WorldWideScience

Sample records for controlling ruminant methane

  1. Methane emissions from ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... Review. Livestock-environment interactions: Methane emissions from ruminants. Aluwong, T.1* ... perception of air quality by human neighbours.The three ... on the climate; the global warming potential of methane is. 21-times that of ... has serious impact on high atmosphere ozone formation. It is important ...

  2. The genome sequence of the rumen methanogen Methanobrevibacter ruminantium reveals new possibilities for controlling ruminant methane emissions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinead C Leahy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methane (CH(4 is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG, having a global warming potential 21 times that of carbon dioxide (CO(2. Methane emissions from agriculture represent around 40% of the emissions produced by human-related activities, the single largest source being enteric fermentation, mainly in ruminant livestock. Technologies to reduce these emissions are lacking. Ruminant methane is formed by the action of methanogenic archaea typified by Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, which is present in ruminants fed a wide variety of diets worldwide. To gain more insight into the lifestyle of a rumen methanogen, and to identify genes and proteins that can be targeted to reduce methane production, we have sequenced the 2.93 Mb genome of M. ruminantium M1, the first rumen methanogen genome to be completed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The M1 genome was sequenced, annotated and subjected to comparative genomic and metabolic pathway analyses. Conserved and methanogen-specific gene sets suitable as targets for vaccine development or chemogenomic-based inhibition of rumen methanogens were identified. The feasibility of using a synthetic peptide-directed vaccinology approach to target epitopes of methanogen surface proteins was demonstrated. A prophage genome was described and its lytic enzyme, endoisopeptidase PeiR, was shown to lyse M1 cells in pure culture. A predicted stimulation of M1 growth by alcohols was demonstrated and microarray analyses indicated up-regulation of methanogenesis genes during co-culture with a hydrogen (H(2 producing rumen bacterium. We also report the discovery of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases in M. ruminantium M1, the first reported in archaeal species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The M1 genome sequence provides new insights into the lifestyle and cellular processes of this important rumen methanogen. It also defines vaccine and chemogenomic targets for broad inhibition of rumen methanogens and represents a significant

  3. [Spectroscopy technique and ruminant methane emissions accurate inspecting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zhan-Huan; Guo, Xu-Sheng; Long, Rui-Jun

    2009-03-01

    The increase in atmospheric CH4 concentration, on the one hand through the radiation process, will directly cause climate change, and on the other hand, cause a lot of changes in atmospheric chemical processes, indirectly causing climate change. The rapid growth of atmospheric methane has gained attention of governments and scientists. All countries in the world now deal with global climate change as an important task of reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, but the need for monitoring the concentration of methane gas, in particular precision monitoring, can be scientifically formulated to provide a scientific basis for emission reduction measures. So far, CH4 gas emissions of different animal production systems have received extensive research. The methane emission by ruminant reported in the literature is only estimation. This is due to the various factors that affect the methane production in ruminant, there are various variables associated with the techniques for measuring methane production, the techniques currently developed to measure methane are unable to accurately determine the dynamics of methane emission by ruminant, and therefore there is an urgent need to develop an accurate method for this purpose. Currently, spectroscopy technique has been used and is relatively a more accurate and reliable method. Various spectroscopy techniques such as modified infrared spectroscopy methane measuring system, laser and near-infrared sensory system are able to achieve the objective of determining the dynamic methane emission by both domestic and grazing ruminant. Therefore spectroscopy technique is an important methane measuring technique, and contributes to proposing reduction methods of methane.

  4. Factors Affecting Mitigation of Methane Emission from Ruminants: Management Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshar Mirzaei-Aghsaghali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, greenhouse gas emission which results in elevating global temperature is an important subject of worldwide ecological and environmental concern. Among greenhouse gases, methane is considered a potent greenhouse gas with 21 times more global warming potential than carbon dioxide. Worldwide, ruminant livestock produce about 80 million metric tons of methane each year, accounting for about 28% of global emissions from human related activities. Therefore it is impelling animal scientists to finding solutions to mitigate methane emission from ruminants. It seems that solutions can be discussed in four topics including: nutrition (feeding, biotechnology, microbiology and management strategies. We have already published the first review article on feeding strategies. In the current review, management strategies such as emphasizing on animals - type and individual variability, reducing livestock numbers, improving animal productivity and longevity as well as pasture management; that can be leads to decreasing methane production from ruminant animal production are discussed.

  5. Impact of ruminal pH on enteric methane emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hünerberg, M; McGinn, S M; Beauchemin, K A; Entz, T; Okine, E K; Harstad, O M; McAllister, T A

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of ruminal pH on methane (CH4) emission from beef cattle. Ruminal pH and CH4 data were generated in 2 experiments using 16 beef heifers offered high-forage (55% barley silage) or high-grain (92% concentrate; DM basis) diets. Both experiments were designed as a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square with 4 periods and 4 dietary treatments. Methane was measured over 4 consecutive days using open-circuit respiratory chambers with each chamber housing 2 heifers. The ruminal pH of individual heifers was measured using indwelling pH loggers. The mean ruminal pH and CH4 emission (g/h) of 2 heifers in every chamber were summarized in 30-min blocks. Even though rumen methanogens have been described to be inhibited by a pH 0.05). Daily mean CH4 emission (g/d) and ruminal pH were only mildly correlated (r2 = 0.27; P emissions from cattle fed high-grain as compared to high-forage diets. Lowering ruminal pH alone is, therefore, not an effective CH4-mitigation strategy. Mechanisms permitting methanogens to survive episodes of low-ruminal pH might include changes in community structure toward more pH-tolerant strains or sequestration into microenvironments within biofilms or protozoa where methanogens are protected from low pH.

  6. Effects of Plant Secondary Metabolites on Methane Production and Fermentation Parameters in In vitro Ruminal Cultures

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    Mihaela Giuburunca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Enteric fermentation process is of concern worldwide for its contribution to global warming. It is known that ruminant animals, due to natural fermentation process contribute substantially to the increase in methane production. Methanogenesis process represents besides its contribution to greenhouse gases emissions an energy loss to the animal. To reduce ruminal methane productions in an ecologically and sustainable way, many attempts have been initiated, such as: uses of chemicals additives or ionophore antibiotics, defaunation process or immunization against ruminal methanogenesis. In the last years, a new strategy has been evaluated whether plant secondary metabolites can be used as natural additives to reduce ruminal methane emissions. The present study has been conducted to investigate the effects of trans-cinnamic, caffeic, p-coumaric acids and catechin hydrate, four plant secondary metabolites (PSMs on methane production and fermentation in in vitro ruminal cultures. The four PSMs were added anaerobically in a 6 mM concentration to 100 ml serum bottles containing 500 mg grass hay as a substrate, 10 ml rumen fluid collected from a fistulated sheep before morning feeding and 40 ml 141 DSM culture medium. The bottles were incubated at 39 ̊C. After 24 h, the following variables were measured: total gas volume, pH, methane and volatile fatty acids (VFAs production. The results showed that caffeic (p = 0.058 and p-coumaric (p = 0.052 acids tended to decrease methane production in comparison to control but the decrease was not statistic significantly at α= 0.05. The other two PSMs had no significant effect on methane production. Addition of PSMs did not affected the total gas volume, the pH and VFAs profile (P>0.05 in relation to the control (no PSM added. In conclusion, caffeic and p-coumaric acids in 6 mM concentration showed some promising effects for decreasing ruminal methane emissions without affecting ruminal fermentation parameters but

  7. Factors affecting mitigation of methane emission from ruminants: Microbiology and biotechnology strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshar Mirzaei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is a subject of global environmental concern. Increased anthropogenic Greenhouse Gas (GHG emissions have increased the global temperature the last 100 to 200 years. Carbon dioxide and methane are the main greenhouse gases related to animal nutrition and methane has greater global warming potential than carbon dioxide. Among greenhouse gases, methane is considered a potent greenhouse gas with 21 times more global warming potential than carbon dioxide. Worldwide, ruminant livestock produce about 80 million metric tons of methane each year, accounting for about 28% of global emissions from human related activities. Therefore it is impelling animal scientists to finding solutions to mitigate methane emission from ruminants. It seems that solutions can be discussed in four topics including: nutrition (feeding, biotechnology, microbiology and management strategies. We have already published the first and second review articles on feeding strategies and management strategies. In the current review, Microbiology and biotechnology such as emphasizing on animal  breeding, genetic merit, bovine somatotropin (BST, unproductive animals, vaccination, immunisation and biological control (bacteriophage, acetogenesis reductive, chemical defaunation that can be leads to decreasing methane production from ruminant animal production are discussed.

  8. Methods for measuring and estimating methane emission from ruminants

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary Knowledge about methods used in quantification of greenhouse gasses is currently needed due to international commitments to reduce the emissions. In the agricultural sector one important task is to reduce enteric methane emissions from ruminants. Different methods for quantifying these emissions are presently being used and others are under development, all with different conditions for application. For scientist and other persons working with the topic it is very important to ...

  9. Methods for Measuring and Estimating Methane Emission from Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen Madsen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a brief introduction to the different methods used to quantify the enteric methane emission from ruminants. A thorough knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of these methods is very important in order to plan experiments, understand and interpret experimental results, and compare them with other studies. The aim of the paper is to describe the principles, advantages and disadvantages of different methods used to quantify the enteric methane emission from ruminants. The best-known methods: Chambers/respiration chambers, SF6 technique and in vitro gas production technique and the newer CO2 methods are described. Model estimations, which are used to calculate national budget and single cow enteric emission from intake and diet composition, are also discussed. Other methods under development such as the micrometeorological technique, combined feeder and CH4 analyzer and proxy methods are briefly mentioned. Methods of choice for estimating enteric methane emission depend on aim, equipment, knowledge, time and money available, but interpretation of results obtained with a given method can be improved if knowledge about the disadvantages and advantages are used in the planning of experiments.

  10. Potential and existing mechanisms of enteric methane production in ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Qiao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Enteric methane (CH4 emissions in ruminants have attracted considerable attention due to their impact on greenhouse gases and the contribution of agricultural practices to global warming. Over the last two decades, a number of approaches have been adopted to mitigate CH4 emissions. However, the mechanisms of methanogenesis have still not been fully defined. According to the genome sequences of M. ruminantium in the rumen and of M. AbM4 in the abomasum, the pathways of carbon dioxide (CO2 reduction and formate oxidation to CH4 have now been authenticated in ruminants. Furthermore, in the light of species or genera description of methanogens, the precursors of methanogenesis discovered in the rumen and research advances in related subjects, pathways of acetate dissimilation via Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta as well as metabolism of methanol to CH4 might be present in the rumen, although neither process has yet been experimentally demonstrated in the rumen. Herein the research advances in methanogenesic mechanisms including existing and potential mechanisms are reviewed in detail. In addition, further research efforts to understand the methanogenesis mechanism should focus on isolation and identification of more specific methanogens, and their genome sequences. Such increased knowledge will provide benefits in terms of improved dietary energy utilization and a reduced contribution of enteric CH4 emissions to total global greenhouse gas emissions from the ruminant production system.

  11. Ruminal Methane Production on Simple Phenolic Acids Addition in in Vitro Gas Production Method

    OpenAIRE

    A. Jayanegara

    2009-01-01

    Methane production from ruminants contributes to total global methane production, which is an important contributor to global warming. In this experiment, six sources of simple phenolic acids (benzoic, cinnamic, phenylacetic, caffeic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids) at two different levels (2 and 5 mM) added to hay diet were evaluated for their potential to reduce enteric methane production using in vitro Hohenheim gas production method. The measured variables were gas production, methane, orga...

  12. Biofiltration of Methane from Ruminants Gas Effluent Using Autoclaved Aerated Concrete as the Carrier Material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganendra, Giovanni; Mercado-Garcia, Daniel; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Peiren, Nico; De Campeneere, Sam; Ho, Adrian; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The performance of Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria (MOB) immobilized on Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC) in a biofilter setup to remove methane from ruminants gas effluent was investigated. Two dairy cows were housed in respiration chambers for two days where the exhaust gas from the chambers w

  13. Biofiltration of Methane from Ruminants Gas Effluent Using Autoclaved Aerated Concrete as the Carrier Material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganendra, Giovanni; Mercado-Garcia, Daniel; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Peiren, Nico; De Campeneere, Sam; Ho, Adrian; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The performance of Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria (MOB) immobilized on Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC) in a biofilter setup to remove methane from ruminants gas effluent was investigated. Two dairy cows were housed in respiration chambers for two days where the exhaust gas from the chambers

  14. Nitrate and inhibition of ruminal methanogenesis: microbial ecology, obstacles and opportunities for lowering methane emissions from ruminant livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjian eYang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ruminal methane production is among the main targets for greenhouse gas (GHG mitigation for the animal agriculture industry. Many compounds have been evaluated for their efficacy to suppress enteric methane production by ruminal microorganisms. Of these, nitrate as an alternative hydrogen sink has been among the most promising, but it suffers from variability in efficacy for reasons that are not understood. The accumulation of nitrite, which is poisonous when absorbed into the animal’s circulation, is also variable and poorly understood. This review identifies large gaps in our knowledge of rumen microbial ecology that handicap the further development and safety of nitrate as a dietary additive. Three main bacterial species have been associated historically with ruminal nitrate reduction, namely Wolinella succinogenes, Veillonella parvula and Selenomonas ruminantium, but others almost certainly exist in the largely uncultivated ruminal microbiota. Indications are strong that ciliate protozoa can reduce nitrate, but the significance of their role relative to bacteria is not known. The metabolic fate of the reduced nitrate has not been studied in detail. It is important to be sure that nitrate metabolism and efforts to enhance rates of nitrite reduction do not lead to the evolution of the much more potent GHG, nitrous oxide. The relative importance of direct inhibition of archaeal methanogenic enzymes by nitrite or the efficiency of capture of hydrogen by nitrate reduction in lowering methane production is also not known, nor are nitrite effects on other members of the microbiota. How effective would combining mitigation methods be, based on our understanding of the effects of nitrate and nitrite on the microbiome? Answering these fundamental microbiological questions is essential in assessing the potential of dietary nitrate to limit methane emissions from ruminant livestock.

  15. Nitrate and Inhibition of Ruminal Methanogenesis: Microbial Ecology, Obstacles, and Opportunities for Lowering Methane Emissions from Ruminant Livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengjian; Rooke, John A; Cabeza, Irene; Wallace, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Ruminal methane production is among the main targets for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation for the animal agriculture industry. Many compounds have been evaluated for their efficacy to suppress enteric methane production by ruminal microorganisms. Of these, nitrate as an alternative hydrogen sink has been among the most promising, but it suffers from variability in efficacy for reasons that are not understood. The accumulation of nitrite, which is poisonous when absorbed into the animal's circulation, is also variable and poorly understood. This review identifies large gaps in our knowledge of rumen microbial ecology that handicap the further development and safety of nitrate as a dietary additive. Three main bacterial species have been associated historically with ruminal nitrate reduction, namely Wolinella succinogenes, Veillonella parvula, and Selenomonas ruminantium, but others almost certainly exist in the largely uncultivated ruminal microbiota. Indications are strong that ciliate protozoa can reduce nitrate, but the significance of their role relative to bacteria is not known. The metabolic fate of the reduced nitrate has not been studied in detail. It is important to be sure that nitrate metabolism and efforts to enhance rates of nitrite reduction do not lead to the evolution of the much more potent GHG, nitrous oxide. The relative importance of direct inhibition of archaeal methanogenic enzymes by nitrite or the efficiency of capture of hydrogen by nitrate reduction in lowering methane production is also not known, nor are nitrite effects on other members of the microbiota. How effective would combining mitigation methods be, based on our understanding of the effects of nitrate and nitrite on the microbiome? Answering these fundamental microbiological questions is essential in assessing the potential of dietary nitrate to limit methane emissions from ruminant livestock.

  16. Genetic aspects of enteric methane emission in ruminants livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martino Cassandro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the importance of enteric methane (CH4 emission in ruminants and relevant to the current on knowledge relevant to genetic aspects of enteric CH4 production, highlighting future research needs and directions. Global average temperature has increased by about 0.7°C in the last century. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC reported that anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHG, including carbon dioxide (CO2, CH4, nitrous oxide (N2O and halocarbons, have been responsible for most of the observed temperature increase since the middle of the twentieth century. Agriculture, particularly livestock, is increasingly being recognized as both a contributor to the process and a potential victim of it. Policy interventions and technical solutions are required to address both the impact of livestock production on climate change and the effects of climate change on livestock production. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO, declared that in the next 50 years, the world’s farmers will be called upon to produce more food than has been produced in the past 10,000 years, and to do so in environmentally sustainable ways. Therefore, the GHG reduction should be treated as a public good. The United States congress is prospecting to define a price on GHG emissions. Limiting the concentration of CO2 and other GHG in Earth’s atmosphere requires a technological and economic revolution. A cost-effective way could be the genetic improvement of livestock, which produces permanent and cumulative changes in performance. Animal variation in enteric CH4 emission has been reported in the literature, providing potential for improvement through genetic selection. 

  17. Recent Development in the Methane Production,Measurement and Emission Control in Ruminants%反刍动物甲烷的产生、测定及减排调控的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李恩凯; 杨在宾

    2014-01-01

    文章综述了反刍动物甲烷的产生机制和瘤胃内主要的产甲烷菌种类,并阐明了不同的产甲烷菌的甲烷合成底物及甲烷合成途径。文章还阐明了反刍动物甲烷产量的测定方法以及减排措施。%This paper reviewed the methane production mechanism,main mathanogen bacteria and methane synthesis pathway in the rumen of ruminant,also discussed the measurement methods and measures to reduce methane emission.

  18. Effects of Plant Extracts on Microbial Population, Methane Emission and Ruminal Fermentation Characteristics in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. Kim

    2012-06-01

    community in added wormwood, garlic, mandarin orange and honeysuckle extracts increased more than that of the others. The addition of onion extract increased R. albus diversity, while other extracts did not influence the R. albus community. The R. flavefaciens population in added wormwood and garlic extracts decreased, while other extracts increased its abundance compared to the control. In conclusion, the results indicated that the plant extracts used in the experiment could be promising feed additives to decrease methane gas emission from ruminant animals while improving ruminal fermentation.

  19. Technical Note: Predicting ruminal methane inhibition by condensed tannins using nonlinear exponential decay regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, H D; Tedeschi, L O; Fonseca, M A

    2015-11-01

    Methane (CH) is a potent greenhouse gas that is normally produced by microbial fermentation in the rumen and released to the environment mainly during eructation. Prediction of ruminal CH production is important for ruminant nutrition, especially for the determination of ME intake to assess the amount of total GE available for metabolism by an animal. Equations have been developed to predict ruminal CH production based on dietary constituents, but none have considered condensed tannins (CT), which are known to impact CH production by ruminants. The objective was to develop an equation to predict ruminal CH, accounting for CT effects. Methane production data were acquired from 48-h in vitro fermentation of a diverse group of warm-season perennial forage legumes containing different concentrations of CT over the course of 3 yr ( = 113). The following nonlinear exponential decay regression equation was developed: CH₄ = 113.6 × exp (-0.1751 x CT) - 2.18), [corrected] in which CH is expressed in grams per kilogram of fermentable organic matter and CT is in percentage of the DM. This equation predicted that CH production could be reduced by approximately 50% when CT is 3.9% DM. This equation is likely more accurate when screening CT-containing forages for their potential ability to mitigate in vitro CH production by ruminants when the CT concentration is greater than 3% DM. Therefore, despite the degree of variability in ruminal CH production, this equation could be used as a tool for screening CT-containing forages for their potential to inhibit ruminal CH. Future research should focus on the development of predictive equations when other potential reducers of ruminal CH are used in conjunction with CT.

  20. Enteric methane production and ruminal fermentation from forage brassica diets fed in continuous culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassicas provide forage for livestock during the late fall when traditional perennial cool-season forages are not productive. However, little research exists on ruminal fermentation and methane(CH4) production of brassicas fed as forage. A continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess nutr...

  1. Evidence for a hydrogen-sink mechanism of (+)catechin-mediated emission reduction of the ruminant greenhouse gas methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.; Wikselaar, van P.G.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Vos, de C.H.; Hall, R.D.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Methane formation in the rumen is a major cause of greenhouse gas emission. Plant secondary compounds in ruminant diets, such as essential oils, saponins and tannins, are known to affect methane production. However, their methane-lowering properties have generally been associated with undesired side

  2. Influence of rumen protozoa on methane emission in ruminants: a meta-analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyader, J; Eugène, M; Nozière, P; Morgavi, D P; Doreau, M; Martin, C

    2014-11-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effects of protozoa concentration on methane emission from ruminants. A database was built from 59 publications reporting data from 76 in vivo experiments. The experiments included in the database recorded methane production and rumen protozoa concentration measured on the same groups of animals. Quantitative data such as diet chemical composition, rumen fermentation and microbial parameters, and qualitative information such as methane mitigation strategies were also collected. In the database, 31% of the experiments reported a concomitant reduction of both protozoa concentration and methane emission (g/kg dry matter intake). Nearly all of these experiments tested lipids as methane mitigation strategies. By contrast, 21% of the experiments reported a variation in methane emission without changes in protozoa numbers, indicating that methanogenesis is also regulated by other mechanisms not involving protozoa. Experiments that used chemical compounds as an antimethanogenic treatment belonged to this group. The relationship between methane emission and protozoa concentration was studied with a variance-covariance model, with experiment as a fixed effect. The experiments included in the analysis had a within-experiment variation of protozoa concentration higher than 5.3 log10 cells/ml corresponding to the average s.e.m. of the database for this variable. To detect potential interfering factors for the relationship, the influence of several qualitative and quantitative secondary factors was tested. This meta-analysis showed a significant linear relationship between methane emission and protozoa concentration: methane (g/kg dry matter intake)=-30.7+8.14×protozoa (log10 cells/ml) with 28 experiments (91 treatments), residual mean square error=1.94 and adjusted R 2=0.90. The proportion of butyrate in the rumen positively influenced the least square means of this relationship.

  3. Ruminal Methane Production on Simple Phenolic Acids Addition in in Vitro Gas Production Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jayanegara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane production from ruminants contributes to total global methane production, which is an important contributor to global warming. In this experiment, six sources of simple phenolic acids (benzoic, cinnamic, phenylacetic, caffeic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids at two different levels (2 and 5 mM added to hay diet were evaluated for their potential to reduce enteric methane production using in vitro Hohenheim gas production method. The measured variables were gas production, methane, organic matter digestibility (OMD, and short chain fatty acids (SCFA. The results showed that addition of cinnamic, caffeic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids at 5 mM significantly (P p-coumaric > ferulic > cinnamic. The addition of simple phenols did not significantly decrease OMD. Addition of simple phenols tends to decrease total SCFA production. It was concluded that methane decrease by addition of phenolic acids was relatively small, and the effect of phenolic acids on methane decrease depended on the source and concentration applied.

  4. Reduction of ruminant methane emissions - a win-win-win opportunity for business, development, and the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, R. [Appropriate Technology International, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes research efforts of The Global Livestock Producers Program (GLPP) in establishing self-sustaining enterprises for cost-effective technologies (i.e., animal nutrition and genetic improvement) and global methane emissions reductions in developing world nations. The US Environmental Protection Agency has funded several studies to examine the possibilities of reducing ruminant methane emissions in India, Tanzania, Bangladesh, and Brazil. The results of the studies showed that: (1) many developing countries` production systems are inefficient, and (2) great potential exists for decreasing global methane emissions through increasing animal productivity. From this effort, the GLPP established livestock development projects in India, Zimbabwe, and Tanzania, and is developing projects for Bangladesh, Nepal, and Brazil. The GLPP has developed a proven methodology for assessing ruminant methane and incorporating methane emissions monitoring into viable projects.

  5. The Use of Plant Bioactive Compounds to Mitigate Enteric Methane in Ruminants and its Application in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Wina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, increasing greenhouse gas (GHG emissions have become a major concern as they are now considered to be the cause of global warming. Several strategies have been planned and taken by different countries including Indonesia to mitigate this situation. Agriculture is considered to be one of major contributors to GHG, especially methane coming from ruminant digestive processes. More than 85% of the methane produced by ruminants comes from enteric fermentation. Several options have been proposed to lower this enteric methane production. This paper describes a review on diet manipulation using feed additives, especially plant bioactive compounds, to mitigate the GHG emission from ruminant livestock. Plant bioactive compounds have been found with various chemical structures. Some of them such as saponin, tannin, essential oils, organosulphur compounds, have been reported to have ability to reduce enteric methane production. Indonesia has many plant resources that have potential as methane reducing agents. Sapindus rarak fruit especially its methanol extract contain saponins which reduce the activity of methanogens in the rumen in vitro, hence reduce methane production (11%. Feeding S. rarak to sheep increased daily weight gain but not that of local cattle. Shrub legumes such as Calliandra calothyrsus and Leucaena leucocephala contain tannins which can reduce methanogenesis (3 – 21% methane reduction. Besides tannin, these shrub legumes are a good source of protein. Feeding shrub legumes can be beneficial as a protein source and a methane reducer. Other sources of methane reducing agents have been tested in other countries and some can be applied for Indonesian situation. The strategy to reduce methane by plant bioactive compounds should be developed to be simple and relatively cheap so it will benefit the local farmers. Extraction of these compounds may be expensive, therefore, costs should be considered carefully when proposing to use the

  6. Archaeal abundance in post-mortem ruminal digesta may help predict methane emissions from beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, R. John; Rooke, John A.; Duthie, Carol-Anne; Hyslop, Jimmy J.; Ross, David W.; McKain, Nest; de Souza, Shirley Motta; Snelling, Timothy J.; Waterhouse, Anthony; Roehe, Rainer

    2014-07-01

    Methane produced from 35 Aberdeen-Angus and 33 Limousin cross steers was measured in respiration chambers. Each group was split to receive either a medium- or high-concentrate diet. Ruminal digesta samples were subsequently removed to investigate correlations between methane emissions and the rumen microbial community, as measured by qPCR of 16S or 18S rRNA genes. Diet had the greatest influence on methane emissions. The high-concentrate diet resulted in lower methane emissions (P Methane was correlated, irrespective of breed, with the abundance of archaea (R = 0.39), bacteria (-0.47), protozoa (0.45), Bacteroidetes (-0.37) and Clostridium Cluster XIVa (-0.35). The archaea:bacteria ratio provided a stronger correlation (0.49). A similar correlation was found with digesta samples taken 2-3 weeks later at slaughter. This finding could help enable greenhouse gas emissions of large animal cohorts to be predicted from samples taken conveniently in the abattoir.

  7. Opportunities and challenges in the use of the Laser Methane Detector to monitor enteric methane emissions from ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagunda, M G G

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this review was to examine the application and relative efficiency of the proprietary hand-held Laser Methane Detector (LMD) in livestock production, with a focus on opportunities and challenges in different production systems. The LMD is based on IR absorption spectroscopy, uses a semiconductor laser as a collimated excitation source and uses the second harmonic detection of wavelength modulation spectroscopy to establish a methane (CH4) concentration measurement. The use of the LMD for CH4 detection in dairy cows is relatively recent. Although developed for entirely different purposes, the LMD provides an opportunity for non-invasive and non-contact scan sampling of enteric CH4. With the possibility for real-time CH4 measurements, the LMD offers a molecular-sensitive technique for enteric CH4 detection in ruminants. Initial studies have demonstrated a relatively strong agreement between CH4 measurements from the LMD with those recorded in the indirect open-circuit respiration calorimetric chamber (correlation coefficient, r = 0.8, P LMD has also demonstrated a strong ability to detect periods of high-enteric CH4 concentration (sensitivity = 95%) and the ability to avoid misclassifying periods of low-enteric CH4 concentration (specificity = 79%). Being portable, the LMD enables spot sampling of methane in different locations and production systems. Two challenges are discussed in the present review. First is on extracting a representation of a point measurement from breath cycle concentrations. The other is on using the LMD in grazing environment. Work so far has shown the need to integrate ambient condition statistics in the flux values. Despite the challenges that have been associated with the use of the LMD, with further validation, the technique has the potential to be utilised as an alternative method in enteric CH4 measurements in ruminants.

  8. In vitro ruminal fermentation and methane production of different seaweed species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina-Alcaide, E.; Carro, M.D.; Roleda, M. Y.

    2017-01-01

    methane production (P 0.05) by either seaweed species or the collection season. Higher final pH (P production, ammonia...... production kinetics and in vitro rumen fermentation in batch cultures of ruminal microorganisms. The seaweeds were three red species (Mastocarpus stellatus, Palmaria palmata and Porphyra sp.), three brown species (Alaria esculenta, Laminaria digitata and Pelvetia canaliculata) and one green species...... by collecting season (P = 0.208–0.341). The TEP values ranged from 1.46 to 50.3 mg/g dry matter (DM), and differed (P production parameters for a rumen passage...

  9. Methane Production of Different Forages in Ruminal Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Meale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro rumen batch culture study was completed to compare effects of common grasses, leguminous shrubs and non-leguminous shrubs used for livestock grazing in Australia and Ghana on CH4 production and fermentation characteristics. Grass species included Andropodon gayanus, Brachiaria ruziziensis and Pennisetum purpureum. Leguminous shrub species included Cajanus cajan, Cratylia argentea, Gliricidia sepium, Leucaena leucocephala and Stylosanthes guianensis and non-leguminous shrub species included Annona senegalensis, Moringa oleifera, Securinega virosa and Vitellaria paradoxa. Leaves were harvested, dried at 55°C and ground through a 1 mm screen. Serum bottles containing 500 mg of forage, modified McDougall’s buffer and rumen fluid were incubated under anaerobic conditions at 39°C for 24 h. Samples of each forage type were removed after 0, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h of incubation for determination of cumulative gas production. Methane production, ammonia concentration and proportions of VFA were measured at 24 h. Concentration of aNDF (g/kg DM ranged from 671 to 713 (grasses, 377 to 590 (leguminous shrubs and 288 to 517 (non-leguminous shrubs. After 24 h of in vitro incubation, cumulative gas, CH4 production, ammonia concentration, proportion of propionate in VFA and IVDMD differed (p<0.05 within each forage type. B. ruziziensis and G. sepium produced the highest cumulative gas, IVDMD, total VFA, proportion of propionate in VFA and the lowest A:P ratios within their forage types. Consequently, these two species produced moderate CH4 emissions without compromising digestion. Grazing of these two species may be a strategy to reduce CH4 emissions however further assessment in in vivo trials and at different stages of maturity is recommended.

  10. Development of Multiwell-Plate Methods Using Pure Cultures of Methanogens To Identify New Inhibitors for Suppressing Ruminant Methane Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimar, M R; Cheung, J; Dey, D; McSweeney, C; Morrison, M; Kobayashi, Y; Whitman, W B; Carbone, V; Schofield, L R; Ronimus, R S; Cook, G M

    2017-08-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogens typically require strictly anaerobic culturing conditions in glass tubes with overpressures of H2 and CO2 that are both time-consuming and costly. To increase the throughput for screening chemical compound libraries, 96-well microtiter plate methods for the growth of a marine (environmental) methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis strain S2 and the rumen methanogen Methanobrevibacter species AbM4 were developed. A number of key parameters (inoculum size, reducing agents for medium preparation, assay duration, inhibitor solvents, and culture volume) were optimized to achieve robust and reproducible growth in a high-throughput microtiter plate format. The method was validated using published methanogen inhibitors and statistically assessed for sensitivity and reproducibility. The Sigma-Aldrich LOPAC library containing 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds and an in-house natural product library (120 compounds) were screened against M. maripaludis as a proof of utility. This screen identified a number of bioactive compounds, and MIC values were confirmed for some of them against M. maripaludis and M. AbM4. The developed method provides a significant increase in throughput for screening compound libraries and can now be used to screen larger compound libraries to discover novel methanogen-specific inhibitors for the mitigation of ruminant methane emissions.IMPORTANCE Methane emissions from ruminants are a significant contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions, and new technologies are required to control emissions in the agriculture technology (agritech) sector. The discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of methanogens using high-throughput phenotypic (growth) screening against compound libraries (synthetic and natural products) is an attractive avenue. However, phenotypic inhibitor screening is currently hindered by our inability to grow methanogens in a high-throughput format. We have developed, optimized, and validated a high

  11. Effects of supplementation frequency on the ruminal fermentation and enteric methane production of beef cattle grazing in tropical pastures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Carrilho Canesin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of ruminal fermentation and enteric methane production in beef cattle subjected to different supplementation frequencies while grazing on Brachiaria brizanthacv. Marandu pastures. Nine cattle (325±65.7 kg BW fitted with ruminal and duodenal cannulas were used in the ruminal fermentation study, and 12 cattle (399±32.6 kg BW were used in the enteric methane production study. The treatments included supplementation once daily, supplementation once daily except Saturdays and Sundays, or supplementation on alternate days. The supplementation was equivalent to 10 g kg−1 BW day−1 for all treatments. The design employed was completely randomized with three treatments and three replications. When all supplements were provided (day 1, no effects of supplementation frequency were observed on ruminal pH; concentration of NH3-N; concentration of acetic, propionic, or butyric acids; or total volatile fatty acids (VFA, but there were month effects. During the day on which only daily supplements were provided (day 2, significant differences were observed only on the molar concentration of acetic acid and total VFA; and month effects were noted on all variables. No significant differences were observed in ruminal fluid volume, dilution rate, N intake, bacterial N synthesis and enteric methane production among the studied supplementation frequencies. Differences were observed in the enteric methane production in the different months, with 85 g kg−1 of gross energy intake observed in September and 123 g kg−1 of gross energy intake observed in November. Lower supplementation frequency is a good option to lower labor costs with little or no consequences on ruminal fermentation characteristics and enteric methane production.

  12. Methane and carbon dioxide ratio in excreted air for quantification of the methane production from ruminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jørgen; Bjerg, Bjarne Schmidt; Hvelplund, Torben

    2010-01-01

    This technical note presents a simple, fast, reliable and cheap method to estimate the methane (CH4) production from animals by using the CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in air near the animals combined with an estimation of the total CO2 production from information on intake of metab......This technical note presents a simple, fast, reliable and cheap method to estimate the methane (CH4) production from animals by using the CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in air near the animals combined with an estimation of the total CO2 production from information on intake...

  13. Effects of the methane-inhibitors nitrate, nitroethane, lauric acid, Lauricidin and the Hawaiian marine algae Chaetoceros on ruminal fermentation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, A K; Anderson, R C; Carstens, G E; Ricke, S C; Callaway, T R; Yokoyama, M T; Wang, J K; Nisbet, D J

    2009-09-01

    The effects of several methane-inhibitors on rumen fermentation were compared during three 24h consecutive batch cultures of ruminal microbes in the presence of nonlimiting amounts of hydrogen. After the initial incubation series, methane production was reduced greater than 92% from that of non-treated controls (25.8+/-8.1 micromol ml(-1) incubation fluid) in cultures treated with nitroethane, sodium laurate, Lauricidin or a finely-ground product of the marine algae, Chaetoceros (added at 1, 5, 5 and 10 mg ml(-1), respectively) but not in cultures treated with sodium nitrate (1 mg m1(-1)). Methane production during two successive incubations was reduced greater than 98% from controls (22.5+/-3.2 and 23.5+/-7.9 micromol ml(-1), respectively) by all treatments. Reductions in amounts of volatile fatty acids and ammonia produced and amounts of hexose fermented, when observed, were most severe in sodium laurate-treated cultures. These results demonstrate that all tested compounds inhibited ruminal methane production in our in vitro system but their effects on fermentation differed.

  14. Evaluating in vitro dose-response effects of Lavandula officinalis essential oil on rumen fermentation characteristics, methane production and ruminal acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadeghari, Shahin; Malecky, Mostafa; Dehghan Banadaky, Mehdi; Navidshad, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    Four in vitro experiments (Exp.) were conducted to evaluate lavender essential oil (LEO) effects at 0 (control), 250 (low dose), 500 (medium dose), 750 and 1000 µL per L (high doses) of incubation medium on rumen gas production kinetics (Exp.1), ruminal digestibility and fermentation (Exp.2), methane production (Exp.3) and rumen acidosis (Exp.4). The asymptote of gas production (A) increased quadratically (p production rate (µ) decreased linearly (p = 0.031) with increasing dose of LEO. A linear and quadratic effect (p production decreased by 11.00 and 44.00 to 60.00% at medium and high doses of LEO (p essential oil decreased also ruminal pH at all included doses (p < 0.05), intensifying rumen acidosis. These results revealed a dose-dependent selective effect (stimulatory at low and medium, and inhibitory at high doses) of LEO on rumen fermentation.

  15. The Use of an Automated System (GreenFeed) to Monitor Enteric Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Ruminant Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Hristov, Alexander N.; Oh, Joonpyo; Giallongo, Fabio; Frederick, Tyler; Weeks, Holley; ZIMMERMAN, PATRICK R.; Harper, Michael T.; Hristova, Rada A.; Zimmerman, R. Scott; Branco, Antonio F.

    2015-01-01

    Ruminant animals (domesticated or wild) emit methane (CH4) through enteric fermentation in their digestive tract and from decomposition of manure during storage. These processes are the major sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from animal production systems. Techniques for measuring enteric CH4 vary from direct measurements (respiration chambers, which are highly accurate, but with limited applicability) to various indirect methods (sniffers, laser technology, which are practical, but ...

  16. The Use of an Automated System (GreenFeed) to Monitor Enteric Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Ruminant Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, Alexander N; Oh, Joonpyo; Giallongo, Fabio; Frederick, Tyler; Weeks, Holley; Zimmerman, Patrick R; Harper, Michael T; Hristova, Rada A; Zimmerman, R Scott; Branco, Antonio F

    2015-09-07

    Ruminant animals (domesticated or wild) emit methane (CH4) through enteric fermentation in their digestive tract and from decomposition of manure during storage. These processes are the major sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from animal production systems. Techniques for measuring enteric CH4 vary from direct measurements (respiration chambers, which are highly accurate, but with limited applicability) to various indirect methods (sniffers, laser technology, which are practical, but with variable accuracy). The sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas method is commonly used to measure enteric CH4 production by animal scientists and more recently, application of an Automated Head-Chamber System (AHCS) (GreenFeed, C-Lock, Inc., Rapid City, SD), which is the focus of this experiment, has been growing. AHCS is an automated system to monitor CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) mass fluxes from the breath of ruminant animals. In a typical AHCS operation, small quantities of baiting feed are dispensed to individual animals to lure them to AHCS multiple times daily. As the animal visits AHCS, a fan system pulls air past the animal's muzzle into an intake manifold, and through an air collection pipe where continuous airflow rates are measured. A sub-sample of air is pumped out of the pipe into non-dispersive infra-red sensors for continuous measurement of CH4 and CO2 concentrations. Field comparisons of AHCS to respiration chambers or SF6 have demonstrated that AHCS produces repeatable and accurate CH4 emission results, provided that animal visits to AHCS are sufficient so emission estimates are representative of the diurnal rhythm of rumen gas production. Here, we demonstrate the use of AHCS to measure CO2 and CH4 fluxes from dairy cows given a control diet or a diet supplemented with technical-grade cashew nut shell liquid.

  17. Effects of the methane-inhibitors nitrate, nitroethane, lauric acid, Lauricidin**R and the Hawaiian marine algae, Chaetoceros, on ruminal fermentation in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of several methane-inhibitors on rumen fermentation were compared during three 24 h consecutive batch cultures of ruminal microbes in the presence of nonlimiting amounts of hydrogen. After the initial incubation series, methane production was reduced greater than 92% from that of nontre...

  18. Prophylactic Modulation of Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emitted from Ruminants Livestock for Sustainable Animal Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Takahashi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Major greenhouse gases (GHG attributed to animal agriculture sector are methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O, either generated from enteric fermentation or manure. The abatement mechanism of rumen CH4 emission may be divided to direct and indirect suppression to methanogens in the rumen.The most significant strategy to mitigate ruminal CH4 emission in indirect manner is to promote alternative metabolic pathway to dispose of the reducing power, competing with methanogenesis for H2 uptake. This includes prebiotics and probiotics (mostly propionate enhancers which consume metabolic hydrogen (H2 compete with methanogens and abate rumen methanogenesis in indirect manner. With regard to mitigate GHG emissions from manure, such waste has been proposed as a renewable energy and nitrogen sources through biogas plant. Furthermore, in advanced new biogas system, the ammonia stripping from digested slurry of livestock manure in biogas plant has been examined to apply to nitrogen recycling-options mitigating N2O emission. These options are: (1 ammonolysis on fiber-rich feedstuffs, (2 saccharification of the NH3 treated cellulose biomass to produce bio-ethanol, and (3 reformed hydrogen into NH3 fuel cell to generate electricity with proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM.

  19. Animal board invited review: genetic possibilities to reduce enteric methane emissions from ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, N K; Oddy, V H; Basarab, J; Cammack, K; Hayes, B; Hegarty, R S; Lassen, J; McEwan, J C; Miller, S; Pinares-Patiño, C S; de Haas, Y

    2015-09-01

    Measuring and mitigating methane (CH4) emissions from livestock is of increasing importance for the environment and for policy making. Potentially, the most sustainable way of reducing enteric CH4 emission from ruminants is through the estimation of genomic breeding values to facilitate genetic selection. There is potential for adopting genetic selection and in the future genomic selection, for reduced CH4 emissions from ruminants. From this review it has been observed that both CH4 emissions and production (g/day) are a heritable and repeatable trait. CH4 emissions are strongly related to feed intake both in the short term (minutes to several hours) and over the medium term (days). When measured over the medium term, CH4 yield (MY, g CH4/kg dry matter intake) is a heritable and repeatable trait albeit with less genetic variation than for CH4 emissions. CH4 emissions of individual animals are moderately repeatable across diets, and across feeding levels, when measured in respiration chambers. Repeatability is lower when short term measurements are used, possibly due to variation in time and amount of feed ingested prior to the measurement. However, while repeated measurements add value; it is preferable the measures be separated by at least 3 to 14 days. This temporal separation of measurements needs to be investigated further. Given the above issue can be resolved, short term (over minutes to hours) measurements of CH4 emissions show promise, especially on systems where animals are fed ad libitum and frequency of meals is high. However, we believe that for short-term measurements to be useful for genetic evaluation, a number (between 3 and 20) of measurements will be required over an extended period of time (weeks to months). There are opportunities for using short-term measurements in standardised feeding situations such as breath 'sniffers' attached to milking parlours or total mixed ration feeding bins, to measure CH4. Genomic selection has the potential to

  20. Mode of action uncovered for the specific reduction of methane emissions from ruminants by the small molecule 3-nitrooxypropanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duin, Evert C; Wagner, Tristan; Shima, Seigo; Prakash, Divya; Cronin, Bryan; Yáñez-Ruiz, David R; Duval, Stephane; Rümbeli, Robert; Stemmler, René T; Thauer, Rudolf Kurt; Kindermann, Maik

    2016-05-31

    Ruminants, such as cows, sheep, and goats, predominantly ferment in their rumen plant material to acetate, propionate, butyrate, CO2, and methane. Whereas the short fatty acids are absorbed and metabolized by the animals, the greenhouse gas methane escapes via eructation and breathing of the animals into the atmosphere. Along with the methane, up to 12% of the gross energy content of the feedstock is lost. Therefore, our recent report has raised interest in 3-nitrooxypropanol (3-NOP), which when added to the feed of ruminants in milligram amounts persistently reduces enteric methane emissions from livestock without apparent negative side effects [Hristov AN, et al. (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112(34):10663-10668]. We now show with the aid of in silico, in vitro, and in vivo experiments that 3-NOP specifically targets methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR). The nickel enzyme, which is only active when its Ni ion is in the +1 oxidation state, catalyzes the methane-forming step in the rumen fermentation. Molecular docking suggested that 3-NOP preferably binds into the active site of MCR in a pose that places its reducible nitrate group in electron transfer distance to Ni(I). With purified MCR, we found that 3-NOP indeed inactivates MCR at micromolar concentrations by oxidation of its active site Ni(I). Concomitantly, the nitrate ester is reduced to nitrite, which also inactivates MCR at micromolar concentrations by oxidation of Ni(I). Using pure cultures, 3-NOP is demonstrated to inhibit growth of methanogenic archaea at concentrations that do not affect the growth of nonmethanogenic bacteria in the rumen.

  1. Potential of condensed tannins for the reduction of emissions of enteric methane and their effect on ruminant productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AT Piñeiro-Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 gas is a by-product of anaerobic fermentation of carbohydrates in the rumen of ruminant species. Agriculture contributes with 47% of anthropogenic emissions of CH4, being the ruminants responsible for 39% of enteric emissions of CH4. This greenhouse gas (GHG has twenty-five times higher global warming potential than CO2 and represents a loss of up to 12% of the gross energy consumed by ruminants. The aim of this review is to describe the mechanisms of action of condensed tannins contained in foliage of trees and shrubs, and their effect on rumen microbes, as well as their potential for mitigation of CH4 emissions. The findings suggest that condensed tannins reduce protozoa population up to 79% and along with this, rumen methanogens are decreased by up to 33%. Condensed tannins bounded to proteins and polysaccharides of the ration form complexes which reduce digestibility of dry and organic matter and production of metabolic used by methanogens to reduce CO2 to CH4 In vitro studies suggest that condensed tannins may reduce rumen CH4 up to 63% in vitro and up to 58% in vivo. Additionally, incorporation of condensed tannins in the ration of ruminants might increase weight gain by 26%, maybe due to the increase in the flow of protein of low rumen degradability to the small intestine or to the reduction of energy losses as CH4 in the rumen. It is concluded that incorporation of condensed tannins in the ration of ruminants at 3-6% of dry matter concentrations can reduce CH4 emissions as well as to improve weight gain and milk yield of productive animals.

  2. Control strategies for peste des petits ruminants in small ruminants of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R P

    2011-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a contagious viral disease of small ruminants. It is endemic in several African, Middle Eastern and Asian countries, including India. India has recently taken comprehensive steps to deal with PPR through the development and production of potent vaccines and monoclonal-antibody-based diagnostic kits, while also gathering baseline information on the disease situation and human resources. As a result, PPR can now be controlled by focused vaccinations in high-risk populations of sheep and goats, followed by mass vaccination campaigns. Mass vaccination campaigns must achieve high levels of herd immunity (70% to 80%) to block the epidemic cycle of the virus. With the tools currently available, disease control and subsequent eradication programmes for PPR may be a feasible option, following the example of the National Rinderpest Eradication Programme, which has successfully eradicated rinderpest from India. An understanding of the cultural and socio-economic circumstances of goat and sheep owners and a keen watch on the endemic nature of PPR in neighbouring countries will enhance the success of this approach. Coordinated efforts from all stakeholders, combined with proper funding and execution of control programmes, will be needed to achieve the goal of a PPR-free India. In addition, the availability of effective combined vaccines of PPR with goat pox or sheep pox offers a cost-effective way of simultaneously launching control programmes against all three of these diseases.

  3. Effects of plants and essential oils on ruminal in vitro batch culture methane production and fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, plants (14) and essential oils (EO; 88) from plants that are naturalized to, or can be successfully grown in North America were evaluated in a batch culture in vitro screening experiments with ruminal fluid as potential anti-methanogenic additives for ruminant diets. Essential oils we...

  4. Inhibition of ruminal microbial methane production by beta-cyclodextrin iodopropane, malate and their combination in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, N; Lila, Z A; Ajisaka, N; Hara, K; Mikuni, K; Hara, K; Kanda, S; Itabashi, H

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of l-malate (0, 5, 10 and 20 mm), 2-iodopropane-beta-cyclodextrin complex (CD-IP) (0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mm) and a combination of malate (10 and 20 mm) plus CD-IP (0.2 and 0.4 mm) on methane production from corn starch. Ruminal fluid was collected from dairy cows, mixed with phosphate buffer (1 : 2) and incubated (30 ml) anaerobically at 38 degrees C for 6 h with or without additives. Fermentation of corn starch in the presence of malate resulted in an increase (p hydrogen production was increased (p Hydrogen production was also decreased (p inhibit methane production as well as to improve rumen fermentation and animal performance.

  5. Effects of chestnut tannins and coconut oil on growth performance, methane emission, ruminal fermentation, and microbial populations in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H; Vaddella, V; Zhou, D

    2011-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of chestnut tannins (CT) and coconut oil (CO) on growth performance, methane (CH₄) emission, ruminal fermentation, and microbial populations in sheep. A total of 48 Rideau Arcott sheep (average body weight 31.5±1.97 kg, 16 wk old) were randomly assigned into 6 treatment groups in a 3 × 2 factorial design, with CT and CO as the main effects (8 sheep per group). The treatments were control diet (CTR), 10 or 30 g of CT/kg of diet (CT10 and CT30), 25 g of CO/kg of concentrate (CO25), and 10 or 30 g of CT/kg of diet+25 g of CO/kg of concentrate (CT10CO25 and CT30CO25). After the feeding trial (60 d), all sheep were moved to respiratory chambers to measure CH₄ emission. After CH₄ emission measurements, all sheep were slaughtered to obtain rumen fluid samples. Results showed that the addition of CT, CO, and CT+CO had no significant effects on growth performance of sheep but reduced CH₄ emission. Addition of CT reduced the NH₃-N concentration in rumen fluid in CT30. Addition of CO decreased the concentration of total volatile fatty acids in rumen fluid. No significant differences were observed in pH and molar proportion of volatile fatty acids among treatments. Addition of CT, CO, and CT+CO significantly decreased methanogen and protozoa populations. Moreover, CO decreased counts of Fibrobacter succinogenes. No significant differences were observed in populations of fungi, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, or Ruminococcus albus among treatments. In conclusion, supplementation of CT and CO seemed to be a feasible means of decreasing emissions of CH₄ from sheep by reduction of methanogen and protozoa populations with no negative effect on growth performance.

  6. Ruminal Methane Emissions by Goats Consuming Dry Hay of Condensed Tannin-Containing Lespedeza With or Without Polyethylene Glycol, Alfalfa, or Sorghum-Sudangrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-four yearling Boer x Spanish wethers (initial BW of 37.7 +/- 1.09) were used to assess effects of different sources of dry hay on ruminal methane emission. Treatments were a legume (Sericea lespedeza, Lespedeza cuneata) high in condensed tannins (CT; 15.3%) without (S) or with (P)polyethylene...

  7. Effects of different fresh-cut forages and their hays on feed intake, digestibility, heat production, and ruminal methane emission by Boer x Spanish goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-four yearling Boer (87.5%) × Spanish wethers (32.5 ± 0.36 kg body weight) were used in a 32-day experiment to assess effects of frequency of feeding condensed tannin (CT)-containing Sericea lespedeza (SL; Lespedeza cuneata) on ruminal methane emission. Fresh SL (15.3% CT) was fed at 1.3 time...

  8. Ruminant methane reduction through livestock development in Tanzania. Final report for US Department of Energy and US Initiative on Joint Implementation--Activities Implemented Jointly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, Roderick

    1999-07-01

    This project was designed to help develop the US Initiative on Joint Implementation activities in Eastern Africa. It has been communicated in meetings with representatives from the Ministry of Environment of Tanzania and the consultant group that developed Tanzania's National Climate Change Action Plan, the Centre for Energy, Environment, Science and Technology, that this project fits very well with the developmental and environmental goals of the Government of Tanzania. The goal of the Activities Implemented Jointly ruminant livestock project is to reduce ruminant methane emissions in Eastern Africa. The project plans a sustainable cattle multiplication unit (CMU) at Mabuki Ranch in the Mwanza Region of Tanzania. This CMU will focus on raising genetically improved animals to be purchased by farmers, developmental organizations, and other CMUs in Tanzania. Through the purchase of these animals farmers will raise their income generation potential and reduce ruminant methane emissions.

  9. Methane production, digestion, ruminal fermentation, nitrogen balance, and milk production of cows fed corn silage- or barley silage-based diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchaar, C; Hassanat, F; Gervais, R; Chouinard, P Y; Petit, H V; Massé, D I

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of replacing barley silage (BS) with corn silage (CS) in dairy cow diets on enteric CH4 emissions, ruminal fermentation characteristics, digestion, milk production, and N balance. Nine ruminally cannulated lactating cows were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design (32-d period) and fed (ad libitum) a total mixed ration (TMR; forage:concentrate ratio 60:40; dry matter basis) with the forage portion consisting of either barley silage (0% CS; 0% CS and 54.4% BS in the TMR), a 50:50 mixture of both silages (27% CS; 27.2% CS and 27.2% BS in the TMR), or corn silage (54% CS; 0% BS and 54.4% CS in the TMR). Increasing the CS proportion (i.e., at the expense of BS) also involved increasing the proportion of corn grain (at the expense of barley grain). Intake and digestibility of dry matter and milk production increased linearly as the proportion of CS increased in the diet. Increasing dietary CS proportion decreased linearly the acetate molar proportion and increased linearly that of propionate. Daily CH4 emissions tended to respond quadratically to increasing proportions of CS in the diet (487, 540, and 523 g/d for 0, 27, and 54% CS, respectively). Methane production adjusted for dry matter or gross energy intake declined as the amount of CS increased in the diet; this effect was more pronounced when cows were fed the 54% CS diet than the 27% CS diet. Increasing the CS proportion in the diet improved N utilization, as reflected by decreases in ruminal ammonia concentration and urinary N excretion and higher use of dietary N for milk protein secretion. Total replacement of BS with CS in dairy cow diets offers a strategy to decrease CH4 energy losses and control N losses without negatively affecting milk performance.

  10. Modelling global methane emissions from livestock: Biological and nutritional controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    The available observations of methane production from the literature have been compiled into a ruminant methane data base. This data base includes 400 treatment mean observations of methane losses from cattle and sheep, and minor numbers of measurements from other species. Methane loss varied from 2.0 to 11.6 percent of dietary gross energy. Measurements included describe the many different weights and physiological states of the animals fed and diets ranging from all forage to all concentrate diets or mixtures. An auxiliary spreadsheet lists approximately 1000 individual animal observations. Many important concepts have emerged from our query and analysis of this data set. The majority of the world's cattle, sheep, and goats under normal husbandry circumstances likely produce methane very close to 6 percent of their daily diets gross energy (2 percent of the diet by weight). Although individual animals or losses from specific dietary research circumstances can vary considerably, the average for the vast majority of groups of ruminant livestock are likely to fall between 5.5 to 6.5 percent. We must caution, however, that little experimental data is available for two-thirds of the world's ruminants in developing countries. Available evidence suggests similar percentage of emissions, but this supposition needs confirmation. More importantly, data is skimpy or unavailable to describe diet consumption, animal weight, and class distribution.

  11. Protection of sunflower seed and sunflower meal protein with malic acid and heat: effects on in vitro ruminal fermentation and methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, Jorge Leonardo; Carro, Maria Dolores; Alvir, Maria Remedios; González, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Combined malic acid-heat treatments of protein supplements have been shown to reduce ruminal protein degradation, but there is no information on their possible influence on ruminal fermentation and methane emissions. This study aimed to investigate the effects of the treatment of sunflower meal (SM) and sunflower seed (SS) with malic acid and subsequent drying at 150°C for 1 (MAL1) or 3 h (MAL3) on in vitro rumen fermentation and methane emission using ruminal fluid from sheep as inoculum. Compared with untreated samples, the MAL3 treatment reduced (P 0.05) total volatile fatty acid production for any feed. This treatment also increased (P production (by 15.5% and 11.3%, respectively) and ammonia-N concentrations (by 26.5% and 14.5%, respectively). The MAL1 treatment was effective in reducing both ammonia-N concentrations and methane emissions without depressing SS and SM fermentation, but more research is needed to formulate environmentally cleaner diets for ruminants. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Sustainable helminth control of ruminants in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, P J

    1997-07-31

    Widespread anthelmintic resistance, at least amongst the important nematode parasites of small ruminants, threatens the sustainability of these livestock industries throughout both the developed and developing world. The exacerbation of this problem over the last decade or so, has provided the impetus for research into non-chemotherapeutic parasite control alternatives, such as host genetic resistance, grazing management, worm vaccines and biological control. Although some of these options provide practical benefits if currently adopted, or exciting prospects for the future, collectively they are unlikely to dispense with the need for the timely intervention of effective anthelmintic treatment. The issue of sustainability of helminth control practices therefore rests with the preservation of anthelmintic effectiveness through the implementation of principles of integrated pest management. Herein lies the difficulty-putting the principles into practice. Much of the research into sustainable nematode parasite control of ruminants has been done in the developed rather than the developing world, and the efforts to transfer this information to livestock owners has also been commensurately greater in the former. However the need for research and technology transfer is much more urgent in the developing world because of the lack of scientific and financial resources, the greater dependence on livestock industries and the much greater severity of the problem of anthelmintic resistance. This will require a major philosophical change in the affluent western world to the funding of national and international aid organisations who are largely responsible for these activities.

  13. 降低反刍动物胃肠道甲烷排放的措施%Measures of Reducing Methane Emission in Ruminants Gut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙凯佳; 朱建营; 梅洋; 李若玺; 高腾云

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important sources of methane is from ruminants gut. Reducing gut methane emission is significant to mitigate climate warming and improve feed utilization. Ruminants gut methane is mainly from microbe’ s fermentation in the rumen. This paper reviewed types of rumen methanogens, synthesis processes of methane and new nutritional regulation technologies for reducing gut methane emission, looking forward to pro-vide references for further studies on development of methane emission reduction measures.%反刍动物胃肠道是甲烷的重要来源之一。降低胃肠道甲烷排放量,对减缓气候变暖和提高饲料利用率有着重要的意义。反刍动物胃肠道甲烷主要来自于瘤胃微生物的发酵。本文综述了瘤胃中的产甲烷菌种类、甲烷合成过程和降低胃肠道甲烷排放的营养调控新技术,期望为进一步制定甲烷减排措施提供参考。

  14. In vitro evaluation of cashew nut shell liquid as a methane-inhibiting and propionate-enhancing agent for ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y; Suzuki, R; Koike, S; Nagashima, K; Mochizuki, M; Forster, R J; Kobayashi, Y

    2010-11-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) containing antibacterial phenolic compounds was evaluated for its potency as a feed additive for ruminants. In experiment 1, ruminal responses to CNSL supplementation were assessed using a batch culture system. Rumen fluid from cattle was diluted with artificial saliva and incubated for 18h in a batch culture with a mixed diet containing a 30:70 hay:concentrate diet to which raw or heated CNSL was added at a final concentration of 500 μg/mL. In experiment 2, a Rusitec, using rumen fluid from the same cattle, was operated over a period of 7 d during which only raw CNSL was tested at concentrations of 0, 50, 100, or 200 μg/mL, and variations in fermentation and bacterial population were assessed. In experiment 3, a pure culture study was conducted using selected bacteria to determine their susceptibility to CNSL. In experiment 1, methane production was inhibited by raw CNSL (56.9% inhibition) but not by heated CNSL. Total volatile fatty acid concentration was not affected, whereas increased concentrations of propionate and decreased concentrations of acetate and butyrate were observed using either raw or heated CNSL. These changes were more obvious when raw CNSL was tested. In experiment 2, raw CNSL inhibited methanogenesis and increased propionate production in a dose-dependent manner, showing maximum methane inhibition (70.1%) and propionate enhancement (44.4%) at 200 μg/mL supplementation. Raw CNSL increased total volatile fatty acid concentration and dry matter digestibility. Raw CNSL also appeared to induce a dramatic shift in the population of rumen microbiota, based on decreased protozoa numbers and changes in quantitative PCR assay values for representative bacterial species. In experiment 3, using pure cultures, raw CNSL prevented the growth of hydrogen-, formate-, and butyrate-producing rumen bacteria, but not the growth of bacteria involved in propionate production. Based on these data, raw CNSL, rich in the antibacterial

  15. Breeding Ruminants that Emit Less Methane – The Role of International Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddy, V H; de Haas, Y; Basarab, J

    production of 40-45%. If a methane-related trait were to be implemented by a livestock industry it will most likely be via genomic breeding values, which demand large numbers of measured animals in the reference population. Given the size of the reference population required for methane traits......, it is imperative that wherever possible groups around the world collaborate on methodologies for measurement and collection of data. This has been the primary focus of the Animal Selection Genetics and Genomics Network (ASGGN) of the Livestock Research Group of the Global Research Alliance to reduce GHG emissions...

  16. Methane emission from ruminants and solid waste: A critical analysis of baseline and mitigation projections for climate and policy studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, E.

    2012-12-01

    Current and projected estimates of methane (CH4) emission from anthropogenic sources are numerous but largely unexamined or compared. Presented here is a critical appraisal of CH4 projections used in climate-chemistry and policy studies. We compare emissions for major CH4 sources from several groups, including our own new data and RCP projections developed for climate-chemistry models for the next IPCC Assessment Report (AR5). We focus on current and projected baseline and mitigation emissions from ruminant animals and solid waste that are both predicted to rise dramatically in coming decades, driven primarily by developing countries. For waste, drivers include increasing urban populations, higher per capita waste generation due to economic growth and increasing landfilling rates. Analysis of a new global data base detailing waste composition, collection and disposal indicates that IPCC-based methodologies and default data overestimate CH4 emission for the current period which cascades into substantial overestimates in future projections. CH4 emission from solid waste is estimated to be ~10-15 Tg CH4/yr currently rather than the ~35 Tg/yr often reported in the literature. Moreover, emissions from developing countries are unlikely to rise rapidly in coming decades because new management approaches, such as sanitary landfills, that would increase emissions are maladapted to infrastructures in these countries and therefore unlikely to be implemented. The low current emission associated with solid waste (~10 Tg), together with future modest growth, implies that mitigation of waste-related CH4 emission is a poor candidate for slowing global warming. In the case of ruminant animals (~90 Tg CH4/yr currently), the dominant assumption driving future trajectories of CH4 emission is a substantial increase in meat and dairy consumption in developing countries to be satisfied by growing animal populations. Unlike solid waste, current ruminant emissions among studies exhibit a

  17. Structural features of condensed tannins affect in vitro ruminal methane production and fermentation characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyen, N.T.; Fryganas, C.; Uittenbogaard, G.; Mueller-Harvey, I.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Hendriks, W.H.; Pellikaan, W.F.

    2016-01-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to investigate the effects of condensed tannin (CT) structural properties, i.e. average polymer size (or mean degree of polymerization), percentage of cis flavan-3-ols and percentage of prodelphinidins in CT extracts on methane (CH4) production and ferme

  18. Girls' Rumination and Anxiety Sensitivity: Are They Related after Controlling for Girl, Maternal, and Parenting Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Christie; Epkins, Catherine C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rumination and anxiety sensitivity are posited cognitive vulnerabilities in the development and/or maintenance of depression and anxiety and have only been examined separately in youth. Objective: We examined the relation between rumination and anxiety sensitivity in girls, after controlling for other girl, maternal, and parenting…

  19. Ruminal methane emission by dairy cattle in Southeast Brazil Emissão de metano ruminal por bovinos leiteiros no sudeste do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio dos Santos Pedreira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Ruminal gases, particularly methane, generated during the fermentative process in rumen, represent a partial loss of feed energy and are also pointed to as an important factors in greenhouse effect. This study aimed at quantifying methane (CH4 emission rates from lactating and dry cows and heifers, 24 month-old in average, on pasture under Southeast Brazil tropical conditions, using the tracer gas technique, sulphur hexafluoride (SF6, four animals per category, distributed in four blocks. Measurements were performed in February and June, 2002, with Holstein and Brazilian Dairy Crossbred (Holstein ¾ x Gir (Zebu ¼, maintained on fertilized Tanzania-grass (Panicum maximum Jacq. cv. Tanzania and fertilized Brachiaria-grass (Brachiaria decumbens cv. Basilisk pastures. Heifers of both breeds were maintained on unfertilized Brachiaria-grass to simulate conditions of extensive cattle farming systems. CH4 and SF6 levels were measured with gas chromatography. Differences in CH4 emissions were measured (p Gases gerados durante o processo de fermantação ruminal, metano em particular, representam não só uma perda parcial de energia da alimentação como também são apontados como importantes fatores do efeito-estufa. Quantificaram-se as taxas de emissão de metano (CH4 ruminal por vacas em lactação, vacas secas e novilhas com idade média de 24 meses, em pastejo sob condições tropicais do sudeste brasileiro, utilizando a técnica do gás traçador hexafluoreto de enxôfre (SF6. Foram utilizados quatro animais para cada categoria, distribuídos em quatro blocos. As medições foram realizadas em fevereiro e junho de 2002, com animais da raça Holandesa e Mestiça Leiteira Holandês ¾ x Gir ¼ - Mestiças, mantidos em pastagem de capim-Tanzânia (Panicum maximum Jacq. cv. Tanzania e capim-braquiária (Brachiaria decumbens cv. Basilisk adubadas, e também novilhas de ambas as raças em pastagens de capim-brachiaria sem adubação, simulando as condi

  20. Q fever diagnosis and control in domestic ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, H I J; Bossers, A; Rebel, J M J

    2013-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii, a highly infectious agent that can survive in the environment. Therefore, Q fever has a major public health impact when outbreaks occur. Small ruminants are identified as the source in the majority of outbreaks in humans. Accurate diagnosis and effective control strategies are necessary to limit the zoonotic and veterinary impact of Q fever. For this, knowledge of the pathogenesis of Q fever and excretion routes of C. burnetii from infected animals is crucial. Abortions as well as normal parturitions in infected small ruminants are the most important excretion routes of C. burnetii. Excretion of C. burnetii via faeces and vaginal mucus has also been suggested. However, contamination of these samples by bacteria present in the environment may influence the results. This hampers the accurate identification of infected animals by these samples; however, the detection of C. burnetii in milk samples seems not to be influenced by environmental contamination. Q fever in animals can be detected by direct (immunohistochemistry and PCR) and indirect (complement fixation test (CFT), enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) methods. A combination of both direct and indirect methods is recommended in current protocols to detect Q fever on herd level. For the control of Q fever in domestic animals, vaccination with a phase 1 C. burnetii whole cell inactivated vaccine is reported to be effective in preventing abortion and reducing bacterial shedding, especially after several years of administration. Vaccination might not be effective in already infected animals nor in pregnant animals. Furthermore, the complicated vaccine production process, requiring biosafety level 3 facilities, could hamper vaccine availability. Future challenges include the development of improved, easier to produce Q fever vaccines.

  1. Neural correlates of rumination in adolescents with remitted major depressive disorder and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhouse, Katie L; Jacobs, Rachel H; Peters, Amy T; Ajilore, Olu; Watkins, Edward R; Langenecker, Scott A

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to use fMRI to examine the neural correlates of engaging in rumination among a sample of remitted depressed adolescents, a population at high risk for future depressive relapse. A rumination induction task was used to assess differences in the patterns of neural activation during rumination versus a distraction condition among 26 adolescents in remission from major depressive disorder (rMDD) and in 15 healthy control adolescents. Self-report depression and rumination, as well as clinician-rated depression, were also assessed among all participants. All of the participants recruited regions in the default mode network (DMN), including the posterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, inferior parietal lobe, and medial temporal gyrus, during rumination. Increased activation in these regions during rumination was correlated with increased self-report rumination and symptoms of depression across all participants. Adolescents with rMDD also exhibited greater activation in regions involved in visual, somatosensory, and emotion processing than did healthy peers. The present findings suggest that during ruminative thought, adolescents with rMDD are characterized by increased recruitment of regions within the DMN and in areas involved in visual, somatosensory, and emotion processing.

  2. Identification of Methanogens and Controls on Methane Production in Incubations of Natural Methane Seep Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkian, R.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Methane, the most abundant hydrocarbon in Earth's atmosphere, is produced in large quantities in sediments underlying the world's oceans. Very little of this methane makes it to surface sediments as it is consumed by Anaerobic Methanotrophs (ANME's) in consortia with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB). Less is known about which organisms are responsible for methane production in marine sediments, and whether that production is under thermodynamic control based on hydrogen concentrations. Although ANMEs have been found to be active in methanogenic sediments and incubations, it is currently unknown whether they are able to grow in methanogenic conditions. We demonstrated with bottle incubations of methane seep sediment taken from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, that hydrogen controls methane production. While sulfate was present the hydrogen concentration was maintained at below 2 nM. Only after the depletion of sulfate allowed hydrogen concentrations to rise above 5 nM did we see production of methane. The same sediments when spiked with methane gas demonstrated its complete removal while sulfate reduction occurred. Quantitative PCR shows that ANME-2 and ANME-1 increase in 16S copy number as methane increases. Total direct cell counts demonstrate a decline in cells with the decrease of sulfate until a recovery corresponding with production of methane. Our results strongly suggest that hydrogen concentrations influence what metabolic processes can occur in marine sediments, and that ANME-1 and ANME-2 are able to grow on the energy provided from methane production.

  3. Methane production by two non-ruminant foregut-fermenting herbivores: The collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) and the pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendl, Catharina; Frei, Samuel; Dittmann, Marie Theres; Furrer, Samuel; Ortmann, Sylvia; Lawrenz, Arne; Lange, Bastian; Munn, Adam; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4) production varies between herbivore species, but reasons for this variation remain to be elucidated. Here, we report open-circuit chamber respiration measurements of CH4 production in four specimens each of two non-ruminant mammalian herbivores with a complex forestomach but largely differing in body size, the collared peccary (Pecari tajacu, mean body mass 17kg) and the pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis, 229kg) fed lucerne-based diets. In addition, food intake, digestibility and mean retention times were measured in the same experiments. CH4 production averaged 8 and 72L/d, 18 and 19L/kg dry matter intake, and 4.0 and 4.2% of gross energy intake for the two species, respectively. When compared with previously reported data on CH4 production in other non-ruminant and ruminant foregut-fermenting as well as hindgut-fermenting species, it is evident that neither the question whether a species is a foregut fermenter or not, or whether it ruminates or not, is of the relevance previously suggested to explain variation in CH4 production between species. Rather, differences in CH4 production between species on similar diets appear related to species-specific differences in food intake and digesta retention kinetics.

  4. Recent advances in measurement and dietary mitigation of enteric methane emissions in ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Kumar Patra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 emission, which is mainly produced during normal fermentation of feeds by the rumen microorganisms, represents a major contributor to the greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. Several enteric CH4 mitigation technologies have been explored recently. A number of new techniques have also been developed and existing techniques have been improved in order to evaluate CH4 mitigation technologies and prepare an inventory of GHG emissions precisely. The aim of this review is to discuss different CH4 measuring and mitigation technologies, which have been recently developed. Respiration chamber technique is still considered as a gold standard technique due to its greater precision and reproducibility in CH4 measurements. With the adoption of recent recommendations for improving the technique, the SF6 method can be used with a high level of precision similar to the chamber technique. Short-term measurement techniques of CH4 measurements generally invite considerable within- and between animal variations. Among the short-term measuring techniques, Greenfeed and methane hood systems are likely more suitable for evaluation of CH4 mitigation studies, if measurements could be obtained at different times of the day relative to the diurnal cycle of the CH4 production. Carbon dioxide and CH4 ratio, sniffer and other short-term breath analysis techniques are more suitable for on farm screening of large number of animals to generate the data of low CH4 producing animals for genetic selection purposes. Different indirect measuring techniques are also investigated in recent years. Several new dietary CH4 mitigation technologies have been explored, but only a few of them are practical and cost-effective. Future research should be directed towards both the medium- and long-term mitigation strategies, which could be utilized on farms to accomplish substantial reductions of CH4 emissions and to profitably reduce carbon footprint of livestock production systems. This

  5. When mental inflexibility facilitates executive control: beneficial side effects of ruminative tendencies on goal maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, Lee J; Miyake, Akira; Whitmer, Anson J

    2010-10-01

    Although previous research suggests that depressive ruminators tend to become stuck in a particular mind-set, this mental inflexibility may not always be disadvantageous; in some cases, it may facilitate active maintenance of a single task goal in the face of distraction. To evaluate this hypothesis, we tested 98 college students, who differed in ruminative tendencies and dysphoria levels, on two executive-control tasks. One task emphasized fast-paced shifting between goals (letter naming), and one emphasized active goal maintenance (modified Stroop). Higher ruminative tendencies predicted more errors on the goal-shifting task but fewer errors on the goal-maintenance task; these results demonstrated that ruminative tendencies have both detrimental and beneficial effects. Moreover, although ruminative tendencies and dysphoria levels were moderately correlated (r = .42), higher dysphoria levels predicted more errors on the goal-maintenance task; this finding indicates that rumination and dysphoria can have opposing effects on executive control. Overall, these results suggest that depressive rumination reflects a trait associated with more stability (goal maintenance) than flexibility (goal shifting).

  6. Effect of replacing alfalfa with panicled-tick clover or sericea lespedeza in corn-alfalfa-based substrates on in vitro ruminal methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, H D; Lambert, B D; Armstrong, S A; Fonseca, M A; Tedeschi, L O; Muir, J P; Ellersieck, M R

    2015-06-01

    Methane emissions from ruminant livestock contribute to total anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and reduce metabolizable energy intake by the animal. Condensed tannins (CT) are polyphenolic plant secondary compounds commonly produced by some perennial forage legumes that characteristically bind to protein, carbohydrates, and minerals. The degree to which CT may affect ruminant nutrition depends upon the concentration, structural composition, and biological activity of the CT. The objective of our experiment was to determine the effect of replacing alfalfa in a corn-alfalfa-based substrate with a legume containing CT on in vitro CH4 production and the dynamics of fermentation using an in vitro gas production technique. All fermented substrates contained 50% ground corn as the energy concentrate portion, whereas the forage portion (50%) of each diet was comprised of alfalfa (control) or some combination of alfalfa and sericea lespedeza (SL) or panicled-tick clover (PTC). Our treatments consisted of PTC or SL 15, 30, and 45, which corresponded with 15, 30, or 45% replacement of the diet (alfalfa component) with either PTC or SL. Substrates containing 45% PTC or SL reduced in vitro CH4 production. Treatments did not affect total gas production as compared with that of the control. Replacement of alfalfa with SL or PTC increased fermentable organic matter (FOM). The PTC treatment increased FOM by as much as 1.8% at the 45% replacement level, whereas FOM of SL 45 was increased by less than 1%. The replacement of alfalfa with PTC increased substrate nutritive value greater than replacement with SL. There were no correlations between any physicochemical constituent of the substrates and CH4 production. A combination of factors associated with the inclusion of PTC and SL contributed to the in vitro CH4 production, and CT in these forages was likely a major contributing factor. Further confirmation of these results on in situ or in vivo animal systems is required. If

  7. The use of sodic monensin and probiotics for controlling subacute ruminal acidosis in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Schwegler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to validate a protocol for induction of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA (Experiment 1 and test the efficiency of probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae or monensin to avoid pH ruminal drops in sheep (Experiment 2. In Experiment 1, six ewes were fasted for two days and then fed most with concentrate during four days. Ewes in this protocol had ruminal fluid pH below 6.0 and kept it for 75 consecutive hours. In Experiment 2, 18 sheep were distributed into three groups: Control (CG, n = 6, monensin (MG, n = 6 and probiotic group (PG, n = 6. SARA was induced according Experiment 1. PG had lower pH (5.7 ± 0.1 than CG (6.0 ± 0.1 (P = 0.05, while MG (5.7 ± 0.1 was similar to both during SARA induction. SARA induction reduced ruminal protozoa population (P < 0.05 and increased chloride concentrations in ruminal fluid (P < 0.01. In serum, SARA increased concentrations of phosphorus (P < 0.01, AST (P < 0.01 and GGT (P < 0.01, but reduced LDH (P < 0.01. In conclusion, the protocol used for SARA induction was able to maintain ruminal pH between 5.5-6.0 for more than 48 hours. However, monensin and probiotics supplementation was not effective in preventing changes in ruminal and serum parameters during SARA.

  8. The Role of Attentional Control and Resilience in Predicting the Rumination in Patients With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Behzadpoor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Rumination is one of the extreme negative cognitions in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD. It is assumed that some cognitive problems such as attentional control can facilitate rumination and some internal capabilities such as resiliency can reduce engaging in these ruminations. Objectives The present study investigated the relationship between rumination with attentional control and resiliency in patients with OCD. Patients and Methods In this correlational study, 50 patients with OCD were selected through accessible purposive sampling. The data was obtained through ruminative response, Connor and Davidson resiliency, and scalability questionnaires and were analyzed using the Pearson correlation and multiple regression tests. Results The results indicated a significant negative correlation (P = 0.001 between rumination and attentional control (r = 0.573 and resiliency (r = 0.579. Results of regression analysis indicated increased attentional control and resiliency can predict reduction of rumination (P = 0.001. Conclusions Regarding that attentional control and resiliency are associated with rumination and can predict rumination in patients with obsession, nurturing resiliency traits and teaching techniques to improve attentional control can be effective in the control and prevention of rumination.

  9. Methane Lunar Surface Thermal Control Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, David W.; Sutherlin, Steven G.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.; Jurns, John M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA is considering propulsion system concepts for future missions including human return to the lunar surface. Studies have identified cryogenic methane (LCH4) and oxygen (LO2) as a desirable propellant combination for the lunar surface ascent propulsion system, and they point to a surface stay requirement of 180 days. To meet this requirement, a test article was prepared with state-of-the-art insulation and tested in simulated lunar mission environments at NASA GRC. The primary goals were to validate design and models of the key thermal control technologies to store unvented methane for long durations, with a low-density high-performing Multi-layer Insulation (MLI) system to protect the propellant tanks from the environmental heat of low Earth orbit (LEO), Earth to Moon transit, lunar surface, and with the LCH4 initially densified. The data and accompanying analysis shows this storage design would have fallen well short of the unvented 180 day storage requirement, due to the MLI density being much higher than intended, its substructure collapse, and blanket separation during depressurization. Despite the performance issue, insight into analytical models and MLI construction was gained. Such modeling is important for the effective design of flight vehicle concepts, such as in-space cryogenic depots or in-space cryogenic propulsion stages.

  10. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Augenstein

    1999-01-11

    ''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

  11. Fermentação ruminal e produção de metano em bovinos alimentados com feno de capim-tifton 85 e concentrado com aditivos Ruminal fermentation and methane production of cattle fed Tifton 85 grass hay and concentrate with additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Rivera Rivera

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar o efeito do uso de monensina, complexo de leveduras, ácidos graxos poliinsaturados e aminoácidos no consumo de matéria seca e nutrientes, na estimativa da digestibilidade ruminal, nos parâmetros de fermentação ruminal (pH, concentração de nitrogênio amoniacal e de ácidos graxos de cadeia curta, na população de protozoários e na produção de metano. Foram utilizados seis bovinos e com peso corporal de 530 ± 15 kg, recebendo complexo de leveduras, ácidos graxos poliinsaturados e aminoácidos (5 g/dia; monensina (5 g/dia; caulim (5 g/dia, usado como controle adicionado à dieta composta de feno de capim-tifton 85 (Cynodon spp.; e concentrado, na relação 80:20. O delineamento experimental adotado para análise do consumo e da digestibilidade foi o de blocos completos casualizados e, para análise dos parâmetros ruminais e da produção de metano, o de parcelas subdivididas. O consumo foi influenciado pelo uso de monensina na dieta, mas não diferiu entre os aditivos. As digestibilidades da matéria seca e dos nutrientes não foram influenciadas pelo fornecimento dos aditivos. A relação acetato:propionato nos animais alimentados com a dieta com monensina foi menor que naqueles que receberam o complexo de leveduras e ácidos graxos poliinsaturados e aminoácidos, diminuindo a perda de energia na forma de metano. O pH e a concentração de nitrogênio amoniacal foram adequados para o crescimento bacteriano. A concentração de metano não é alterada pelo uso dos aditivos testados.The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of monensin, yeast complex, unsaturated fatty acids and amino acids on dry matter and nutrient intake, total and partial digestibility and ruminal parameters of ruminal fermentation (pH, ammonia nitrogen concentration and short chain fatty acids, the protozoa population and methane production. Six castrated steers, body weight 530 ± 15 kg were used, receiving yeast complex

  12. Examining the mechanisms of overgeneral autobiographical memory: capture and rumination, and impaired executive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Jennifer A; Griffith, James W; Mineka, Susan

    2011-02-01

    Overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) is an important cognitive phenomenon in depression, but questions remain regarding the underlying mechanisms. The CaR-FA-X model (Williams et al., 2007) proposes three mechanisms that may contribute to OGM, but little work has examined the possible additive and/or interactive effects among them. We examined two mechanisms of CaR-FA-X: capture and rumination, and impaired executive control. We analysed data from undergraduates (N=109) scoring high or low on rumination who were presented with cues of high and low self-relevance on the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT). Executive control was operationalised as performance on both the Stroop Colour-Word Task and the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT). Hierarchical generalised linear modelling was used to predict whether participants would generate a specific memory on a trial of the AMT. Higher COWAT scores, lower rumination, and greater cue self-relevance predicted a higher probability of a specific memory. There was also a rumination×cue self-relevance interaction: Higher (vs lower) rumination was associated with a lower probability of a specific memory primarily for low self-relevant cues. We found no evidence of interactions between these mechanisms. Findings are interpreted with respect to current autobiographical memory models. Future directions for OGM mechanism research are discussed.

  13. A comparison of two integrated approaches of controlling nematode parasites in small ruminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Control of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in small ruminants in regions of the world where anthelmintic resistance is prevalent must rely on more than just chemical deworming strategies. The objective of this experiment was to compare two integrated treatment protocols for control of GIN (primari...

  14. Targeting Ruminative Thinking in Adolescents at Risk for Depressive Relapse: Rumination-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy in a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial with Resting State fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Rachel H; Watkins, Edward R; Peters, Amy T; Feldhaus, Claudia G; Barba, Alyssa; Carbray, Julie; Langenecker, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    This pilot randomized control trial was designed to examine whether Rumination-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy (RFCBT) reduces rumination and residual depressive symptoms among adolescents with a history of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) who are at risk for relapse. We also examined whether these changes in symptoms were associated with changes in functional connectivity of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a key node in the default mode network (DMN). Thirty-three adolescents (ages 12-18) were randomized to eight weeks of RFCBT or an assessment only (AO) control. Twenty two adolescents successfully completed fMRI scans pre- and post-intervention. Adolescents were recruited from the clinic and community and met criteria for at least one previous episode of MDD and were currently in full or partial remission. An Independent Evaluator interviewed parent and child before and after the eight-week intervention. The left PCC (-5, -50, 36) seed was used to probe resting state functional connectivity of the DMN. Adolescents who received RFCBT demonstrated reduced rumination (F = -2.76, df = 112, p depression across eight weeks (F = -2.58, df = 113, p depression and rumination. These data suggest that rumination can be reduced over eight weeks and that this reduction is associated with parallel decreases in residual depressive symptoms and decreased functional connectivity of the left PCC with cognitive control nodes. These changes may enhance the ability of vulnerable youth to stay well during the transition to adulthood. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01905267.

  15. Methane : its role in climate change and options for control

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This study on CH4, (its role in climate change and options for control), aimed at a scenario analysis to assess future climate change under reduced methane emissions. At the same time improving the quality of CH4 emission inventories and estimating the costs of emission reductions between 2010 and 2100. In this thesis 28 major options to control or mitigate methane emissions from different sources were identified. The effectiveness and costs of these options were assessed. This resulted in a ...

  16. Ecosystem and physiological controls over methane production in northern wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, David W.; Holland, Elisabeth A.; Schimel, David S.

    1994-01-01

    Peat chemistry appears to exert primary control over methane production rates in the Canadian Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES) area. We determined laboratory methane production rate potentials in anaerobic slurries of samples collected from a transect of sites through the NOWES study area. We related methane production rates to indicators of resistance to microbial decay (peat C: N and lignin: N ratios) and experimentally manipulated substrate availability for methanogenesis using ethanol (EtOH) and plant litter. We also determined responses of methane production to pH and temperature. Methane production potentials declined along the gradient of sites from high rates in the coastal fens to low rates in the interior bogs and were generally highest in surface layers. Strong relationships between CH4 production potentials and peat chemistry suggested that methanogenesis was limited by fermentation rates. Methane production at ambient pH responded strongly to substrate additions in the circumneutral fens with narrow lignin: N and C: N ratios (delta CH4/delta EtOH = 0.9-2.3 mg/g) and weakly in the acidic bogs with wide C: N and lignin: N ratios (delta CH4/delta EtOH = -0.04-0.02 mg/g). Observed Q(sub 10) values ranged from 1.7 to 4.7 and generally increased with increasing substrate availability, suggesting that fermentation rates were limiting. Titration experiments generally demonstrated inhibition of methanogenesis by low pH. Our results suggest that the low rates of methane emission observed in interior bogs during NOWES likely resulted from pH and substrate quality limitation of the fermentation step in methane production and thus reflect intrinsically low methane production potentials. Low methane emission rates observed during NOWES will likely be observed in other northern wetland regions with similar vegetation chemistry.

  17. Environmental control on aerobic methane oxidation in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinle, Lea; Maltby, Johanna; Engbersen, Nadine; Zopfi, Jakob; Bange, Hermann; Elvert, Marcus; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Kock, Annette; Lehmann, Moritz; Treude, Tina; Niemann, Helge

    2016-04-01

    Large quantities of methane are produced in anoxic sediments of continental margins and may be liberated to the overlying water column, where some of it is consumed by aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB). Aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) in the water column is consequently the final sink for methane before its release to the atmosphere, where it acts as a potent greenhouse gas. In the context of the ocean's contribution to atmospheric methane, coastal seas are particularly important accounting >75% of global methane emission from marine systems. Coastal oceans are highly dynamic, in particular with regard to the variability of methane and oxygen concentrations as well as temperature and salinity, all of which are potential key environmental factors controlling MOx. To determine important environmental controls on the activity of MOBs in coastal seas, we conducted a two-year time-series study with measurements of physicochemical water column parameters, MOx activity and the composition of the MOB community in a coastal inlet in the Baltic Sea (Boknis Eck Time Series Station, Eckernförde Bay - E-Bay). In addition, we investigated the influence of temperature and oxygen on MOx during controlled laboratory experiments. In E-Bay, hypoxia developed in bottom waters towards the end of the stratification period. Constant methane liberation from sediments resulted in bottom water methane accumulations and supersaturation (with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium) in surface waters. Here, we will discuss the factors impacting MOx the most, which were (i) perturbations of the water column (ii) temperature and (iii) oxygen concentration. (i) Perturbations of the water column caused by storm events or seasonal mixing led to a decrease in MOx, probably caused by replacement of stagnant water with a high standing stock of MOB by 'new' waters with a lower abundance of methanotrophs. b) An increase in temperature generally led to higher MOx rates. c) Even though methane was

  18. Replacing alfalfa silage with corn silage in dairy cow diets: Effects on enteric methane production, ruminal fermentation, digestion, N balance, and milk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanat, F; Gervais, R; Julien, C; Massé, D I; Lettat, A; Chouinard, P Y; Petit, H V; Benchaar, C

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of replacing alfalfa silage (AS) with corn silage (CS) in dairy cow total mixed rations (TMR) on enteric CH4 emissions, ruminal fermentation characteristics, apparent total-tract digestibility, N balance, and milk production. Nine ruminally cannulated lactating cows were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square design (32-d period) and fed (ad libitum) a TMR [forage:concentrate ratio of 60:40; dry matter (DM) basis], with the forage portion consisting of either alfalfa silage (0% CS; 56.4% AS in the TMR), a 50:50 mixture of both silages (50% CS; 28.2% AS and 28.2% CS in the TMR), or corn silage (100% CS; 56.4% CS in the TMR). Increasing the CS proportion (i.e., at the expense of AS) in the diet was achieved by decreasing the corn grain proportion and increasing that of soybean meal. Intake of DM and milk yield increased quadratically, whereas DM digestibility increased linearly as the proportion of CS increased in the diet. Increasing the dietary CS proportion resulted in changes (i.e., lower ruminal pH and acetate:propionate ratio, reduced fiber digestibility, decreased protozoa numbers, and lower milk fat and higher milk protein contents) typical of those observed when cows are fed high-starch diets. A quadratic response in daily CH4 emissions was observed in response to increasing the proportion of CS in the diet (440, 483, and 434 g/d for 0% CS, 50% CS, and 100% CS, respectively). Methane production adjusted for intake of DM, and gross or digestible energy was unaffected in cows fed the 50% CS diet, but decreased in cows fed the 100% CS diet (i.e., quadratic effect). Increasing the CS proportion in the diet at the expense of AS improved N utilization, as reflected by the decreases in ruminal NH3 concentration and manure N excretion, suggesting low potential NH3 and N2O emissions. Results from this study, suggest that total replacement of AS with CS in dairy cow diets offers a means of decreasing CH4 output

  19. Diagnosis and Control Strategies for Peste Des Petits Ruminants Virus: Global and Pakistan Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abubakar*, Samina Ashiq2, Aamir Bin Zahoor1, Muhammad Javed Arshed and Ashley C. Banyard3

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV causes an acute and highly contagious disease and belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae and genus Morbillivirus. The control of animal diseases is one of the primary objectives of government livestock departments in Pakistan. Control of any viral disease requires rapid, specific and sensitive diagnostic tests and efficacious vaccines. Small ruminants infected with PPRV are routinely diagnosed on the basis of clinical examination, gross pathology, histological findings and laboratory confirmation. A number of serological and molecular diagnostic tests are used for the detection of PPRV. Control of PPRV may be attained using measures including movement control of sheep and goats from affected areas, quarantine of infected animals, removal of potentially infected fomites and a restriction on the importation of sheep and goats from infected areas. The effective way to control PPR in Pakistan is by mass immunization of small ruminants as strict sanitary control measures, including the stamping out policy are not economically viable. Therefore, the control of PPR requires an effective vaccine and for this purpose several vaccines such as homologous and recombinant vaccines have been developed.

  20. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

    2000-02-26

    Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with

  1. Mediation effect of anger rumination on the relationship between dimensions of anger and anger control with mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Besharat, Mohammad; Department of Psychology, University of Tehran, Iran; Pourbohlool, Samane; Department of Psychology, University of Tehran, Iran

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine mediation effect of anger rumination on the relationship between dimensions of anger and anger control including trait anger, state anger, anger in, anger out, anger-control in, and anger-control out with mental health in a sample of Iranian students. A total of 449 volunteer students (234 girls, 215 boys) were included in this study. All participants were asked to complete the Tehran Multidimensional Anger Scale (TMAS; Besharat, 2008), Anger Rumination Sc...

  2. Rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy vs. cognitive behaviour therapy for depression: study protocol for a randomised controlled superiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvenegaard, Morten; Watkins, Ed R; Poulsen, Stig; Rosenberg, Nicole K; Gondan, Matthias; Grafton, Ben; Austin, Stephen F; Howard, Henriette; Moeller, Stine B

    2015-08-11

    Cognitive behavioural therapy is an effective treatment for depression. However, one third of the patients do not respond satisfactorily, and relapse rates of around 30 % within the first post-treatment year were reported in a recent meta-analysis. In total, 30-50 % of remitted patients present with residual symptoms by the end of treatment. A common residual symptom is rumination, a process of recurrent negative thinking and dwelling on negative affect. Rumination has been demonstrated as a major factor in vulnerability to depression, predicting the onset, severity, and duration of future depression. Rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy is a psychotherapeutic treatment targeting rumination. Because rumination plays a major role in the initiation and maintenance of depression, targeting rumination with rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy may be more effective in treating depression and reducing relapse than standard cognitive behavioural therapy. This study is a two-arm pragmatic randomised controlled superiority trial comparing the effectiveness of group-based rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy with the effectiveness of group-based cognitive behavioural therapy for treatment of depression. One hundred twenty-eight patients with depression will be recruited from and given treatment in an outpatient service at a psychiatric hospital in Denmark. Our primary outcome will be severity of depressive symptoms (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression) at completion of treatment. Secondary outcomes will be level of rumination, worry, anxiety, quality of life, behavioural activation, experimental measures of cognitive flexibility, and emotional attentional bias. A 6-month follow-up is planned and will include the primary outcome measure and assessment of relapse. The clinical outcome of this trial may guide clinicians to decide on the merits of including rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy in the treatment of depression in

  3. Nosce te ipsum--Socrates revisited? Controlling momentary ruminative self-referent thoughts by neuromodulation of emotional working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne; Brunoni, Andre R; Loeys, Tom; Boggio, Paulo S; De Raedt, Rudi

    2013-11-01

    It becomes ever more evident that cognitive operations serve as fundamental mechanisms underlying higher order ruminative thoughts. In this sham controlled within subjects study, we performed anodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in 32 healthy participants. We tested the causal hypothesis that the relationship between DLPFC activity and ruminative thinking is mediated by working memory operations. We used the Internal Shift Task, a paradigm in which participants have to update and shift between specific (non)emotional representations in working memory. Subsequently, during an unguided rest period approximately 20 min after the stimulation, we explored the occurrence of momentary ruminative self-referent thought. The results demonstrated that the influence of anodal tDCS of the left DLPFC (and not of sham stimulation) on momentary ruminative self-referent thinking is mediated by the enhancement of WM operations for angry faces. Moreover, the more individuals ruminate in everyday life (as measured using the Ruminative Response Style), the larger this mediation effect was. These findings suggest that enhancing cognitive self-regulation, by increasing the ability to update and shift away from negative representations in working memory, might help individuals to control unintentional streams of self-referent thoughts that are self-critical and self-evaluative, a thinking style known as rumination.

  4. Effects of Different Treated Rice Straws on Pattern, Methane Production and Microflora of in Vitro Ruminal Fermentation%不同处理水稻秸秆对体外瘤胃发酵模式、甲烷产量和微生物区系的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛杭书; 刘凯玉; 张永根; 王明君; 李仲玉; 王志博; 潘春方; 李欣新; 刘可园

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different treated rice straws on pattern, meth?ane production and microflora of in vitro ruminal fermentation. Three Holstein cows fitted with permanent ru?men fistulas were used as the donor of rumen fluid. Untreated dry rice straw ( control) , rice straw silage, ami?nated rice straws and alkalified rice straws were used as substrates, and the changes of gas production, methane production, ruminal fermentation parameters, as well as ruminal microbes during 72 h incubation were deter?mined using in vitro gas production method. The results showed as follows:the treatments of silage, ammonia?tion and alkalization significantly increased 72 h gas production and 24 h total volatile fatty acid concentration of rice straws incubated in vitro ( P0.05) . It is concluded that treatments of rice straw, such as silage, ammoniation and alkali?zation can change pattern, methane production and microflora of in vitro ruminal fermentation; considering from methane production control, the treatments of silage and ammoniation are optional.%本试验旨在研究不同处理水稻秸秆对瘤胃发酵模式、甲烷产量和微生物区系的影响.以3头安装有永久性瘤胃瘘管的健康荷斯坦奶牛作为瘤胃液供体,各处理分别以干秸秆(对照)、青贮秸秆、氨化秸秆和碱化秸秆为发酵底物,通过体外产气量法,测定培养72 h内的产气量、甲烷产量、瘤胃发酵参数及瘤胃微生物区系的变化. 结果表明:青贮、氨化和碱化处理均显著增加了秸秆体外培养72 h的产气量和24 h的总挥发性脂肪酸浓度(P0.05). 由此可见,对水稻秸秆进行青贮、氨化和碱化处理,可以不同程度地改变体外瘤胃的发酵模式、甲烷生成以及瘤胃微生物区系的组成;从甲烷减排角度考虑,可选择青贮和氨化的处理方式.

  5. Effect of incremental flaxseed supplementation of an herbage diet on methane output and ruminal fermentation in continuous culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 4-unit dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess the effect of increasing flax supplementation of an herbage-based diet on nutrient digestibility, bacterial N synthesis and methane output. Treatments were randomly assigned to fermentors in a 4 x 4 Latin square design with 7 ...

  6. Methane production, nutrient digestion, ruminal fermentation, N balance, and milk production of cows fed timothy silage- or alfalfa silage-based diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanat, F; Gervais, R; Massé, D I; Petit, H V; Benchaar, C

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of changing forage source in dairy cow diets from timothy silage (TS) to alfalfa silage (AS) on enteric CH₄ emissions, ruminal fermentation characteristics, digestion, milk production, and N balance. Nine ruminally cannulated lactating cows were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design (32-d period) and fed (ad libitum) a total mixed ration (TMR; forage:concentrate ratio of 60:40, dry matter basis), with the forage portion consisting of either TS (0% AS; 0% AS and 54.4% TS in the TMR), a 50:50 mixture of both silages (50% AS; 27.2% AS and 27.2% TS in the TMR), or AS (100% AS; 54.4% AS and 0% TS in the TMR). Compared with TS, AS contained less (36.9 vs. 52.1%) neutral detergent fiber but more (20.5 vs. 13.6%) crude protein (CP). In sacco 24-h ruminal degradability of organic matter (OM) was higher for AS than for TS (73.5 vs. 66.9%). Replacement of TS with AS in the diet entailed increasing proportions of corn grain and bypass protein supplement at the expense of soybean meal. As the dietary proportion of AS increased, CP and starch concentrations increased, whereas fiber content declined in the TMR. Dry matter intake increased linearly with increasing AS proportions in the diet. Apparent total-tract digestibility of OM and gross energy remained unaffected, whereas CP digestibility increased linearly and that of fiber decreased linearly with increasing inclusion of AS in the diet. The acetate-to-propionate ratio was not affected, whereas ruminal concentration of ammonia (NH₃) and molar proportion of branched-chain VFA increased as the proportion of AS in the diet increased. Daily CH₄ emissions tended to increase (476, 483, and 491 g/d for cows fed 0% AS, 50% AS, and 100% AS, respectively) linearly as cows were fed increasing proportions of AS. Methane production adjusted for dry matter intake (average=19.8 g/kg) or gross energy intake (average=5.83%) was not affected by increasing AS inclusion

  7. Technical note: Can the sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas technique be used to accurately measure enteric methane production from ruminally cannulated cattle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchemin, K A; Coates, T; Farr, B; McGinn, S M

    2012-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether using ruminally cannulated cattle affects the estimate of enteric methane (CH(4)) emissions when using the sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) tracer technique with samples taken from a head canister. Eleven beef cattle were surgically fitted with several types of ruminal cannula (2C, 3C, 3C+washer, 9C; Bar Diamond, Parma, ID). The 2C and 3C models (outer and inner flanges with opposite curvature) had medium to high leakage, whereas the 9C models (outer and inner flanges with the same curvature) provided minimum to moderate leakage of gas. A total of 48 cow-day measurements were conducted. For each animal, a permeation tube containing sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) was placed in the rumen, and a sample of air from around the nose and mouth was drawn through tubing into an evacuated canister (head canister). A second sample of air was collected from outside the rumen near the cannula into another canister (cannula canister). Background concentrations were also monitored. The methane (CH(4)) emission was estimated from the daily CH(4) and SF(6) concentrations in the head canister (uncorrected). The permeation SF(6) release rate was then partitioned based on the proportion of the SF(6) concentration measured in the head vs. the cannula canister. The CH(4) emissions at each site were calculated using the two release rates and the two CH(4):SF(6) concentration ratios. The head and cannula emissions were summed to obtain the total emission (corrected). The difference (corrected - uncorrected) in CH4 emission was attributed to the differences in CH(4):SF(6) ratio at the 2 exit locations. The proportions of CH(4) and SF(6) recovered at the head were greater (P 0.05; 2C, 6% and 4%; 3C, 17% and 15%; 3C+washer, 19% and 14%). Uncorrected CH(4) emissions were ± 10% of corrected emissions for 53% of the cow-day measurements. Only when more than 80% of the SF(6) escaped via the rumen did the difference between the uncorrected and corrected

  8. Methane : its role in climate change and options for control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amstel, van A.R.

    2012-01-01

    This study on CH4, (its role in climate change and options for control), aimed at a scenario analysis to assess future climate change under reduced methane emissions. At the same time improving the quality of CH4 emission inventories and estimating the costs of emission reducti

  9. Potential of tannin-rich plants for modulating ruminal microbes and ruminal fermentation in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rira, M; Morgavi, D P; Archimède, H; Marie-Magdeleine, C; Popova, M; Bousseboua, H; Doreau, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study nutritional strategies for decreasing methane production by ruminants fed tropical diets, combining in vitro and in vivo methods. The in vitro approach was used to evaluate the dose effect of condensed tannins (CT) contained in leaves of Gliricidia sepium, Leucaena leucocephala, and Manihot esculenta (39, 75, and 92 g CT/kg DM, respectively) on methane production and ruminal fermentation characteristics. Tannin-rich plants (TRP) were incubated for 24 h alone or mixed with a natural grassland hay based on Dichanthium spp. (control plant), so that proportions of TRP were 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0. Methane production, VFA concentration, and fermented OM decreased with increased proportions of TRP. Numerical differences on methane production and VFA concentration among TRP sources may be due to differences in their CT content, with greater effects for L. leucocephala and M. esculenta than for G. sepium. Independently of TRP, the response to increasing doses of CT was linear for methane production but quadratic for VFA concentration. As a result, at moderate tannin dose, methane decreased more than VFA. The in vivo trial was conducted to investigate the effect of TRP on different ruminal microbial populations. To this end, 8 rumen-cannulated sheep from 2 breeds (Texel and Blackbelly) were used in two 4 × 4 Latin square designs. Diets were fed ad libitum and were composed of the same feeds used for the in vitro trial: control plant alone or combined with pellets made from TRP leaves at 44% of the diet DM. Compared to TRP, concentration of Ruminococcus flavefaciens was greater for the control diet and concentration of Ruminococcus albus was least for the control diet. The methanogen population was greater for Texel than for Blackbelly. By contrast, TRP-containing diets did not affect protozoa or Fibrobacter succinogenes numbers. Hence, TRP showed potential for mitigating methane production by ruminants. These findings suggest

  10. Global distribution of peste des petits ruminants virus and prospects for improved diagnosis and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Ashley C; Parida, Satya; Batten, Carrie; Oura, Chris; Kwiatek, Olivier; Libeau, Genevieve

    2010-12-01

    Viral diseases of farm animals, rather than being a diminishing problem across the world, are now appearing with regularity in areas where they have never been seen before. Across the developing world, viral pathogens such as peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) place a huge disease burden on agriculture, in particular affecting small ruminant production and in turn increasing poverty in some of the poorest parts of the world. PPRV is currently considered as one of the main animal transboundary diseases that constitutes a threat to livestock production in many developing countries, particularly in western Africa and south Asia. Infection of small ruminants with PPRV causes a devastating plague and as well as being endemic across much of the developing world, in recent years outbreaks of PPRV have occurred in the European part of Turkey. Indeed, the relevance of many once considered 'exotic' viruses is now also high across the European Union and may threaten further regions across the globe in the future. Here, we review the spread of PPRV across Africa, Asia and into Europe through submissions made to the OIE Regional Reference Laboratories. Further, we discuss current control methods and the development of further tools to aid both diagnosis of the disease and prevention.

  11. Revisiting factors controlling methane emissions from high-Arctic tundra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastepanov, M.; Sigsgaard, Charlotte; Tagesson, Håkan Torbern;

    2013-01-01

    controlling methane emission, i.e. temperature and water table position. Late in the growing season CH4 emissions were found to be very similar between the study years (except the extremely dry 2010) despite large differences in climatic factors (temperature and water table). Late-season bursts of CH4...... short-term control factors (temperature and water table). Our findings suggest the importance of multiyear studies with a continued focus on shoulder seasons in Arctic ecosystems....

  12. Stochastic prediction and control to methane in coalmine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Wen-zhong

    2011-01-01

    The ventilation system plays an essential role in underground workings,and improvements in dilution effect to stochastic methane build-up at cul-de-sac of a coalmine require the installation of mixed ventilation system.For 4-12-1 1N02.8A centrifugal ventilation fan,the characteristic operating function of its mixed ventilation system is calculated from ventilation quantity and total pressure in the actual working status.At cul-de-sac of the reference coalmine,the evolution of methane concentration is a compound Poisson process and equivalent to a Brownian motion for Gaussian distributed increments.Solution of stochastic differential equation driven by mixed ventilation system,with dilution equation for its closure,provides parameters of mine ventilation system for keeping methane concentration within the permissible limit at cul-de-sac of the reference coalmine.These results intend to shed some light on application of blowing-sucking mixed ventilation systems in underground workings,and establish stochastic trends to consider methane control in coalmines.

  13. Effect of Morinda citrifolia leaf as saponin sources on fermentation characteristic, protozoa defaunated, gas and methane production of ruminal fluid in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Herdian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have reported that the Morinda citrifolia (pace plant was a useful material for human health. However the exploration of this plant on rumen fermentation is still needed. Therefore, a research was done to study the effect of M. citrifolia leaf on fermentation characteristics of rumen fluid consisted of protozoa defaunated process, VFA composition, NH3 content, rumen microbial protein content, gas and methane production using in vitro techniques. Rumen fluid obtained from two fistulated Ongole crossbreed cattle fed with forage and concentrate feed ration (70 : 30. The fluid was incubated at 39ºC for 48 hours. The treatment on the rumen fluid consisted of control treatment: 100% (200 mg DM kolonjono forage substrate (Penisetum purpureum and M. citrifolia treatments: kolonjono forage plus M. citrifolia (equivalent saponin 3; 6; 9; and 12 mg DM, respectively. The treatment of M. citrifolia leaf addition showed declined patterns in the number of protozoa population (P 0.05. Microbial protein content in rumen fluid increased (P 0.05 compared to control, while M. citrifolia treatments reduced the methane gas production of (P < 0.05 compared to control. It was concluded that M. citrifolia leaf has potential as a limiting agent of protozoa population and methane gas production in rumen.

  14. First In Vivo Measurements of Methane Emissions from Ruminant Livestock Enteric Fermentation in Mexico Using Respiration Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelan-Ortega, O. A.; Ku-Vera, J. C.; Molina, L. T.; Pedraza-Beltrán, P. E.; Canul-Solis, J. R.; Piñeiro-Vázquez, A.; Hernández-Pineda, G.; Benaouda, M.

    2015-12-01

    Until recently there were no facilities in Mexico to measure in vivo methane (CH4) emission by livestock. Inventories were calculated using emission factors from the IPCC, so the uncertainty in calculation is high. In 2014 the first laboratory equipped to measure CH4 started operations at the Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán. The second laboratory was built at the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México and it began operations in June 2015. The first laboratory consists of two open-circuit respiration chambers, which are currently used to measure CH4 emissions by cattle in Mexico's tropical regions. Chamber dimensions are: 3.0 x 2.14 x 1.44 m (DxHxW). Air exiting the chambers is drawn by a mass flowmeter (Flowkit 500) at a rate of 500 L/min. The air sample is passed through a multiplexer and then through a chemical desiccant before entering the methane infrared analyzer (MA-10). All the instruments were fabricated by Sable Systems International, Las Vegas, USA. The average CH4 emission factor for Nelore bulls of 350 kg live weight fed with a tropical grass was 117.3 L/day and it increased to 198.6 L/day when 3 kg of concentrate feed were supplemented. For adult crossbred cows also fed with a tropical grass CH4 emission ranged from 92.7 to 137.3 L/day. The second laboratory consist of a respiration chamber of the head box type. It consists of a head box of 1.05 x 0.8 x 1.80 m (WxDxH) made of 3.5 x 3.5 cm stainless steel angle, and on the bottom, top, sides, back and front of the head box, 0.6 cm clear acrylic sheeting was used to provide comfortable vision to the animal, and a metabolic cage of 1.08 x 2.92 x 1.8 m (WxDxH) made of iron tubes with steel sheeting floor adapted for feces and urine collection. The methane analyzer and the mass flowmeter were of the same model as in the first laboratory. Once calibrated, in vivo measurements were performed using high yielding adult Holstein cows with an average live weight of 573 ±71 kg and milk yield of 30kg

  15. Control of Methane Production and Exchange in Northern Peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crill, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    This proposal has successfully supported studies that have developed unique long ten-n datasets of methane (CH4) emissions and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange in order to quantify the controls on CH4 production and exchange especially the linkages to the carbon cycle in northern peatlands. The primary research site has been a small fen in southeastern New Hampshire where a unique multi-year data baseline of CH4 flux measurements was begun (with NASA funding) in 1989. The fen has also been instrumented for continuous hydrological and meteorological observations and year-round porewater sampling. Multiyear datasets of methane flux are very valuable and very rare. Datasets using the same sampling techniques at the same sites are the only way to assess the effect of the integrated ecosystem response to climatological variability. The research has had two basic objectives: 1. To quantify the effect of seasonal and interannual variability on CH4flux. 2. To examine process level controls on methane dynamics.

  16. Use of medicinal plants to control Haemonchus contortus infection in small ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawleha Qadir1

    Full Text Available Haemonchus contortus is singly the most important of all the gastrointestinal nematodes that constrain the survival and productivity of sheep and goats owned by rural poor farmers in the developing world. This haematophagus parasite is infamous throughout the humid tropics/subtropics, being responsible for acute disease outbreaks with high levels of mortalities, particularly in young animals. Costs associated with control of this parasite in India, have been estimated to be US$ 103 million. H. contortus is also prominent amongst the reports of anthelmintic resistance that has emerged in all countries of the world that produce small ruminants. This emergence of multiple anthelmintic resistances has provided a spur for research on alternative forms of control. Recent surveys in developing countries have identified many plants that are intended and have the potential to be used as anthelmintics. This paper reviews the use of some medicinal plants as anthelmintics against H. contortus infection in small ruminants. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(11.000: 515-518

  17. 海南霉素对瘤胃发酵模式、甲烷生成和微生物区系的影响%Effects of Hainanmycin on Ruminal Fermentation Pattern, Methane Production and Micro Flora

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘薇; 辛杭书; 刘彩娟; 文奇男; 谭伟卓; 张永根

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different levels of supplementation with Hainanmycin on rumen fermentation parameters, methane production and microflora in vitro. The results showed that the addition of Hainanmycin could inhibit significantly the gas production (P<0. 05) and the concentration of ammoniacal nitrogen (P<0. 05). And pH enhanced linearly remarkably as the addition level of Hainanmycin increased (P<0. 05). Compared to the control, the 10 mg ? Kg"1 Hainanmycin supplementation in the diet increased the pH by 4%. The content of propionate increased and the concentration of acetate, butyrate and A/P decreased significantly (P<0. 05). The methane production was inhibited quadratically by the addition of Hainanmycin in the diet (P<0. 05). The percentage of ruminococcu flavefaciens, fungi and protozoa accounting for the total bacterial 16S rDNA reduced significantly in experiment groups compared with the control (Pruminal fermentation pattern, inhibit the methane production, and affect micro-flora significantly in vitro. And the methane production could reach the lowest level theoretically when the supplementation level of Hainanmycin was 7. 2 mg kg"1.%本试验采用活体外人工瘤胃发酵法研究日粮中添加不同水平的海南霉素对瘤胃发酵参数、甲烷生成以及微生物区系变化的影响.结果表明,日粮中添加海南霉素显著降低了瘤胃发酵的产气量(P<0.05)以及氨态氮的浓度(P<0.05),并且随着添加水平的增加,瘤胃pH呈显著的线性升高趋势(P<0.05),与对照组相比,10 mg·kg-1的海南霉素可将pH提高4个百分点;而乙、丁酸的摩尔比例及乙酸/丙酸(A/P)值呈显著的下降趋势(P<0.05),丙酸的摩尔比例增加(P<0.05).海南霉素的添加降低了甲烷的产量(P<0

  18. PRODUCTION OF HOMOLOGOUS LIVE ATTENUATED CELL CULTURE VACCINE FOR THE CONTROL OF PESTE DES PETITS RUMINANTS IN SMALL RUMINANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. ASIM, A. RASHID, A. H. CHAUDHARY AND M. S. NOOR

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibody response of a live-attenuated Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR cell culture vaccine was studied at Veterinary Research Institute, Lahore, Pakistan. For this purpose, one group of five sheep and 5 goats each was vaccinated subcutaneously with 1 ml reconstituted PPR vaccine and second group of five sheep and 5 goats was inoculated with 1 ml saline solution. Blood samples were collected before and after vaccination, sera were obtained and analyzed for antibodies against PPR by competitive ELISA (cELISA. Findings suggested that antibody titres at day zero, 21 and 45 were 24.762 ± 2.69, 65.467 ± 2.29 and 83.012 ± 2.11 in sheep and 18.723 ± 2.27, 59.162 ± 1.53 and 72.176 ± 2.93 in goats, respectively. No untoward reactions were observed following vaccination. All vaccinated animals developed high titre of antibodies (PI>50.

  19. Effects of increasing amounts of corn dried distillers grains with solubles in dairy cow diets on methane production, ruminal fermentation, digestion, N balance, and milk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchaar, C; Hassanat, F; Gervais, R; Chouinard, P Y; Julien, C; Petit, H V; Massé, D I

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of including corn dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) in the diet at the expense of corn and soybean meal on enteric CH4 emissions, ruminal fermentation characteristics, digestion (in sacco and apparent total-tract digestibility), N balance, and milk production of dairy cows. Twelve lactating Holstein cows were used in a triplicated 4×4 Latin square design (35-d periods) and fed (ad libitum intake) a total mixed ration containing (dry matter basis) 0, 10, 20, or 30% DDGS. Dry matter intake increased linearly, whereas apparent-total tract digestibility of dry matter and gross energy declined linearly as DDGS level in the diet increased. Increasing the proportion of DDGS in the diet decreased the acetate:propionate ratio, but this decrease was the result of reduced acetate concentration rather than increased propionate concentration. Milk yield increased linearly (up to +4kg/d) with increasing levels of DDGS in the diet and a tendency was observed for a quadratic increase in energy-corrected milk as the proportion of DDGS in the diet increased. Methane production decreased linearly with increasing levels of DDGS in the diet (495, 490, 477, and 475 g/d for 0, 10, 20, and 30% DDGS diets, respectively). When adjusted for gross energy intake, CH4 losses also decreased linearly as DDGS proportion increased in the diet by 5, 8, and 14% for 10, 20, and 30% DDGS diets, respectively. Similar decreases (up to 12% at 30% DDGS) were also observed when CH4 production was corrected for digestible energy intake. When expressed relative to energy-corrected milk, CH4 production declined linearly as the amount of DDGS increased in the diet. Total N excretion (urinary and fecal; g/d) increased as the amount of DDGS in the diet increased. Efficiency of N utilization (milk N secretion as a proportion of N intake) declined linearly with increasing inclusion of DDGS in the diet. However, productive N increased linearly with

  20. [The use of fenbendazole for controlling helminths in small zoo ruminants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barutzki, D; von Hegel, G; Schmid, K

    1989-01-01

    By means of coproscopical examination the anthelmintic efficacy of 5.0 mg fenbendazole/kg body weight and 0.714 mg/kg body weight, administered for seven consecutive days, was determined in three series of trials on small ruminants in the zoological gardens of Munich. Both doses proved to be highly effective against trichostrongylids; the egg output was reduced to an average of 100% and 80-100%, respectively. Despite of a partly lower efficiency after the multiple administration of a low level doses (7 x 0.714 mg fenbendazole/kg body weight) this is a sufficient and economical treatment for the control of the infestation with endoparasites in the - in this respect - difficult housing systems of zoological gardens.

  1. Research by NIOSH for controlling respirable dust and methane gas on continuous miner faces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, G.V.R.; Taylor, C.D.; Colinet, J.F.; Thimons, E.D. [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, Dust and Toxic Substances Control Branch

    2001-07-01

    The importance of controlling respirable dust and methane gas levels in underground coal mining cannot be underestimated. While respirable dust can significantly affect the occupational health of underground coal miners, methane gas accumulations pose significant safety concerns for these same workers. Water sprays and machine mounted dust scrubbers offer effective control of respirable dust exposures and methane gas accumulations. Water must not only be applied carefully to avoid dust rollback to the machine operator but must create sufficient turbulence to remove dead zones that could contain high concentrations of methane gas. While the flooded-bed dust scrubber has been generally responsible for decreased worker exposures to respirable dusts, this device has proved effective in controlling methane levels at the face. This paper reviews practical applications of water sprays and dust scrubbers to control respirable dust and methane gas on continuous miner faces. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Revisiting factors controlling methane emissions from high-Arctic tundra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mastepanov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The northern latitudes are experiencing disproportionate warming relative to the mid-latitudes, and there is growing concern about feedbacks between this warming and methane production and release from high-latitude soils. Studies of methane emissions carried out in the Arctic, particularly those with measurements made outside the growing season, are underrepresented in the literature. Here we present results of 5 yr (2006–2010 of automatic chamber measurements at a high-Arctic location in Zackenberg, NE Greenland, covering both the growing seasons and two months of the following freeze-in periods. The measurements show clear seasonal dynamics in methane emission. The start of the growing season and the increase in CH4 fluxes were strongly related to the date of snowmelt. Within each particular growing season, CH4 fluxes were highly correlated with the soil temperature (R2 > 0.75, which is probably explained by high seasonality of both variables, and weakly correlated with the water table. The greatest variability in fluxes between the study years was observed during the first part of the growing season. Somewhat surprisingly, this variability could not be explained by commonly known factors controlling methane emission, i.e. temperature and water table position. Late in the growing season CH4 emissions were found to be very similar between the study years (except the extremely dry 2010 despite large differences in climatic factors (temperature and water table. Late-season bursts of CH4 coinciding with soil freezing in the autumn were observed during at least three years. The cumulative emission during the freeze-in CH4 bursts was comparable in size with the growing season emission for the year 2007, and about one third of the growing season emissions for the years 2009 and 2010. In all three cases the CH4 burst was accompanied by a corresponding episodic increase in CO2 emission, which can compose a significant contribution to the annual CO2

  3. Internet-Based Exposure and Behavioral Activation for Complicated Grief and Rumination : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisma, M.C.; Boelen, P.A.; van den Bout, J.; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Schut, H.A.W.; Lancee, Jaap; Stroebe, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness and feasibility of therapist-guided Internet-delivered exposure (EX) and behavioral activation (BA) for complicated grief and rumination. Forty-seven bereaved individuals with elevated levels of complicated grief and grief rumination were randomly assigned to th

  4. Internet-based exposure and behavioral activation for complicated grief and rumination: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisma, M.C.; Boelen, P.A.; van den Bout, J.; Stroebe, W.; Schut, H.A.; Lancee, J.; Stroebe, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness and feasibility of therapist-guided Internet-delivered exposure (EX) and behavioral activation (BA) for complicated grief and rumination. Forty-seven bereaved individuals with elevated levels of complicated grief and grief rumination were randomly assigned to th

  5. Drug resistance makes new control measures of stomach parasites in small ruminants necessary = Resistentie maakt nieuwe aanpak van de bestrijding van maagdarmwormen bij kleine herkauwers noodzakelijk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eysker, M.; Borgsteede, F.H.M.; Ploeger, H.W.; Vellema, P.

    2005-01-01

    Control of Parasitic gastroenteritis in small ruminants is threatened by the worldwide growing problem of anthelmintic resistance. Therfore, alternativeapproaches for worm control are imperative. Of utmost importance is to slow down selection pressure for anthelmintic resistance by using alternative

  6. Studies on prevalence, risk indicators and control options for tick infestation in ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nady M. Asmaa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An epidemiological study was conducted at Benisuef district to determine the current situation and associated determinants of tick infestations in ruminants and to assess the efficacy of three different types of insecticides against tick infestation under field conditions. Total of (1082 animals of different species (540 cattle, 230 buffaloes, 108 of each sheep & goats and 96 camels were selected randomly and examined carefully for tick infestation. About (30.1% of total observed animals were found tick infested with highest rate in cattle (60.5% followed by goats (25.9%, buffaloes (17.8%, sheep (14.8% while no tick infestation recorded in camels. The most prevalent tick's species affecting ruminants was Boophilus annulatus (26.5% followed by Hyalomma anatolicum (6.1% then Rhipicephalus turanicus (3.4%. Regarding the associated risk factors, tick infestation was found statistically significant (P 3 years (78.8% followed by at age, ≤2 months (57.8% and during summer months were found highly significant (P < 0.01 in cattle ( 76.5% followed by goats and sheep (33.3% & 22.9% resp., comparing with results in winter. The preferred sites of ticks' attachment to infested animals were udders and external genitalia (70.7% of each then Neck & chest (63.0% of each, inner thighs (61.1%, perineum (41.7%, ears (14.6%, around eyes (11.7%. The obtained results revealed that poor husbandry practices of small holder farmers be a determinant making the animals more prone to tick infestation in this district. Improving the hygienic conditions associated with treatment of infested cattle with Ivermectin (0.2 mg/kg b.wt, S/C and spraying of Deltamethrin (1% for surrounding environment twice every 14 days are recommended for control of tick infestation under field condition.

  7. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Augenstein

    2001-02-01

    The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

  8. Revisiting factors controlling methane emissions from high-Arctic tundra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastepanov, M.; Sigsgaard, C.; Tagesson, T.;

    2013-01-01

    with measurements made outside the growing season, are underrepresented in the literature. Here we present results of 5 yr (2006-2010) of automatic chamber measurements at a high-Arctic location in Zackenberg, NE Greenland, covering both the growing seasons and two months of the following freeze-in periods...... explained by high seasonality of both variables, and weakly correlated with the water table. The greatest variability in fluxes between the study years was observed during the first part of the growing season. Somewhat surprisingly, this variability could not be explained by commonly known factors...... controlling methane emission, i.e. temperature and water table position. Late in the growing season CH4 emissions were found to be very similar between the study years (except the extremely dry 2010) despite large differences in climatic factors (temperature and water table). Late-season bursts of CH4...

  9. A randomized controlled trial of mindfulness meditation versus relaxation training: effects on distress, positive states of mind, rumination, and distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shamini; Shapiro, Shauna L; Swanick, Summer; Roesch, Scott C; Mills, Paul J; Bell, Iris; Schwartz, Gary E R

    2007-02-01

    Although mindfulness meditation interventions have recently shown benefits for reducing stress in various populations, little is known about their relative efficacy compared with relaxation interventions. This randomized controlled trial examines the effects of a 1-month mindfulness meditation versus somatic relaxation training as compared to a control group in 83 students (M age = 25; 16 men and 67 women) reporting distress. Psychological distress, positive states of mind, distractive and ruminative thoughts and behaviors, and spiritual experience were measured, while controlling for social desirability. Hierarchical linear modeling reveals that both meditation and relaxation groups experienced significant decreases in distress as well as increases in positive mood states over time, compared with the control group (p differences between meditation and relaxation on distress and positive mood states over time. Effect sizes for distress were large for both meditation and relaxation (Cohen's d = 1.36 and .91, respectively), whereas the meditation group showed a larger effect size for positive states of mind than relaxation (Cohen's d =.71 and .25, respectively). The meditation group also demonstrated significant pre-post decreases in both distractive and ruminative thoughts/behaviors compared with the control group (p mindfulness meditation's effects on reducing distress were partially mediated by reducing rumination. No significant effects were found for spiritual experience. The data suggest that compared with a no-treatment control, brief training in mindfulness meditation or somatic relaxation reduces distress and improves positive mood states. However, mindfulness meditation may be specific in its ability to reduce distractive and ruminative thoughts and behaviors, and this ability may provide a unique mechanism by which mindfulness meditation reduces distress.

  10. New insights into the transport processes controlling the sulfate-methane-transition-zone near methane vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Nabil; Garziglia, Sébastien; Ruffine, Livio

    2016-05-01

    Over the past years, several studies have raised concerns about the possible interactions between methane hydrate decomposition and external change. To carry out such an investigation, it is essential to characterize the baseline dynamics of gas hydrate systems related to natural geological and sedimentary processes. This is usually treated through the analysis of sulfate-reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here, we model sulfate reduction coupled with AOM as a two-dimensional (2D) problem including, advective and diffusive transport. This is applied to a case study from a deep-water site off Nigeria’s coast where lateral methane advection through turbidite layers was suspected. We show by analyzing the acquired data in combination with computational modeling that a two-dimensional approach is able to accurately describe the recent past dynamics of such a complex natural system. Our results show that the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ) is not a vertical barrier for dissolved sulfate and methane. We also show that such a modeling is able to assess short timescale variations in the order of decades to centuries.

  11. Methanotrophy controls groundwater methane export from a barrier island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Charles A.; Wilson, Alicia M.; Evans, Tyler; Moore, Willard S.; Joye, Samantha B.

    2016-04-01

    Methane concentrations can be high in coastal groundwater, resulting in methane export driven by submarine groundwater discharge. However, the magnitude of this methane flux depends significantly on the rate of methanotrophy, the often overlooked process of microbial methane consumption that occurs within coastal aquifer sediments. Here we describe a zone of methanogenesis within the freshwater lens of a barrier island aquifer and investigate the methane source/sink behavior of the barrier island system as a whole. The median concentration of methane dissolved in fresh groundwater beneath the center of the island was 0.6 mM, supported by high rates of potential methanogenesis (22 mmol m-2 day-1). However, rates of microbial methane consumption were also elevated in surrounding sediments (18 mmol m-2 day-1). Groundwater flowing from the zone of methanogenesis to the point of discharge into the ocean had a long residence time within methanotrophic sediments (∼195 days) such that the majority of the methane produced within the barrier island aquifer was likely consumed there.

  12. 减少新疆地区反刍动物甲烷排放的技术措施%Possible Means of Reducing Methane Emission from Ruminants in Sinkiang Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑断疾; 唐淑珍; 刘艳丰

    2012-01-01

    随着新疆地区畜牧业的发展,牛、羊养殖数量的不断增加,新疆地区反刍动物温室气体排放量也逐年增加,甲烷通过胃肠道排放,不仅损失饲料能量,还破坏大气臭氧层。文章就目前新疆地区畜牧业发展现状,提出关于减少反刍动物甲烷排放的一些技术措施。%With the development of Sinkiang region animal husbandry,Cattle and sheep increasing continuously,greenhouse gas emissions from ruminants in Sinkiang region increased year by year,feedstuff energy loss,deplete the ozone layer,therefore,discussed the current situation about animal husbandry,put forward possible means of reducing methane emission from ruminants.

  13. Co-inoculating ruminal content neither provides active hydrolytic microbes nor improves methanization of ¹³C-cellulose in batch digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapleur, Olivier; Bize, Ariane; Serain, Thibaut; Mazéas, Laurent; Bouchez, Théodore

    2014-03-01

    Cellulose hydrolysis often limits the kinetics and efficiency of anaerobic degradation in industrial digesters. In animal digestive systems, specialized microorganisms enable cellulose biodegradation at significantly higher rates. This study aims to assess the potential of ruminal microbial communities to settle and to express their cellulolytic properties in anaerobic digesters. Cellulose-degrading batch incubations were co-inoculated with municipal solid waste digester sludge and ruminal content. ¹³C-labeled cellulose degradation was described over time with Gas Chromatography-Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry. Results were linked to the identification of the microorganisms assimilating ¹³C and to the monitoring of their relative dynamics. Cellulose degradation in co-inoculated incubations was efficient but not significantly improved. Transient disturbances in degradation pathways occurred, as revealed by propionate accumulation. Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis dynamics and pyrosequencing revealed that expected classes of Bacteria and Archaea were active and degraded cellulose. However, despite the favorable co-inoculation conditions, molecular tools also revealed that no ruminal species settled in the bioreactors. Other specific parameters were probably needed for this to happen. This study shows that exploiting the rumen's cellulolytic properties in anaerobic digesters is not straightforward. Co-inoculation can only be successful if ruminal microorganisms manage to thrive in the anaerobic digester and outcompete native microorganisms, which requires specific nutritional and environmental parameters, and a meticulous reproduction of the selection pressure encountered in the rumen.

  14. Effect of nitroethane, dimethyl-2-nitroglutarate and 2-nitro-methyl-propionate on ruminal methane production and hydrogen balance in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruminal methanogenesis is considered a digestive inefficiency that results in the loss of 2-12% of the host’s gross energy intake and contributes nearly 20% to the United States’ annual CH4 emissions. Presently, the effects of the known CH4 inhibitor, nitroethane, and two synthesized nitrocompounds...

  15. Developing vaccines to control protozoan parasites in ruminants: dead or alive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Elisabeth A; Bartley, Paul M; Rocchi, Mara; Benavidas-Silvan, Julio; Burrells, Alison; Hotchkiss, Emily; Chianini, Francesca; Canton, German; Katzer, Frank

    2011-08-04

    Protozoan parasites are among some of the most successful organisms worldwide, being able to live and multiply within a very wide range of hosts. The diseases caused by these parasites cause significant production losses in the livestock sector involving reproductive failure, impaired weight gain, contaminated meat, reduced milk yields and in severe cases, loss of the animal. In addition, some protozoan parasites affecting livestock such as Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum may also be transmitted to humans where they can cause serious disease. Data derived from experimental models of infection in ruminant species enables the study of the interactions between parasite and host. How the parasite initiates infection, becomes established and multiplies within the host and the critical pathways that may lead to a disease outcome are all important to enable the rational design of appropriate intervention strategies. Once the parasites invade the hosts they induce both innate and adaptive immune responses and the induction and function of these immune responses are critical in determining the outcome of the infection. Vaccines offer green solutions to control disease as they are sustainable, reducing reliance on pharmacological drugs and pesticides. The use of vaccines has multiple benefits such as improving animal health and welfare by controlling animal infections and infestations; improving public health by controlling zoonoses and food borne pathogens in animals; solving problems associated with resistance to acaricides, antibiotics and anthelmintics; keeping animals and the environment free of chemical residues and maintaining biodiversity. All of these attributes should lead to improved sustainability of animal production and economic benefit. Using different protozoan parasitic diseases as examples this paper will discuss various approaches used to develop vaccines to protect against disease in livestock and discuss the relative merits of using live

  16. Project identification for methane reduction options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses efforts directed at reduction in emission of methane to the atmosphere. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, which on a 20 year timeframe may present a similar problem to carbon dioxide. In addition, methane causes additional problems in the form of smog and its longer atmospheric lifetime. The author discusses strategies for reducing methane emission from several major sources. This includes landfill methane recovery, coalbed methane recovery, livestock methane reduction - in the form of ruminant methane reduction and manure methane recovery. The author presents examples of projects which have implemented these ideas, the economics of the projects, and additional gains which come from the projects.

  17. Limits to dihydrogen incorporation into electron sinks alternative to methanogenesis in ruminal fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio M. Ungerfeld

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Research is being conducted with the objective of decreasing methane (CH4 production in the rumen, as methane emissions from ruminants are environmentally damaging and a loss of digestible energy to ruminants. Inhibiting ruminal methanogenesis generally results in accumulation of dihydrogen (H2, which is energetically inefficient and can inhibit fermentation. It would be nutritionally beneficial to incorporate accumulated H2 into propionate or butyrate production, or reductive acetogenesis. The objective of this analysis was to examine three possible physicochemical limitations to the incorporation of accumulated H2 into propionate and butyrate production, and reductive acetogenesis, in methanogenesis-inhibited ruminal batch and continuous cultures: i Thermodynamics; ii Enzyme kinetics; iii Substrate kinetics. Batch (N = 109 and continuous (N = 43 culture databases of experiments with at least 50% inhibition in CH4 production were used in this meta-analysis. Incorporation of accumulated H2 into propionate production and reductive acetogenesis seemed to be thermodynamically feasible but quite close to equilibrium, whereas this was less clear for butyrate. With regard to enzyme kinetics, it was speculated that hydrogenases of ruminal microorganisms may have evolved towards high-affinity and low maximal velocity to compete for traces of H2, rather than for high pressure accumulated H2. Responses so far obtained to the addition of propionate production intermediates do not allow distinguishing between thermodynamic and substrate kinetics control.

  18. Temperament and Risk for Depressive Symptoms in Adolescence: Mediation by Rumination and Moderation by Effortful Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Katrien; Vasey, Michael W.; Raes, Filip; Bijttebier, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the relations between temperament, ruminative response style and depressive symptoms both cross-sectionally and prospectively (1 year follow-up) in a community sample of 304 seventh- through tenth-graders. First, higher levels of negative affectivity (NA), lower levels of positive affectivity (PA) and lower levels of…

  19. Effect of divergence in phenotypic residual feed intake on methane emissions, ruminal fermentation, and apparent whole-tract digestibility of beef heifers across three contrasting diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, R P; Hart, K J; Boland, T M; Kelly, A K; McGee, M; Kenny, D A

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of divergent phenotypic ranking for residual feed intake (RFI) on ruminal CH emissions, diet digestibility, and indices of ruminal fermentation in heifers across 3 commercially relevant diets. Twenty-eight Limousin × Friesian heifers were used and were ranked on the basis of phenotypic RFI: 14 low-RFI and 14 high-RFI animals. Ruminal CH emissions were estimated over 5 d using the SF tracer gas technique on 3 successive occasions: 1) at the end of a 6-wk period (Period 1) on grass silage (GS), 2) at the end of an 8-wk period (Period 2) at pasture, and 3) at the end of a 5-wk period (Period 3) on a 30:70 corn silage:concentrate total mixed ration (TMR). Animals were allowed ad libitum access to feed and water at all times. Individual DMI was estimated during CH measurement and rumen samples were taken at the end of each CH measurement period. Diet type affected all feed intake and CH traits measured ( 0.05), but CH yield was greatest in low-RFI heifers ( = 0.03) as a proportion of both DMI and GE intake. Interactions between the main effects were observed ( < 0.05) for CP digestibility (CPD), DM digestibility (DMD), ruminal propionate, and the acetate:propionate ratio. Low-RFI animals had greater ( < 0.05) CPD and DMD than their high-RFI contemporaries when offered GS but not the other 2 diets. Low-RFI heifers also had greater OM digestibility ( = 0.027). Additionally, low-RFI heifers had a lower concentration of propionate ( < 0.05) compared with high-RFI heifers when fed GS, resulting in a greater ( < 0.05) acetate:propionate ratio. However, these differences were not evident for the other 2 diets. Energetically efficient animals do not have a lower ruminal methanogenic potential compared with their more inefficient counterparts and, indeed, some evidence to the contrary was found, which may reflect the greater nutrient digestive potential observed in low-RFI cattle.

  20. Effects of mood and rumination on cortisol levels in daily life: an ambulatory assessment study in remitted depressed patients and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffziger, Silke; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich; Zamoscik, Vera; Reinhard, Iris; Kirsch, Peter; Kuehner, Christine

    2013-10-01

    The influence of naturally occurring emotional and cognitive experiences on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) activity is still underinvestigated, particularly in clinical populations. The present study examined effects of mood and rumination on cortisol levels in daily life in remitted depressed patients with recurrent episodes or a chronic precourse (n=31) and healthy controls (n=32). Ambulatory assessment of subjective variables (valence, calmness, energetic-arousal, ruminative self-focus), daily stressors, and saliva cortisol samples was performed five times a day on two consecutive workdays, whereby cortisol was collected 20min after the subjective assessments. In addition, depressive symptoms and trait rumination (brooding, reflection) were measured retrospectively. Multilevel models revealed that remitted depressed patients showed lower cortisol activity compared to healthy controls. Depressive symptoms and trait rumination did not predict HPAA activity, whereas, by controlling for daily stressors, higher daily means of ruminative self-focus and lower daily means of valence, energetic arousal and calmness were associated with higher daily cortisol levels. Separate analyses per group revealed that mean daily ruminative self-focus predicted higher cortisol in both samples. In contrast, lower daily means of calmness, but also of valence and energetic arousal, were significantly linked to higher cortisol output only in healthy controls, but not in the patient sample. These findings indicate that naturally occurring rumination and low mood are associated with increased activation of the HPAA in daily life. Moreover, our data revealed a potentially reduced mood-cortisol coupling in remitted recurrent depression, possibly indicating that during the course of recurrent depression HPAA activation might become less responsive toward subtle emotional experiences in natural contexts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fluxes of methane between landfills and the atmosphere: Natural and engineered controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogner, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Meadows, M. [ETSU, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Czepiel, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Field measurement of landfill methane emissions indicates natural variability spanning more than 2 seven orders of magnitude, from approximately 0.0004 to more than 4000 g m{sub -2} day{sup -1}. This wide range reflects net emissions resulting from production (methanogenesis), consumption (methanotrophic oxidation), and gaseous transport processes. The determination of an {open_quotes}average{close_quotes} emission rate for a given field site requires sampling designs and statistical techniques which consider spatial and temporal variability. Moreover, particularly at sites with pumped gas recovery systems, it is possible for methanotrophic microorganisms in aerated cover soils to oxidize all of the methane from landfill sources below and, additionally, to oxidize methane diffusing into cover soils from atmospheric sources above. In such cases, a reversed soil gas concentration gradient is observed in shallow cover soils, indicating bidirectional diffusional transport to the depth of optimum methane oxidation. Rates of landfill methane oxidation from field and laboratory incubation studies range up to 166 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} among the highest for any natural setting, providing an effective natural control on net emissions. Estimates of worldwide landfill methane emissions to the atmosphere have ranged from 9 to 70 Tg yr{sup -1}, differing mainly in assumed methane yields from estimated quantities of landfilled refuse. At highly controlled landfill sites in developed countries, landfill methane is often collected via vertical wells or horizontal collectors. Recovery of landfill methane through engineered systems can provide both environmental and energy benefits by mitigating subsurface migration, reducing surface emissions, and providing an alternative energy resource for industrial boiler use, on-site electrical generation, or upgrading to a substitute natural gas.

  2. Controls on gas hydrate stability in methane depleted sediments: Laboratory and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, L.; Chanton, J.; Martens, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits are the Earth’s largest reservoir of the powerful greenhouse gas methane and thus a key future energy resource. However, hydrate stability in sedimentary environments featuring highly variable methane concentrations needs to be understood to allow resource estimation and recovery. Hydrates are at chemical equilibrium and therefore stable where high pressures, low temperatures, and moderate salinities coexist with methane-saturated pore waters. When all of these conditions are not met, hydrates should dissociate or dissolve, releasing methane to the overlying water and possibly the atmosphere. In addition, other natural factors may control the kinetics of their degradation complicating models for hydrate stability and occurrence. Our measurements indicate that the pore-waters surrounding some shallow buried hydrates are not methane-saturated suggesting that dissolution should occur relatively rapidly. Yet, these hydrate deposits are known to persist relatively unchanged for years. We hypothesize that, once formed, hydrate deposits may be stabilized by natural factors inhibiting dissolution, including oil or microbial biofilm coatings. While most studies have focused on pressure and temperature changes where hydrates occur, relatively few have included measurements of in situ methane concentration gradients because of the difficulties inherent to making such measurements. Here we present recent measurements of methane concentration and stable carbon isotope gradients immediately adjacent to undisturbed hydrate surfaces obtained through deployments of novel seafloor instruments. Our results suggest that the hydrates studied are relatively stable when exposed to overlying and pore-waters that are undersaturated with methane. Concurrent laboratory measurements of methane concentration gradients next to artificial hydrate surfaces were utilized to test our protective coating hypothesis. After a stable dissolution rate for hydrate samples was

  3. The enrichment characteristics and geological controlling factors of coalbed methane occurrence in Laochang area, Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Cai-fang; CHEN Zhao-ying; WANG Cong; JIANG Wei

    2012-01-01

    The enriched characters of methane content in the main coal seam of Yunnan's Laochang coal mine was analyzed through combined with the geologic conditions of the research area:structure type,hydrogeology condition,coal reservoir's macerals,ash,water content,and so on.The geology factors of controlling gas in Laochang coal mine were illustrated; and the different geology models of controlling gas of geologic condition coupling were posed.Research shows that,in the region,the methane contents of the main coal seams decrease gradually from middle to all around it; the northeast and southeast is higher than the west.In the local area,the methane content of anticline axis is higher,and the gas content is reduced to both wings and plunging crown.On macroscopic view,the distribution of methane content in coal-beds was controlled by structural type.On microscopic view,the methane content in coal-beds is mainly involved in coal reservoir's macerals,ash content,and water content.The enriched characters of CBM in the research area are mainly the result of structure-hydrogeology-petrophysics coupling controls of CBM.On the basis of above analysis,according to the distribution character of methane content in coalbeds,the research area was divided into low gas area,middle gas area,and high gas area.

  4. Global Health Benefits from Reductions in Background Tropospheric Ozone due to Methane Emission Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J. J.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Fiore, A. M.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2005-05-01

    Increases in background ozone throughout the troposphere are partially attributed to rising anthropogenic methane concentrations, which are projected to continue to increase in the future. Because methane is long-lived and affects background ozone, controls on methane emissions would reduce surface ozone concentrations fairly uniformly around the globe. Epidemiological research indicates that exposure to ozone increases incidence of respiratory ailments and premature mortality. In addition, exposure to ozone reduces agricultural yields and damages natural ecosystems. We use the MOZART-2 global atmospheric chemistry and transport model to estimate the effects on global surface ozone of perturbations in methane emissions. We consider a baseline scenario for 2000 and the 2030 A2 scenario (emissions from the IPCC AR-4 2030 atmospheric chemistry experiments), and examine the impact on ozone of decreasing anthropogenic methane emissions relative to this baseline by 20%. Using the simulated spatially-distributed decreases in surface ozone concentrations resulting from these reductions in methane emissions, we estimate the global benefits to human health in the methane emission reduction scenario. We focus on human mortality, and consider the sensitivity of our estimates to different assumptions of health effect thresholds at low ozone concentrations.

  5. Some frontiers of research in basic ruminant nutrition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    generation in anaerobes and their influence on the efficiency of the ruminal .... reagents were found to be potent inhibitors of methane synthesis (Sauer, Bush ...... Regulation of ammonia assimilatory enzymes and urease in. Selenomonas ...

  6. A new methane control and prediction software suite for longwall mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Heather N.; Özgen Karacan, C.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents technical and application aspects of a new software suite, MCP (Methane Control and Prediction), developed for addressing some of the methane and methane control issues in longwall coal mines. The software suite consists of dynamic link library (DLL) extensions to MS-Access TM, written in C++. In order to create the DLLs, various statistical, mathematical approaches, prediction and classification artificial neural network (ANN) methods were used. The current version of MCP suite (version 1.3) discussed in this paper has four separate modules that (a) predict the dynamic elastic properties of coal-measure rocks, (b) predict ventilation emissions from longwall mines, (c) determine the type of degasification system that needs to be utilized for given situations and (d) assess the production performance of gob gas ventholes that are used to extract methane from longwall gobs. These modules can be used with the data from basic logs, mining, longwall panel, productivity, and coal bed characteristics. The applications of these modules separately or in combination for methane capture and control related problems will help improve the safety of mines. The software suite's version 1.3 is discussed in this paper. Currently, it's new version 2.0 is available and can be downloaded from http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/products/product180.htm free of charge. The models discussed in this paper can be found under "ancillary models" and under "methane prediction models" for specific U.S. conditions in the new version.

  7. Epidemiological Intelligence for Grazing Management in Strategic Control of Parasitic Gastroenteritis in Small Ruminants in India AND#8211; A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf Bukhari and Prabir Kumar Sanyal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Because of the environmental and consumer concerns arising out of exponential growth in human population the world over, a term Sustainable Development has become an integral international concept, which is defined as one which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Ruminant animals appear sustainable as they do not compete with man for food, play a crucial role in the conversion of low quality plant material and crop residues to high quality human food as well as return valuable plant nutrients to the soil. Parasite control in ruminant livestock is a first-order input in any sustainable animal production system. As sustainable development is a compromise between reducing environmental degradation and positive economic growth, sustainable parasite control should aim towards less intensive, lower input, lesser risk of parasite induced losses with greater opportunities for integration of all available control resources. The compound scenario of rising anthelmintic resistance, food and environmental security and apathy of the pharmaceutical industry to go for the invention of new anthelmintic compounds has triggered the need for optimising the use of available anthelmintics with integration of all other alternative means for sustainable worm control. The “Sustainable Control of Parasitic Gastroenteritis in Ruminants” is thus encompasses a multidisciplinary approach involving integration of chemotherapy, grazing management, biological control, worm vaccines, genetic resistance of hosts, mathematical model based decision support and other strategies, if any. There is no single requirement more crucial to the rational and sustainable control of helminth parasites in grazing animals than a comprehensive knowledge of the epidemiology of the parasite as it interacts with the host in a specific climatic, management and production environment. In its absence, anthelmintic treatment

  8. Are methane production and cattle performance related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methane is a product of fermentation of feed in ruminant animals. Approximately 2 -12% of the gross energy consumed by cattle is released through enteric methane production. There are three primary components that contribute to the enteric methane footprint of an animal. Those components are dry ...

  9. The potential of bacteria isolated from ruminal contents of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep to hydrolyse seaweed components and produce methane by anaerobic digestion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allan G; Withers, Susan; Sutherland, Alastair D

    2013-01-01

    The production of methane biofuel from seaweeds is limited by the hydrolysis of polysaccharides. The rumen microbiota of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep was studied for polysaccharidic bacterial isolates degrading brown-seaweed polysaccharides. Only nine isolates out of 65 utilized >90% of the polysaccharide they were isolated on. The nine isolates (eight Prevotella spp. and one Clostridium butyricum) utilized whole Laminaria hyperborea extract and a range of seaweed polysaccharides, including alginate (seven out of nine isolates), laminarin and carboxymethylcellulose (eight out of nine isolates); while two out of nine isolates additionally hydrolysed fucoidan to some extent. Crude enzyme extracts from three of the isolates studied further had diverse glycosidases and polysaccharidase activities; particularly against laminarin and alginate (two isolates were shown to have alginate lyase activity) and notably fucoidan and carageenan (one isolate). In serial culture rumen microbiota hydrolysed a range of seaweed polysaccharides (fucoidan to a notably lesser degree) and homogenates of L. hyperborea, mixed Fucus spp. and Ascophyllum nodosum to produce methane and acetate. The rumen microbiota and isolates represent potential adjunct organisms or enzymes which may improve hydrolysis of seaweed components and thus improve the efficiency of seaweed anaerobic digestion for methane biofuel production.

  10. Contagious agalactia due to Mycoplasma spp. in small dairy ruminants: epidemiology and prospects for diagnosis and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Martín, Angel; Amores, Joaquín; Paterna, Ana; De la Fe, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Contagious agalactia (CA) is a serious disease of small dairy ruminants that has a substantial economic impact on the goat and sheep milk industries. The main aetiological agent of the disease is Mycoplasma agalactiae, although other species, such as Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri, Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum and Mycoplasma putrefaciens, are pathogenic in goats. There are two clinical-epidemiological states of CA in sheep and goats; herds and flocks may exhibit outbreaks of CA or may be chronically infected, the latter with a high incidence of subclinical mastitis and only occasional clinical cases. The complex epidemiology of CA is related to the genetic characteristics and mechanisms of molecular variation of the Mycoplasma spp. involved, along with presence of CA-mycoplasmas in wild ruminant species. In goats, the situation is particularly complex and asymptomatic carriers have been detected in chronically infected herds. The coexistence of other non-pathogenic mycoplasmas in the herd further complicates the diagnosis of CA and the design of efficient strategies to control the disease. Routes of infection, such as the venereal route, may be involved in the establishment of chronic infection in herds. Current challenges include the need for improved diagnostic methods for detection of chronic and subclinical infections and for the design of more efficient vaccines.

  11. Peste des petits ruminants diagnosis and diagnostic tools at a glance: perspectives on global control and eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhamani, Ramasamy; Singh, Rabindra Prasad; Njeumi, Felix

    2016-11-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious, economically important viral disease of small ruminants, targeted for global eradication by the year 2030. The recent geographic surge in PPR virus distribution, economic implications, the success of the rinderpest eradication campaign, and ongoing national/regional efforts convinced the FAO and OIE to initiate a global PPR control and eradication strategy. Since its discovery, a series of diagnostic tools have been developed for detecting PPR virus and virus-specific antibodies. Furthermore, it is understood that diagnostic and vaccine-monitoring tools are inevitable components of the four-stage strategy of global PPR eradication from assessment to the post-eradication phase. However, these tools may not be suitable for all stages of PPR control and eradication. For instance, diagnostics such as ELISA could be used for mass screening of clinical and serum samples, whereas immunochromatographic tests can be used at the field level as a pen-side test. Yet, assays with higher sensitivity, such as RT-PCR, RT-PCR ELISA, real-time RT-PCR and LAMP are important for early diagnosis of PPR and also, theoretically, during the late stages of eradication or when sampling non-natural hosts. Moreover, during the later stages of any control program, suspected/doubtful outbreaks will have to be reconfirmed using multiple laboratory tests. Hence, diagnostics can and should be efficiently applied at different stages of the PPR control and eradication campaign based on available resources and the number of samples to be tested. This article provides an overview of the various PPR diagnostic tools and suggests where and how they should be logically applied during the different phases of global PPR control and eradication.

  12. Possible control and eradication of peste des petits ruminants from India: technical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raj Kumar; Balamurugan, Vinayagamurthy; Bhanuprakash, Veerakyathappa; Sen, Arnab; Saravanan, Paramasivam; Pal Yadav, Mahendra

    2009-01-01

    The peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is an acute and highly contagious, notifiable viral disease of sheep and goats that causes substantial morbidity and mortality. There are three cell culture-based live attenuated PPR vaccines available (one from an African isolate and two from Indian isolates). The PPR vaccine produced by the Indian Veterinary Research Institute has been extensively evaluated in the field and found safe and potent in sheep and goats in India. Diagnostic tests, such as the sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (s-ELISA), competitive ELISA, single and duplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) and RT-PCR-ELISA at the Indian Veterinary Research Institute have also been validated on a large scale. Furthermore, the expertise that remained after the successful eradication of rinderpest in the National Project on Rinderpest Eradication can be utilised effectively for the eradication of PPR without much additional budgetary expense. Thus, the availability of an effective vaccine, accurate diagnostic tests for PPR and an experienced infrastructure prompt us to propose a national project for a peste des petits ruminants eradication programme on the lines of National Project on Rinderpest Eradication. This would greatly enhance the prospects of PPR eradication not only on a national level but also from the Asian continent, alleviate poverty and, in turn, contribute to the national economy.

  13. Possible control and eradication of peste des petits ruminants from India: technical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar Singh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The peste des petits ruminants (PPR is an acute and highly contagious, notifiable viral disease of sheep and goats that causes substantial morbidity and mortality. There are three cell culture-based live attenuated PPR vaccines available (one from an African isolate and two from Indian isolates. The PPR vaccine produced by the Indian Veterinary Research Institute has been extensively evaluated in the field and found safe and potent in sheep and goats in India. Diagnostic tests, such as the sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (s?ELISA, competitive ELISA, single and duplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs and RT-PCR-ELISA at the Indian Veterinary Research Institute have also been validated on a large scale. Furthermore, the expertise that remained after the successful eradication of rinderpest in the National Project on Rinderpest Eradication can be utilised effectively for the eradication of PPR without much additional budgetary expense. Thus, the availability of an effective vaccine, accurate diagnostic tests for PPR and an experienced infrastructure prompt us to propose a national project for a peste des petits ruminants eradication programme on the lines of National Project on Rinderpest Eradication. This would greatly enhance the prospects of PPR eradication not only on a national level but also from the Asian continent, alleviate poverty and, in turn, contribute to the national economy.

  14. Reproductive seasonality in captive wild ruminants: implications for biogeographical adaptation, photoperiodic control, and life history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbe, Philipp; Clauss, Marcus; Codron, Daryl; Bingaman Lackey, Laurie; Rensch, Eberhard; Streich, Jürgen W; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Müller, Dennis W H

    2012-11-01

    Many ruminant species show seasonal patterns of reproduction. Causes for this are widely debated, and include adaptations to seasonal availability of resources (with cues either from body condition in more tropical, or from photoperiodism in higher latitude habitats) and/or defence strategies against predators. Conclusions so far are limited to datasets with less than 30 species. Here, we use a dataset on 110 wild ruminant species kept in captivity in temperate-zone zoos to describe their reproductive patterns quantitatively [determining the birth peak breadth (BPB) as the number of days in which 80% of all births occur]; then we link this pattern to various biological characteristics [latitude of origin, mother-young-relationship (hider/follower), proportion of grass in the natural diet (grazer/browser), sexual size dimorphism/mating system], and compare it with reports for free-ranging animals. When comparing taxonomic subgroups, variance in BPB is highly correlated to the minimum, but not the maximum BPB, suggesting that a high BPB (i.e. an aseasonal reproductive pattern) is the plesiomorphic character in ruminants. Globally, latitude of natural origin is highly correlated to the BPB observed in captivity, supporting an overruling impact of photoperiodism on ruminant reproduction. Feeding type has no additional influence; the hider/follower dichotomy, associated with the anti-predator strategy of 'swamping', has additional influence in the subset of African species only. Sexual size dimorphism and mating system are marginally associated with the BPB, potentially indicating a facilitation of polygamy under seasonal conditions. The difference in the calculated Julian date of conception between captive populations and that reported for free-ranging ones corresponds to the one expected if absolute day length was the main trigger in highly seasonal species: calculated day length at the time of conception between free-ranging and captive populations followed a y = x

  15. Relationship between selection for feed efficiency and methane production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enteric methane is a product of fermentation in the gastro-intestinal tract of ruminants. A group of archaea bacteria collectively called “methanogens” are responsible for the synthesis of methane. In ruminants, the methanogens grow in the reticulum-rumen complex and in the cecum. Most of the met...

  16. Linseed oil and DGAT1 K232A polymorphism: Effects on methane emission, energy and nitrogen metabolism, lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, and rumen microbial composition of Holstein-Friesian cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gastelen, S; Visker, M H P W; Edwards, J E; Antunes-Fernandes, E C; Hettinga, K A; Alferink, S J J; Hendriks, W H; Bovenhuis, H; Smidt, H; Dijkstra, J

    2017-09-13

    Complex interactions between rumen microbiota, cow genetics, and diet composition may exist. Therefore, the effect of linseed oil, DGAT1 K232A polymorphism (DGAT1), and the interaction between linseed oil and DGAT1 on CH4 and H2 emission, energy and N metabolism, lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, and rumen bacterial and archaeal composition was investigated. Twenty-four lactating Holstein-Friesian cows (i.e., 12 with DGAT1 KK genotype and 12 with DGAT1 AA genotype) were fed 2 diets in a crossover design: a control diet and a linseed oil diet (LSO) with a difference of 22 g/kg of dry matter (DM) in fat content between the 2 diets. Both diets consisted of 40% corn silage, 30% grass silage, and 30% concentrates (DM basis). Apparent digestibility, lactation performance, N and energy balance, and CH4 emission were measured in climate respiration chambers, and rumen fluid samples were collected using the oral stomach tube technique. No linseed oil by DGAT1 interactions were observed for digestibility, milk production and composition, energy and N balance, CH4 and H2 emissions, and rumen volatile fatty acid concentrations. The DGAT1 KK genotype was associated with a lower proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk fat, and with a higher milk fat and protein content, and proportion of saturated fatty acids in milk fat compared with the DGAT1 AA genotype, whereas the fat- and protein-corrected milk yield was unaffected by DGAT1. Also, DGAT1 did not affect nutrient digestibility, CH4 or H2 emission, ruminal fermentation or ruminal archaeal and bacterial concentrations. Rumen bacterial and archaeal composition was also unaffected in terms of the whole community, whereas at the genus level the relative abundances of some bacterial genera were found to be affected by DGAT1. The DGAT1 KK genotype was associated with a lower metabolizability (i.e., ratio of metabolizable to gross energy intake), and with a tendency for a lower milk N efficiency compared with the

  17. The future of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce ca. 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions steming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. Until all these aspects of methane are better understood, its future role in the world`s energy mix will remain uncertain. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity and importance of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  18. Controls on subsurface methane fluxes and shallow gas formation in Baltic Sea sediment (Aarhus Bay, Denmark)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Sabine; Røy, Hans; Dale, Andrew W.; Fossing, Henrik; Tóth, Zsuzsanna; Spiess, Volkhard; Jensen, Jørn Bo; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2016-09-01

    Shallow gas accumulates in coastal marine sediments when the burial rate of reactive organic matter beneath the sulfate zone is sufficiently high and the methanogenic zone is sufficiently deep. We investigated the controls on methane production and free methane gas accumulation along a 400 m seismo-acoustic transect across a sharp transition from gas-free into gas-bearing sediment in Aarhus Bay (Denmark). Twelve gravity cores were taken, in which the pore water was analyzed for inorganic solutes while rates of organic carbon mineralization were measured experimentally by 35SO42- radiotracer method. The thickness of organic-rich Holocene mud increased from 5 to 10 m along the transect concomitant with a shallowing of the depth of the sulfate-methane transition from >4 m to 2.5 m. In spite of drastic differences in the distribution of methane and sulfate in the sediment along the transect, there were only small differences in total mineralization, and methanogenesis was only equivalent to about 1% of sulfate reduction. Shallow gas appeared where the mud thickness exceeded 8-9 m. Rates of methanogenesis increased along the transect as did the upward diffusive flux of methane. Interestingly, the increase in the sedimentation rate and Holocene mud thickness had only a modest direct effect on methanogenesis rates in deep sediments. This increase in methane flux, however, triggered a shallowing of the sulfate-methane transition which resulted in a large increase in methanogenesis at the top of the methanogenic zone. Thus, our results demonstrate a positive feedback mechanism that causes a strong enhancement of methanogenesis and explains the apparently abrupt appearance of gas when a threshold thickness of organic-rich mud is exceeded.

  19. Environmental factors controlling methane emissions from peatlands in northern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dise, Nancy B.; Gorham, Eville; Verry, Elon S.

    1993-01-01

    The environmental factors affecting the emission of methane from peatlands were investigated by correlating CH4 emission data for two years, obtained from five different peatland ecosystems in northern Minnesota, with peat temperature, water table position, and degree of peat humification. The relationship obtained between the CH4 flux and these factors was compared to results from a field manipulation experiment in which the water table was artificially raised in three experimental plots within the driest peatland. It was found that peat temperature, water table position, and degree of peat humification explained 91 percent of the variance in log CH4 flux, successfully predicted annual CH4 emission from individual wetlands, and predicted the change in flux due to the water table manipulation. Raising the water table in the bog corrals by an average of 6 cm in autumn 1989 and 10 cm in summer 1990 increased CH4 emission by 2.5 and 2.2 times, respectively.

  20. Effects of Induced Rumination and Distraction on Mood and Overgeneral Autobiographical Memory in Adolescent Major Depressive Disorder and Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, R. J.; Goodyer, I. M.; Teasdale, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    Background: In adults there is evidence that the affective-cognitive processes of rumination and overgeneral autobiographical memory retrieval may play a part in maintaining depression. This study investigated the effects of induced rumination as compared to distraction on mood and categoric overgeneral memory in adolescents with first episode…

  1. Bovine Host Genetic Variation Influences Rumen Microbial Methane Production with Best Selection Criterion for Low Methane Emitting and Efficiently Feed Converting Hosts Based on Metagenomic Gene Abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Roehe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Methane produced by methanogenic archaea in ruminants contributes significantly to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The host genetic link controlling microbial methane production is unknown and appropriate genetic selection strategies are not developed. We used sire progeny group differences to estimate the host genetic influence on rumen microbial methane production in a factorial experiment consisting of crossbred breed types and diets. Rumen metagenomic profiling was undertaken to investigate links between microbial genes and methane emissions or feed conversion efficiency. Sire progeny groups differed significantly in their methane emissions measured in respiration chambers. Ranking of the sire progeny groups based on methane emissions or relative archaeal abundance was consistent overall and within diet, suggesting that archaeal abundance in ruminal digesta is under host genetic control and can be used to genetically select animals without measuring methane directly. In the metagenomic analysis of rumen contents, we identified 3970 microbial genes of which 20 and 49 genes were significantly associated with methane emissions and feed conversion efficiency respectively. These explained 81% and 86% of the respective variation and were clustered in distinct functional gene networks. Methanogenesis genes (e.g. mcrA and fmdB were associated with methane emissions, whilst host-microbiome cross talk genes (e.g. TSTA3 and FucI were associated with feed conversion efficiency. These results strengthen the idea that the host animal controls its own microbiota to a significant extent and open up the implementation of effective breeding strategies using rumen microbial gene abundance as a predictor for difficult-to-measure traits on a large number of hosts. Generally, the results provide a proof of principle to use the relative abundance of microbial genes in the gastrointestinal tract of different species to predict their influence on traits e

  2. Bovine Host Genetic Variation Influences Rumen Microbial Methane Production with Best Selection Criterion for Low Methane Emitting and Efficiently Feed Converting Hosts Based on Metagenomic Gene Abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehe, Rainer; Dewhurst, Richard J; Duthie, Carol-Anne; Rooke, John A; McKain, Nest; Ross, Dave W; Hyslop, Jimmy J; Waterhouse, Anthony; Freeman, Tom C; Watson, Mick; Wallace, R John

    2016-02-01

    Methane produced by methanogenic archaea in ruminants contributes significantly to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The host genetic link controlling microbial methane production is unknown and appropriate genetic selection strategies are not developed. We used sire progeny group differences to estimate the host genetic influence on rumen microbial methane production in a factorial experiment consisting of crossbred breed types and diets. Rumen metagenomic profiling was undertaken to investigate links between microbial genes and methane emissions or feed conversion efficiency. Sire progeny groups differed significantly in their methane emissions measured in respiration chambers. Ranking of the sire progeny groups based on methane emissions or relative archaeal abundance was consistent overall and within diet, suggesting that archaeal abundance in ruminal digesta is under host genetic control and can be used to genetically select animals without measuring methane directly. In the metagenomic analysis of rumen contents, we identified 3970 microbial genes of which 20 and 49 genes were significantly associated with methane emissions and feed conversion efficiency respectively. These explained 81% and 86% of the respective variation and were clustered in distinct functional gene networks. Methanogenesis genes (e.g. mcrA and fmdB) were associated with methane emissions, whilst host-microbiome cross talk genes (e.g. TSTA3 and FucI) were associated with feed conversion efficiency. These results strengthen the idea that the host animal controls its own microbiota to a significant extent and open up the implementation of effective breeding strategies using rumen microbial gene abundance as a predictor for difficult-to-measure traits on a large number of hosts. Generally, the results provide a proof of principle to use the relative abundance of microbial genes in the gastrointestinal tract of different species to predict their influence on traits e.g. human metabolism

  3. Effects of three methane mitigation agents on parameters of kinetics of total and hydrogen gas production, ruminal fermentation and hydrogen balance using in vitro technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Wang, Rong; Yang, Shan; Deng, Jin Ping; Tang, Shao Xun; Tan, Zhi Liang

    2016-02-01

    Methane (CH4 ) can be mitigated through directly inhibiting methanogen activity and starving methanogens by hydrogen (H2 ) sink. Three types of mechanism (i.e. bromoethanesulphonate (BES), nitrate and emodin) and doses of CH4 mitigation agents were employed to investigate their pathways of CH4 inhibition. Results indicated that both BES and emodin inhibited CH4 production and altered H2 balance, which could be accompanied by decreased dry matter disappearance (DMD), fractional rate of gH2 formation, volatile fatty acid (VFA) production, ability to produce and use reducing equivalences and molecular H2 , and increased final asymptotic gH2 production, time to the peak of gH2 , discrete lag time of gH2 production and fermentation efficiency. However, emodin decreased gas volume produced by rapidly fermentable components of substrate and the rate of fermentation at early stage of incubation, while BES supplementation inhibited gas volume produced by both rapidly and slowly fermentable components of substrate and the rate of fermentation at middle or late stage of incubation. The nitrate supplementation inhibited CH4 production without affecting VFA profile, because of its dual role as H2 sink and being toxic to methanogens. Nitrate supplementation had more complicated pattern of fermentation, VFA production and profile and H2 balance in comparison to BES and emodin supplementation.

  4. Experimental workflow for developing a feed forward strategy to control biomass growth and exploit maximum specific methane productivity of Methanothermobacter marburgensis in a biological methane production process (BMPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Krajete

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, interests for new biofuel generations allowing conversion of gaseous substrate(s to gaseous product(s arose for power to gas and waste to value applications. An example is biological methane production process (BMPP with Methanothermobacter marburgensis. The latter, can convert carbon dioxide (CO2 and hydrogen (H2, having different origins and purities, to methane (CH4, water and biomass. However, these gas converting bioprocesses are tendentiously gas limited processes and the specific methane productivity per biomass amount (qCH4 tends to be low. Therefore, this contribution proposes a workflow for the development of a feed forward strategy to control biomass, growth (rx and qCH4 in a continuous gas limited BMPP. The proposed workflow starts with a design of experiment (DoE to optimize media composition and search for a liquid based limitation to control selectively growth. From the DoE it came out that controlling biomass growth was possible independently of the dilution and gassing rate applied while not affecting methane evolution rates (MERs. This was done by shifting the process from a natural gas limited state to a controlled liquid limited growth. The latter allowed exploiting the maximum biocatalytic activity for methane formation of Methanothermobacter marburgensis. An increase of qCH4 from 42 to 129 mmolCH4 g−1 h−1 was achieved by applying a liquid limitation compare with the reference state. Finally, a verification experiment was done to verify the feeding strategy transferability to a different process configuration. This evidenced the ratio of the fed KH2PO4 to rx (R(FKH2PO4/rx has an appropriate parameter for scaling feeds in a continuous gas limited BMPP. In the verification experiment CH4 was produced in a single bioreactor step at a methane evolution rate (MER of   132 mmolCH4*L−1*h−1 at a CH4 purity of 93 [Vol.%].

  5. Control of the induction of type I interferon by Peste des petits ruminants virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz Bernardo, Beatriz; Goodbourn, Stephen; Baron, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) is a morbillivirus that produces clinical disease in goats and sheep. We have studied the induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) following infection of cultured cells with wild-type and vaccine strains of PPRV, and the effects of such infection with PPRV on the induction of IFN-β through both MDA-5 and RIG-I mediated pathways. Using both reporter assays and direct measurement of IFN-β mRNA, we have found that PPRV infection induces IFN-β only weakly and transiently, and the virus can actively block the induction of IFN-β. We have also generated mutant PPRV that lack expression of either of the viral accessory proteins (V&C) to characterize the role of these proteins in IFN-β induction during virus infection. Both PPRV_ΔV and PPRV_ΔC were defective in growth in cell culture, although in different ways. While the PPRV V protein bound to MDA-5 and, to a lesser extent, RIG-I, and over-expression of the V protein inhibited both IFN-β induction pathways, PPRV lacking V protein expression can still block IFN-β induction. In contrast, PPRV C bound to neither MDA-5 nor RIG-I, but PPRV lacking C protein expression lost the ability to block both MDA-5 and RIG-I mediated activation of IFN-β. These results shed new light on the inhibition of the induction of IFN-β by PPRV.

  6. Risk factors for campylobacteriosis of chicken, ruminant, and environmental origin: a combined case-control and source attribution analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lapo Mughini Gras

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Campylobacteriosis contributes strongly to the disease burden of food-borne pathogens. Case-control studies are limited in attributing human infections to the different reservoirs because they can only trace back to the points of exposure, which may not point to the original reservoirs because of cross-contamination. Human Campylobacter infections can be attributed to specific reservoirs by estimating the extent of subtype sharing between strains from humans and reservoirs using multilocus sequence typing (MLST. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated risk factors for human campylobacteriosis caused by Campylobacter strains attributed to different reservoirs. Sequence types (STs were determined for 696 C. jejuni and 41 C. coli strains from endemic human cases included in a case-control study. The asymmetric island model, a population genetics approach for modeling Campylobacter evolution and transmission, attributed these cases to four putative animal reservoirs (chicken, cattle, sheep, pig and to the environment (water, sand, wild birds considered as a proxy for other unidentified reservoirs. Most cases were attributed to chicken (66% and cattle (21%, identified as the main reservoirs in The Netherlands. Consuming chicken was a risk factor for campylobacteriosis caused by chicken-associated STs, whereas consuming beef and pork were protective. Risk factors for campylobacteriosis caused by ruminant-associated STs were contact with animals, barbecuing in non-urban areas, consumption of tripe, and never/seldom chicken consumption. Consuming game and swimming in a domestic swimming pool during springtime were risk factors for campylobacteriosis caused by environment-associated STs. Infections with chicken- and ruminant-associated STs were only partially explained by food-borne transmission; direct contact and environmental pathways were also important. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first case-control study in which risk

  7. Electron-induced dry reforming of methane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xuming

    2013-09-23

    Dry reforming of methane has the potential to reduce the greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide and to generate hydrogen-rich syngas. In reforming methane, plasma-assisted reforming processes may have advantages over catalytic processes because they are free from coking and their response time for mobile applications is quick. Although plasma-assisted reforming techniques have seen recent developments, systematic studies that clarify the roles that electron-induced chemistry and thermo-chemistry play are needed for a full understanding of the mechanisms of plasma-assisted reformation. Here, we developed a temperature-controlled coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) apparatus to investigate the relative importance of electron-induced chemistry and thermo-chemistry in dry reforming of methane. In the tested background temperature range 297-773 K, electron-induced chemistry, as characterized by the physical properties of micro-discharges, was found to govern the conversions of CH4 and CO2, while thermo-chemistry influenced the product selectivities because they were found to depend on the background temperature. Comparisons with results from arc-jet reformation indicated that thermo-chemistry is an efficient conversion method. Our findings may improve designs of plasma-assisted reformers by using relatively hotter plasma sources. However, detailed chemical kinetic studies are needed. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. Executive Control in Depressive Rumination: Backward Inhibition and Non-inhibitory Switching Performance in a Modified Mixed Antisaccade Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Barbara C. Y.; Liu, Jeffrey C. C.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The present study examines backward inhibition (BI) and non-inhibitory switching performance among depressed and healthy participants in a modified mixed antisaccade task. Specifically, sad and neutral faces were incorporated in the design to examine executive control difficulties associated with brooding trait. Methods: Thirty-nine participants took part in the study, including 19 depressed patients and 20 healthy control subjects. Participants completed a diagnostic interview and self-report questionnaires, including the Beck Depression Inventory and Ruminative Response Scale-Brooding Subscale. They were then instructed to complete prosaccade and antisaccade trials in the pure and mixed blocks whereby eye gazes were tracked to assess inhibition and switching efficiency. Results: For the switching effects, a significant group × brooding × task type interaction was found as hypothesized when multilevel modeling analysis was employed. Switching deficits associated with brooding was found to be greatest when sad faces were presented to depressed group. No significant results in BI or error rates were observed. Conclusion: The patterns observed suggest that as opposed to BI, set shifting difficulty associated with brooding trait may be modulated by negative mood and cognition. In future research, emotional faces other than sad faces may be used to further explore if the observations could be generalized to other affective conditions.

  9. Partial oxidation of methane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xuming

    2015-01-01

    We studied the relative importance of the reduced field intensity and the background reaction temperature in the partial oxidation of methane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor. We obtained important mechanistic insight from studying high-temperature and low-pressure conditions with similar reduced field intensities. In the tested range of background temperatures (297 < T < 773 K), we found that the conversion of methane and oxygen depended on both the electron-induced chemistry and the thermo-chemistry, whereas the chemical pathways to the products were overall controlled by the thermo-chemistry at a given temperature. We also found that the thermo-chemistry enhanced the plasma-assisted partial oxidation process. Our findings expand our understanding of the plasma-assisted partial oxidation process and may be helpful in the design of cost-effective plasma reformers. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  10. 瘤胃微生物甲烷产生调控技术的研究进展%Research Progress on Technology of Methan Production Control by Rumen Microorganism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴端钦; 谭支良

    2011-01-01

    反刍动物体内甲烷的产生是瘤胃发酵能损失的一主要原因,减少甲烷产量对提高反刍动物的能量利用率和环境保护均具有重要意义.论文就反刍动物甲烷生成的机制及影响其生成量的因素等方面做一综述.%Methane production represents a loss of feed energy to ruminant animals,and decreasing the methane production is very important to energy utilization for ruminants and environment protection.Therefore, the research progress in the mechanism of methane generated and direct influence on methane production were reviewed.

  11. Brucellosis control in Tajikistan using Rev 1 vaccine: change in seroprevalence in small ruminants from 2004 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D; Jackson, R; Karomatullo, H; Khakimov, T; Kurbonov, K; Amirbekov, M; Stack, J; El-Idrissi, A; Heuer, C

    2012-01-01

    Cross-sectional serological surveys of 13,006 small ruminants were conducted in 2003 to establish baseline levels of seropositivity to brucellosis and of 12,102 again in 2009 to evaluate the efficacy of controls based on biannual conjunctival vaccination with Rev 1. Seroprevalence dropped by 80 per cent in five years in eight pilot programme districts where vaccination was generally well implemented, and the prevalence of households with evidence of infection in their animals dropped from 25.1 to 7.5 per cent. Seroprevalence was reduced by 40 per cent in 10 districts where vaccination was intermittent with low coverage during some seasons. There were no changes in 19 districts where no vaccinations were carried out. Sheep vaccinated one or more times were found to be 2.5 times more likely to be serotest positive than were non-vaccinated sheep, whereas vaccinated goats were 6.4 times more likely to be serotest positive than non-vaccinated goats.

  12. Pengaruh Penambahan Minyak Kelapa, Minyak Biji Bunga Matahari, dan Minyak Kelapa Sawit terhadap Penurunan Produksi Metan di dalam Rumen secara in Vitro (The Effect of Addition Coconut Oil, Sunflower Seed Oil, and Palm Olein on Reducing Ruminal Methane Pro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puput Diah Sitoresmi

    2012-02-01

    protozoa growth and addition oil up to 5.0% reduced methane production as much as 15.80%. (Key words : Coconut oil, Sunflower seed oil, Palm olein, Methane production, Protozoa count, In vitro fermentation

  13. Overriding control of methane flux temporal variability by water table dynamics in a Southern Hemisphere, raised bog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, J. P.; Campbell, D. I.; Roulet, N. T.; Clearwater, M. J.; Schipper, L. A.

    2015-05-01

    There are still large uncertainties in peatland methane flux dynamics and insufficient understanding of how biogeochemical processes scale to ecosystems. New Zealand bogs differ from Northern Hemisphere ombrotrophic systems in climatic setting, hydrology, and dominant vegetation, offering an opportunity to evaluate our knowledge of peatland methane biogeochemistry gained primarily from northern bogs and fens. We report eddy covariance methane fluxes from a raised bog in New Zealand over 2.5 years. Annual total methane flux in 2012 was 29.1 g CH4 m-2 yr-1, whereas during a year with a severe drought (2013) it was 20.6 g CH4 m-2 yr-1, both high compared to Northern Hemisphere bogs and fens. Drier conditions led to a decrease in fluxes from ~100 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 to ~20 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, and subsequent slow recovery of flux after postdrought water table rise. Water table depth regulated the temperature sensitivity of methane fluxes, and this sensitivity was greatest when the water table was within 100 mm of the surface, corresponding to the shallow rooting zone of the dominant vegetation. A correlation between daytime CO2 uptake and methane fluxes emerged during times with shallow water tables, suggesting that controls on methane production were critical in determining fluxes, more so than oxidation. Water table recession through this shallow zone led to increasing methane fluxes, whereas changes in temperature during these periods were not correlated. Models of methane fluxes should consider drought-induced lags in seasonal flux recovery that depend on drought characteristics and location of the critical zone for methane production.

  14. Primary production control of methane emission from wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, G. J.; Chanton, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Based on simultaneous measurements of CO2 and CH4 exchange in wetlands extending from subarctic peatlands to subtropical marshes, a positive correlation between CH4 emission and net ecosystem production is reported. It is suggested that net ecosystem production is a master variable integrating many factors which control CH4 emission in vegetated wetlands. It is found that about 3 percent of the daily net ecosystem production is emitted back to the atmosphere as CH4. With projected stimulation of primary production and soil microbial activity in wetlands associated with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, the potential for increasing CH4 emission from inundated wetlands, further enhancing the greenhouse effect, is examined.

  15. Remarkable recovery and colonization behaviour of methane oxidizing bacteria in soil after disturbance is controlled by methane source only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Y.; Abell, G.C.J.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Meima-Franke, M.; Sessitsch, A.; Bodrossy, L.

    2014-01-01

    Little is understood about the relationship between microbial assemblage history, the composition and function of specific functional guilds and the ecosystem functions they provide. To learn more about this relationship we used methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) as model organisms and performed soil

  16. Study on molecular controlled mining system of methane hydrate; Methane hydrate no bunshi seigyo mining ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyagawa, M.; Saito, T.; Kobayashi, H.; Karasawa, H.; Kiyono , F.; Nagaoki, R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Komai, T.; Haneda, H.; Takahashi, Y. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan); Nada, H. [Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Basic studies are conducted for the collection of methane from the methane hydrate that exists at levels deeper than 500m in the sea. The relationship between the hydrate generation mechanism and water cluster structure is examined by use of mass spectronomy. It is found that, among the stable liquid phase clusters, the (H2O)21H{sup +} cluster is the most stable. Stable hydrate clusters are in presence in quantities, and participate in the formation of hydrate crystal nuclei. For the elucidation of the nucleus formation mechanism, a kinetic simulation is conducted of molecules in the cohesion system consisting of water and methane molecules. Water molecules that array near methane molecules at the normal pressure is disarrayed under a higher pressure for rearray into a hydrate structure. Hydrate formation and breakdown in the three-phase equilibrium state of H2O, CH4, and CO2 at a low temperature and high pressure are tested, which discloses that supercooling is required for formation, that it is possible to extract CH4 first for replacement by guest molecule CO2 since CO2 is stabler than CH4 at a lower pressure or higher temperature, and that formation is easier to take place when the grain diameter is larger at the formation point since larger grain diameters result in a higher formation temperature. 3 figs.

  17. Methane on the greenhouse agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Kathleen B.; Hoffman, John S.; Thompson, Anne M.

    1991-01-01

    Options for reducing methane emissions, which could have a significant effect on global warming, are addressed. Emissions from landfills, coal mining, oil and natural gas systems, ruminants, animal wastes and wastewater, rice cultivation, and biomass burning are considered. Methods for implementing these emission reductions are discussed.

  18. Plantas taniníferas e o controle de nematóides gastrintestinais de pequenos ruminantes Tanniferous plants and control of gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Mayana Beserra de Oliveira

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Os nematóides gastrintestinais são responsáveis por acentuada redução na produtividade de ovinos e caprinos. Na tentativa de controlar esses parasitos, são utilizados diversos anti-helmínticos sintéticos, mas o desenvolvimento da resistência tem tornado esse controle pouco eficaz. Na busca por alternativas de controle dos nematóides gastrintestinais, a utilização de plantas taniníferas tem despertado interesse de pesquisadores em várias regiões do mundo. Essa revisão visa a abordar os diversos aspectos relacionados ao fornecimento dessas plantas a ovinos e caprinos, bem como os principais resultados obtidos em pesquisas utilizando taninos para o controle de nematóides de pequenos ruminantes.The gastrointestinal nematodes are responsible for a marked reduction in the productivity of sheep and goats. In an attempt to control these parasites, different synthetic anthelmintics are used, but development of resistance has become this control little effective. In the search for alternatives to control these nematodes, the use of tanniferous plants has attracted attention from researchers in different regions of the world. This review aims to address the various aspects related to the administration of these plants to sheep and goats, and the main results obtained from studies using tannins to control nematodes in small ruminants.

  19. The Potential Role of Seaweeds in the Natural Manipulation of Rumen Fermentation and Methane Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.; Mendonça, Carla; Cabrita, Ana R. J.

    2016-08-01

    This study is the first to evaluate the effects of five seaweeds (Ulva sp., Laminaria ochroleuca, Saccharina latissima, Gigartina sp., and Gracilaria vermiculophylla) on gas and methane production and ruminal fermentation parameters when incubated in vitro with two substrates (meadow hay and corn silage) for 24 h. Seaweeds led to lower gas production, with Gigartina sp. presenting the lowest value. When incubated with meadow hay, Ulva sp., Gigartina sp. and G. vermiculophylla decreased methane production, but with corn silage, methane production was only decreased by G. vermiculophylla. With meadow hay, L. ochroleuca and S. latissima promoted similar methane production as the control, but with corn silage, L. ochroleuca increased it. With the exception of S. latissima, all seaweeds promoted similar levels of total volatile fatty acid production. The highest proportion of acetic acid was produced with Ulva sp., G. vermiculophylla, and S. latissima; the highest proportion of butyric acid with the control and L. ochroleuca; and the highest proportion of iso-valeric acid with Gigartina sp. These results reveal the potential of seaweeds to mitigate ruminal methane production and the importance of the basal diet. To efficiently use seaweeds as feed ingredients with nutritional and environmental benefits, more research is required to determine the mechanisms underlying seaweed and substrate interactions.

  20. The Potential Role of Seaweeds in the Natural Manipulation of Rumen Fermentation and Methane Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.; Mendonça, Carla; Cabrita, Ana R. J.

    2016-01-01

    This study is the first to evaluate the effects of five seaweeds (Ulva sp., Laminaria ochroleuca, Saccharina latissima, Gigartina sp., and Gracilaria vermiculophylla) on gas and methane production and ruminal fermentation parameters when incubated in vitro with two substrates (meadow hay and corn silage) for 24 h. Seaweeds led to lower gas production, with Gigartina sp. presenting the lowest value. When incubated with meadow hay, Ulva sp., Gigartina sp. and G. vermiculophylla decreased methane production, but with corn silage, methane production was only decreased by G. vermiculophylla. With meadow hay, L. ochroleuca and S. latissima promoted similar methane production as the control, but with corn silage, L. ochroleuca increased it. With the exception of S. latissima, all seaweeds promoted similar levels of total volatile fatty acid production. The highest proportion of acetic acid was produced with Ulva sp., G. vermiculophylla, and S. latissima; the highest proportion of butyric acid with the control and L. ochroleuca; and the highest proportion of iso-valeric acid with Gigartina sp. These results reveal the potential of seaweeds to mitigate ruminal methane production and the importance of the basal diet. To efficiently use seaweeds as feed ingredients with nutritional and environmental benefits, more research is required to determine the mechanisms underlying seaweed and substrate interactions. PMID:27572486

  1. The Potential Role of Seaweeds in the Natural Manipulation of Rumen Fermentation and Methane Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Margarida R G; Fonseca, António J M; Oliveira, Hugo M; Mendonça, Carla; Cabrita, Ana R J

    2016-08-30

    This study is the first to evaluate the effects of five seaweeds (Ulva sp., Laminaria ochroleuca, Saccharina latissima, Gigartina sp., and Gracilaria vermiculophylla) on gas and methane production and ruminal fermentation parameters when incubated in vitro with two substrates (meadow hay and corn silage) for 24 h. Seaweeds led to lower gas production, with Gigartina sp. presenting the lowest value. When incubated with meadow hay, Ulva sp., Gigartina sp. and G. vermiculophylla decreased methane production, but with corn silage, methane production was only decreased by G. vermiculophylla. With meadow hay, L. ochroleuca and S. latissima promoted similar methane production as the control, but with corn silage, L. ochroleuca increased it. With the exception of S. latissima, all seaweeds promoted similar levels of total volatile fatty acid production. The highest proportion of acetic acid was produced with Ulva sp., G. vermiculophylla, and S. latissima; the highest proportion of butyric acid with the control and L. ochroleuca; and the highest proportion of iso-valeric acid with Gigartina sp. These results reveal the potential of seaweeds to mitigate ruminal methane production and the importance of the basal diet. To efficiently use seaweeds as feed ingredients with nutritional and environmental benefits, more research is required to determine the mechanisms underlying seaweed and substrate interactions.

  2. Assessment of process control parameters in the biochemical methane potential of sunflower oil cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raposo, F.; Borja, R.; Rincon, B. [Instituto de la Grasa (CSIC), Avda. Padre Garcia Tejero 4, 41012 Seville (Spain); Jimenez, A.M. [Departamento de Ciencias Ambientales, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Ctra. De Utrera, km 1, 41013 Sevilla (Spain)

    2008-12-15

    A laboratory-scale study was conducted on the batch anaerobic digestion of sunflower oil cake (SuOC), solid waste derived from the extraction process of sunflower oil. A multi-reactor system was used to compare methane production from this waste at inoculum to substrate ratios (ISRs) of 3.0, 2.0, 1.5, 1.0, 0.8 and 0.5 (expressed as volatile solids (VS) basis). The tests were carried out at mesophilic temperature (35 C) and run against a control of inoculum without substrate. The results obtained in the biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests showed that the ultimate methane yield (Y{sub M,ult}) decreased considerably from 227{+-}23 to 107{+-}11 ml CH{sub 4} at standard temperature and pressure (STP) conditions g{sup -1} VS{sub added} when the ISR decreased from 3.0 to 0.5, showing a clear influence of the ISR on the methane yield coefficient. The biodegradability (BD) of the waste also decreased from 86% to 41% when the ISR varied from 3.0 to 0.5. A net total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) yield of 39.2 mg N g{sup -1} VS{sub added} was obtained, and this value was not influenced by the ISRs assayed, which demonstrated the appropriate operation of the hydrolytic-acidogenic stage of the overall digestion process. A clear imbalance of the methanogenic process was observed at the lowest ISRs studied (0.5 and 0.8) due to a considerable increase in CODs and TVFA in the digestates. The profile of VFA was also influenced by the ISR, typical of the proteinaceous substrates. (author)

  3. A fuzzy-logic-based controller for methane production in anaerobic fixed-film reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, A; Latrille, E; Ruano, M V; Steyer, J P

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to develop a controller for biogas production in continuous anaerobic fixed-bed reactors, which used effluent total volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration as control input in order to prevent process acidification at closed loop. To this aim, a fuzzy-logic-based control system was developed, tuned and validated in an anaerobic fixed-bed reactor at pilot scale that treated industrial winery wastewater. The proposed controller varied the flow rate of wastewater entering the system as a function of the gaseous outflow rate of methane and VFA concentration. Simulation results show that the proposed controller is capable to achieve great process stability even when operating at high VFA concentrations. Pilot results showed the potential of this control approach to maintain the process working properly under similar conditions to the ones expected at full-scale plants.

  4. Abiotic and biotic controls on methane formation down to 2.5 km depth within the Precambrian Fennoscandian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Ahonen, Lasse; Niinikoski, Paula; Nykänen, Hannu; Kukkonen, Ilmo T.

    2017-04-01

    Despite a geological history characterised by high temperature and pressure processes and organic carbon deprived crystalline bedrock, large amounts of hydrocarbons are found in deep groundwaters within Precambrian continental shields. In many sites, methane comprises more that 80% of the dissolved gas phase reaching concentrations of tens of mmol l-1. In this study, we used isotopic methods to study the carbon isotope systematics and sources of crustal methane within the Fennoscandian Shield. The main study sites were the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole and the Pyhäsalmi mine in Finland, both of which allow groundwater sampling down to 2.5 km depth and have been previously studied for their groundwater chemistry and microbiology. We show that the differences in the amount and isotopic composition of methane are related to the availability of carbon sources as well as processes behind the incorporation of hydrogen and carbon via abiotic and biotic pathways into hydrocarbon molecules. Supported by previously reported occurrences and isotopic data of deep groundwater methane in lithologically different locations in Finland and Sweden, we show that methane formation is controlled by microbial methanogenesis and abiotic reactions, as well as lithology with the metasedimentary environments being the most favourable for methane occurrence. Rather than a thermogenic relic, crustal methane within the Fennoscandian Shield is more likely the result of low temperature formation from ancient organic compounds or their inorganic intermediates such as graphite. Such crustal gases are characterised by the lack of major amounts of C2+ hydrocarbons and 13C-rich methane. Further, microbiological and isotopic geochemical evidence suggest that microbial methane is more common at depths shallower than 1.5 km.

  5. Remarkable recovery and colonization behaviour of methane oxidizing bacteria in soil after disturbance is controlled by methane source only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yao; Abell, Guy C J; Bodelier, Paul L E; Meima-Franke, Marion; Sessitsch, Angela; Bodrossy, Levente

    2014-08-01

    Little is understood about the relationship between microbial assemblage history, the composition and function of specific functional guilds and the ecosystem functions they provide. To learn more about this relationship we used methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) as model organisms and performed soil microcosm experiments comprised of identical soil substrates, hosting distinct overall microbial diversities(i.e., full, reduced and zero total microbial and MOB diversities). After inoculation with undisturbed soil, the recovery of MOB activity, MOB diversity and total bacterial diversity were followed over 3 months by methane oxidation potential measurements and analyses targeting pmoA and 16S rRNA genes. Measurement of methane oxidation potential demonstrated different recovery rates across the different treatments. Despite different starting microbial diversities, the recovery and succession of the MOB communities followed a similar pattern across the different treatment microcosms. In this study we found that edaphic parameters were the dominant factor shaping microbial communities over time and that the starting microbial community played only a minor role in shaping MOB microbial community.

  6. Mangosteen peel can reduce methane production and rumen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TROPIKA 18

    2016-11-24

    Nov 24, 2016 ... RL: http://www.sasas.co.za .... mangosteen in Malaysia, it could be used as a feed supplement for ruminants to reduce methane production and fatty acid .... retention time and peak area of known standards (Sigma Chemical).

  7. Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus in Vulnerable Wild Small Ruminants, Iran, 2014-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marashi, Mahmoud; Masoudi, Siamak; Moghadam, Majid Kharazian; Modirrousta, Hossein; Marashi, Mahyar; Parvizifar, Masoumeh; Dargi, Majid; Saljooghian, Mahyar; Homan, Farbod; Hoffmann, Bernd; Schulz, Claudia; Starick, Elke; Beer, Martin; Fereidouni, Sasan

    2017-04-01

    In 2014-2016, >1,000 wild goats and sheep in 4 northern and central provinces of Iran died from peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) infection. Partial nucleoprotein sequencing of PPRV from 3 animals showed a close relationship to lineage 4 strains from China. Control measures are needed to preserve vulnerable ruminant populations.

  8. Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus in Vulnerable Wild Small Ruminants, Iran, 2014–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marashi, Mahmoud; Masoudi, Siamak; Moghadam, Majid Kharazian; Modirrousta, Hossein; Marashi, Mahyar; Parvizifar, Masoumeh; Dargi, Majid; Saljooghian, Mahyar; Homan, Farbod; Hoffmann, Bernd; Schulz, Claudia; Starick, Elke; Beer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    In 2014–2016, >1,000 wild goats and sheep in 4 northern and central provinces of Iran died from peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) infection. Partial nucleoprotein sequencing of PPRV from 3 animals showed a close relationship to lineage 4 strains from China. Control measures are needed to preserve vulnerable ruminant populations. PMID:28322692

  9. Contribution of condensed tannins and mimosine to the methane mitigation caused by feeding Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltan, Yosra A; Morsy, Amr S; Sallam, Sobhy M A; Lucas, Ronaldo C; Louvandini, Helder; Kreuzer, Michael; Abdalla, Adibe L

    2013-06-01

    Leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala), a leguminous shrub promising to cope with feed scarcity in the tropics, may help in mitigating ruminal methane (CH4) emission in the tropics as well. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of Leucaena and major secondary compounds of this plant in ruminants. At first, effects of Leucaena tannins and mimosine on ruminal CH4 and nutrient degradability were tested in vitro. Incubations were made with Leucaena without or with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to exclude the tannins effects, as well as with Bermuda grass (Tifton) and lucerne hays, both either untreated or supplemented with mimosine at the same concentration that has been provided by the tested Leucaena (6.52 mg/g DM). Furthermore, in an in vivo experiment a control diet (per kg DM 700 g Tifton hay) and Leucaena diets (per kg DM 350 g Tifton hay and 350 g Leucaena), either with or without 20 g PEG/d per head, were evaluated in six Santa Inês sheep following a double Latin square design. In vitro, Leucaena resulted in the lowest (p Leucaena had no effect on ruminal CH4 and TDOM. In vivo Leucaena, compared to the Tifton diet, enhanced (p Leucaena also decreased (p Leucaena to mitigate in vivo methane emission of sheep, but did not reveal which constituent of Leucaena was primarily responsible for that since no clear efficiency of either tannins or mimosine could be demonstrated.

  10. Effects of lauric and myristic acids on ruminal fermentation, production, and milk fatty acid composition in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, A N; Lee, C; Cassidy, T; Long, M; Heyler, K; Corl, B; Forster, R

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this experiment were to investigate the effects of lauric (LA) and myristic (MA) acids on ruminal fermentation, production, and milk fatty acid (FA) profile in lactating dairy cows and to identify the FA responsible for the methanogen-suppressing effect of coconut oil. The experiment was conducted as a replicated 3×3 Latin square. Six ruminally cannulated cows (95±26.4 DIM) were subjected to the following treatments: 240 g/cow per day each of stearic acid (SA, control), LA, or MA. Experimental periods were 28 d and cows were refaunated between periods. Lauric acid reduced protozoal counts in the rumen by 96%, as well as acetate, total VFA, and microbial N outflow from the rumen, compared with SA and MA. Ruminal methane production was not affected by treatment. Dry matter intake was reduced 35% by LA compared with SA and MA, which resulted in decreased milk yield. Milk fat content also was depressed by LA compared with SA and MA. Treatment had no effect on milk protein content. All treatments increased milk concentration of the respective treatment FA. Concentration of C12:0 was more than doubled by LA, and C14:0 was increased (45%) by MA compared with SA. Concentration of milk FAC16 FA and MUFA were increased, by LA compared with the other treatments. In this study, LA had profound effects on ruminal fermentation, mediated through inhibited microbial populations, and decreased DMI, milk yield, and milk fat content. Despite the significant decrease in protozoal counts, however, LA had no effect on ruminal methane production. Thus, the antimethanogenic effect of coconut oil, observed in related studies, is likely due to total FA application level, the additive effect of LA and MA, or a combination of both. Both LA and MA modified milk FA profile significantly.

  11. Intravenous lipopolysaccharide challenge alters ruminal bacterial microbiota and disrupts ruminal metabolism in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Longhui; Zhang, Ruiyang; Liu, Yujie; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2014-07-28

    In the present study, three primiparous lactating Holstein cows (260-285 d in lactation) were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design to assess the effects of three doses (0.0, 0.4 and 0.8 μg/kg body weight) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, Escherichia coli 0111:B4) on changes in ruminal microbiota and ruminal fermentation. Ruminal pH was linearly decreased (Pinfusion linearly decreased (Phay and soyabean meal in the rumen, but did not affect (P>0.10) the gene expression of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and monocarboxylic acid transporter-1, -2 and -4. A plot of principal coordinate analysis based on unweighted UniFrac values and analysis of molecular variance revealed that the structure of ruminal bacterial communities in the control was distinct from that of the ruminal microbiota in the cattle exposed to LPS. At the phylum level, when compared with the control group, LPS infusion in the tested cows linearly increased (P< 0.05) the abundance of Firmicutes, and linearly decreased (P< 0.05) the percentage of Bacteroidetes, Tenericutes, Spirochaetes, Chlorobi and Lentisphaerae. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that intravenously LPS challenge altered the ruminal bacterial microbiota and fermentation profiles. The present data suggest that systemic LPS could alter ruminal environment and ruminal microbiota composition, leading to a general decrease in fermentative activity.

  12. Preliminary Experimental Examination Of Controls On Methane Expulsion During Melting Of Natural Gas Hydrate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Flemings, P. B.; Bryant, S. L.; You, K.; Polito, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Global climate change will cause warming of the oceans and land. This will affect the occurrence, behavior, and location of subseafloor and subterranean methane hydrate deposits. We suggest that in many natural systems local salinity, elevated by hydrate formation or freshened by hydrate dissociation, may control gas transport through the hydrate stability zone. We are performing experiments and modeling the experiments to explore this behavior for different warming scenarios. Initially, we are exploring hydrate association/dissociation in saline systems with constant water mass. We compare experiments run with saline (3.5 wt. %) water vs. distilled water in a sand mixture at an initial water saturation of ~0.5. We increase the pore fluid (methane) pressure to 1050 psig. We then stepwise cool the sample into the hydrate stability field (~3 degrees C), allowing methane gas to enter as hydrate forms. We measure resistivity and the mass of methane consumed. We are currently running these experiments and we predict our results from equilibrium thermodynamics. In the fresh water case, the modeled final hydrate saturation is 63% and all water is consumed. In the saline case, the modeled final hydrate saturation is 47%, the salinity is 12.4 wt. %, and final water saturation is 13%. The fresh water system is water-limited: all the water is converted to hydrate. In the saline system, pore water salinity is elevated and salt is excluded from the hydrate structure during hydrate formation until the salinity drives the system to three phase equilibrium (liquid, gas, hydrate) and no further hydrate forms. In our laboratory we can impose temperature gradients within the column, and we will use this to investigate equilibrium conditions in large samples subjected to temperature gradients and changing temperature. In these tests, we will quantify the hydrate saturation and salinity over our meter-long sample using spatially distributed temperature sensors, spatially distributed

  13. Controls on tree species stem transport and emission of methane from tropical peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haren, J. L. M.; Cadillo-Quiroz, H.

    2016-12-01

    Methane emissions from wetlands dominate the global budget and are most likely responsible for the annual variability in emissions. Methane is produced and consumed by microbial activity and then transported to the atmosphere. Plants have been shown to facilitate the transport of methane to significant amounts, but broad surveys across multiple sites have been lacking. We present data collected from multiple peatland and wetland sites south of Iquitos Peru and varzea sites from Santarem Brazil and compare our results to the limited literature of tree stem fluxes. The survey suggests that methane stem emissions might be conserved at the genera level, but not the family level. Large emitters exist in the Aracaceae, Euphorbiaceae, and Sapotaceae, however, other genera within the same families do not emit any methane. Certain genera are consistent pan-tropical methane emitters. The methane emission from the stems decreases generally with height, suggesting a diffusion constrained stem flux. Further constraints on the methane emissions from tree stems involve soil methane concentration and wood density, which is likely an indicator for stem conductivity. Diurnal cycles, flooding level and tree leaves appear to have less of an influence on the tree methane emissions though flooding can lead to a translocation of emissions up the stem to above the flooding level. Methane emissions and the plant transport pathways appear to be constrained at the genera level within wetlands.

  14. On-off and PI Control of Methane Gas Production of a Pilot Anaerobic Digestion Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Haugen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A proposed feedback control system for methane flow control of a real pilot anaerobic digestion reactor fed with dairy waste is designed and analyzed using the modified Hill model, which has previously been adapted to the reactor. Conditions for safe operation of the reactor are found using steady-state responses of dynamic simulations, taking into account the upper limit of the volatile fatty acids (VFA concentration recommended in the literature. The controllers used are standard process controllers, namely the on-off controller and the PI controller. Several PI controller tuning methods are evaluated using simulations. Two methods are favoured, namely the Skogestad method, which is an open loop method, and the Relaxed Ziegler-Nichols closed loop method. The two methods give approximately the same PI settings. Still, the Skogestad method is ranged first as it requires less tuning time, and because it is easier to change the PI settings at known changes in the process dynamics. Skogestad's method is successfully applied to a PI control system for the real reactor. Using simulations, the critical operating point to be used for safe controller tuning is identified.

  15. Methane emissions from process equipment at natural gas production sites in the United States: pneumatic controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David T; Pacsi, Adam P; Sullivan, David W; Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Harrison, Matthew; Keen, Kindal; Fraser, Matthew P; Daniel Hill, A; Sawyer, Robert F; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-01-06

    Emissions from 377 gas actuated (pneumatic) controllers were measured at natural gas production sites and a small number of oil production sites, throughout the United States. A small subset of the devices (19%), with whole gas emission rates in excess of 6 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h), accounted for 95% of emissions. More than half of the controllers recorded emissions of 0.001 scf/h or less during 15 min of measurement. Pneumatic controllers in level control applications on separators and in compressor applications had higher emission rates than controllers in other types of applications. Regional differences in emissions were observed, with the lowest emissions measured in the Rocky Mountains and the highest emissions in the Gulf Coast. Average methane emissions per controller reported in this work are 17% higher than the average emissions per controller in the 2012 EPA greenhouse gas national emission inventory (2012 GHG NEI, released in 2014); the average of 2.7 controllers per well observed in this work is higher than the 1.0 controllers per well reported in the 2012 GHG NEI.

  16. Controls on methane concentrations and fluxes in streams draining human-dominated landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John T.; Emily H. Stanley,

    2016-01-01

    Streams and rivers are active processors of carbon, leading to significant emissions of CO2 and possibly CH4 to the atmosphere. Patterns and controls of CH4 in fluvial ecosystems remain relatively poorly understood. Furthermore, little is known regarding how major human impacts to fluvial ecosystems may be transforming their role as CH4 producers and emitters. Here, we examine the consequences of two distinct ecosystem changes as a result of human land use: increased nutrient loading (primarily as nitrate), and increased sediment loading and deposition of fine particles in the benthic zone. We did not find support for the hypothesis that enhanced nitrate loading down-regulates methane production via thermodynamic or toxic effects. We did find strong evidence that increased sedimentation and enhanced organic matter content of the benthos lead to greater methane production (diffusive + ebullitive flux) relative to pristine fluvial systems in northern Wisconsin (upper Midwest, USA). Overall, streams in a human-dominated landscape of southern Wisconsin were major regional sources of CH4 to the atmosphere, equivalent to ~20% of dairy cattle emissions, or ~50% of a landfill’s annual emissions. We suggest that restoration of the benthic environment (reduced fine deposits) could lead to reduced CH4 emissions, while decreasing nutrient loading is likely to have limited impacts to this ecosystem process.

  17. The control of coal mine gas and coordinated exploitation of coal bed methane in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-zhong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of the coalfield geology and the distribution of coal bed methane (CBM) in China, the geological conditions for exploiting the CBM and drain-ing the coal mine gas were analyzed, as well as the characteristics of CBM production. By comparing the current situation of CBM exploitation in China with that in the United States, the current technology and characteristics of the CBM exploitation in China were summa-rized and the major technical problems of coal mine gas control and CBM exploitation analyzed. It was emphasized that the CBM exploitation in China should adopt the coal mine gas drainage method coordinated with coal mine exploitation as the main model. It was proposed that coal mine gas control should be coordinated with coal mine gas ex-ploitation. The technical countermeasure should be integrating the exploitation of coal and CBM and draining gas before coal mining.

  18. The Structural and Functional Capacity of Ruminal and Cecal Microbiota in Growing Cattle Was Unaffected by Dietary Supplementation of Linseed Oil and Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka Popova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms in the digestive tract of ruminants differ in their functionality and ability to use feed constituents. While cecal microbiota play an important role in post-rumen fermentation of residual substrates undigested in the rumen, limited knowledge exists regarding its structure and function. In this trial we investigated the effect of dietary supplementation with linseed oil and nitrate on methane emissions and on the structure of ruminal and cecal microbiota of growing bulls. Animals were allocated to either a CTL (control or LINNIT (CTL supplemented with 1.9% linseed and 1.0% nitrates diet. Methane emissions were measured using the GreenFeed system. Microbial diversity was assessed using amplicon sequencing of microbial genomic DNA. Additionally, total RNA was extracted from ruminal contents and functional mcrA and mtt genes were targeted in amplicon sequencing approach to explore the diversity of functional gene expression in methanogens. LINNIT had no effect on methane yield (g/kg DMI even though it decreased methane production by 9% (g/day; P < 0.05. Methanobrevibacter- and Methanomassiliicoccaceae-related OTUs were more abundant in cecum (72 and 24% compared to rumen (60 and 11% irrespective of the diet (P < 0.05. Feeding LINNIT reduced the relative abundance of Methanomassiliicoccaceae mcrA cDNA reads in the rumen. Principal component analysis revealed significant differences in taxonomic composition and abundance of bacterial communities between rumen and cecum. Treatment decreased the relative abundance of a few Ruminococcaceae genera, without affecting global bacterial community structure. Our research confirms a high level of heterogeneity in species composition of microbial consortia in the main gastrointestinal compartments where feed is fermented in ruminants. There was a parallel between the lack of effect of LINNIT on ruminal and cecal microbial community structure and functions on one side and methane emission changes

  19. Development of a high efficiency membrane complex methane production unit. ; Development of instrumentation and control system technology. Koseino bunrimaku fukugo methane gas seizo sochi kaihatsu. ; Keisoku seigyo gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, S. (Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    There is first reported on the development of a technique for estimating the activity of microorganisms used for methane fermentation (referred to as methane bacteria for brevity). A device has been developed that takes pictures expressing fluoroscopic images of methane bacteria floating in waste water, to each of which a fluorescent enzyme be belongs. A picture processing device connected to the above device removes various sorts of noises from these pictures so that they provide images which make it possible to evaluate the density of methane bacteria in the water. It is noted that there is proper correlation between enumerated data obtained by use of these devices and quantities representing the activity of methane bacteria, such as the rate of methane production, the rate of biochemical generation of heat, and others. There is next reported on a method of controlling methane fermentation process by use of a mathematical model. A process model has been developed, which may be used for controlling the operation of a small-scale test plant. Various parameters which are introduced into the model are estimated by means of the Kalman filter method so that the model can provide results agreeing with experimental data. Based on an analysis using this model, it is noted that the operation of a membrane complex reactor of suspension type is effectively controlled by regulating the concentration of suspension solids entering the membrane unit. 2 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Feasibility of a "leader-follower" grazing system instead of specialised paddocks with regard to integrated gastrointestinal control in small ruminant farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Maurice; Gauthier, Valérie; Arquet, Rémy; Calif, Brigitte; Archimède, Harry; Mandonnet, Nathalie

    2015-04-01

    In the humid tropics, small ruminant farmers have to deal with gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes (GIN), among which anthelmintic resistant (AR) populations are rapidly spreading. Although targeted selective treatments (TSTs) are being increasingly used in breeding stock, suppressive drenchings remain the rule in younger animals, for safety and ease of implementation. Until now, the weaned animals are grazed on dedicated plots, making the selection and spread of AR parasites inevitable. Given that GINs disseminate through pastures, we compared the usual grazing system (control) to a "leader-follower" grazing system (LF) for managing the entire GIN population at the farm scale. There were no significant differences between treatments for the dam reproductive parameters and level of GIN infection nor for the pre-weaning death rate of the kids. The 70-day weight of the litter was significantly lower for LF than for control goats (9.71 vs. 11.64 kg, P systems, respectively. Additionally, the LF grazing system would make the stocking rate easier to manage. Therefore, it is to be recommended as a complement of TSTs in sustainable small ruminant farming.

  1. Prospective use of bacteriocinogenic Pediococcus pentosaceus as direct-fed microbial having methane reducing potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanjay Kumar; Sumit S Dagar; Seyed H Ebrahimi; Ravinder K Malik; Ramesh C Upadhyay; Anil K Puniya

    2015-01-01

    Direct-fed microbials (DFM), general y regarded as safe status, are successful y used in improving rumen ecology, gastro-in-testinal health, feed efifciency, milk production and growth rate in ruminants. On the other hand, methanogenesis in rumen, which accounts for a signiifcant loss of ruminant energy and increased greenhouse gas in environment, is of great concern, therefore, use of DFM for improving productivity without compromising the animal health and ecological sustainability is encouraged. The present study was conducted to investigate the methane reducing potential of bacteriocinogenic strain Pediococcus pentosaceus-34. Since, the culture showed no hemolysis on blood agar and DNase activity, hence, it was considered to be avirulent in nature, a prerequisite for any DFM. The culture also showed tolerance to pH 5.0 for 24 h with 0.5%organic acid mixture, whereas when given a shock for 2 h at different pH and organic acids concentrations, it showed growth at pH 3.0 and 4.0 with 0.1 and 1.0%organic acids, respectively, as having good animal probiotics attributes. The total gas production was signiifcantly (P<0.05) higher in live pedicoccal culture (LPC) and dead pedicoccal culture (DPC) both with wheat straw, when compared to the control. In sugarcane bagasse, gas production was signiifcantly lower (P<0.05) with LPC compared to the control and DPC both. Methane was reduced by the inclusion of LPC in sugarcane bagasse (0.07 mL CH4 mg–1 dry matter digestibility) with no effect on other rumen fermentation parameters. However, with wheat straw and LPC total gas, in vitro dry matter digestibility, total volatile fatty acids increased signiifcantly but no reduction in methane production was observed in comparison to the control. Therefore, further research is warranted in this direction, if the bacteriocinogenic strains can be used as DFM for ruminants to improve the ruminant productivity.

  2. A process-based mathematical model on methane production with emission indices for control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, A; Bhattacharaya, D K

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, a process-based mathematical model is developed for the production of methane through biodegradation. It is a three-dimensional model given by ordinary differential equations. The results of the analysis of the model are interpreted through three emission indices, which are introduced for the first time. The estimation of either one or all of them can interpret the feasibility of the equilibrium and the long-term emission tendency of methane. The vulnerability of the methane production process with respect to soil temperature effects in methanogenic phase has been discussed and a feasible condition within a specified temperature range has defined for the nonvulnerability of the methane production process and also it has shown that under the same condition, zero-emission process of methane will be nonvulnerable with respect to the soil temperature effects in methanogenic phase. Lastly, condition for zero emission of methane is also obtained and it is interpreted through the emission indices.

  3. 小反刍兽疫的流行、诊断与防控%Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Prevention and Control of Peste Des Petits Ruminants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁善钢

    2012-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious, infectious, viral disease of domestic and wild small ruminants characterized by fever,stomatitis,conjunctivitis,gastroenteritis and pneumonia. It is one of the major notifiable diseases of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).This review presents comprehensive information on this dangerous disease including its history, spread, and diagnosis of the disease. It also deals with relevant preventive and control measures to be implemented in areas with PPR outbreaks.%小反刍兽疫是一种传染性极强的病毒性疾病,主要影响家养以及野生的小反刍动物.该病的主要特征是发热、口腔炎、结膜炎、肠胃炎和肺炎.小反刍兽疫也是世界动物卫生组织(OIE)规定必须上报的法定疾病之一.文章对该病的流行、传播方式、诊断方法以及防控措施进行了综述.

  4. 小反刍兽疫的流行、诊断与防控%Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Prevention and Control of Peste des Ptits Ruminants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石岩; 翁善钢

    2013-01-01

    小反刍兽疫是一种传染性极强的病毒性疾病,主要影响家养及野生的小反刍动物.该病的主要特征是发热、口腔炎、结膜炎、肠胃炎和肺炎,是世界动物卫生组织(World Organization for Animal Health,OIE)规定必须上报的疾病之一.文章对该病的流行与传播、诊断方法及防控措施进行了综述.%Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious, infectious, viral disease of domestic and wild small ruminants characterized by fever, stomatitis, conjunctivitis, gastroenteritis and pneumonia. It is one of the major notifiable diseases of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). This review presents comprehensive information on this dangerous disease including its history, spread, and diagnosis of the disease. It also deals with relevant preventive and control measures to be implemented in areas with PPR outbreaks.

  5. Emission of Methane From Enteric Fermentation: National Contribution and Factors Affecting it in Livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Haryanto

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Changing in atmosphere condition is affected by the quantity of gases produced from all activities on the earth. Gases that have effects on global warming are CO2, N2O, H2O, and CH4 (methane. Among other sources of methane are enteric fermentation of organic material from ruminants and feces decomposition. Methane production from ruminants is affected by several factors such as breed/type of animal, feed quality, environmental temperature and physiological status of the animal. Energy as methane in ruminants may reach 2 to 15% of the total energy consumption. To reduce the emission of methane from ruminants, it is necessary to apply a strategic feeding system for more efficient utilization of feed.

  6. Methane production and methanogen levels in steers that differ in residual gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methane gas released by cattle is a product of fermentation in the digestive tract. The two primary sites of methane fermentation in ruminants are the reticulum-rumen complex, and the cecum. Methane release from cattle represents a 2 to 12% loss of the energy intake. Reducing the proportion of fe...

  7. Geologically controlling factors on coal bed methane (CBM) productivity in Liulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Li-jun; TANG Da-zhen; XU Hao; MENG Shang-zhi; ZHANG Wen-zhong; MENG Yan-jun; WANG Jun-jian

    2012-01-01

    It is of great significance to forecast high yield of CBM wells and analyze dynamic production by having an overall study on the characteristics of the produced CBM and determining the main factors influencing the productivity of CBM.With the test report and the related geological parameters of a single well,methods of combining the productivity data and typical production curves were used to analyze different geological factors and how to influence the capacity of a single layer.Then,the paper proposed a new understanding about capacity characteristics of the study area and geological control factors:First,the Shanxi formation production capacity characteristics was divided into two-stages,showing signs of gas and gas breakthrough for 100 days.Second,two parameters,which include potential of gas production and gas production capacity,were better than the single parameter,such as gas content,coal thickness,and penetration to analyze affecting factors of single well production.Finally,comprehensive analysis concluded that the ratio of critical desorption pressure to reservoir pressure has greater influence on the production of vertical CBM wells.Besides,the potential of gas production capacity has greater impact at stage of showing gas signs; the coal reservoir pressure and gas production capacity have greater impact at stage of gas breakthrough for 100 days.Thus,to seek the coal bed methane with high ratio of critical desorption pressure to reservoir pressure and high yield of gas will be important guarantee to the success of the coal bed methane exploration and development.

  8. Variability in methane emissions from West Siberia's shallow boreal lakes on a regional scale and its environmental controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabrekov, Aleksandr F.; Runkle, Benjamin R. K.; Glagolev, Mikhail V.; Terentieva, Irina E.; Stepanenko, Victor M.; Kotsyurbenko, Oleg R.; Maksyutov, Shamil S.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.

    2017-08-01

    Small lakes represent an important source of atmospheric CH4 from northern wetlands. However, spatiotemporal variations in flux magnitudes and the lack of knowledge about their main environmental controls contribute large uncertainty into the global CH4 budget. In this study, we measured methane fluxes from small lakes using chambers and bubble traps. Field investigations were carried out in July-August 2014 within the West Siberian middle and southern taiga zones. The average and median of measured methane chamber fluxes were 0.32 and 0.30 mgCH4 m-2 h-1 for middle taiga lakes and 8.6 and 4.1 mgCH4 m-2 h-1 for southern taiga lakes, respectively. Pronounced flux variability was found during measurements on individual lakes, between individual lakes and between zones. To analyze these differences and the influences of environmental controls, we developed a new dynamic process-based model. It shows good performance with emission rates from the southern taiga lakes and poor performance for individual lakes in the middle taiga region. The model shows that, in addition to well-known controls such as temperature, pH and lake depth, there are significant variations in the maximal methane production potential between these climatic zones. In addition, the model shows that variations in gas-filled pore space in lake sediments are capable of controlling the total methane emissions from individual lakes. The CH4 emissions exhibited distinct zonal differences not only in absolute values but also in their probability density functions: the middle taiga lake fluxes were best described by a lognormal distribution while the southern taiga lakes followed a power-law distribution. The latter suggests applicability of self-organized criticality theory for methane emissions from the southern taiga zone, which could help to explain the strong variability within individual lakes.

  9. Global health benefits of mitigating ozone pollution with methane emission controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J. Jason; Fiore, Arlene M.; Horowitz, Larry W.; Mauzerall, Denise L.

    2006-03-01

    Methane (CH4) contributes to the growing global background concentration of tropospheric ozone (O3), an air pollutant associated with premature mortality. Methane and ozone are also important greenhouse gases. Reducing methane emissions therefore decreases surface ozone everywhere while slowing climate warming, but although methane mitigation has been considered to address climate change, it has not for air quality. Here we show that global decreases in surface ozone concentrations, due to methane mitigation, result in substantial and widespread decreases in premature human mortality. Reducing global anthropogenic methane emissions by 20% beginning in 2010 would decrease the average daily maximum 8-h surface ozone by 1 part per billion by volume globally. By using epidemiologic ozone-mortality relationships, this ozone reduction is estimated to prevent 30,000 premature all-cause mortalities globally in 2030, and 370,000 between 2010 and 2030. If only cardiovascular and respiratory mortalities are considered, 17,000 global mortalities can be avoided in 2030. The marginal cost-effectiveness of this 20% methane reduction is estimated to be 420,000 per avoided mortality. If avoided mortalities are valued at 1 million each, the benefit is 240 per tonne of CH4 (12 per tonne of CO2 equivalent), which exceeds the marginal cost of the methane reduction. These estimated air pollution ancillary benefits of climate-motivated methane emission reductions are comparable with those estimated previously for CO2. Methane mitigation offers a unique opportunity to improve air quality globally and can be a cost-effective component of international ozone management, bringing multiple benefits for air quality, public health, agriculture, climate, and energy. human health | mortality | tropospheric ozone | air quality

  10. Forecasting gob gas venthole production performances using intelligent computing methods for optimum methane control in longwall coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karacan, C. Oezgen [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Gob gas ventholes (GGV) are used to control methane inflows into a longwall operation by capturing it within the overlying fractured strata before it enters the work environment. Thus, it is important to understand the effects of various factors, such as drilling parameters, location of borehole, applied vacuum by exhausters and mining/panel parameters in order to be able to evaluate the performance of GGVs and to predict their effectiveness in controlling methane emissions. However, a practical model for this purpose currently does not exist. In this paper, we analyzed the total gas flow rates and methane percentages from 10 GGVs located on three adjacent panels operated in Pittsburgh coalbed in Southwestern Pennsylvania section of Northern Appalachian basin. The ventholes were drilled from different surface elevations and were located at varying distances from the start-up ends of the panels and from the tailgate entries. Exhauster pressures, casing diameters, location of longwall face and mining rates and production data were also recorded. These data were incorporated into a multilayer-perceptron (MLP) type artificial neural network (ANN) to model venthole production. The results showed that the two-hidden layer model predicted total production and the methane content of the GGVs with more than 90% accuracy. The ANN model was further used to conduct sensitivity analyses about the mean of the input variables to determine the effect of each input variable on the predicted production performance of GGVs. (author)

  11. Use of mass vaccination with a reduced dose of REV 1 vaccine for Brucella melitensis control in a population of small ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharp, D W; al Khalaf, S A; al Muhanna, M W; Cheema, R A; Godana, W

    1999-06-01

    Mass vaccination with reduced dose 1/50 Rev 1 strain live vaccine (1-2 10(9) colony forming units), administered subcutaneously, over a four and a half year period reduced the prevalence of Brucella melitensis in Kuwait's small ruminant population from 5.8% in 1993 to 2.02% in 1997. Serological test results using the Rose Bengal Plate Test, Rivanol Agglutination Test and Complement Fixation showed no evidence of persistence of positive serology in animals nine or more months after vaccination. Questionnaires and post-vaccination flock inspections found that the effects on gestation (abortions) were minimal--and not proven to be due to the vaccine. The conclusion from these findings is that mass vaccination with reduced dose Rev 1 administered by the subcutaneous route is a practical field strategy for control of Brucella melitensis.

  12. Forage use to improve environmental sustainability of ruminant production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyader, J; Janzen, H H; Kroebel, R; Beauchemin, K A

    2016-08-01

    Ruminants raised for meat and milk are important sources of protein in human diets worldwide. Their unique digestive system allows them to derive energy and nourishment from forages, making use of vast areas of grazing lands not suitable for arable cropping or biofuel production and avoiding direct competition for grain that can be used as human food. However, sustaining an ever-growing population of ruminants consuming forages poses a dilemma: while exploiting their ecological niche, forage-fed ruminants produce large amount of enteric methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Resolving this quandary would allow ruminants an expanded role in meeting growing global demands for livestock products. One way around the dilemma is to devise forage-based diets and feeding systems that reduce methane emissions per unit of milk or meat produced. Ongoing research has made significant strides toward this objective. A wider opportunity is to look beyond methane emissions alone and consider all greenhouse gas emissions from the entire livestock-producing system. For example, by raising ruminants in systems using forages, some of the methane emissions can be offset by preserving or enhancing soil carbon reserves, thereby withholding carbon dioxide from the air. Similarly, well-managed systems based on forages may reduce synthetic fertilizer use by more effective use of manure and nitrogen-fixing plants, thereby curtailing nitrous oxide emissions. The potential environmental benefits of forage-based systems may be expanded even further by considering their other ecological benefits, such as conserving biodiversity, improving soil health, enhancing water quality, and providing wildlife habitat. The quandary, then, can be alleviated by managing ruminants within a holistic land-livestock synchrony that considers not only methane emissions but also suppression of other greenhouse gases as well as other ecological benefits. Given the complexity of such systems, there likely are no singular

  13. Rumen microbial abundance and fermentation profile during severe subacute ruminal acidosis and its modulation by plant derived alkaloids in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickdam, Elsayed; Khiaosa-Ard, Ratchaneewan; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Klevenhusen, Fenja; Chizzola, Remigius; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-06-01

    Rumen microbiota have important metabolic functions for the host animal. This study aimed at characterizing changes in rumen microbial abundances and fermentation profiles using a severe subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in vitro model, and to evaluate a potential modulatory role of plant derived alkaloids (PDA), containing quaternary benzophenanthridine and protopine alkaloids, of which sanguinarine and chelerythrine were the major bioactive compounds. Induction of severe SARA strongly affected the rumen microbial composition and fermentation variables without suppressing the abundance of total bacteria. Protozoa and fungi were more sensitive to the low ruminal pH condition than bacteria. Induction of severe SARA clearly depressed degradation of fiber (P < 0.001), which came along with a decreased relative abundance of fibrolytic Ruminococcus albus and Fibrobacter succinogenes (P < 0.001). Under severe SARA conditions, the genus Prevotella, Lactobacillus group, Megasphaera elsdenii, and Entodinium spp. (P < 0.001) were more abundant, whereas Ruminobacter amylophilus was less abundant. SARA largely suppressed methane formation (-70%, P < 0.001), although total methanogenic 16S rRNA gene abundance was not affected. According to principal component analysis, Methanobrevibacter spp. correlated to methane concentration. Addition of PDA modulated ruminal fermentation under normal conditions such as enhanced (P < 0.05) concentration of total SCFA, propionate and valerate, and increased (P < 0.05) degradation of crude protein compared with the unsupplemented control diet. Our results indicate strong shifts in the microbial community during severe SARA compared to normal conditions. Supplementation of PDA positively modulates ruminal fermentation under normal ruminal pH conditions.

  14. Valuing the Ozone-Related Health Benefits of Methane Emission Controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarofim, Marcus C.; Waldhoff, Stephanie T.; Anenberg, Susan C.

    2015-06-29

    Methane is a greenhouse gas that oxidizes to form ground-level ozone, itself a greenhouse gas and a health-harmful air pollutant. Reducing methane emissions will both slow anthropogenic climate change and reduce ozone-related mortality. We estimate the benefits of reducing methane emissions anywhere in the world for ozone-related premature mortality globally and for eight geographic regions. Our methods are consistent with those used by the U.S. Government to estimate the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC). We find that the global short- and long-term premature mortality benefits due to reduced ozone production from methane mitigation are (2011)$790 and $1775 per tonne methane, respectively. These correspond to approximately 70% and 150% of the valuation of methane’s global climate impacts using the SCC after extrapolating from carbon dioxide to methane using Global Warming Potential (GWP) estimates. Results are most sensitive to the choice of VSL and increase for emission years further in the future. Regionally, most of the global mortality benefits accrue in Asia, but 10% accrue in the United States. This methodology can be used to assess the benefits of methane emission reductions anywhere in the world, including those achieved by national and multinational policies.

  15. Efeitos de dietas contendo Leucaena leucocephala e Saccharomyces cerevisiae sobre a fermentação ruminal e a emissão de gás metano em bovinos Effects of leucaena and yeast on rumen fermentation and methane emissions in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Aparecida Possenti

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar os efeitos do uso de leucena e levedura em dietas para bovinos sobre o metabolismo ruminal, incluindo o pH e as produções de ácido graxos voláteis (AGV, amônia e gás metano. Quatro bovinos machos com 800 kg e fistulados no rúmen foram mantidos em quadrado latino 4 × 4, em arranjo fatorial 2 × 2, composto de dois níveis de leucena (20 e 50% MS e feno de capim coast-cross na presença ou ausência de levedura. Não houve influência das dietas nos valores médios de pH (média 6,82 e nas concentrações de amônia no rúmen, que variaram de 18 a 21 mg/100 mL. Houve interação entre níveis de leucena e levedura na concentração total de AGV. As dietas não diferiram quanto à concentração de ácido acético, mas os animais alimentados com a dieta com 50% de leucena e contendo levedura apresentaram maiores concentrações médias de ácido propiônico (média 19,14 mM. A emissão de metano reduziu em12,3% em relação à mesma dieta sem levedura e em 17,2% quando os animais foram alimentados com 20% de leucena com levedura. Verificou-se efeito associativo de leucena, quando fornecida em alto nível na dieta (50% MS, e levedura na redução da emissão de metano e na melhoria no padrão de fermentação no rúmen, o que pode reduzir as perdas de energia e melhorar eficiência energética do animal.This research was to evaluate the effect of Leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae in diets for bovines on ruminal metabolism, including pH, volatile fatty acids, and ammonia and methane production. Four crossbred male cattle (800 kg LW rumen cannulated were distributed to a 4 × 4 Latin Square design, in 2 × 2 factorial arrangement, composed by two levels of Leucaena (20% and 50% DM and coast-cross grass hay, with or without yeast. No differences were observed in rumen pH (mean 6.82 and ammonia concentrations that varied from 18.71 to 21.28 mg/100 mL of

  16. Biochar effects on methane emissions from soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeffery, Simon; Verheijen, Frank G.A.; Kammann, Claudia; Abalos Rodriguez, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emissions have increased by more than 150% since 1750, with agriculture being the major source. Further increases are predicted as permafrost regions start thawing, and rice and ruminant animal production expand. Biochar is posited to increase crop productivity while miti

  17. Redox controls on methane formation, migration and fate in shallow aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humez, Pauline; Mayer, Bernhard; Nightingale, Michael; Becker, Veith; Kingston, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen; Bayegnak, Guy; Millot, Romain; Kloppmann, Wolfram

    2016-07-01

    Development of unconventional energy resources such as shale gas and coalbed methane has generated some public concern with regard to the protection of groundwater and surface water resources from leakage of stray gas from the deep subsurface. In terms of environmental impact to and risk assessment of shallow groundwater resources, the ultimate challenge is to distinguish (a) natural in situ production of biogenic methane, (b) biogenic or thermogenic methane migration into shallow aquifers due to natural causes, and (c) thermogenic methane migration from deep sources due to human activities associated with the exploitation of conventional or unconventional oil and gas resources. This study combines aqueous and gas (dissolved and free) geochemical and isotope data from 372 groundwater samples obtained from 186 monitoring wells of the provincial Groundwater Observation Well Network (GOWN) in Alberta (Canada), a province with a long record of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon exploration. We investigated whether methane occurring in shallow groundwater formed in situ, or whether it migrated into the shallow aquifers from elsewhere in the stratigraphic column. It was found that methane is ubiquitous in groundwater in Alberta and is predominantly of biogenic origin. The highest concentrations of biogenic methane (> 0.01 mM or > 0.2 mgL-1), characterized by δ13CCH4 values migration from deeper methanogenic aquifers. Of the samples, 14.1 % contained methane with δ13CCH4 values > -54 ‰, potentially suggesting a thermogenic origin, but aqueous and isotope geochemistry data revealed that the elevated δ13CCH4 values were caused by microbial oxidation of biogenic methane or post-sampling degradation of low CH4 content samples rather than migration of deep thermogenic gas. A significant number of samples (39.2 %) contained methane with predominantly biogenic C isotope ratios (δ13CCH4 migration into shallow aquifers either naturally or via anthropogenically

  18. Environmental control on anaerobic oxidation of methane in the gassy sediments of Eckernforde Bay (German Baltic)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Kruger, M.; Boetius, A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the effect of seasonal environmental changes on the rate and distribution of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in Eckernforde Bay sediments (German Baltic Sea) and identified organisms that are likely to be involved in the process. Surface sediments were sampled during September...... the warm productive season and to a slightly deeper AOM zone during the cold winter season. Rising methane bubbles apparently fed AOM above the sulfate-methane transition. Methanosarcinales-related anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME-2), identified with fluorescence in situ hybridization, is suggested to mediate...

  19. Controls on methane expulsion during melting of natural gas hydrate systems. Topic area 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flemings, Peter [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-01-14

    1.1. Project Goal The project goal is to predict, given characteristic climate-induced temperature change scenarios, the conditions under which gas will be expelled from existing accumulations of gas hydrate into the shallow ocean or directly to the atmosphere. When those conditions are met, the fraction of the gas accumulation that escapes and the rate of escape shall be quantified. The predictions shall be applicable in Arctic regions and in gas hydrate systems at the up dip limit of the stability zone on continental margins. The behavior shall be explored in response to two warming scenarios: longer term change due to sea level rise (e.g. 20 thousand years) and shorter term due to atmospheric warming by anthropogenic forcing (decadal time scale). 1.2. Project Objectives During the first budget period, the objectives are to review and categorize the stability state of existing well-studied hydrate reservoirs, develop conceptual and numerical models of the melting process, and to design and conduct laboratory experiments that dissociate methane hydrate in a model sediment column by systematically controlling the temperature profile along the column. The final objective of the first budget period shall be to validate the models against the experiments. In the second budget period, the objectives are to develop a model of gas flow into sediment in which hydrate is thermodynamically stable, and conduct laboratory experiments of this process to validate the model. The developed models shall be used to quantify the rate and volume of gas that escapes from dissociating hydrate accumulations. In addition, specific scaled simulations characteristic of Arctic regions and regions near the stability limit at continental margins shall be performed. 1.3. Project Background and Rationale The central hypothesis proposed is that hydrate melting (dissociation) due to climate change generates free gas that can, under certain conditions, propagate through the gas hydrate stability

  20. Wetland methane emissions during the Last Glacial Maximum estimated from PMIP2 simulations: Climate, vegetation, and geographic controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, S. L.; Drury, A. J.; Toonen, W. H. J.; van Weele, M.

    2010-03-01

    It is an open question to what extent wetlands contributed to the interglacial-glacial decrease in atmospheric methane concentration. Here we estimate methane emissions from glacial wetlands, using newly available PMIP2 simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) climate from coupled atmosphere-ocean and atmosphere-ocean-vegetation models. These simulations apply improved boundary conditions resulting in better agreement with paleoclimatic data than earlier PMIP1 simulations. Emissions are computed from the dominant controls of water table depth, soil temperature, and plant productivity, and we analyze the relative role of each factor in the glacial decline. It is found that latitudinal changes in soil moisture, in combination with ice sheet expansion, cause boreal wetlands to shift southward in all simulations. This southward migration is instrumental in maintaining the boreal wetland source at a significant level. The mean emission temperature over boreal wetlands drops by only a few degrees, despite the strong overall cooling. The temperature effect on the glacial decline in the methane flux is therefore moderate, while reduced plant productivity contributes equally to the total reduction. Model results indicate a relatively small boreal and large tropical source during the LGM, with wetlands on the exposed continental shelves mainly contributing to the tropical source. This distribution in emissions is consistent with the low interpolar difference in glacial methane concentrations derived from ice core data.

  1. Scientific preventing and control of peste des Petits Ruminants%小反刍兽疫的科学防控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王军; 华泽军; 于长泳; 张秀萍; 王岩; 谷志大; 杨国丽; 郑洪玲; 何利昆; 崔基贤; 张雅为; 王克才; 段亚良

    2014-01-01

    Peste des Petits Ruminants(PPR) is a kind of infection disease contained much charac-teristics, such as acute, touching and hypso-fatal and so on. The disease has been in world for 70 years and the prevlant sphere is unceasingly enlarging. It’s pathogeny is peste des petits rumi-nants virus which has intimate genetic relationship with Cattle plague virus antigen. Goat and sheep is natural host of the PPR, many kinds of small rumination livestock also may contract the disease and display symptom. The infected goat or sheep is infection sources. Healthy goat would get infected by immediate contact with sick goat or sheep through respiratory tract infection or mediate contact. The disease mainly takes place in rainy season and dry and chilly season. The symptoms of PPR displayed heat, more eye and nasal discharge, severe diarrhoea and anabrotic stoma-titis. The oral cavity was necrosis and anabrotic, the mucous membrane of nose was necrosis, it has bronchial pneumonia and apex pulmonis pneumonia, alimentary tract hemorrhage, rectal pathologi-cal changes showed zebra shape, enlarged spleen and necrosis. The effective preventions are rein-force supervising and monitoring the cross province input, reinforce breeding administration. And vaccine should be used when necessary.%小反刍兽疫是危害山羊和绵羊及“生小反刍兽的一种急性或亚急性、接触性、高致死性传染病。本病在世界范围内的流行已有70余年的历史,流行范围不断扩大。该病的病原是小反刍兽疫病毒(PPRV),与牛瘟病毒抗原性和亲缘关系密切相关。山羊和绵羊是本病的自然宿主,多种小反刍兽也可感染发病。感染和发病羊是传染源,健康羊与发病羊直接接触通过呼吸道感染,间接接触也能感染,本病在多雨季节和干燥寒冷季节多发。病羊表现出发热、眼、口、鼻分泌物增多、严重腹泻、糜烂性口炎等症状。剖检发现口腔坏死、糜烂,鼻

  2. CFD Modeling of Methane Gas Distribution and Control Strategies in a Gassy Coal Mine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tanguturi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available High methane (CH4 gas emission from the goaf in a gassy coal mine diffuses the gas into the face that leads to hazardous working environment and create operational difficulties. Electrical equipment which are loaded with sensors get tripped off when CH4 level is greater than 2%. Oxygen (O2 ingresses more on the maingate (MG side than the tailgate (TG side of the goaf due to high ventilation air pressure and hence no major gas issues are dealt on this side of the goaf. However, when the air flows along the face, air pressure decreases and less O2 ingress on TG side of goaf and more CH4 gas diffuse into the face in these regions. CH4 gas diffusion not only disrupts the functioning of electrical equipment but also creates hazardous environment for the operator. In this paper, an attempt was made to understand the CH4 gas distribution at the TG for gas emission rate of 1000l/s respectively and investigate the control options available for diluting the gas concentrations in the TG region. From Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD investigations, it was concluded that for gas emission rates over 1000l/s the CH4 concentration level at the TG region was above 2% and demand for control measures. Gas control strategies with goaf drainage, back return ventilation system and curtains across the face in the TG region were investigated using CFD techniques. From numerical investigations, it can be concluded that gas control strategy with goaf drainage was able to reduce the CH4 level to below 1% and back return system at the TG side was able to completely eliminate gas traces. Placing a curtain assisted in shifting the gas fringes into the goaf and thereby reducing the gas concentrations to below 1%.

  3. A coupled molecular and field-based approach to study microbial controls on methane flux in upland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, C. R.; von Fischer, J. C.; Fierer, N.

    2007-12-01

    Predicting the responses of ecosystems to global change depends, in part, on understanding how soil microbial communities respond to external controls. To address this question, we are studying a relatively simple biogeochemical process: methane consumption in upland (i.e., well-drained, oxic) soils. In this process, methane molecules diffuse from the atmosphere into the soil, where they are consumed by methanotrophic bacteria. Because of the simplicity of this process, we have been able to develop a reaction-diffusion model that allows us to directly quantify methanotroph activity in situ from chamber-based measures of flux and diffusivity. Moreover, because the bacteria that oxidize methane come from a phylogenetically cohesive group, we can use molecular tools to quantify the size of methanotroph community and determine its species composition. Our application of these approaches on the Shortgrass Steppe Long-Term Ecological Research (SGS LTER) site in northeastern Colorado has revealed strong temporal and spatial patterns in methane uptake rates that are driven primarily by methanotroph activity, and very little by soil diffusivity. The temporal patterns in methanotroph activity follow seasonal changes in soil temperature and water content, with sharp reductions in activity associated with hot, dry conditions. Spatial patterns in activity follow differences in soil texture, with sandier soils expressing a greater range of methanotroph activity than clay soils. Although methanotroph abundances did not vary across soil types, the phylogenetic structure of the methanotroph communities differed significantly between clay and sand soil types. In addition, we found that the majority of methanotrophs were not the usual Type I or Type II, but instead were of the JR2 and JR3 types previously found only in a dry California grassland by Horz et al. AEM (2005). Together, these observations suggest that the species composition of methanotroph communities reflects changes in

  4. Fracture-driven methane bubble ascent within shallow fine-grained clay-bearing aquatic sediments: dynamics and controlling factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarboush Sirhan, Shahrazad; Katsman, Regina; Ten Brink, Uri

    2017-04-01

    Mature methane gas bubbles in the fine-grained, clay-bearing (cohesive) aquatic sediments, found at many locations throughout the world, are much larger than the characteristic pore size. When gas pressure within the bubble is high enough to overcome compression, friction, and cohesion at grain contacts, gas migrates upward driven by buoyancy, by pushing the grains apart and fracturing the fine-grained sediments. Fracturing of the fine-grained cohesive sediments by the migrating bubbles destabilizes sediment and might result in slope failure. Migrating methane bubbles may bypass processes of oxidation in the upper sediment layers due to their fast rise velocity, release to the water column and eventually to the atmosphere. In this study we use coupled macroscopic single-bubble mechanical/reaction-transport numerical model to explore bubble ascent under various ambient concentration profiles, associated with bio-chemical processes of methane production and consumption below sediment-water interface, as it occurs in nature. Modeling results show that changes in the ambient dissolved-methane concentrations strongly affect bubble ascent velocity. It is demonstrated that bubble migration scenario within fine-grained muddy sediments is controlled dominantly by the internal bubble pressure that manages solute exchange with adjacent porewater. It is significantly affected by the total hydrostatic pressure. For shallow water depths two sequential bubble propagation patterns were observed: (1) Stable (saw-tooth) fracturing, followed by (2) Dynamic (unstable, rising line) fracturing, leading to an ultimate release of the bubble to the water column. However, for a higher water depth, bubble propagation pattern is characterized by stable fracturing only. In this pattern the bubble becomes more sensitive to the ambient field of methane concentrations and may stop below sediment-water interface due solute release caused by the local methanotrophy.

  5. Fault zone controlled seafloor methane seepage in the rupture area of the 2010 Maule earthquake, Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geersen, Jacob; Scholz, Florian; Linke, Peter; Schmidt, Mark; Lange, Dietrich; Behrmann, Jan H.; Völker, David; Hensen, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Seafloor seepage of hydrocarbon-bearing fluids has been identified in a number of marine fore arcs. However, temporal variations in seep activity and the structural and tectonic parameters that control the seepage often remain poorly constrained. Subduction zone earthquakes, for example, are often discussed to trigger seafloor seepage but causal links that go beyond theoretical considerations have not yet been fully established. This is mainly due to the inaccessibility of offshore epicentral areas, the infrequent occurrence of large earthquakes, and challenges associated with offshore monitoring of seepage over large areas and sufficient time periods. Here we report visual, geochemical, geophysical, and modeling results and observations from the Concepción Methane Seep Area (offshore Central Chile) located in the rupture area of the 2010 Mw. 8.8 Maule earthquake. High methane concentrations in the oceanic water column and a shallow subbottom depth of sulfate penetration indicate active methane seepage. The stable carbon isotope signature of the methane and hydrocarbon composition of the released gas indicate a mixture of shallow-sourced biogenic gas and a deeper sourced thermogenic component. Pristine fissures and fractures observed at the seafloor together with seismically imaged large faults in the marine fore arc may represent effective pathways for methane migration. Upper plate fault activity with hydraulic fracturing and dilation is in line with increased normal Coulomb stress during large plate-boundary earthquakes, as exemplarily modeled for the 2010 earthquake. On a global perspective our results point out the possible role of recurring large subduction zone earthquakes in driving hydrocarbon seepage from marine fore arcs over long timescales.

  6. Soil moisture control over autumn season methane flux, Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Sturtevant

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimates of annual budgets of methane (CH4 efflux in arctic regions are severely constrained by the paucity of non-summer measurements. Moreover, the incomplete understanding of the ecosystem-level sensitivity of CH4 emissions to changes in tundra moisture makes prediction of future CH4 release from the Arctic extremely difficult. This study addresses some of these research gaps by presenting an analysis of eddy covariance and chamber measurements of CH4 efflux and supporting environmental variables during the autumn season and associated beginning of soil freeze-up at our large-scale water manipulation site near Barrow, Alaska (the Biocomplexity Experiment. We found that the autumn season CH4 emission is significant (accounting for 21–25% of the average growing season emission, and that this emission is mostly controlled by the fraction of inundated landscape, atmospheric turbulence, and the decline in unfrozen water during the period of soil freezing. Drainage decreased autumn CH4 emission by a factor of 2.4 compared to our flooded treatment. Flooding slowed the soil freezing process which has implications for extending elevated CH4 emissions longer into the winter season.

  7. Controls on methane released through ebullition in peatlands affected by permafrost degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapstein, Sara J.; Turetsky, Merritt R.; McGuire, Anthony; Harden, Jennifer W.; Czimczik, C.I.; Xu, Xiaomei; Chanton, J.P.; Waddington, James Michael

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost thaw in peat plateaus leads to the flooding of surface soils and the formation of collapse scar bogs, which have the potential to be large emitters of methane (CH4) from surface peat as well as deeper, previously frozen, permafrost carbon (C). We used a network of bubble traps, permanently installed 20 cm and 60 cm beneath the moss surface, to examine controls on ebullition from three collapse bogs in interior Alaska. Overall, ebullition was dominated by episodic events that were associated with changes in atmospheric pressure, and ebullition was mainly a surface process regulated by both seasonal ice dynamics and plant phenology. The majority (>90%) of ebullition occurred in surface peat layers, with little bubble production in deeper peat. During periods of peak plant biomass, bubbles contained acetate-derived CH4 dominated (>90%) by modern C fixed from the atmosphere following permafrost thaw. Post-senescence, the contribution of CH4 derived from thawing permafrost C was more variable and accounted for up to 22% (on average 7%), in the most recently thawed site. Thus, the formation of thermokarst features resulting from permafrost thaw in peatlands stimulates ebullition and CH4 release both by creating flooded surface conditions conducive to CH4 production and bubbling as well as by exposing thawing permafrost C to mineralization.

  8. A Serological Survey of Ruminant Livestock in Kazakhstan During Post-Soviet Transitions in Farming and Disease Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corteyn A

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of a serological survey of livestock in Kazakhstan, carried out in 1997–1998, are reported. Serum samples from 958 animals (cattle, sheep and goats were tested for antibodies to foot and mouth disease (FMD, bluetongue (BT, epizootic haemorrhagic disease (EHD, rinderpest (RP and peste des petits ruminants (PPR viruses, and to Brucella spp. We also investigated the vaccination status of livestock and related this to changes in veterinary provision since independence in 1991. For the 2 diseases under official surveillance (FMD and brucellosis our results were similar to official data, although we found significantly higher brucellosis levels in 2 districts and widespread ignorance about FMD vaccination status. The seroprevalence for BT virus was 23%, and seropositive animals were widespread suggesting endemicity, despite the disease not having being previously reported. We found a few seropositives for EHDV and PPRV, which may suggest that these diseases are also present in Kazakhstan. An hierarchical model showed that seroprevalence to FMD and BT viruses were clustered at the farm/village level, rather than at a larger spatial scale. This was unexpected for FMD, which is subject to vaccination policies which vary at the raion (county level.

  9. Modeling micro-topographic controls on boreal peatland hydrology and methane fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cresto Aleina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale surface heterogeneities can influence land–atmosphere fluxes and therefore carbon, water and energy budgets on larger scale. This effect is of particular relevance for high-latitude ecosystems, because of the great amount of carbon stored in their soils. We introduce a novel micro-topographic model, the Hummock–Hollow (HH model, which explicitly represents small-scale surface elevation changes. By computing the water table at the small scale, and by coupling the model with a process-based model for soil methane processes, we are able to model effects of micro-topography on hydrology and methane emissions in a typical boreal peatland. In order to assess the effect of micro-topography on water balance and methane emissions of the peatland we compare two versions of the model, one with a representation of micro-topography and a classical single-bucket model version, and show that the temporal variability in the model version with micro-topography performs better if compared with local data. Accounting for micro-topography almost triples the cumulative methane flux over the simulated time-slice. We found that the single-bucket model underestimates methane emissions because of its poor performance in representing hydrological dynamics. The HH model with micro-topography captures the spatial dynamics of water and methane fluxes, being able to identify the hotspots for methane emissions. The model also identifies a critical scale (0.01 km2 which marks the minimal resolution for the explicit representation of micro-topography in larger-scale models.

  10. Effect of Sunflower and Marine Oils on Ruminal Microbiota, In vitro Fermentation and Digesta Fatty Acid Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio E. Vargas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study using the rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC investigated the changes in the ruminal microbiota and anaerobic fermentation in response to the addition of different lipid supplements to a ruminant diet. A basal diet with no oil added was the control, and the treatment diets were supplemented with sunflower oil (2% only, or sunflower oil (2% in combination with fish oil (1% or algae oil (1%. Four fermentation units were used per treatment. RUSITEC fermenters were inoculated with rumen digesta. Substrate degradation, fermentation end-products (volatile fatty acids, lactate, gas, methane, and ammonia, and microbial protein synthesis were determined. Fatty acid profiles and microbial community composition were evaluated in digesta samples. Numbers of representative bacterial species and microbial groups were determined using qPCR. Microbial composition and diversity were based on T-RFLP spectra. The addition of oils had no effect on substrate degradation or microbial protein synthesis. Differences among diets in neutral detergent fiber degradation were not significant (P = 0.132, but the contrast comparing oil–supplemented diets with the control was significant (P = 0.039. Methane production was reduced (P < 0.05 with all oil supplements. Propionate production was increased when diets containing oil were fermented. Compared with the control, the addition of algae oil decreased the percentage C18:3 c9c12c15 in rumen digesta, and that of C18:2 c9t11 was increased when the control diet was supplemented with any oil. Marine oils decreased the hydrogenation of C18 unsaturated fatty acids. Microbial diversity was not affected by oil supplementation. Cluster analysis showed that diets with additional fish or algae oils formed a group separated from the sunflower oil diet. Supplementation with marine oils decreased the numbers of Butyrivibrio producers of stearic acid, and affected the numbers of protozoa, methanogens, Selenomonas ruminantium

  11. Dietary Modulation Of Rumen Metabolism: A Key Factor To Enhancing Ruminant Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qendrim Zebeli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Owing to microbial hydrolysis of nutrients in the rumen, ruminants are relatively efficient animals for livestock production considering that they can utilize low-quality feeds including industrial by-products. On the other hand, however, they also contribute to global warming because of their methane emission from the enteric fermentation. The methane emission not only affects the environment but also represents the loss of consumed energy. Thus, mitigating enteric methane emission may improve animal production efficiency as well as contribute to alleviate the impact of ruminants on climate change. This review focuses on various achievements of the last years which have expanded our knowledge regarding mitigation of enteric methanogenesis and its potential contribution in improving cattle production efficiency. The article also discusses the role of nutrition and rumen metabolism on gut and host’s health status as well as on enhancement of product quality of cattle products. The improvement of quality of ruminant products relies mainly on improving their fatty acids composition toward health-promoting polyunsaturated fatty acid profile such as omega-3 fatty acids and conjugated linolenic acids. Plant secondary compounds appear to possess multi-beneficial effects that when fed to ruminants can beneficially modify rumen metabolism, contributing to methane mitigation, gut health, food safety and quality. However, identification of active compounds for use as feed additives in ruminant production and understanding their mode of specific actions remain a big challenge for research.

  12. Environmental and physical controls on northern terrestrial methane emissions across permafrost zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olefeldt, David; Turetsky, Merritt R; Crill, Patrick M; McGuire, A David

    2013-02-01

    Methane (CH4 ) emissions from the northern high-latitude region represent potentially significant biogeochemical feedbacks to the climate system. We compiled a database of growing-season CH4 emissions from terrestrial ecosystems located across permafrost zones, including 303 sites described in 65 studies. Data on environmental and physical variables, including permafrost conditions, were used to assess controls on CH4 emissions. Water table position, soil temperature, and vegetation composition strongly influenced emissions and had interacting effects. Sites with a dense sedge cover had higher emissions than other sites at comparable water table positions, and this was an effect that was more pronounced at low soil temperatures. Sensitivity analysis suggested that CH4 emissions from ecosystems where the water table on average is at or above the soil surface (wet tundra, fen underlain by permafrost, and littoral ecosystems) are more sensitive to variability in soil temperature than drier ecosystems (palsa dry tundra, bog, and fen), whereas the latter ecosystems conversely are relatively more sensitive to changes of the water table position. Sites with near-surface permafrost had lower CH4 fluxes than sites without permafrost at comparable water table positions, a difference that was explained by lower soil temperatures. Neither the active layer depth nor the organic soil layer depth was related to CH4 emissions. Permafrost thaw in lowland regions is often associated with increased soil moisture, higher soil temperatures, and increased sedge cover. In our database, lowland thermokarst sites generally had higher emissions than adjacent sites with intact permafrost, but emissions from thermokarst sites were not statistically higher than emissions from permafrost-free sites with comparable environmental conditions. Overall, these results suggest that future changes to terrestrial high-latitude CH4 emissions will be more proximately related to changes in moisture, soil

  13. Methane emissions from global rice fields: Magnitude, spatiotemporal patterns, and environmental controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bowen; Tian, Hanqin; Ren, Wei; Tao, Bo; Lu, Chaoqun; Yang, Jia; Banger, Kamaljit; Pan, Shufen

    2016-09-01

    Given the importance of the potential positive feedback between methane (CH4) emissions and climate change, it is critical to accurately estimate the magnitude and spatiotemporal patterns of CH4 emissions from global rice fields and better understand the underlying determinants governing the emissions. Here we used a coupled biogeochemical model in combination with satellite-derived contemporary inundation area to quantify the magnitude and spatiotemporal variation of CH4 emissions from global rice fields and attribute the environmental controls of CH4 emissions during 1901-2010. Our study estimated that CH4 emissions from global rice fields varied from 18.3 ± 0.1 Tg CH4/yr (Avg. ±1 SD) under intermittent irrigation to 38.8 ± 1.0 Tg CH4/yr under continuous flooding in the 2000s, indicating that the magnitude of CH4 emissions from global rice fields is largely dependent on different water schemes. Over the past 110 years, our simulated results showed that global CH4 emissions from rice cultivation increased by 85%. The expansion of rice fields was the dominant factor for the increasing trends of CH4 emissions, followed by elevated CO2 concentration, and nitrogen fertilizer use. On the contrary, climate variability had reduced the cumulative CH4 emissions for most of the years over the study period. Our results imply that CH4 emissions from global rice fields could be reduced through optimizing irrigation practices. Therefore, the future magnitude of CH4 emissions from rice fields will be determined by the human demand for rice production as well as the implementation of optimized water management practices.

  14. In vitro methane production and quality of corn silage treated with maleic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanber Kara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effects of maleic acid (MA addition to corn at ensiling on silage quality and in vitro methane and total gas production, metabolisable energy (ME, and organic matter digestibility (OMD parameters by using in vitro gas production techniques. Forage corn was ensiled either without (control group: MA 0 or with three different dosages of maleic acid, 0.5% (MA 0.5, 1.0% (MA 1.0, and 1.5% (MA 1.5 w/w of the fresh material for 60 days. As a result of this study, neutral detergent fibre level was decreased in the MA 1.5 group (P<0.05. The 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5% addition of maleic acid to forage corn at ensiling increased lactic acid concentration (P<0.05 in silage and reduced propionic acid (P<0.05. Iso-valeric acid concentration in the organic acids of the silage was decreased with maleic acid addition (P<0.05. The maleic acid addition decreased in vitro ruminal methane production (P<0.01. The silage pH value, and acetic, butyric and isobutyric acid concentrations and in vitro total gas production, OMD, and ME values did not change by MA addition (P>0.05. It was concluded that MA addition could reduce methane emission without any negative effects on silage nutrient composition or in vitro ruminal fermentation parameters.

  15. Methane Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Methane (CH4) flux is the net rate of methane exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS LandCarbon project...

  16. Effect of essential oils on ruminal fermentation and lactation performance of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekippe, J A; Tacoma, R; Hristov, A N; Lee, C; Oh, J; Heyler, K S; Cassidy, T W; Varga, G A; Bravo, D

    2013-01-01

    Three experiments (Exp.) were conducted to study the effects of dietary addition of an essential oil product (EO) based on eugenol and cinnamaldehyde (0, control, or 525 mg/d of Xtract 6965; Pancosma SA, Geneva, Switzerland) on ruminal fermentation, total-tract digestibility, manure gas emissions, N losses, and dairy cow performance. In Exp. 1 and 3, the EO supplement was added to the vitamin-mineral premix. In Exp. 2, EO was top-dressed. Experiments 1 and 2 were crossover designs with 20 multiparous Holstein cows each (including 4 and 8 ruminally cannulated cows, respectively) and consisted of two 28-d periods. Intake of dry matter did not differ between treatments. Most ruminal fermentation parameters were unaffected by EO. Concentrations of ammonia (Exp. 1), isobutyrate (Exp. 1 and 2), and isovalerate (Exp. 1) were increased by EO compared with the control. Apparent total-tract digestibility of nutrients was similar between treatments, except total-tract digestibility of neutral-detergent fiber, which was increased or tended to be increased by EO in Exp. 1 and 2. Manure emissions of ammonia and methane were unaffected by EO. Blood plasma and milk urea-N concentrations and urinary N losses were increased by EO compared with the control in Exp. 1, but not in Exp. 2. Average milk yield, 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield, and milk fat, protein, and lactose concentrations were unaffected by treatment. Urinary excretion of purine derivatives, a marker for microbial protein production in the rumen, was greater in cows receiving the EO diet in Exp. 1, but not in Exp. 2. In Exp. 3, 120 Holstein cows were grouped in pens of 20 cows/pen in a 12-wk experiment to study production effects of EO. Dry matter intake, milk yield (a trend for a slight decrease with EO), milk components, milk urea N, and feed efficiency were similar between treatments. Results from these studies indicate that supplementing dairy cows with 525 mg/d of Xtract 6965 had moderate effects on ruminal

  17. Feeding saponin-containing Yucca schidigera and Quillaja saponaria to decrease enteric methane production in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtshausen, L; Chaves, A V; Beauchemin, K A; McGinn, S M; McAllister, T A; Odongo, N E; Cheeke, P R; Benchaar, C

    2009-06-01

    An experiment was conducted in vitro to determine whether the addition of saponin-containing Yucca schidigera or Quillaja saponaria reduces methane production without impairing ruminal fermentation or fiber digestion. A slightly lower dose of saponin was then fed to lactating dairy cows to evaluate effects on ruminal fermentation, methane production, total-tract nutrient digestibility, and milk production and composition. A 24-h batch culture in vitro incubation was conducted in a completely randomized design with a control (no additive, CON) and 3 doses of either saponin source [15, 30, and 45 g/kg of substrate dry matter (DM)] using buffered ruminal fluid from 3 dairy cows. The in vivo study was conducted as a crossover design with 2 groups of cows, 3 treatments, and three 28-d periods. Six ruminally cannulated cows were used in group 1 and 6 intact cows in group 2 (627 +/- 55 kg of body weight and 155 +/- 28 d in milk). The treatments were 1) early lactation total mixed ration, no additive (control; CON); 2) CON diet supplemented with whole-plant Y. schidigera powder at 10 g/kg of DM (YS); and 3) CON diet supplemented with whole-plant Q. saponaria powder at 10 g/kg of DM (QS). Methane production was measured in environmental chambers and with the sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) tracer technique. In vitro, increasing levels of both saponin sources decreased methane concentration in the headspace and increased the proportion of propionate in the buffered rumen fluid. Concentration of ammonia-N, acetate proportion, and the acetate:propionate ratio in the buffered rumen fluid as well as 24-h digestible neutral detergent fiber were reduced compared with the CON treatment. Medium and high saponin levels decreased DM digestibility compared with the CON treatment. A lower feeding rate of both saponin sources (10 g/kg of DM) was used in vivo in an attempt to avoid potentially negative effects of higher saponin levels on feed digestibility. Feeding saponin did not affect milk

  18. Critical evaluation of essential oils as rumen modifiers in ruminant nutrition: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobellis, Gabriella, E-mail: cobellis.gabriella@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Medicina Veterinaria, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Department of Animal Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Trabalza-Marinucci, Massimo [Dipartimento di Medicina Veterinaria, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Yu, Zhongtang [Department of Animal Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Ruminant livestock systems contribute significantly to emission of methane, a potent greenhouse gas as they waste a portion of the ingested energy (2–15%) as methane and a large proportion (75–95%) of the ingested nitrogen as ammonia. Recently, numerous researches have been conducted to evaluate plant secondary metabolites, including essential oils (EO), as natural feed additives in ruminant nutrition and to exploit their potential to improve rumen fermentation efficiency. Essential oils appeared to be very promising compounds as they selectively reduced methane production and protein breakdown in both in vitro and in vivo studies. However, in some studies, the use of EO as feed additives was accompanied with decreased feed degradability and lowered volatile fatty acid. These adverse effects could be attributed to their broad and often non-specific antimicrobial activities within the rumen. Future research should be directed to identification of the active and useful EO compounds, optimization of EO doses, and use of a whole-farm approach with a focus on animal welfare, performance and economic benefits. - Highlights: • Ruminants contributes 16–25% to the global greenhouse gases emissions. • Decrease methane emission and nitrogen excretion from ruminant livestock industry is urgently needed. • Essential oils have been shown to be promising feed additives in mitigating methane and ammonia emissions. • Essential oils have showed inconsistent results about feed degradability and VFA production. • The mode of action and activities of essential oils on rumen microbiome remain poorly understood.

  19. The ecology of methane in streams and rivers: Patterns, controls, and global significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Emily H.; Casson, Nora J.; Christel, Samuel T.; Crawford, John T.; Loken, Luke; Oliver, Samantha K.

    2016-01-01

    Streams and rivers can substantially modify organic carbon (OC) inputs from terrestrial landscapes, and much of this processing is the result of microbial respiration. While carbon dioxide (CO2) is the major end-product of ecosystem respiration, methane (CH4) is also present in many fluvial environments even though methanogenesis typically requires anoxic conditions that may be scarce in these systems. Given recent recognition of the pervasiveness of this greenhouse gas in streams and rivers, we synthesized existing research and data to identify patterns and drivers of CH4, knowledge gaps, and research opportunities. This included examining the history of lotic CH4 research, creating a database of concentrations and fluxes (MethDB) to generate a global-scale estimate of fluvial CH4 efflux, and developing a conceptual framework and using this framework to consider how human activities may modify fluvial CH4 dynamics. Current understanding of CH4 in streams and rivers has been strongly influenced by goals of understanding OC processing and quantifying the contribution of CH4 to ecosystem C fluxes. Less effort has been directed towards investigating processes that dictate in situ CH4 production and loss. CH4 makes a meager contribution to watershed or landscape C budgets, but streams and rivers are often significant CH4 sources to the atmosphere across these same spatial extents. Most fluvial systems are supersaturated with CH4 and we estimate an annual global emission of 26.8 Tg CH4, equivalent to ~15-40% of wetland and lake effluxes, respectively. Less clear is the role of CH4 oxidation, methanogenesis, and total anaerobic respiration to whole ecosystem production and respiration. Controls on CH4 generation and persistence can be viewed in terms of proximate controls that influence methanogenesis (organic matter, temperature, alternative electron acceptors, nutrients) and distal geomorphic and hydrologic drivers. Multiple controls combined with its

  20. Browse species from Ethiopia: role in methane reduction and nematode control in goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mengistu, Genet F.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the research reported in this thesis was to evaluate browse species collected from Ethiopia for preference by goats, and for their in vitro anthelmintic and methane (CH4) reduction properties. During the conduct of the studies observations were made warranting a further aim, to compare in

  1. The effects of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy on affective memory recall dynamics in depression : A mechanistic model of rumination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, Marieke K.; Hitchcock, Peter; Shahar, Ben; Britton, Willoughby

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Converging research suggests that mindfulness training exerts its therapeutic effects on depression by reducing rumination. Theoretically, rumination is a multifaceted construct that aggregates multiple neurocognitive aspects of depression, including poor executive control, negative and

  2. The effects of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy on affective memory recall dynamics in depression : A mechanistic model of rumination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, Marieke K.; Hitchcock, Peter; Shahar, Ben; Britton, Willoughby

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Converging research suggests that mindfulness training exerts its therapeutic effects on depression by reducing rumination. Theoretically, rumination is a multifaceted construct that aggregates multiple neurocognitive aspects of depression, including poor executive control, negative and

  3. Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) in Pakistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abubakar, Muhammad; Zahur, Aamir Bin; Afzal, Muhammad; Ali, Qurban; Gonzales Rojas, Jose

    2017-01-01

    The study was aimed to obtain baseline information about the presence and distribution of Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) in Pakistan by quantifying the sero-prevalence of this infection in all provinces/regions in the country. There are ongoing activities towards the progressive control and

  4. Eficácia de plantas para o controle de nematóides gastrintestinais de pequenos ruminantes: revisão de estudos publicados Plant efficacy in small ruminant gastrointestinal nematode control: a review of published studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Nery

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As helmintoses gastrintestinais constituem um dos principais fatores limitantes para a ovinocaprinocultura em todo o mundo e a saúde dos rebanhos depende de um efetivo controle antiparasitário. A resistência aos anti-helmínticos representa um dos entraves para esse controle e a busca por novas bases tem sido um desafio constante. A utilização da fitoterapia na medicina veterinária constitui um campo promissor de pesquisas. Estudos nesta área necessitam da inserção em um contexto agroecológico, tendo como fator limitante o manejo sustentável dos recursos naturais envolvidos. O presente artigo apresenta uma revisão dos estudos de plantas cientificamente testadas no Brasil e em outros países para o controle das parasitoses gastrintestinais em pequenos ruminantes.Gastrointestinal helminthiasis has been one of the main limiting factors to small ruminant breeding around the world and the health of these animals depends on an efficient parasitological control. Resistance to anthelmintics represents one of the barriers to this control and the search for new bases has been a constant challenge. The use of phytotherapy in Veterinary Medicine is a promising research field. Studies in this area require the insertion into an agroecological context, presenting as limitation the sustainable management of the involved natural resources. This paper presents a review of studies on plants scientifically tested in Brazil and other countries for gastrointestinal nematode control concerning small ruminants.

  5. Effect of lauric acid and coconut oil on ruminal fermentation, digestion, ammonia losses from manure, and milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, A N; Vander Pol, M; Agle, M; Zaman, S; Schneider, C; Ndegwa, P; Vaddella, V K; Johnson, K; Shingfield, K J; Karnati, S K R

    2009-11-01

    This experiment (replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design) was conducted to investigate the effects of lauric acid (LA) or coconut oil (CO) on ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestibility, ammonia losses from manure, and milk fatty acid (FA) composition in lactating cows. Treatments consisted of intraruminal doses of 240 g of stearic acid/d (SA; control), 240 g of LA/d, or 530 g of CO/d administered once daily, before feeding. Between periods, cows were inoculated with ruminal contents from donor cows and allowed a 7-d recovery period. Treatment did not affect dry matter intake, milk yield, or milk composition. Ruminal pH was slightly increased by CO compared with the other treatments, whereas LA and CO decreased ruminal ammonia concentration compared with SA. Both LA and CO decreased protozoal counts by 80% or more compared with SA. Methane production rate in the rumen was reduced by CO compared with LA and SA, with no differences between LA and SA. Treatments had no effect on total tract apparent dry matter, organic matter, N, and neutral detergent fiber digestibility coefficients or on cumulative (15 d) in vitro ammonia losses from manure. Compared with SA, LA and CO increased milk fat 12:0, cis-9 12:1, and trans-9 12:1 content and decreased 6:0, 8:0, 10:0, cis-9 10:1, 16:0, 18:0, cis 18:1, total 18:2, 18:3 n-3 and total polyunsaturated FA concentrations. Administration of LA and 14:0 (as CO) in the rumen were apparently transferred into milk fat with a mean efficiency of 18 and 15%, respectively. In conclusion, current data confirmed that LA and CO exhibit strong antiprotozoal activity when dosed intraruminally, an effect that is accompanied by decreases in ammonia concentration and, for CO, lowered methane production. Administration of LA and CO in the rumen also altered milk FA composition.

  6. Post-entry blockade of small ruminant lentiviruses by wild ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjosé, Leticia; Crespo, Helena; Blatti-Cardinaux, Laure; Glaria, Idoia; Martínez-Carrasco, Carlos; Berriatua, Eduardo; Amorena, Beatriz; De Andrés, Damián; Bertoni, Giuseppe; Reina, Ramses

    2016-01-06

    Small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) infection causes losses in the small ruminant industry due to reduced animal production and increased replacement rates. Infection of wild ruminants in close contact with infected domestic animals has been proposed to play a role in SRLV epidemiology, but studies are limited and mostly involve hybrids between wild and domestic animals. In this study, SRLV seropositive red deer, roe deer and mouflon were detected through modified ELISA tests, but virus was not successfully amplified using a set of different PCRs. Apparent restriction of SRLV infection in cervids was not related to the presence of neutralizing antibodies. In vitro cultured skin fibroblastic cells from red deer and fallow deer were permissive to the SRLV entry and integration, but produced low quantities of virus. SRLV got rapidly adapted in vitro to blood-derived macrophages and skin fibroblastic cells from red deer but not from fallow deer. Thus, although direct detection of virus was not successfully achieved in vivo, these findings show the potential susceptibility of wild ruminants to SRLV infection in the case of red deer and, on the other hand, an in vivo SRLV restriction in fallow deer. Altogether these results may highlight the importance of surveilling and controlling SRLV infection in domestic as well as in wild ruminants sharing pasture areas, and may provide new natural tools to control SRLV spread in sheep and goats.

  7. Effect of feeding garlic leaves on rumen fermentation, methane emission, plasma glucose kinetics, and nitrogen utilization in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthee, Arvinda; Matsuno, Ayana; Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Sano, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Garlic and its constituents are reported to have been effective in reducing methane emission and also influence glucose metabolism in body; however, studies in ruminants using garlic leaves are scarce. Garlic leaves contain similar compounds as garlic bulbs, but are discarded in field after garlic bulb harvest. We speculate that feeding garlic leaves might show similar effect as garlic constituents in sheep and could be potential animal feed supplement. Thus, we examined the effect of freeze dried garlic leaves (FDGL) on rumen fermentation, methane emission, plasma glucose kinetics and nitrogen utilization in sheep. Six sheep were fed Control diet (mixed hay and concentrate (60:40)) or FDGL diet (Control diet supplemented with FDGL at 2.5 g/kg BW(0.75) of sheep) using a crossover design. Methane gas emission was measured using open-circuit respiratory chamber. Plasma glucose turnover rate was measured using isotope dilution technique of [U-(13)C]glucose. Rumen fluid, feces and urine were collected to measure rumen fermentation characteristics and nitrogen utilization. No significant difference in rumen fermentation parameters was noticed except for rumen ammonia tended to be higher (0.05 glucose concentration was similar between diets and plasma glucose turnover rate tended to be higher in FDGL diet (0.05 glucose turnover rate and microbial nitrogen supply, further studies at higher dose would be necessary to conclude the merit of FDGL as supplement in ruminant feedstuff.

  8. A review of farm level modelling approaches for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from ruminant livestock systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schils, R.L.M.; Olesen, J.E.; Prado, del A.; Soussana, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    Ruminant livestock systems contribute to global warming through the emission of nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). This paper discusses a general framework for a whole-farm approach to develop cost-effective GHG mitigation strategies. A dairy farm is a complex system with d

  9. Immunization against Small Ruminant Lentiviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Amorena

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Multisystemic disease caused by Small Ruminant Lentiviruses (SRLV in sheep and goats leads to production losses, to the detriment of animal health and welfare. This, together with the lack of treatments, has triggered interest in exploring different strategies of immunization to control the widely spread SRLV infection and, also, to provide a useful model for HIV vaccines. These strategies involve inactivated whole virus, subunit vaccines, DNA encoding viral proteins in the presence or absence of plasmids encoding immunological adjuvants and naturally or artificially attenuated viruses. In this review, we revisit, comprehensively, the immunization strategies against SRLV and analyze this double edged tool individually, as it may contribute to either controlling or enhancing virus replication and/or disease.

  10. Methane reduction by plant pigments and antioxidants in rumen fluid involves modifications, e.g. hydrogenatioor degradation of the active compoundsn,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.; Wikselaar, van P.G.; Ilgenfritz, J.; Beekwilder, M.J.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Franz, C.H.; Zitterl-Eglseer, K.

    2013-01-01

    Methane is a major greenhouse gas, and ruminants cause about a quarter of all anthropogenic methane emissions. The objective of this study was to testplant secondary products in terms of their effects on methane production, and to follow active compounds analytically during incubation. In a simplifi

  11. Methane reduction by plant pigments and antioxidants in rumen fluid involves modifications, e.g. hydrogenatioor degradation of the active compoundsn,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.; Wikselaar, van P.G.; Ilgenfritz, J.; Beekwilder, M.J.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Franz, C.H.; Zitterl-Eglseer, K.

    2013-01-01

    Methane is a major greenhouse gas, and ruminants cause about a quarter of all anthropogenic methane emissions. The objective of this study was to testplant secondary products in terms of their effects on methane production, and to follow active compounds analytically during incubation. In a simplifi

  12. Peste des petits ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, S; Muniraju, M; Mahapatra, M; Muthuchelvan, D; Buczkowski, H; Banyard, A C

    2015-12-14

    Peste des petits ruminants virus causes a highly infectious disease of small ruminants that is endemic across Africa, the Middle East and large regions of Asia. The virus is considered to be a major obstacle to the development of sustainable agriculture across the developing world and has recently been targeted by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) for eradication with the aim of global elimination of the disease by 2030. Fundamentally, the vaccines required to successfully achieve this goal are currently available, but the availability of novel vaccine preparations to also fulfill the requisite for differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) may reduce the time taken and the financial costs of serological surveillance in the later stages of any eradication campaign. Here, we overview what is currently known about the virus, with reference to its origin, updated global circulation, molecular evolution, diagnostic tools and vaccines currently available to combat the disease. Further, we comment on recent developments in our knowledge of various recombinant vaccines and on the potential for the development of novel multivalent vaccines for small ruminants. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Management practices and controls on methane emissions from sub-tropical wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucia, Nicholas; Casa-Nova Gomez, Nuri; Bernacchi, Carl

    2015-04-01

    It is well documented that green house gas concentrations have risen at unequivocal rates since the industrial revolution but the disparity between anthropogenic sources and natural sources is uncertain. Wetlands are one example of a natural ecosystem that can be a substantial source or sink for methane (CH4) depending on any combination of climate conditions, natural and anthropogenic disturbances, or ecosystem perturbations. Due to strict anaerobic conditions required for CH4-generating microorganisms, natural wetlands are the main source for biogenic CH4. Although wetlands occupy less than 5% of total land surface area, they contribute approximately 20% of total CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. CH4 is one of the most damaging green house gases with current emission estimates ranging from 55 to 231 Tg CH4 yr-1. The processes regulating CH4 emissions are sensitive to land use and management practices of areas surrounding wetlands. Variation in adjacent vegetation or grazing intensity by livestock can, for example, alter CH4 fluxes from wetland soils by altering nutrient balance, carbon inputs and hydrology. Therefore, understanding how these changes will affect wetland source strength is essential to understand the impact of wetland management practices on the global climate system. In this study we quantify wetland methane fluxes from subtropical wetlands on a working cattle ranch in central Florida near Okeechobee Lake (27o10'52.04"N, 81o21'8.56"W). To determine differences in CH4 fluxes associated with land use and management, a replicated (n = 4) full factorial experiment was designed for wetlands where the surrounding vegetation was (1) grazed or un-grazed and (2) composed of native vegetation or improved pasture. Net exchange of CH4 and CO2 between the land surface and the atmosphere were sampled with a LICOR Li-7700 open path CH4 analyzer and Li-7500A open path CO2/H20 analyzer mounted in a 1-m3 static gas-exchange chamber. Our results showed and verified

  14. Quantification of methane behaviour in continuous miner headings using a controlled environment.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, FJ

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available . . . . . . . . 29 10 Statistical analysis . . . . . . 34 11 Discussion . . . . . . . 35 11.1 Last Through Road (LTR) velocity . . . . 35 11.2 Airflow past the operator’s cabin . . . . 36 11.3 Peak methane levels recorded . . . . 37 11.4 Operating parameters.../F left front LTR Last through road MS means squares N/A not applicable P probability R/H retrofitted hood Ret. return SS sums of squares SIMRAC Safety in Mines Research Advisory Committee Symbols bar bar KPa kilo Pascal L/min liters per minute...

  15. Seasonal trends and environmental controls of methane emissions in a rice paddy field in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Meijide

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice paddy fields are one of the greatest anthropogenic sources of methane (CH4, the third most important greenhouse gas after water vapour and carbon dioxide. In agricultural fields, CH4 is usually measured with the closed chamber technique, resulting in discontinuous series of measurements performed over a limited area, that generally do not provide sufficient information on the short-term variation of the fluxes. On the contrary, aerodynamic techniques have been rarely applied for the measurement of CH4 fluxes in rice paddy fields. The eddy covariance (EC technique provides integrated continuous measurements over a large area and may increase our understanding of the underlying processes and diurnal and seasonal pattern of CH4 emissions in this ecosystem.

    For this purpose a Fast Methane Analyzer (Los Gatos Research Ltd. was installed in an eddy-covariance field set-up in a rice paddy field in the Po Valley (Northern Italy. Methane fluxes were measured during the rice growing season, both with EC and with manually operated closed chambers. Methane fluxes were strongly influenced by the presence of the water table, with emissions peaking when it was above 10–12 cm. Further studies are required to evaluate if water table management could decrease CH4 emissions. The development of rice plants and soil temperature were also responsible of the seasonal variation on the fluxes. The EC measured showed a diurnal cycle in the emissions, which was more relevant during the vegetative period, and with CH4 emissions being higher in the late evening, possibly associated with higher water temperature. The comparison between both measurement techniques shows that greater fluxes are measured with the chambers, especially when higher fluxes are being produced, resulting in 30 % higher seasonal estimations with the chambers than with the EC (41.1 and 31.8 g CH4 m−2

  16. Seasonal trends and environmental controls of methane emissions in a rice paddy field in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Meijide

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice paddy fields are one of the greatest anthropogenic sources of methane (CH4, the third most important greenhouse gas after water vapour and carbon dioxide. In agricultural fields, CH4 is usually measured with the closed chamber technique, resulting in discontinuous series of measurements performed over a limited area, that generally do not provide sufficient information on the short-term variation of the fluxes. On the contrary, aerodynamic techniques have been rarely applied for the measurement of CH4 fluxes in rice paddy fields. The eddy covariance (EC technique provides integrated continuous measurements over a large area and may increase our understanding of the underlying processes and diurnal and seasonal pattern of CH4 emissions in this ecosystem.

    For this purpose a Fast Methane Analyzer (Los Gatos Research Ltd. was installed in a rice paddy field in the Po Valley (Northern Italy. Methane fluxes were measured during the rice growing season with both EC and manually operated closed chambers. Methane fluxes were strongly influenced by the height of the water table, with emissions peaking when it was above 10–12 cm. Soil temperature and the developmental stage of rice plants were also responsible of the seasonal variation on the fluxes. The measured EC fluxes showed a diurnal cycle in the emissions, which was more relevant during the vegetative period, and with CH4 emissions being higher in the late evening, possibly associated with higher water temperature. The comparison between the two measurement techniques shows that greater fluxes are measured with the chambers, especially when higher fluxes are being produced, resulting in 30 % higher seasonal estimations with the chambers than with the EC (41.1 and 31.7 g CH4 m−2 measured with chambers and EC respectively and even greater differences are found if shorter periods with high chamber sampling

  17. Risk factors for campylobacteriosis of chicken, ruminant, and environmental origin: a combined case-control and source attribution analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mughini Gras, L.; Smid, J.H.; Wagenaar, J.A.; de Boer, A.G.; Havelaar, A.H.; Friesema, I.H.M.; French, N.P.; Busani, L.; van Pelt, W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Campylobacteriosis contributes strongly to the disease burden of food-borne pathogens. Case-control studies are limited in attributing human infections to the different reservoirs because they can only trace back to the points of exposure, which may not point to the original reservoirs be

  18. Risk Factors for Campylobacteriosis of Chicken, Ruminant, and Environmental Origin: A Combined Case-Control and Source Attribution Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, L.M.; Smid, J.H.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Boer, de A.G.; Havelaar, A.H.; Friesema, I.H.M.; French, N.P.; Busani, L.; Pelt, van W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Campylobacteriosis contributes strongly to the disease burden of food-borne pathogens. Case-control studies are limited in attributing human infections to the different reservoirs because they can only trace back to the points of exposure, which may not point to the original reservoirs b

  19. Upcoming of the integrated tick control program of ruminants with special emphasis on livestock farming system in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, D B; Sarma, K; Saravanan, M

    2013-02-01

    Ticks and tick-borne diseases are a global problem and considered as a major obstacle in the health and product performance of animals which reflects impact on the livelihood of resource-poor farming communities. Tick control is practiced in a variety of methods including vaccination involving different livestock system. At present, periodic application of chemical acaricides is the most commonly used method of tick control especially among the small and marginal farmers of India. Resistance to existing chemical acaricides is widespread, and newer classes of acaricides have tended to be significantly more expensive. Presently, there is increasing concern about the use of chemicals in all forms of agriculture as well as livestock management by their potential environmental hazard and presence in food products. The use of herbal preparations among the rural folks is gaining importance because of their strong belief for folded benefits. Integrated control of ticks is the combination of a series of complementary control measures to make the best use of each without placing too much reliance on any single component. Alternative integrated approaches involve the use of eco-friendly cost effective sustainable methods in a strategic integrated manner.

  20. Risk factors for campylobacteriosis of chicken, ruminant, and environmental origin: a combined case-control and source attribution analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mughini Gras, L.; Smid, J.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313996458; Wagenaar, J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126613354; de Boer, A.G.; Havelaar, A.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072306122; Friesema, I.H.M.; French, N.P.; Busani, L.; van Pelt, W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Campylobacteriosis contributes strongly to the disease burden of food-borne pathogens. Case-control studies are limited in attributing human infections to the different reservoirs because they can only trace back to the points of exposure, which may not point to the original reservoirs be

  1. Risk Factors for Campylobacteriosis of Chicken, Ruminant, and Environmental Origin: A Combined Case-Control and Source Attribution Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, L.M.; Smid, J.H.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Boer, de A.G.; Havelaar, A.H.; Friesema, I.H.M.; French, N.P.; Busani, L.; Pelt, van W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Campylobacteriosis contributes strongly to the disease burden of food-borne pathogens. Case-control studies are limited in attributing human infections to the different reservoirs because they can only trace back to the points of exposure, which may not point to the original reservoirs b

  2. Methane output and diet digestibility in response to feeding dairy cows crude linseed, extruded linseed, or linseed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C; Rouel, J; Jouany, J P; Doreau, M; Chilliard, Y

    2008-10-01

    This experiment studied the effect of 3 forms of presentation of linseed fatty acids (FA) on methane output using the sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique, total tract digestibility, and performance of dairy cows. Eight multiparous lactating Holstein cows (initial milk yield 23.4 +/- 2.2 kg/d) were assigned to 4 dietary treatments in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design: a control diet (C) consisting of corn silage (59%), grass hay (6%), and concentrate (35%) and the same diet with crude linseed (CLS), extruded linseed (ELS), or linseed oil (LSO) at the same FA level (5.7% of dietary DM). Each experimental period lasted 4 wk. All the forms of linseed FA significantly decreased daily CH(4) emissions (P 0.05) but was decreased with ELS and LSO (-3.1 and -5.1 kg/d, respectively; P Linseed FA offer a promising dietary means to depress ruminal methanogenesis. The form of presentation of linseed FA greatly influences methane output from dairy cows. The negative effects of linseed on milk production will need to be overcome if it is to be considered as a methane mitigation agent. Optimal conditions for the utilization of linseed FA in ruminant diets need to be determined before recommending its use for the dairy industry.

  3. Is rumination after bereavement linked with loss avoidance? Evidence from eye-tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten C Eisma

    Full Text Available Rumination is a risk factor in adjustment to bereavement. It is associated with and predicts psychopathology after loss. Yet, the function of rumination in bereavement remains unclear. In the past, researchers often assumed rumination to be a maladaptive confrontation process. However, based on cognitive avoidance theories of worry in generalised anxiety disorder (GAD and rumination after post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, others have suggested that rumination may serve to avoid painful aspects of the loss, thereby contributing to complicated grief. To examine if rumination is linked with loss avoidance, an eye-tracking study was conducted with 54 bereaved individuals (27 high and 27 low ruminators. On 24 trials, participants looked for 10 seconds at a picture of the deceased and a picture of a stranger, randomly combined with negative, neutral or loss-related words. High ruminators were expected to show initial vigilance followed by subsequent disengagement for loss stimuli (i.e., picture deceased with a loss word in the first 1500 ms. Additionally, we expected high ruminators to avoid these loss stimuli and to show attentional preference for non-loss-related negative stimuli (i.e., picture stranger with a negative word on longer exposure durations (1500-10000 ms. Contrary to expectations, we found no evidence for an effect of rumination on vigilance and disengagement of loss stimuli in the first 1500 ms. However, in the 1500-10000 ms interval, high ruminators showed shorter gaze times for loss stimuli and longer gaze times for negative (and neutral non-loss-related stimuli, even when controlling for depression and complicated grief symptom levels. Effects of rumination on average fixation times mirrored these findings. This suggests that rumination and loss avoidance are closely associated. A potential clinical implication is that rumination and grief complications after bereavement may be reduced through the use of exposure and acceptance

  4. Ruminative Response Styles and Metacognitions in Internet Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer SENORMANCI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although cognitive behavioral model of Internet addiction has been well described, studies on metacognitions and ruminative response styles related with Internet addiction are very limited. The aim of the present study was to compare metacognitions and ruminative response style in Internet addicts with a healthy control group. Method: The study included 30 males who presented to our Internet Addiction Outpatient clinic, and diagnosed with Internet addiction, and a control group of 30 healthy males with similar sociodemographic characteristics. A sociodemographic data form, Internet Addiction Test (IAT, Metacognitions Questionnaire (MCQ-30, Ruminative Response Scale-short version (RRS-SV, and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were used for data collection. Results: The MCQ-30 total, MCQ-30 uncontrollability and danger score, MCQ-30 need to control thoughts score and RRS-SV scores statistically significantly higher in study group compared the control group. After correcting for BDI by ANCOVA, the difference between MCQ-30 total score and RRS-SV disappeared. Conclusion: Internet addicts show ruminative responses instead of having an effective problem-solving attitude and defining problems; and this self-focused rumination leads an individual to recall more reinforced memories about the Internet so that the problem of Internet addiction becomes deeper. As a result of this study, although Internet addiction is accompanied by depression primarily or secondarily, manifestation of Internet addiction is exacerbated by depression through ruminative responses and metacognitions

  5. Conceptual framework for analysing farm-specific economic effects of helminth infections in ruminants and control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, Mariska; Charlier, Johannes; Lauwers, Ludwig; Vercruysse, Jozef; Van Huylenbroeck, Guido; Van Meensel, Jef

    2013-05-01

    Helminth infections are considered to be an important constraint on livestock productivity worldwide. The economic impact of these infections or their control strategies has traditionally been assessed by their effect on animal performance indicators or traditional economic calculation methods (e.g. budgeting and cost-benefit analysis). Because the impact of helminth infections has become more subtle and is farm-specific, one needs more refined economic evaluations of actions meant to increase or maintain the health of livestock on individual farms. This paper proposes an interdisciplinary framework that combines the developments in the veterinary control of helminth infections with economic performance measurements to identify farm-specific and profitable anthelmintic management decisions. Our framework positions individual farms' performance against performance benchmarks and is based on the farms' efficiency in transforming input(s) into output(s). We show how this positioning makes it possible to establish a linkage between input and output transformation, helminth infection levels and effects of control strategies. Furthermore, the framework allows for the identification of improvement paths that are not necessarily related to the helminth infection, but which may lead to other management improvements. We discuss the epidemiological information required and which complementary methods (e.g. efficiency analysis and budgeting techniques) can be used to make the framework operational.

  6. Digestive strategies in ruminants and non-ruminants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieren, van S.E.

    1996-01-01

    Of the 176 species of ungulates in the world the great majority (146 species) are ruminants. The more recent ruminants probably have displaced the older nonruminants because of their superior digestive system in combination with the ruminantion mechanism leading to significant advantageous differenc

  7. Ruminative Response Styles and Metacognitions in Internet Addicts

    OpenAIRE

    Senormanci, Omer; Konkan, Ramazan; Guclu, Oya; Senormanci, Guliz

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although cognitive behavioral model of Internet addiction has been well described, studies on metacognitions and ruminative response styles related with Internet addiction are very limited. The aim of the present study was to compare metacognitions and ruminative response style in Internet addicts with a healthy control group. Method: The study included 30 males who presented to our Internet Addiction Outpatient clinic, and diagnosed with Internet addiction, and a c...

  8. Arctic methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyupina, E.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2013-01-01

    What are the risks of a runaway greenhouse effect from methane release from hydrates in the Arctic? In January 2013, a dramatic increase of methane concentration up to 2000 ppb has been measured over the Arctic north of Norway in the Barents Sea. The global average being 1750 ppb. It has been

  9. Arctic methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyupina, E.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2013-01-01

    What are the risks of a runaway greenhouse effect from methane release from hydrates in the Arctic? In January 2013, a dramatic increase of methane concentration up to 2000 ppb has been measured over the Arctic north of Norway in the Barents Sea. The global average being 1750 ppb. It has been sugges

  10. Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, M D; Diallo, A; Lancelot, R; Libeau, G

    2016-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) causes a severe contagious disease of sheep and goats and has spread extensively through the developing world. Because of its disproportionately large impact on the livelihoods of low-income livestock keepers, and the availability of effective vaccines and good diagnostics, the virus is being targeted for global control and eventual eradication. In this review we examine the origin of the virus and its current distribution, and the factors that have led international organizations to conclude that it is eradicable. We also review recent progress in the molecular and cellular biology of the virus and consider areas where further research is required to support the efforts being made by national, regional, and international bodies to tackle this growing threat. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Methylotrophic methanogenic Thermoplasmata implicated in reduced methane emissions from bovine rumen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten; Schwab, Clarissa; Jensen, Bent Borg

    2013-01-01

    Rumen methanogens are major sources of anthropogenic methane emissions, and these archaea are targets in strategies aimed at reducing methane emissions. Here we show that the poorly characterised Thermoplasmata archaea in bovine rumen are methylotrophic methanogens and that they are reduced upon...... potential as target in future strategies to mitigate methane emissions from ruminant livestock. Our findings and the findings of others also indicate a wider distribution of methanogens than previously anticipated....

  12. Schmallenberg virus infection of ruminants: challenges and opportunities for veterinarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claine F

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available François Claine, Damien Coupeau, Laetitia Wiggers, Benoît Muylkens, Nathalie Kirschvink Veterinary Department, Faculty of Sciences, Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences (NARILIS, University of Namur (UNamur, Namur, Belgium Abstract: In 2011, European ruminant flocks were infected by Schmallenberg virus (SBV leading to transient disease in adult cattle but abortions and congenital deformities in calves, lambs, and goat kids. SBV belonging to the Simbu serogroup (family Bunyaviridae and genus Orthobunyavirus was first discovered in the same region where bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8 emerged 5 years before. Both viruses are transmitted by biting midges (Culicoides spp. and share several similarities. This paper describes the current knowledge of temporal and geographical spread, molecular virology, transmission and susceptible species, clinical signs, diagnosis, prevention and control, impact on ruminant health, and productivity of SBV infection in Europe, and compares SBV infection with BTV-8 infection in ruminants. Keywords: Schmallenberg virus, Europe, ruminants, review

  13. Ruminal lipopolysaccharide concentration and inflammatory response during grain-induced subacute ruminal acidosis in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozho, G N; Krause, D O; Plaizier, J C

    2007-02-01

    The effects of grain-induced subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in lactating dairy cows on free ruminal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and indicators of inflammation were determined. Four mid lactation dairy cows were divided into 2 groups of 2 cows and used in a repeated switchover design. During each period, SARA was induced in 2 animals for 5 subsequent days by replacing 25% of their total mixed ration (dry matter basis) with a concentrate made of 50% wheat and 50% barley. The other 2 cows acted as controls and were fed a total mixed ration diet in which 44% of dry matter was concentrate. On average, inducing SARA did not affect milk composition, increased the duration of rumen pH below 5.6 from 187 to 309 min/d, and increased free ruminal LPS concentration from 24,547 endotoxin units (EU)/mL to 128,825 EU/mL. Averaged across treatments, milk fat yield and milk protein yield were 0.66 and 1.00 kg/d, respectively. Rumen pH and milk fat data suggest that control cows also experienced ruminal acidosis, albeit a milder form of this disease than SARA cows. Serum LPS concentration in both control and SARA cows was less than the detection limit of inflammation including haptoglobin, fibrinogen, serum copper, or white blood cells. These results suggest that grain-induced SARA in mid lactation dairy cows increases the lysis of gram-negative bacteria and activates an inflammatory response.

  14. Early family context and development of adolescent ruminative style: moderation by temperament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilt, Lori M; Armstrong, Jeffrey M; Essex, Marilyn J

    2012-01-01

    We know very little about the development of rumination, the tendency to passively brood about negative feelings. Because rumination is a risk factor for many forms of psychopathology, especially depression, such knowledge could prove important for preventing negative mental health outcomes in youth. This study examined developmental origins of rumination in a longitudinal sample (N=337; 51% girls) studied in preschool (ages 3½ and 4½ years) and early adolescence (ages 13 and 15 years). Results indicated that family context and child temperament, assessed during the preschool period, were risk factors for a ruminative style in adolescence. Specifically, early family contexts characterised by over-controlling parenting and a family style of negative-submissive expressivity predicted higher levels of later rumination. These associations were moderated by children's temperamental characteristics of negative affect and effortful control. Further, the interaction of these temperament factors exerted an additional influence on later rumination. Implications for prevention and intervention efforts are discussed.

  15. The impact of air pollutant and methane emission controls on tropospheric ozone and radiative forcing: CTM calculations for the period 1990–2030

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Raes

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available To explore the relationship between tropospheric ozone and radiative forcing with changing emissions, we compiled two sets of global scenarios for the emissions of the ozone precursors methane (CH4, carbon monoxide (CO, non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC and nitrogen oxides (NOx up to the year 2030 and implemented them in two global Chemistry Transport Models. The "Current Legislation" (CLE scenario reflects the current perspectives of individual countries on future economic development and takes the anticipated effects of presently decided emission control legislation in the individual countries into account. In addition, we developed a "Maximum technically Feasible Reduction" (MFR scenario that outlines the scope for emission reductions offered by full implementation of the presently available emission control technologies, while maintaining the projected levels of anthropogenic activities. Whereas the resulting projections of methane emissions lie within the range suggested by other greenhouse gas projections, the recent pollution control legislation of many Asian countries, requiring introduction of catalytic converters for vehicles, leads to significantly lower growth in emissions of the air pollutants NOx, NMVOC and CO than was suggested by the widely used IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change SRES (Special Report on Emission Scenarios scenarios (Nakicenovic et al., 2000. With the TM3 and STOCHEM models we performed several long-term integrations (1990–2030 to assess global, hemispheric and regional changes in CH4, CO, hydroxyl radicals, ozone and the radiative climate forcings resulting from these two emission scenarios. Both models reproduce realistically the observed trends in background ozone, CO, and CH4 concentrations from 1990 to 2002. For the "current legislation" case, both models indicate an increase of the annual average ozone levels in the Northern hemisphere by 5 ppbv, and up to 15 ppbv over the Indian

  16. Mitigation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from animal operations: I. A review of enteric methane mitigation options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hristov, A.N.; Oh, J.; Firkins, J.; Dijkstra, J.; Kebreab, E.; Waghorn, G.; Makkar, H.P.S.; Adesogan, A.T.; Yang, W.; Lee, C.; Gerber, P.J.; Henderson, B.L.; Tricarico, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this review was to analyze published data related to mitigation of enteric methane (CH4) emissions from ruminant animals to document the most effective and sustainable strategies. Increasing forage digestibility and digestible forage intake was one of the major recommended CH4 mitigation

  17. Mitigation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from animal operations: I. A review of enteric methane mitigation options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hristov, A.N.; Oh, J.; Firkins, J.; Dijkstra, J.; Kebreab, E.; Waghorn, G.; Makkar, H.P.S.; Adesogan, A.T.; Yang, W.; Lee, C.; Gerber, P.J.; Henderson, B.L.; Tricarico, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this review was to analyze published data related to mitigation of enteric methane (CH4) emissions from ruminant animals to document the most effective and sustainable strategies. Increasing forage digestibility and digestible forage intake was one of the major recommended CH4 mitigation

  18. Quantification of methane emissions from danish landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Mønster, Jacob; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Whole-landfill methane emission was quantified using a tracer technique that combines controlled tracer gas release from the landfill with time-resolved concentration measurements downwind of the landfill using a mobile high-resolution analytical instrument. Methane emissions from 13 Danish...... landfills varied between 2.6 and 60.8 kg CH4 h–1. The highest methane emission was measured at the largest (in terms of disposed waste amounts) of the 13 landfills, whereas the lowest methane emissions (2.6-6.1 kgCH4 h–1) were measured at the older and smaller landfills. At two of the sites, which had gas...... collection, emission measurements showed that the gas collection systems only collected between 30-50% of the methane produced (assuming that the produced methane equalled the sum of the emitted methane and the collected methane). Significant methane emissions were observed from disposed shredder waste...

  19. Acidose ruminal em caprinos

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, José Diogo de Oliveira e silva Ribeiro da

    2012-01-01

    Dissertação de Mestrado Integrado em Medicina Veterinária Com este trabalho pretendeu-se fazer uma revisão acerca da acidose ruminal em caprinos, visto haver pouca bibliografia sobre o tema. Este trabalho foi baseado na revisão bibliográfica de artigos científicos e completado através da observação de casos clínicos ocorridos durante o estágio curricular. O objectivo deste estudo foi realizar uma breve revisão da anatomia e fisiologia do tracto gastrointestinal dos caprinos assim com...

  20. Acidose ruminal em caprinos

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, José Diogo de Oliveira e silva Ribeiro da

    2012-01-01

    Dissertação de Mestrado Integrado em Medicina Veterinária Com este trabalho pretendeu-se fazer uma revisão acerca da acidose ruminal em caprinos, visto haver pouca bibliografia sobre o tema. Este trabalho foi baseado na revisão bibliográfica de artigos científicos e completado através da observação de casos clínicos ocorridos durante o estágio curricular. O objectivo deste estudo foi realizar uma breve revisão da anatomia e fisiologia do tracto gastrointestinal dos caprinos assim com...

  1. Avoidance processes mediate the relationship between rumination and symptoms of complicated grief and depression following loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisma, Maarten C; Stroebe, Margaret S; Schut, Henk A W; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Boelen, Paul A; van den Bout, Jan

    2013-11-01

    Ruminative coping has been associated with negative outcomes in bereavement. Rather than assuming it to be a problematic confrontation process, researchers have recently suggested rumination to be maladaptive through its links with avoidance processes. The main aim of this study was to examine, for the first time, whether the relationship between ruminative coping and symptoms of complicated grief and depression is mediated by avoidance processes (suppression, memory/experiential avoidance, behavioral avoidance, loss-reality avoidance). A sample of 282 adults (88% female, 12% male), bereaved on average 18 months previously, filled out three questionnaires at 6-month intervals. We assessed symptom levels, grief rumination, and trait rumination at baseline; avoidance processes after 6 months; and symptom levels after 12 months. When controlling for initial symptom levels, experiential avoidance mediated the link between grief rumination and complicated grief, and experiential avoidance and behavioral avoidance mediated the link between grief rumination and depression. Post hoc analyses showed suppression may also mediate the link between grief rumination and symptoms of complicated grief, but not depression. Loss-reality avoidance was no significant mediator of these relationships. This study provides initial evidence that rumination during bereavement increases and perpetuates symptoms of psychopathology, because it is linked with specific avoidance processes. Bereaved individuals with problematic grief and (chronic) rumination may benefit from therapy focused on countering avoidance tendencies.

  2. Brief Report: Adolescents' Co-Rumination with Mothers, Co-Rumination with Friends, and Internalizing Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Erika M.; Rose, Amanda J.

    2013-01-01

    The current research examined co-rumination (extensively discussing, rehashing, and speculating about problems) with mothers and friends. Of interest was exploring whether adolescents who co-ruminate with mothers were especially likely to co-ruminate with friends as well as the interplay among co-rumination with mothers, co-rumination with…

  3. Adaptive and maladaptive rumination after loss: A three-wave longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisma, Maarten C; Schut, Henk A W; Stroebe, Maggie S; Boelen, Paul A; van den Bout, Jan; Stroebe, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Rumination is a risk factor after bereavement, predicting higher concurrent and prospective symptom levels of complicated grief and depression in mourners. Research has shown that rumination may consist of adaptive and maladaptive subtypes, but there has been a paucity of research in this topic in the bereavement area. Therefore, we aimed to clarify whether functional and dysfunctional forms of rumination can be distinguished after loss. Two-hundred and forty-two adults, who lost a first-degree family member on average 10 months previously, filled out questionnaires at three time points with 6 months between each time point. Multiple regression analyses, controlled for loss-related variables, neuroticism, and baseline symptoms, were run to examine associations of subtypes of depressive rumination (brooding, reflection) and grief rumination (rumination about injustice, meaning, reactions, relationships and counterfactual thinking) with concurrent and prospective symptom levels of complicated grief and depression. Overall, grief rumination explained more variance in symptom levels than depressive rumination. Other major findings were that grief rumination about injustice predicted higher concurrent and prospective symptom levels of complicated grief and higher prospective symptom levels of depression. In contrast, grief rumination about emotional reactions was related to prospective reductions in symptoms of complicated grief. Reflection was also associated with prospective reductions of complicated grief and depressive symptom levels. Results indicate that adaptive and maladaptive forms of ruminative thinking can be distinguished in bereaved individuals. Therapeutic interventions for complicated grief could potentially be improved by including techniques aimed at reducing maladaptive rumination and increasing adaptive rumination. Clinical implications: Adaptive and maladaptive components of rumination after loss can be distinguished. They are differentially

  4. Methane from domestic animals: Possibilities for reduction by methane inhibitors; Methan fra husdyr: Muligheder for reduktion ved brug af metanhaemmende stoffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisbjerg, M.R. [Danmarks JordbrugsForskning. Afd. for Husdyrsundhed, Velfaerd og Ernaering, Tjele (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    Ruminant's enteric fermentation implies production of methane. A number of substances might have an impact on the production of methane, either through influence on the composition of rumen microbes or through hydrogen consumption. Changing the rumen micro-flora composition through biological methods might also influence the methane production. Several chemical methane inhibitors will not be acceptable for use in cattle farming, and the use of biological methods is technological immature. The most promising methods acceptable for general use are the use of bacteriocines, e.g. Nisin, and application of hydrogen consuming substances as fumarat or malat to the fodder. Furthermore, serums with the ability to further antibody production against methanogen bacteria are being developed, which would reduce the methane production. (BA)

  5. Effect of lactic acid bacteria inoculant and beet pulp addition on fermentation characteristics and in vitro ruminal digestion of vegetable residue silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y; Cai, Y; Takahashi, T; Yoshida, N; Tohno, M; Uegaki, R; Nonaka, K; Terada, F

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of beet pulp (BP) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on silage fermentation quality and in vitro ruminal dry matter (DM) digestion of vegetable residues, including white cabbage, Chinese cabbage, red cabbage, and lettuce. Silage was prepared using a small-scale fermentation system, and treatments were designed as control silage without additive or with BP (30% fresh matter basis), LAB inoculant Chikuso-1 (Lactobacillus plantarum, 5mg/kg, fresh matter basis), and BP+LAB. In vitro incubation was performed using rumen fluid mixed with McDougall's artificial saliva (at a ratio of 1:4, vol/vol) at 39°C for 6h to determine the ruminal fermentability of the vegetable residue silages. These vegetable residues contained high levels of crude protein (20.6-22.8% of DM) and moderate levels of neutral detergent fiber (22.7-33.6% of DM). In all silages, the pH sharply decreased and lactic acid increased, and the growth of bacilli, coliform bacteria, molds, and yeasts was inhibited by the low pH at the early stage of ensiling. The silage treated with BP or LAB had a lower pH and a higher lactic acid content than the control silage. After 6h of incubation, all silages had relatively high DM digestibility (38.6-44.9%); in particular, the LAB-inoculated silage had the highest DM digestibility and the lowest methane production. The vegetable residues had high nutritional content and high in vitro DM digestibility. Also, both the addition of a LAB inoculant and moisture adjustment with BP improved the fermentation quality of the vegetable residue silages. In addition, LAB increased DM digestibility and decreased ruminal methane production.

  6. Rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy vs. cognitive behaviour therapy for depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvenegaard, Morten; Watkins, Ed R; Poulsen, Stig

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive behavioural therapy is an effective treatment for depression. However, one third of the patients do not respond satisfactorily, and relapse rates of around 30 % within the first post-treatment year were reported in a recent meta-analysis. In total, 30-50 % of remitted patients...... of future depression. Rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy is a psychotherapeutic treatment targeting rumination. Because rumination plays a major role in the initiation and maintenance of depression, targeting rumination with rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy may be more...... effective in treating depression and reducing relapse than standard cognitive behavioural therapy. METHOD/DESIGN: This study is a two-arm pragmatic randomised controlled superiority trial comparing the effectiveness of group-based rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy with the effectiveness...

  7. Rumination fosters indecision in dysphoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Randenborgh, Annette; de Jong-Meyer, Renate; Hüffmeier, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of rumination on indecision, assessed as high levels of perceived decision difficulty, low confidence in a decision, and decision latency. Dysphoric and nondysphoric participants were assigned to either a rumination or a distraction induction. Subsequently, they made four decisions with alleged real-life consequences. As predicted, rumination exhibited a negative effect on dysphoric participants' decision-making process. They experienced the decisions as more difficult and had less confidence in their choices. No effects emerged on the measure of decision time. Mediation analyses revealed that increased difficulty of the decisions was due to self-focused thinking as a cognitive consequence of rumination, while reduced confidence in the decisions was partly mediated by negative affect that resulted from rumination. The finding that rumination affects the important life domain of decision making by fostering indecision in dysphoric individuals is a central extension of previous studies on rumination's consequences. In addition, these results provide insight into the depressive symptom of indecisiveness by revealing its underlying mechanisms.

  8. Physical controls on the storage of methane in land fast sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Jiayun; Tison, Jean Louis; Carnat, Gauthier

    2014-01-01

    the overall higher CH4 concentrations in brine than in the under-ice water. As sea ice thickened, gas bubble formation became less efficient so that CH4 was then mainly trapped in the dissolved state. The increase of sea ice permeability during ice melt marks the end of CH4 storage.......We report on methane (CH4) dynamics in landfast sea ice, brine and under-ice seawater at Barrow in 2009. The CH4 concentrations in under-ice water ranged between 25.9 and 116.4 nmol L−1sw, indicating a superaturation of 700 to 3100% relative to the atmosphere. In comparison, the CH4 concentrations...... in ice, ranged between 3.4 and 17.2 nmol L−1ice, and the deduced CH4 concentrations in brine, between 13.2 and 677.7 nmol L−1br. We investigated on the processes explaining the difference in CH4 concentrations between sea ice, brine and the under-ice water, and suggest that two physical processes...

  9. Marine-controlled source electromagnetic study of methane seeps and gas hydrates at Opouawe Bank, Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalenberg, Katrin; Rippe, Dennis; Koch, Stephanie; Scholl, Carsten

    2017-05-01

    Marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data have been collected to investigate methane seep sites and associated gas hydrate deposits at Opouawe Bank on the southern tip of the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand. The bank is located in about 1000 m water depth within the gas hydrate stability field. The seep sites are characterized by active venting and typical methane seep fauna accompanied with patchy carbonate outcrops at the seafloor. Below the seeps, gas migration pathways reach from below the bottom-simulating reflector (at around 380 m sediment depth) toward the seafloor, indicating free gas transport into the shallow hydrate stability field. The CSEM data have been acquired with a seafloor-towed, electric multi-dipole system measuring the inline component of the electric field. CSEM data from three profiles have been analyzed by using 1-D and 2-D inversion techniques. High-resolution 2-D and 3-D multichannel seismic data have been collected in the same area. The electrical resistivity models show several zones of highly anomalous resistivities (>50 Ωm) which correlate with high amplitude reflections located on top of narrow vertical gas conduits, indicating the coexistence of free gas and gas hydrates within the hydrate stability zone. Away from the seeps the CSEM models show normal background resistivities between 1 and 2 Ωm. Archie's law has been applied to estimate gas/gas hydrate saturations below the seeps. At intermediate depths between 50 and 200 m below seafloor, saturations are between 40 and 80% and gas hydrate may be the dominating pore filling constituent. At shallow depths from 10 m to the seafloor, free gas dominates as seismic data and gas plumes suggest.

  10. 46 CFR 154.703 - Methane (LNG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methane (LNG). 154.703 Section 154.703 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... and Temperature Control § 154.703 Methane (LNG). Unless a cargo tank carrying methane (LNG)...

  11. Writing about life goals: effects on rumination, mood and the cortisol awakening response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teismann, Tobias; Het, Serkan; Grillenberger, Matthias; Willutzki, Ulrike; Wolf, Oliver T

    2014-11-01

    Rumination is a vulnerability factor for the onset and maintenance of emotional distress. This study examined whether writing about life goals is associated with a decrease in ruminative thinking and a reduced cortisol awakening response. 68 healthy participants either wrote about their personal life goals or a control topic. Writing about life goals was associated with a modest decrease in ruminative thinking and a reduced cortisol awakening response at the post-intervention assessment. Results provide initial evidence that writing about life goals can be a helpful aid in decreasing rumination and physiological stress reactivity.

  12. Decision making in ruminant orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, J F; Adams, S B

    1996-03-01

    Decision making in ruminant orthopedics is determined by many factors, the most of important of which is age, size, and value of the patient, the nature of the injury, the prognosis for effective treatment and satisfactory healing, the intentions of the client, and the experiences of the veterinarian. Ruminant orthopedics currently is expanding to include the treatment of llamas and small ruminants as companion animals in addition to the treatment of valuable livestock. The future promises increasing sophistication in treatments and an ever higher quality of patient care.

  13. Research on the Control System of Lick Brick Processing for Ruminant%反刍动物舔砖加工系统的控制研究与设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐香琴

    2009-01-01

    This text discussed that the design train of thought on control system of lick brick processing for ruminant, programmable controller (PLC) and microcomputer are used for the control system. The author brought forward that the design train of thought and technique on by PLC controlling combined with processing craft flow and working principle.%论述了反刍动物舔砖加工控制系统的设计思路,可编程控制器(PLC)及微机在控制系统中的应用,结合加工工艺流程与工作原理,提出了用PLC进行控制的设计思路及控制设计方法.

  14. Prediction and evaluation of enteric methane emissions from lactating dairy cows using different levels of covariate information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santiago-Juarez, B.; Moraes, L.E.; Appuhamy, J.A.D.R.N.; Pellikaan, W.F.; Casper, D.P.; Tricarico, J.; Kebreab, E.

    2016-01-01

    The dairy sector contributes to global warming through enteric methane (CH4) emissions. Methane is also a loss of energy to the ruminant. Several studies have developed CH4 prediction models to assess mitigation strategies to reduce emissions. However, the majority of these models have low

  15. Investigating Physical Controls on Methane and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes over Reservoirs Using the Eddy Covariance Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, S.; Beaulieu, J. J.; Walker, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    Reservoirs are a globally important source of carbon to the atmosphere. Several recent studies have found that both carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions from reservoirs are currently being underestimated by up to 50%. This underestimation is due to inadequate characterization of both spatial variability (e.g. ebullition and CO2 surface water concentration hot spots) and temporal variability (e.g. diurnal patterns, seasonal differences, and pulses driven by weather events or other disturbances). Use of the eddy covariance technique to measure CO2 and CH4 fluxes over reservoirs can help address the issues of spatial and temporal coverage. Here we present results from two eddy covariance measurement campaigns monitoring CO2 and CH4 fluxes over reservoirs in southwestern Ohio, US. The first campaign examined the effects of water level drawdown on reservoir CH4 ebullition. The eddy covariance results showed a clear response of CH4 emissions to the change in water level, increasing from a baseline of 3440 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 to a maximum of 6740 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 during the drawdown. These results agreed well with the emission rates measured via bubble samplers deployed in the vicinity of the tower. Conversely, the CO2 fluxes did not show a strong response to the drawdown. The eddy covariance system was deployed for a longer period of time during a second campaign at a mid-sized (2.4 km2) lake. Analyses of diurnal patterns in CO2 and CH4 emissions as well as emission response to synoptic events will be presented. Our results contribute to the ongoing effort to better interpret and scale-up CH4 and CO2 emissions from reservoirs.

  16. Methane emission by adult ostriches (Struthio camelus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Samuel; Dittmann, Marie T; Reutlinger, Christoph; Ortmann, Sylvia; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2015-02-01

    Ostriches (Struthio camelus) are herbivorous birds with a digestive physiology that shares several similarities with that of herbivorous mammals. Previous reports, however, claimed a very low methane emission from ostriches, which would be clearly different from mammals. If this could be confirmed, ostrich meat would represent a very attractive alternative to ruminant-and generally mammalian-meat by representing a particularly low-emission agricultural form of production. We individually measured, by chamber respirometry, the amount of oxygen consumed as well as carbon dioxide and methane emitted from six adult ostriches (body mass 108.3±8.3 kg) during a 24-hour period when fed a pelleted lucerne diet. While oxygen consumption was in the range of values previously reported for ostriches, supporting the validity of our experimental setup, methane production was, at 17.5±3.2 L d(-1), much higher than previously reported for this species, and was of the magnitude expected for similar-sized, nonruminant mammalian herbivores. These results suggest that methane emission is similar between ostriches and nonruminant mammalian herbivores and that the environmental burden of these animals is comparable. The findings furthermore indicate that it appears justified to use currently available scaling equations for methane production of nonruminant mammals in paleo-reconstructions of methane production of herbivorous dinosaurs.

  17. Strategies for optimizing nitrogen use by ruminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calsamiglia, S; Ferret, A; Reynolds, C K

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of N utilization in ruminants is typically low (around 25%) and highly variable (10% to 40%) compared with the higher efficiency of other production animals. The low efficiency has implications for the production performance and environment. Many efforts have been devoted to improv......The efficiency of N utilization in ruminants is typically low (around 25%) and highly variable (10% to 40%) compared with the higher efficiency of other production animals. The low efficiency has implications for the production performance and environment. Many efforts have been devoted...... to improving the efficiency of N utilization in ruminants, and while major improvements in our understanding of N requirements and metabolism have been achieved, the overall efficiency remains low. In general, maximal efficiency of N utilization will only occur at the expense of some losses in production...... performance. However, optimal production and N utilization may be achieved through the understanding of the key mechanisms involved in the control of N metabolism. Key factors in the rumen include the efficiency of N capture in the rumen (grams of bacterial N per grams of rumen available N...

  18. Effects of fluorination modification on pore size controlled electrospun activated carbon fibers for high capacity methane storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Ji Sun; Jung, Min Jung; Lee, Young-Seak

    2009-11-01

    Electrospun carbon fibers were prepared as a methane storage medium. Chemical activation was carried out using potassium carbonate to develop the pore structure, which can provide sites for the uptake of methane, and then fluorination surface modification was conducted to enhance the capacity of storage. Chemical activation provided a highly microporous structure, which is beneficial for methane storage, with a high specific surface area greater than 2500m(2)/g. The pore size distribution showed that the prepared samples have pore sizes in the range of 0.7-1.6nm. The effect of fluorination surface modification was also investigated. The functional groups, which were confirmed by XPS analysis, played an important role in guiding methane gas into the carbon silt pores via the attractive force felt by the electrons in the methane molecules due to the high electronegativity of fluorine. Eventually, the methane uptake increased up to 18.1wt.% by the synergetic effects of the highly developed micropore structure and the guiding of methane to carbon pores by fluorine.

  19. Controlled Surface Segregation Leads to Efficient Coke-Resistant Nickel/Platinum Bimetallic Catalysts for the Dry Reforming of Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lidong [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Zhou, Lu [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Ould-Chikh, Samy [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Anjum, Dalaver H. [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Kanoun, Mohammed B. [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Scaranto, Jessica [SABIC Corporate Research and Innovation Center, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Hedhili, Mohamed N. [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Khalid, Syed [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Laveille, Paco V. [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); D' Souza, Lawrence [SABIC Corporate Research and Innovation Center, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Clo, Alain [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Basset, Jean-Marie [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-02-03

    The surface composition and structure are of vital importance for heterogeneous catalysts, especially for bimetallic catalysts, which often vary as a function of reaction conditions (known as surface segregation). The preparation of bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure is very challenging. In this study, we synthesize a series of Ni/Pt bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure using a method derived from surface organometallic chemistry. Moreover, the evolution of the surface composition and structure of the obtained bimetallic catalysts under simulated reaction conditions is investigated by various techniques, which include CO-probe IR spectroscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis, X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis, XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the structure of the bimetallic catalyst is evolved from Pt monolayer island-modified Ni nanoparticles to core–shell bimetallic nanoparticles composed of a Ni-rich core and a Ni/Pt alloy shell upon thermal treatment. The catalysts are active for the dry reforming of methane, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure.

  20. Source Attribution of Methane Emissions in Northeastern Colorado Using Ammonia to Methane Emission Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilerman, S. J.; Neuman, J. A.; Peischl, J.; Aikin, K. C.; Ryerson, T. B.; Perring, A. E.; Robinson, E. S.; Holloway, M.; Trainer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Due to recent advances in extraction technology, oil and natural gas extraction and processing in the Denver-Julesburg basin has increased substantially in the past decade. Northeastern Colorado is also home to over 250 concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), capable of hosting over 2 million head of ruminant livestock (cattle and sheep). Because of methane's high Global Warming Potential, quantification and attribution of methane emissions from oil and gas development and agricultural activity are important for guiding greenhouse gas emission policy. However, due to the co-location of these different sources, top-down measurements of methane are often unable to attribute emissions to a specific source or sector. In this work, we evaluate the ammonia:methane emission ratio directly downwind of CAFOs using a mobile laboratory. Several CAFOs were chosen for periodic study over a 12-month period to identify diurnal and seasonal variation in the emission ratio as well as differences due to livestock type. Using this knowledge of the agricultural ammonia:methane emission ratio, aircraft measurements of ammonia and methane over oil and gas basins in the western US during the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field campaign in March and April 2015 can be used for source attribution of methane emissions.

  1. Controls on coalbed methane potential and gas sorption characteristics of high-volatile bituminous coals in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Acosta, Wilfrido

    The increasing demand for energy and a growing concern for global warming, owing in part to the steep rise in anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, have sparked worldwide interest in clean coal technologies. Although the energy potential of coal is large, there are many environmental concerns associated with its large-scale utilization. An alternative solution to increasing demand for energy is the recovery of coalbed methane (CBM), an efficient and clean fossil fuel associated with extensive coal deposits. CBM today represents nearly 10 percent of the energy consumed in the United States. From an environmental perspective, coal beds that are too deep or that contain low-quality coal are being investigated as potential sites for permanently sequestering carbon dioxide emissions (CO2 sequestration). Methane has been documented in coals of various ranks. The occurrence and distribution of economically recoverable quantities of CBM result from the interplay between stratigraphy, tectonics, and hydrology. This study evaluates geologic factors that control the occurrence of CBM in Indiana coals, ranging from large-scale processes (i.e., burial and fracturing) to molecular interactions between CBM and the physical structure of coal (i.e., gas adsorption). This study investigates the role of tectonics and burial in the formation of coal fracture sets (cleats) that are critical for CBM extraction. Based on field data, I investigate the role of fracturing with regard to gas occurrence and CBM producibility. The timing of cleat formation is evaluated via carbon and oxygen isotopic signatures of cleat-filling minerals. In addition to field-scale observations, this study includes an experimental component that, based on a multitude of laboratory data, constrains optimum conditions for coal-sample preservation prior to laboratory analyses for exploration. Chemical analyses, petrography, grain-size distributions, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, pore

  2. The impact of air pollutant and methane emission controls on tropospheric ozone and radiative forcing: CTM calculations for the period 1990-2030

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dentener

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore the relationship between tropospheric ozone and radiative forcing with changing emissions, we compiled two sets of global scenarios for the emissions of the ozone precursors methane (CH4, carbon monoxide (CO, non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC and nitrogen oxides (NOx up to the year 2030 and implemented them in two global Chemistry Transport Models. The 'Current Legislation' (CLE scenario reflects the current perspectives of individual countries on future economic development and takes the anticipated effects of presently decided emission control legislation in the individual countries into account. In addition, we developed a 'Maximum technically Feasible Reduction' (MFR scenario that outlines the scope for emission reductions offered by full implementation of the presently available emission control technologies, while maintaining the projected levels of anthropogenic activities. Whereas the resulting projections of methane emissions lie within the range suggested by other greenhouse gas projections, the recent pollution control legislation of many Asian countries, requiring introduction of catalytic converters for vehicles, leads to significantly lower growth in emissions of the air pollutants NOx, NMVOC and CO than was suggested by the widely used and more pessimistic IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change SRES (Special Report on Emission Scenarios scenarios (Nakicenovic et al., 2000, which made Business-as-Usual assumptions regarding emission control technology. With the TM3 and STOCHEM models we performed several long-term integrations (1990-2030 to assess global, hemispheric and regional changes in CH4, CO, hydroxyl radicals, ozone and the radiative climate forcings resulting from these two emission scenarios. Both models reproduce broadly the observed trends in CO, and CH4 concentrations from 1990 to 2002. For the 'current legislation' case, both models indicate an increase of the annual average ozone

  3. Effects of monolaurin on ruminal methanogens and selected bacterial species from cattle, as determined with the rumen simulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klevenhusen, Fenja; Meile, Leo; Kreuzer, Michael; Soliva, Carla R

    2011-10-01

    Before being able to implement effective ruminal methane mitigation strategies via feed supplementation, the assessment of side effects on ruminal fermentation and rumen microbial populations is indispensable. In this respect we investigated the effects of monolaurin, a methane-mitigating lipid, on methanogens and important carbohydrate-degrading bacteria present in ruminal fluid of dairy cattle in continuous culture employing the rumen simulation technique. In six experimental runs, each lasting for 10 days, four diets with different carbohydrate composition, based on hay, maize, wheat and a maize-wheat mixture, either remained non-supplemented or were supplemented with monolaurin and incubated in a ruminal-fluid buffer mixture. Incubation liquid samples from days 6 to 10 of incubation were analyzed with relative quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of 16S rRNA genes to assess monolaurin-induced shifts in specific rumen microbial populations in relation to the corresponding non-supplemented diets. Monolaurin completely inhibited Fibrobacter succinogenes in all diets while the response of the other cellulolytic bacteria varied in dependence of the diet. Megasphaera elsdenii remained unaffected by monolaurin in the two diets containing maize, but was slightly stimulated by monolaurin with the wheat and largely with the hay diet. The supply of monolaurin suppressed Methanomicrobiales below the detection limit with all diets, whereas relative 16S rRNA gene copy numbers of Methanobacteriales increased by 7-fold with monolaurin in case of the hay diet. Total Archaea were decreased by up to over 90%, but this was significant only for the wheat containing diets. Thus, monolaurin exerted variable effects mediated by unknown mechanisms on important ruminal microbes involved in carbohydrate degradation, along with its suppression of methane formation. The applicability of monolaurin for methane mitigation in ruminants thus depends on the extent to which adverse

  4. Ruminal Acidosis in Feedlot: From Aetiology to Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Hernández

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute ruminal acidosis is a metabolic status defined by decreased blood pH and bicarbonate, caused by overproduction of ruminal D-lactate. It will appear when animals ingest excessive amount of nonstructural carbohydrates with low neutral detergent fiber. Animals will show ruminal hypotony/atony with hydrorumen and a typical parakeratosis-rumenitis liver abscess complex, associated with a plethora of systemic manifestations such as diarrhea and dehydration, liver abscesses, infections of the lung, the heart, and/or the kidney, and laminitis, as well as neurologic symptoms due to both cerebrocortical necrosis and the direct effect of D-lactate on neurons. In feedlots, warning signs include decrease in chewing activity, weight, and dry matter intake and increase in laminitis and diarrhea prevalence. The prognosis is quite variable. Treatment will be based on the control of systemic acidosis and dehydration. Prevention is the most important tool and will require normalization of ruminal pH and microbiota. Appropriate feeding strategies are essential and involve changing the dietary composition to increase neutral detergent fiber content and greater particle size and length. Appropriate grain processing can control the fermentation rate while additives such as prebiotics or probiotics can help to stabilize the ruminal environment. Immunization against producers of D-lactate is being explored.

  5. Ruminal acidosis in feedlot: from aetiology to prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Joaquín; Benedito, José Luis; Abuelo, Angel; Castillo, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Acute ruminal acidosis is a metabolic status defined by decreased blood pH and bicarbonate, caused by overproduction of ruminal D-lactate. It will appear when animals ingest excessive amount of nonstructural carbohydrates with low neutral detergent fiber. Animals will show ruminal hypotony/atony with hydrorumen and a typical parakeratosis-rumenitis liver abscess complex, associated with a plethora of systemic manifestations such as diarrhea and dehydration, liver abscesses, infections of the lung, the heart, and/or the kidney, and laminitis, as well as neurologic symptoms due to both cerebrocortical necrosis and the direct effect of D-lactate on neurons. In feedlots, warning signs include decrease in chewing activity, weight, and dry matter intake and increase in laminitis and diarrhea prevalence. The prognosis is quite variable. Treatment will be based on the control of systemic acidosis and dehydration. Prevention is the most important tool and will require normalization of ruminal pH and microbiota. Appropriate feeding strategies are essential and involve changing the dietary composition to increase neutral detergent fiber content and greater particle size and length. Appropriate grain processing can control the fermentation rate while additives such as prebiotics or probiotics can help to stabilize the ruminal environment. Immunization against producers of D-lactate is being explored.

  6. Heritability for enteric methane emission from Danish Holstein cows using a non-invasive FTIR method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jan; Løvendahl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Enteric methane emission from ruminants contributes substantially to the greenhouse effect. Few studies have focused on the genetic variation in enteric methane emission from dairy cattle. One reason for that is the limited number of methods appropriate for large scale phenotyping to measure...... tools to reduce methane emission from dairy cattle. Another study (Wall et al ., 2010) has shown that selecting for correlated indicator traits such as productivity and efficiency would help lowering the methane emission from the cattle production. Furthermore, it is still important to have emphasis...

  7. Technical note: Ruminal cannulation technique in young Holstein calves:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Bastian; Engbæk, Marie; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2010-01-01

    for effects on performance traits and gross anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract compared with a control group not undergoing surgery. Five calves were ruminally cannulated at approximately 10 d of age and 5 matching calves were used as controls. All calves were fed milk replacer and a diet based on clover...... grass silage and sodium hydroxide-treated wheat. Ruminal fluid was collected from cannulated calves once weekly for 3 consecutive weeks. All calves were euthanized at 43 ± 3 d of age. No apparent adverse effects of cannulation were observed. Feed intake, BW gain, and gross anatomy...

  8. Paleobiogeography of the Siwalik Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Akbar Khan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available During the Miocene, the Indian plates moved closer to Eurasia causing the further elevation of the Alps, Himalayas and other mountain belts. The Neogene terrestrial rocks generally the Siwaliks, form the Sub-Himalayas. Early pecarons in Africa, Pakistan and India are poorly known. Ruminant fossils are numerous in the Siwaliks. The cervoid are found in Eurasia and presumably evolved there but some fragmentary fossils are found in Bugti hills and two specimens are collected from the Chinji Formation. Tragulids are found in the Lower Miocene of Egypt, East Africa and Nambia and Giraffoids evolved in Africa. The Bovid (Eotragus appeared in Europe and the same time in the lower Siwalik of Pakistan. Changes in global climate had a direct impact on the distribution of species. The global climate also permitted Asian animals to disperse into Europe. Faunal exchange between Europe and the Siwaliks occurred through SE Europe and Anatolia. While extensive landmasses were slowly being formed out of a number of smaller fragments, sea level changes connected and disconnected these areas and allowed for, or inhibited faunal exchange. The effects of the sea level changes were strongest during the Early Miocene, whereas from the Middle Miocene onward, the land sea distribution seems to have been less affected and less important in controlling the geographical distribution of mammals.

  9. Controlled surface segregation leads to efficient coke-resistant nickel/platinum bimetallic catalysts for the dry reforming of methane

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lidong

    2015-02-03

    Surface composition and structure are of vital importance for heterogeneous catalysts, especially for bimetallic catalysts, which often vary as a function of reaction conditions (known as surface segregation). The preparation of bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure is very challenging. In this study, we synthesize a series of Ni/Pt bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure using a method derived from surface organometallic chemistry. The evolution of the surface composition and structure of the obtained bimetallic catalysts under simulated reaction conditions is investigated by various techniques, which include CO-probe IR spectroscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis, X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis, XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the structure of the bimetallic catalyst is evolved from Pt monolayer island-modified Ni nanoparticles to core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles composed of a Ni-rich core and a Ni/Pt alloy shell upon thermal treatment. These catalysts are active for the dry reforming of methane, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure. The reform of reforming: A series of alumina-supported Ni/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled surface composition and structure are prepared. Remarkable surface segregation for these bimetallic NPs is observed upon thermal treatment. These bimetallic NPs are active catalysts for CO2 reforming of CH4, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure.

  10. Hydroxylation of methane through component interactions in soluble methane monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Jae

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydroxylation through methane monooxygenases (MMOs) is a key aspect due to their control of the carbon cycle in the ecology system and recent applications of methane gas in the field of bioenergy and bioremediation. Methanotropic bacteria perform a specific microbial conversion from methane, one of the most stable carbon compounds, to methanol through elaborate mechanisms. MMOs express particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in most strains and soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) under copper-limited conditions. The mechanisms of MMO have been widely studied from sMMO belonging to the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) superfamily. This enzyme has diiron active sites where different types of hydrocarbons are oxidized through orchestrated hydroxylase, regulatory and reductase components for precise control of hydrocarbons, oxygen, protons, and electrons. Recent advances in biophysical studies, including structural and enzymatic achievements for sMMO, have explained component interactions, substrate pathways, and intermediates of sMMO. In this account, oxidation of methane in sMMO is discussed with recent progress that is critical for understanding the microbial applications of C-H activation in one-carbon substrates.

  11. Effects of rutin and buckwheat seeds on energy metabolism and methane production in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoldt, Ann-Kathrin; Derno, Michael; Das, Gürbüz; Weitzel, Joachim M; Wolffram, Siegfried; Metges, Cornelia C

    2016-03-01

    Flavonoids are secondary plant metabolites with several health promoting effects. As dairy cows often suffer from metabolic imbalance and health problems, interest is growing in health improvements by plant substances such as flavonoids. Our group has recently shown that the flavonoids quercetin and rutin (a glucorhamnoside of quercetin) are bioavailable in cows when given via a duodenal fistula or orally, respectively, affect glucose metabolism, and have beneficial effects on liver health. Furthermore, flavonoids may reduce rumen methane production in vitro through their antibacterial properties. To test the hypothesis that rutin has effects on energy metabolism, methane production, and production performance in dairy cows, we fed rutin trihydrate at a dose of 100mg/kg of body weight to a group of 7 lactating dairy cows for 2 wk in a crossover design. In a second experiment, 2 cows were fed the same ration but were supplemented with buckwheat seeds (Fagopyrum tartaricum), providing rutin at a dose comparable to the first experiment. Two other cows receiving barley supplements were used as controls in a change-over mode. Blood samples were taken weekly and respiration measurements were performed at the end of each treatment. Supplementation of pure rutin, but not of rutin contained in buckwheat seeds, increased the plasma quercetin content. Methane production and milk yield and composition were not affected by rutin treatment in either form. Plasma glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate, and albumin were increased by pure rutin treatment, indicating a possible metabolic effect of rutin on energy metabolism of dairy cows. In addition, we did not show that in vivo ruminal methane production was reduced by rutin. In conclusion, we could not confirm earlier reports on in vitro methane reduction by rutin supplementation in dairy cows in established lactation.

  12. Effects of dietary cellulase and xylanase addition on digestion, rumen fermentation and methane emission in growing goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Jiao, Jinzhen; Tang, Shaoxun; He, Zhixiong; Zhou, Chuanshe; Han, Xuefeng; Wang, Min; Kang, Jinhe; Odongo, N E; Tan, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementation of cellulase and xylanase to diets of growing goats to improve nutrient digestibility, utilisation of energy and mitigation of enteric methane emissions. The experiment was conducted in a 5 × 5 Latin square design using five goats with permanent rumen fistulae and five treatments consisted of two levels of cellulase crossed over with two levels of xylanase plus unsupplemented Control. The cellulase (243 U/g) derived from Neocallimastix patriciarum was added at 0.8 and 1.6 g/kg dry matter intake (DMI) and the xylanase (31,457 U/ml) derived from Aspergillus oryzae was fed at 1.4 and 2.2 ml/kg DMI. There were no differences in apparent digestibility of organic matter, neutral detergent fibre, acid detergent fibre and rumen fermentation parameters (i.e. ammonia-nitrogen [N], volatile fatty acids) among all treatments. Dietary cellulase and xylanase addition did not influence energy and N utilisation. But compared to xylanase addition at the higher dose, at the low xylanase dose the retained N, the availability of retained N and digested N were increased (p < 0.01). Moreover, enzyme addition did not affect the enteric methane emission and community diversity of ruminal methanogens. The present results indicated that previous in vitro findings were not confirmed in ruminant trials.

  13. Functional and Dysfunctional rumination in alcohol dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Grynberg, Delphine; Briane, Yasmine; Timary, Philippe De; Maurage, Pierre; 16th International Society of Addiction Medicine Annual Meeting

    2014-01-01

    Previous findings have shown that rumination predicts alcohol abuse independently of depression. However, the literature does not inform about the relationships between alcohol dependence and functional and dysfunctional rumination. It has indeed been suggested that there exist a functional form of rumination(concrete thinking) and a dysfunctional form of rumination (abstract thinking). In this study, our aim is to evaluate if alcohol dependence is similarly associated with functional/constru...

  14. Peste des petits ruminants in Arabian wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinne, J; Kreutzer, R; Kreutzer, M; Wernery, U; Wohlsein, P

    2010-08-01

    Recurrence of peste des petits ruminants (PPR) was diagnosed in the United Arabian Emirates in several wild ruminants confirmed by morphological, immunohistochemical, serological and molecular findings. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the virus strain belongs to lineage IV, which is different to some previously isolated PPR strains from the Arabian Peninsula. This study shows that wild ruminants may play an important epidemiological role as virus source for domestic small ruminants.

  15. Carbon-dependent control of electron transfer and central carbon pathway genes for methane biosynthesis in the Archaean, Methanosarcina acetivorans strain C2A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunsalus Robert P

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The archaeon, Methanosarcina acetivorans strain C2A forms methane, a potent greenhouse gas, from a variety of one-carbon substrates and acetate. Whereas the biochemical pathways leading to methane formation are well understood, little is known about the expression of the many of the genes that encode proteins needed for carbon flow, electron transfer and/or energy conservation. Quantitative transcript analysis was performed on twenty gene clusters encompassing over one hundred genes in M. acetivorans that encode enzymes/proteins with known or potential roles in substrate conversion to methane. Results The expression of many seemingly "redundant" genes/gene clusters establish substrate dependent control of approximately seventy genes for methane production by the pathways for methanol and acetate utilization. These include genes for soluble-type and membrane-type heterodisulfide reductases (hdr, hydrogenases including genes for a vht-type F420 non-reducing hydrogenase, molybdenum-type (fmd as well as tungsten-type (fwd formylmethanofuran dehydrogenases, genes for rnf and mrp-type electron transfer complexes, for acetate uptake, plus multiple genes for aha- and atp-type ATP synthesis complexes. Analysis of promoters for seven gene clusters reveal UTR leaders of 51-137 nucleotides in length, raising the possibility of both transcriptional and translational levels of control. Conclusions The above findings establish the differential and coordinated expression of two major gene families in M. acetivorans in response to carbon/energy supply. Furthermore, the quantitative mRNA measurements demonstrate the dynamic range for modulating transcript abundance. Since many of these gene clusters in M. acetivorans are also present in other Methanosarcina species including M. mazei, and in M. barkeri, these findings provide a basis for predicting related control in these environmentally significant methanogens.

  16. Effect of propolis on ruminal fermentation, reproductive and productive performance of Santa Inês ewes

    OpenAIRE

    Amr Salah Morsy Amine Selem

    2012-01-01

    Propolis as natural dietary additive can be used to manipulate rumen fermentation towards less methane (CH4) and it may affect animal reproductive and productive performance. To study the application of propolis, three studies were conducted. The first study aimed to evaluate the in vitro nutritive value of two types of propolis (Brazilian red propolis (BRP) and Egyptian brown propolis (EBP) for their anti-methanogenic activity, ruminal fermentation and degradability. Propolis extracts were p...

  17. Identifying sources, formation pathways and geological controls of methane in shallow groundwater above unconventional natural gas plays in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, B.; Humez, P.; Nightingale, M.; Ing, J.; Kingston, A. W.; Clarkson, C.; Cahill, A.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.; Millot, R.; Kloppmann, W.; Osadetz, K.; Lawton, D.

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of shale gas development facilitated by hydraulic fracturing it has become increasingly important to develop tracer tools to scientifically determine potential impacts of stray gases on shallow aquifers. To assess potential future impacts on shallow aquifers by leakage of natural gas from unconventional energy resource development, it is essential to establish a reliable baseline. Occurrence of methane in shallow groundwater in Alberta (Canada) between 2006 and 2014 was assessed and was ubiquitous in 186 sampled monitoring wells. Free and dissolved gas sampling and measurement approaches yielded comparable results with often low methane concentrations in shallow groundwater, but in 28 samples methane exceeded 10 mg/L in dissolved gas and 300,000 ppmv in free gas. Methane concentrations in free and dissolved gas samples were found to increase with well depth and were especially elevated in groundwater obtained from aquifers containing coal seams and shale units. Carbon isotope ratios of methane averaged -69.7 ± 11.1 ‰ in free gas and -65.6 ± 8.9 ‰ in dissolved gas. δ13C values were not found to vary with well depth or lithology indicating that the methane in Alberta groundwater was formed via a similar mechanism. The low δ13C values in concert with average δ2H values of -289 ± 44 ‰ suggest that most methane was of biogenic origin predominantly generated via CO2 reduction. This interpretation is confirmed by gas dryness parameters typically >500 due to only small amounts of ethane and a lack of propane in most samples. Novel approaches of in-situ concentration and isotope measurements for methane during drilling of a 530 m deep well yielded a mud-gas profile characterizing natural gas occurrences in the intermediate zone. Comparison with mudgas profile carbon isotope data revealed that methane in the investigated shallow groundwater in Alberta is isotopically similar to hydrocarbon gases found in 100-250 meter depths in the Western

  18. Effects of alfalfa flavonoids on the production performance, immune system, and ruminal fermentation of dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinshun Zhan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective The objective of this study was to examine the effects of alfalfa flavonoids on the production performance, immunity, and ruminal fermentation of dairy cows. Methods The experiments employed four primiparous Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas, and used a 4×4 Latin square design. Cattle were fed total mixed ration supplemented with 0 (control group, Con, 20, 60, or 100 mg of alfalfa flavonoids extract (AFE per kg of dairy cow body weight (BW. Results The feed intake of the group receiving 60 mg/kg BW of AFE were significantly higher (p<0.05 than that of the group receiving 100 mg/kg BW. Milk yields and the fat, protein and lactose of milk were unaffected by AFE, while the total solids content of milk reduced (p = 0.05 linearly as AFE supplementation was increased. The somatic cell count of milk in group receiving 60 mg/kg BW of AFE was significantly lower (p<0.05 than that of the control group. Apparent total-tract digestibility of neutral detergent fiber and crude protein showed a tendency to increase (0.05Methane dicarboxylic aldehyde concentration decreased (p = 0.03 linearly, whereas superoxide dismutase activity showed a tendency to increase (p = 0.10 quadratically, with increasing levels of AFE supplementation. The lymphocyte count and the proportion of lymphocytes decreased (p = 0.03 linearly, whereas the proportion of neutrophil granulocytes increased (p = 0.01 linearly with increasing levels of dietary AFE supplementation. The valeric acid/total volatile fatty acid (TVFA ratio was increased (p = 0.01 linearly with increasing of the level of AFE supplementation, the other ruminal fermentation parameters were not affected by AFE supplementation. Relative levels of the rumen microbe Ruminococcus flavefaciens tended to decrease (p = 0.09 quadratically, whereas those of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens showed a tendency to increase (p = 0.07 quadratically in response to AFE supplementation

  19. The Development of Aromas in Ruminant Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María M. Campo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This review provides an update on our understanding of the chemical reactions (lipid oxidation, Strecker and Maillard reactions, thiamine degradation and a discussion of the principal aroma compounds derived from those reaction or other sources in cooked meat, mainly focused on ruminant species. This knowledge is essential in order to understand, control, and improve the quality of food products. More studies are necessary to fully understand the role of each compound in the overall cooked meat flavour and their possible effect in consumer acceptability.

  20. Immunogenetics of Small Ruminant Lentiviral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Stonos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV include the caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV and the Maedi-Visna virus (MVV. Both of these viruses limit production and can be a major source of economic loss to producers. Little is known about how the immune system recognizes and responds to SRLVs, but due to similarities with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, HIV research can shed light on the possible immune mechanisms that control or lead to disease progression. This review will focus on the host immune response to HIV-1 and SRLV, and will discuss the possibility of breeding for enhanced SRLV disease resistance.

  1. Effect of induced ruminal acidosis on blood variables in heifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ruminal acidosis is responsible for the onset of different pathologies in dairy and feedlot cattle, but there are major difficulties in the diagnosis. This study modelled the data obtained from various blood variables to identify those that could indicate the severity of ruminal acidosis. Six heifers were fed three experimental rations throughout three periods. The diets were characterised by different starch levels: high starch (HS), medium starch (MS) and low starch, as the control diet (CT). Ruminal pH values were continuously measured using wireless sensors and compared with pH measurements obtained by rumenocentesis. Blood samples were analysed for complete blood count, biochemical profile, venous blood gas, blood lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and LPS-binding proteins (LBP). Results The regression coefficient comparing the ruminal pH values, obtained using the two methods, was 0.56 (P = 0.040). Feeding the CT, MS and HS led to differences in the time spent below the 5.8, 5.5 and 5.0 pH thresholds and in several variables, including dry matter intake (7.7 vs. 6.9 vs. 5.1 kg/d; P = 0.002), ruminal nadir pH (5.69 vs. 5.47 vs. 5.44; P = 0.042), mean ruminal pH (6.50 vs. 6.34 vs. 6.31; P = 0.012), haemoglobin level (11.1 vs. 10.9 vs. 11.4 g/dL; P = 0.010), platelet count (506 vs. 481 vs. 601; P = 0.008), HCO3- (31.8 vs. 31.3 vs. 30.6 mmol/L; P = 0.071) and LBP (5.9 vs. 9.5 vs. 10.5 μg/mL; P acidosis, subacute ruminal acidosis and acute ruminal acidosis) using haemoglobin, mean platelet volume, β-hydroxybutyrate, glucose and reduced haemoglobin. Conclusions Although additional studies are necessary to confirm the reliability of these discriminant functions, the use of plasma variables in a multifactorial model appeared to be useful for the evaluation of ruminal acidosis severity. PMID:23647881

  2. Coalbed methane reservoir boundaries and sealing mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Xianbo; LIN Xiaoying; LIU Shaobo; SONG Yan

    2005-01-01

    It is important to investigate the coalbed methane reservoir boundaries for the classification, exploration, and development of the coalbed methane reservoir.Based on the investigation of the typical coalbed methane reservoirs in the world, the boundaries can be divided into four types: hydrodynamic boundary, air altered boundary,permeability boundary, and fault boundary. Hydrodynamic and air altered boundaries are ubiquitous boundaries for every coalbed methane reservoir. The four types of the fault sealing mechanism in the petroleum geological investigation (diagen- esis, clay smear, juxtaposition and cataclasis) are applied to the fault boundary of the coalbed methane reservoir. The sealing mechanism of the open fault boundary is the same with that of the hydrodynamic sealing boundary.The sealing mechanism of the permeability boundary is firstly classified into capillary pressure sealing and hydrocarbon concentration sealing. There are different controlling boundaries in coalbed methane reservoirs that are in different geological backgrounds. Therefore, the coalbed methane reservoir is diversiform.

  3. Both trait and state mindfulness predict lower aggressiveness via anger rumination: A multilevel mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory A; Peters, Jessica R; Pond, Richard S; DeWall, C Nathan

    2016-06-01

    Trait mindfulness, or the capacity for nonjudgmental, present-centered attention, predicts lower aggression in cross-sectional samples, an effect mediated by reduced anger rumination. Experimental work also implicates state mindfulness (i.e., fluctuations around one's typical mindfulness) in aggression. Despite evidence that both trait and state mindfulness predict lower aggression, their relative impact and their mechanisms remain unclear. Higher trait mindfulness and state increases in mindfulness facets may reduce aggression-related outcomes by (1) limiting the intensity of anger, or (2) limiting rumination on anger experiences. The present study tests two hypotheses: First, that both trait and state mindfulness contribute unique variance to lower aggressiveness, and second, that the impact of both trait and state mindfulness on aggressiveness will be uniquely partially mediated by both anger intensity and anger rumination. 86 participants completed trait measures of mindfulness, anger intensity, and anger rumination, then completed diaries for 35 days assessing mindfulness, anger intensity, anger rumination, anger expression, and self-reported and behavioral aggressiveness. Using multilevel zero-inflated regression, we examined unique contributions of trait and state mindfulness facets to daily anger expression and aggressiveness. We also examined the mediating roles of anger intensity and anger rumination at both trait and state levels. Mindfulness facets predicted anger expression and aggressiveness indirectly through anger rumination after controlling for indirect pathways through anger intensity. Individuals with high or fluctuating aggression may benefit from mindfulness training to reduce both intensity of and rumination on anger.

  4. Controls on northern wetland methane emissions: insights from regional synthesis studies and the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetsky, M. R.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Czimczik, C. I.; Waldrop, M. P.; Olefeldt, D.; Fan, Z.; Kane, E. S.; McGuire, A. D.; Harden, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Wetlands are the largest natural source of atmospheric methane. Static chambers have been used to quantify variation in wetland CH4 flux for many decades. Regional to global scale synthesis studies of static chamber measurements show that relationships between temperature, water availability and CH4 emissions depend on wetland type (bog, fen, swamp), region (tropical, temperate, arctic) and disturbance. For example, while water table position and temperature serve as the dominant controls on bog and swamp CH4 flux, vegetation is an important control on emissions from fens. These studies highlight the fact that wetland types have distinct controls on CH4 emissions; however, it is unlikely that modeling of wetland CH4 flux will improve without a better mechanistic understanding of the processes underlying CH4 production, transport, and oxidation. At the Alaska Peatland Experiment, we are quantifying CH4 emission using static chambers, automated chambers, and towers. Our sites vary in permafrost regime, including groundwater fens without permafrost, forested peat plateaus with intact permafrost, and collapse scar bogs formed through permafrost thaw. Experimental studies that examine plant and microbial responses to altered water table position and soil temperature are complemented by a gradient approach, where we use a space-for-time substitutions to examine the consequences of thaw on time-scales of decades to centuries. Our results thus far have documented the importance of soil rewetting in governing large CH4 fluxes from northern wetland soils. Accounting for CH4, our collapse scar bog significantly contributed to the global warming potential of the landscape. A major objective of our work is to explore the role of permafrost C release in greenhouse gas fluxes from wetland soils, which we are assessing using radiocarbon as a natural tracer. We have shown, for example, that ebullition of CH4 is dominated by recently fixed C, but a significant fraction of CH4 in

  5. Major factors controlling nitrous oxide emission and methane uptake from forest soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Soil samples were taken from depth of 0-12 cm in virgin broad-leaved Korean pine mixed forest in Changbai Mountain in July 2000. The effects of temperature, soil water content, pH, NH4+ and NO3- on N2O emission and CH4 uptake of a forest soil were studied in laboratory by the method of orthogonal design. It was observed under laboratory conditions in this study that there were significant correlations between N2O emission rate, CH4 oxidation rate, soil pH and temperature. Nevertheless, N2O emission rate also showed a significant positive correlation with CH4 oxidation rate. The results suggested that pH and tem-perature were important factors controlling N2O emission and CH4 oxidation under this experiment conditions.

  6. Investigating the Hydro-geochemical Impact of Fugitive Methane on Groundwater: The Borden Aquifer Controlled Release Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, A. G.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.; Mayer, K. U.; Mayer, B.; Ryan, C.

    2015-12-01

    Shale gas development by hydraulic fracturing is believed by many to have the potential to transform the world's energy economy. The propensity of this technique to cause significant environmental impact is strongly contested and lacks evidence. Fugitive methane (CH4), potentially mobilized during well drilling, the complex extraction process and/or leaking well seals over time is arguably the greatest concern. Advanced understanding of CH4 mobility and fate in the subsurface is needed in order to assess risks, design suitable monitoring systems and gain public trust. Currently knowledge on subsurface CH4 mobilization and migration at scales relevant to shale gas development is lacking. Consequently a shallow aquifer controlled CH4 release experiment is being conducted at the Borden aquifer research facility (an unconfined, unconsolidated silicate sand aquifer) in Ontario, Canada. During the experiment, 100 m3 of gas phase CH4 was injected into the saturated zone over approximately 60 days through 2 inclined sparging wells (4.5 and 9 m depth) at rates relevant to natural gas well casing vent flows. The gas mobility and fate is being comprehensively monitored temporally and spatially in both the saturated and unsaturated zones considering; aqueous chemistry (including stable isotopes), soil gas characterization, surface efflux, geophysics (GPR and ERT), real time sensors (total dissolved gas pressure, soil moisture content, CH4 and CO2), mineralogical and microbiological characterization before, during and after injection. An overview of this unique study will be given including experimental design, monitoring system configuration and preliminary results. This multidisciplinary study will provide important insights regarding the mechanisms and rates for shallow CH4 migration, attenuation and water quality impacts that will inform baseline groundwater monitoring programs and retrospective forensic studies.

  7. Thermal pretreatment of olive mill wastewater for efficient methane production: control of aromatic substances degradation by monitoring cyclohexane carboxylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontoni, Ludovico; d'Antonio, Giuseppe; Esposito, Giovanni; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Frunzo, Luigi; Pirozzi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is investigated as a sustainable depurative strategy of olive oil mill wastewater (OOMW). The effect of thermal pretreatment on the anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic compounds present in (OMWW) was investigated. The anaerobic degradation of phenolic compounds, well known to be the main concern related to this kind of effluents, was monitored in batch anaerobic tests at a laboratory scale on samples pretreated at mild (80±1 °C), intermediate (90±1 °C) and high temperature (120±1 °C). The obtained results showed an increase of 34% in specific methane production (SMP) for OMWW treated at the lowest temperature and a decrease of 18% for treatment at the highest temperature. These results were related to the different decomposition pathways of the lignocellulosic compounds obtained in the tested conditions. The decomposition pathway was determined by measuring the concentrations of volatile organic acids, phenols, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) versus time. Cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHCA) production was identified in all the tests with a maximum concentration of around 200 µmol L(-1) in accordance with the phenols degradation, suggesting that anaerobic digestion of aromatic compounds follows the benzoyl-CoA pathway. Accurate monitoring of this compound was proposed as the key element to control the process evolution. The total phenols (TP) and total COD removals were, with SMP, the highest (TP 62.7%-COD 63.2%) at 80 °C and lowest (TP 44.9%-COD 32.2%) at 120 °C. In all cases, thermal pretreatment was able to enhance the TP removal ability (up to 42% increase).

  8. Rumination and Performance in Dynamic, Team Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eRoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available People high in rumination are good at tasks that require persistence whereas people low in rumination are good at tasks that require flexibility. Here we examine real world implications of these differences in dynamic, team sport. In two studies, we found that professional male football (soccer players from Germany and female field hockey players on the US national team were lower in rumination than were non-athletes. Further, low levels of rumination were associated with a longer career at a higher level in football players. Results indicate that athletes in dynamic, team sport might benefit from the flexibility associated with being low in rumination.

  9. Methane emissions from grazing cattle using point-source dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, S M; Turner, D; Tomkins, N; Charmley, E; Bishop-Hurley, G; Chen, D

    2011-01-01

    The ability to accurately measure greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is essential to gauge our ability to reduce these emissions. Enteric methane from ruminants is an important but often difficult source to quantify since it depends on the amount and type of feed intake. Unfortunately, many of the available measurement techniques for estimating enteric methane emissions can impose a change in feed intake. Our study evaluates a nonintrusive technique that uses a novel approach (point-source dispersion with multiple open-path concentrations) to calculate enteric methane emissions from grazing cattle, reported as the major source of GHG in many countries, particularly Australia. A scanner with a mounted open-path laser was used to measure methane concentration across five paths above a paddock containing 18 grazing cattle over 16 d. These data were used along with wind statistics in a dispersion model (WindTrax) to estimate an average herd methane emission rate over 10-mm intervals. Enteric methane emissions from the herd grazing a combination of Rhodes grass (Chlotis gayana Kunth) and Leucaena [Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.)] averaged (+/- SD) 141 (+/- 147) g animal(-1) d(-1). In a release-recovery experiment, the technique accounted for 77% of the released methane at a single point. Our study shows the technique generates more reliable methane emissions during daytime (unstable stratification).

  10. The dynamics of nematode infections of farmed ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roberts, M.G.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the dynamics and control of nematode parasites of farmed ruminants are discussed via a qualitative analysis of a differential equation model. To achieve this a quantity, 'the basic reproduction quotient' (Q0), whose definition coincides with previous definitions of R0 for macroparasite

  11. Controls for ecosystem methane exchange are time-scale specifc and shift during the growing season of a temperate fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, T.; Koebsch, F.; Jurasinski, G.; Koch, M.; Hofmann, J.; Glatzel, S.

    2014-12-01

    Wetlands are the largest natural sources for atmospheric methane (CH4). In wetlands with permanent shallow inundation, the seasonal variation of CH4 exchange is mainly controlled by temperature and phenology. In addition, ecosystem CH4 exchange varies considerably on smaller temporal scales such as days or weeks. Several single processes that control CH4 emissions on the local soil-plant-atmosphere continuum are well investigated, but their interaction on ecosystem level is not well understood yet. We applied wavelet analysis to a quasi-continuous Eddy Covariance CH4 flux time series to describe the temporal variation of ecosystem CH4 exchange within the growing season of a permanently inundated temperate fen. Moreover, we addressed time scale-specific controls and investigated whether their impact changes during the course of the growing season. On large time scales of two weeks to three months, temperature explained most of the variation in ecosystem CH4 exchange. In general, the temperature in the shallow water column had the largest impact as explanatory variable, however, air temperature and soil temperature became increasingly important as explanatory variables when water level dropped slightly up to June. The diurnal variation of ecosystem CH4 exchange shifted during the course of the growing season: During a short time period at the end of April, plant activity (expressed by canopy photosynthesis) caused a diurnal variation of ecosystem CH4 exchange with peak time around noon. In the following weeks, the daily cycle of convective mixing within the water column (expressed by the water temperature gradient) gradually gained importance and caused high night-time CH4 emissions, thereby levelling off the diurnal CH4 emission pattern. Moreover, shear-induced turbulence caused short-term fluctuations of ecosystem CH4 exchange on time scales up to two hours. Our study highlights the need for multi-scale approaches that consider the non-stationarity of the

  12. 煤层气发电厂预处理系统及控制%Coal-bed Methane Power Plant Pretreatment System and Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵德悦

    2015-01-01

    主要介绍煤层气发电流程中的气体预处理系统及其控制系统 ,包括预处理系统的作业流程、主要设备功能、控制系统、技术参数等 ,并对其进行了详细分析和讨论.%This paper mainly introduces a gas pretreatment process of coal-bed methane power generation system and its control sys-tem ,including the pretreatment system's working process ,main equipment ,control system and technical parameters ,etc .

  13. Testing and analysis of the impact on engine cycle parameters and control system modifications using hydrogen or methane as fuel in an industrial gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, H. H.-W.; Keinz, J.; Börner, S.; Hendrick, P.; Elsing, R.

    2016-07-01

    The paper highlights the modification of the engine control software of the hydrogen (H2) converted gas turbine Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) GTCP 36-300 allowing safe and accurate methane (CH4) operation achieved without mechanical changes of the metering unit. The acceleration and deceleration characteristics of the engine controller from idle to maximum load are analyzed comparing H2 and CH4. Also, the paper presents the influence on the thermodynamic cycle of gas turbine resulting from the different fuels supported by a gas turbine cycle simulation of H2 and CH4 using the software GasTurb.

  14. Rumen fermentation and nitrogen balance of lambs fed diets containing plant extracts rich in tannins and saponins, and associated emissions of nitrogen and methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwiński, B J; Kreuzer, M; Wettstein, H R; Machmüller, Andrea

    2002-12-01

    Tannins were added to experimental diets at levels of 1 and 2 g/kg DM (hydrolysable tannins; Castanea sativa wood extract) and saponins at 2 and 30 mg/kg DM (sarsaponin; Yucca schidigera extract). These levels were far below thresholds expected to be adverse in ruminants. Effects were measured in lambs by comparison with unsupplemented control diets calculated to be either deficient (10%) or adequate in protein. The diets consisted of hay, concentrate (1:1) and extra wheat starch with increasing body weight. Ruminal pH, VFA concentration, protozoa count and apparent digestibilities of organic matter and fibre did not differ among treatments. The low tannin dose significantly decreased bacteria count compared to the high saponin dose. Saponin supplementation and the high tannin dose showed some potential to reduce ruminal ammonia concentration. This was associated with weak trends towards lower urine N excretion (only tannins) and ammonia emission from manure. Methane release was increased by the low tannin dose compared to the unsupplemented control. Diet effects on heat production were not systematic. In conclusion, the extracts rich in tannins or saponins gave only slight indications for either increased body nitrogen retention or reduced nitrogen emission. However, effects might have been larger with more pronounced dietary protein deficit.

  15. Effect of dietary nitrate level on enteric methane production, hydrogen emission, rumen fermentation, and nutrient digestibility in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olijhoek, D W; Hellwing, A L F; Brask, M; Weisbjerg, M R; Højberg, O; Larsen, M K; Dijkstra, J; Erlandsen, E J; Lund, P

    2016-08-01

    Nitrate may lower methane production in ruminants by competing with methanogenesis for available hydrogen in the rumen. This study evaluated the effect of 4 levels of dietary nitrate addition on enteric methane production, hydrogen emission, feed intake, rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility, microbial protein synthesis, and blood methemoglobin. In a 4×4 Latin square design 4 lactating Danish Holstein dairy cows fitted with rumen, duodenal, and ileal cannulas were assigned to 4 calcium ammonium nitrate addition levels: control, low, medium, and high [0, 5.3, 13.6, and 21.1g of nitrate/kg of dry matter (DM), respectively]. Diets were made isonitrogenous by replacing urea. Cows were fed ad libitum and, after a 6-d period of gradual introduction of nitrate, adapted to the corn-silage-based total mixed ration (forage:concentrate ratio 50:50 on DM basis) for 16d before sampling. Digesta content from duodenum, ileum, and feces, and rumen liquid were collected, after which methane production and hydrogen emissions were measured in respiration chambers. Methane production [L/kg of dry matter intake (DMI)] linearly decreased with increasing nitrate concentrations compared with the control, corresponding to a reduction of 6, 13, and 23% for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively. Methane production was lowered with apparent efficiencies (measured methane reduction relative to potential methane reduction) of 82.3, 71.9, and 79.4% for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively. Addition of nitrate increased hydrogen emissions (L/kg of DMI) quadratically by a factor of 2.5, 3.4, and 3.0 (as L/kg of DMI) for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively, compared with the control. Blood methemoglobin levels and nitrate concentrations in milk and urine increased with increasing nitrate intake, but did not constitute a threat for animal health and human food safety. Microbial crude protein synthesis and efficiency were unaffected. Total volatile fatty acid

  16. Hipotiroidismo en rumiantes Hypothyroidism in Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. MATAMOROS

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available La glándula tiroides está presente en todos los vertebrados y es única entre las glándulas endocrinas en que almacena sus productos de secreción (hormonas tiroidales extracelularmente. Estas hormonas juegan un papel indispensable en una variedad de reacciones bioquímicas en tejidos periféricos como el músculo esquelético, cardíaco, el hígado y el riñón los que colectivamente controlan la actividad metabólica basal del organismo. A pesar de que muchos procesos fisiológicos en rumiantes requieren una actividad normal de la glándula tiroides, generalmente se ha resaltado su rol principalmente en la fisiología reproductiva. Sin embargo, en la mayoría de la literatura actual, la síntesis y acciones de las hormonas tiroidales en la fisiología de los rumiantes se ha extrapolado del conocimiento extenso que se tiene en la especie canina y felina. Por lo tanto, este trabajo pretende entregar información actualizada sobre la fisiología endocrina de la glándula tiroides en los rumiantes, enfatizando su rol en el bovino y ovino y las causas mas comunes de hipotiroidismo clínico en los rumiantes domésticosThe thyroid gland is present in all vertebrates and it is unique among endocrine glands in that it stores its secretory products (the thyroid hormones extracellularly. These hormones play an indispensable role in a variety of biochemical reactions at the level of peripheral tissues such as the skeletal and heart muscle, the liver and the kidney which collectively control the basal metabolic activity of the organism. Although many physiologic processes in ruminant require a normal activity of the thyroid gland, their role has generally been emphasized in the reproductive physiology. However, in most of the current literature, the synthesis and mechanism of action of the thyroid hormones in the ruminant physiology have been extrapolated of the extensive knowledge that we have in the canine and feline species. This work seeks to give

  17. Open Path Tracer Measurements of Methane Emissions from Free Ranging Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, D. W.; Tonini, M.; Bryant, G. R.; Eckard, R.; Grainger, C.; McGinn, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    This paper addresses the need for more accurate and representative measurements of methane emissions from cattle in their natural environments. Improved measurements are or will be required to quantify methane emissions for national greenhouse gas budgets and future carbon trading schemes, and to assess the effectiveness of proposed mitigation strategies. We describe measurements of methane emissions from free- ranging cattle grazing in their natural outdoor environments in Australia and New Zealand. We employ a novel tracer method in which nitrous oxide is released at a known rate from fenceline tubing or canisters attached to individual cows, and the mixing ratios of methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide are measured continuously and simultaneously downwind by open path FTIR spectroscopy. Correlations between methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide can be used to infer the herd-average methane flux directly. Measurements will be compared with the more conventional SF6 ruminal tracer technique.

  18. Zoonotic risks from small ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganter, M

    2015-12-14

    Zoonoses are infections that spread naturally between species (sometimes by a vector) from animals to other animal species or to humans or from humans to animals. Most of the zoonoses diagnosed in sheep and goats are transmitted by close contact of man with these animals and are, more often, occupational diseases that principally affect breeders, veterinarians and/or slaughterhouse workers. Some other diseases have an airborne transmission and affect the population in the vicinity of sheep/goat farms. Due to the fact that small ruminants are almost the only remaining animals which are migrating in industrialised countries, there is a severe risk for transmitting the diseases. Some other zoonotic diseases are foodborne diseases, which are mainly transmitted from animals to humans and to other animal species by contaminated food and water. Within the last decade central Europe was threatened by some new infections, e.g., bluetongue disease and schmallenberg disease, which although not of zoonotic interest, are caused by pathogens transmitted by vectors. Causal agents of both diseases have found highly effective indigenous vectors. In the future, climate change may possibly modify conditions for the vectors and influence their distribution and competence. By this, other vector-borne zoonotic infections may propagate into former disease free countries. Changes in human behaviour in consummation and processing of food, in animal housing and management may also influence future risks for zoonosis. Monitoring, prevention and control measures are proposed to limit further epidemics and to enable the containment of outbreaks. Measures depend mainly on the damage evoked or anticipated by the disease, the local situation, and the epidemiology of the zoonoses, the presence of the infective agent in wild and other animals, as well as the resistance of the causal microorganisms in the environment and the possibility to breed sheep and goats which are resistant to specific

  19. Ruminal fermentation of Anti-methanogenic Nitrate- and Nitro-Containing Forages In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin C. Anderson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate, 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA and 3-nitro-1-propanol (NPOH can accumulate in forages and be poisonous to animals if consumed in high enough amounts. These chemicals are also recognized as potent anti-methanogenic compounds, but plants naturally containing these chemicals have been studied little in this regard. Presently, we found that nitrate-, NPA- or NPOH-containing forages effectively decreased methane production, by 35 to 87%, during in vitro fermentation by mixed cultures of ruminal microbes compared to fermentation by cultures incubated similarly with alfalfa. Methane production was further decreased during incubation of mixed cultures also inoculated with Denitrobacterium detoxificans, a ruminal bacterium known to metabolize nitrate, NPA and NPOH. Inhibition of methanogens within the mixed cultures was greatest with the NPA- and NPOH-containing forages. Hydrogen accumulated in all the mixed cultures incubated with forages containing nitrate, NPA or NPOH but was dramatically higher, exceeding 40 µmol hydrogen/mL, in mixed cultures incubated with NPA-containing forage but not inoculated with D. detoxificans. This possibly reflects the inhibition of hydrogenase-catalyzed uptake of hydrogen produced via conversion of 50 µmol added formate per mL to hydrogen. Accumulations of volatile fatty acids revealed compensatory changes in fermentation in mixed cultures incubated with the nitrate-, NPA- and NPOH-containing forages as evidenced by lower accumulations of acetate, and in some cases higher accumulations of butyrate and lower accumulations of ammonia, iso-buytrate and iso-valerate compared to cultures incubated with alfalfa. Results reveal that nitrate, NPA and NPOH that accumulate naturally in forages can be made available within ruminal incubations to inhibit methanogenesis. Further research is warranted to determine if diets can be formulated with nitrate-, NPA- and NPOH-containing forages to achieve efficacious mitigation in

  20. Ruminal Fermentation of Anti-Methanogenic Nitrate- and Nitro-Containing Forages In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robin C.; Ripley, Laura H.; Bowman, Jan G. P.; Callaway, Todd R.; Genovese, Kenneth J.; Beier, Ross C.; Harvey, Roger B.; Nisbet, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate, 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA) and 3-nitro-1-propanol (NPOH) can accumulate in forages and be poisonous to animals if consumed in high enough amounts. These chemicals are also recognized as potent anti-methanogenic compounds, but plants naturally containing these chemicals have been studied little in this regard. Presently, we found that nitrate-, NPA-, or NPOH-containing forages effectively decreased methane production, by 35–87%, during in vitro fermentation by mixed cultures of ruminal microbes compared to fermentation by cultures incubated similarly with alfalfa. Methane production was further decreased during the incubation of mixed cultures also inoculated with Denitrobacterium detoxificans, a ruminal bacterium known to metabolize nitrate, NPA, and NPOH. Inhibition of methanogens within the mixed cultures was greatest with the NPA- and NPOH-containing forages. Hydrogen accumulated in all the mixed cultures incubated with forages containing nitrate, NPA or NPOH and was dramatically higher, exceeding 40 μmol hydrogen/mL, in mixed cultures incubated with NPA-containing forage but not inoculated with D. detoxificans. This possibly reflects the inhibition of hydrogenase-catalyzed uptake of hydrogen produced via conversion of 50 μmol added formate per milliliter to hydrogen. Accumulations of volatile fatty acids revealed compensatory changes in fermentation in mixed cultures incubated with the nitrate-, NPA-, and NPOH-containing forages as evidenced by lower accumulations of acetate, and in some cases, higher accumulations of butyrate and lower accumulations of ammonia, iso-buytrate, and iso-valerate compared to cultures incubated with alfalfa. Results reveal that nitrate, NPA, and NPOH that accumulate naturally in forages can be made available within ruminal incubations to inhibit methanogenesis. Further research is warranted to determine if diets can be formulated with nitrate-, NPA-, and NPOH-containing forages to achieve efficacious mitigation

  1. Dietary strategies to reducing N excretion from cattle: implications for methane emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, J.; Oenema, O.; Bannink, A.

    2011-01-01

    Ruminants turn human inedible into human edible products, but at a cost of excretion of various pollutants. Implications of dietary measures for cattle to reduce faecal and urinary nitrogen losses on methane emissions are reviewed. Reducing the dietary protein content decreases nitrogen excretion in

  2. Genetic parameters for predicted methane production and potential for reducing enteric emissions through genomic selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de Y.; Windig, J.J.; Calus, M.P.L.; Dijkstra, J.; Haan, de M.H.A.; Bannink, A.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2011-01-01

    Mitigation of enteric methane (CH4) emission in ruminants has become an important area of research because accumulation of CH4 is linked to global warming. Nutritional and microbial opportunities to reduce CH4 emissions have been extensively researched, but little is known about using natural

  3. Persistency of methane mitigation by dietary nitrate supplementation in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijderveld, van S.M.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Dijkstra, J.; Newbold, J.R.; Hulshof, R.B.A.; Perdok, H.B.

    2011-01-01

    Feeding nitrate to dairy cows may lower ruminal methane production by competing for reducing equivalents with methanogenesis. Twenty lactating Holstein-Friesian dairy cows (33.2±6.0 kg of milk/d; 104±58 d in milk at the start of the experiment) were fed a total mixed ration (corn silage-based; forag

  4. In vivo and in vitro effects of a blend of essential oils on rumen methane mitigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro-Montoya, J.; Peiren, N.; Cone, J.W.; Zweifel, B.; Fievez, V.; Campeneere, De S.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Agolin Ruminant, a blend of essential oils, on methane (CH4) emissions were investigated in two in vivo experiments and in four in vitro experiments. In the in vivo experiments, four lactating dairy cows and four beef heifers were supplemented 0.2 g/d of the essential oils (ca. 2–4 ppm

  5. In vivo and in vitro effects of a blend of essential oils on rumen methane mitigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro-Montoya, J.; Peiren, N.; Cone, J.W.; Zweifel, B.; Fievez, V.; Campeneere, De S.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Agolin Ruminant, a blend of essential oils, on methane (CH4) emissions were investigated in two in vivo experiments and in four in vitro experiments. In the in vivo experiments, four lactating dairy cows and four beef heifers were supplemented 0.2 g/d of the essential oils (ca. 2–4 ppm

  6. Vaccination schedules in small ruminant farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasta, D; Ferrer, L M; Ramos, J J; González, J M; Ortín, A; Fthenakis, G C

    2015-12-14

    Development and implementation of health management plans is the cornerstone of profitable farms; prevention of microbial diseases by means of vaccination is an integral part of such a plan. In every production type and management system in small ruminants, microbial diseases have a major significance, hence their proper control must be based in good health management practices, including use of effective and safe vaccines. Development of various types of vaccines is evolving very quickly in recent years and the improvement of new type of vaccines offers prospects. The article reviews and discusses vaccination programs and latest advances in development of vaccines against diseases that cause major economic losses in small ruminants. Specifically, vaccination schedules for the following diseases are reviewed: bacterial abortion (abortion associated with Brucella melitensis, Campylobacter spp., Chlamydophila abortus, Coxiella burnetii, Salmonella abortus ovis or Salmonella brandenburg), caseous lymphadenitis, clostridial diseases, colibacillosis, contagious echtyma, epididymitis caused by Brucella ovis, footrot, mammary diseases (contagious agalactia, mastitis), paratuberculosis and respiratory diseases (respiratory disease caused by Mannheimia haemolytica or other Pasteurellaceae).

  7. Starch hydrolysis by the ruminal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarski, S F; Waniska, R D; Thurn, K K

    1992-01-01

    The effects of grain type and processing on ruminal starch digestion are well documented but poorly understood at the biochemical and molecular levels. Waxy grains have starches high in amylopectin and are more readily digested than nonwaxy grains. However, the composition of the endosperm cell matrix and the extent to which the starch granules are embedded within it also affect starch digestion rates. Continued work is needed to determine the influence of specific cell matrix proteins, protein-starch interactions and cell wall carbohydrates on starch availability. The microbial populations that metabolize starch are diverse, differing in their capacities to hydrolyze starch granules and soluble forms of starch. Surveys show that the amylases are under regulatory control in most of these organisms, but few studies have addressed the types of amylolytic enzymes produced, their regulation and the impact of other plant polymers on their synthesis. Research in these areas, coupled with the development and use of isogeneic or near-isogeneic grain cultivars with biochemically defined endosperm characteristics, will enhance our ability to identify mechanisms to manipulate ruminal starch digestion.

  8. Application of meta-omics techniques to understand greenhouse gas emissions originating from ruminal metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Robert J; Snelling, Timothy J; McCartney, Christine A; Tapio, Ilma; Strozzi, Francesco

    2017-01-16

    Methane emissions from ruminal fermentation contribute significantly to total anthropological greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. New meta-omics technologies are beginning to revolutionise our understanding of the rumen microbial community structure, metabolic potential and metabolic activity. Here we explore these developments in relation to GHG emissions. Microbial rumen community analyses based on small subunit ribosomal RNA sequence analysis are not yet predictive of methane emissions from individual animals or treatments. Few metagenomics studies have been directly related to GHG emissions. In these studies, the main genes that differed in abundance between high and low methane emitters included archaeal genes involved in methanogenesis, with others that were not apparently related to methane metabolism. Unlike the taxonomic analysis up to now, the gene sets from metagenomes may have predictive value. Furthermore, metagenomic analysis predicts metabolic function better than only a taxonomic description, because different taxa share genes with the same function. Metatranscriptomics, the study of mRNA transcript abundance, should help to understand the dynamic of microbial activity rather than the gene abundance; to date, only one study has related the expression levels of methanogenic genes to methane emissions, where gene abundance failed to do so. Metaproteomics describes the proteins present in the ecosystem, and is therefore arguably a better indication of microbial metabolism. Both two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and shotgun peptide sequencing methods have been used for ruminal analysis. In our unpublished studies, both methods showed an abundance of archaeal methanogenic enzymes, but neither was able to discriminate high and low emitters. Metabolomics can take several forms that appear to have predictive value for methane emissions; ruminal metabolites, milk fatty acid profiles, faecal long-chain alcohols and urinary metabolites have all

  9. Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) challenge, ruminal condition and cellular immunity in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shigeru

    2015-02-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) is characterized by repeated bouts of low ruminal pH. Cows with SARA often develop complications or other diseases, and associate physiologically with immunosuppression and inflammation. Ruminal free lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increases during SARA and translocates into the blood circulation activating an inflammatory response. Ruminal fermentation and cellular immunity are encouraged by supplementing hay with calf starter during weaning. SARA calves given a 5-day repeated administration of a bacteria-based probiotic had stable ruminal pH levels (6.6-6.8). The repeated administration of probiotics enhance cellular immune function and encourage recovery from diarrhea in pre-weaning calves. Furthermore, the ruminal fermentation could guard against acute and short-term feeding changes, and changes in the rumen microbial composition of SARA cattle might occur following changes in ruminal pH. The repeated bouts of low ruminal pH in SARA cattle might be associated with depression of cellular immunity.

  10. Factors Affecting Methane Emission from Rice Paddies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于心科; 王卫东; 等

    1995-01-01

    A comparative study of rice paddies and the uncovered water field in Taoyuan(Hunan) showed that methane emission from rice-vegetated paddy fields in 1993 was different from that in 1992(I,e,lower in rates and irregular in pattern).Climate has obvious influence on methane emission .And ebullition made a considerable contribution to the total flux of methane emission from rice paddies (45%).This implies that the intensification of paddy cultivation of rice might not be,as was proposed,the main con-tributor to the observed gradual increasing of atmospheric methane.24-hour automatic measurements of atmospheric temperature,air temperature and methane concentration in the static sampling boxes revealed that temperature,in addition to fertilization and irrigation style,is one of the most important factors that control the emission of methane from rice paddies.

  11. Global Air Quality and Health Co-benefits of Mitigating Near-term Climate Change Through Methane and Black Carbon Emission Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anenberg, Susan C.; Schwartz, Joel; Shindell, Drew Todd; Amann, Markus; Faluvegi, Gregory S.; Klimont, Zbigniew; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Pozzoli, Luca; Dingenen, Rita Van; Vignati, Elisabetta; Emberson, Lisa; Muller, Nicholas Z.; West, J. Jason; Williams, Martin; Demkine, Volodymyr; Hicks, W. Kevin; Kuylenstierna, Johan; Raes, Frank; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    2012-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone and black carbon (BC), a component of fine particulate matter (PM air quality and health benefits of 14 specific emission control measures targeting BC and methane, an ozone precursor, that were selected because of their potential to reduce the rate of climate change over the next 20-40 years. Methods: We simulated the impacts of mitigation measures on outdoor concentrations of PM2.5 and ozone using two composition-climate models, and calculated associated changes in premature PM2.5- and ozone-related deaths using epidemiologically derived concentration-response functions. Results: We estimated that, for PM2.5 and ozone, respectively, fully implementing these measures could reduce global population-weighted average surface concentrations by 23-34% and 7-17% and avoid 0.6-4.4 and 0.04-0.52 million annual premature deaths globally in 2030. More than 80% of the health benefits are estimated to occur in Asia. We estimated that BC mitigation measures would achieve approximately 98% of the deaths that would be avoided if all BC and methane mitigation measures were implemented, due to reduced BC and associated reductions of nonmethane ozone precursor and organic carbon emissions as well as stronger mortality relationships for PM2.5 relative to ozone. Although subject to large uncertainty, these estimates and conclusions are not strongly dependent on assumptions for the concentration-response function. Conclusions: In addition to climate benefits, our findings indicate that the methane and BC emission control measures would have substantial co-benefits for air quality and public health worldwide, potentially reversing trends of increasing air pollution concentrations and mortality in Africa and South, West, and Central Asia. These projected benefits are independent of carbon dioxide mitigation measures. Benefits of BC measures are underestimated because we did not account for benefits from reduced indoor exposures and because outdoor exposure estimates

  12. Association between Anger Rumination and Autism Symptom Severity, Depression Symptoms, Aggression, and General Dysregulation in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shivani; Day, Taylor N.; Jones, Neil; Mazefsky, Carla A.

    2017-01-01

    Rumination has a large direct effect on psychopathology but has received relatively little attention in autism spectrum disorder despite the propensity to perseverate in this population. This study provided initial evidence that adolescents with autism spectrum disorder self-report more anger-focused rumination than typically developing controls,…

  13. Association between Anger Rumination and Autism Symptom Severity, Depression Symptoms, Aggression, and General Dysregulation in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shivani; Day, Taylor N.; Jones, Neil; Mazefsky, Carla A.

    2017-01-01

    Rumination has a large direct effect on psychopathology but has received relatively little attention in autism spectrum disorder despite the propensity to perseverate in this population. This study provided initial evidence that adolescents with autism spectrum disorder self-report more anger-focused rumination than typically developing controls,…

  14. Review on Ruminant Nutrition Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Haryanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research works in ruminant nutrition have been widely published, especially those related to the energy and protein utilization. The energy and protein requirements for maintenance and production in tropical regions may be different from those in the subtropical areas. Responses of different species of ruminants to energy and protein supplements were also observed. The synchronization of energy and protein availability has been considered as an important strategy in affecting the microbial fermentative process in the rumen and in affecting the animal performance. The inclusion of long-chained unsaturated fatty acids in the diets has been successfully affecting milk production with higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids. Feedstuffs characteristics in terms of their degradability and fermentation by rumen microbial enzymes have been intensively studied; however, further experimentations are still needed to elucidate the specific fate of its nutritive components in the rumen and tissue levels.

  15. ESTUDO DA EFICIÊNCIA DO CALCÁRIO CALCÍTICO, DO CARBONATO DE CÁLCIO E DO ÓXIDO DE MAGNÉSIO NO CONTROLE DO pH RUMINAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirson Vieira

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi desenvolvido no Departamento de Produção Animal da Escola de Veterinária da Universidade Federal de Goiás, com o objetivo de estudar o comportamento do pH ruminal, da glicemia sérica e da uréia em ovinos que receberam calcário calcítico, carbonato de cálcio e óxido de magnésio na dieta. Foram utilizados dezesseis ovinos machos, da raça Santa Inês, confinados em gaiolas metabólicas individuais contendo bebedouro e cocho para o fornecimento de volumosos e concentrados. Os tratamentos constituíram-se de quatro rações concentradas isoprotéicas e isoenergéticas, contendo 16% de proteína bruta e 3.300 Kcal de energia digestível e níveis de 0% na dieta controle, 1% de calcário calcítico, 1% de carbonato de cálcio e 1% de óxido de magnésio. O delineamento empregado foi inteiramente casualizado em esquema de parcelas subdivididas, com os tratamentos nas parcelas e os períodos nas subparcelas. Utilizaram-se quatro repetições paraavaliar os quatro tratamentos, sendo cada unidade experimental constituída por um animal. O período experimental foi de nove dias, sendo sete dias de pré-experimento e dois dias de coleta. As médias foram comparadas pelo teste de Scott-Knott. Os valores médios do pH do líquido ruminal obtidos para cada tratamento, zero hora após a ingestão de alimento, foram 7,65; 7,88, 7,32 e 7,66 (P>0,05, e para quatro horas após o consumo 6,42; 6,65; 7,56 e 6,56 (P<0,01 respectivamente. Os valores médios da uréia para zero hora foram 24,83; 26,86, 21,96 e 28,53 mg/100 mL (P<0,01 e para quatro horas foram 27,20; 28,99, 23,65 e 48,07 mg/100 mL (P<0,01 respectivamente. Os valores médios da glicose sérica para zero hora foram 67,07; 65,08, 60,51 e 62,22 mg/100 mL (P<0,05 e para quatro horas foram 74,49; 65,85, 70,70 e 66,51 mg/100 mL (P<0,05 respectivamente. Conclui-se que o carbonato de cálcio foi mais eficaz no controle do pH ruminal após quatro horas da ingestão de alimento

  16. Kinetics of methane fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. R.; Hashimoto, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics on methane fermentation are described using published data for livestock residue, sewage sludge, and municipal refuse. Methods are presented to determine the kinetic constants and the finally attainable methane production using steady-state methane production data. The effects of temperature, loading rate, and influent substrate concentration on methane fermentation kinetics are discussed. These relationships were used to predict the rate of methane production of a pilot-scale fermentor with excellent results.

  17. Methanogen Diversity in Indigenous and Introduced Ruminant Species on the Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao Dan; Martinez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Long, Ruijun; Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Host factors are regarded as important in shaping the archaeal community in the rumen but few controlled studies have been performed to demonstrate this across host species under the same environmental conditions. A study was designed to investigate the structure of the methanogen community in the rumen of two indigenous (yak and Tibetan sheep) and two introduced domestic ruminant (cattle and crossbred sheep) species raised and fed under similar conditions on the high altitude Tibetan Plateau. The methylotrophic Methanomassiliicoccaceae was the predominant archaeal group in all animals even though Methanobrevibacter are usually present in greater abundance in ruminants globally. Furthermore, within the Methanomassiliicoccaceae family members from Mmc. group 10 and Mmc. group 4 were dominant in Tibetan Plateau ruminants compared to Mmc. group 12 found to be highest in other ruminants studied. Small ruminants presented the highest number of sequences that belonged to Methanomassiliicoccaceae compared to the larger ruminants. Although the methanogen community structure was different among the ruminant species, there were striking similarities between the animals in this environment. This indicates that factors such as the extreme environmental conditions and diet on the Tibetan Plateau might have a greater impact on rumen methanogen community compared to host differences.

  18. Methanogen Diversity in Indigenous and Introduced Ruminant Species on the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Dan Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Host factors are regarded as important in shaping the archaeal community in the rumen but few controlled studies have been performed to demonstrate this across host species under the same environmental conditions. A study was designed to investigate the structure of the methanogen community in the rumen of two indigenous (yak and Tibetan sheep and two introduced domestic ruminant (cattle and crossbred sheep species raised and fed under similar conditions on the high altitude Tibetan Plateau. The methylotrophic Methanomassiliicoccaceae was the predominant archaeal group in all animals even though Methanobrevibacter are usually present in greater abundance in ruminants globally. Furthermore, within the Methanomassiliicoccaceae family members from Mmc. group 10 and Mmc. group 4 were dominant in Tibetan Plateau ruminants compared to Mmc. group 12 found to be highest in other ruminants studied. Small ruminants presented the highest number of sequences that belonged to Methanomassiliicoccaceae compared to the larger ruminants. Although the methanogen community structure was different among the ruminant species, there were striking similarities between the animals in this environment. This indicates that factors such as the extreme environmental conditions and diet on the Tibetan Plateau might have a greater impact on rumen methanogen community compared to host differences.

  19. Rising methane: post-2007 growth, geographic loci, timings and isotopic shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Euan G.; Manning, Martin R.; Dlugokencky, Ed; Lowry, David; Fisher, Rebecca E.; Brownlow, Rebecca

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric methane is rising rapidly again, after a period of stability [1]. NOAA report a global growth rate from 2007-2013 of 5.7±1.2 ppb yr-1, followed by extreme growth of 12.6±0.5 ppb in 2014 and 10.0±0.7 ppb in 2015. Growth has been accompanied by a shift in δ13C(CH4) (a measure of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in methane) to significantly more negative values since 2007. This isotopic shift has been observed in independently calibrated NOAA, Royal Holloway and NIWA-New Zealand measurements: thus the negative trend is real, global, and not a calibration artifact. Fossil fuel methane emissions, which are mostly more positive than atmospheric values, are not driving the rise in methane. Instead, the geographic loci of post-2007 growth, and the timings of the methane rise and isotopic shift suggest growth was dominated by significant increases in biogenic methane emissions, particularly in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere: for example in years with heavy rainfall under the Inter-Tropical Convergence, from wetlands and increased agricultural sources such as ruminants and rice paddies. Changes in the removal rate of methane by the OH radical or other sinks may also have occurred but do not appear fully to explain short term variations in methane isotopes. All these drivers of rising methane - wetlands, ruminants, changing sinks - may reflect underlying decade-long trends in tropical climate: methane may thus be an important climate-change signal. 1. Nisbet, E.G. et al. (2016) Rising atmospheric methane: 2007-2014 growth and isotopic shift, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 30, doi:10.1002/ 2016GB005406.

  20. Functional Role of PPARs in Ruminants: Potential Targets for Fine-Tuning Metabolism during Growth and Lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Bionaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization and biological roles of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR isotypes are well known in monogastrics, but not in ruminants. However, a wealth of information has accumulated in little more than a decade on ruminant PPARs including isotype tissue distribution, response to synthetic and natural agonists, gene targets, and factors affecting their expression. Functional characterization demonstrated that, as in monogastrics, the PPAR isotypes control expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism, anti-inflammatory response, development, and growth. Contrary to mouse, however, the PPAR gene network appears to controls milk fat synthesis in lactating ruminants. As in monogastrics, PPAR isotypes in ruminants are activated by long-chain fatty acids, therefore, making them ideal candidates for fine-tuning metabolism in this species via nutrients. In this regard, using information accumulated in ruminants and monogastrics, we propose a model of PPAR isotype-driven biological functions encompassing key tissues during the peripartal period in dairy cattle.

  1. GRI methane chemistry program review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dignon, J.; Grant, K.; Grossman, A.; Wuebles, D.; Brasseur, G.; Madronich, S.; Huang, T.; Chang, J.; Lott, B.

    1997-02-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas which affects the atmosphere directly by the absorption and re-emission of infrared radiation as well as indirectly, through chemical interactions. Emissions of several important greenhouse gases (GHGS) including methane are increasing, mainly due to human activity. Higher concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere are projected to cause a decrease in the amount of infrared radiation escaping to space, and a subsequent warming of global climate. It is therefore vital to understand not only the causes of increased production of methane and other GHGS, but the effect of higher GHG concentrations on climate, and the possibilities for reductions of these emissions. In GRI-UIUC methane project, the role of methane in climate change and greenhouse gas abatement strategies is being studied using several distinct approaches. First, a detailed treatment of the mechanisms controlling each important methane source and sink, and hence the atmospheric concentration of methane, is being developed for use with the UIUC Integrated Science Assessment Model. The focus of this study is to resolve the factors which determine methane emissions and removal, including human population, land use, energy demand, global temperature, and regional concentrations of the hydroxyl radical, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxides, non-methane hydrocarbons, water vapor, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone.

  2. Investigation of the use of various plant extracts activity in ruminant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüca, Songül; Gül, Mehmet; Ćaǧlayan, Alper

    2016-04-01

    The prohibition of the use of antibiotics and as a result of the adverse effect on health of synthetic products, research has focused on natural feed additives. In recent years, the diet of farm animals many feed additives have been used for various purposes or continues. These include as used in ruminant rations as plant extract thyme, anise, pepper, mint, garlic, rosemary, cinnamon, parsley, bay leaf, coconut, like used herbal extracts and their effects on the performance of ruminants was investigated. Antioxidant, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflamaotry is known to have effects of plant extract. By stimulating the digestive system of ruminants, they increase the activity of digestive enzymes, to prevent environmental pollution caused by manure, regulations rumen fermentation, inhibition of methane formation and protein degradability in the rumen as well as the animal is known to have many benefits. The structure of essential oils and plant extracts in this collection, examining the use of ruminant livestock events and the importance of the use in animal nutrition into practice will be discussed.

  3. The effects of cognitive-behavioural therapy on mood-related ruminative response style in depressed adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodyer Ian M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A mood-related ruminative response style increases the risk of onset and persistence of depression. This preliminary study investigated whether, in depressed adolescents, cognitive-behaviour therapy reduces mood-related ruminative response style. Whether specific factors within the rumination scale were differentially affected by CBT is also reported. Methods 26 depressed adolescents were randomised to receiving serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRI plus psychosocial treatment as usual or SSRI and psychosocial treatment as usual plus CBT. Ruminative response style and depressive symptoms were measured at baseline and after 30 weeks of treatment, with the Responses to Depression Questionnaire and Mood and Feelings Questionnaire. Results There were significantly greater reductions in ruminations in the CBT group compared to the non-CBT group (p = .002. There was no significant difference in the reduction in self-reported depressive symptoms between the groups. Rumination was reduced to levels of never-depressed controls in adolescents who had recovered from depression and received CBT. There were greater falls in the CBT group in the more pathological 'brooding' factor of rumination. Conclusion These findings suggest that adding CBT to SSRI medication in the presence of active clinical care causes a greater reduction in mood-related ruminative response style in depressed adolescents. This may reduce the risk of future relapse. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCNT83809224.

  4. The Relationship between Adolescent Rumination and Maternal Rumination, Criticism and Positivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jessica L; Williams, Deirdre; Reynolds, Shirley

    2017-05-01

    Rumination predicts depression in adults and adolescents. The development of rumination has been linked to parenting practices, but only limited research has investigated this and research has tended to rely on self-report parenting measures. To investigate the relationship between female adolescent rumination and maternal modelling, criticism and positivity using an observational measure of parental behaviour. A cross-sectional design was used. Daughters aged 16-18 years and their mothers (n = 154 dyads) completed questionnaire measures of rumination and affect. Mothers of girls with rumination scores in the upper and lower quartile (both n = 26) also completed the Five Minute Speech Sample, which was used to measure maternal criticism and positivity. Mothers of low rumination girls made significantly more positive comments about their daughters than the mothers of high ruminators. Mothers made very few critical comments. Self-reported rumination was not correlated in mothers and daughters, suggesting a lack of support for the potential role of modelling. Overall, low maternal positivity was associated with rumination in female adolescents. There was no evidence that maternal rumination or criticism were associated with adolescent rumination. The results suggest a number of implications for future research, including the need for prospective longitudinal studies using observational parenting measures.

  5. Efeito da monensina e do óleo de soja sobre os protozoários ciliados do rúmen e correlação dos protozoários com parâmetros da fermentação ruminal e digestivos Effect of monensin and soybean oil on rumen ciliate protozoa and correlation between protozoa with ruminal fermentation and digestive parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martinele

    2008-06-01

    lactating cows on the counting of ciliate protozoa beyond establishing correlations between number of protozoa with some parameters of digestion and ruminal fermentation. The treatments consisted of the inclusion of 33 ppm of sodium monensin or soybean oil at 4% DM, as following: control diet, without oil or monensin - CT; diet with monensin - MN; diet with soybean oil - OL; diet with the combination of 33 ppm of monensin and 4% of soybean oil - OM. Occurrence of 11 ciliate genera was observed, being Entodinium the predominant in all treatments. No significant soybean oil × monensin interaction was observed on protozoa number and genera. The genera Entodinium, Dasytricha, Eremoplastron and Isotricha reduced in the diets with oil, while monensin reduced the counting of Dasytricha, Eremoplastron and Epidinium. The total number of ciliate protozoa and cellulolytics protozoa was reduced by soybean oil and monensin effects, showing a defaunatory additive effect when combined the oil and the monensin. The ciliate cellulolytics was reduced by linoleic acid intake and was related positively with NDF ruminal digestibility and ruminal ammonia. The total number of protozoa was correlated with the molar proportion of propionate in the ruminal liquid, suggesting that monensin and soybean oil, due their defaunatory effect, can reduce the loss of methane in the rumen.

  6. Polioencefalomalacia em ruminantes Polioencephalomalacia in ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano J.F. de Sant'Ana

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Polioencefalomalacia (PEM de ruminantes é uma doença complexa. O termo indica um diagnóstico morfológico em que necrose neuronal grave resulta em amolecimento da substância cinzenta do cérebro. Interpretada no início como uma doença única, causada por deficiência de tiamina, acredita-se hoje que várias causas e diferentes mecanismos patogênicos, ou um único mecanismo patogênico disparado por diferentes agentes, sejam responsáveis pelo aparecimento da doença. Neste artigo, as possíveis causas e a patogênese de PEM em ruminantes são criticamente revisadas e discutidas. Também são revisadas a epidemiologia, os sinais clínicos, os achados macro e microscópicos e os métodos de diagnóstico, tratamento e controle.Polioencephalomalacia (PEM of ruminants is a complex disease. The term indicates a morphological diagnosis where severe neuronal necrosis results in softening of cerebral grey matter. Initially though as a single disease caused by thiamine deficiency, PEM is currently believe to have several causes and different pathogenic mechanisms or a single pathogenic organism triggered by different agents are responsible for the disease. In this paper the possible causes and pathogenesis of PEM in ruminants are critically reviewed and discussed. Also are reviewed the epidemiology, clinical signs, gross and histological findings, methods of diagnosis, treatment and control.

  7. Rumination in major depressive disorder is associated with impaired neural activation during conflict monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Brandon L; Olson, Ryan L; Bates, Marsha E; Selby, Edward A; Buckman, Jennifer F; Brush, Christopher J; Panza, Emily A; Kranzler, Amy; Eddie, David; Shors, Tracey J

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) often ruminate about past experiences, especially those with negative content. These repetitive thoughts may interfere with cognitive processes related to attention and conflict monitoring. However, the temporal nature of these processes as reflected in event-related potentials (ERPs) has not been well-described. We examined behavioral and ERP indices of conflict monitoring during a modified flanker task and the allocation of attention during an attentional blink (AB) task in 33 individuals with MDD and 36 healthy controls, and whether their behavioral performance and ERPs varied with level of rumination. N2 amplitude elicited by the flanker task was significantly reduced in participants with MDD compared to healthy controls. Level of self-reported rumination was also correlated with N2 amplitude. In contrast, P3 amplitude during the AB task was not significantly different between groups, nor was it correlated with rumination. No significant differences were found in behavioral task performance measures between groups or by rumination levels. These findings suggest that rumination in MDD is associated with select deficits in cognitive control, particularly related to conflict monitoring.

  8. Rumination in major depressive disorder is associated with impaired neural activation during conflict monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Alderman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD often ruminate about past experiences, especially those with negative content. These repetitive thoughts may interfere with cognitive processes related to attention and conflict monitoring. However, the temporal nature of these processes as reflected in event-related potentials (ERPs has not been well described. We examined behavioral and ERP indices of conflict monitoring during a modified flanker task and the allocation of attention during an attentional blink (AB task in 33 individuals with MDD and 36 healthy controls, and whether their behavioral performance and ERPs varied with level of rumination. N2 amplitude elicited by the flanker task was significantly reduced in participants with MDD compared to healthy controls. Level of self-reported rumination was also correlated with N2 amplitude. In contrast, P3 amplitude during the AB task was not significantly different between groups, nor was it correlated with rumination. No significant differences were found in behavioral task performance measures between groups or by rumination levels. These findings suggest that rumination in MDD is associated with select deficits in cognitive control, particularly related to conflict monitoring.

  9. Effects of Peanut Butter on Ruminating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Katherine S.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Effects of supplementary peanut butter on rumination behavior among five institutionalized mentally retarded adults were studied, by independently manipulating caloric density versus consistency of the peanut butter. Results showed an inverse relationship between rates of rumination and amount of peanut butter consumed, an effect primarily…

  10. Heritability estimates for methane emission in Holstein cows using breath measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jan; Madsen, Jørgen; Løvendahl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Enteric methane emission from ruminants contributes substantially to the greenhouse effect. Few studies have focused on the genetic variation in enteric methane emission from dairy cattle. The objective of this study was to estimate the heritability for enteric methane emission from Danish Holstein...... of economic importance in the breeding goal as well as the possibility to use methane as an indicator of feed efficiency. It is concluded that FTIR breath analysis is effective for measuring GHG emissions and may find further applications with a wider panel of gases including acetone and its relation...... model included fixed effects of herd, month, days in milk, lactation number, and random effects of animal and residual. Variance components were estimated in an animal model design using a pedigree containing 9661 animals. The heritability of the methane to carbon dioxide ratio was moderate (0...

  11. The impact of rumination on state paranoid ideation in a nonclinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Cristina; Cavanagh, Kate; Dudley, Robert E J

    2013-09-01

    Cognitive-behavioral models of paranoia have emphasized the potential role of perseverative thinking styles, such as rumination or worry, in the development, maintenance and exacerbation of paranoid beliefs. This study aimed to experimentally test the hypothesis that rumination may play a role in the maintenance or exacerbation of state paranoid ideation. Following a paranoia induction, 37 nonclinical participants were randomly assigned to either a rumination task or a distraction control condition. In accord with main hypothesis, rumination was associated with maintained levels of paranoia, whereas distraction was associated with a decrease in levels of paranoia. These findings suggest that perseverative thinking may play a role in the maintenance of paranoid ideas, which may have implications for our understanding of the maintenance of paranoia and persecutory delusions in the clinical population. Furthermore, the study used a novel experimental paradigm for inducing paranoia, which may prove valuable for future research aiming to elicit paranoid thoughts and feelings in vivo.

  12. Review of methane mitigation technologies with application to rapid release of methane from the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Bhattacharyya, Subarna; Smith, Clara A; Bourcier, William L; Cameron-Smith, Philip J; Aines, Roger D

    2012-06-19

    Methane is the most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, with particular influence on near-term climate change. It poses increasing risk in the future from both direct anthropogenic sources and potential rapid release from the Arctic. A range of mitigation (emissions control) technologies have been developed for anthropogenic sources that can be developed for further application, including to Arctic sources. Significant gaps in understanding remain of the mechanisms, magnitude, and likelihood of rapid methane release from the Arctic. Methane may be released by several pathways, including lakes, wetlands, and oceans, and may be either uniform over large areas or concentrated in patches. Across Arctic sources, bubbles originating in the sediment are the most important mechanism for methane to reach the atmosphere. Most known technologies operate on confined gas streams of 0.1% methane or more, and may be applicable to limited Arctic sources where methane is concentrated in pockets. However, some mitigation strategies developed for rice paddies and agricultural soils are promising for Arctic wetlands and thawing permafrost. Other mitigation strategies specific to the Arctic have been proposed but have yet to be studied. Overall, we identify four avenues of research and development that can serve the dual purposes of addressing current methane sources and potential Arctic sources: (1) methane release detection and quantification, (2) mitigation units for small and remote methane streams, (3) mitigation methods for dilute (methane streams, and (4) understanding methanotroph and methanogen ecology.

  13. Rumination and Age: Some Things Get Better

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Sütterlin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rumination has been defined as a mode of responding to distress that involves passively focusing one's attention on symptoms of distress without taking action. This dysfunctional response style intensifies depressed mood, impairs interpersonal problem solving, and leads to more pessimistic future perspectives and less social support. As most of these results were obtained from younger people, it remains unclear how age affects ruminative thinking. Three hundred members of the general public ranging in age from 15 to 87 years were asked about their ruminative styles using the Response Styles Questionnaire (RSQ, depression and satisfaction with life. A Mokken Scale analysis confirmed the two-factor structure of the RSQ with brooding and reflective pondering as subcomponents of rumination. Older participants (63 years and older reported less ruminative thinking than other age groups. Life satisfaction was associated with brooding and highest for the earlier and latest life stages investigated in this study.

  14. Chlamydial infections in small ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nietfeld, J C

    2001-07-01

    Chlamydophila abortus (formerly Chlamydia psittaci) is one of the most important causes of reproductive failure in sheep and goats, especially in intensively managed flocks. The disease is usually manifested as abortion in the last 2 to 3 weeks of gestation, regardless of when the animal was infected. Ewes that abort are resistant to future reproductive failure due to C. abortus, but they become inapparent carriers and persistently shed the organism from their reproductive tracts during estrus. Chlamydophila pecorum is the other member of the genus that affects small ruminants, and it is recognized as a primary cause of keratoconjunctivitis in sheep and goats and of polyarthritis in sheep.

  15. Assessing dissolved methane patterns in central New York groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E. McPhillips

    2014-07-01

    New hydrological insights for this region: There was no significant difference between methane concentrations in valleys versus upslope locations, in water wells less than or greater than 1 km from a conventional gas well, and across different geohydrologic units. Methane concentrations were significantly higher in groundwater dominated by sodium chloride or sodium bicarbonate compared with groundwater dominated by calcium bicarbonate, indicating bedrock interactions and lengthy residence times as controls. A multivariate regression model of dissolved methane using only three variables (sodium, hardness, and barium explained 77% of methane variability, further emphasizing the dominance of geochemistry and hydrogeology as controls on baseline methane patterns.

  16. Interspecific transmission of small ruminant lentiviruses from goats to sheep

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza, Thiago S.; Pinheiro,Raymundo R.; Joselito N. Costa; Lima,Carla C.V. de; Alice Andrioli; de Azevedo, Dalva A.A.; Vanderlan W.S. dos Santos; Araújo,Juscilânia F.; de Sousa, Ana Lídia M.; Pinheiro, Danielle N.S.; Flora M.C. Fernandes; Antonio O. Costa Neto

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to evaluate the transmission of caprine lentivirus to sheep using different experimental groups. The first one (colostrum group) was formed by nine lambs receiving colostrum from goats positive for small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV). The second group (milk group) was established by nine lambs that received milk of these goats. Third was a control group, consisting of lambs that suckled colostrum and milk of negative mothers. Another experimental group (contac...

  17. Body image and emotional distress in newly diagnosed cancer patients: The mediating role of dysfunctional attitudes and rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianlin; Peh, Chao Xu; Mahendran, Rathi

    2016-12-06

    Body image concerns (BIC) has been reported to be associated with emotional distress for cancers across various sites. This study sought to examine two cognitive vulnerability mechanisms: dysfunctional attitudes and rumination, and their combined effects on the relationship between BIC and emotional distress in newly diagnosed Asian cancer patients. Participants were 221 newly diagnosed adult cancer patients who were assessed on BIC, rumination, dysfunctional attitudes, and emotional distress. Path analysis was used to examine the hypothesized mediation model. The hypothesized mediation model controlling for age, sex, marital status, education level, cancer type, cancer stage, and treatment modality revealed that both dysfunctional attitudes and rumination mediated the relationship between BIC and emotional distress. The present study provides evidence for a mediating role of dysfunctional attitudes and rumination between BIC and emotional distress. Psychological treatment should target dysfunctional attitudes and rumination in cancer patients experiencing BIC.

  18. Effect of virginiamycin on ruminal fermentation in cattle during adaptation to a high concentrate diet and during an induced acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, M L; Nagaraja, T G; Sun, Y D; Wallace, N; Towne, E G; Kemp, K E; Hutcheson, J P

    1999-08-01

    The objective of Exp. 1 was to compare the effects of virginiamycin (VM; 0, 175, or 250 mg x animal(-1) x d(-1)) and monensin/tylosin (MT; 250/ 90 mg x animal(-1) x d(-1)) on ruminal fermentation products and microbial populations in cattle during adaptation to an all-concentrate diet. Four ruminally cannulated, Holstein steers were used in a 4x4 Williams square design with 21-d periods. Steers were stepped up to an all-concentrate diet fed at 2.5% of BW once daily. Ruminal pH, protozoal counts, and NH3-N and VFA concentrations generally were unaffected by VM or MT. Mean counts of Lactobacillus and Streptococcus bovis were lower (PVirginiamycin seemed to control the growth of ruminal lactic acid-producing bacteria and, therefore, has the potential to moderate ruminal fermentation in situations that could lead to rapid production of lactic acid.

  19. Dispersion forces in methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Coulon, P.; Luyckx, R.

    1977-01-01

    The coefficients of the R-6 and R-7 terms in the series representation of the dispersion interaction between two methane molecules and between methane and helium, neon and argon are calculated by a variation method.

  20. Scientific Opinion on peste des petits ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare (AHAW

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peste des petits ruminants (PPR is a severe viral disease of small ruminants caused by a Morbillivirus closely related to rinderpest virus. It is widespread in Africa and Asia and is currently also found in Turkey and Northern Africa. PPR is transmitted via direct contact, and the disease would mainly be transferred to infection-free areas by transport of infected animals. In the EU, it could only happen through illegal transport of animals. The risk of that depends on the prevalence in the country of origin and the number of animals illegally moved. The extent of the spread would depend mainly on the time during which it is undetected, the farm density, the frequency and distance of travel of animals. PPR has a high within-herd transmission rate, therefore contacts between flocks, e.g. through common grazing areas, should be avoided when PPR is present. If PPR enters EU areas with dense sheep population but low goat density, it may spread rapidly undetected, since goats are considered more susceptible than sheep. Effective measures in limiting the spread of PPR in the EU include prompt culling of infected herds, rapid detection, movement restriction, and disinfection. Live attenuated vaccines against PPR are available, safe and effective, and have been successfully used to control PPR epidemics, but no method exists for differentiating between infected and vaccinated animals; therefore, the development of one is recommended. Awareness-raising campaigns for farmers and veterinary staff to promote recognition of the disease should be considered. The cooperation of the EU with neighbouring countries should be encouraged to prevent the spread of PPR and other transboundary diseases.

  1. Methane production from plant biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauner, E.

    1985-01-01

    Methane fermentations of plant biomass were performed to increase basic knowledge necessary for development of suitable conversion technologies. Effects of bacterial inoculants, substrate compounds and varied process conditions were analyzed in batch and continuous fermentation experiments. Use of enriched bacterial populations precultured and adapted to plant materials was proved to be advantageous for inoculation. Methane yields and productivities as well as chemical and bacterial composition of digester fluids were determined at various loading rates and retention times during fermentation of different grass and maize silages. Recycling for favorable amounts of decomposed effluent for neutralization of supplied acid raw materials was important to achieve high methane yields. Quantity and composition of acido-, aceto- and methanogenic bacteria were not essentially influenced by changed fermentation conditions. Results of these laboratory examinations have to be completed by long run and scale up experiments to develop control parameters for plant biogas digesters.

  2. Serological Detection of Antibodies to Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus in Large Ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, M; Mahapatra, M; Muniraju, M; Arshed, M J; Khan, E H; Banyard, A C; Ali, Q; Parida, S

    2017-04-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is an economically important disease of small ruminants with a rapidly expanding geographical distribution. Peste des petits ruminants virus may manifest in a variety of ways with disease ranging from acute to subclinical. We investigated the exposure of large ruminants to PPRV in areas where the virus is endemic in the small ruminant population by assessing the serological status of groups of animals. This study focused on the Punjab province of Pakistan as an area where the virus is endemic and where mixed farming practices occur enabling close interactions between small and large ruminant populations. An overall PPR seropositivity was detected in 10.0% of cattle and 14.16% of buffaloes. Following an assessment of serological profiles in large ruminants within different age groups, a maximum seroprevalence was observed in cattle (17.5%) and buffaloes (22.5%) over 2 years of age indicating the potential utility of sampling large ruminant populations for PPR serosurveillance. The large ruminants sampled between one and two years of age had similar levels of seropositivity within populations with 11.2% and 16.2% of animals being seropositive, respectively. Current PPR vaccination strategies do not enable the differentiation between infected and vaccinated small ruminants, and as such, the serological surveillance of sheep and goats is of little value. When considering eradication programmes for PPRV, this factor is of great significance. However, where large and small ruminants are farmed together, serological surveillance of large ruminants may provide a snapshot of virus infection within populations where mild disease is present or where small ruminants are regularly vaccinated. © 2015 The Authors. Transboundary and Emerging Diseases Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Interactions between nitrogenous fertilizers and methane cycling in wetland and upland soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent dynamics and uncertainties in global methane budgets necessitate research of controls of sources and sinks of atmospheric methane. Production of methane by methanogenic archaea in wetlands is a major source while consumption by methane oxidizing bacteria in upland soils is a major sink.

  4. Dynamics of small ruminant development in Central Java-Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gede Suparta Budisatria, I.

    2006-01-01

    Small ruminants are an important but neglected resource in developing countries. Small ruminant production systems are complex. The multiple goals related to small ruminants, combined with the complexity of their management, and the resources and social arrangements involved, make small ruminants ke

  5. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply-substituted “clumped” isotopologues, e.g., 13CH3D, has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures; however, the impact of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  6. Methane production and diurnal variation measured in dairy cows and predicted from fermentation pattern and nutrient or carbon flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brask, M.; Weisbjerg, M.R.; Hellwing, A.L.F.; Bannink, A.; Lund, P.

    2015-01-01

    Many feeding trials have been conducted to quantify enteric methane (CH4) production in ruminants. Although a relationship between diet composition, rumen fermentation and CH4 production is generally accepted, the efforts to quantify this relationship within the same experiment remain scarce. In

  7. Enterolobium contortisiliquum is a cause of acute ruminal acidosis in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupin, Rayane C; Leal, Paula V; Lima, Stephanie C; Melo, Gleice Kelli A; Pott, Arnildo; Araújo, Marcelo A; Barros, Claudio S L; Lemos, Ricardo A A

    2017-02-01

    The ingestion of pods of Enterolobium contortisiliquum is associated with digestive disturbances, photosensitivity and abortion in domestic ruminants. This experiment was designed to test the hypothesis that digestive disturbances in this toxicosis are really caused by acute ruminal acidosis. Three sheep fed large doses (10-15 g/kg/body weight [bw]) of E. contortisiliquum pods developed ruminal acidosis and were treated with sodium bicarbonate to try to control this metabolic disturbance, thus providing additional evidence of the involvement of ruminal acidosis in the pathogenesis of toxicosis. Two of the sheep died, and one recovered after treatment. In the two sheep that developed severe signs of ruminal acidosis, the values of blood lactate were 18 mg/dL and 196.88 mg/dL, indicating metabolic acidosis as the cause of death. Additionally, four sheep developed elevated serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase and gamma glutamyl transferase, indicating that the pods had hepatotoxic effects. Necropsy findings included the accentuation of the hepatic lobular pattern and multiple focally extensive red areas in the rumen mucosa and on the surface of the liver. Repeated ingestion of small doses induced tolerance but did not induce cumulative effects. Histopathologically, the epithelial mucosa of the rumen and reticulum exhibited swollen and vacuolated epithelia with intraepithelial pustules. Focal ulceration of the mucosa was also observed. Multifocal vacuolar degeneration of hepatocytes and scattered individual hepatocellular necrosis were evident in the liver. We concluded that the main clinical manifestation of intoxication by E. contortisiliquum pods in sheep was acute ruminal lactic acidosis and metabolic acidosis. Ingestion of repeated sublethal doses could stimulate proliferation of the ruminal fauna that degrades the sugar present in the pods, and thereby prevent the occurrence of ruminal acidosis. The plant is also hepatotoxic, and no abortions were

  8. Sarcoptic mange in wild ruminants in zoological gardens in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeruham, I; Rosen, S; Hadani, A; Nyska, A

    1996-01-01

    Sarcoptic mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) occurred among wild ruminant species in five zoological gardens in Israel, from 1984 to 1994. Infestation of five ruminants by S. scabiei is reported for the first time: mountain gazelles (Gazella gazella), Nubian ibexes (Capra ibex nubiana), a barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia), elands (Taurotragus oryx), and an Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx). All animals in the herds were administered ivermectin orally at a dose of 200 micrograms/kg body weight daily for 3 consecutive days. This was repeated three times at 2-wk intervals. The disease was eradicated in four small zoos, whereas in the biggest zoo, only control was achieved. Mortality among animals 8-yr-old animals composed 65% of mortality among all age classes.

  9. Isolation and characterization of yeasts from fermented apple bagasse as additives for ruminant feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Castillo-Castillo

    Full Text Available Abstract Solid-state fermentation can be used to produce feeds for ruminants, which can provide an enriched population of yeasts to improve ruminal fermentation. Fermentation of apple bagasse was performed to obtain a yeast-rich product, with the objective of isolating, identifying, and characterizing yeast strains and testing their capability to enhance in vitro ruminal fermentation of fibrous feeds. Yeasts were isolated from apple bagasse fermented under in vitro conditions, using rumen liquor obtained from cannulated cows and alfalfa as a fibrous substrate. A total of 16 new yeast strains were isolated and identified by biochemical and molecular methods. The strains were designated Levazot, followed by the isolate number. Their fermentative capacity was assessed using an in vitro gas production method. Strain Levazot 15 (Candida norvegensis showed the greatest increase in gas production (p < 0.05 compared with the yeast-free control and positively affected in vitro ruminal fermentation parameters of alfalfa and oat straw. Based on these results, it was concluded that the Levazot 15 yeast strain could be potentially used as an additive for ruminants consuming high-fiber diets. However, further studies of effects of these additives on rumen digestion, metabolism, and productive performance of ruminants are required.

  10. Rumination and the displacement of aggression in United Kingdom gang-affiliated youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Eduardo A; Osman, Sarah; Wood, Jane L

    2012-01-01

    The concept of gang aggression oftentimes elicits images of brutal intergang violence. In reality, gang-related aggression can vary widely, can have various motivations and causal factors, and includes interpersonal as well as intergroup aggression. This study examined the tendency of UK youth to engage in displaced aggression (aggression aimed at undeserving targets) and examined the relationship among gang affiliation, ruminative thought, and aggression levels. Students in three London schools were asked to complete a questionnaire that assessed levels of gang affiliation, rumination about aversive events, and a tendency to engage in displaced aggression. Our analyses found a three-way interaction between gang affiliation, rumination, and gender, such that males who were high in affiliation and rumination had the greatest tendency to displace aggression toward innocent others. Additionally, it was shown that rumination could account for a significant part of the correlation between gang affiliation and displaced aggression. Furthermore, regression analyses showed that even after controlling for trait aggression, anger, hostility, and irritability, rumination remained a significant predictor of displaced aggression. The implications for understanding gang-related aggression and for conducting future research in this area were discussed.

  11. Metacognitive beliefs and rumination as predictors of anger: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Gabriele; Offredi, Alessia; Martino, Francesca; Varalli, Davide; Ruggiero, Giovanni M; Sassaroli, Sandra; Spada, Marcantonio M; Wells, Adrian

    2017-02-23

    The metacognitive approach conceptualizes the relationship between anger and rumination as driven by metacognitive beliefs, which are information individuals hold about their own cognition and about coping strategies that impact on it. The present study aimed to test the prospective predictive impact of metacognitive beliefs and rumination on anger in a community sample. Seventy-six participants were recruited and engaged in a 2-week anger, rumination, and metacognitive beliefs monitoring protocol. A multi-wave panel design was employed to test whether metacognitive beliefs and rumination have a prospective impact on anger. Metacognitive beliefs and rumination were found to have a significant prospective impact on anger that was independent from the number of triggering events. Metacognitive beliefs about the need to control thoughts were shown to have a direct impact on subsequent anger, independently from rumination. These findings provide support for the potential value for applying metacognitive theory and therapy to anger-related problems. Aggr. Behav. 9999:1-9, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Rumination but not distraction increases eating-related symptoms in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Eva; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Caffier, Detlef; Svaldi, Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    Recent models of eating disorders emphasize the importance of ruminative thinking in the occurrence of unhealthy eating behavior. Hence, the aim of the current study was to examine the influence of induced rumination and distraction on the desire to engage in eating-related symptoms in anorexia (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). After a sadness induction, either a ruminative or distractive emotion regulation style was encouraged in women with AN (n = 38), BN (n = 37), and non-eating disordered controls (CG; n = 36). At baseline and after the emotion regulation induction feelings of sadness, desire to abstain from eating (DTA) and desire to binge (DTB) were assessed. Main results reveal that rumination led to a significant increase of DTA in the AN group and of DTB in patients with BN. In the CG, DTA significantly decreased after distraction. Although there were significant increases in subjective sadness in the rumination condition, no changes were found in the distraction condition. The results suggest that rumination in response to sadness has a detrimental effect on eating-related symptoms in eating disorders.

  13. Small ruminant lentivirus infections and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguijón, E; Reina, R; Pérez, M; Polledo, L; Villoria, M; Ramírez, H; Leginagoikoa, I; Badiola, J J; García-Marín, J F; de Andrés, D; Luján, L; Amorena, B; Juste, R A

    2015-12-14

    Small ruminant lentiviruses include viruses with diverse genotypes that frequently cross the species barrier between sheep and goats and that display a great genetic variability. These characteristics stress the need to consider the whole host range and to perform local surveillance of the viruses to opt for optimum diagnostic tests, in order to establish control programmes. In the absence of effective vaccines, a comprehensive knowledge of the epidemiology of these infections is of major importance to limit their spread. This article intends to cover these aspects and to summarise information related to characteristics of the viruses, pathogenesis of the infection and description of the various syndromes produced, as well as the diagnostic tools available, the mechanisms involved in transmission of the pathogens and, finally, the control strategies that have been designed until now, with remarks on the drawbacks and the advantages of each one. We conclude that there are many variables influencing the expected cost and benefits of control programs that must be evaluated, in order to put into practice measures that might lead to control of these infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamics of small ruminant development in Central Java-Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    I Gede Suparta Budisatria

    2006-01-01

    Small ruminants are an important but neglected resource in developing countries. Small ruminant production systems are complex. The multiple goals related to small ruminants, combined with the complexity of their management, and the resources and social arrangements involved, make small ruminants keeping an enterprise that is inherently difficult to study and to understand. This study analysed the behaviour of small ruminant production systems in order to understand their development prospect...

  15. Studies on Methane Emissions from Pastoral Farming in New Zealand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Meng-meng; ZHANG Gui-guo; SUN Xue-zhao; DONG Shu-ting; Simone O. Hoskin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to give a basic understanding of studies on methane emissions of New Zealand, as we know the agriculture of New Zealand is pastoral farming, most livestock animals are grazed in pasture, and quantities of methane were released from the digestive tract and animals excreta. In New Zealand some 50% greenhouse gases (GHG) sources are attributed to agriculture and one third is methane from livestock enteric formation. For many years, many researchers have been exploiting the techniques and methods to measure the emission of methane of New Zealand, further more studing the available options to alleviate the methane emissions. Their pioneering work and successful experiences including the determined methods and mitigation strategies are worth learning for scholars around the world. Some of their approaches were not only suitable for New Zealand grazed livestock, but for many other countries, even the animals are intensively bred in pen. The calorimeter/respiration chamber is the most exactly method in present, but it needs expensive equipments and skilled manipulators, so there are still some dififculty in applying this approach extensively in practice. Sulfur hexalfuoride (SF6) trace technique is much adopted for grazed livestock evaluating the methane emission, though its veracity was doubted by some researchers, it is still a good option in present for studying the GHG emissions for grazing animals. By measuring the rumen volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration to estimate the methane emission is a relatively simple approach, it is just only a rough evaluation, and it is unsuitable for exact study, but this method may be used in China for extensively raised ruminant. In present China, the ruminants are fed in an extensively managed state, the diversities of roughage and animals varieties caused dififcult to exactly estimate the methane emission. So exploiting theavailable options is much important for constituting the exhaustive emission

  16. Effects of Ruminal Infusion of Garlic Oil on Fermentation Dynamics, Fatty Acid Profile and Abundance of Bacteria Involved in Biohydrogenation in Rumen of Goats

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Zhi; Mao, Shengyong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of ruminal infusion of garlic oil (GO) on fermentation dynamics, fatty acid (FA) profile, and abundance of bacteria involved in biohydrogenation in the rumen. Six wethers fitted with ruminal fistula were assigned to two groups for cross-over design with a 14-d interval. Each 30-d experimental period consisted of a 27-d adaptation and a 3-d sample collection. Goats were fed a basal diet without (control) or with GO ruminal infusion (0.8 g/d). Ruminal...

  17. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  18. {Stable isotope probing of the physical and biological controls that influence the fate and isotopic composition of carbon derived from the terrestrial methane sink }

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxfield, P. J.; Hornibrook, E. R. C.; Dildar, N.; Evershed, R. P.

    2009-04-01

    Methane oxidizing bacteria (Methanotrophs) occur in every soil order, and are an important sink for atmospheric CH4 in well aerated soils. The quantity of C cycled via methanotrophic bacteria in soils is globally significant (Le Mer et al., 2001) yet the fate of methane derived carbon remains largely unknown and unquantified. There is generally good agreement regarding the magnitude of the soil CH4 sink determined by methane flux measurements and process modeling. More poorly characterised aspects of the soil CH4 sink include: (i) the physical and biological controls that influence the mechanism of CH4 oxidation in soils; (ii) the fate of oxidized CH4 carbon; (iii) the proportion of C from CH4 oxidation that is sequestered as organic C or released as CO2 (iv) the magnitude of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) associated with high affinity methanotrophy in soils and the potential influence on the stable carbon isotope composition of atmospheric CH4. This research combines multiple stable isotope analytical approaches to investigate the magnitude, mechanism and pathways of the terrestrial methane sink. Principally 13CH4 stable isotope labeling techniques (Stable isotope probing; SIP) have been used to characterize and quantify methanotrophic populations in a range of different soils (Maxfield et al., 2006). Following 13CH4-incubations soil cores were removed for compound-specific C isotope analyses. Identification and quantification of methanotrophs was effectively achieved via the analysis of 13C-labelled phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) to link bacterial structure and function. It was also possible to identify the predominant controls influencing the active methanotrophic populations in both grassland and woodland soils (Maxfield et al., 2008). SIP can be combined with further isotopic analyses to facilitate a broader study of methanotroph C uptake and CH4 derived C sequestration. As SIP facilitates taxonomic assignments of the soil microorganisms involved in CH4 C

  19. Effects of Neutral Detergent Soluble Fiber and Sucrose Supplementation on Ruminal Fermentation, Microbial Synthesis, and Populations of Ruminal Cellulolytic Bacteria Using the Rumen Simulation Technique (RUSITEC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiang-hui; LIU Chan-juan; LI Chao-yun; YAO Jun-hu

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of neutral detergent soluble fiber (NDSF) and sucrose supplementation on ruminal fermentation, microbial synthesis, and populations of ruminal cellulolytic bacteria using the rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC). The experiment had a 2×2 factorial design with two dosages of sucrose, low (ca. 0.26 g d-1, low-sucrose) and high (ca. 1.01 g d-1, high-sucrose), and two dosages of supplied NDSF, low (1.95 g d-1, low-NDSF) and high (2.70 g d-1, high-NDSF). Interactions between NDSF and sucrose were detected for xylanase activity from solid fraction and apparent disappearance of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and hemicellulose, with the lowest values observed for high-NDSF and high-sucrose treatment. Supplemental NDSF appeared to increase the molar proportion of acetate and reduce that of butyrate;however, the effects of supplemental sucrose on VFA profiles depended upon NDSF amount. There was a NDSF×sucrose interaction for the production of methane. High-NDSF fermenters had lower ammonia-N production, greater daily N flow of solid-associated microbial pellets and total microorganisms, and greater microbial synthesis efficiency compared with low-NDSF fermenters. Supplementation with NDSF resulted in an increase in 16S rDNA copies of Ruminococcus flavefaciens and a reduction in copies of Ruminococcus albus. Supplementation with sucrose tended to increase the 16S rDNA copies of R. albus from liquid fraction, but did not affect daily total microbial N flow and cellulolytic bacterium populations from solid fraction. These data indicate that the effects of the interaction between NDSF and sugars on ruminal fermentation and fiber digestion should be taken into account in diet formulation. Ruminal fermentation and metabolism of sugars warrant further investigation.

  20. Biochemically enhanced methane production from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Aleksandra

    For many years, biogas was connected mostly with the organic matter decomposition in shallow sediments (e.g., wetlands, landfill gas, etc.). Recently, it has been realized that biogenic methane production is ongoing in many hydrocarbon reservoirs. This research examined microbial methane and carbon dioxide generation from coal. As original contributions methane production from various coal materials was examined in classical and electro-biochemical bench-scale reactors using unique, developed facultative microbial consortia that generate methane under anaerobic conditions. Facultative methanogenic populations are important as all known methanogens are strict anaerobes and their application outside laboratory would be problematic. Additional testing examined the influence of environmental conditions, such as pH, salinity, and nutrient amendments on methane and carbon dioxide generation. In 44-day ex-situ bench-scale batch bioreactor tests, up to 300,000 and 250,000 ppm methane was generated from bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste respectively, a significant improvement over 20-40 ppm methane generated from control samples. Chemical degradation of complex hydrocarbons using environmentally benign reagents, prior to microbial biodegradation and methanogenesis, resulted in dissolution of up to 5% bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste and up to 25% lignite in samples tested. Research results confirm that coal waste may be a significant underutilized resource that could be converted to useful fuel. Rapid acidification of lignite samples resulted in low pH (below 4.0), regardless of chemical pretreatment applied, and did not generate significant methane amounts. These results confirmed the importance of monitoring and adjusting in situ and ex situ environmental conditions during methane production. A patented Electro-Biochemical Reactor technology was used to supply electrons and electron acceptor environments, but appeared to influence methane generation in a

  1. The effect of starch, inulin, and degradable protein on ruminal fermentation and microbial growth in rumen simulation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang H. Zhao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A rumen simulation technique apparatus with eight 800 mL fermentation vessels was used to investigate the effects of rumen degradable protein (RDP level and non-fibre carbohydrate (NFC type on ruminal fermentation, microbial growth, and populations of ruminal cellulolytic bacteria. Treatments consisted of two NFC types (starch and inulin supplemented with 0 g/d (low RDP or 1.56 g/d (high RDP sodium caseinate. No significant differences existed among dietary treatments in the apparent disappearance of dietary nutrients except for dietary N, which increased with increased dietary RDP (P<0.001. Compared with starch, inulin treatments reduced the molar proportion of acetate (P<0.001, the acetate:propionate ratio (P<0.001, and methane production (P=0.006, but increased the butyrate proportion (P<0.001. Increased dietary RDP led to increases in production of total volatile fatty acid (P=0.014 and methane (P=0.050, various measures of N (P≤0.046, and 16s rDNA copy numbers of Ruminococcus flavefaciens (P≤0.010. Non-fibre carbohydrate source did not affect daily microbial N flow regardless of dietary RDP, but ammonia N production was lower for inulin than for starch treatments under high RDP conditions (P<0.001. Compared with starch treatments, inulin depressed the copy numbers of Fibrobacter succinogenes in solid fraction (P=0.023 and R. flavefaciens in liquid (P=0.017 and solid fractions (P=0.007, but it increased the carboxymethylcellulase activity in solid fraction (P=0.045. Current results suggest that starch and inulin differ in ruminal volatile fatty acid fermentation but have similar effects on ruminal digestion and microbial synthesis in vitro, although inulin suppressed the growth of partial ruminal cellulolytic bacteria.

  2. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS OF SAFETY SIMULTANEOUS EXTRACTION OF COAL AND COALBED METHANE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shugang

    2000-01-01

    Coalbed methane is of great value to extract and utilize in China, but the result of such research is not satisfied yet today.The paper analyzed the storage characteristics of coalbed methane, and then studied the behavior of coalbed methane using the key stratum theory of strata control.According to the features related to coalbed methane accumulations and delivery, the technique for safely simultaneous extraction of coal and coalbed methane is proposed, and benefit analysis is made too.

  3. Methane emission, digestive characteristics and faecal archaeol in heifers fed diets based on silage from brown midrib maize as compared to conventional maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarm, Angela; Schweigel-Röntgen, Monika; Kreuzer, Michael; Ortmann, Sylvia; Gill, Fiona; Kuhla, Björn; Meyer, Ulrich; Lohölter, Malte; Derno, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to compare silage prepared from maize having a brown midrib (BMR) mutation with control (CTR) maize to identify their effects on enteric methane emission, digesta mean retention time (MRT), ruminal fermentation and digestibility. In addition, the utility of archaeol present in faecal samples was validated as a proxy for methane production. Seven German Holstein heifers were fed total mixed rations with a maize-silage proportion (either BMR or CTR) of 920 g/kg dry matter (DM) in a change-over design. Heifers were fed boluses with markers to measure MRT; faeces were collected for 7 days and rumen fluid was collected on the penultimate day. Methane emission was measured in respiration chambers on one day. Data were analysed by t-test and regression analysis. DM intake did not differ between the two diets. The apparent digestibility of DM and most nutrients was unaffected by diet type, but apparent digestibility of neutral and acid detergent-fibre was higher in those heifers fed BMR than in those fed CTR. Comparisons between diets revealed no difference in particle or solute MRT in the gastro-intestinal tract and the reticulorumen. Concentrations of short-chain fatty acid and ammonia in rumen fluid and its pH were not affected by silage type. Independent of the mode of expression [l/d, l/kg DM intake, l/kg digested organic matter], methane emissions were not affected by maize-silage type, but with BMR, there was a trend towards lower methane production per unit of digested neutral detergent fibre than there was with CTR silage. Results of the present study show that feeding heifers BMR silage does not increase methane emissions despite a higher fibre digestibility as compared to CTR silage. Therefore, it is assumed that improvements in animal productivity achieved by feeding BMR silage, as some studies have reported, can be obtained without extra environmental cost per unit of milk or meat. Neither faecal archaeol content [µg

  4. Infectious Reproductive Diseases of Small Ruminants

    OpenAIRE

    Bagley, Clell V.

    2001-01-01

    Several diseases which infect small ruminants result in abortion or reduced fertility and some may also infect humans (zoonotic diseases). Each of the diseases listed below will be briefly outlined. Those marked with an asterisk (*) may also cause human disease.

  5. Glycerol inhibition of ruminal lipolysis in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplemental glycerol inhibits rumen lipolysis, a prerequisite for rumen biohydrogenation, which is responsible for the saturation of dietary fatty acids consumed by ruminant animals. Feeding excess glycerol, however, adversely affects dry matter digestibility. To more clearly define the effect of...

  6. The in vitro reduction of sodium [36Cl]chlorate in bovine ruminal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, C E; Bauer, M L; Caton, J S; Anderson, R C; Smith, D J

    2007-08-01

    Sodium chlorate effectively reduces or eliminates gram-negative pathogenic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tracts of live cattle. Limitations to the in vivo efficacy of chlorate are its rapid absorption from the gastrointestinal tract and its presumed reduction to chloride within the gastrointestinal tract. We hypothesized that chlorate would be reduced via ruminal bacteria in a ruminal in vitro system and that the reduction of chlorate would be influenced by the dietary for-age:concentrate ratio; thus, 4 ruminally cannulated steers were fed 20 or 80% concentrate diets in a crossover design. Ruminal fluid was collected in 2 periods and dispensed into in vitro tubes containing sodium [36Cl]chlorate, which was sufficient for 100 or 300 mg/L final chlorate concentrations. The tubes were incubated for 0, 1, 4, 8, 16, or 24 h; autoclaved, control ruminal fluid, fortified with sodium [36Cl]chlorate, was incubated for 24 h. Chlorate remaining in each sample was measured by liquid scintillation counting after [36Cl]chloride was precipitated with silver nitrate. A preliminary study indicated that chlorite, a possible intermediate in the reduction of chlorate, had a half-life of approximately 4.5 min in freshly collected (live) ruminal fluid; chlorite was, therefore, not specifically measured in ruminal incubations. The chlorate dose did not affect in vitro DM digestion (P > or = 0.11), whereas in vitro DM digestibility was decreased (P or = 0.18) on chlorate reduction; however, when chlorate reduction was expressed on a percentage basis, chlorate reduction tended to be greater (P > or = 0.09) at 8 and 16 h in the incubations containing the low-concentrate diet. Chlorate remaining in autoclaved controls at 24 h was intermediate (P < 0.01) between chlorate remaining in live ruminal fluid samples incubated for 0 or 24 h. Attempts to isolate chlorate-respiring bacteria from 2 sources of ruminal fluid were not successful. These data indicate that microbial-dependent or chemical

  7. Strategies for optimizing nitrogen use by ruminants

    OpenAIRE

    Calsamiglia, S.; Ferret, A.; Reynolds, C.K.; Kristensen, N. B.; VAN VUUREN, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of N utilization in ruminants is typically low (around 25%) and highly variable (10% to 40%) compared with the higher efficiency of other production animals. The low efficiency has implications for the production performance and environment. Many efforts have been devoted to improving the efficiency of N utilization in ruminants, and while major improvements in our understanding of N requirements and metabolism have been achieved, the overall efficiency remains low. In general,...

  8. Rumination in bipolar disorder: evidence for an unquiet mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaznavi Sharmin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Depression in bipolar disorder has long been thought to be a state characterized by mental inactivity. However, recent research demonstrates that patients with bipolar disorder engage in rumination, a form of self-focused repetitive cognitive activity, in depressed as well as in manic states. While rumination has long been associated with depressed states in major depressive disorder, the finding that patients with bipolar disorder ruminate in manic states is unique to bipolar disorder and challenges explanations put forward for why people ruminate. We review the research on rumination in bipolar disorder and propose that rumination in bipolar disorder, in both manic and depressed states, reflects executive dysfunction. We also review the neurobiology of bipolar disorder and recent neuroimaging studies of rumination, which is consistent with our hypothesis that the tendency to ruminate reflects executive dysfunction in bipolar disorder. Finally, we relate the neurobiology of rumination to the neurobiology of emotion regulation, which is disrupted in bipolar disorder.

  9. Peste des petits ruminants infection in domestic ruminants in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intisar, K S; Ali, Y H; Haj, M A; Sahar, M A T; Shaza, M M; Baraa, A M; Ishag, O M; Nouri, Y M; Taha, K M; Nada, E M; Ahmed, A M; Khalafalla, A I; Libeau, G; Diallo, A

    2017-04-01

    The existence of peste des petits ruminants (PPR) in domestic ruminants and camels in Sudan during 2008-2012 was investigated. Lung tissues and serum samples were randomly collected from sheep, goats, cattle, and camels at different areas of Sudan. A total of 12,384 serum samples were collected from clinically healthy 7413 sheep, 1988 camels, 1501 cattle, 1459 goats, and 23 gazelles at different areas in the Sudan. They were examined for PPR antibodies using competitive ELISA (cELISA). The overall detected seroprevalence of PPR in tested sera was 49.4%; seroprevalence values within species were 67.1, 48.2, 25.8, 2.1, and 21.7% in sheep, goat, cattle, camels, and gazelles, respectively. The highest seroprevalence (68.1%) was observed in sera collected from Darfur states, then the central states (54.3%). A total of 1276 lung tissue samples (623 sheep, 324 cattle, 220 camels, and 109 goats) were collected. The majority of lung samples were collected from clinically healthy animals that showed lesions on PM in slaughterhouses (95%) and during PPR outbreaks; samples were tested for PPR antigen using immunocapture ELISA (IcELISA). PPR antigen was detected in 233 out of the 1276 tested samples (18.3%). Positive results were observed in samples collected from clinically healthy and diseased animals. The observed prevalence values in each species were 33.6, 21.1, 15.4, and 12.3% in camel, goat, sheep, and cattle, respectively. PPR antigen was detected in samples from different areas; however, the highest prevalence (63.9%) was found in samples collected from the eastern states, then Khartoum state (28%). Trials for virus isolation were done in different cell cultures. Out of 30 IcELISA-positive samples inoculated in primary bovine and ovine kidney cells, Vero cells, the PPR virus was successfully isolated from 15 (eight sheep, five camels, and two goats) samples in the three cell culture types. Using RT-PCR, PPRV nucleic acid was detected in all 25 IcELISA-positive tested

  10. Interactions between nitrogen cycling and methane oxidation in the pelagic waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joye, S. B.; Weber, S.; Battles, J.; Montoya, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas that plays a critical role in climate variation. Although a variety of marine methane sources and sinks have been identified, key aspects of the fate of methane in the ocean remain poorly constrained. At cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere, methane is introduced into the overlying water column via fluid escape from the seabed. We quantified the fate of methane in the water column overlying seafloor cold seeps, in a brine basin, and at several control sites. Our goals were to determine the factors that regulated methane consumption and assimilation and to explore how these controlling factors varied among and between sites. In particular, we examined the impact of nitrogen availability on methane oxidation and studied the ability of methane oxidizing bacteria to fix molecular nitrogen. Methane oxidation rates were highest in the methane rich bottom waters of natural hydrocabron seeps. At these sites, inorganic nitrogen addition stimulated methane oxidation in laboratory experiments. In vitro shipboard experiments revealed that rates of methane oxidation and nitrogen fixation were correlated strongly, suggesting that nitrogen fixation may have been mediated by methanotrophic bacteria. The highest rates of methane oxidation and nitrogen fixation were observed in the deepwater above at natural hydrocarbon seeps. Rates of methane oxidation were substantial along the chemocline of a brine basin but in these ammonium-rich brines, addition of inorganic nitrogen had little impact on methane oxidation suggesting that methanotrophy in these waters were not nitrogen limited. Control sites exhibited the lowest methane concentrations and methane oxidation rates but even these waters exhibited substantial potential for methane oxidation when methane and inorganic nitrogen concentrations were increased. Together, these data suggest that the availability of inorganic nitrogen plays a critical role in regulating methane oxidation in

  11. THE APPLICATION OF A JET FAN FOR THE CONTROL OF AIR AND METHANE STREAMS MIXING AT THE EXCAVATIONS CROSS – THE RESULTS OF NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł WRONA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of numerical simulations into the distribution of methane concentration at the intersec-tion of two excavations with a fan (turned on giving the air stream to the area of the crossing. Assumed case represents emergency situation related to the unexpected flow of methane from an excavation and its mixing with fresh air. It is possible when sudden gas outburst takes place, methane leaks from methane drainage system or gas leaks out the pipelines of underground coal gasification devices. Three options were considered – corresponding to three different speeds of the jet fan. They represent three stages of fan work. First – low air speed is forced by a pneumatic fan, when electricity is cut off after high methane concentration detection. Medium speed can be forced by pneumatic-electric device when methane concentration allows to turn on the electricity. Third, the highest speed is for electric fans. Simula-tions were carried out in the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS belongs to the group of programs Computational Fluid Dy-namics (CFD. The governing equations are being solved in a numerical way. It was shown that proposed solution allows partial dilution of methane in every variant of speed what should allow escape of the miners from hazardous area.

  12. Evaluation of feeds from tropical origin for in vitro methane production potential and rumen fermentation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, K.; Patra, A. K.; Sahoo, K.

    2015-07-01

    Enteric methane arising due to fermentation of feeds in the rumen contributes substantially to the greenhouse gas emissions. Thus, like evaluation of chemical composition and nutritive values of feeds, methane production potential of each feed should be determined. This experiment was conducted to evaluate several feeds for methane production potential and rumen fermentation using in vitro gas production technique so that low methane producing feeds could be utilized to feed ruminants. Protein- and energy-rich concentrates (n=11), cereal and grass forages (n=11), and different straws and shrubs (n=12), which are commonly fed to ruminants in India, were collected from a number of locations. Gas production kinetics, methane production, degradability and rumen fermentation greatly varied (p<0.01) among feeds depending upon the chemical composition. Methane production (mL/g of degraded organic matter) was lower (p<0.01) for concentrate than forages, and straws and shrubs. Among shrubs and straws, methane production was lower (p<0.01) for shrubs than straws. Methane production was correlated (p<0.05) with concentrations of crude protein (CP), ether extract and non-fibrous carbohydrate (NFC) negatively, and with neutral detergent (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) positively. Potential gas production was negatively correlated (p=0.04) with ADF, but positively (p<0.01) with NFC content. Rate of gas production and ammonia concentration were influenced by CP content positively (p<0.05), but by NDF and ADF negatively (p<0.05). Total volatile fatty acid concentration and organic matter degradability were correlated (p<0.05) positively with CP and NFC content, but negatively with NDF and ADF content. The results suggest that incorporation of concentrates and shrubs replacing straws and forages in the diets of ruminants may decrease. (Author)

  13. Cinética ruminal da degradação de nutrientes da silagem de milho em ambiente ruminal inoculado com diferentes aditivos Ruminal degradation kinetics of corn silage in bulls inoculated with different additives in the rumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Andrade Katsuki

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar a cinética ruminal da degradação de MS, PB e FDN da silagem de milho em ambiente ruminal inoculado com diferentes aditivos. Utilizou-se um delineamento em quadrado latino 4 x 4, com quatro bovinos holandeses e quatro períodos de incubação, em ambiente ruminal adaptado ou não com diferentes aditivos alimentares. Foram testados os seguintes tratamentos: SCL - silagem de milho em ambiente ruminal sem inoculação de aditivo; SBL - silagem de milho em ambiente ruminal inoculado com 5 g de produto comercial contendo bactérias ruminais e intestinais liofilizadas (Ruminobacter amylophilum: 3,0 x 10(11 ufc/kg; Fibrobacter succinogenes: 3,0 x 10(11 ufc/kg; Succinovibrio dextrinsolvens: 4,4 x 10(11 ufc/kg; Bacillus cereus: 3,5 x 10(11 ufc/kg; Lactobacillus acidophilus: 3,5 x 10(11 ufc/kg e Streptococcus faecium: 3,5 x 10(11 ufc/kg; SEC - silagem de milho em ambiente ruminal inoculado com 15 g de produto comercial contendo enzimas celulolíticas (xilanase 10%; e SMS - silagem de milho em ambiente ruminal inoculado com 3 g de produto comercial contendo monensina sódica. Os tratamentos SBL e SEC não afetaram a fração potencialmente degradável (b dos nutrientes avaliados da silagem de milho. A monensina sódica reduziu a fração (b da MS (51,01% e a degradabilidade potencial da silagem de milho (72,33%. Entre os aditivos estudados, a monensina sódica proporcionou a maior fração não-degradável da FDN (45,57%, reduzindo o desaparecimento desta fração a partir de 48 horas de incubação intra-ruminal. Os diferentes aditivos, nas concentrações estudadas, não proporcionaram melhora na degradabilidade efetiva da MS, PB e FDN da silagem de milho.Four bulls fitted with ruminal cannula were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design to evaluate the effects of different ruminally inoculated additives on the degradation kinetics of DM, CP, and NDF of corn silage (CS. The treatments were: control CS incubated in rumen with no

  14. Encapsulated nitrate and cashew nut shell liquid on blood and rumen constituents, methane emission, and growth performance of lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zaiat, H M; Araujo, R C; Soltan, Y A; Morsy, A S; Louvandini, H; Pires, A V; Patino, H O; Correa, P S; Abdalla, A L

    2014-05-01

    Nitrate can be a source of NPN for microbial growth at the same time that it reduces ruminal methane production. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of 2 encapsulated nitrate products used as urea replacers on blood and rumen constituents, methane emission, and growth performance of lambs. Eighteen Santa Inês male lambs (27 ± 4.9 kg) were individually allotted to indoor pens and assigned to a randomized complete block design with 6 blocks and 3 dietary treatments: control (CTL) = 1.5% urea, ENP = 4.51% encapsulated nitrate product (60.83% NO3(-) in the product DM), and ENP+CNSL = 4.51% ENP containing cashew nut shell liquid (60.83% NO3(-) and 2.96% cashew nut shell liquid [CNSL] in the product DM). Diets were isonitrogenous with 60:40 concentrate:forage (Tifton 85 hay) ratio. The experiment lasted for 92 d and consisted of 28 d for adaptation (a weekly 33% stepwise replacement of CTL concentrate by nitrate-containing concentrates) and 64 d for data collection. The ENP and ENP+CNSL showed greater (P 0.05) among treatments, with mean values within normal range and remaining below 1.1% of total hemoglobin. There was an increase (P 0.05) were observed on acetate to propionate ratio. Methane production (L/kg DMI) was reduced (P 0.05) in further reduction of methane production when compared with ENP. Final BW, DMI, ADG, and feed efficiency were similar (P > 0.05) among treatments. Values for DMI were 1.11, 1.03, and 1.04 kg/d and for ADG were 174, 154, and 158 g for CTL, ENP, and ENP+CNSL, respectively. In conclusion, encapsulated nitrate products showed no risks of toxicity based on MetHb formation. The products persistently reduced methane production without affecting performance. Inclusion of cashew nut shell liquid in the product formulation had no additional benefits on methane mitigation.

  15. High Time Resolution Measurements of Methane Fluxes From Enteric Fermentation in Cattle Rumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerchinger, C. R.; Herndon, S.; Fortner, E.; Roscioli, J. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Knighton, W. B.; Molina, L. T.; Zavala, M.; Castelán, O.; Ku Vera, J.; Castillo, E.

    2013-12-01

    Methane accounts for roughly 20% of the global radiative climate forcing in the last two and a half centuries. Methane emissions arise from a number of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In some areas enteric fermentation in livestock produces over 90% of agricultural methane. In the spring of 2013, as a part of the Short Lived Climate Forcer-Mexico field campaign, the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory in partnership with the Molina Center for the Environment studied methane production associated with enteric fermentation in the rumen of cattle. A variety of different breeds and stocks being raised in two agricultural and veterinary research facilities located in different areas of Mexico were examined. Methane fluxes were quantified using two methods: 1) an atmospherically stable gaseous tracer release was collocated with small herds in a pasture, allowing tracer ratio flux measurements; 2) respiratory CO2 was measured in tandem with methane in the breath of individual animals allowing methane production to be related to metabolism. The use of an extensive suite of very high time response instruments allows for differentiation of individual methane producing rumination events and respiratory CO2 from possible background interferences. The results of these studies will be presented and compared to data from traditional chamber experiments.

  16. Analysis of Electrical Control in Gas Treatment System of Coal Bed Methane Power Generation%浅析煤层气发电中气体处理系统的电气控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯效勇

    2011-01-01

    为使煤矿企业利用瓦斯发电,最大化利用煤层气,分析了煤层气发电的预处理系统的电气控制,比较了加压风机采用PID控制前后不同浓度下的控制系统参数,并提出需要注意的问题。%In order to make mining enterprises use gas for power generation and maximize utilization of coal bed methane,the electrical control of pre-processing system for coal bed methane power generation is analyzed.Compared the different concentration of fan pressure using PID control before and after the control system parameters,and proposed the problems to attention.

  17. Possibilities for using plant extracts added to ruminant feed aimed at improving production results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grdović Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of plant extracts with the objective of improving production results and the quality of food articles of animal origin is an area which is acquiring increasing scientific importance. Numerous investigations carried out so far on ruminants and other species of domestic animals have been aimed at examining specific bioactive matter of plants. The results of these investigations have demonstrated a positive influence on the production results. A large number of data indicate that plant extracts added to animal feed contribute to increasing overall productivity. Furthermore, plant extracts as additives in animal feed have a positive effect also on the health condition of the animals. A large number of plants have characteristics which potentially improve consumption, digestibility and conversion of food, and also growth. Examinations have been performed of the effects of different plant extracts on food consumption, wool growth, growth and composition of the trunk, milk production, reproductive parameters, agents for wool shearing, preventing bloat, methane production, as well as the influence of plants on curbing nematode infestations of ruminants. This work presents a review of scientific investigations of different plant species and their effects on the production characteristics of ruminants. .

  18. Effect of Yucca schidigera on ruminal fermentation and nutrient digestion in heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, A N; McAllister, T A; Van Herk, F H; Cheng, K J; Newbold, C J; Cheeke, P R

    1999-09-01

    In a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square experiment, six heifers (443 +/- 6.1 kg) fed a 61% barley grain:39% alfalfa silage diet (DM basis) were given intraruminal doses of powdered Yucca schidigera (YS). Doses of 0 (control), 20, or 60 g/d were given at 0800 daily. Ruminal content was sampled 0, 2, 4, and 6 h after dosing. Acidity, concentrations of reducing sugars, free amino acids, and peptides in the rumen were not affected (P > .05) by YS. Relative to control, ruminal ammonia concentration was reduced (P Yucca did not affect (P > .05) rate or extent of in situ DM degradability. Fibrolytic, amylolytic, and proteolytic activities in ruminal contents were similar among treatments (P > .05). Dry matter intake, apparent digestibilities of DM, NDF, and CP, nitrogen balance, and microbial protein synthesis in the rumen were not affected (P > .05) by treatment. The effect of YS on ruminal ammonia concentration likely resulted from a decreased concentration of protozoa and, presumably, from ammonia binding by YS. The effect on ruminal propionate was probably a result of a selective inhibitory effect of YS on rumen microbial species.

  19. Prevalence Estimates of Antibodies Towards Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Small Ruminants in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balinda, Sheila Nina; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Muwanika, Vincent B.;

    2009-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Uganda with control strategies focusing on vaccination of cattle, while small ruminants are largely ignored. In order for Uganda to establish effective control strategies, it is crucial that the epidemiology of the disease is fully understood. This study...

  20. CYANOBACTERIA FOR MITIGATING METHANE EMISSION FROM SUBMERGED PADDY FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upasana Mishra; Shalini Anand [Department of Environmental Studies, Inderprastha Engineering College, Sahibabad, Ghaziabad (India)

    2008-09-30

    Atmospheric methane, a potent greenhouse gas with high absorption potential for infrared radiation, is responsible for one forth of the total anticipated warming. It is forming a major part of green house gases, next after carbon dioxide. Its concentration has been increasing alarmingly on an average at the rate of one percent per year. Atmospheric methane, originating mainly from biogenic sources such as paddy fields, natural wetlands and landfills, accounts for 15-20% of the world's total anthropogenic methane emission. With intensification of rice cultivation in coming future, methane emissions from paddy fields are anticipated to increase. India's share in world's rice production is next after to China and likewise total methane emission from paddy fields also. Methane oxidation through planktophytes, particularly microalgae which are autotrophic and abundant in rice rhizospheres, hold promise in controlling methane emission from submerged paddy fields. The present study is focused on the role of nitrogen fixing, heterocystous cyanobacteria and Azolla (a water fern harboring a cyanobacterium Anabaena azollae) as biological sink for headspace concentration of methane in flooded soils. In this laboratory study, soil samples containing five potent nitrogen fixer cyanobacterial strains from paddy fields, were examined for their methane reducing potential. Soil sample without cyanobacterial strain was tested and taken as control. Anabaena sp. was found most effective in inhibiting methane concentration by 5-6 folds over the control. Moist soil cores treated with chemical nitrogen, urea, in combination with cyanobacteria mixture, Azolla microphylla or cyanobacteria mixture plus Azolla microphylla exhibited significance reduction in the headspace concentration of methane than the soil cores treated with urea alone. Contrary to other reports, this study also demonstrates that methane oxidation in soil core samples from paddy fields was stimulated by

  1. Recent Advances in Ruminant Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Rüştü Kutlu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most industrialized animal production branches of ruminant production successfully requires a blending of theoretical knowledge of nutritional principles with practical stockmanship, maintaining health and dealing with numbers. It is well known that high yielding, dairy cows, require balanced diet with adequate nutrients for yielding. This is not provided with only a few feedstuffs. Milk production in dairy cows is related to the improvements in genetic merit of farm animals and also developments in feed science, feed technology and animal nutrition. In particular, feeds and feed technology studies associated with sustainability, economical perspectives and product quality in the last decade have been in advance. In the present work, recent advances in feed sources and feed technology, minerals (macro and trace minerals , vitamins and amino acids, feed additives (antibiotics alternative growth stimulants, rumen modulator, organic acids, antioxidants, enzymes, plant extracts, nutrition-products (meat-milk-progeny quality and functional food production (milk, meat nutrition-reproduction, nutrition-animal health, nutrition-environmental temperature, nutrition-global warming were evaluated.

  2. Intelligent Inventory Control via Ruminative Reinforcement Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatpong Katanyukul

    2014-01-01

    learning (RRL has been introduced recently based on this approach. RRL is motivated by how humans contemplate the consequences of their actions in trying to learn how to make a better decision. This study further investigates the issues of RRL and proposes new RRL methods applied to inventory management. Our investigation provides insight into different RRL characteristics, and our experimental results show the viability of the new methods.

  3. The effect of rumination on social problem-solving and autobiographical memory retrieval in depression : a cross-cultural perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Chih-Mei

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that depression and thinking style (rumination versus distraction) interact to influence cognitive processing. Depressed ruminators produce more categoric autobiographical memories (AM) (i.e., a summary of repeated memories), and also demonstrate poorer SPS performance than depressed distracters and matched controls. The quality of AM retrieval during SPS is also related to the effectiveness of SPS solutions such that categoric AM retrieval during SPS contribut...

  4. Abortion and various associated risk factors in small ruminants in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardjadj, Moustafa; Kouidri, Brahim; Metref, Djamil; Luka, Pam Dachung; Ben-Mahdi, Meriem Hind

    2016-01-01

    Identification of the causes of abortion among the huge population of small ruminants in Algeria (≈31 millions heads), is an important task for the control of livestock productivity and viability scourges to the small ruminants industry. Optimal production and utilization is constrained by a number of factors: disease, poor feeding and low management skills. Therefore, in the present study the prevalence of abortion in Algerian small ruminant's flocks was estimated and its possible association was correlated with infectious (PPR, BT and Brucellosis seropositivity) and managerial (flock size, grazing system, type of farming, and contact with other flocks) risk factors. The present study showed an overall flock prevalence of small ruminant's abortion as 75.33% (113/150) [95% CI 71.72-78.94%]. The risk factor analysis using multivariable logistic regression recognized the north-western and the steppe region as well as PPR positivity as a risk factor for abortion in Algerian small ruminant's flocks. The odds of flock abortion was 11.47 [95% CI 2.39-54.88; P=0.002] and 10.31 [95% CI 1.28-82.88; P=0.028] times higher in north-western and steppe regions respectively compared to other region. Also the presence of PPRV infection in small ruminant flocks amplified the odds by 6 times [95% CI 2.221-17.427; P=0.001].Surprisingly, the univariate analysis for the other risk factors associated with abortions in Algerian small ruminant flocks indicated no statistically significant links with bluetongue (P=1.000) and brucellosis seropositivity (P=0.334). Flock size (P=0.574), type of farming (P=0.443), grazing system (P=0.117) and contact with other flocks (P=0.245) was also not statistically significant. Our results revealed that abortion in small ruminants is a challenge to farmers and PPR was chiefly linked to it. Therefore an effective vaccination and control programme is advocated for small ruminants in Algeria.

  5. Worry and anger rumination in fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ricci

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was twofold: 1 to investigate the psychological profile of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FS as compared to patients with other chronic pain syndromes (CP and healthy subjects (HS; 2 to examine the associations between anxiety, depression, worry and angry rumination in FS patients. FS patients (N=30, CP patients (N=30 and HS (N=30 completed measurements of anxiety, depression, worry and angry rumination. FS patients showed higher levels of state and trait anxiety, worry and angry rumination than CP patients and HS, and higher levels of depression than HS. Worry and angry rumination were strongly associated in the FS group. FS patients may use worry and rumination as coping strategies to deal with their negative emotional experience, which might impair their emotional wellbeing. Findings from the present study add to our understanding of the psychological profile of FS patients, and have important implications for developing a tailored CBT protocol for pain management in FS patients.

  6. Utilization of coalbed methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, J.B. [Gustavson Associates Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made in capturing coalbed methane (CBM gas), which constitutes a valuable source of clean burning energy. It is of importance to study the various potential uses of coalbed methane and to understand the various technologies required, as well as their economics and any institutional constraints. In industrialised countries, the uses of coalbed methane are almost solely dependent on microeconomics; coalbed methane must compete for a market against natural gas and other energy sources - and frequently, coalbed methane is not competitive against other energy sources. In developing countries, on the other hand, particularly where other sources of energy are in short supply, coalbed methane economics yield positive results. Here, constraints to development of CBM utilization are mainly lack of technology and investment capital. Sociological aspects such as attitude and cultural habits, may also have a strong negative influence. This paper outlines the economics of coalbed methane utilization, particularly its competition with natural gas, and touches upon the many different uses to which coalbed methane may be applied. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Methane and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reay, D.; Smith, P.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-fifth of man-made global warming. Per kilogram, it is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time horizon -- and global warming is likely to enhance methane release from a number of sour

  8. Methane and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reay, D.; Smith, P.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-fifth of man-made global warming. Per kilogram, it is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time horizon -- and global warming is likely to enhance methane release from a number of

  9. Evidence for the inhibition of the terminal step of ruminal alpha-linolenic acid biohydrogenation by condensed tannins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiaosa-Ard, R; Bryner, S F; Scheeder, M R L; Wettstein, H-R; Leiber, F; Kreuzer, M; Soliva, C R

    2009-01-01

    Effects of condensed tannins (CT), either via extract or plant-bound, and saponin extract on ruminal biohydrogenation of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) were investigated in vitro. Grass-clover hay served as basal diet (control). The control hay was supplemented with extracts contributing either CT from Acacia mearnsii [7.9% of dietary dry matter (DM)] or saponins from Yucca schidigera (1.1% of DM). The fourth treatment consisted of dried sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia), a CT-containing forage legume, in an amount also providing 7.9% CT in dietary DM. All diets were supplemented with linseed oil at a level contributing 60% of total dietary ALA in all treatments. Diets were incubated for 10 d (n = 4) in the rumen simulation technique system, using the last 5 d for statistical evaluation. Fatty acids were analyzed in feed, feed residues, incubation fluid, and its effluent. Data were subjected to ANOVA considering diet and experimental run as main effects. Both CT treatments reduced ruminal fiber and crude protein degradation, and lowered incubation fluid ammonia concentration. Only the CT extract suppressed methane formation and shifted microbial populations toward bacteria at cost of protozoa. The saponin extract remained without clear effects on fermentation characteristics except for increased protozoal counts. The extent of ALA biohydrogenation was 20% less with the CT plant, but this probably resulted from reduced organic matter degradability rather than from an inhibition of biohydrogenation. After incubation analysis of incubation fluid effluent and feed residues showed a considerable proportion of the 3 biohydrogenation intermediates, cis-9, trans-11, cis-15 C18:3, trans-11, cis-15 C18:2, and trans-11 C18:1, which did not occur in the initial feeds. Only the CT-extract diet led to a different profile in the effluent compared with the control diet with trans-11 C18:1 being considerably increased at cost of C18:0. This could have been achieved by suppressing

  10. 反刍动物甲烷排放量营养调控技术的研究进展%The Research Progress Of Nutrition Control Technology About Ruminant Methane Emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴健豪; 曲永利; 王丹

    2008-01-01

    本文通过研究甲烷产生的机理,阐述降低反刍动物瘤胃内甲烷的产量的调控方法,旨在为缓解温室效应、减少反刍动物瘤胃发酵的能量损失,找到一项重要的反刍动物绿色营养调控技术提供理论参考依据.

  11. Effects of virginiamycin and monensin plus tylosin on ruminal protein metabolism in steers fed corn-based finishing diets with or without wet corn gluten feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, S E; Titgemeyer, E C; Nagaraja, T G; del Barrio, A; Bindel, D J; Hollis, L C

    2002-11-01

    Six ruminally cannulated steers (345 +/- 20 kg initial BW) were used in a 6 x 6 Latin square to evaluate effects of diet and antibiotics on ruminal protein metabolism. Two diets and three antibiotic treatments were arranged factorially. One diet contained (DM basis) 72% dry-rolled corn, 12% soybean meal, 10% alfalfa hay, and 4% molasses (SBM), and the other contained 63% dry-rolled corn, 30% wet corn gluten feed, and 5% alfalfa hay (WCGF). Antibiotic treatments included control, virginiamycin (175 mg/d; VM), and monensin/tylosin (250 and 100 mg/d, respectively; MT). Steers were fed at 12-h intervals at a rate of 2.4% of empty BW daily. Each period included 18 d of adaptation and 3 d of ruminal fluid collections. Samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 h after the morning feeding on d 19 and 20. On d 21, rumens were dosed 2 h after the morning feeding with 350 g of solubilized casein to evaluate in vivo ruminal protease and deaminase activities. Ruminal fluid samples were collected 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 h after the casein dose. On d 19 and 20, antibiotics had no effect on ruminal pH or concentrations of VFA, lactate, ammonia, ciliated protozoa, alpha-amino nitrogen (AAN), or peptide N, but VM reduced (P < 0.01) the concentration of isovalerate compared to MT and control. After casein dosing (d 21), peptide N concentration was unaffected by antibiotics, but AAN were higher (P < 0.01) for VM than MT and control. Relative to MT and control, VM reduced ruminal isovalerate (P = 0.05) and increased ruminal propionate (P < 0.01) on d 21. Ruminal pH was lower (P < 0.01) in steers fed SBM than in steers fed WCGF, but lactate concentrations were unaffected by diet. Steers fed SBM had higher (P < 0.05) ruminal concentrations of total VFA and propionate. Ammonia concentrations were lower before feeding and higher after feeding for steers fed WCGF (P < 0.01). Steers fed WCGF had higher counts of total ciliated protozoa than steers fed SBM (P < 0.05) due to greater Entodinium

  12. Rumen microbial (meta)genomics and its application to ruminant production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgavi, D P; Kelly, W J; Janssen, P H; Attwood, G T

    2013-03-01

    Meat and milk produced by ruminants are important agricultural products and are major sources of protein for humans. Ruminant production is of considerable economic value and underpins food security in many regions of the world. However, the sector faces major challenges because of diminishing natural resources and ensuing increases in production costs, and also because of the increased awareness of the environmental impact of farming ruminants. The digestion of feed and the production of enteric methane are key functions that could be manipulated by having a thorough understanding of the rumen microbiome. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and bioinformatics are transforming our understanding of complex microbial ecosystems, including the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. The application of these techniques to the rumen ecosystem has allowed the study of the microbial diversity under different dietary and production conditions. Furthermore, the sequencing of genomes from several cultured rumen bacterial and archaeal species is providing detailed information about their physiology. More recently, metagenomics, mainly aimed at understanding the enzymatic machinery involved in the degradation of plant structural polysaccharides, is starting to produce new insights by allowing access to the total community and sidestepping the limitations imposed by cultivation. These advances highlight the promise of these approaches for characterising the rumen microbial community structure and linking this with the functions of the rumen microbiota. Initial results using high-throughput culture-independent technologies have also shown that the rumen microbiome is far more complex and diverse than the human caecum. Therefore, cataloguing its genes will require a considerable sequencing and bioinformatic effort. Nevertheless, the construction of a rumen microbial gene catalogue through metagenomics and genomic sequencing of key populations is an attainable goal. A rumen

  13. The role of experiential avoidance, rumination and mindfulness in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdrey, Felicity A; Park, Rebecca J

    2012-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa has been associated with high levels of ruminative thoughts about eating, shape and weight as well as avoidance of emotion and experience. This study examined the associations between disorder-specific rumination, mindfulness, experiential avoidance and eating disorder symptoms. A sample of healthy females (n=228) completed a battery of on-line self-report measures. A hierarchical regression analysis revealed that ruminative brooding on eating, weight and shape concerns was uniquely associated with eating disorder symptoms, above and beyond anxiety and depression symptoms. In a small group (n=42) of individuals with a history of anorexia nervosa, only reflection on eating weight and shape was able to predict eating disorder symptoms when controlling for depression and anxiety. The results suggest that rumination (both brooding and reflection) on eating, weight and shape concerns may be a process which exacerbates eating disorder symptoms. Examining rumination may improve understanding of the cognitive processes which underpin anorexia nervosa and this may in turn aid the development of novel strategies to augment existing interventions. Replication in a larger clinical sample is warranted.

  14. Effect of maturity and hybrid on ruminal and intestinal digestion of corn silage in dry cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrat, J; Baumont, R; Le Morvan, A; Nozière, P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of stage of maturity at harvest on extent of starch, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and protein digestion, and rumen fermentation in dry cows fed whole-plant corn silage from different hybrids. Four nonlactating Holstein cows cannulated at the rumen and proximal duodenum were fed 4 corn silages differing in hybrid (flint vs. flint-dent) and maturity stage (early vs. late) in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. From early to late maturity, starch content increased (from 234.5 to 348.5 g/kg), whereas total-tract (99.7 to 94.5%) and ruminal starch digestibility (91.3 to 86.5%) decreased significantly. The decrease in ruminal starch digestibility with increasing maturity was similar between hybrids. No effects were found of maturity, hybrid, or maturity × hybrid interaction on total-tract NDF digestibility, ruminal NDF digestibility, true digestibility of N and organic matter in the rumen, or microbial synthesis. Harvesting at later maturity led to increased ruminal ammonia, total volatile fatty acid concentrations, and acetate/propionate ratio but not pH. This study concludes that delaying date of harvest modifies the proportions of digestible starch and NDF supplied to cattle. Adjusting date of corn harvest to modulate amount of rumen-digested starch could be used as a strategy to control nutrient delivery to ruminants.

  15. Ruminal microbe of biohydrogenation of trans-vaccenic acid to stearic acid in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimization of the unsaturated fatty acid composition of ruminant milk and meat is desirable. Alteration of the milk and fatty acid profile was previously attempted by the management of ruminal microbial biohydrogenation. The aim of this study was to identify the group of ruminal trans-vaccenic acid (trans-11 C18:1, t-VA hydrogenating bacteria by combining enrichment studies in vitro. Methods The enrichment culture growing on t-VA was obtained by successive transfers in medium containing t-VA. Fatty acids were detected by gas chromatograph and changes in the microbial composition during enrichment were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE. Prominent DGGE bands of the enrichment cultures were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results The growth of ruminal t-VA hydrogenating bacteria was monitored through the process of culture transfer according to the accumulation of stearic acid (C18:0, SA and ratio of the substrate (t-VA transformed to the product (SA. A significant part of the retrieved 16S rRNA gene sequences was most similar to those of uncultured bacteria. Bacteria corresponding to predominant DGGE bands in t-VA enrichment cultures clustered with t-VA biohydrogenated bacteria within Group B. Conclusions This study provides more insight into the pathway of biohydrogenation. It also may be important to control the production of t-VA, which has metabolic and physiological benefits, through management of ruminal biohydrogenation bacterium.

  16. Hormonal regulation of phosphate homeostasis in goats during transition to rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscher, Alexandra; Hattendorf, Julia; Pfeffer, Ernst; Breves, Gerhard; Huber, Korinna

    2008-07-01

    Regulatory processes in phosphorus (P) homeostasis in small ruminants are quite different compared to monogastric animals. Adaptive responses of modulating hormones [parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcitriol] to feeding variable amounts of P are lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the influence of high dietary P intake (control diet: 4 g kg(-1) dry matter; high-P diet: 8 g kg(-1) dry matter) on the expression levels of PTH receptor (PTHR), vitamin D receptor (VDR) and Na+-dependent Pi transporters (NaPi II) in kidney and jejunum of goats starting rumination. After 3 months of feeding, plasma phosphate (Pi) and PTH concentrations were increased in the high-P diet group, whereas calcium and calcitriol were not changed. The intestinal Na+-dependent Pi transport capacity was not influenced by a high-P diet and the expression of jejunal VDR, PTHR and NaPi IIb was not modified. Interestingly, renal Na+-dependent Pi transport capacity was significantly reduced and concomitantly the expression of PTHR and NaPi IIa was decreased. In conclusion, the adaptive response of renal Pi reabsorption in goats, which were in transition from non-ruminant to ruminant stage was comparable to that of monogastric animals. In contrast, the modulation of the intestinal Pi absorption was like in adult ruminants.

  17. Rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy for residual depression: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ed; Scott, Jan; Wingrove, Janet; Rimes, Katharine; Bathurst, Neil; Steiner, Herbert; Kennell-Webb, Sandra; Moulds, Michelle; Malliaris, Yanni

    2007-09-01

    The treatment of chronic and recurrent depression is a priority for the development of new interventions. The maintenance of residual symptoms following acute treatment for depression is a risk factor for both chronic depression and further relapse/recurrence. This open case series provides the first data on a cognitive-behavioural treatment for residual depression that explicitly targets depressive rumination. Rumination has been identified as a key factor in the onset and maintenance of depression, which is found to remain elevated following remission from depression. Fourteen consecutively recruited participants meeting criteria for medication--refractory residual depression [Paykel, E.S., Scott, J., Teasdale, J.D., Johnson, A.L., Garland, A., Moore, R. et al., 1999. Prevention of relapse in residual depression by cognitive therapy--a controlled trial. Archives of General Psychiatry 56, 829-835] were treated individually for up to 12 weekly 60-min sessions. Treatment specifically focused on switching patients from less helpful to more helpful styles of thinking through the use of functional analysis, experiential/imagery exercises and behavioural experiments. Treatment produced significant improvements in depressive symptoms, rumination and co-morbid disorders: 71% responded (50% reduction on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale) and 50% achieved full remission. Treating depressive rumination appears to yield generalised improvement in depression and co-morbidity. This study provides preliminary evidence that rumination-focused CBT may be an efficacious treatment for medication--refractory residual depression.

  18. What else do you feel when you feel sad? Emotional overproduction, neuroticism and rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervas, Gonzalo; Vazquez, Carmelo

    2011-08-01

    Numerous experimental and naturalistic studies have shown the relevant role of ruminative styles in the onset, duration and severity of depressive episodes. Recent research has increasingly focused on the precursors of these ruminative responses. Neuroticism has been found to be closely related to ruminative styles, but the nature of this relationship is unknown. Across three studies, we explored the role of emotional overproduction, conceptualized as the tendency to simultaneously experience an elevated number of negative emotions and feelings during sad episodes. Study 1 showed that emotional overproduction is independently and strongly associated with ruminative styles. Furthermore, emotional overproduction was found to mediate the relationship between neuroticism and ruminative styles. Study 2 replicated these findings in a large community sample even after controlling for mood, personality, and other emotion-related variables. In Study 3, we conducted a laboratory study to increase the internal and external validity of our findings. Implications for personality, for coping and stress literature, and for clinical research and treatment are suggested.

  19. Sheep fed with banana leaf hay reduce ruminal protozoa population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Cláudio Eduardo Silva; Duarte, Eduardo Robson; Alves, Dorismar David; Martinele, Isabel; D'Agosto, Marta; Cedrola, Franciane; de Moura Freitas, Angélica Alves; Dos Santos Soares, Franklin Delano; Beltran, Makenzi

    2017-04-01

    A ciliate protozoa suppression can reduce methane production increasing the energy efficiency utilization by ruminants. The physicochemical characteristics of rumen fluid and the profile of the rumen protozoa populations were evaluated for sheep fed banana leaf hay in replacement of the Cynodon dactylon cv. vaqueiro hay. A total of 30 male sheep were raised in intensive system during 15 days of adaptation and 63 days of experimental period. The animals were distributed in a completely randomized design that included six replicates of five treatments with replacement levels (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%) of the grass vaquero for the banana leaf hay. Samples of fluid were collected directly from the rumen with sterile catheters. Color, odor, viscosity, and the methylene blue reduction potential (MBRP) were evaluated and pH estimated using a digital potentiometer. After decimal dilutions, counts of genus protozoa were performed in Sedgewick Rafter chambers. The averages of pH, MBRP, color, odor, and viscosity were not influenced by the inclusion of the banana leaf hay. However, the total number of protozoa and Entodinium spp. population significantly decreased at 75 and 100% inclusions of banana leaf hay as roughage.

  20. Fungal treated lignocellulosic biomass as ruminant feed ingredient: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, van S.J.A.; Sonnenberg, A.S.M.; Baars, J.J.P.; Hendriks, W.H.; Cone, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    In ruminant nutrition, there is an increasing interest for ingredients that do not compete with human nutrition. Ruminants are specialists in digesting carbohydrates in plant cell walls; therefore lignocellulosic biomass has potential in ruminant nutrition. The presence of lignin in biomass,

  1. Global Methane Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeburgh, W. S.

    2003-12-01

    Methane (CH4) has been studied as an atmospheric constituent for over 200 years. A 1776 letter from Alessandro Volta to Father Campi described the first experiments on flammable "air" released by shallow sediments in Lake Maggiore (Wolfe, 1996; King, 1992). The first quantitative measurements of CH4, both involving combustion and gravimetric determination of trapped oxidation products, were reported in French by Boussingault and Boussingault, 1864 and Gautier (1901), who reported CH4 concentrations of 10 ppmv and 0.28 ppmv (seashore) and 95 ppmv (Paris), respectively. The first modern measurements of atmospheric CH4 were the infrared absorption measurements of Migeotte (1948), who estimated an atmospheric concentration of 2.0 ppmv. Development of gas chromatography and the flame ionization detector in the 1950s led to observations of vertical CH4 distributions in the troposphere and stratosphere, and to establishment of time-series sampling programs in the late 1970s. Results from these sampling programs led to suggestions that the concentration of CH4, as that of CO2, was increasing in the atmosphere. The possible role of CH4 as a greenhouse gas stimulated further research on CH4 sources and sinks. Methane has also been of interest to microbiologists, but findings from microbiology have entered the larger context of the global CH4 budget only recently.Methane is the most abundant hydrocarbon in the atmosphere. It plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry and the radiative balance of the Earth. Stratospheric oxidation of CH4 provides a means of introducing water vapor above the tropopause. Methane reacts with atomic chlorine in the stratosphere, forming HCl, a reservoir species for chlorine. Some 90% of the CH4 entering the atmosphere is oxidized through reactions initiated by the OH radical. These reactions are discussed in more detail by Wofsy (1976) and Cicerone and Oremland (1988), and are important in controlling the oxidation state of the atmosphere

  2. Seroprevalence of Sheep and Goat Pox, Peste Des Petits Ruminants and Rift Valley Fever in Saudi Arabia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani Boshra

    Full Text Available Sheep and goat pox, peste des petits ruminants and Rift Valley fever are important diseases of small ruminant livestock. Sheep and goat pox, along with peste des petits ruminants, are endemic throughout most of Africa, Asia and the Middle East. Whereas Rift Valley fever is endemic in Africa, outbreaks in the Middle East have been reported over the past decade, including the Arabian Peninsula. Saudi Arabia is a major importer of livestock, and understanding the prevalence of these viral infections would be useful for disease control. In this study, sera from sheep and goats were collected from 3 regions in Saudi Arabia. They were evaluated for antibodies specific to sheep and goat pox, peste des petits ruminants and Rift Valley fever by virus neutralization assays. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the seroprevalence of these viruses in sheep and goats.

  3. Seroprevalence of Sheep and Goat Pox, Peste Des Petits Ruminants and Rift Valley Fever in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshra, Hani; Truong, Thang; Babiuk, Shawn; Hemida, Maged Gomaa

    2015-01-01

    Sheep and goat pox, peste des petits ruminants and Rift Valley fever are important diseases of small ruminant livestock. Sheep and goat pox, along with peste des petits ruminants, are endemic throughout most of Africa, Asia and the Middle East. Whereas Rift Valley fever is endemic in Africa, outbreaks in the Middle East have been reported over the past decade, including the Arabian Peninsula. Saudi Arabia is a major importer of livestock, and understanding the prevalence of these viral infections would be useful for disease control. In this study, sera from sheep and goats were collected from 3 regions in Saudi Arabia. They were evaluated for antibodies specific to sheep and goat pox, peste des petits ruminants and Rift Valley fever by virus neutralization assays. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the seroprevalence of these viruses in sheep and goats.

  4. Evaluation of the SF6 tracer technique for estimating methane emission rates with reference to dairy cows using a mechanistic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, H.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; France, J.; Ellis, J.L.; Zijderveld, van S.M.; Dijkstra, J.

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic, mechanistic model of the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer technique, used for estimating methane (CH4) emission rates from ruminants, was constructed to evaluate the accuracy of the technique. The model consists of six state variables and six zero-pools representing the quantities of SF6

  5. Is Work-related Rumination Associated with deficits in Executive Functioning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Cropley

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWork-related rumination, that is, perseverative thinking about work during leisure time, has been associated with a range of negative health and wellbeing issues. The present paper examined the association between work-related rumination and cognitive processes centred around the theoretical construct of executive functioning. Executive functioning is an umbrella term for high level cognitive processes such as planning, working memory, inhibition, mental flexibility; and it underlies how people manage and regulate their goal directed behaviour. Three studies are reported. Study I, reports the results of a cross-sectional study of 240 employees, and demonstrates significant correlations between work-related rumination and three proxy measures of executive functioning: cognitive failures (.33, cognitive flexibility (-.24 and situational awareness at work (-.28. Study II (n = 939, expands on the findings from study 1 and demonstrates that workers reporting medium and high work-related rumination were 2.8 and 5 times, respectively, more likely to report cognitive failures relative to low ruminators. High ruminators also demonstrated greater difficulties with ‘lapses of attention’ (OR = 4.8, ‘lack of focus of attention’ (OR = 3.4, and ‘absent mindedness’ (OR = 4.3. The final study, examined the association between work-related rumination and executive functioning using interview data from 2460 full time workers. Workers were divided into tertiles low, medium and high. The findings showed that high work-related rumination was associated with deficits in starting (OR = 2.3 and finishing projects (OR = 2.4, fidgeting (OR = 1.9, memory (OR = 2.2, pursuing tasks in order (OR = 1.8, and feeling compelled to do things (OR = 2.0. It was argued that work-related rumination may not be related to work demands per se, but appears to be an executive functioning/control issue. Such findings are important for the design and delivery of

  6. Is Work-Related Rumination Associated with Deficits in Executive Functioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropley, Mark; Zijlstra, Fred R. H.; Querstret, Dawn; Beck, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Work-related rumination, that is, perseverative thinking about work during leisure time, has been associated with a range of negative health and wellbeing issues. The present paper examined the association between work-related rumination and cognitive processes centerd around the theoretical construct of executive functioning. Executive functioning is an umbrella term for high level cognitive processes such as planning, working memory, inhibition, mental flexibility; and it underlies how people manage and regulate their goal directed behavior. Three studies are reported. Study I, reports the results of a cross-sectional study of 240 employees, and demonstrates significant correlations between work-related rumination and three proxy measures of executive functioning: cognitive failures (0.33), cognitive flexibility (-0.24), and situational awareness at work (-0.28). Study II (n = 939), expands on the findings from study 1 and demonstrates that workers reporting medium and high work-related rumination were 2.8 and 5 times, respectively, more likely to report cognitive failures relative to low ruminators. High ruminators also demonstrated greater difficulties with ‘lapses of attention’ (OR = 4.8), ‘lack of focus of attention’ (OR = 3.4), and ‘absent mindedness’ (OR = 4.3). The final study, examined the association between work-related rumination and executive functioning using interview data from 2460 full time workers. Workers were divided into tertiles low, medium, and high. The findings showed that high work-related rumination was associated with deficits in starting (OR = 2.3) and finishing projects (OR = 2.4), fidgeting (OR = 1.9), memory (OR = 2.2), pursuing tasks in order (OR = 1.8), and feeling compelled to do things (OR = 2.0). It was argued that work-related rumination may not be related to work demands per se, but appears to be an executive functioning/control issue. Such findings are important for the design and delivery of intervention

  7. Feasibility of atmospheric methane removal using methanotrophic biotrickling filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sukhwan; Carey, Jeffrey N.; Semrau, Jeremy D. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-15

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential {proportional_to}23 times that of carbon dioxide. Here, we describe the modeling of a biotrickling filtration system composed of methane-consuming bacteria, i.e., methanotrophs, to assess the utility of these systems in removing methane from the atmosphere. Model results indicate that assuming the global average atmospheric concentration of methane, 1.7 ppmv, methane removal is ineffective using these methanotrophic biofilters as the methane concentration is too low to enable cell survival. If the concentration is increased to 500-6,000 ppmv, however, similar to that found above landfills and in concentrated animal feeding operations (factory farms), 4.98-35.7 tons of methane can be removed per biofilter per year assuming biotrickling filters of typical size (3.66 m in diameter and 11.5 m in height). Using reported ranges of capital, operational, and maintenance costs, the cost of the equivalent ton of CO{sub 2} removal using these systems is $90-$910 ($2,070-$20,900 per ton of methane), depending on the influent concentration of methane and if heating is required. The use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible and, provided that either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive. (orig.)

  8. China's grazed temperate grasslands are a net source of atmospheric methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Ping; Song, Yang; Gulledge, Jay; Yu, Qiang; Liu, Hong-Sheng; Han, Xing-Guo

    A budget for the methane (CH 4) cycle in the Xilin River basin of Inner Mongolia is presented. The annual CH 4 budget in this region depends primarily on the sum of atmospheric CH 4 uptake by upland soils, emission from small wetlands, and emission from grazing ruminants (sheep, goats, and cattle). Flux rates for these processes were averaged over multiple years with differing summer rainfall. Although uplands constitute the vast majority of land area, they consume much less CH 4 per unit area than is emitted by wetlands and ruminants. Atmospheric CH 4 uptake by upland soils was -3.3 and -4.8 kg CH 4 ha -1 y -1 in grazed and ungrazed areas, respectively. Average CH 4 emission was 791.0 kg CH 4 ha -1 y -1 from wetlands and 8.6 kg CH 4 ha -1 y -1 from ruminants. The basin area-weighted average of all three processes was 6.8 kg CH 4 ha -1 y -1, indicating that ruminant production has converted this basin to a net source of atmospheric CH 4. The total CH 4 emission from the Xilin River basin was 7.29 Gg CH 4 y -1. The current grazing intensity is about eightfold higher than that which would result in a net zero CH 4 flux. Since grazing intensity has increased throughout western China, it is likely that ruminant production has converted China's grazed temperate grasslands to a net source of atmospheric CH 4 overall.

  9. Genetic characterization of peste des petits ruminants virus, Turkey, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şevik, Murat; Sait, Ahmet

    2015-08-01

    Peste des petits ruminants is an endemic disease of small ruminants in Turkey and vaccination has been the method of control but sporadic outbreaks have been reported. This study was carried out to characterize the local peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) by sequencing fusion (F) protein and nucleoprotein (N) gene segments and phylogenetic analysis, so as to focus on genetic variation in the field viruses. Samples were collected from sheep and goats clinically suspected of having PPRV infection in Central and Mediterranean regions of Turkey during 2009-2013. Phylogenetic analysis based on the F gene sequences showed that the field isolates in the present study belong to lineage 4 with other Middle East isolates. While N gene sequences revealed a different pattern, the field isolates in the present study clustered with previous Turkish isolates, which probably represents the true picture of molecular epidemiology for PPRV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Manipulation of Rumen Microbial Fermentation by Polyphenol Rich Solvent Fractions from Papaya Leaf to Reduce Green-House Gas Methane and Biohydrogenation of C18 PUFA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Saeid; Meng, Goh Yong; Rajion, Mohamed Ali; Jahromi, Mohammad Faseleh; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2016-06-01

    Different solvents (hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, butanol, and water) were used to identify the effect of papaya leaf (PL) fractions (PLFs) on ruminal biohydrogenation (BH) and ruminal methanogenesis in an in vitro study. PLFs at a concentration of 0 (control, CON) and 15 mg/250 mg dry matter (DM) were mixed with 30 mL of buffered rumen fluid and were incubated for 24 h. Methane (CH4) production (mL/250 mg DM) was the highest (P < 0.05) for CON (7.65) and lowest for the chloroform fraction (5.41) compared to those of other PLFs at 24 h of incubation. Acetate to propionate ratio was the lowest for PLFs compared to that of CON. Supplementation of the diet with PLFs significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the rate of BH of C18:1n-9 (oleic acid; OA), C18:2n-6 (linoleic acid; LA), and C18:3n-3 (α-linolenic acid; LNA) compared to that of CON after 24 h of incubation. Real time PCR indicated that total protozoa and total methanogen population in PLFs decreased (P < 0.05) compared to those of CON.

  11. Mindfulness and rumination as predictors of persistence with a distress tolerance task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Greg; Dunn, Emily; Stemke, Carrie; Bell, Kelly; Greeson, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Distress tolerance (DT) is a proposed transdiagnostic factor in psychopathology, yet sources of individual differences in DT are largely unknown. The present study examined mindfulness and rumination facets as predictors of persistence on a standardized DT task (mirror tracing). Acting with awareness (a facet of mindfulness) and reflection (a potentially adaptive form of rumination) predicted increased DT. Increased task-induced skin conductance reactivity predicted decreased DT. These results held after controlling for task skill and subjective and heart rate reactivity. Together, these results suggest that teaching skills to promote mindful awareness and reflection hold promise as interventions to enhance DT.

  12. Meta-analysis on Methane Mitigating Properties of Saponin-rich Sources in the Rumen: Influence of Addition Levels and Plant Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuraga Jayanegara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Saponins have been considered as promising natural substances for mitigating methane emissions from ruminants. However, studies reported that addition of saponin-rich sources often arrived at contrasting results, i.e. either it decreased methane or it did not. The aim of the present study was to assess ruminal methane emissions through a meta-analytical approach of integrating related studies from published papers which described various levels of different saponin-rich sources being added to ruminant feed. A database was constructed from published literature reporting the addition of saponin-rich sources at various levels and then monitoring ruminal methane emissions in vitro. Accordingly, levels of saponin-rich source additions as well as different saponin sources were specified in the database. Apart from methane, other related rumen fermentation parameters were also included in the database, i.e. organic matter digestibility, gas production, pH, ammonia concentration, short-chain fatty acid profiles and protozoal count. A total of 23 studies comprised of 89 data points met the inclusion criteria. The data obtained were subsequently subjected to a statistical meta-analysis based on mixed model methodology. Accordingly, different studies were treated as random effects whereas levels of saponin-rich source additions or different saponin sources were considered as fixed effects. Model statistics used were p-value and root mean square error. Results showed that an addition of increasing levels of a saponin-rich source decreased methane emission per unit of substrate incubated as well as per unit of total gas produced (ptea>quillaja, statistically they did not differ each other. It can be concluded that methane mitigating properties of saponins in the rumen are level- and source-dependent.

  13. Botulism in non-ruminants in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto de Oliveira Júnior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Botulism is an intoxication caused by the ingestion of neurotoxins secreted by Clostridium botulinum and characterized by progressive flaccid symmetrical paralysis. Among non-ruminant animals, avian species and dogs are the most commonly affected by botulism, while horses and pigs are less-commonly diagnosed with the disease. Despite the importance of this disease in animals, the Brazilian literature only includes case studies and outbreak descriptions. The aim of this study was to review the main features and to provide recent data on the occurrence of botulism in non-ruminants in Brazil.

  14. Effect of ruminal vs postruminal administration of degradable protein on utilization of low-quality forage by beef steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyk, C A; Cochran, R C; Wickersham, T A; Titgemeyer, E C; Farmer, C G; Higgins, J J

    2001-01-01

    An experiment was designed to determine the effects of ruminal and postruminal infusions of ruminally degradable protein (casein) on intake and digestion of low-quality hay by beef steers. Twelve ruminally fistulated Angus x Hereford steers (initial BW = 563 kg) were blocked by weight and assigned to one of three treatments: control (C; hay only) or hay plus ruminal (R) or postruminal (P) infusion of 400 g/d of sodium caseinate. The trial consisted of five periods: 1) 10-d adaptation to the hay diet; 2) 7-d measurement of hay intake (without infusions); 3) 10-d adaptation to protein infusion treatments (intake measurements continued); 4) 7-d measurement of hay intake and digestibility (infusions continued); and 5) 3-d ruminal sampling period (infusions continued). Steers were given ad libitum access to tallgrass-prairie hay (3.4% CP, 76.6% NDF) throughout the study. Casein was administered once daily before feeding, either directly into the rumen or via anchored infusion lines into the abomasum. Hay intake was increased by supplementation (P infusion elicited a greater (P = 0.04) increase in hay intake than postruminal infusion. Intake tended (P = 0.11) to be lower in period 4 than in period 2 for control steers but was greater in period 4 than in period 2 (P infusion of a degradable protein source improved forage utilization, although the response in forage OM intake and total digestible OM intake was greater for ruminal infusion than for postruminal infusion.

  15. Evaluation of a Commercial ELISA for Detection of Ruminant Processed Animal Proteins in Non-Ruminant Processed Animal Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, M.G.E.G.; Margry, R.J.C.F.; Vaessen, J.C.H.; Doremalen, van A.M.H.; Palen, van der J.G.P.; Kaathoven, van R.G.C.; Kemmers-Voncken, A.E.M.; Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.

    2013-01-01

    Due to a growing aquaculture industry, demand for high-quality proteins for aquatic feeds is increasing. Non-ruminant processed animal proteins (PAPs) have shown great potential for this purpose. Safe reintroduction of non-ruminant PAPs in aqua feed requires methods that can discriminate ruminant an

  16. Cryolava flow destabilization of crustal methane clathrate hydrate on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Sotin, Christophe; Choukroun, Mathieu; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2016-08-01

    To date, there has been no conclusive observation of ongoing endogenous volcanic activity on Saturn's moon Titan. However, with time, Titan's atmospheric methane is lost and must be replenished. We have modeled one possible mechanism for the replenishment of Titan's methane loss. Cryolavas can supply enough heat to release large amounts of methane from methane clathrate hydrates (MCH). The volume of methane released is controlled by the flow thickness and its areal extent. The depth of the destabilisation layer is typically ≈30% of the thickness of the lava flow (≈3 m for a 10-m thick flow). For this flow example, a maximum of 372 kg of methane is released per m2 of flow area. Such an event would release methane for nearly a year. One or two events per year covering ∼20 km2 would be sufficient to resupply atmospheric methane. A much larger effusive event covering an area of ≈9000 km2 with flows 200 m thick would release enough methane to sustain current methane concentrations for 10,000 years. The minimum size of "cryo-flows" sufficient to maintain the current atmospheric methane is small enough that their detection with current instruments (e.g., Cassini) could be challenging. We do not suggest that Titan's original atmosphere was generated by this mechanism. It is unlikely that small-scale surface MCH destabilisation is solely responsible for long-term (> a few Myr) sustenance of Titan's atmospheric methane, but rather we present it as a possible contributor to Titan's past and current atmospheric methane.

  17. Methanization of industrial liquid effluents; Methanisation des effluents industriels liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederic, S.; Lugardon, A. [Societe Naskeo Environnement, 92 - Levallois-Perret (France)

    2007-09-15

    In a first part, this work deals with the theoretical aspects of the methanization of the industrial effluents; the associated reactional processes are detailed. The second part presents the technological criteria for choosing the methanization process in terms of the characteristics of the effluent to be treated. Some of the methanization processes are presented with their respective advantages and disadvantages. At last, is described the implementation of an industrial methanization unit. The size and the main choices are detailed: the anaerobic reactor, the control, the valorization aspects of the biogas produced. Some examples of industrial developments illustrate the different used options. (O.M.)

  18. Peste des Petits Ruminant: Exotic Ruminant Disease That Should Be Anticipated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrawati Sendow

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Peste des Pettits Ruminants (PPR is one of infectious and contagious viral diseases from morbilliviruses group in ruminants especially small ruminants. The disease was characterized by nasal and eye discharge, conjunctivitis, high fever, gastrointestinal disorder and pneumonia. Hence PPR may cause economical impact for the farmers due to the decrease of animal productivity and death. Peste des pettits ruminants is also a disease that has serious attention on the Office International des Epizooties (OIE list. In Indonesia, the disease has not been reported, so the anticipation of entering the disease is needed. The paper will describe the disease in many aspects included transmission, host ranges, epidemiology, clinical disease, diagnosis and the ability to identify the disease in Indonesia.

  19. Tannin content and rate of ruminal protein degradation of legume hays

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work evaluated ruminal protein degradation rates of legume hays that varied in tannin content. Two cuttings of 5 varieties of birdsfoot trefoil, (Lotus corniculatus), selected for different tannin contents but similar NDF and CP contents, and Spredor 4 alfalfa (control) were conserved as hay. S...

  20. Extra-label use of ivermectin in some minor ruminant species: pharmacokinetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Canga, A; Belmar-Liberato, R; Escribano, M

    2012-05-01

    The characterisation of ivermectin pharmacokinetics can be used to predict and to ensure an optimal activity in the target species and for designing programmes aimed for parasite control. Ivermectin pharmacokinetic studies performed in several minor ruminant species are reviewed in this paper with the aim of facilitating the adoption of rational basis for the establishment of appropriate dosage schedules.

  1. 地质构造对煤层气井产能的控制机理与规律%Control Mechanism and Law of Geological Structure Affected to Production Capacity of Coal Bed Methane Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵少磊; 朱炎铭; 曹新款; 王怀勐; 周友

    2012-01-01

    The paper discussed the control mechanism of the structure evolution and structural shape affected to the production capacity of the coal bed methane well. In combination with the practices in Fenzhuang Mining Area of Qinnan Area, the paper analyzed the control law of the geological structure to the distribution of the coal bed methane wells with different production capacity. The study showed that the structure evolution would control the full accumulation process of coal bed methane. The later structure shape would be critical impor- tant to the migration and storage of the coal bed methane. The two wings of the fold and the syncline core would have high methane content and the anticline core and the open fault nearby would have low methane content. The study on the Fanzhuang Mining Area showed that the production capacity of coal bed methane well would have a close relationship to the structure location. The high production wells main- ly distributed at the wings of the fold structure, the subordinate anticline core of synclinorium and the subordinate syncline core of anticli-norium and the average daily gas production could reach to 1 000-5 000 m^3. The low production coal bed methane well and the water production well mainly distributed at the subordinate anticline core of anticlinorium and around the normal faults and the average daily gas production would reach to less than 500 m^3.%探讨了构造演化与构造形态对煤层气井产能的控制机理,并结合沁南地区樊庄矿区实践,分析了构造对不同产能煤层气井分布的控制规律。研究表明:构造演化控制煤层气的整个成藏过程;后期构造形态对煤层气的运移和保存至关重要,褶曲两翼及向斜核部含气量高,背斜核部及开放性断层附近含气量低。同时对樊庄矿区研究表明:煤层气井产能与所处构造部位密切相关,高产井主要分布于褶曲构造翼部、复向斜的次级背斜核部及复背斜的次级向

  2. High Prevalence of Anaplasma spp. in Small Ruminants in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Lbacha, H; Alali, S; Zouagui, Z; El Mamoun, L; Rhalem, A; Petit, E; Haddad, N; Gandoin, C; Boulouis, H-J; Maillard, R

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of infection by Anaplasma spp. (including Anaplasma phagocytophilum) was determined using blood smear microscopy and PCR through screening of small ruminant blood samples collected from seven regions of Morocco. Co-infections of Anaplasma spp., Babesia spp, Theileria spp. and Mycoplasma spp. were investigated and risk factors for Anaplasma spp. infection assessed. A total of 422 small ruminant blood samples were randomly collected from 70 flocks. Individual animal (breed, age, tick burden and previous treatment) and flock data (GPS coordinate of farm, size of flock and livestock production system) were collected. Upon examination of blood smears, 375 blood samples (88.9%) were found to contain Anaplasma-like erythrocytic inclusion bodies. Upon screening with a large spectrum PCR targeting the Anaplasma 16S rRNA region, 303 (71%) samples were found to be positive. All 303 samples screened with the A. phagocytophilum-specific PCR, which targets the msp2 region, were found to be negative. Differences in prevalence were found to be statistically significant with regard to region, altitude, flock size, livestock production system, grazing system, presence of clinical cases and application of tick and tick-borne diseases prophylactic measures. Kappa analysis revealed a poor concordance between microscopy and PCR (k = 0.14). Agreement with PCR is improved by considering microscopy and packed cell volume (PCV) in parallel. The prevalence of double infections was found to be 1.7, 2.5 and 24% for Anaplasma-Babesia, Anaplasma-Mycoplasma and Anaplasma-Theileria, respectively. Co-infection with three or more haemoparasites was found in 1.6% of animals examined. In conclusion, we demonstrate the high burden of anaplasmosis in small ruminants in Morocco and the high prevalence of co-infections of tick-borne diseases. There is an urgent need to improve the control of this neglected group of diseases. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Strategies for optimizing nitrogen use by ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calsamiglia, S.; Ferret, A.; Reynolds, C.K.; Kristensen, N.B.; Vuuren, van A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of N utilization in ruminants is typically low (around 25%) and highly variable (10% to 40%) compared with the higher efficiency of other production animals. The low efficiency has implications for the production performance and environment. Many efforts have been devoted to improving

  4. Peste Des Petits Ruminants Virus Infection of Small Ruminants: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Peste des petits ruminants (PPR is caused by a Morbillivirus that belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae. PPR is an acute, highly contagious and fatal disease primarily affecting goats and sheep, whereas cattle undergo sub-clinical infection. With morbidity and mortality rates that can be as high as 90%, PPR is classified as an OIE (Office International des Epizooties-listed disease. Considering the importance of sheep and goats in the livelihood of the poor and marginal farmers in Africa and South Asia, PPR is an important concern for food security and poverty alleviation. PPR virus (PPRV and rinderpest virus (RPV are closely related Morbilliviruses. Rinderpest has been globally eradicated by mass vaccination. Though a live attenuated vaccine is available against PPR for immunoprophylaxis, due to its instability in subtropical climate (thermo-sensitivity, unavailability of required doses and insufficient coverage (herd immunity, the disease control program has not been a great success. Further, emerging evidence of poor cross neutralization between vaccine strain and PPRV strains currently circulating in the field has raised concerns about the protective efficacy of the existing PPR vaccines. This review summarizes the recent advancement in PPRV replication, its pathogenesis, immune response to vaccine and disease control. Attempts have also been made to highlight the current trends in understanding the host susceptibility and resistance to PPR.

  5. Peste des petits ruminants virus infection of small ruminants: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Maherchandani, Sunil; Kashyap, Sudhir Kumar; Singh, Shoor Vir; Sharma, Shalini; Chaubey, Kundan Kumar; Ly, Hinh

    2014-06-06

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is caused by a Morbillivirus that belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae. PPR is an acute, highly contagious and fatal disease primarily affecting goats and sheep, whereas cattle undergo sub-clinical infection. With morbidity and mortality rates that can be as high as 90%, PPR is classified as an OIE (Office International des Epizooties)-listed disease. Considering the importance of sheep and goats in the livelihood of the poor and marginal farmers in Africa and South Asia, PPR is an important concern for food security and poverty alleviation. PPR virus (PPRV) and rinderpest virus (RPV) are closely related Morbilliviruses. Rinderpest has been globally eradicated by mass vaccination. Though a live attenuated vaccine is available against PPR for immunoprophylaxis, due to its instability in subtropical climate (thermo-sensitivity), unavailability of required doses and insufficient coverage (herd immunity), the disease control program has not been a great success. Further, emerging evidence of poor cross neutralization between vaccine strain and PPRV strains currently circulating in the field has raised concerns about the protective efficacy of the existing PPR vaccines. This review summarizes the recent advancement in PPRV replication, its pathogenesis, immune response to vaccine and disease control. Attempts have also been made to highlight the current trends in understanding the host susceptibility and resistance to PPR.

  6. Methane prediction in collieries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Creedy, DP

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of the project was to assess the current status of research on methane emission prediction for collieries in South Africa in comparison with methods used and advances achieved elsewhere in the world....

  7. Dwelling on it may make it worse: the links between relational victimization, relational aggression, rumination, and depressive symptoms in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Lindsay C; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Crick, Nicki R

    2014-08-01

    Although there is considerable evidence that relational victimization is associated with depressive symptoms in youth, our understanding about the mechanisms by which victimization and depressive symptoms are linked is limited. The current study explored ruminating about victimization experiences as a potential mechanism that might contribute to an understanding of the association between relational victimization and depressive symptoms. We also tested the specificity of the proposed models by controlling for and testing parallel models of a highly related behavior: relational aggression. A sample of 499 adolescents from sixth through eighth grades participated. Teacher reports were used to assess relational victimization and relational aggression. Self-reports were used to assess depressive symptoms and rumination. The results showed that rumination partially mediated the association between relational victimization and depressive symptoms. No moderation effect was found. In contrast, rumination moderated the association between relational aggression and depressive symptoms. Specifically, relational aggression was associated with depressive symptoms for those adolescents who were also ruminators. Thus, ruminating about victimization experiences appears to be an important mechanism that functions differently for relational aggression and relational victimization in conferring risk for depressive symptoms. The findings offer important practical implications for those working with adolescents and also lay the groundwork for future research.

  8. 控制灌溉稻田的甲烷减排效果%Mitigation of methane emissions from paddy fields under controlled irrigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭世彰; 和玉璞; 杨士红; 徐俊增; 侯会静

    2013-01-01

    In order to explore the influence of soil moisture regulation on methane (CH4) emissions under water-saving irrigation and look for an irrigation mode for rice that would save water while simultaneously limiting CH4 emissions, the regularity of CH4 emissions from paddy fields under controlled irrigation was analyzed based on 5 years’of field experiment data. Two different irrigation managements were conducted as follows with the same rice variety, cultivation practices and plant protection measures:controlled irrigation (CI) and irrigated intermittently flooded single aeration irrigation (FI). Rice was cultivated in a 150 m2 (20 m×7.5 m) plot between 2006 and 2007, each plot was separated by brick concrete with a height of 30 cm and width of 30 cm. Plastic anti-seepage films were inserted into soil plough layer to a depth of 50cm to isolate water exchange between the plots. For exploring the influence of rainfall on CH4 emissions from irrigated paddy fields and controlling soil moisture accurately, experiments were conducted in lysimeter with mobile canopy between 2009 and 2011, and each plot area was 5 m2(2.5 m×2 m). Gas samples were collected using manual static chamber and were analyzed by a gas chromatograph (ShimadzuGC-14B) with a flame ionization detector (FID) for CH4 concentration. The results showed that the total CH4 emissions from CI paddy fields were 1.07±0.17g/m2, which was significantly reduced by 83.5%compared with FI paddy fields (6.49±0.17 g/m2). Total seasonal and annual CH4 emissions from CI and FI paddy fields located in Southeast China were lower than the reported values. Meanwhile, the total annual CH4 emissions from controlled irrigation paddy fields was lower than that of paddy filed in most parts of the World. When compared to irrigated intermittently flooded multiple aeration, irrigated intermittently flooded single aeration and irrigated continuously flooded paddy fields, seasonal CH4 emissions from CI paddy fields decreased 94

  9. Rumination and autobiographical memory impairment in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricarte, J J; Hernández, J V; Latorre, J M; Danion, J M; Berna, F

    2014-12-01

    Although patients with schizophrenia exhibit autobiographical memory impairment, which is considered to be a limiting factor in their daily life, the mechanisms underlying such impairment have been rarely studied. In the current study, we investigate whether rumination and, in particular, brooding, which is a form of maladaptive repetitive thinking, may be linked to the difficulty that patients with schizophrenia experience when attempting to access specific autobiographical memories. Our results indicate that patients reported less specific autobiographical memories compared to control participants. Patients also displayed a higher level of brooding and had more depressive symptoms. According to the CaR-FA-X model (Williams et al., 2007), depression and brooding were associated with memory specificity in control participants. In contrast, neither depression nor brooding was correlated with memory specificity in patients. These results suggest that depression and rumination may not be directly related to patients' difficulty to recall specific memories and that other factors, such as metacognitive deficits, must first be considered when seeking interventions aimed to improve autobiographical memory in patients with schizophrenia.

  10. The Opportunity To Eradicate Peste des Petits Ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariner, Jeffrey C; Jones, Bryony A; Rich, Karl M; Thevasagayam, Samuel; Anderson, John; Jeggo, Martyn; Cai, Yi; Peters, Andrew R; Roeder, Peter L

    2016-05-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly infectious disease of sheep and goats that is caused by PPR virus, a member of the genus Morbillivirus that includes the viruses that cause rinderpest (RP) in cattle. RP was the first animal disease to be globally eradicated in 2011 and is only the second disease, after smallpox, to have ever been eradicated. PPR is one of the principal constraints to small ruminant production in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. The epidemiology of PPR and RP as well as the technologies available for their diagnosis and control are similar. The conditions that favored the eradication of RP are also largely present for PPR. In this work, we outline the evolving strategy for eradication in light of current opportunities and challenges, as well as the lessons from other eradication programs in animal and human health. The global PPR situation and technology for its control are summarized. A strategy based on the lessons from previous eradication efforts that integrate epidemiology, social science, and economics as tools to target and motivate vaccination is summarized. Major aspects of the cost and benefit-cost analysis of the indicated program are presented. The overall undiscounted cost of eradication was estimated as $3.1 billion, and the benefit-cost ratio for the most likely scenario was estimated at 33.8. We close with a discussion of the possible next steps. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Role of live microbial feed supplements with reference to anaerobic fungi in ruminant productivity:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anil K Puniya; Ravinder Kumar; Abdelfattah Z M Salem; Sanjay Kumar; Sumit S Dagar; Gareth W Grififth; Monica Puniya; Sreenivas R Ravella; Nikhil Kumar; Tejpal Dhewa

    2015-01-01

    To keep the concept of a safe food supply to the consumers, animal feed industries world over are showing an increasing interest in the direct-fed microbials (DFM) for improved animal performance in terms of growth or productivity. This becomes al the more essential in a situation, where a number of the residues of antibiotics and/or other growth stimulants reach in milk and meat with a number of associated potential risks for the consumers. Hence, in the absence of growth stimulants, a positive manipulation of the rumen microbial ecosystem to enhance the feedstuff utilization for improved production ef-ifciency by ruminants has become of much interest to the researchers and entrepreneurs. A few genera of live microbes (i.e., bacteria, fungi and yeasts in different types of formulations from paste to powder) are infrequently used as DFM for the domestic ruminants. These DFM products are live microbial feed supplements containing natural y occurring microbes in the rumen. Among different DFM possibilities, anaerobic rumen fungi (ARF) based additives have been found to improve ruminant productivity consistently during feeding trials. Administration of ARF during the few trials conducted, led to the increased weight gain, milk production, and total tract digestibility of feed components in ruminants. Anaerobic fungi in the rumen display very strong cel-wal degrading cel ulolytic and xylanolytic activities through rhizoid development, resulting in the physical disruption of feed structure paving the way for bacterial action. Signiifcant improvements in the ifber digestibil-ity were found to coincide with increases in ARF in the rumen indicating their role. Most of the researches based on DFM have indicated a positive response in nutrient digestion and methane reducing potential during in vivo and/or in vitro sup-plementation of ARF as DFM. Therefore, DFM especial y ARF wil gain popularity but it is necessary that al the strains are thoroughly studied for their

  12. Methane over the North American Continent - INTEX-NA, Summer 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen, B.; Blake, D.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, N.; Sachse, G.; Slate, T.

    2005-12-01

    During July and August of 2004, the INTEX-NA mission was flown over the North American continent as a part of the integrated ICARTT campaign. Its primary focus was to examine the intercontinental transport and transformation of chemically and radiatively important trace gases and aerosols across the region. As a part of the mission, methane (CH4) was sampled using both canisters and a fast response tunable diode laser, the DACOM instrument. Agreement between the two techniques was excellent. Sources of methane are both natural (wetlands, wildfires) and anthropogenically controlled (landfills, ruminants, petroleum production and use, coal mining). Although natural biogenic emissions would be expected to be near seasonal maximums, the majority of North American wetlands are located in Canada and Alaska, and were difficult to isolate during the mission. Overall distributions were well correlated with C2Cl4, a tracer of industrial and urban activity, and reflect the widespread impact of anthropogenic emissions. As expected for a gas with surface continental sources, variability was greatest in the near-surface atmosphere and decreased with increasing altitude and distance from the continent. Summer convective activity over the region resulted in elevated concentrations measured at altitudes above 6 km. Enhanced levels with distinctive trace gas signatures were observed for a variety of sources, including petroleum mining and distribution, coal mining, Canadian wildfires, and aged Asian plumes advected across the Pacific. Several flights during the mission were flown along the U.S. east coast to sample air masses transported off the continent to the Atlantic. In the near-surface over the ocean, clean boundary layer air with mixing ratios comparable to background CMDL levels at this time were encountered. At altitudes above about 4 km, CH4 was enhanced by roughly 20-50 ppb.

  13. Fortification of dried distillers grains plus solubles with grape seed meal in the diet modulates methane mitigation and rumen microbiota in Rusitec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiaosa-Ard, R; Metzler-Zebeli, B U; Ahmed, S; Muro-Reyes, A; Deckardt, K; Chizzola, R; Böhm, J; Zebeli, Q

    2015-04-01

    The role of dried distillers grains plus solubles (DDGS) and associative effects of different levels of grape seed meal (GSM) fortified in DDGS, used as both protein and energy sources in the diet, on ruminal fermentation and microbiota were investigated using rumen-simulation technique. All diets consisted of hay and concentrate mixture with a ratio of 48:52 [dry matter (DM) basis], but were different in the concentrate composition. The control diet contained soybean meal (13.5% of diet DM) and barley grain (37%), whereas DDGS treatments, unfortified DDGS (19.5% of diet DM), or DDGS fortified with GSM, either at 1, 5, 10, or 20% were used entirely in place of soybean meal and part of barley grain at a 19.5 to 25% inclusion level. All diets had similar DM, organic matter, and crude protein contents, but consisted of increasing neutral detergent fiber and decreasing nonfiber carbohydrates levels with DDGS-GSM inclusion. Compared with the soy-based control diet, the unfortified DDGS treatment elevated ammonia concentration (19.1%) of rumen fluid associated with greater crude protein degradation (~19.5%). Methane formation decreased with increasing GSM fortification levels (≥ 5%) in DDGS by which the methane concentration significantly decreased by 18.9 to 23.4 and 12.8 to 17.6% compared with control and unfortified DDGS, respectively. Compared with control, unfortified DDGS decreased butyrate proportion, and GSM fortification in the diet further decreased this variable. The proportions of genus Prevotella and Clostridium cluster XIVa were enhanced by the presence of DDGS without any associative effect of GSM fortification. The abundance of methanogenic archaea was similar, but their composition differed among treatments; whereas Methanosphaera spp. remained unchanged, proportion of Methanobrevibacter spp. decreased in DDGS-based diets, being the lowest with 20% GSM inclusion. The abundance of Ruminococcus flavefaciens, anaerobic fungi, and protozoa were decreased

  14. Investigating unsaturated fat, monensin, or bromoethanesulfonate in continuous cultures retaining ruminal protozoa. I. Fermentation, biohydrogenation, and microbial protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnati, S K R; Sylvester, J T; Ribeiro, C V D M; Gilligan, L E; Firkins, J L

    2009-08-01

    Methane is an end product of ruminal fermentation that is energetically wasteful and contributes to global climate change. Bromoethanesulfonate, animal-vegetable fat, and monensin were compared with a control treatment to suppress different functional groups of ruminal prokaryotes in the presence or absence of protozoa to evaluate changes in fermentation, digestibility, and microbial N outflow. Four dual-flow continuous culture fermenter systems were used in 4 periods in a 4 x 4 Latin square design split into 2 subperiods. In subperiod 1, a multistage filter system (50-microm smallest pore size) retained most protozoa. At the start of subperiod 2, conventional filters (300-microm pore size) were substituted to efflux protozoa via filtrate pumps over 3 d; after a further 7 d of adaptation, the fermenters were sampled for 3 d. Treatments were retained during both subperiods. Flow of total N and digestibilities of NDF and OM were 18, 16, and 9% higher, respectively, for the defaunated subperiod but were not different among treatments. Ammonia concentration was 33% higher in the faunated fermenters but was not affected by treatment. Defaunation increased the flow of nonammonia N and bacterial N from the fermenters. Protozoal counts were not different among treatments, but bromoethanesulfonate increased the generation time from 43.2 to 55.6 h. Methanogenesis was unaffected by defaunation but tended to be increased by unsaturated fat. Defaunation did not affect total volatile fatty acid production but decreased the acetate:propionate ratio; monensin increased production of isovalerate and valerate. Biohydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids was impaired in the defaunated fermenters because effluent flows of oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids were 60, 77, and 69% higher, and the ratio of vaccenic acid:unsaturated FA ratio was decreased by 34% in the effluent. This ratio was increased in both subperiods with the added fat diet, indicating an accumulation of

  15. Molecular characterization of peste des petits ruminants viruses from outbreaks caused by unrestricted movements of small ruminants in pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, M; Saeed, A; Abubakar, M; Kanwal, S; Berg, M

    2015-02-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is an endemic disease of small ruminants, and vaccination has been the method of control but outbreaks are continuously occurring in Pakistan. The following study presents a detailed investigation of an outbreak, suspected to be PPR, probably introduced by PPRV-infected sheep and goats from Sindh Province (north-west) to Punjab Province (central) of Pakistan during the flood relief campaign in 2011. A total of 70 serum samples from 28 different flocks were tested with competitive ELISA (H antibodies), which detected 24 (34.2%) samples positive for PPRV antibodies. Nasal swabs and faeces were tested with immunocapture ELISA (N antigen), which detected 18 (25.7%) samples positive for PPRV antigen. The RNA detected positive (n = 28, 40%) using real-time PCR was subjected to conventional PCR for the amplification of the fusion and nucleoprotein genes. Sequencing of both genes and subsequent phylogenetic analysis indicated the grouping of all the sequences to be in lineage IV along with other Asian isolates of PPRV. However, sequences of both genes were divided into two groups within lineage IV. One group of viruses clustered with previously characterized Pakistani isolates, whereas the other group was distinctly clustered with isolates from the Middle East or India. The sequence identity indicated the introduction of at least one population of PPRV from a different source and circulation in the local flocks of small ruminants, which emphasized the need to obtain health clearance certificate before movement of animals. The results of this study provide baseline data for the genetic characterization of different PPRV populations in Pakistan. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Methane consumption in waters overlying a hydrate-associated mound in the Santa Monica Basin : a project synopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, M.B.; Mau, S.; Valentine, D.L.; Reed, J.H. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Hallam, S.J.; Yang, J. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology

    2008-07-01

    Understanding the role of methane hydrates in the global carbon cycle and climate change requires an understanding of methane consumption in hydrate-associated environments. A dual-component microbial biofilter consumes up to 80 per cent of methane produced in the marine environment. Throughout most of the oceans around the world, anaerobic methane oxidation within sediment prevents large quantities of methane from leaving the seafloor. However, in regions of increased methane production, methane is released to the water column. The water column component of the marine biofilter for methane is the largest uncharacterized global sink for methane. This study combined geochemical and molecular biology to develop a quantitative understanding of methane consumption in the marine water column of the Southern California Bight. The paper presented geochemical data demonstrating that the degree of basin enclosure and basin-scale circulation patterns, were first order controls on methane oxidation rates in the Santa Monica Basin (SMB). The paper also presented genetic data showing similarities and differences in methanotrophic communities in distinctive horizons within the SMB water column. It described the study site, sampling, and methods as well as the preliminary findings. A contrast was observed between methane concentration and methane turnover time profiles. It was concluded that although methane concentration is a first-order control on methanotrophic activity, community concentration, dilution and seeding control the broad scale efficacy of methane consumption. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Effectiveness of Emotional Schema Therapy on Severity of Depression and Rumination in People with Major Depressive Disorder

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    M rezaee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The emotional schema model emphasises on mind rumination and other emotional schemas in depression. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of Emotional Schema Therapy (EST on severity of depression and rumination in people with major depression disorder. Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial study using pre-test and post-test-follow up with the control group. Among all patients with major depressive disorder visited in Imam Hossein hospital and Rahyar clinic of Tehran, 32 patients were selected through inclusion or exclusion criteria and convenience sampling then they were randomly assigned into two equal groups; experimental (16 persons and control (16 persons. Experimental group experienced 14 weeks of emotional schema therapy, while the control grouprecieved no treatment intervention. Revised Beck depression inventory (BDI-II and ruminative response scale (RRS were used in base lines, post-test and follow up as the assessment instruments. Data were analyzed by mixed analysis of variance via SPSS19 software. Results: The results of this research showed that the means of depression and rumination in the experimental group were reduced significantly in comparison with the control group in post-test and follow up (P<0.05. Conclusion: The study findings proposed that Emotional Schema Therapy can be used as an effective intervention in order to reduce the depression and mind rumination in people with major depressive disorder.

  18. Cystic echinococcosis amongst small ruminants and humans in central Ethiopia

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    Habtamu Assefa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of cystic echinococcosis (CE in small ruminants and humans in Addis Ababa, central Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study involving systematic random sampling was conducted to estimate the prevalence of CE in 512 small ruminants (262 sheep and 250 goats slaughtered at Addis Ababa Abattoir Enterprise between October 2011 and March 2012. Hydatid cysts were identified macroscopically during postmortem examination and their fertility and viability were determined. CE was observed in 21 (8.02% sheep and 17 (6.80% goats. In sheep 13 (4.96% of the lungs, 10 (3.81% livers and 1 (0.381% heart were found to be infected with hydatid cysts. Involvement of lung and liver in goats was found to be 10 (4.0% and 8 (3.2% respectively, with no cysts recorded in the heart. Of the total of 77 and 47 cysts encountered in sheep and goats, 33 (42.85% and 15 (31.91% respectively were fertile. Viability of protoscoleces from fertile cysts in sheep (29 [87.87%] was higher than in goats (6 [40.0%]. For humans, retrospective analysis covering five years of case reports at two major hospitals in Addis Ababa between January 2008 and December 2012 showed that of the total of 25 840 patients admitted for ultrasound examination, 27 CE cases were registered, a prevalence of 0.1% and mean annual incidence rate of approximately 0.18 cases per 100 000 population. Liver was the major organ affected in humans (81.5% in affected patients followed by spleen (11.1% and kidney (7.4%. Logistic regression analysis showed that prevalence of CE varied significantly in relation to host age in the small ruminants (OR = 3.93, P < 0.05 as well as in humans (95% CI, R = 4.8. This epidemiological study confirms the importance of CE in small ruminants and humans in central Ethiopia, emphasising the need for integrated approaches to controlling this neglected preventable disease.

  19. Overview of California's Efforts to Understand and Reduce Methane Sources

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    Croes, B. E.; Chen, Y.; Duren, R. M.; Falk, M.; Franco, G.; Herner, J.; Ingram, W.; Kuwayama, T.; McCarthy, R.; Scheehle, E.; Vijayan, A.

    2016-12-01

    Methane is an important short-lived climate pollutant (SLCP) and also has significant health implications as a tropospheric ozone precursor. As part of a comprehensive effort to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions overall by 40% from 1990 levels by 2030, California has proposed an SLCP Strategy that includes a 40% reduction of methane emissions from 2013 levels by 2030, with goals to reduce oil and gas related emissions and capture methane emissions from dairy operations and organic waste. A recent analysis of satellite data found a large methane "hot spot" over the Central Valley in California, likely the second largest over the entire U.S. In light of this finding, the California legislature passed Assembly Bill 1496 in 2015, which requires the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to undertake measurements to understand the sources of methane hot spots, evaluate life-cycle emissions from natural gas imported into California, and update relevant policies and programs. There is growing evidence in the recent scientific literature suggesting that a small fraction of methane sources within a category emit disproportionately higher emissions than their counterparts, usually referred to as "super emitters". As such, controlling these sources may provide a lower cost opportunity for methane reductions needed to meet near- and long-term climate goals. In order to achieve a comprehensive understanding of sources contributing to "hot spots", CARB, the California Energy Commission, and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are implementing a large-scale statewide methane survey using a tiered monitoring and measurement program, which will include airborne and ground-level measurements of the various regions and source sectors in the State. This presentation will discuss research and program implementation efforts to evaluate and mitigate methane super emitters and hot spots. These efforts are expected to improve our understanding of methane emission source distributions

  20. Ruminal fermentation characteristics and fatty acid profile of ruminal fluid and milk of dairy cows fed flaxseed hulls supplemented with monensin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva-Kazama, Daniele C; Côrtes, Cristiano; Kazama, Ricardo; Benchaar, Chaouki; Santos, Geraldo T D; Zeoula, Lucia M; Petit, Hélène V

    2011-02-01

    Flaxseed hull, a co-product obtained from flax processing, is a rich source of n-3 fatty acids (FA) but there is little information on its value for dairy production. Monensin supplementation is known to modify biohydrogenation of FA by rumen microbes. Therefore, the main objective of the experiment was to determine the effect of feeding a combination of monensin and flaxseed hulls on ruminal fermentation characteristics and FA profile of ruminal fluid and milk. Four ruminally fistulated multiparous Holstein cows averaging 665 ± 21 kg body weight and 190 ± 5 d in milk were assigned to a 4×4 Latin square design (28-d experimental periods) with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Treatments were: 1) control, neither flaxseed hulls nor monensin; 2) diet containing (dry matter basis) 19·8% flaxseed hulls; 3) diet with monensin (16 mg/kg dry matter); 4) diet containing 19·8% (dry matter basis) flaxseed hulls and 16 mg monensin/kg. Flaxseed hull supplementation decreased the acetate to propionate ratio in ruminal fluid and monensin had no effect. Concentrations of trans-18:1 isomers (trans9,trans11,trans13/14+6/8) and cis9,12,15-18:3 in ruminal fluid and milk fat were higher and those of cis9,12-18:2 in milk fat tended (P=0·07) to be higher for cows supplemented with flaxseed hulls than for cows fed no flaxseed hulls. Monensin had little effect on milk fatty acid profile. A combination of flaxseed hulls and monensin did not result in better milk fatty acid profile than when feeding only flaxseed hulls.

  1. In vitro study of effectiveness of saponin from Sapindus rarak fruit as methanogenesis inhibitor on ruminal digestion system

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    Amlius Thalib

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Methane produced in the rumen system causes the lost of ingested chemical energy, and the methane emitted contributes the greenhouse effect to the atmosphere environment. A study to evaluate the effectiveness of saponin from Sapindus rarak fruit as an inhibitor of ruminal methanogenesis was conducted. The method conducted in this study was a fermentation of a substrate by in vitro technique using rumen fluid (obtained from fistulated sheep as inoculum. Substrate (king grass was fermented in anaerobic incubator system at pH of medium 6.9 and temperature of 39°C for 48 hours. Inoculum was supplemented with an ingredient obtained by extraction of Sapindus rarak fruit with methanol (Aksapon SR and the ones without extraction (lerak powder, and further, these treatments were compared to other methanogenesis inhibitors (i.e. Fe3+, SO4 2– and poly unsaturated longchain fatty acids: PULCFA.The treatments were 1. Inoculum without treatment (K; 2. K + Aksapon SR (80 mg/100 ml; 3. K + lerak powder (160 mg/100 ml; 4. K + Fe3+ (0.8 mg/100 ml; 5. K + SO4 2- (96 mg/100 ml; 6. K + PULCFA (24 mg/100 ml. Measurements conducted were portion of methane, dry matter digestibility (DMD, NH3-N content, microbial population, and volatile fatty acids (VFA. The data measured were analyzed by using completely randomized design. The results of the experiment showed that Aksapon SR was the most effective inhibitor of methanogenesis compared to the others, that is when compared to control, Aksapon SR lowered methane production by 31% (P0.05 and SO4 2–(10% (P>0.05. All additive treatments did not affect the DMD value of the substrate fermented by control inoculum. Compared to control, all treatments lowered the protozoal population where the Aksapon SR gave the strongest effect (1.91 x 105 vs 9.94 x 105 cell/ml, and the decrease of protozoal number in Aksapon SR treatment was followed by the increase of bacterial (4.13 x 109 vs 2.56 x 109 colony/ml. Aksapon SR and SO4 2

  2. Methane Emissions from Upland Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megonigal, Patrick; Pitz, Scott; Wang, Zhi-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Global budgets ascribe 4-10% of atmospheric methane sinks to upland soils and assume that soils are the sole surface for methane exchange between upland forests and the atmosphere. The dogma that upland forests are uniformly atmospheric methane sinks was challenged a decade ago by the discovery of abiotic methane production from plant tissue. Subsequently a variety of relatively cryptic microbial and non-microbial methane sources have been proposed that have the potential to emit methane in upland forests. Despite the accumulating evidence of potential methane sources, there are few data demonstrating actual emissions of methane from a plant surface in an upland forest. We report direct observations of methane emissions from upland tree stems in two temperate forests. Stem methane emissions were observed from several tree species that dominate a forest located on the mid-Atlantic coast of North America (Maryland, USA). Stem emissions occurred throughout the growing season while soils adjacent to the trees simultaneously consumed methane. Scaling fluxes by stem surface area suggested the forest was a net methane source during a wet period in June, and that stem emissions offset 5% of the soil methane sink on an annual basis. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycles in stem methane emission rates, pointing to soils as the methane source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for gas transport. Similar observations were made in an upland forest in Beijing, China. However, in this case the evidence suggested the methane was not produced in soils, but in the heartwood by microbial or non-microbial processes. These data challenge the concept that forests are uniform sinks of methane, and suggest that upland forests are smaller methane sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Tree emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration.

  3. The Effects of Worry and Rumination on Affect States and Cognitive Activity

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    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Borkovec, Thomas D.; Sibrava, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of worry and rumination on affective states and mentation type were examined in an unselected undergraduate sample in Study 1 and in a sample of individuals with high trait worry and rumination, high rumination, and low worry/rumination in Study 2. Participants engaged in worry and rumination inductions, counterbalanced in order across…

  4. Effect of Fodder Tree Species with Condensed Tannin Contents on In vitro Methane Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Ernestina Gutiérrez; Medina, Leonardo Hernández; Benavides, Liliana Márquez; Caratachea, Aureliano Juárez; Razo, Guillermo Salas; Burgos, Armin Javier Ayala; Rodríguez, Ruy Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of fodder tree species (FTS) with condensed tannin contents: Cordia elaeagnoides, Platymiscium lasiocarpum, Vitex mollis, and Haematoxylon brasiletto, on in vitro methane (CH4) production at 24 h post incubation. The analysis was performed using the in vitro gas production technique, with three levels of inclusion/species: 600, 800, and 1,000 mg and with 4 replicates/species/level of inclusion. The substrate was incubated at 39°C, and the gas and CH4 production were recorded at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h post incubation. The data collected was analyzed through Pearson correlation, polinomial regression and fixed effects models. There were negative correlations between FTS-total gas volume (r = −0.40; p32.7%), taking into account the total CH4 production at 24 h of the forage used as reference (Avena sativa). It’s suggested that C. elaeagnoides-according to its crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and condensed tannins content- is the best alternative within the FTS analyzed, for feeding ruminants and for the control of CH4 emissions during the dry season. PMID:26732330

  5. Role of wild small ruminants in the epidemiology of peste des petits ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, M

    2014-10-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) causes one of the most contagious and highly infectious respiratory diseases in sheep and goats known as peste des petits ruminants (PPR). Reports of outbreaks of PPR in captive and wild small ruminants have extended the known spectrum of susceptible species to include antelopes. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleoprotein and fusion genes indicates that all PPRVs isolated from wild ungulate outbreaks belong to lineage IV. While it is clear that a number of wildlife species are susceptible to infection, the role of wildlife in the epidemiology of PPR remains uncertain. The available information about the occurrence of disease in free-ranging wildlife is mainly derived from surveys based on serological evidence. Data on the genetic nature of circulating PPRV strains are scarce. Given the scope of PPR in wild ungulates that are widespread in many countries, current disease surveillance efforts are inadequate and warrant additional investment. This is crucial because domestic and wild ruminants mingle together at several points, allowing inter-species transmission of PPRV. There is no reason to believe that PPRV circulates in wild animals and acts as a potential source of virus for domestic species. Irrespective of the possibility of wild small ruminants as the reservoir of PPRV, concerns about the role of susceptible species of antelopes need to be addressed, due to the fact that the disease can pose a serious threat to the survival of endangered species of wild ruminants on the one hand and could act as a constraint to the global eradication of PPR on the other hand. In this review, knowledge gained through research or surveillance on the sustainability of PPRV in wild ruminants is discussed. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Effects of ruminal doses of sucrose, lactose, and corn starch on ruminal fermentation and expression of genes in ruminal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, M; Mewis, J L; Zhining, Z

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate effects of a ruminal dose of sucrose, lactose, and corn starch on ruminal fermentation and expression of genes in ruminal epithelial cells. Six ruminally cannulated nonlactating nonpregnant Holstein cows (body weight=725±69.6kg) were assigned to treatments in a 3×3 Latin square design with 7-d periods; 1d for data and sample collection followed by a 6-d washout period. Cows were fed a diet containing whole-crop barley silage and dry ground corn, and dietary neutral detergent fiber and crude protein contents were 41.8 and 13.2% [dry matter (DM) basis], respectively. Treatment was a pulse-dose of sucrose, lactose, and corn starch (3.0, 3.0, and 2.85kg of DM, respectively; providing similar amounts of hexose across the treatments) through the ruminal cannulas. All treatments were given with alfalfa silage (1.75kg DM) to prevent acute rumen acidosis. Rumen pH was continuously monitored, and rumen fluid was sampled at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180min after the dose. In addition, ruminal papillae were sampled from the ventral sac at 180min after the dose. Ruminal dosing with sucrose and lactose, compared with corn starch, increased ruminal total volatile fatty acid concentration and molar proportion of butyrate from 60 to 180min after the dose, and expression of genes for sodium hydrogen exchanger isoforms 1 and 2, and ATPase isoform 1 in ruminal epithelial cells. Ruminal dosing with sucrose, compared with lactose and corn starch, decreased rumen pH from 120 to 180min after the dose and molar proportion of acetate in ruminal fluid from 60 to 150min after the dose, and increased molar proportion of propionate in ruminal fluid from 60 to 150min, and expression of genes involved in butyrate metabolism (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase isoform 1) and anion exchange across ruminal apical cell membrane (putative anion transporter isoform 1). These results suggest that replacing dietary starch with sugars may affect ruminal

  7. [Psychometric Properties of the Metacognition Scales about Rumination in Clinical and Non-clinical Turkish Samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Adviye Esin; Sungur, Mehmet Zihni; Konkan, Ramazan; Şenormancı, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the reliability and validity of the Turkish adaptations of the Positive Beliefs about Rumination Scale (PBRS) and the Negative Beliefs about Rumination Scale (NBRS) in clinical and non-clinical samples. While the non-clinical sample of the study consisted of 455 participants, the clinical sample was composed of 60 major depressive disorder (MDD), 30 panic disorder (PD) and 30 social anxiety disorder (SAD) cases. The results of the factor analyses confirm the construct validity and original factor structure of the scales. Findings obtained from internal consistency and test-retest analyses indicated good reliability for the scales. Supporting the convergent validity of the scales, the correlations between metacognitions about rumination and depressive symptoms, rumination, metacognitions about worry, pathological worry, and anxiety symptoms were found to be positive and significant in the non-clinical sample. Hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that both scales have predictive validity for depressive symptoms after controlling for anxiety symptoms. As for extreme group comparisons, it supported the criterion-related validity of the scales. In discriminant clinical validity examinations, although both scales were able to differentiate MDD, PD, and SAD groups from healthy controls, they were unable to differentiate the depressive group from the other anxiety disorder groups. A comprehensive psychometric evaluation of the scales demonstrated that both PBRS and NBRS are reliable and valid assessment devices that can be used for research purposes both in clinical and non-clinical groups in Turkey.

  8. A naturalistic examination of negative affect and disorder-related rumination in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Maria; Petermann, Juliane; Diestel, Stefan; Ritschel, Franziska; Boehm, Ilka; King, Joseph A; Geisler, Daniel; Bernardoni, Fabio; Roessner, Veit; Goschke, Thomas; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    In anorexia nervosa (AN), volitional inhibition of rewarding behaviors, such as eating, involves a conflict between the desire to suppress appetite and the inherent motive to consume. This conflict is thought to have costs that carry over into daily life, e.g., triggering negative affect and/or recurring ruminations, which may ultimately impact long term outcome. Hence, increasing research effort is being dedicated to understand the link between emotional and ruminative processes in the etiology and maintenance of AN. We investigated whether affective states influence disorder-related rumination in AN applying "ecological momentary assessment", a method which allows the experimenter to gain insight into psychological processes in the natural environment and assess data in real time. Participants (AN = 37, healthy controls = 33) were given a smartphone for 14 days. A ringtone signaled at six random time-points each day to fill in a questionnaire, which gauged disorder-typical thoughts about food and weight as well as affective state. Analyses, applying hierarchical linear models confirmed that AN patients spend more time thinking about food, body shape and weight than controls (p thinking induces a vulnerability to negative stimuli which, in turn, fosters heightened negative affect. Thus, therapeutic interventions could be improved by implementing modules that specifically target disorder-related rumination.

  9. Multiparametric methane sensor for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borecki, M.; Duk, M.; Kociubiński, A.; Korwin-Pawlowski, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Today, methane sensors find applications mostly in safety alarm installations, gas parameters detection and air pollution classification. Such sensors and sensors elements exists for industry and home use. Under development area of methane sensors application is dedicated to ground gases monitoring. Proper monitoring of soil gases requires reliable and maintenance-free semi-constant and longtime examination at relatively low cost of equipment. The sensors for soil monitoring have to work on soil probe. Therefore, sensor is exposed to environment conditions, as a wide range of temperatures and a full scale of humidity changes, as well as rain, snow and wind, that are not specified for classical methane sensors. Development of such sensor is presented in this paper. The presented sensor construction consists of five commercial non dispersive infra-red (NDIR) methane sensing units, a set of temperature and humidity sensing units, a gas chamber equipped with a micro-fan, automated gas valves and also a microcontroller that controls the measuring procedure. The electronics part of sensor was installed into customized 3D printed housing equipped with self-developed gas valves. The main development of proposed sensor is on the side of experimental evaluation of construction reliability and results of data processing included safety procedures and function for hardware error correction. Redundant methane sensor units are used providing measurement error correction as well as improved measurement accuracy. The humidity and temperature sensors are used for internal compensation of methane measurements as well as for cutting-off the sensor from the environment when the conditions exceed allowable parameters. Results obtained during environment sensing prove that the gas concentration readings are not sensitive to gas chamber vertical or horizontal position. It is important as vertical sensor installation on soil probe is simpler that horizontal one. Data acquired during six

  10. Advances in Diagnosis of Respiratory Diseases of Small Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Chakraborty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrespective of aetiology, infectious respiratory diseases of sheep and goats contribute to 5.6 percent of the total diseases of small ruminants. These infectious respiratory disorders are divided into two groups: the diseases of upper respiratory tract, namely, nasal myiasis and enzootic nasal tumors, and diseases of lower respiratory tract, namely, peste des petits ruminants (PPR, parainfluenza, Pasteurellosis, Ovine progressive pneumonia, mycoplasmosis, caprine arthritis encephalitis virus, caseous lymphadenitis, verminous pneumonia, and many others. Depending upon aetiology, many of them are acute and fatal in nature. Early, rapid, and specific diagnosis of such diseases holds great importance to reduce the losses. The advanced enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs for the detection of antigen as well as antibodies directly from the samples and molecular diagnostic assays along with microsatellites comprehensively assist in diagnosis as well as treatment and epidemiological studies. The present review discusses the advancements made in the diagnosis of common infectious respiratory diseases of sheep and goats. It would update the knowledge and help in adapting and implementing appropriate, timely, and confirmatory diagnostic procedures. Moreover, it would assist in designing appropriate prevention protocols and devising suitable control strategies to overcome respiratory diseases and alleviate the economic losses.

  11. In-vitro screening of Kalahari browse species for rumen methane mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobus Johannes Francois Theart

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional value of browse foliage from the Thorny Kalahari Dune Bush veld of South Africa is not characterized. Most of this browse species is rich in tannin, but still palatable, and is consumed by ruminants during the dry season, as well as having a role to play in mitigating enteric methane emission from ruminants. In this study, the rumen methane mitigation potential of 19 browse species foliage collected from the Thorny Kalahari Dune Bush veld, was analyzed in terms of chemical composition, in vitro fermentation, digestibility and methane production. In vitro gas and methane production and organic matter digestibility (IVOMD were determined by using rumen fluid collected, strained and anaerobically prepared. A semi-automated system was used to measure gas production (GP from each browse species by incubating 400 mg samples in a shaking incubator at 39 °C with or without inclusion of 400 mg of polyethylene glycol (PEG. Data for all the parameters collected were statistically analyzed using the SAS (9.0 general linear model (GLM procedure, and differences between foliage species were determined using Duncan’s multiple-range test. Acacia luederitziiand Monechma incanumshowed the best potential for decreasing methane production by up to 90 % after 48 h of incubation. The secondary components (mainly tannins of the browse species appeared to have a significant effect on volatile fatty acids (VFA, methane and gas production as judged by the comparison of samples incubated with or without PEG inclusion. The substantial amount of crude protein (CP content coupled with their anti-methanogenic effect during fermentation would make these browses a potential mitigation option for small scale farmers and pastoralists in sub-Sahara Africa. However, it is also very important that systematic and strategic supplementation in a mixed diet should be looked at as the way forward in terms of best utilization.

  12. Enteric methane emissions and lactational performance of Holstein cows fed different concentrations of coconut oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, M; Powers, W J; Fogiel, A C; Liesman, J S; Bello, N M; Beede, D K

    2012-05-01

    To determine if dietary medium-chain fatty acids (FA; C(8) to C(14)) may mitigate enteric methane emissions, 24 cows were blocked by body size (n=2) and randomly assigned to 1 sequence of dietary treatments. Diets were fed for 35 d each in 2 consecutive periods. Diets differed in concentrations of coconut oil (CNO; ~75% medium-chain FA): 0.0 (control) or 1.3, 2.7, or 3.3% CNO, dry matter basis. The control diet contained 50% forage (74% from corn silage), 16.5% crude protein (60% from rumen-degradable protein), 34% neutral detergent fiber (NDF; 71% from forage), and 28% starch, dry matter basis. Data and sample collections were from d 29 to 35 in environmentally controlled rooms to measure methane (CH(4)) production. Methane emitted was computed from the difference in concentrations of inlet and outlet air and flux as measured 8 times per day. Control cows emitted 464 g of CH(4)/d, consumed 22.9 kg of DM/d, and produced 34.8 kg of solids-corrected milk/d and 1.3 kg of milk fat/d. Treatment with 1.3, 2.7, or 3.3% dietary CNO reduced CH(4) (449, 291, and 253 g/d, respectively), but concomitantly depressed dry matter intake (21.4, 17.9, and 16.2 kg/d, respectively), solids-corrected milk yield (36.3, 28.4, and 26.8 kg/d, respectively), and milk fat yield (1.4, 0.9, and 0.9 kg/d, respectively). The amount of NDF digested in the total tract decreased with increased dietary CNO concentrations; thus, CH(4) emitted per unit of NDF digested rose from 118 to 128, 153, and 166 g/kg across CNO treatments. Dietary CNO did not significantly affect apparent digestibility of CP but increased apparent starch digestibility from 92 to 95%. No FA C(10) or shorter were detected in feces, and apparent digestibility decreased with increasing FA chain length. Coconut oil concentrations of 2.7 or 3.3% decreased yields of milk FA C(14). The highest milk fat concentration (3.69%; 1.3% CNO) was due to the greatest yields of C(12) to C(16) milk FA. Milk FA concentrations of C(18:2 trans-10,cis