity or ALT level. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with high grade steatosis or high CAP values have a higher risk of discordance between LB and CAP. Further studies are needed to improve the accuracy of CAP interpretation, especially in patients with higher CAP values.

  14. Nephrology pre-dialysis care affects the psychological adjustment, not only blood pressure, anemia, and phosphorus control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusho, Masahide; Kawazu, Minami; Takeda, Kazuhito; Kurachi, Emiko; Nakashima, Takafumi; Sagara, Rikako; Hara, Takashi; Mukai, Hideyuki; Miura, Shuhei; Sugawara, Koji

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have suggested that pre-dialysis care is associated with clinical outcomes. However, little has been reported on the influence of pre-dialysis care on the psychological adjustment to dialysis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of pre-dialysis care on psychological adjustment to dialysis and clinical characteristics. In this cross-sectional study, we enrolled 52 patients who started hemodialysis at our hospital. They were divided into two groups according to the time of referral to our hospital: the early referral group (over 1 year prior to first dialysis: 19 patients, mean age 69.3 ± 11.1) and the late referral group (within 1 year prior to first dialysis: 33 patients, mean age 72.3 ± 8.9). We measured the clinical characteristics and evaluated the psychological adjustment to dialysis by Shontz's stage theory. Compared with the late referral group, the early referral group had a significantly better clinical characteristics concerning blood pressure (140.2 ± 23.7 vs. 156.9 ± 23.3 mmHg, P = 0.0150), hemoglobin (10.3 ± 1.5 vs. 9.4 ± 1.0 g/dL, P = 0.0078), and phosphorus (4.5 ± 1.5 vs. 5.5 ± 1.3 mg/dL, P = 0.0166). In addition, psychological adjustment to dialysis evaluated by Shontz's stage theory was significantly better in the early referral group (P = 0.017). Our results indicate that nephrology pre-dialysis care affects not only blood pressure, anemia, and phosphorus control but also the psychological adjustment to dialysis.

  15. A Randomized Controlled Comparison of Integrative Cognitive-Affective Therapy and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy-Enhanced for Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Peterson, Carol B.; Crosby, Ross D.; Smith, Tracey L.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this investigation was to compare a new psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa, Integrative Cognitive-Affective Therapy (ICAT), with an established treatment, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy-Enhanced (CBT-E). Method Eighty adults with symptoms of bulimia nervosa were randomized to ICAT or CBT-E for 21 sessions over 19 weeks. Bulimic symptoms, measured by the Eating Disorder Examination, were assessed at baseline, end of treatment, and 4-month follow-up. Treatment outcome, as measured by binge eating frequency, purging frequency, global eating disorder severity, emotion regulation, self-oriented cognition, depression, anxiety, and self-esteem, was determined using generalized estimating equations, logistic regression, and a general linear model (intent-to-treat). Results Both treatments were associated with significant improvement in bulimic symptoms as well as all measures of outcome, and no statistically significant differences were observed between the two conditions at end of treatment or follow-up. Intent-to-treat abstinence rates for ICAT (37.5% at end of treatment, 32.5% at follow-up) and CBT-E (22.5% at both end of treatment and follow-up) were not significantly different. Conclusions ICAT was associated with significant improvements in bulimic and associated symptoms that did not differ from those obtained with CBT-E. This initial randomized controlled trial of a new individual psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa suggests that targeting emotion and self-oriented cognition in the context of nutritional rehabilitation may be efficacious and worthy of further study. PMID:23701891

  16. The associations of humorous coping styles, affective states, job demands and job control with the frequency of upper respiratory tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibe Doosje

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: There is some evidence that job demands and job resources such as job control and humorous coping may contribute to the risk of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI.Research purpose: The purpose of this study was to test a model including these variables as well as job-related affect, in order to explore their role in the explanation of the frequency of upper respiratory tract infection.Motivation of the study: This study has been conducted in order to extend our understanding of the role of traditional variables like job demands and job control with humorous coping styles and affective variables with regard to the explanation of the frequency of URTI.Research design, approach and method: A sample of 2094 employees filled out questionnaires assessing job demands, job control, generic (MSHS-C, antecedent-focused and responsefocused humorous coping (QOHC and job-related affect (JAWS.Main findings: Job demands were indirectly related to the frequency of upper respiratory tract infections, mediated by their relationships with job control and negative job-related affect. Generic and response-focused humorous coping were less relevant for the explanation of the frequency of upper respiratory tract infections than the presumably ‘healthy’ antecedentfocused humorous coping style. The latter showed a negative association with negative jobrelated affect. The frequency of upper respiratory tract infections was better predicted by job control and negative job-related affect than by humorous coping, in the expected directions.Practical/managerial implication: These findings may have practical relevance for the improvement of stress management interventions in organisations.Contribution/value-add: Although it was shown that healthy humorous coping does contribute to decreases in upper respiratory tract infection, job demands, job resources and negative affective state seem the most important predictors.

  17. Qualitative analysis of interviews of future non-affective psychotic disorder patients and non-psychiatric controls: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katya Rubinstein

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: The findings of this unique historical-prospective qualitative analysis of interviews performed before the onset of psychosis, confirmed previous findings of premorbid abnormality of future non-affective psychosis patients. Using qualitative analysis enabled obtaining a more in-depth understanding of the real-life experience of the premorbid period among patients with non-affective psychotic disorders.

  18. Cardiorespiratory fitness moderates the effect of an affect-guided physical activity prescription: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, A.S.; Kangas, J.L.; Denman, D.C.; Smits, J.A.J.; Yamada, T.; Otto, M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) interventions have a clear role in promoting mental health. Current PA guidelines directed toward specific PA intensities may have negative effects on affective response to exercise, and affective response is an important determinant of PA adherence. In this randomized trial

  19. Past racial discrimination exacerbates the effects of racial exclusion on negative affect, perceived control, and alcohol-risk cognitions among Black young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Michelle L; Peterson, Laurel M; Molloy, Brianne K; Lambert, Sharon F

    2017-06-01

    Racial discrimination is associated with alcohol use and risky sex cognitions and behaviors, which are risk factors for negative health outcomes, including human immunodeficiency virus infection. The current study investigated the causal impact of racial discrimination on alcohol and sexual-risk cognitions while exploring potential mediators that might help explain this relation: negative affect, perceived control, and meaningful existence. We also examined if past discrimination impacts the strength of (moderates) these effects. Participants were 287 Black/African American young adults aged 18-25. They were randomly assigned to be excluded or included by White peers via the game Cyberball. Racial exclusion (vs. inclusion) predicted greater: perceived racial discrimination, negative affect, alcohol use willingness, and reduced perceived control and meaningful existence. Furthermore, excluded participants who experienced more past racial discrimination reported the lowest perceived control, and greatest negative affect and alcohol-risk cognitions. The findings suggest that past racial discrimination exacerbates the harmful health effects of immediate experiences of discrimination.

  20. THE EFFECT OF AN INTEGRATED AFFECTIVE-COGNITIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING APPROACH ON ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT, SELF-EFFICACY, LOCUS OF CONTROL AND ATTITUDE TOWARDS ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahira Anwar Lashari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Engineers are responsible for the sustainable development of society and to be effective in their role they must possess holistic skills that encompass the skills of the affective and the cognitive domain. Therefore, engineering education must place equal emphasis on the needs of the affective domain in addition to the needs of the cognitive domain. However, existing engineering education practices do not pay adequate attention to the needs of the affective domain. Therefore, the study seeks to determine the effect of a teaching and learning approach that integrates the affective and the cognitive learning needs on academic achievement, locus of control, self-efficacy, and attitude towards engineering. A quasi-experimental design study with pre and post-test was conducted on 70 engineering students who were enrolled in the Diploma of engineering programme in the Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia with n=36 and n=34 for the experimental and control group respectively. The results indicate that the experimental group was better on the achievement test and attitude measure compared to the control group and the academic improvement was most noticeable among the low achievers. In conclusion these results indicate that an integrated affective-cognitive learning approach can be used to induce simultaneous improvements in learning of the cognitive and affective domain.

  1. Neurological soft signs and cognitive functions: Amongst euthymic bipolar I disorder cases, non-affected first degree relatives and healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Srikant; Bhatia, Triptish; Mazumdar, Sati; Deshpande, Smita N.

    2016-01-01

    Both neurological soft signs (NSS) and cognitive deficits are present among euthymic bipolar patients. NSS could be related to neurocognitive performance, but this is not explored thoroughly. Healthy relatives of patients may also suffer from similar deficits. This study compared NSS and cognitive functions in euthymic Bipolar I Disorder (BPI) cases to their non-affected first degree relatives and healthy controls. We also investigated the association between NSS and cognitive functions in these three groups. NSS were assessed in three groups using Neurological Evaluation Scale-revised (NES-r). Eight cognitive domains were assessed in 31 euthymic BPI cases, their 30 non-affected first degree relatives and 30 healthy controls using Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (CNB). Euthymic BPI patients had significantly more NSS than non-affected first degree relatives on 5/7 tests (p-value ranges from 0.042 to p = 0.0001) and healthy controls on all tests (p-value from 0.042 to <0.0001). Non-affected first degree relatives and controls did not have any significant difference. BPI participants performed worse than their non-affected first degree relatives on one neurocognitive domain of CNB (spatial memory accuracy, p = 0.03) and healthy controls on four domains (spatial memory accuracy (p = 0.04), abstraction and mental flexibility efficiency (p = 0.04), spatial memory efficiency (p = 0.04), and emotion efficiency (p = 0.04). Non-affected relatives and healthy controls were similar on neurocognitive domains. Accuracy and efficiency indices of some specific cognitive domains were negatively associated with AV rating and tap copying NSS ratings. PMID:27520894

  2. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and arsenite with reduction and pH dual-sensitive vesicle for synergistic cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Xiao, Hong; Li, Jingguo; Cheng, Du; Shuai, Xintao

    2016-06-01

    Drug resistance is the underlying cause for therapeutic failure in clinical cancer chemotherapy. A prodrug copolymer mPEG-PAsp(DIP-co-BZA-co-DOX) (PDBD) was synthesized and assembled into a nanoscale vesicle comprising a PEG corona, a reduction and pH dual-sensitive hydrophobic membrane and an aqueous lumen encapsulating doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX.HCl) and arsenite (As). The dual stimulation-sensitive design of the vesicle gave rise to rapid release of the physically entrapped DOX.HCl and arsenite inside acidic lysosomes, and chemically conjugated DOX inside the cytosol with high glutathione (GSH) concentration. In the optimized concentration range, arsenite previously recognized as a promising anticancer agent from traditional Chinese medicine can down-regulate the expressions of anti-apoptotic and multidrug resistance proteins to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapy. Consequently, the DOX-As-co-loaded vesicle demonstrated potent anticancer activity. Compared to the only DOX-loaded vesicle, the DOX-As-co-loaded one induced more than twice the apoptotic ratio of MCF-7/ADR breast cancer cells at a low As concentration (0.5 μM), due to the synergistic effects of DOX and As. The drug loading strategy integrating chemical conjugation and physical encapsulation in stimulation-sensitive carriers enabled efficient drug loading in the formulation.Drug resistance is the underlying cause for therapeutic failure in clinical cancer chemotherapy. A prodrug copolymer mPEG-PAsp(DIP-co-BZA-co-DOX) (PDBD) was synthesized and assembled into a nanoscale vesicle comprising a PEG corona, a reduction and pH dual-sensitive hydrophobic membrane and an aqueous lumen encapsulating doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX.HCl) and arsenite (As). The dual stimulation-sensitive design of the vesicle gave rise to rapid release of the physically entrapped DOX.HCl and arsenite inside acidic lysosomes, and chemically conjugated DOX inside the cytosol with high glutathione (GSH) concentration. In the

  3. Arsenite removal from aqueous solutions by γ-Fe2O3-TiO2 magnetic nanoparticles through simultaneous photocatalytic oxidation and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lian; Peng, Xianjia; Ni, Fan; Li, Jin; Wang, Dongsheng; Luan, Zhaokun

    2013-02-15

    A novel Fe-Ti binary oxide magnetic nanoparticles which combined the photocatalytic oxidation property of TiO(2) and the high adsorption capacity and magnetic property of γ-Fe(2)O(3) have been synthesized using a coprecipitation and simultaneous oxidation method. The as-prepared samples were characterized by powder XRD, TEM, TG-DTA, VSM and BET methods. Photocatalytic oxidation of arsenite, the effect of solution pH values and initial As(III) concentration on arsenite removal were investigated in laboratory experiments. Batch experimental results showed that under UV light, As(III) can be efficiently oxidized to As(V) by dissolved O(2) in γ-Fe(2)O(3)-TiO(2) nanoparticle suspensions at various pH values. At the same time, As(V) was effectively removed by adsorption onto the surface of nanoparticles. The maximum removal capability of the nano-material for arsenite was 33.03 mg/g at pH 7.0. Among all the common coexisting ions investigated, phosphate was the greatest competitor with arsenic for adsorptive sites on the nano-material. Regeneration studies verified that the γ-Fe(2)O(3)-TiO(2) nanoparticles, which underwent five successive adsorption-desorption processes, still retained comparable catalysis and adsorption performance, indicating the excellent stability of the nanoparticles. The excellent photocatalytic oxidation performance and high uptake capability of the magnetic nano-material make it potentially attractive material for the removal of As(III) from water.

  4. Diversity and abundance of the arsenite oxidase gene aioA in geothermal areas of Tengchong, Yunnan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; Jiang, Dawei; Wu, Geng; Dong, Hailiang; Wang, Yanhong; Li, Bing; Wang, Yanxin; Guo, Qinghai

    2014-01-01

    A total of 12 samples were collected from the Tengchong geothermal areas of Yunnan, China, with the goal to assess the arsenite (AsIII) oxidation potential of the extant microbial communities as inferred by the abundance and diversity of the AsIII oxidase large subunit gene aioA relative to geochemical context. Arsenic concentrations were higher (on average 251.68 μg/L) in neutral or alkaline springs than in acidic springs (on average 30.88 μg/L). aioA abundance ranged from 1.63 × 10(1) to 7.08 × 10(3) per ng of DNA and positively correlated with sulfide and the ratios of arsenate (AsV):total dissolved arsenic (AsTot). Based on qPCR estimates of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene abundance, aioA-harboring organisms comprised as much as ~15% of the total community. Phylogenetically, the major aioA sequences (270 total) in the acidic hot springs (pH 3.3-4.4) were affiliated with Aquificales and Rhizobiales, while those in neutral or alkaline springs (pH 6.6-9.1) were inferred to be primarily bacteria related to Thermales and Burkholderiales. Interestingly, aioA abundance at one site greatly exceeded bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance, suggesting these aioA genes were archaeal even though phylogenetically these aioA sequences were most similar to the Aquificales. In summary, this study described novel aioA sequences in geothermal features geographically far removed from those in the heavily studied Yellowstone geothermal complex.

  5. Phytochelatins and antioxidant systems respond differentially during arsenite and arsenate stress in Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S; Mishra, S; Tripathi, R D; Dwivedi, S; Trivedi, P K; Tandon, P K

    2007-04-15

    Serious contamination of aquatic systems by arsenic (As) in different parts of the world calls for the development of an in situ cost-effective phytoremediation technology. In the present investigation, plants of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle were exposed to various concentrations of arsenate (As(V)) (0-250 microM) and arsenite (AsIII) (0-25 microM) and analyzed for accumulation responses vis-à-vis biochemical changes. Total As accumulation was found to be higher in plants exposed to AsIII (315 microg g(-1) dw at 25 microM) compared to As(V) (205 microg g(-1) dw at 250 microM) after 7 d of treatment. Plants tolerated low concentrations of As(III) and As(V) by detoxifying the metalloid through augmented synthesis of thiols such as phytochelatins and through increased activity of antioxidant enzymes. While As(V) predominantly stimulated antioxidant enzyme activity, As(III) primarily caused enhanced levels of thiols. The maximum amount of As chelated by PCs was found to be about 39% in plants exposed to As(III) (at 10 microM) and 35% in As(V) exposed plants (at 50 microM) after 4 d. Only the respective highest concentrations of As(III) (25 microM) and As(V) (250 microM) proved toxic for normal plant growth after prolonged treatment. Thus, H. verticillata forms a promising candidate for the phytoremediation of As contaminated water.

  6. Arsenite and ferrous iron oxidation linked to chemolithotrophic denitrification for the immobilization of arsenic in anoxic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Milner, L.; Oremland, R.; Field, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore a bioremediation strategy based on injecting NO3- to support the anoxic oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) and arsenite (As(III)) in the subsurface as a means to immobilize As in the form of arsenate (As(V)) adsorbed onto biogenic ferric (Fe(III)) (hydr)oxides. Continuous flows and filled columns were used to simulate a natural anaerobic groundwater and sediment system with co-occurring As(III) and Fe(II) in the presence (column SF1) or absence (column SF2) of nitrate, respectively. During operation for 250 days, the average influent arsenic concentration of 567 ??g L-1 was reduced to 10.6 (??9.6) ??g L-1 in the effluent of column SF1. The cumulative removal of Fe(II) and As(III) in SF1 was 6.5 to 10-fold higher than that in SF2. Extraction and measurement of the mass of iron and arsenic immobilized on the sand packing of the columns were close to the iron and arsenic removed from the aqueous phase during column operation. The dominant speciation of the immobilized iron and arsenic was Fe(III) and As(V) in SF1, compared with Fe(II) and As(III) in SF2. The speciation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that microbial oxidation of As(III) and Fe(II) linked to denitrification resulted in the enhanced immobilization of aqueous arsenic in anaerobic environments by forming Fe(III) (hydr)oxide coated sands with adsorbed As(V). ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  7. Evaluation of the Relationship between Critical Thinking Skills and Affective Control in Child Training Students of the Female Technical and Vocational College in the City of Broujerd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Zohreh; Bagheri, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    This study is a descriptive-correlational study with the purpose of evaluating the relationship between critical thinking skills and affective control in child training students of the female technical and Vocational College in the city of Broujerd. Statistical population of this study consisted of all students in the field of child training of…

  8. Task-Based and Questionnaire Measures of Inhibitory Control Are Differentially Affected by Acute Food Restriction and by Motivationally Salient Food Stimuli in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdy, Savani; Cheng, Jiumu; Schmidt, Ulrike; Campbell, Iain C; O'Daly, Owen G

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive eating behaviors are dependent on an interaction between motivational states (e.g., hunger) and the ability to control one's own behavior (inhibitory control). Indeed, behavioral paradigms are emerging that seek to train inhibitory control to improve eating behavior. However, inhibitory control is a multifaceted concept, and it is not yet clear how different types (e.g., reactive motor inhibition, proactive motor inhibition, reward-related inhibition) are affected by hunger. Such knowledge will provide insight into the contexts in which behavioral training paradigms would be most effective. The present study explored the impact of promoting a "need" state (hunger) together with motivationally salient distracting stimuli (food/non-food images) on inhibitory control in 46 healthy adults. Participants attended two study sessions, once after eating breakfast as usual and once after acute food restriction on the morning of the session. In each session, participants completed questionnaires on hunger, mood and inhibitory control, and undertook task-based measures of inhibitory control, and had physiological measurements (height, weight, and blood glucose) obtained by a researcher. Acute food restriction influenced task-based assessments but not questionnaire measures of inhibitory control, suggesting that hunger affects observable behavioral control but not self-reported inhibitory control. After acute food restriction, participants showed greater temporal discounting (devaluation of future rewards), and subjective hunger and these were inversely correlated with stop accuracy on the stop signal task. Finally, participants generally responded faster when food-related distractor images were presented, compared to non-food images, independent of state. This suggests that although food stimuli motivate approach behavior, stimulus relevance does not impact inhibitory control in healthy individuals, nor interact with motivational state. These findings may provide some

  9. Task-based and questionnaire measures of inhibitory control are differentially affected by acute food restriction and by motivationally salient food stimuli in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savani Bartholdy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive eating behaviors are dependent on an interaction between motivational states (e.g., hunger and the ability to control one’s own behavior (inhibitory control. Indeed, behavioral paradigms are emerging that seek to train inhibitory control to improve eating behavior. However, inhibitory control is a multifaceted concept, and it is not yet clear how different types (e.g., reactive motor inhibition, proactive motor inhibition, reward-related inhibition are affected by hunger. Such knowledge will provide insight into the contexts in which behavioral training paradigms would be most effective. The present study explored the impact of promoting a need state (hunger together with motivationally salient distracting stimuli (food/non-food images on inhibitory control in 46 healthy adults. Participants attended two study sessions, once after eating breakfast as usual and once after acute food restriction on the morning of the session. In each session, participants completed questionnaires on hunger, mood and inhibitory control, and undertook task-based measures of inhibitory control, and had physiological measurements (height, weight and blood glucose obtained by a researcher. Acute food restriction influenced task-based assessments but not questionnaire measures of inhibitory control, suggesting that hunger affects observable behavioral control but not self-reported inhibitory control. After acute food restriction, participants showed greater temporal discounting (devaluation of future rewards, and subjective hunger and these were inversely correlated with stop accuracy on the stop signal task. Finally, participants generally responded faster when food-related distractor images were presented, compared to non-food images, independent of state. This suggests that although food stimuli motivate approach behavior, stimulus relevance does not impact inhibitory control in healthy individuals, nor interact with motivational state. These findings may

  10. Predicting automaticity in exercise behaviour: the role of perceived behavioural control, affect, intention, action planning, and behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, G.J.; Gardner, B.; van Osch, L.; Sniehotta, F.F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Habit formation has been proposed as a way to maintain behaviour over time. Purpose Recent evidence suggests that constructs additional to repeated performance may predict physical automaticity, but no research has yet explored possible direct impacts of intention, planning, affect, and

  11. Predicting automaticity in exercise behaviour: the role of perceived behavioural control, affect, intention, action planning, and behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, G.J.; Gardner, B.; van Osch, L.; Sniehotta, F.F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Habit formation has been proposed as a way to maintain behaviour over time. Purpose Recent evidence suggests that constructs additional to repeated performance may predict physical automaticity, but no research has yet explored possible direct impacts of intention, planning, affect, and p

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Sexually Exploited, War-Affected Congolese Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Paul; McMullen, John; Shannon, Ciaran; Rafferty, Harry; Black, Alastair

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) delivered by nonclinical facilitators in reducing posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety and conduct problems and increasing prosocial behavior in a group of war-affected, sexually exploited girls in a single-blind, parallel-design, randomized,…

  13. Effect of vector control and foliar nutrition on the quality of orange juice affected by Huanglongbing: Sensory evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 3-year study was undertaken to establish the effect of field nutritional sprays, combined or not with insecticide treatments against Asian Citrus psyllid, on the fruit quality of ‘Valencia’ orange trees affected by the greening disease Huanglongbing (HLB). Four replicated plots were harvested, jui...

  14. Effects of optimism, social support, fighting spirit, cancer worry and internal health locus of control on positive affect in cancer survivors: a path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Kayleigh; Winstanley, Sue

    2012-12-01

    The psychological impact of a cancer diagnosis can extend through treatment, well into cancer survivorship and can be influenced by a range of psychosocial resources. At different stages in this trajectory, optimism is known to affect well-being directly. This study focusing upon the potential to flourish after cancer, investigates the relationship between optimism and positive affect during cancer survivorship together with four possible mediators: social support, fighting spirit, internal health locus of control and cancer worry, all of which have been shown to be important predictors of well-being in cancer patients. Participants (n = 102) from online cancer forums completed standardized questionnaires, and path analysis confirmed that optimism had a direct effect on positive affect in cancer survivors. Social support and fighting spirit were also shown to be significant mediators of this relationship, accounting collectively for 50% of the variance in positive affect. Whilst cancer worry and internal health locus of control could be predicted from levels of optimism, they did not mediate the optimism-positive affect relationship. Efforts to promote optimism and thus encourage fighting spirit at diagnosis through treatment may be worthwhile interventions, as would ensuring appropriate social support through the trajectory.

  15. Arsenite as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis: Description of three strains of Ectothiorhodospria from Mono Lake, California, and Big Soda Lake, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Shelley; Boren, Alison; Hernandez-Maldonado, Jaime; Stoneburner, Brendon; Saltikov, Chad W; Stolz, John F.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2017-01-01

    Three novel strains of photosynthetic bacteria from the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae were isolated from soda lakes of the Great Basin Desert, USA by employing arsenite (As(III)) as the sole electron donor in the enrichment/isolation process. Strain PHS-1 was previously isolated from a hot spring in Mono Lake, while strain MLW-1 was obtained from Mono Lake sediment, and strain BSL-9 was isolated from Big Soda Lake. Strains PHS-1, MLW-1, and BSL-9 were all capable of As(III)-dependent growth via anoxygenic photosynthesis and contained homologs of arxA, but displayed different phenotypes. Comparisons were made with three related species: Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii DSM 2111, Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii DSM 243T, and Halorhodospira halophila DSM 244. All three type cultures oxidized arsenite to arsenate but did not grow with As(III) as the sole electron donor. DNA–DNA hybridization indicated that strain PHS-1 belongs to the same species as Ect. shaposhnikovii DSM 2111 (81.1% sequence similarity), distinct from Ect. shaposhnikovii DSM 243T (58.1% sequence similarity). These results suggest that the capacity for light-driven As(III) oxidation is a common phenomenon among purple photosynthetic bacteria in soda lakes. However, the use of As(III) as a sole electron donor to sustain growth via anoxygenic photosynthesis is confined to novel isolates that were screened for by this selective cultivation criterion.

  16. Investigation of sodium arsenite, thioacetamide, and diethanolamine in the alkaline comet assay: Part of the JaCVAM comet validation exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevers, Carol; Henderson, Debbie; Lillford, Lucinda

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay), we examined sodium arsenite, thioacetamide, and diethanolamine. Using the JaCVAM approved study protocol version 14.2, each chemical was tested in male rats up to maximum tolerated dose levels and DNA damage in the liver and stomach was assessed approximately 3h after the final administration by gavage. Histopathology assessments of liver and stomach sections from the same animals were also examined for evidence of cytotoxicity or necrosis. No evidence of DNA damage was observed in the stomach of animals treated with sodium arsenite at 7.5, 15, or 30 mg/kg/day. However, equivocal findings were found in the liver, where increases in DNA migration were observed in two independent experiments, but not in all treated animals and not at the same dose levels. Thioacetamide caused an increase in DNA migration in the stomach of rats treated at 19, 38, and 75 mg/kg/day, but not in the liver, despite evidence of marked hepatotoxicity following histopathology assessments. No evidence of DNA damage was observed in the stomach or liver of animals treated with diethanolamine at 175, 350, or 700 mg/kg/day.

  17. Life in an arsenic-containing gold mine: genome and physiology of the autotrophic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium rhizobium sp. NT-26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Jérémy; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Barbe, Valérie; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Cleiss-Arnold, Jessica; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Geist, Lucie; Joublin, Aurélie; Koechler, Sandrine; Lassalle, Florent; Marchal, Marie; Médigue, Claudine; Muller, Daniel; Nesme, Xavier; Plewniak, Frédéric; Proux, Caroline; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sismeiro, Odile; Vallenet, David; Santini, Joanne M; Bertin, Philippe N

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is widespread in the environment and its presence is a result of natural or anthropogenic activities. Microbes have developed different mechanisms to deal with toxic compounds such as arsenic and this is to resist or metabolize the compound. Here, we present the first reference set of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data of an Alphaproteobacterium isolated from an arsenic-containing goldmine: Rhizobium sp. NT-26. Although phylogenetically related to the plant-associated bacteria, this organism has lost the major colonizing capabilities needed for symbiosis with legumes. In contrast, the genome of Rhizobium sp. NT-26 comprises a megaplasmid containing the various genes, which enable it to metabolize arsenite. Remarkably, although the genes required for arsenite oxidation and flagellar motility/biofilm formation are carried by the megaplasmid and the chromosome, respectively, a coordinate regulation of these two mechanisms was observed. Taken together, these processes illustrate the impact environmental pressure can have on the evolution of bacterial genomes, improving the fitness of bacterial strains by the acquisition of novel functions.

  18. More is not always better: The pivotal role of desire for control in affecting service attitudes and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, H.W.M.; Bloemer, J.M.M.; Hillebrand, B.

    2013-01-01

    Many marketers and academics assume that customers always want control of the service experience and benefit (perceive value) from having more control (Namasivayam and Mount, 2006). However, empirical support for this assumption is limited. The study proposes that beneficial effects will occur if th

  19. Uptake and translocation of arsenite by Pteris vittata L.: Effects of glycerol, antimonite and silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, Shiny [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Rathinasabapathi, Bala [Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Ma, Lena Q., E-mail: lqma@ifas.ufl.edu [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    AsIII uptake in living cells is through aquaglyceroporin transporters, but it is unknown in arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata. We investigated the effects of AsIII analogs glycerol and antimonite (SbIII) at 0-100 mM and aquaporin inhibitor AgNO{sub 3} at 0-0.1 mM on the uptake of 0.1 mM AsIII or AsV by P. vittata over 1-2 h. Glycerol or SbIII didn't impact AsIII or AsV uptake by P. vittata (p < 0.05), with As concentrations in the fronds and roots being 4.4-6.3 and 3.9-6.2 mg/kg. However, 0.01 mM AgNO{sub 3} reduced As concentrations in the fronds and roots by 64% and 58%. Hence, AsIII uptake in P. vittata might be via an aquaporin transporter different from glycerol and SbIII transporters. Further as AsIII analogs and aquaporin inhibitor had no impact on AsV uptake, AsIII and AsV were likely taken up by different transporters in P. vittata. Our results imply a different AsIII transporter in P. vittata from other plants. - Highlights: > AsIII analogs glycerol and SbIII didn't impact AsIII or AsV uptake by P. vittata. > P. vittata took up substantial amount of SbIII but unable to translocate it to fronds. > Aquaglyceroporin inhibitor Ag reduced AsIII uptake by P. vittata. > AsIII transporter in P. vittata was Ag-sensitive, different from glycerol and SbIII. - AsIII uptake in P. vittata was via unusual aquaglyceroporins or other novel transporter proteins, which was not affected by glycerol or SbIII but was sensitive to 0.01 mM AgNO{sub 3}.

  20. Influence of locus of control on interpersonal attraction and affective reactions in situations involving reward and punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, D S; Jackson, T H

    1975-01-01

    Ninety-six subjects with either high or low I-E Scale scores participated in individual discussions with an experimental who either (a) rewarded and then punished, (b) punished and then rewarded, or (c) gave no evaluative feedback after the subject's responses. Because previous research has suggested that internally controlled subjects attend primarily to rewards while externally controlled subjects attend primarily to punishments, it was hypothesized (a) that the internally controlled subjects, as compared to externally controlled subjects, would be more attracted to the experimenter in the conditions involving rewards and punishments regardless of the sequencing and (b) that the reverse would be true in the nonevaluative control condition. The prediction was consistently supported and subjects' feelings of anger and anxiety during the discussions generally complemented the attention and attraction hypotheses. The results indicate that individual differences influence attraction in situations involving rewards and punishments and they offer a prescription for developing interpersonal attraction and minimizing anger: Offer rewards to internally controlled persons and remain neutral with externally controlled persons.

  1. Management Options and Factors Affecting Control of a Common Waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis Biotype Resistant to Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana B. Harder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Repeated use of protox-inhibiting herbicides has resulted in a common waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis Sauer biotype that survived lactofen applied up to 10 times the labeled rate. Field and greenhouse research evaluated control options for this biotype of common waterhemp. In the field, PRE applications of flumioxazin at 72 g ai ha−1, sulfentrazone at 240 g ai ha−1, and isoxaflutole at 70 g ai ha−1 controlled common waterhemp >90% up to 6 weeks after treatment. POST applications of fomesafen at 330 g ai ha−1, lactofen at 220 g ai ha−1, and acifluorfen at 420 g ai ha−1 resulted in <60% visual control of common waterhemp, but differences were detected among herbicides. In the greenhouse, glyphosate was the only herbicide that controlled protox resistant waterhemp. The majority of herbicide activity from POST flumioxazin, fomesafen, acifluorfen, and lactofen was from foliar placement, but control was less than 40% regardless of placement. Control of common waterhemp seeded at weekly intervals after herbicide treatment with flumioxazin, fomesafen, sulfentrazone, atrazine, and isoxaflutole exceeded 85% at 0 weeks after herbicide application (WAHA, while control with isoxaflutole was greater than 60% 6 WAHA. PRE and POST options for protox-resistant common waterhemp are available to manage herbicide resistance.

  2. The influence of controlled floods on fine sediment storage in debris fan-affected canyons of the Colorado River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Erich R.; Grams, Paul E.; Schmidt, John C.; Hazel, Joseph E.; Alexander, Jason S.; Kaplinski, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the construction of large dams on the Green and Colorado Rivers, annual floods aggraded sandbars in lateral flow-recirculation eddies with fine sediment scoured from the bed and delivered from upstream. Flows greater than normal dam operations may be used to mimic this process in an attempt to increase time-averaged sandbar size. These controlled floods may rebuild sandbars, but sediment deficit conditions downstream from the dams restrict the frequency that controlled floods produce beneficial results. Here, we integrate complimentary, long-term monitoring data sets from the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons downstream from Glen Canyon dam and the Green River in the Canyon of Lodore downstream from Flaming Gorge dam. Since the mid-1990s, several controlled floods have occurred in these canyon rivers. These controlled floods scour fine sediment from the bed and build sandbars in eddies, thus increasing channel relief. These changes are short-lived, however, as interflood dam operations erode sandbars within several months to years. Controlled flood response and interflood changes in bed elevation are more variable in Marble Canyon and Grand Canyon, likely reflecting more variable fine sediment supply and stronger transience in channel bed sediment storage. Despite these differences, neither system shows a trend in fine-sediment storage during the period in which controlled floods were monitored. These results demonstrate that controlled floods build eddy sandbars and increase channel relief for short interflood periods, and this response may be typical in other dam-influenced canyon rivers. The degree to which these features persist depends on the frequency of controlled floods, but careful consideration of sediment supply is necessary to avoid increasing the long-term sediment deficit.

  3. The influence of controlled floods on fine sediment storage in debris fan-affected canyons of the Colorado River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Erich R.; Grams, Paul E.; Schmidt, John C.; Hazel, Joseph E.; Alexander, Jason S.; Kaplinski, Matt

    2014-12-01

    Prior to the construction of large dams on the Green and Colorado Rivers, annual floods aggraded sandbars in lateral flow-recirculation eddies with fine sediment scoured from the bed and delivered from upstream. Flows greater than normal dam operations may be used to mimic this process in an attempt to increase time-averaged sandbar size. These controlled floods may rebuild sandbars, but sediment deficit conditions downstream from the dams restrict the frequency that controlled floods produce beneficial results. Here, we integrate complimentary, long-term monitoring data sets from the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons downstream from Glen Canyon dam and the Green River in the Canyon of Lodore downstream from Flaming Gorge dam. Since the mid-1990s, several controlled floods have occurred in these canyon rivers. These controlled floods scour fine sediment from the bed and build sandbars in eddies, thus increasing channel relief. These changes are short-lived, however, as interflood dam operations erode sandbars within several months to years. Controlled flood response and interflood changes in bed elevation are more variable in Marble Canyon and Grand Canyon, likely reflecting more variable fine sediment supply and stronger transience in channel bed sediment storage. Despite these differences, neither system shows a trend in fine-sediment storage during the period in which controlled floods were monitored. These results demonstrate that controlled floods build eddy sandbars and increase channel relief for short interflood periods, and this response may be typical in other dam-influenced canyon rivers. The degree to which these features persist depends on the frequency of controlled floods, but careful consideration of sediment supply is necessary to avoid increasing the long-term sediment deficit.

  4. Age-related changes in dynamic postural control and attentional demands are minimally affected by local muscle fatigue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony eRemaud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal aging results in alterations in the visual, vestibular and somtaosensory systems, which in turn modify the control of balance. Muscle fatigue may exacerbate these age-related changes in sensory and motor functions, and also increase the attentional demands associated with dynamic postural control. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on dynamic postural control and posture-related attentional demands before and after a plantar flexor fatigue protocol. Participants (young adults: n=15; healthy seniors: n=13 performed a dynamic postural task along the antero-posterior and the medio-lateral axes, with and without the addition of a simple reaction time task. The dynamic postural task consisted in following a moving circle on a computer screen with the representation of the center of pressure (COP. This protocol was repeated before and after a fatigue task where ankle plantarflexor muscles were targeted. The mean COP-target distance and the mean COP velocity were calculated for each trial. Cross-correlation analyses between the COP and target displacements were also performed. Reaction times were recorded during dual-task trials. Results showed that while young adults adopted an anticipatory control mode to move their COP as close as possible to the target center, seniors adopted a reactive control mode, lagging behind the target center. This resulted in longer COP-target distance and higher COP velocity in the latter group. Concurrently, reaction time increased more in seniors when switching from static stance to dynamic postural conditions, suggesting potential alterations in the central nervous system functions. Finally, plantar flexor muscle fatigue and dual-tasking had only minor effects on dynamic postural control of both young adults and seniors. Future studies should investigate why the fatigue-induced changes in quiet standing postural control do not seem to transfer to dynamic balance tasks.

  5. The effects of family-centered affective stimulation on brain-injured comatose patients' level of consciousness: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani, F; Mohammadi, E; Rezvani, M; Kazemnezhad, A

    2017-06-04

    Despite the well-defined effects of sensory stimulation, the knowledge of the pure effects of affective stimulation is scarce. To evaluate the effects of family-centered affective stimulation on the level of consciousness among comatose patients with brain injuries. This study was designed as a three-group double-blinded Randomized Controlled Trial. Ninety consecutive patients with traumatic brain injuries and a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 5-8 were selected. Patients were randomly allocated to an experimental, a placebo, and a control group using permuted block randomization. Affective stimulation intervention was provided to patients in the experimental group by their family members twice a day during the first seven days of their hospitalization. In the placebo group, a sensory stimulation program was implemented by a fixed trained person who was not familiar with the patients. Patients in the control group solely received sensory stimulation which was routinely provided to all patients. The level of consciousness among the patients using the Glasgow Coma Scale and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised were measured both before and after a family visit. The SPSS software (version 17.0) was used to analyze the data through running the one-way and the repeated measure analyses of variance. Despite an insignificant difference among the groups regarding baseline level of consciousness, the results of the one-way analysis of variance revealed at the seventh day of this study, however, the level of consciousness in the experimental group was significantly higher (9.1±2.1) than the placebo (7.2±1.1), the control groups (6.6±1.7) (P<0.001), subsequently. Moreover, at the seventh day of the study, the Coma Recovery Scale score in the experimental group (11.9±3.7) was significantly greater than the placebo (9.0±2.0) and the control (6.6±1.6) groups (P<0.001). Recovery rate and effect size values also confirmed the greater effectiveness of affective stimulation compared with

  6. CHRM2 gene predisposes to alcohol dependence, drug dependence and affective disorders: results from an extended case-control structured association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xingguang; Kranzler, Henry R; Zuo, Lingjun; Wang, Shuang; Blumberg, Hilary P; Gelernter, Joel

    2005-08-15

    Cholinergic muscarinic 2 receptor (CHRM2) is implicated in memory and cognition, functions impaired in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Wang et al. [Wang, J.C., Hinrichs, A.L., Stock, H., Budde, J., Allen, R., Bertelsen, S., Kwon, J.M., Wu, W., Dick, D.M., Rice, J. et al. (2004) Evidence of common and specific genetic effects: association of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2) gene with alcohol dependence and major depressive syndrome. Hum. Mol. Genet., 13, 1903-1911] reported that variation in CHRM2 gene predisposed to alcohol dependence (AD) and major depressive syndrome. We examined the relationships between variation in CHRM2 and AD, drug dependence (DD) and affective disorders, using a novel extended case-control structured association (SA) method. Six markers at CHRM2 and 38 ancestry-informative markers (AIMs) were genotyped in a sample of 871 subjects, including 333 healthy controls [287 European-Americans (EAs) and 46 African-Americans (AAs)] and 538 AD and/or DD subjects (415 with AD and 346 with DD and 382 EAs and 156 AAs). The same CHRM2 markers were genotyped in a sample of 137 EA subjects with affective disorders. All of the six markers were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in controls, but SNP3 (rs1824024) was in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium in the AD and DD groups. Using conventional case-control comparisons, some markers were nominally significantly or suggestively associated with phenotypes before or after controlling for population stratification and admixture effects, but these associations were not significant after multiple test correction. However, regression analysis identified specific alleles, genotypes, haplotypes and diplotypes that were significantly associated with risk for each disorder. We conclude that variation in CHRM2 predisposes to AD, DD and affective disorders. One haplotype block within the 5'-UTR of CHRM2 may be more important for the development of these disorders than other regions. Interaction between two

  7. Does Telephone Follow-Up and Education Affect Self-Care and Metabolic Control in Diabetic Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytekin Kanadli, Keriman; Ovayolu, Nimet; Ovayolu, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    The major goal of diabetes control is to assist patients to perform self-care and metabolic control. One possible way to achieve this goal is education and regular monitoring of patients by telephone. Thus, the present study was conducted with the aim of investigating the impact of education and telephone follow-up on self-care and metabolic control in diabetic patients. This experimental study was conducted at a hospital in the Central Anatolia region of Turkey, with 88 diabetic patients including 44 intervention subjects and 44 control subjects. After an initial discussion, patients in the intervention group received education and telephone follow-up for 3 months. Required approvals were obtained before initiation of the study. Data were collected using a questionnaire form and the Diabetes Self-Care Scale. The Diabetes Self-Care Scale scores ranged between 140 and 210, where higher scores indicated increased self-care activities of patients. At the end of the study, the self-care score was found to increase from 61.3 ± 10.9 to 89.9 ± 12.3 in the intervention group (P self-care scores and had a positive impact on metabolic control variables. In light of these findings, we suggest that education and tele-health home monitoring may be provided on a continuous basis to help patients sustain self-care behaviors that they have adopted during the study period.

  8. Neuronal mechanisms of voice control are affected by implicit expectancy of externally triggered perturbations in auditory feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Korzyukov

    Full Text Available Accurate vocal production relies on several factors including sensory feedback and the ability to predict future challenges to the control processes. Repetitive patterns of perturbations in sensory feedback by themselves elicit implicit expectations in the vocal control system regarding the timing, quality and direction of perturbations. In the present study, the predictability of voice pitch-shifted auditory feedback was experimentally manipulated. A block of trials where all pitch-shift stimuli were upward, and therefore predictable was contrasted against an unpredictable block of trials in which the stimulus direction was randomized between upward and downward pitch-shifts. It was found that predictable perturbations in voice auditory feedback led to a reduction in the proportion of compensatory vocal responses, which might be indicative of a reduction in vocal control. The predictable perturbations also led to a reduction in the magnitude of the N1 component of cortical Event Related Potentials (ERP that was associated with the reflexive compensations to the perturbations. We hypothesize that formation of expectancy in our study is accompanied by involuntary allocation of attentional resources occurring as a result of habituation or learning, that in turn trigger limited and controlled exploration-related motor variability in the vocal control system.

  9. Using A Semiotic Metatheory for Theory Understanding, Appraisal, and Use: An Illustrative Social Work Translation of the Affect Control Theory of Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Forte

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Charles Sanders Peirce’s creed, “Do Not Block Inquiry,” and his triadic model of the signs serve as the base for a semiotic metatheory of science and scientific theory. Semioticians characterize science as a universe of diverse sign systems, and scientists as members of different language communities.This paper introduces this approach. Affect control theorists ponder and investigate how actors, identities, actions, objects, emotions, and social settings are interrelated during interaction. Semiotic tools and principles guide the translation of the Affect Control Theory(ACT of emotion. ACT is summarized and appraised for its value in increasing our understanding of human behavior in the social environment, its suitability to social work, and its applicability. ACT technical words are translated into simpler language, ACT displays into words, and ACT’s interactionist language is translated into the language of ecosystems theory. Suggestions for strengthening ACT and for promoting semiotic translation are included.

  10. Hot foam for weed control-Do alkyl polyglucoside surfactants used as foaming agents affect the mobility of organic contaminants in soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlund, H; Börjesson, E

    2016-08-15

    Use of alkyl polyglucosides (APGs) as a foaming agent during hot water weed control may influence the environmental fate of organic contaminants in soil. We studied the effects of the APG-based foaming agent NCC Spuma (C8-C10) on leaching of diuron, glyphosate, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sand columns. We also examined how APG concentration affected the apparent water solubility and adsorption of the herbicides and of the PAHs acenaphthene, acenaphthylene and fluorene. Application of APGs at the recommended concentration of 0.3% did not significantly affect leaching of any of the compounds studied. However, at a concentration of 1.5%, leaching of both diuron and glyphosate was significantly increased. The increased leaching corresponded to an increase in apparent water solubility of diuron and a decrease in glyphosate adsorption to the sand. However, APG addition did not significantly affect the mobility of PAHs even though their apparent water solubility was increased. These results suggest that application of APG-based foam during hot water weed control does not significantly affect the mobility of organic contaminants in soil if used according to recommendations. Moreover, they suggest that APGs could be useful for soil bioremediation purposes if higher concentrations are used.

  11. A randomized controlled effectiveness trial of cognitive behavior therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder in terrorist-affected people in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, Richard A.; EKASAWIN, SUPARAT; CHAKRABHAND, SOMCHAI; SUWANMITRI, SOAWALUK; DUANGCHUN, ORAWAN; CHANTALUCKWONG, THANANET

    2011-01-01

    Although cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), there is no evidence of its success with PTSD patients still under direct threat of terrorist attacks. This study reports the first randomized controlled trial of CBT for PTSD terrorist-affected people. Twenty-eight survivors of terrorist attacks in southern Thailand were randomized to 8 sessions of either CBT or treatment as usual (TAU). CBT was modified to accom...

  12. Inhibitory Control, but Not Prolonged Object-Related Experience Appears to Affect Physical Problem-Solving Performance of Pet Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Corsin A; Riemer, Stefanie; Virányi, Zsófia; Huber, Ludwig; Range, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Human infants develop an understanding of their physical environment through playful interactions with objects. Similar processes may influence also the performance of non-human animals in physical problem-solving tasks, but to date there is little empirical data to evaluate this hypothesis. In addition or alternatively to prior experiences, inhibitory control has been suggested as a factor underlying the considerable individual differences in performance reported for many species. Here we report a study in which we manipulated the extent of object-related experience for a cohort of dogs (Canis familiaris) of the breed Border Collie over a period of 18 months, and assessed their level of inhibitory control, prior to testing them in a series of four physical problem-solving tasks. We found no evidence that differences in object-related experience explain variability in performance in these tasks. It thus appears that dogs do not transfer knowledge about physical rules from one physical problem-solving task to another, but rather approach each task as a novel problem. Our results, however, suggest that individual performance in these tasks is influenced in a complex way by the subject's level of inhibitory control. Depending on the task, inhibitory control had a positive or a negative effect on performance and different aspects of inhibitory control turned out to be the best predictors of individual performance in the different tasks. Therefore, studying the interplay between inhibitory control and problem-solving performance will make an important contribution to our understanding of individual and species differences in physical problem-solving performance.

  13. The social biofeedback theory of parental affect-mirroring: the development of emotional self-awareness and self-control in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergely, G; Watson, J S

    1996-12-01

    The authors present a new theory of parental affect-mirroring and its role in the development of emotional self-awareness and control in infancy. It is proposed that infants first become sensitised to their categorical emotion-states through a natural social biofeedback process provided by the parent's 'marked' reflections of the baby's emotion displays during affect-regulative interactions. They argue that this sensitisation process is mediated (similarly to that of adult biofeedback training) by the mechanism of contingency-detection and maximising. Apart from sensitisation, affect-mirroring serves three further developmental functions: (1) it contributes to the infant's state-regulation; (2) it leads to the establishment of secondary representations that become associated with the infant's primary procedural affect-states providing the cognitive means for accessing and attributing emotions to the self; (3) it results in the development of a generalised communicative code of "marked' expressions characterised by the representational functions of referential decoupling, anchoring and suspension of realistic consequences. They consider the clinical implications of our theory, relating it to current psychodynamic approaches to the functions of parental affect-mirroring. Using their model they identify various types of deviant mirroring styles and speculate about their developmental consequences. Finally, they discuss what role their social biofeedback model may play as a mediating mechanism in the therapeutic process.

  14. IT-Supported Formal Control: How Perceptual (in)Congruence Affects the Convergence of Crowd-Sourced Ideas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeber, Isabella; Waizenegger, Lena; Demetz, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    IT-supported teams face challenges when converging on crowd-sourced ideas. One reason is that teams have difficulties in establishing shared understanding. Enacting formal control has been suggested as a way how to overcome these challenges as they help to develop shared understanding and focus...

  15. Action Control, Motivated Strategies, and Integrative Motivation as Predictors of Language Learning Affect and the Intention to Continue Learning French

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, Peter D.; Blackie, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines the relative ability of variables from three motivational frameworks to predict four non-linguistic outcomes of language learning. The study examines Action Control Theory with its measures of (1) hesitation, (2) volatility and (3) rumination. The study also examined Pintrich's expectancy-value model that uses measures…

  16. Religion priming and an oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) polymorphism interact to affect self-control in a social context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Joni Y; Mojaverian, Taraneh; Kim, Heejung S

    2015-02-01

    Using a genetic moderation approach, this study examines how an experimental prime of religion impacts self-control in a social context, and whether this effect differs depending on the genotype of an oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) polymorphism (rs53576). People with different genotypes of OXTR seem to have different genetic orientations toward sociality, which may have consequences for the way they respond to religious cues in the environment. In order to determine whether the influence of religion priming on self-control is socially motivated, we examine whether this effect is stronger for people who have OXTR genotypes that should be linked to greater rather than less social sensitivity (i.e., GG vs. AA/AG genotypes). The results showed that experimentally priming religion increased self-control behaviors for people with GG genotypes more so than people with AA/AG genotypes. Furthermore, this Gene × Religion interaction emerged in a social context, when people were interacting face to face with another person. This research integrates genetic moderation and social psychological approaches to address a novel question about religion's influence on self-control behavior, which has implications for coping with distress and psychopathology. These findings also highlight the importance of the social context for understanding genetic moderation of psychological effects.

  17. Effect of vector control and foliar nutrition on quality of orange juice affected by Huanglongbing (HLB): chemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Valencia’ orange trees from groves with 90% infection by Candidatus liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), thought to be the pathogen for citrus greening or huanglongbing (HLB) disease, were treated with insecticide (I), a nutritional spray (N), insecticide plus nutritional spray (I+N). Controls (C) were...

  18. Action Control, Motivated Strategies, and Integrative Motivation as Predictors of Language Learning Affect and the Intention to Continue Learning French

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, Peter D.; Blackie, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines the relative ability of variables from three motivational frameworks to predict four non-linguistic outcomes of language learning. The study examines Action Control Theory with its measures of (1) hesitation, (2) volatility and (3) rumination. The study also examined Pintrich's expectancy-value model that uses measures…

  19. IT Control Deficiencies That Affect the Financial Reporting of Companies since the Enactment of the Sarbanes Oxley Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Roosevelt

    2014-01-01

    This research study examined the specific categories of IT control deficiencies and their related effects on financial reporting. The approach to this study was considered non-experimental, an approach sometimes called descriptive. Descriptive statistics are used to describe the basic features of the data in a study, providing simple summaries…

  20. To freeze or not to freeze? Affective and cognitive perturbations have markedly different effects on postural control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stins, J.F.; Roerdink, M.; Beek, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Similar effects have been reported for diverting attention from postural control and increased anxiety on the characteristics of center-of-pressure (COP) time series (decreased excursions and elevated mean power frequency). These effects have also received similar interpretations in terms of increas

  1. Interaction of maternal peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma2 Pro12Ala polymorphism with fetal sex affects maternal glycemic control during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocher, Berthold; Schlemm, Ludwig; Haumann, Hannah; Poralla, Christine; Chen, You-Peng; Li, Jian; Guthmann, Florian; Bamberg, Christian; Kalache, Karim D; Pfab, Thiemo

    2010-02-01

    It was suggested that fetal sex may substantially affect maternal glycemic control during pregnancy in genetically susceptible mothers. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma2 (PPARgamma2) Pro12Ala polymorphism is known to affect glycemic control and may act in a sex-specific manner. This polymorphism is thus an attractive candidate to test this hypothesis using a second independent functionally relevant polymorphism. We analyzed the impact of fetal sex on maternal glycemic control during pregnancy in relation to the maternal PPARgamma2 Pro12Ala polymorphism. Two-thousand fourteen Caucasian women without preexisting diabetes and preexisting hypertension with singleton pregnancies delivering consecutively at the Charité obstetrics department were genotyped. Glycemic control was analyzed by measuring total glycated hemoglobin at birth. Correction for confounding factors and multiple testing was considered in the analysis. The maternal PPARgamma2 Pro12Ala polymorphism without consideration of fetal sex had no effect on blood pressure, new onset of proteinuria and total glycated hemoglobin at delivery. Mothers carrying both G alleles (GG genotype) delivering a girl had a higher (P = 0.015) total glycated hemoglobin (6.81 or - 0.50%) versus mothers carrying the same alleles but delivering boys (5.85 + or - 0.58%). Comparing mothers with the GG genotype delivering girls with mothers with CC or CG genotypes also delivering girls (6.32 + or - 0.72%) revealed a significantly higher maternal total glycated hemoglobin at delivery in the former group (P Pro12Ala polymorphism.

  2. Setting the agenda for a healthy retail environment: content analysis of US newspaper coverage of tobacco control policies affecting the point of sale, 2007-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Allison E; Southwell, Brian G; Ribisl, Kurt M; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Lytle, Leslie A

    2017-07-01

    Tobacco control policies affecting the point of sale (POS) are an emerging intervention, yet POS-related news media content has not been studied. We describe news coverage of POS tobacco control efforts and assess relationships between article characteristics, including policy domains, frames, sources, localisation and evidence present, and slant towards tobacco control efforts. High circulation state (n=268) and national (n=5) newspapers comprised the sampling frame. We retrieved 917 relevant POS-focused articles in newspapers from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2014. 5 raters screened and coded articles, 10% of articles were double coded, and mean inter-rater reliability (IRR) was 0.74. POS coverage emphasised tobacco retailer licensing (49.1% of articles) and the most common frame present was regulation (71.3%). Government officials (52.3%), followed by tobacco retailers (39.6%), were the most frequent sources. Half of articles (51.3%) had a mixed, neutral or antitobacco control slant. Articles presenting a health frame, a greater number of protobacco control sources, and statistical evidence were significantly more likely to also have a protobacco control slant. Articles presenting a political/rights or regulation frame, a greater number of antitobacco control sources, or government, tobacco industry, tobacco retailers, or tobacco users as sources were significantly less likely to also have a protobacco control slant. Stories that feature procontrol sources, research evidence and a health frame also tend to support tobacco control objectives. Future research should investigate how to use data, stories and localisation to encourage a protobacco control slant, and should test relationships between content characteristics and policy progression. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes differentially affects sympathetic innervation and control of plantar metatarsal and mesenteric arteries in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Niloufer J; Tripovic, Diana; Brock, James A

    2013-01-15

    In humans neural control of arterial vessels supplying skin in the extremities is particularly vulnerable to the effects of diabetes. Here the streptozotocin (STZ) rat model of type 1 diabetes was used to compare effects on neurovascular function in plantar metatarsal arteries (PMAs), which supply blood to skin of hind paw digits, with those in mesenteric arteries (MAs). Twelve weeks after STZ (60 mg/kg ip), wire myography was used to assess vascular function. In PMAs, lumen dimensions were unchanged but both nerve-evoked contractions and sensitivity to α(1) (phenylephrine, methoxamine)- and α(2) (clonidine)-adrenoceptor agonists were reduced. The density of perivascular nerve fibers was also reduced by ~25%. These changes were not observed in PMAs from STZ-treated rats receiving either a low dose of insulin that did not greatly reduce blood glucose levels or a high dose of insulin that markedly reduced blood glucose levels. In MAs from STZ-treated rats, nerve-evoked increases in force did not differ from control but, because lumen dimensions were ~20% larger, nerve-evoked increases in effective transmural pressure were smaller. Increases in effective transmural pressure produced by phenylephrine or α,β-methylene ATP in MAs from STZ-treated rats were not smaller than control, but the density of perivascular nerve fibers was reduced by ~10%. In MAs, the increase in vascular dimensions is primarily responsible for reducing effectiveness of nerve-evoked constrictions. By contrast, in PMAs decreases in both the density of perivascular nerve fibers and the reactivity of the vascular muscle appear to explain impairment of neurovascular transmission.

  4. Estradiol differently affects melanin synthesis of malignant and normal melanocytes: a relationship with clock and clock-controlled genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletini, Maristela Oliveira; de Assis, Leonardo Vinicius Monteiro; Moraes, Maria Nathalia; Castrucci, Ana Maria de Lauro

    2016-10-01

    Melanin production within melanocytes is regulated, among others, by estradiol, whose effects on melanogenesis are still not completely elucidated. Here we show that although 10(-7) M 17β-estradiol (E2) increased tyrosinase mRNA levels in B16-F10 malignant melanocytes, there was a transient decrease and abolishment of the temporal variation of melanin content. Both parameters were much higher in the malignant than in normal Melan-a cells. Considering that silencing clock machinery in human melanocytes increases melanogenesis, we investigated clock gene expression in those cell lines. Except for Melan-a Bmal1 and B16-F10 Per2 expression of control cells, Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 expression increased independently of cell type or E2 treatment after 24 h. However, melanoma cells showed a marked increase in Per1 and Bma11 expression in response to E2 at the same time points, what may rule out E2 as a synchronizer agent since the expression of those genes were not in antiphase. Next, we investigated the expression of Xpa, a clock-controlled gene, which in Melan-a cells, peaked at 18 h, and E2 treatment shifted this peak to 24 h, whereas B16-F10 Xpa expression peaked at 24 h in both control and E2 group, and it was higher compared to Melan-a cells in both groups. Therefore, malignant and normal melanocytes display profound differences on core elements of the local clock, and how they respond to E2, what is most probably determinant of the differences seen on melanin synthesis and Tyrosinase and Xpa expression. Understanding these processes at the molecular level could bring new strategies to treat melanoma.

  5. Vector control and foliar nutrition to maintain economic sustainability of bearing citrus in Florida groves affected by huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansly, Philip A; Arevalo, H Alejandro; Qureshi, Jawwad A; Jones, Moneen M; Hendricks, Katherine; Roberts, Pamela D; Roka, Fritz M

    2014-03-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening is a bacterial disease vectored by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) causing tree decline, and yield loss. Vector control and foliar nutrition are used in Florida to slow the spread of HLB and mitigate debilitating effects of the disease. A four year replicated field study was initiated February 2008 in a 5.2-ha commercial block of young 'Valencia' orange trees employing a factorial design to evaluate individual and compound effects of vector management and foliar nutrition. Insecticides were sprayed during tree dormancy and when psyllid populations exceeded a nominal threshold. A mixture consisting primarily of micro- and macro-nutrients was applied three times a year corresponding to the principal foliar flushes. Differences in ACP numbers from five- to 13-fold were maintained in insecticide treated and untreated plots. Incidence of HLB estimated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), rose from 30% at the beginning of the study to 95% in only 18 months. Highest yields all four years were seen from trees receiving both foliar nutrition and vector control. Production for these trees in the fourth year was close to the pre-HLB regional average for 10 year old 'Valencia' on 'Swingle'. Nevertheless, at current juice prices, the extra revenue generated from the combined insecticide and nutritional treatment did not cover the added treatment costs. This experiment demonstrated that vector control, especially when combined with enhanced foliar nutrition, could significantly increase yields in a citrus orchard with high incidence of HLB. Economic thresholds for both insecticide and nutrient applications are needed under different market and environmental conditions. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Efficacy of a Transdiagnostic internet-based treatment for emotional disorders with a specific component to address positive affect: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-García, Amanda; González-Robles, Alberto; Fernández-Álvarez, Javier; García-Palacios, Azucena; Baños, Rosa María; Botella, Cristina

    2017-04-20

    Emotional disorders (ED) are among the most prevalent mental disorders. However, less than 50% of people suffering from ED receive the appropriate treatment. This situation has led to the development of new intervention proposals based on the transdiagnostic perspective, which tries to address the underlying processes common to ED. Most of these programs focus primarily on down-regulating negative affectivity, rather than increasing strengths and up-regulating positive affectivity. The data suggest the existence of disturbances in positive affectivity in these disorders, and so new interventions focusing on these problems are greatly needed. It is also essential to provide assistance to all the people in need. Information and Communication Technologies can be very useful. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a transdiagnostic Internet-based treatment for ED in a community sample. The protocol includes traditional CBT components, as well as a specific component to address positive affect. We intend to test this protocol, including this specific component or not, versus a waiting list control group. Moreover, we aim to test the differential effect of this specific component, and study the effectiveness (in terms of patients' acceptance) of using a self-applied Internet-based program. This paper presents the study protocol. The study is a randomized controlled trial. 207 participants will be randomly assigned to: a)Transdiagnostic Internet-based protocol (TIBP), b)Transdiagnostic Internet-based protocol + positive affect component (TIBP + PA), or c)a Waiting List control group (WL). Primary outcomes measures will be the BDI-II, the BAI, and the PANAS. Secondary outcomes will include diagnosis-specific measures of the principal disorder. Participants' treatment acceptance will also be measured. Participants will be assessed at pre-, post-treatment, and 3- and 12- month follow-ups. The data will be analyzed based on the Intention-to-treat principle. Per

  7. Vector control measures failed to affect genetic structure of Aedes aegypti in a sentinel metropolitan area of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Kathleen R; Ribeiro, Gilmar; Silva dos Santos, Carlos Gustavo; de Lima, Eliaci Couto; Melo, Paulo R S; Reis, Mitermayer G; Blanton, Ronald E; Silva, Luciano K

    2013-12-01

    In order to evaluate subpopulation differentiation, effective population size (Ne) and evidence for population bottlenecks at various geographic levels, Aedes aegypti larvae were collected longitudinally from 2007 to 2009 from four areas in the city of Salvador, Brazil. The DNA from each larva was isolated and genotyped with five independent microsatellite markers. FST and Jost's D revealed significant population structuring (Pcontrol measures did contribute to vector reduction, but this was not enough to decrease A. aegypti population genetic diversity in Salvador. The understanding of A. aegypti population dynamics may be helpful for planning and evaluation of control measures to make them more effective.

  8. Environmental and behavioural factors affecting the prevalence of foot lameness in New Zealand dairy herds - a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesterton, R N; Pfeiffer, D U; Morris, R S; Tanner, C M

    1989-12-01

    A case-control study of environmental and behavioural factors influencing foot lameness was undertaken on 62 dairy herds comprising an average of 185 milking cows in Taranaki, New Zealand. Thirty two case herds were identified as having had at least 10 per cent of the cows lame during the milking season in which the herd was studied, and thirty control herds were selected on the basis that no more than 3 per cent of cows in these herds had been lame per year for at least two years immediately prior to investigation. Each herd was visited at both a morning and an afternoon milking, and 58 risk factors were measured between the time the farmer began to assemble the cows for milking and the completion of milking. Comparison of single variables between case and control herds identified 24 which showed differences (p<0.10). These variables were then subjected to stepwise multivariate logistic regression, and statistically significant variables in this analysis were used to create a tentative path diagram of possible causal web relationships between the various risk factors and the outcome variable, the lameness prevalence level. Information from a review of the published literature was used to include further variables to the 24 into the initial (or null hypothesis) path model. Logistic path analysis was then used to eliminate non-significant paths from the diagram, leaving 19 arrows joining 13 variables in the final path diagram, compared with 33 joining 20 variables in the initial version. The most influential variables in explaining variation between case and control herds were the average level of maintenance of the track and the degree of patience shown by the farmer in bringing the cows in for milking. Overall, factors associated with the movement of animals to the milking shed explained 40 per cent of the variation (deviance) with regard to the lameness prevalence level. Risk factors associated with characteristics of the milking process explain 24 per cent, and

  9. Chronic resistance training does not affect post-exercise blood pressure in normotensive older women: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Gerage,Aline Mendes; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; do Nascimento, Matheus Amarante; Pina,Fábio Luiz Cheche; Gonçalves,Cássio Gustavo Santana; Sardinha, Luís B; Edilson Serpeloni CYRINO

    2015-01-01

    Resistance training has been recommended for maintenance or improvement of the functional health of older adults, but its effect on acute cardiovascular responses remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of 12 weeks of resistance training on post-exercise blood pressure (BP) in normotensive older women. Twenty-eight normotensive and physically inactive women (≥60 years) were randomly assigned to a training group (TG) or a control group (CG). The TG underwent ...

  10. Controlled release metformin hydrochloride microspheres of ethyl cellulose prepared by different methods and study on the polymer affected parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Pratim K; Kar, Mousumi

    2009-02-01

    The objectives of this investigation were to prepare microspheres of the anti-diabetic drug, metformin hydrochloride, using ethyl cellulose as the polymer and evaluate the encapsulation efficiency and release characteristics in vitro and in vivo; utilizing different microencapsulation techniques. Different proportions of polymer were used to obtain varying drug-polymer ratios. Physical properties, loading efficiency and dissolution rate were dependent on the method chosen for preparation and also on the drug-to-polymer ratio. The addition of surfactant during emulsification and petroleum ether in non-solvent addition process affected release of drug and also size distribution of microspheres. To investigate the type of mechanism that occurs, dissolution data were plotted according to different kinetic models. In vitro release studies show first order and Higuchi model release characteristics being exhibited. All the results were treated statistically to validate the findings. Significant differences in percentage yield, entrapment efficiency and sustaining capacity were seen with microspheres prepared by two different methods. In vivo studies in normal and hyperglycemic mice show faster glucose reduction with microspheres prepared by the evaporation method, whereas the release sustaining effect was more pronounced with microspheres prepared by the non-solvent addition method.

  11. Work locus of control and its relationship to stress perception, related affections, attitudes and behaviours from a domain-specific perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jiajin; Wang, Lei

    2012-08-01

    This research aims to examine the value of applying the Work Locus of Control Scale in predicting work-related outcomes. Study 1 surveyed 323 employees from different companies in China and found that the domain-specific scale was more predictive than the general scale in predicting perceived stressors, rather than in predicting organizational affective commitment and altruistic behaviour. Study 2 applied a multi-wave and multi-source design and used commensurate Likert scales to measure work and general locus of control. Participants were 344 employees from one corporation. Work locus of control was found to be more useful in predicting supervisor-rated job performance, conscientious and altruistic behaviours. These findings help understand the theory-based and measurement-based reasons for the advantages of using domain-specific measures. They claim the importance for employing the domain-specific measure to predict work-related perceptions and behaviours. Implications for the theory and practice are discussed.

  12. Metacognitive deficits predict future levels of negative symptoms in schizophrenia controlling for neurocognition, affect recognition, and self-expectation of goal attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaker, Paul H; Kukla, Marina; Dubreucq, Julien; Gumley, Andrew; McLeod, Hamish; Vohs, Jenifer L; Buck, Kelly D; Minor, Kyle S; Luther, Lauren; Leonhardt, Bethany L; Belanger, Elizabeth A; Popolo, Raffaele; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2015-10-01

    The recalcitrance of negative symptoms in the face of pharmacologic treatment has spurred interest in understanding the psychological factors that contribute to their formation and persistence. Accordingly, this study investigated whether deficits in metacognition, or the ability to form integrated ideas about oneself, others, and the world, prospectively predicted levels of negative symptoms independent of deficits in neurocognition, affect recognition and defeatist beliefs. Participants were 53 adults with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder. Prior to entry into a rehabilitation program, all participants completed concurrent assessments of metacognition with the Metacognitive Assessment Scale-Abbreviated, negative symptoms with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, neurocognition with the MATRICS battery, affect recognition with the Bell Lysaker Emotion Recognition Task, and one form of defeatist beliefs with the Recovery Assessment Scale. Negative symptoms were then reassessed one week, 9weeks, and 17weeks after entry into the program. A mixed effects regression model revealed that after controlling for baseline negative symptoms, a general index of neurocognition, defeatist beliefs and capacity for affect recognition, lower levels of metacognition predicted higher levels of negative symptoms across all subsequent time points. Poorer metacognition was able to predict later levels of elevated negative symptoms even after controlling for initial levels of negative symptoms. Results may suggest that metacognitive deficits are a risk factor for elevated levels of negative symptoms in the future. Clinical implications are also discussed.

  13. Factors that Affect Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Following Orthognathic Surgery for Mandibular Prognathism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Kaori; Nishizawa, Daisuke; Kasai, Shinya; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Fukuda, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The predictors of postoperative pain and analgesic consumption were previously found to include preoperative pain, anxiety, age, type of surgery, and genotype, but remaining unclear was whether intraoperative factors could predict postoperative pain. In the present study, we investigated the time-course of fentanyl consumption using intravenous patient-controlled analgesia records from patients who underwent orthognathic surgery for mandibular prognathism and analyzed the influence of anesthesia methods and surgical methods together with sex on the time course. A significant difference in the time course of fentanyl administration was found (Pbimaxillary; P = 0.008), with no interaction between time course and surgical method (P = 0.535). Total postoperative 24 h consumption associated with the bimaxillary procedure was significantly higher than with BSSRO (P = 0.008). The present results indicate that administration patterns and total 24 h consumption were different among the three groups of anesthesia methods and between the two groups of surgical methods, respectively. Although more research on patient-controlled analgesia patterns and consumption is necessary, the present study will contribute to adequately relieving individual patients from postoperative pain. PMID:24893040

  14. Dietary starch type affects body weight and glycemic control in freely fed but not energy-restricted obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Alfred A; Kenney, Laura S; Goulet, Benoit; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed

    2009-10-01

    This study comprised 2 experiments that tested the hypothesis that a high-amylose starch diet (AMO) would improve body weight and glycemic control relative to a high-amylopectin starch diet (AMN) in rats with diet-induced obesity. After inducing obesity with a high-fat and -energy diet (Expt. 1), male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 46) were divided into 4 groups and given free or restricted access to either an AMN or an AMO diet for 4 wk (Expt. 2). After 3 wk, rats from each group underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. At the end of the experiment, food-deprived rats were killed by decapitation and blood and tissues were collected for analyses. AMO led to lower total energy intake, weight gain, fat pad mass, and glycemic response but higher insulin sensitivity index than AMN, only when consumed ad libitum (AL) (P resistant starch content rather than its glycemic index. We conclude that starches high in AMO can be effective in weight and glycemic control in obesity.

  15. Chronic resistance training does not affect post-exercise blood pressure in normotensive older women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerage, Aline Mendes; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; do Nascimento, Matheus Amarante; Pina, Fábio Luiz Cheche; Gonçalves, Cássio Gustavo Santana; Sardinha, Luís B; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni

    2015-06-01

    Resistance training has been recommended for maintenance or improvement of the functional health of older adults, but its effect on acute cardiovascular responses remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of 12 weeks of resistance training on post-exercise blood pressure (BP) in normotensive older women. Twenty-eight normotensive and physically inactive women (≥ 60 years) were randomly assigned to a training group (TG) or a control group (CG). The TG underwent a resistance training program (12 weeks, 8 exercises, 2 sets, 10-15 repetitions, 3 days/week), while the CG performed stretching exercises (12 weeks, 2 sets, 20 s each, 2 days/week). At baseline and after the intervention, participants were randomly submitted to two experimental sessions: a resistance exercise session (7 exercises, 2 sets, 10-15 repetitions) and a control session. BP was obtained pre- and post-sessions (90 min), through auscultation. Post-exercise hypotension was observed for systolic, diastolic, and mean BP in the TG (-6.1, -3.4, and -4.3 mmHg, respectively; P post-exercise BP and 12 weeks of resistance training program do not change the occurrence or magnitude of this hypotension. (ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT02346981).

  16. Effects of Sodium Arsenite and Sodium Arsenate on Expression of DNA and Arsenic Methyltransferases in Rats%不同价态砷对DNA和砷甲基转移酶的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴军; 师喆; 郑玉建; 刘冬梅; 姜平

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence on arsenic methyltransferase (As3MT) and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B) mRNA expression in rats liver treated with sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate and seek for the difference of DNA and arsenic methylation and both' s correlation between sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate (iAs3+ and iAs5+). Methods Different valence state and doses of arsenic were administrated through drinking water to Wistar rats,male rats were divided into seven group randomly,five in each group,control group (deionized water),sodium arsenite low dose group (1/45 LD50,2.33 mg/kg),moderate dose group (1/15 LD50,6.67 mg/kg),high dose group (1/5 LD50,20.00 mg/kg) administrated with different concentrations of sodium arsenite; sodium arsenate low dose group (1/45 LD50,2.33 mg/kg), moderate dose group (1/15 LD50,6.67 mg/kg),high dose group (1/5 LD50,20.00 mg/kg) administrated with different concentrations of sodium arsenate. The reagents were given through drinking water, for 90 consecutive days. At the end of the third month, the rats were sacrificed to collect the liver,and the expression of DNA and arsenic methyltransferase were detected by real-time PCR in liver genome mRNA. Results The difference of As3MT and DNA methyltransferase mRNA expression in every group was significant (P<0.05) compared with the control group; the expression of As3MT mRNA increased and the expression of DNMT3A and DNMT3B mRNA were decreased in arsenic the exposed group; the expression of DNMT1 mRNA increased in high and low iAs3+ exposed group and in high iAs5+ exposed group,the expression of DNMT1 mRNA decreased in moderate iAs3+ exposed group and in low iAs5+ exposed group. With the increasing dose of iAs3+,As3MT mRNA expression showed an increasing trend and DNMT3A and DNMT3B mRNA expression showed a decresing trend in iAs3+ group; with the increase of iAs5+ dose,As3MT mRNA expression showed a decreasing trend and DNMT3A,DNMT3B and DNMT1 mRNA expression

  17. Plant spacing and weed control affect sunflower stalk insects and the girdling behavior of Dectes texanus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, J P; Stahlman, P W; Jyoti, J L; Grant, A K

    2009-06-01

    We conducted a 2-yr study to determine the effects of crop density and weeds on levels of damage caused by stalk-boring insects in rain-fed sunflowers in west-central Kansas. Weed-free sunflower had higher seed weight and oil content in 2007, but not in 2006, but weeds did not affect infestation by stalk-boring insects in either year. High-density sunflower had lower estimated seed yield per unit area than low-density sunflower in both years, but percentage oil was slightly greater in the high-density treatment in 2006. Sunflowers were more heavily infested by larvae of Ataxia hubbardi Fisher, Cylindrocopturus adspersus (Leconte), and Pelochrista womanana (Kearfott) in 2006 than in 2007, ostensibly as a result of being planted earlier. Larvae of Dectes texanus LeConte appeared unaffected by planting date and were present in > 70% of plants in both years. Conditions during the period of crop maturity were much drier in 2006 than in 2007 and were associated with higher seed oil content and earlier and faster progression of stalk girdling by D. texanus larvae in both low- and high-density plots. There was also a strong effect of plant density on girdling behavior that seemed to be mediated by effects on soil moisture. Stalk girdling began earlier in high-density plots and a larger proportion of plants were girdled compared with low-density plots on all sampling dates in both years. Certain cultural tactics, in particular reduced plant spacing, have potential to delay the onset of girdling behavior by D. texanus larvae and thus mitigate losses that otherwise result from the lodging of girdled plants.

  18. Factors that affect intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for postoperative pain following orthognathic surgery for mandibular prognathism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Aoki

    Full Text Available The predictors of postoperative pain and analgesic consumption were previously found to include preoperative pain, anxiety, age, type of surgery, and genotype, but remaining unclear was whether intraoperative factors could predict postoperative pain. In the present study, we investigated the time-course of fentanyl consumption using intravenous patient-controlled analgesia records from patients who underwent orthognathic surgery for mandibular prognathism and analyzed the influence of anesthesia methods and surgical methods together with sex on the time course. A significant difference in the time course of fentanyl administration was found (P<0.001. No significant difference in the time course of fentanyl administration was found between males and females (P = 0.653, with no interaction between time course and sex (P = 0.567. No significant difference in the time course of fentanyl administration was found among anesthesia methods, such as fentanyl induction followed by fentanyl maintenance, fentanyl induction followed by remifentanil maintenance, and remifentanil induction followed by remifentanil maintenance (P = 0.512, but an interaction between time course and anesthesia method was observed (P = 0.004. A significant difference in the time course of fentanyl administration was found between surgical methods, such as bilateral mandibular sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSRO and BSSRO combined with Le Fort I osteotomy (bimaxillary; P = 0.008, with no interaction between time course and surgical method (P = 0.535. Total postoperative 24 h consumption associated with the bimaxillary procedure was significantly higher than with BSSRO (P = 0.008. The present results indicate that administration patterns and total 24 h consumption were different among the three groups of anesthesia methods and between the two groups of surgical methods, respectively. Although more research on patient-controlled analgesia patterns and consumption is necessary, the

  19. Insulin sensitivity affects propensity to obesity in an ethnic-specific manner: results from two controlled weight loss intervention studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gower Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Risk for obesity differs with ethnicity/race and is associated with insulin sensitivity (SI, insulin responsiveness, and dietary glycemic load (GL. The objective of this study was to test the hypotheses that, 1 obesity-prone, normal weight, African-American (AA women would be more insulin sensitive than BMI-matched, never overweight AA women; 2 increased adiposity over time would be associated with greater baseline SI and higher dietary GL in AA but not European-American (EA women; and 3 increased adiposity over time would be predicted by SI in women with high but not low acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg. Methods Two controlled weight loss interventions were conducted involving overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m2 premenopausal AA and EA women. The first included matching with normal-weight (BMI 2 controls following weight loss, and then comparing SI. The second included a 1-year follow-up of weight-reduced participants to identify predictors of change in %body fat. Main outcome measure in the first study was insulin sensitivity (SI as assessed with intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT, and in the second study was change in %fat, as assessed with DXA, over one year. AIRg was assessed during IVGTT, and free-living diet was determined by food record. Results In the first study, formerly overweight AA women were 43% more insulin sensitive than BMI-matched never overweight AA (P I was positively associated with change in %fat over 1 year only in AA women (P P P = 0.086 for diet x SI interaction. In both studies, AA women had higher AIRg (P  Conclusions Formerly overweight (obesity-prone AA women were more insulin sensitive than never overweight AA women, a quality that may predispose to adiposity, particularly when combined with a high GL diet. This ethnicity/race-specific effect may be due to high insulin responsiveness among AA.