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Sample records for controlling radionuclide releases

  1. Radionuclide release calculations for SAR-08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Gavin; Miller, Alex; Smith, Graham; Jackson, Duncan (Enviros Consulting Ltd, Wolverhampton (United Kingdom))

    2008-04-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the post-closure safety assessment of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate waste (L/ILW), SAFE, the SKB has prepared an updated assessment called SAR-08. This report describes the radionuclide release calculations that have been undertaken as part of SAR-08. The information, assumptions and data used in the calculations are reported and the results are presented. The calculations address issues raised in the regulatory review, but also take account of new information including revised inventory data. The scenarios considered include the main case of expected behaviour of the system, with variants; low probability releases, and so-called residual scenarios. Apart from these scenario uncertainties, data uncertainties have been examined using a probabilistic approach. Calculations have been made using the AMBER software. This allows all the component features of the assessment model to be included in one place. AMBER has been previously used to reproduce results the corresponding calculations in the SAFE assessment. It is also used in demonstration of the IAEA's near surface disposal assessment methodology ISAM and has been subject to very substantial verification tests and has been used in verifying other assessment codes. Results are presented as a function of time for the release of radionuclides from the near field, and then from the far field into the biosphere. Radiological impacts of the releases are reported elsewhere. Consideration is given to each radionuclide and to each component part of the repository. The releases from the entire repository are also presented. The peak releases rates are, for most scenarios, due to organic C-14. Other radionuclides which contribute to peak release rates include inorganic C-14, Ni-59 and Ni-63. (author)

  2. Application of innovative policies for controlling radionuclide releases: The {open_quotes}open-market trading rule{close_quotes}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, D.W. [Dade Moeller & Associates, Inc., New Bern, NC (United States)

    1997-08-01

    In the past, most efforts for reducing airborne radio nuclide releases and controlling radioactive wastes have been directed to the development of new and improved technologies. Little attention has been paid to the possible application to these problems of new, innovative policies. Yet, experience in other fields shows that such applications could be beneficial. A prime example is the {open_quotes}open-market trading rule,{close_quotes} now being widely used in the U.S. for the control of a range of environmental problems. Through this rule, nuclear facility operators would be permitted to control airborne emissions in a more cost-effective manner, and those responsible for decommissioning and decontaminating nuclear facilities no longer in operation could do so at far lower costs while generating significantly smaller volumes of radioactive wastes. Application of such a policy would also significantly reduce the demands on existing, and the need for research to develop new, improved, control technologies. 16 refs.

  3. Radionuclide release from irradiated Th-Pu mox fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, N.; Quinones, J. [Ciemat., Avda. Complutense 22. E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Cobos, J. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Parque Tecnologico Cartuja 93, Av. Thomas Alva Edison, 7, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain); Rondinella, V.V.; Van Winckel, S.; Somers, J.; Papaioanu, D.; Glatz, J.P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Plutonium and minor actinides produced as by-products of the UO{sub 2} nuclear cycle could be considered as waste or energy source depending on the strategy selected in the nuclear energy programme. Considering Pu and Minor Actinides as a source, they can be burned in existing water reactor for diminishing the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel, it is necessary to use 'inactive' materials as matrix like ThO{sub 2}. ThO{sub 2} matrix has demonstrated its Pu burning efficiency and higher corrosion resistance than UO{sub 2}. Uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel efficiency is low because the presence of U in MOX results in the creation of some new Pu under irradiation. The dissolution behaviour of irradiated (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} pellets with burn-up of 38.8 MWd/kg Th has been studied in carbonated (20 mM HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), deionised and granite ground water solution in a hot cell. The dissolution behaviour of Th, Pu, U and Np was studied in order to find out whether radionuclides release is depending on the matrix dissolution (solubility control). After irradiating the samples, K-ORIGEN and ORIGEN ARP codes were used to find out the theoretical inventory. Afterwards, fuel samples were dissolved completely and analyzed, in order to determine the experimental radionuclide inventory of the irradiated fuel. Th matrix alteration appears to reach an steady state and radionuclides dissolution shows dependence on the matrix behaviour as can be observed through the FIAP results. (authors)

  4. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES RELEASED FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING PLANTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANCIS,A.J.

    2006-10-18

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, and the fission products Tc, I, Cs, Sr, released from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides and the fission products under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  5. Radionuclides release possibility analysis of MSR at various accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choong Wie; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    There are some accidents which go beyond our expectation such as Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster and amounts of radionuclides release to environment, so more effort and research are conducted to prevent it. MSR (Molten Salt Reactor) is one of GEN-IV reactor types, and its coolant and fuel are mixtures of molten salt. MSR has a schematic like figure 1 and it has different features with the solid fuel reactor, but most important and interesting feature of MSR is its many safety systems. For example, MSR has a large negative void coefficient. Even though power increases, the reactor slows down soon. Radionuclides release possibility of MSR was analyzed at various accident conditions including Chernobyl and Fukushima ones. The MSR was understood to prevent the severe accident by the negative reactivity coefficient and the absence of explosive material such as water at the Chernobyl disaster condition. It was expected to contain fuel salts in the reactor building and not to release radionuclides into environment even if the primary system could be ruptured or broken and fuel salts would be leaked at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster condition of earthquake and tsunami. The MSR, which would not lead to the severe accident and therefore prevents the fuel release to the environment at many expected scenarios, was thought to have priority in the aspect of accidents. A quantitative analysis and a further research are needed to evaluate the possibility of radionuclide release to the environment at the various accident conditions based on the simple comparison of the safety feature between MSR and solid fuel reactor.

  6. Radionuclide solubility control by solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, F.; Klinkenberg, M.; Rozov, K.; Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6); Vinograd, V. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geosciences

    2015-07-01

    The migration of radionuclides in the geosphere is to a large extend controlled by sorption processes onto minerals and colloids. On a molecular level, sorption phenomena involve surface complexation, ion exchange as well as solid solution formation. The formation of solid solutions leads to the structural incorporation of radionuclides in a host structure. Such solid solutions are ubiquitous in natural systems - most minerals in nature are atomistic mixtures of elements rather than pure compounds because their formation leads to a thermodynamically more stable situation compared to the formation of pure compounds. However, due to a lack of reliable data for the expected scenario at close-to equilibrium conditions, solid solution systems have so far not been considered in long-term safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories. In recent years, various solid-solution aqueous solution systems have been studied. Here we present state-of-the art results regarding the formation of (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} solid solutions. In some scenarios describing a waste repository system for spent nuclear fuel in crystalline rocks {sup 226}Ra dominates the radiological impact to the environment associated with the potential release of radionuclides from the repository in the future. The solubility of Ra in equilibrium with (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} is much lower than the one calculated with RaSO{sub 4} as solubility limiting phase. Especially, the available literature data for the interaction parameter W{sub BaRa}, which describes the non-ideality of the solid solution, vary by about one order of magnitude (Zhu, 2004; Curti et al., 2010). The final {sup 226}Ra concentration in this system is extremely sensitive to the amount of barite, the difference in the solubility products of the end-member phases, and the degree of non-ideality of the solid solution phase. Here, we have enhanced the fundamental understanding regarding (1) the thermodynamics of (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} solid solutions and (2) the

  7. Radionuclide Release after Channel Flow Blockage Accident in CANDU-6 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hoon; Jun, Hwang Yong [Korea Electric Power Corporation Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The channel flow blockage accident is one of the in core loss of coolant accidents, the release path of radionuclide is very different from conventional loss of coolant accidents. The large amount of radionuclide released from broken channel is being washed during it passes through the moderator in Calandria. The objective of containment behavior analysis for channel flow blockage event is to assess the amount of radionuclide release to the ambient atmosphere. Radionuclide release rates in case of channel flow blockage with all safety system available, that is containment building is intact, as well as with containment system impairment are analyzed with GOTHIC and SMART code

  8. Monitoring release of disposable radionuclides in the Kara sea: Bioaccumulation of long-lived radionuclides in echinoderms and molluscs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, N.S.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the present proposal is to continue and extend our research on the trophic transfer of important radionuclides in benthic fauna of the Kara Sea. This project is assessing the extent to which select species of seastars, brittle stars, and clams typical of the Kara Sea concentrate and retain a variety of long-lived radionuclides known to be (or suspected to be) present in the disposed wastes in the Russian Arctic. The rates and routes of uptake and depuration of isotopes in the same or in closely related species are being quantified so that endemic benthic organisms can be assessed as potential bioindicators of released radionuclides in Arctic waters.

  9. Nuclear decay data for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1977-08-01

    This report gives tabulations of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted by 240 radionuclides. Most of the radionuclides are those expected to occur in routine releases of effluents from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. For each radionuclide are given the half-life and recommended values for the energies, intensities, and equilibrium absorbed-dose constants for each of the atomic and nuclear radiations. Also given are the daughter radionuclides produced and recommended values for decay branching ratios, where applicable. The radioactivity decay chains and branching ratios are displayed in diagram form.

  10. Radionuclide Release after LBLOCA with Loss of Class IV Power Accident in CANDU-6 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hoon [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    A large break in a pipe train of a primary heat transport system discharges coolant, which has high energy and large mass, into the containment building. Reactor shutdown and emergency core cooling water will limit the fuel cladding failure, but cannot prevent it entirely. The containment building is the last barrier of radionuclide release to the environment. Containment isolation and pressure suppression by dousing and local air cooler reduce the amount of radionuclide release to the environment. The objective of containment behavior analysis for large break loss of coolant with loss of class IV power accident is to assess the amount of radionuclide release to the ambient atmosphere. Radionuclide release rates in this event, with all safety system available, that is, the containment building is intact, as well as with containment system impairment, are analyzed with GOTHIC and SMART code

  11. 21 CFR 892.5700 - Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... electromechanical or pneumatic device intended to enable an operator to apply, by remote control, a radionuclide... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5700 Remote controlled...

  12. Regulatory Technology Development Plan - Sodium Fast Reactor. Mechanistic Source Term - Metal Fuel Radionuclide Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabaskas, David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bucknor, Matthew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jerden, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The development of an accurate and defensible mechanistic source term will be vital for the future licensing efforts of metal fuel, pool-type sodium fast reactors. To assist in the creation of a comprehensive mechanistic source term, the current effort sought to estimate the release fraction of radionuclides from metal fuel pins to the primary sodium coolant during fuel pin failures at a variety of temperature conditions. These release estimates were based on the findings of an extensive literature search, which reviewed past experimentation and reactor fuel damage accidents. Data sources for each radionuclide of interest were reviewed to establish release fractions, along with possible release dependencies, and the corresponding uncertainty levels. Although the current knowledge base is substantial, and radionuclide release fractions were established for the elements deemed important for the determination of offsite consequences following a reactor accident, gaps were found pertaining to several radionuclides. First, there is uncertainty regarding the transport behavior of several radionuclides (iodine, barium, strontium, tellurium, and europium) during metal fuel irradiation to high burnup levels. The migration of these radionuclides within the fuel matrix and bond sodium region can greatly affect their release during pin failure incidents. Post-irradiation examination of existing high burnup metal fuel can likely resolve this knowledge gap. Second, data regarding the radionuclide release from molten high burnup metal fuel in sodium is sparse, which makes the assessment of radionuclide release from fuel melting accidents at high fuel burnup levels difficult. This gap could be addressed through fuel melting experimentation with samples from the existing high burnup metal fuel inventory.

  13. Risk-informed assessment of radionuclide release from dissolution of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Tae M., E-mail: tae.ahn@nrc.gov

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Dissolution of HLW waste form was assessed with long-term risk informed approach. • The radionuclide release rate decreases with time from the initial release rate. • Fast release radionuclides can be dispersed with discrete container failure time. • Fast release radionuclides can be restricted by container opening area. • Dissolved radionuclides may be further sequestered by sorption or others means. - Abstract: This paper aims to detail the different parameters to be considered for use in an assessment of radionuclide release. The dissolution of spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste glass was considered for risk and performance insights in a generic disposal system for more than 100,000 years. The probabilistic performance assessment includes the waste form, container, geology, and hydrology. Based on the author’s previous extended work and data from the literature, this paper presents more detailed specific cases of (1) the time dependence of radionuclide release, (2) radionuclide release coupled with container failure (rate-limiting process), (3) radionuclide release through the opening area of the container and cladding, and (4) sequestration of radionuclides in the near field after container failure. These cases are better understood for risk and performance insights. The dissolved amount of waste form is not linear with time but is higher at first. The radionuclide release rate from waste form dissolution can be constrained by container failure time. The partial opening area of the container surface may decrease radionuclide release. Radionuclides sequestered by various chemical reactions in the near field of a failed container may become stable with time as the radiation level decreases with time.

  14. Conceptual Model for Radionuclide Release from the Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) at Yucca Mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, L. K.; Walton, J.; Woocay, A.

    2008-12-01

    Over time, nuclear waste packages at Yucca Mountain repository are likely to fail gradually or in stages, due to general or localized corrosion. Rock fall and other physical (or chemical) disturbances will lead to different general corrosion rates and different times of penetration. In the long run, the waste package is likely to evolve into a combination of failure locations mixed with relicts of intact Alloy-22 (or other waste package materials). Release of radionuclides (mostly by dissolution in water) from the waste packages is one of the most important factors determining the performance of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. In this paper we develop a conceptual model of radionuclide release from the EBS. In this system, residual heat release in the waste, in conjunction with the capillary effect, is anticipated to set up flow systems in the relict protected areas, where liquid water flows into the protected area toward the warmest region, and vapor flows outward away from the warmest region - effectively preventing release and sometimes sequestering radionuclides in the relict sheltered areas (dead ends). We derive a dimensionless group that specifies the condition for the internal heat driven flow system, and estimates the minimum size of the covered areas required to sequester radionuclides and prevent release. Over time, the minimum area required for protection slowly increases while general corrosion decreases the average size of relict areas. Convolution of the two processes suggests that radionuclide release from the flow-through system of partially failed waste packages will be gradual and long delayed (100,000 - 1,000,000 years), even in the case of early penetration by localized corrosion.

  15. HADOC: a computer code for calculation of external and inhalation doses from acute radionuclide releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1981-04-01

    The computer code HADOC (Hanford Acute Dose Calculations) is described and instructions for its use are presented. The code calculates external dose from air submersion and inhalation doses following acute radionuclide releases. Atmospheric dispersion is calculated using the Hanford model with options to determine maximum conditions. Building wake effects and terrain variation may also be considered. Doses are calculated using dose conversion factor supplied in a data library. Doses are reported for one and fifty year dose commitment periods for the maximum individual and the regional population (within 50 miles). The fractional contribution to dose by radionuclide and exposure mode are also printed if requested.

  16. Modelling of radionuclides dispersion in coastal waters. A study case on the dispersion of radionuclides released with the liquid effluents of Angra dos Reis NPP - Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, H.M.; Veiga, L.; Rochedo, E.; Vetere, M.I. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Osvath, I. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco (Monaco). Marine Environment Lab

    1997-12-31

    The problem of the dispersion of radionuclides at coastal areas is discussed. The study focused on the dispersion of {sup 3}H and {sup 137}Cs released at Ribeira Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with the liquid effluents of the Angra dos Reis nuclear power plant. It has been demonstrated that due to the site specific hydrodynamics the exportation of radionuclides to the open ocean would be a rather fast process. The study also examined the best strategy for accidental releases. It could be evaluated that in terms of the radionuclide inventory in the boxes the release at Itaorna Inlet would be a better option than the release at Piraquara de Fora Inlet. However, this option should be examined after a detailed dose assessment study. (author) 6 refs.

  17. Controlled-release microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sadhana; Nijdam, A Jasper; Sinha, Piyush M; Walczak, Robbie J; Liu, Xuewu; Cheng, Mark M-C; Ferrari, Mauro

    2006-05-01

    Efficient drug delivery remains an important challenge in medicine: continuous release of therapeutic agents over extended time periods in accordance with a predetermined temporal profile; local delivery at a constant rate to the tumour microenvironment to overcome much of the systemic toxicity and to improve antitumour efficacy; improved ease of administration, and increasing patient compliance required are some of the unmet needs of the present drug delivery technology. Microfabrication technology has enabled the development of novel controlled-release microchips with capabilities not present in the current treatment modalities. In this review, the current status and future prospects of different types of controlled-release microchips are summarised and analysed with reference to microneedle-based microchips, as well as providing an in-depth focus on microreservoir-based and nanoporous microchips.

  18. Conditions inside Water Pooled in a Failed Nuclear Waste Container and its Effect on Radionuclide Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, L. K.; Walton, J. C.; Woocay, A.

    2009-12-01

    Nuclear power use is expected to expand in the future, as part of the global clean energy initiative, to meet the world’s surging energy demand, and attenuate greenhouse gas emissions, which are mainly caused by fossil fuels. As a result, it is estimated that hundreds of thousands of metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will accumulate. SNF disposal has major environmental (radiation exposure) and security (nuclear proliferation) concerns. Storage in unsaturated zone geological repositories is a reasonable solution for dealing with SNF. One of the key factors that determine the performance of the geological repository is the release of radionuclides from the engineered barrier system. Over time, the nuclear waste containers are expected to fail gradually due to general and localized corrosions and eventually infiltrating water will have access to the nuclear waste. Once radionuclides are released, they will be transported by water, and make their way to the accessible environment. Physical and chemical disturbances in the environment over the container will lead to different corrosion rates, causing different times and locations of penetration. One possible scenario for waste packages failure is the bathtub model, where penetrations occur on the top of the waste package and water pools inside it. In this paper the bathtub-type failed waste container is considered. We shed some light on chemical and physical processes that take place in the pooled water inside a partially failed waste container (bathtub category), and the effects of these processes on radionuclide release. Our study considers two possibilities: temperature stratification of the pooled water versus mixing process. Our calculations show that temperature stratification of the pooled water is expected when the waste package is half (or less) filled with water. On the other hand, when the waste package is fully filled (or above half) there will be mixing in the upper part of water. The effect of

  19. Analysis of Radionuclide Releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achim, Pascal; Monfort, Marguerite; Le Petit, Gilbert; Gross, Philippe; Douysset, Guilhem; Taffary, Thomas; Blanchard, Xavier; Moulin, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    The present part of the publication (Part II) deals with long range dispersion of radionuclides emitted into the atmosphere during the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident that occurred after the March 11, 2011 tsunami. The first part (Part I) is dedicated to the accident features relying on radionuclide detections performed by monitoring stations of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization network. In this study, the emissions of the three fission products Cs-137, I-131 and Xe-133 are investigated. Regarding Xe-133, the total release is estimated to be of the order of 6 × 1018 Bq emitted during the explosions of units 1, 2 and 3. The total source term estimated gives a fraction of core inventory of about 8 × 1018 Bq at the time of reactors shutdown. This result suggests that at least 80 % of the core inventory has been released into the atmosphere and indicates a broad meltdown of reactor cores. Total atmospheric releases of Cs-137 and I-131 aerosols are estimated to be 1016 and 1017 Bq, respectively. By neglecting gas/particulate conversion phenomena, the total release of I-131 (gas + aerosol) could be estimated to be 4 × 1017 Bq. Atmospheric transport simulations suggest that the main air emissions have occurred during the events of March 14, 2011 (UTC) and that no major release occurred after March 23. The radioactivity emitted into the atmosphere could represent 10 % of the Chernobyl accident releases for I-131 and Cs-137.

  20. Radiological consequences of radionuclide releases to sewage systems from hospitals in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Rodolfo; Cruz, Idalmis de la [Facilia AB (Sweden); Bergman, Synnoeve [Vattenfall Power Consultants AB (Sweden); Hasselblad, Serena [Callido AB (Sweden)

    2007-08-15

    The report addresses radioactive discharges to sewers originating from hospitals, mainly in the form of the excretion of patients treated with radioisotopes for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. Assessments of doses to the public, including sewage workers, arising from such discharges are performed. Doses are compared against the exemption level of 10 {mu}Sv/a and the dose constraint of 100 {mu}Sv/a. As a basis for the dose assessments, information on the use of radionuclides in Swedish hospitals during the period 1999-2004 is presented and estimates of discharges to the sewage systems are derived. Current sewage treatment practices in Sweden are summarised focusing particularly on the fate of sewage sludge, both in the sewage plant and outside. Radiological impact assessments are performed in two steps. The assessments in the first stage are performed using a simple screening model, not intending to predict exposures realistically but only to identify exposure pathways and radionuclides that are potentially relevant and require further consideration in the more detailed assessments. Results show that only a few of those radionuclides used in the period 1999-2004 in Swedish hospitals for radiotherapy and radiodiagnostics could lead to potentially significant doses (P-32, Y-90, Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, I-131 and Tl-201). Relevant exposure pathways are the external exposure of sewage workers (for Tc- 99m, I-123, I-131, In-111 and Tl-201) and the exposure of the public via ingestion of water (I-131) and fish (P-32, Y-90 and In-111 and I-131). The objective of the second stage is to perform realistic assessments of the doses to sewage workers and to the public through the use of contaminated agricultural sludge and through the contamination of drinking water. For this purpose, the LUCIA model was developed. This model dynamically addresses the behaviour of radionuclides in the different process steps of a sewage plant. The model can address continuous releases as well

  1. Inverse modelling of radionuclide release rates using gamma dose rate observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, Thomas; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Stohl, Andreas; von Haustein, Christoph; Thummerer, Severin; Wallner, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Severe accidents in nuclear power plants such as the historical accident in Chernobyl 1986 or the more recent disaster in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in 2011 have drastic impacts on the population and environment. Observations and dispersion modelling of the released radionuclides help to assess the regional impact of such nuclear accidents. Modelling the increase of regional radionuclide activity concentrations, which results from nuclear accidents, underlies a multiplicity of uncertainties. One of the most significant uncertainties is the estimation of the source term. That is, the time dependent quantification of the released spectrum of radionuclides during the course of the nuclear accident. The quantification of the source term may either remain uncertain (e.g. Chernobyl, Devell et al., 1995) or rely on estimates given by the operators of the nuclear power plant. Precise measurements are mostly missing due to practical limitations during the accident. The release rates of radionuclides at the accident site can be estimated using inverse modelling (Davoine and Bocquet, 2007). The accuracy of the method depends amongst others on the availability, reliability and the resolution in time and space of the used observations. Radionuclide activity concentrations are observed on a relatively sparse grid and the temporal resolution of available data may be low within the order of hours or a day. Gamma dose rates, on the other hand, are observed routinely on a much denser grid and higher temporal resolution and provide therefore a wider basis for inverse modelling (Saunier et al., 2013). We present a new inversion approach, which combines an atmospheric dispersion model and observations of radionuclide activity concentrations and gamma dose rates to obtain the source term of radionuclides. We use the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART (Stohl et al., 1998; Stohl et al., 2005) to model the atmospheric transport of the released radionuclides. The

  2. Radionuclide Release after End Fitting Failure Accident in CANDU-6 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hoon; Kim, Yun Ho; Lee, Kwang Ho [Korea Electric Power Corporation Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The total amount of mass and energy discharged into containment building from primary heat transport system in the event of end fitting failure accident in CANDU-6 plant is similar to that of small loss of coolant accident. But the ejection of fuel bundles into fuelling machine room is unique phenomenon and causes radio nuclides release from the physically broken fuel rod to outside containment building. The only objective of containment behavior analysis for end fitting failure event is to assess the amount of radio nuclides release to the ambient atmosphere. Radionuclide release rates in case of end fitting failure with all safety system available, that is containment building is intact, as well as with containment system impairment are analyzed with GOTHIC and SMART code

  3. Ni and Cr addition to alloy waste forms to reduce radionuclide environmental releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-10-11

    Reference alloy waste forms (RAW) were fabricated and underwent hybrid corrosion/immersion testing to parameterize the ANL analytical oxidative-dissolution model to enable the calculation of fractional release rates and to determine the effectiveness of Ni and Cr trim additions in reducing release rates of radionuclide surrogates. Figure 1 shows the prototypical multiphase microstructure of the alloys with each phase type contributing about equally to the exposed surface area. The waste forms tested at SRNL were variations of the RAW-6 formulation that uses HT9 as the main alloy component, and are meant to enable evaluation of the impact of Ni and Cr trim additions on the release rates of actinides and Tc-99. The test solutions were deaerated alkaline and acidic brines, ranging in pH 3 to pH 10, representing potential repositories with those conditions. The testing approach consisted of 4 major steps; 1) bare surface corrosion measurements at pH values of 3, 5, 8, and 10, 2) hybrid potentiostatic hold/exposure measurements at pH 3, 3) measurement of radionuclide concentrations and relations to anodic current from potentiostatic holds, and 4) identification of corroding phases using SEM/EDS of electrodes.

  4. Global Collective Dose Commitments from Release of Long-Lived Radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, H. L.

    1977-01-01

    that the use of global collective dose commitments in differential cost-benefit analysis can lead to questionable results. In differential cost-benefit analysis it is suggested that population exposures should not simply be integrated irrespective of their time of occurrence, but that a certain discount rate......The concept of global collective dose commitment as a measure of total detriment from the release of radioactivity to the environment is outlined. Estimates are given of global collective dose commitments resulting from the release of 14C and uranium daughter products from the nuclear fuel cycle....... Comparisons are made with similar estimates of global collective dose commitments resulting from the use of fossil fuels and certain fertilizers due to their content of uranium and its daughter products. In the case of long-lived radionuclides that remain in circulation in the biosphere, it is shown...

  5. Environmental releases from fuel cycle facility: part 1: radionuclide resuspension vs. stack releases on ambient airborne uranium and thorium levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Olivier; Pourcelot, Laurent; Boulet, Béatrice; Cagnat, Xavier; Videau, Gérard

    2015-03-01

    Airborne activity levels of uranium and thorium series were measured in the vicinity (1.1 km) of a uranium (UF4) processing plant, located in Malvési, south of France. Regarding its impact on the environment, this facility is characterized by its routine atmospheric releases of uranium and by the emission of radionuclide-labelled particles from a storage pond filled with waste water or that contain dried sludge characterized by traces of plutonium and thorium ((230)Th). This study was performed during a whole year (November 2009-November 2010) and based on weekly aerosol sampling. Thanks to ICP-MS results, it was possible to perform investigations of uranium and thorium decay product concentration in the air. The number of aerosol filters sampled (50) was sufficient to establish a relationship between airborne radionuclide variations and the wind conditions. As expected, the more the time spent in the plume, the higher the ambient levels. The respective contributions of atmospheric releases and resuspension from local soil and waste ponds on ambient dust load and uranium-bearing aerosols were estimated. Two shutdown periods dedicated to facility servicing made it possible to estimate the resuspension contribution and to specify its origin (local or regional) according to the wind direction and remote background concentration. Airborne uranium mainly comes from the emission stack and, to a minor extent (∼20%), from wind resuspension of soil particles from the surrounding fields and areas devoted to waste storage. Moreover, weighed activity levels were clearly higher during operational periods than for shutdown periods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Disclosure of the National Data Centre Preparedness Exercise 2013 radionuclide release and atmospheric dispersion scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J. Ole; Hartmann, Gernot; Ceranna, Lars; Gestermann, Nicolai

    2015-04-01

    justified. Various pieces of Supplementary Information were offered in order to facilitate a broad participation of NDCs. Finally, the full NPE2013 scenario was disclosed at the NDC Workshop in Vienna in May 2014. The radionuclide source scenario and location as well as the forward Atmospheric Transport Modelling (ATM) to generate the simulated concentrations are presented. The specific challenges of the localization of the fictitious radionuclide source by means of ATM backtracking and isotopic composition analysis are pointed out. The underlying scenario of NPE2013 was a false-positive: The induced seismic event in FRISIA was completely unrelated to the simulated reactor release at 600 km distance in a neighbouring country. The NPE2013 addressed thus a number of relevant issues which have to be considered when dealing with data of the International Monitoring System and of additional national technical means in the pre-run of a request for an On-Site Inspection.

  7. Workload Control with Continuous Release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan, B. S. Nguyen; Land, M. J.; Gaalman, G. J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Workload Control (WLC) is a production planning and control concept which is suitable for the needs of make-to-order job shops. Release decisions based on the workload norms form the core of the concept. This paper develops continuous time WLC release variants and investigates their due date

  8. Birth control - slow release methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007555.htm Birth control - slow release methods To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Certain birth control methods contain man-made forms of hormones. These ...

  9. Models for transport and fate of carbon, nutrients and point source released radionuclides to an aquatic ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumblad, Linda [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Systems Ecology; Kautsky, Ulrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-01

    In this report three ecosystem models are described in terms of structure, initial data, and results. All models are dynamic, mass-balanced and describe the transport and fate of elements in an open aquatic ecosystem. The models are based on ecologically sound principles, provide model results with high resolution and transparency, and are constrained by the nutrient dynamics of the ecosystem itself. The processes driving the transport in all the models are both the biological processes such as primary production, consumption, respiration and excretion, and abiotic e.g. water exchange and air-sea exchange. The first model, the CNP-model, describes the distribution and fluxes of carbon and nutrients for the coastal ecosystem off Forsmark. The second model, the C-14 model, is an extension of the CNP-model and describes the transport and distribution of hypothetically released C-14 from the underground repository SFR-1 to the ecosystem above. The third model, the RN-model, is a generic radionuclide flow model that models the transport and distribution of radionuclides other than C-14 hypothetically discharged to the ecosystem. The model also analyses the importance of some radionuclide specific mechanisms for the radionuclide flow. The generic radionuclide model is also based on the CNP-model, but has radionuclide specific mechanisms connected to each compartment.

  10. Application of two-barrier model of radioactive agent transport in sea water for analyzing artificial radionuclide release from containers with radioactive waste dumped in Kara Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishin, Denis S.; Laykin, Andrey I.; Kuchin, Nickolay L.; Platovskikh, Yuri A. [Krylov State Research Center, Saint Petersburg, 44 Moskovskoe shosse, 196158 (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Modeling of artificial radionuclide transport in sea water is crucial for prognosis of radioecological situation in regions where dumping of radioactive waste had been made and/or accidents with nuclear submarines had taken place. Distribution of artificial radionuclides in bottom sediments can be a detector of radionuclide release from dumped or sunk objects to marine environment. Proper model can determine the dependence between radionuclide distribution in sediments and radionuclide release. Following report describes two-barrier model of radioactive agent transport in sea water. It was tested on data from 1994 - 2013 expeditions to Novaya Zemlya bays, where regular dumping of solid radioactive waste was practiced by the former USSR from the early 1960's until 1990. Two-barrier model agrees with experimental data and allows more accurate determination of time and intensity of artificial radionuclide release from dumped containers. (authors)

  11. Specific activity and activity ratios of radionuclides in soil collected about 20 km from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant: Radionuclide release to the south and southwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo; Uchihori, Yukio; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Kitamura, Hisashi; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki

    2011-10-15

    Soil samples at different depths (0-2, 5-7 and 10-12cm) were collected from J Village, about 20km south of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) to determine their radionuclide specific activities and activity ratios. The concentrations and activity ratios of (131)I, (134, 136, 137)Cs and (129m)Te were obtained, but only trace amounts of (95)Nb, (110m)Ag and (140)La were detected which were too low to provide accurate concentrations. Radionuclides such as (95)Zr, (103, 106)Ru and (140)Ba that were found in Chernobyl fallout, were not found in these soil samples. This suggests that noble gasses and volatile radionuclides predominated in the releases from FNPP to the terrestrial environment. The average activity ratios of (131)I/(137)Cs, (134)Cs/(137)Cs, (136)Cs/(137)Cs and (129m)Te/(137)Cs were 55, 0.90, 0.22 and 4.0 (corrected to March 11, 2011) in the 0-2cm soil samples of April 20 and 28, 2011.

  12. Probability of liquid radionuclide release of a near surface repository; Probabilidade de liberacao liquida de radionuclideos de um repositorio proximo a superficie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Lais A.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: lais@con.ufrj.br; frutuoso@con.ufrj.br; Passos, Erivaldo; Alves, Antonio Sergio [ELETRONUCLEAR, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Seguranca Nuclear]. E-mail: epassos@eletronuclear.gov.br; asergi@eletronuclear.gov.br

    2005-07-01

    The safety analysis of a near surface repository for medium and low activity wastes leads to investigating accident scenarios related to water infiltration phenomena. The probability of radionuclide release through the infiltration water could be estimated with the aid of suitable probabilistic models. For the analysis, the repository system is divided into two subsystems: the first, due to the barriers against the water infiltration (backfill material and container), and the second one comprising the barriers against the leaching of radionuclide to the biosphere (solid matrix and geosphere). The repository system is supposed to have its components (barriers) working in an active parallel mode. The probability of the system failure is obtained from the logical structure of a failure tree. The study was based on the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) technique for the most significant radionuclides within the radioactive packages system of low and medium activity, and so the probability of failure of the system for each radionuclide during the time period of institutional control was obtained. (author)

  13. Optogenetic control of ATP release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Matthew A.; Joshi, Bipin; Gu, Ling; Feranchak, Andrew; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Controlled release of ATP can be used for understanding extracellular purinergic signaling. While coarse mechanical forces and hypotonic stimulation have been utilized in the past to initiate ATP release from cells, these methods are neither spatially accurate nor temporally precise. Further, these methods cannot be utilized in a highly effective cell-specific manner. To mitigate the uncertainties regarding cellular-specificity and spatio-temporal release of ATP, we herein demonstrate use of optogenetics for ATP release. ATP release in response to optogenetic stimulation was monitored by Luciferin-Luciferase assay (North American firefly, photinus pyralis) using luminometer as well as mesoscopic bioluminescence imaging. Our result demonstrates repetitive release of ATP subsequent to optogenetic stimulation. It is thus feasible that purinergic signaling can be directly detected via imaging if the stimulus can be confined to single cell or in a spatially-defined group of cells. This study opens up new avenue to interrogate the mechanisms of purinergic signaling.

  14. Controlled release from recombinant polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-09-28

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed.

  15. Assessing the impact of releases of radionuclides into sewage systems in urban environment - simulation, modelling and experimental studies - LUCIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundelll-Bergman, S. (Vattenfall Power Consultant, Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, R.; Cruz, I. de la (Facilia AB, (Sweden)); Xu, S. (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, (Sweden)); Puhakainen, M.; Heikkinene, T.; Rahola, T. (STUK (Finland)); Hosseini, A. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Nielsen, Sven (Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, DTU (Denmark)); Sigurgeirsson, M. (Geislavarnir rikisins (Iceland))

    2009-06-15

    This report summarises the findings of a project on assessing the impact of releases of radionuclides into sewage systems and was established to provide more knowledge and suitable tools for emergency preparedness purposes in urban areas. It was known that the design of sewage plants, and their wastewater treatments, is rather similar between the Nordic countries. One sewage plant in each of the five Nordic countries was selected for assessing the impact of radionuclide releases from hospitals into their sewerage systems. Measurements and model predictions of dose assessments to different potentially exposed members of the public were carried out. The results from the dose assessments indicate that in case of routine releases annual doses to the three hypothetical groups of individuals are most likely insignificant. Estimated doses for workers are below 10 muSv/y, for the two studied radionuclides 99mTc and 131I. If uncertainties in the predictions of activity concentrations in sludge are considered, then the probability of obtaining doses above 10 muSv/y may not be insignificant. The models and approaches developed can also be applied in case of accidental releases. A laboratory inter-comparison exercise was also organised to compare analytical results across the laboratories participating in the project, using both 131I, dominating man-made radionuclide in sewage systems due to the medical use. A process oriented model of the biological treatment is also proposed in the report that does not require as much input data as for the LUCIA model. This model is a combination of a simplified well known Activated Sludge Model No.1 (Henze, 1987) and the Kd concept used in the LUCIA model. The simplified model is able to estimate the concentrations and the retention time of the sludge in different parts of the treatment plant, which in turn, can be used as a tool for the dose assessment purpose.filled by the activity. (au)

  16. Analysis of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a radiopharmaceutical production facility based on a medical cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, M.; Tomarchio, E.; Greco, D.

    2015-11-01

    Positron emitting radionuclides are increasingly used in medical diagnostics and the number of radiopharmaceutical production facilities have been estimated to be growing worldwide. During the process of production and/or patient administration of radiopharmaceuticals, an amount of these radionuclides might become airborne and escape into the environment. Therefore, the analysis of radionuclide concentration in the air released to the stack is a very important issue to evaluate the dose to the population living around the plant. To this end, sampling and measurement of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a Nuclear Medicine Center (NMC), provided with a cyclotron for radiopharmaceuticals production, must be routinely carried out with an automatic measurement system. In this work is presented the air monitoring system realized at "San Gaetano" NMC at Bagheria (Italy) besides the analysis of the recorded stack relesead air concentration data. Sampling of air was carried out continuously and gamma-ray spectrometric measurement are made on-line and for a short time by using a shielded Marinelli beaker filled with sampled air and a gamma detector. The use of this system allows to have 1440 values of air concentration per day from 2002, year of the start of operation with the cyclotron. Therefore, the concentration values are very many and an analysis software is needed to determine the dose to the population. A comparison with the results of a simulation code based on a Gaussian Plume air dispersion modelling allow us to confirm the no-radiological significance of the stack effluent releases in terms of dose to population and to evaluate possible improvements in the plant devices to reduce the air concentration at stack.

  17. Releases of natural radionuclides from oil-shale-fired power plants in Estonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Realo, E.; Realo, K.; Jogi, J. [AN Ehstonskoj SSR, Tartu (Estonia). Inst. Fiziki

    1996-11-01

    In the vicinity of two large oil-shale-fired power plants in northeast Estonia, depth-dependent activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in soil were determined by gamma spectrometry. In the surface soil considerably higher (or lower) concentrations of {sup 40}k, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th were found than in deeper soil layers. The observed increase or decrease of the enrichment of radionuclides for different sampling sites was dependent on the relative concentrations of radionuclides in fly-ash and in deep soil layers. The fraction of the radionuclides deposited onto the ground was characterized by a mean {sup 226}Ra/{sup 232}Th activity concentration ratio of 2.2, approximately equal to the one (2.1) found for oil-shale filter ash. The atmospheric deposition rates of fly-ash radionuclides onto the ground were estimated and compared to other relevant published data. The migration of the deposited fly-ash radionuclides into soil was satisfactorily described assuming an exponential depth distribution with the relaxation length value, {alpha}{sup -1} = 2.9 {+-} 0.6 cm, for both {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th. (Author).

  18. The assessment of human exposure to radionuclides from a uranium mill tailings release and mine dewatering effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttenber, A J; Kreiss, K; Douglas, R L; Buhl, T E; Millard, J

    1984-07-01

    This study provides an assessment of human exposure to radiation from a river system contaminated by radionuclides of the 238U decay series released through a dam break at a uranium mill tailings pond and by the continuous discharge of dewatering effluent from 2 uranium mines. The in vivo analyses of radionuclides in 6 Navajo Indians who lived near the river indicate no detectable elevations above background concentrations. Dose estimates for inhalation of suspended river sediment indicate a maximum annual 50-yr dose commitment of 204 mrem to the endosteum. Estimates of doses (50-yr dose commitments) from the ingestion of livestock range between 1 mrem (to liver) and 79 mrem (to bone) suggest that the major contribution to human exposure is from mine dewatering effluent that has been continuously released into the river system for many years. Although the estimated exposures do not exceed existing state or federal regulations, their magnitude justifies further measurement of radionuclides in animals and in the natural environment and the consideration of strategies to reduce radiation exposure to humans and animals.

  19. The impact of oceanic circulation and phase transfer on the dispersion of radionuclides released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Choi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism behind the dispersion of radionuclides released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant on March 2011 is investigated using a numerical model. This model is a Lagrangian particle tracking–ocean circulation coupled model that is capable of solving the movement and migration of radionuclides between seawater, particulates, and bottom sediments. Model simulations show the radionuclides dispersing rapidly into the interior of the North Pacific once they enter a meso-scale eddy. However, some radionuclides also remain near the coast, with spatial distribution depending strongly on the oceanic circulation during the first month after the release. Major adsorption to bottom sediments occurs during this first month and many of these radionuclides remain on the sea floor once they are adsorbed. Model results suggest that weak offshore advection during the first month will increase the adsorption of radionuclides to bottom sediments and decelerate the dispersion to the open ocean. If vertical mixing is weak, however, fewer radionuclides reach the sea floor and adsorb to bottom sediments. More radionuclides will then quickly disperse to the open ocean.

  20. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical background document for best available radionuclide control technology demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, A.B.; Skone, S.S.; Rodenhizer, D.G.; Marusich, M.V. (Ebasco Services, Inc., Bellevue, WA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This report provides the background documentation to support applications for approval to construct and operate new radionuclide emission sources at the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) near Richland, Washington. The HWVP is required to obtain permits under federal and state statutes for atmospheric discharges of radionuclides. Since these permits must be issued prior to construction of the facility, draft permit applications are being prepared, as well as documentation to support these permits. This report addresses the applicable requirements and demonstrates that the preferred design meets energy, environmental, and economic criteria for Best Available Radionuclide Control Technology (BARCT) at HWVP. 22 refs., 11 figs., 25 tabs.

  1. RADIOLOGICAL CRITERIA FOR PATIENT RELEASE FROM CLINIC AFTER RADIONUCLIDE THERAPY OF BRACHYTHERAPY WITH SEALED SOURCE IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. M.I. Balonov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dose criteria for limitation of exposure incurred by persons helping the patients or living with patients discharged from hospitals following radionuclide therapy or brachytherapy with implanted sealed radionuclide sources have been proposed for national Russian regulation. By means of a conservative dosimetry model, the values of operational radiological criteria for patient discharge from hospital are substantiated, i.e. whole body activity for radionuclides 125I,131I,153Sm and 188Re as well as dose rate near patient body. Observance of suggested criteria included in the new Russian Standards for Radiation Safety (RSS-99/2009 will ensure radiation safety of people in near environment (family, close friends et ah.

  2. On release of radionuclides from a near-surface radioactive waste repository to the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudelis Arūnas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A closed near-surface radioactive waste repository is the source of various radionuclides causing the human exposure. Recent investigations confirm an effectiveness of the engineering barriers installed in 2006 to prevent the penetration of radionuclides to the environment. The tritium activity concentration in groundwater decreased from tens of kBq/l to below hundreds of Bq/l. The monitoring and groundwater level data suggest the leaching of tritium from previously contaminated layers of unsaturated zone by rising groundwater while 210Pb may disperse as a decay product of 226Ra daughters.

  3. Modelling the transport of radionuclides released in the Ilha Grande bay (Brazil) after a Large Break Loca ion the primary system of a PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Andre Silva de; Simoes Filho, Francisco Fernando Lamego; Soares, Abner Duarte; Lapa, Celso Marcelo Franklin, E-mail: flamego@ien.gov.b, E-mail: asoares@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: lapa@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (LIMA/IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    It was postulated, in the cooling system of the core, a LOCA, where 431 m{sup 3} of soda almost instantaneously was lost. This inventory contained 1.87x10{sup 10} Bq/m{sup 3} of tritium, 2.22x10{sup 7} Bq/m{sup 3} of cobalt,3.48x10{sup 8} Bq/m{sup 3} of cesium and 3.44x10{sup 10} Bq/m{sup 3} of iodine and was released in liquid form near the Itaorna cove, Angra dos Reis - RJ. Applying the model in the proposed scenario (Angra 1 and 2 in operation and Angra 3 progressively reducing the capture and discharge after the accident), the simulated dilution of the specific activity of radionuclide spots, reached values much lower than report levels for seawater (1,1x10{sup 6} Bq/m{sup 3}, 1,11x10{sup 4} Bq/m{sup 3} and 1,85x10{sup 3} Bq/m{sup 3}) after 22 hours, respectively for {sup 3}H, {sup 60}Co, {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs. From the standpoint of public exposure to radionuclide dispersion, the results of activity concentration obtained by the model suggest that the observed radiological impact is negligible. Based on these findings, we conclude that there would be no radiological impact related to a further release of controlled effluent discharges into Itaorna cove. (author)

  4. Health impacts of large releases of radionuclides. Interactions with human nutrition and other indices of population health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigna, A A

    1997-01-01

    The consumption of food is an important pathway involved in the internal contamination of humans. The site-related critical foodstuffs can be grouped into three main categories: dairy products; aquatic animals, such as fish, molluscs and crustaceans; and other typical foods. The concentration factor plays a more important role than the amount of a certain food consumed. Semi-natural and natural ecosystems are of special interest in this context because they can provide critical pathways for radionuclide transfer to humans, and they can also act as temporary sinks or long-term sources for radionuclides deposited from the atmosphere. From the viewpoint of population health, another important role is played by the countermeasures. The reference values commonly adopted in radiation protection are conservative and they have been established for planning practices that could provide future sources of irradiation. After a large release of radionuclides, the evaluation of the problem must be as realistic as possible, otherwise the countermeasures will imply consequences worse than those produced by the accident itself (without any further intervention). This criterion was clearly stated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection but it was frequently neglected after the Chernobyl accident. The results of a survey on the number of induced abortions following this incident are reported. These suggest that moral and ethical problems are involved above and beyond any economical implications.

  5. Modelling and simulations of controlled release fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Sayed Ameenuddin; Razali, Radzuan; Shaari, Ku Zilati Ku; Mansor, Nurlidia

    2016-11-01

    The recent advancement in controlled release fertilizer has provided an alternative solution to the conventional urea, controlled release fertilizer has a good plant nutrient uptake they are environment friendly. To have an optimum plant intake of nutrients from controlled release fertilizer it is very essential to understand the release characteristics. A mathematical model is developed to predict the release characteristics from polymer coated granule. Numerical simulations are performed by varying the parameters radius of granule, soil water content and soil porosity to study their effect on fertilizer release. Understanding these parameters helps in the better design and improve the efficiency of controlled release fertilizer.

  6. Safety case for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto. Assessment of radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-12-15

    Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios sits within Posiva Oy's Safety Case 'TURVA-2012' report portfolio and has the objective of presenting an assessment of the repository system scenarios leading to radionuclide releases that have been identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios. A base scenario, variant scenarios and disturbance scenarios are considered. For each scenario, a range of calculation cases, also identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios, has been analysed, complemented by Monte Carlo simulations, a probabilistic sensitivity analysis and other supporting calculations. The calculation cases and analyses take into account major uncertainties in the initial state of the barriers and possible paths for the evolution of the repository system identified in Performance Assessment. Quality control and assurance measures have been adopted to ensure transparency and traceability of the calculations performed and hence to promote confidence in the analysis of the calculation cases. The calculation cases each consider a single, failed canister, where three possible modes of failure are addressed: (1) the presence of an initial penetrating defect in the copper overpack of the canister, (2) corrosion of the copper overpack, which occurs most rapidly in scenarios in which buffer density is reduced, e.g. by erosion, (3) shear movement on a fracture intersecting a deposition hole. The likelihood and consequences of multiple canister failure occurring during the assessment time frame are also considered. In particular, the analyses consider: The likelihood and consequences of there being multiple canisters with initial penetrating defects; The consequences if canister failure due to corrosion following buffer erosion were to occur; and The low annual probability of there being an earthquake large enough to give rise to canister failure due to rock shear movements and the potential consequences of such an earthquake

  7. Radionuclides and isotopes release of spent fuel matrix. Conceptual and mathematical models of wastes behaviour; Liberacion de los radionucleidos e isotopos estables contenidos en la matriz del combustible. Modelo conceptual y modelo matematico del comportamiento del residuo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cera, E.; Merino, J.; Bruno, J.

    2000-07-01

    We have developed a conceptual and numerical model to calculate release of selected radionuclides from spent fuel under repository condition. This has been done in the framework of the Enresa 2000 performance assessment exercise. The model has been developed based on kinetic mass balance equations in order to study the evolution of the spent fuel water interface as a function of time. Several processes have been kinetically modelled: congruent dissolution, radioactive decay, ingrowth and water turnover in the gap. The precipitation/redissolution of secondary solid phases has been taken into account from a thermodynamic point of view. Both approaches have been coupled and the resulting equations solved for a number of radionuclides in both, a conservative and realistic approach. The results show three distinct groups of radionuclides based on their release behaviour: a first group is composed of radioisotopes of highly insoluble elements (e. g., Pu, Am, Pd) whose concentration in the gap is mainly controlled by their solubility and therefore their evolution is identical in both cases. Secondly, a set of radionuclides from soluble elements under these conditions (e. g., I, Cs, Ra) show concentrations kinetically controlled, decreasing with time following the congruent dissolution trend. Their release concentrations are one order of magnitude larger in the conservative case than in the realistic case. Finally, a third group has been identified (e. g., Se, Th, Cm) where a mixed behaviour takes place: initially their solubility limiting phases control their concentration in the gap but the situation reverts to a kinetic control as the chemical conditions change and the secondary precipitates become totally dissolved. The fluxes of the different radionuclides are also given as an assessment of the source term in the performance assessment. (Author)

  8. TERRA: a computer code for simulating the transport of environmentally released radionuclides through agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1984-11-01

    TERRA is a computer code which calculates concentrations of radionuclides and ingrowing daughters in surface and root-zone soil, produce and feed, beef, and milk from a given deposition rate at any location in the conterminous United States. The code is fully integrated with seven other computer codes which together comprise a Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System, CRRIS. Output from either the long range (> 100 km) atmospheric dispersion code RETADD-II or the short range (<80 km) atmospheric dispersion code ANEMOS, in the form of radionuclide air concentrations and ground deposition rates by downwind location, serves as input to TERRA. User-defined deposition rates and air concentrations may also be provided as input to TERRA through use of the PRIMUS computer code. The environmental concentrations of radionuclides predicted by TERRA serve as input to the ANDROS computer code which calculates population and individual intakes, exposures, doses, and risks. TERRA incorporates models to calculate uptake from soil and atmospheric deposition on four groups of produce for human consumption and four groups of livestock feeds. During the environmental transport simulation, intermediate calculations of interception fraction for leafy vegetables, produce directly exposed to atmospherically depositing material, pasture, hay, and silage are made based on location-specific estimates of standing crop biomass. Pasture productivity is estimated by a model which considers the number and types of cattle and sheep, pasture area, and annual production of other forages (hay and silage) at a given location. Calculations are made of the fraction of grain imported from outside the assessment area. TERRA output includes the above calculations and estimated radionuclide concentrations in plant produce, milk, and a beef composite by location.

  9. Radionuclides release from re-irradiated fuel under high temperature and pressure conditions. Gamma-ray measurements of VEGA-5 test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, Akihide; Kudo, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Takehiko; Kanazawa, Toru; Kiuchi, Toshio; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The VEGA (Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release) program is being performed at JAERI to clarify mechanisms of radionuclides release from irradiated fuel during severe accidents and to improve source term predictability. The fifth VEGA-5 test was conducted in January 2002 to confirm the reproducibility of decrease in cesium release under elevated pressure that was observed in the VEGA-2 test and to investigate the release behavior of short-life radionuclides. The PWR fuel of 47 GWd/tU after about 8.2 years of cooling was re-irradiated at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) for 8 hours before the heat-up test. After that, the two pellets of 10.9 g without cladding were heated up to about 2,900 K at 1.0 MPa under the inert He condition. The experiment reconfirmed the decrease in cesium release rate under the elevated pressure. The release data on short-life radionuclides such as Ru-103, Ba-140 and Xe-133 that have never been observed in the previous VEGA tests without re-irradiation was obtained using the {gamma} ray measurement. (author)

  10. Distribution of radionuclides in an iron calibration standard for a free release measurement facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, Mikael; Stroh, Heiko; Marissens, Gerd; Tzika, Faidra; Lutter, Guillaume; Šurán, Jiri; Kovar, Petr; Skala, Lukas; Sud, Jaromír

    2016-03-01

    A Europallet-sized calibration standard composed of 12 grey cast iron tubes contaminated with (60)Co and (110m)Ag with a mass of 246kg was developed. As the tubes were produced through centrifugal casting it was of particular concern to study the distribution of radionuclides in the radial direction of the tubes. This was done by removing 72 small samples (swarf) of ~0.3g each on both the inside and outside of the tubes. All of the samples were measured in the underground laboratory HADES.

  11. Radioecological model calculations for natural radionuclides released into the environment by disposal of phosphogypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, H W; Leenhouts, H P; van Weers, A W; Frissel, M J

    1985-10-01

    The Dutch phosphogypsum, 2 Tg.y-1, is disposed of into the Rhine. This leads to an increase of the U-238 chain radionuclides along the Dutch coast off Rotterdam, decreasing in northerly direction into the German Bight. The calculated increase of activity concentrations in sea food causes an increase of the individual radiation dose of maximal 150 muSv.y-1 and of the collective dose of the Dutch of 170 manSv.y-1. Increase of the radiation dose from stacking phosphogypsum is one order of magnitude lower.

  12. Global Collective Dose Commitments from Release of Long-Lived Radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, H. L.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of global collective dose commitment as a measure of total detriment from the release of radioactivity to the environment is outlined. Estimates are given of global collective dose commitments resulting from the release of 14C and uranium daughter products from the nuclear fuel cycle....

  13. The challenges posed by radiation and radionuclide releases to the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenning, Richard J; Apitz, Sabine E; Backhaus, Thomas; Barnthouse, Lawrence; Batley, Graeme; Brooks, Bryan; Chapman, Peter M; Griffin, Michael; Kapustka, Lawrence; Landis, Wayne; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Linkov, Igor; Seager, Thomas P; Suter, Glenn; Tannenbaum, Lawrence

    2011-07-01

    The recent accident at the Fukushima I nuclear power plant in Japan (also known as Fukushima Daiichi) captured the world's attention and re-invigorated concerns about the safety of nuclear power technology. The Editors of Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management invited experts in the field to describe the primary issues associated with the control and release of radioactive materials to the environment, particularly those that are of importance to the health of the human populations and the ecological systems that populate our planet. This collection of invited short commentaries aims to inform on the safety of nuclear power plants damaged by natural disasters and provide a primer on the potential environmental impacts. The intent of these invited commentaries is not to fuel the excitement and fears about the Fukushima Daiichi incident; rather, it is to collect views and comments from some of the world's experts on the broad science and policy challenges raised by this event, and to provide high-level views on the science issues that surround this situation in order to improve our collective ability to avoid or at least minimize the consequences of future events.

  14. Recent patents in flavor controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tao; Xiao, Zuobing; Tian, Huaixiang

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, considerable effort has been directed toward the preparation of flavoring materials specifically, flavor materials have been sought that provide greater flavor intensity coupled with controlled flavor release for long periods of time. Here, some recent patents related to controlled flavor release are reviewed from the angle of its application field, its mechanism and its determination method. It is found that controlled flavor release often depends not only on materials' chemical and physical properties, such as melting point, solution properties and so on, but also on flavors' chemical and physical properties, such as diffusion capacity, its stability in different media etc. Meanwhile, flavor release is also controlled by an electric reducing device according to the flavor generation condition. It might be also known that flavor release rate could be determined by using a purge-and-trap/gas chromatographic procedure. In future, it's necessary to use mathematical model to study the kinetic behavior of controlled flavor release.

  15. Study of applying the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability to nuclear power plants. [Use of ARAC to forecast hazards of accidental release of radionuclides to the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orphan, R.C.

    1978-06-01

    Each utility licensee for a nuclear power reactor is required to minimize the adverse effects from an accidental radionuclide release into the atmosphere. In the past the ability to forecast quantitatively the extent of the hazard from such a release has been limited. Now powerful atmospheric modeling techniques are available to assist nuclear reactor site officials with greatly improved assessments. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) has developed a prototype system called the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) which is designed to integrate the modeling with advanced sensors, data handling techniques, and weather data in order to provide timely, usable advisories to the site officials. The purpose of this project is to examine the ways and means of adapting ARAC for application to many nuclear power reactors widely dispersed across the nation. The project will emphasize the management aspects, including government-industry relationships, technology transfer, organizational structure, staffing, implementing procedures, and costs. Benefits and costs for several alternative systems will be compared. The results will be reviewed and evaluated by the management and staff of the ARAC project at LLL and also by selected staff members of the sponsoring government agency.

  16. Stimuli responsive nanomaterials for controlled release applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song

    2012-01-01

    The controlled release of therapeutics has been one of the major challenges for scientists and engineers during the past three decades. Coupled with excellent biocompatibility profiles, various nanomaterials have showed great promise for biomedical applications. Stimuli-responsive nanomaterials guarantee the controlled release of cargo to a given location, at a specific time, and with an accurate amount. In this review, we have combined the major stimuli that are currently used to achieve the ultimate goal of controlled and targeted release by "smart" nanomaterials. The most heavily explored strategies include (1) pH, (2) enzymes, (3) redox, (4) magnetic, and (5) light-triggered release.

  17. Two Dimensional Near-field Calculations of Radionuclide Releases from the Vaults of the SFR 1 Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Antonio [AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm Center of Physics, Astronomy and Biotechnology (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Sundstroem, Benny [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-12-01

    Radionuclide releases from the near-field for the vaults of the SFR 1 repository are examined in this report. To model those releases we have developed four models, one for each of the vaults; 2BTF, 1BTF, BMA and BLA. The respective codes are based on the finite element method and are called FEMBTF2, FEMBTF1, FEMBMA and FEMBLA, respectively. These codes are two-dimensional representations of the cross sections of the vaults. The different barriers of the vaults have been modelled individually using the physical dimensions of the cross sections. The same conceptual model has been used to estimate the releases from the near-field. This conceptual model is implemented by four different FEM codes that solve the two-dimensional transport equation, e.g. the advective-diffusive-reactive equation that also includes radioactive decay. An interesting property of the codes is that they allow the use of time-dependent properties to represent for instance the evolution of water flow, porosities, distribution coefficients etc. This capability of the code has been used only in some cases because the FEM codes put heavy requirements on the computer's CPU. The nuclides studied here were chosen from a set representing the highest release rates from the near-field obtained by SKB during their project SAFE. Some of the results reported here are somewhat lower than SKBs, other higher. Uncertainties in the conceptual models and differences in the input data are the reasons for the numerical differences. For most cases, the differences between our results and those of SKB should be considered relatively small within present context of near-field calculations.

  18. Lignin based controlled release coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Harmsen, P.F.H.; Eastham, D.

    2011-01-01

    Urea is a commonly used fertilizer. Due to its high water-solubility, misuse easily leads to excess nitrogen levels in the soil. The aim of this research was to develop an economically feasible and biodegradable slow-release coating for urea. For this purpose, lignin was selected as coating material

  19. Lignin based controlled release coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Harmsen, P.F.H.; Eastham, D.

    2011-01-01

    Urea is a commonly used fertilizer. Due to its high water-solubility, misuse easily leads to excess nitrogen levels in the soil. The aim of this research was to develop an economically feasible and biodegradable slow-release coating for urea. For this purpose, lignin was selected as coating

  20. Lignin based controlled release coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Harmsen, P.F.H.; Eastham, D.

    2011-01-01

    Urea is a commonly used fertilizer. Due to its high water-solubility, misuse easily leads to excess nitrogen levels in the soil. The aim of this research was to develop an economically feasible and biodegradable slow-release coating for urea. For this purpose, lignin was selected as coating material

  1. Effect of pH on the release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resins collected from operating nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Data are presented on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small-scale waste--form specimens collected during solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station were leach-tested and subjected to compressive strength testing in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1). Samples of untreated resin waste collected from each solidification vessel before the solidification process were analyzed for concentrations of radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to determine the quantities of these chemicals in the waste-form specimens. The chelating agents included oxalic, citric, and picolinic acids. In order to determine the effect of leachant chemical composition and pH on the stability and leachability of the waste forms, waste-form specimens were leached in various leachants. Results of this study indicate that differences in pH do not affect releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms, but that differences in leachant chemistry and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. Also, this study indicates that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents are similar for waste- form specimens that decomposed and those that retained their general physical form. 36 refs., 60 figs., 28 tabs.

  2. Recommended Parameter Values for GENII Modeling of Radionuclides in Routine Air and Water Releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Arimescu, Carmen; Napier, Bruce A.; Hay, Tristan R.

    2012-11-01

    The GENII v2 code is used to estimate dose to individuals or populations from the release of radioactive materials into air or water. Numerous parameter values are required for input into this code. User-defined parameters cover the spectrum from chemical data, meteorological data, agricultural data, and behavioral data. This document is a summary of parameter values that reflect conditions in the United States. Reasonable regional and age-dependent data is summarized. Data availability and quality varies. The set of parameters described address scenarios for chronic air emissions or chronic releases to public waterways. Considerations for the special tritium and carbon-14 models are briefly addressed. GENIIv2.10.0 is the current software version that this document supports.

  3. Atmospheric transport and deposition of radionuclides released after the Fukushima Dai-chi accident and resulting effective dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Giuseppe A.

    2014-09-01

    On 11 March 2011 an earthquake off the Pacific coast of the Fukushima prefecture generated a tsunami that hit Fukushima Dai-ichi and Fukushima Da-ini Nuclear Power Plants. From 12 March a significant amount of radioactive material was released into the atmosphere and dispersed worldwide. Among the most abundant radioactive species released were iodine and cesium isotopes. By means of an atmospheric dispersion Lagrangian code and publicly available meteorological data, the atmospheric dispersion of 131I, 134Cs, and 137Cs have been simulated for three months after the event with a spatial resolution of 0.5° × 0.5° globally. The simulation has been validated by comparison to publicly available measurements collected in 206 locations worldwide. Sensitivity analysis shows that release height of the radionuclides, wet deposition velocity, and source term are the parameters with the most impact on the simulation results. The simulation shows that the radioactive plume, consisting of about 200 PBq by adding contributions from 131I, 134Cs, and 137Cs, has been transported over the entire northern hemisphere depositing up to 1.2 MBq m-2 nearby the NPPs to less than 20 Bq m-2 in Europe. The consequent effective dose to the population over a 50-year period, calculated by considering both external and internal pathways of exposure, is found to be about 40 mSv in the surroundings of Fukushima Dai-ichi, while other countries in the northern hemisphere experienced doses several orders of magnitude lower suggesting a small impact on the population health elsewhere.

  4. Release Control of Dye from Agar Ball

    OpenAIRE

    板屋, 智之; 山村, 俊貴; 唐澤, 有太朗

    2013-01-01

    Agar is a special product of Nagano prefecture. To utilize agar gel as adsorbing or releasing material of dyes or drugs, spherical agar gel “agar ball” was prepared by dropping aqueous agar solution into salad oil. And releasing behavior of a dye (rhodamine B) from agar ball was studied. The dye is released easily from agar ball, but the release can be controlled by hybiridazation of agar and galatin. In addition, it was found that agar ball could extract the dye from oil phase containing the...

  5. Simplified analytical model to simulate radionuclide release from radioactive waste trenches; Modelo simplificado para simulacao da liberacao de radionuclideos de repositorios de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Bernardete Lemes Vieira de

    2001-07-01

    In order to evaluate postclosure off-site doses from low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, a computer code was developed to simulate the radionuclide released from waste form, transport through vadose zone and transport in the saturated zone. This paper describes the methodology used to model these process. The radionuclide released from the waste is calculated using a model based on first order kinetics and the transport through porous media was determined using semi-analytical solution of the mass transport equation, considering the limiting case of unidirectional convective transport with three-dimensional dispersion in an isotropic medium. The results obtained in this work were compared with other codes, showing good agreement. (author)

  6. In-Package Sorption Controls Over Radionuclide Export from the Proposed Repository at Yucca Mtn

    Science.gov (United States)

    brady, p v

    2001-12-01

    Performance assessment calculations done to assess the long-term effectiveness of the proposed high level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mtn. Nevada tend to ignore sorption of radionuclides onto degradation products (primarily oxides of iron and, to a lesser extent, copper) that are expected to accumulate inside of breached waste packages. While conservative with respect to human health impacts, ignoring sorption onto iron hydroxides neglects one of the more effective obstacles to radionuclide transport in natural environments. A series of one-dimensional transport calculations done using the reaction-path transport codes PHREEQC and Langmuir, measured adsorption and desorption isotherms for Pu, Np, and Tc, and a series of model in-package flow paths allow assessment of reversible and irreversible sorption controls over radionuclide sorption fronts that are predicted to form inside and in the immediate vicinity of breached WP's. Natural analogue evidences (e.g. bomb pulse Pu profiles and chemical potential gradients at the natural reactor at Oklo) provide partial validation

  7. Determining the Release of Radionuclides from Tank 18F Waste Residual Solids: FY2016 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, William D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hobbs, David T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-12

    Pore water leaching studies were conducted on actual Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 18F residual waste solids to support Liquid Waste tank closure efforts. A test methodology was developed during previous simulant testing to produce slurries of tank residual solids and grout-representative solids in grout pore water solutions (based on SRS groundwater compositions) with pH and Eh values expected during the aging of the closed waste tank. The target conditions are provided below where the initial pore water has a reducing potential and a relatively high pH (Reducing Region II). The pore water is expected to become increasingly oxidizing with time (Oxidizing Region II) and during the latter stages of aging (Oxidizing Region III) the pH is expected to decrease. For the reducing case, tests were conducted with both unwashed and washed Tank 18F residual solids. For the oxidizing cases (Oxidizing Regions II and III), all samples were washed with simulated grout pore water solutions prior to testing, since it is expected that these conditions will occur after considerable pore water solution has passed through the system. For the reducing case, separate tests were conducted with representative ground grout solids and with calcium carbonate reagent, which is the grout phase believed to be controlling the pH. Ferrous sulfide (FeS) solids were also added to the reducing samples to lower the slurry Eh value. Calcium carbonate solids were used as the grout-representative solid phase for each of the oxidizing cases. Air purge-gas with and without CO2 removed was transferred through the oxidizing test samples and nitrogen purge-gas was transferred through the reducing test samples during leach testing. The target pH values were achieved to within 0.5 pH units for all samples. Leaching studies were conducted over an Eh range of approximately 0.7 V. However, the highest and lowest Eh values achieved of ~+0.5 V and ~-0.2 V were

  8. Determining the release of radionuclides from tank waste residual solids. FY2015 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, William D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hobbs, David T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-11

    Methodology development for pore water leaching studies has been continued to support Savannah River Site High Level Waste tank closure efforts. For FY2015, the primary goal of this testing was the achievement of target pH and Eh values for pore water solutions representative of local groundwater in the presence of grout or grout-representative (CaCO3 or FeS) solids as well as waste surrogate solids representative of residual solids expected to be present in a closed tank. For oxidizing conditions representative of a closed tank after aging, a focus was placed on using solid phases believed to be controlling pH and Eh at equilibrium conditions. For three pore water conditions (shown below), the target pH values were achieved to within 0.5 pH units. Tank 18 residual surrogate solids leaching studies were conducted over an Eh range of approximately 630 mV. Significantly higher Eh values were achieved for the oxidizing conditions (ORII and ORIII) than were previously observed. For the ORII condition, the target Eh value was nearly achieved (within 50 mV). However, Eh values observed for the ORIII condition were approximately 160 mV less positive than the target. Eh values observed for the RRII condition were approximately 370 mV less negative than the target. Achievement of more positive and more negative Eh values is believed to require the addition of non-representative oxidants and reductants, respectively. Plutonium and uranium concentrations measured during Tank 18 residual surrogate solids leaching studies under these conditions (shown below) followed the general trends predicted for plutonium and uranium oxide phases, assuming equilibrium with dissolved oxygen. The highest plutonium and uranium concentrations were observed for the ORIII condition and the lowest concentrations were observed for the RRII condition. Based on these results, it is recommended that these test methodologies be used to

  9. Local control of striatal dopamine release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger eCachope

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine (DA systems play a key role in the physiology of reward seeking, motivation and motor control. Importantly, they are also involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, schizophrenia and addiction. Control of DA release in the striatum is tightly linked to firing of DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the substantia nigra (SN. However, local influences in the striatum affect release by exerting their action directly on axon terminals. For example, endogenous glutamatergic and cholinergic activity is sufficient to trigger striatal DA release independently of cell body firing. Recent developments involving genetic manipulation, pharmacological selectivity or selective stimulation have allowed for better characterization of these phenomena. Such termino-terminal forms of control of DA release transform considerably our understanding of the mesolimbic and nigrostriatal systems, and have strong implications as potential mechanisms to modify impaired control of DA release in the diseased brain. Here, we review these and related mechanisms and their implications in the physiology of ascending DA systems.

  10. Electrosprayed nanoparticle delivery system for controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eltayeb, Megdi, E-mail: megdi.eltayeb@sustech.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Sudan University of Science and Technology, PO Box 407, Khartoum (Sudan); Stride, Eleanor, E-mail: eleanor.stride@eng.ox.ac.uk [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Headington OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Edirisinghe, Mohan, E-mail: m.edirisinghe@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Harker, Anthony, E-mail: a.harker@ucl.ac.uk [London Centre for Nanotechnology, Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    This study utilises an electrohydrodynamic technique to prepare core-shell lipid nanoparticles with a tunable size and high active ingredient loading capacity, encapsulation efficiency and controlled release. Using stearic acid and ethylvanillin as model shell and active ingredients respectively, we identify the processing conditions and ratios of lipid:ethylvanillin required to form nanoparticles. Nanoparticles with a mean size ranging from 60 to 70 nm at the rate of 1.37 × 10{sup 9} nanoparticles per minute were prepared with different lipid:ethylvanillin ratios. The polydispersity index was ≈ 21% and the encapsulation efficiency ≈ 70%. It was found that the rate of ethylvanillin release was a function of the nanoparticle size, and lipid:ethylvanillin ratio. The internal structure of the lipid nanoparticles was studied by transmission electron microscopy which confirmed that the ethylvanillin was encapsulated within a stearic acid shell. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated that the ethylvanillin had not been affected. Extensive analysis of the release of ethylvanillin was performed using several existing models and a new diffusive release model incorporating a tanh function. The results were consistent with a core-shell structure. - Highlights: • Electrohydrodynamic spraying is used to produce lipid-coated nanoparticles. • A new model is proposed for the release rates of active components from nanoparticles. • The technique has potential applications in food science and medicine. • Electrohydrodynamic processing controlled release lipid nanoparticles.

  11. An independent review and prioritization of past radionuclide and chemical releases from the Los Alamos National Laboratory--implications for future dose reconstruction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Matthew H; Buddenbaum, John E; Burns, Robert E; Shonka, Joseph J; Gaffney, Shannon H; Donovan, Ellen P; Flack, Susan M; Widner, Thomas E

    2011-10-01

    From 1999 through 2010, a team of scientists and engineers systematically reviewed approximately eight million classified and unclassified documents at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that describe historical off-site releases of radionuclides and chemicals in order to determine the extent to which a full-scale dose reconstruction for releases is warranted and/or feasible. As a part of this effort, a relative ranking of historical airborne and waterborne radionuclide releases from LANL was established using priority index (PI) values that were calculated from estimated annual quantities released and the maximum allowable effluent concentrations according to The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Chemical releases were ranked based on annual usage estimates and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) toxicity values. PI results for airborne radionuclides indicate that early plutonium operations were of most concern between 1948 and 1961, in 1967, and again from 1970 through 1973. Airborne releases of uranium were found to be of most interest for 1968, from 1974 through 1978, and again in 1996. Mixed fission products yielded the highest PI value for 1969. Mixed activation product releases yielded the highest PI values from 1979 to 1995. For waterborne releases, results indicate that plutonium is of most concern for all years evaluated with the exception of 1956 when (90)Sr yielded the highest PI value. The prioritization of chemical releases indicate that four of the top five ranked chemicals were organic solvents that were commonly used in chemical processing and for cleaning. Trichloroethylene ranked highest, indicating highest relative potential for health effects, for both cancer and non-cancer effects. Documents also indicate that beryllium was used in significant quantities, which could have lead to residential exposures exceeding established environmental and occupational exposure limits, and warrants further consideration. In part because

  12. Predicted radionuclide release from reactor-related unenclosed solid objects dumped in the Sea of Japan and the Pacific Ocean, east coast of Kamchatka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mount, M.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lynn, N.M.; Warden, J.M. [Royal Naval Coll., Greenwich (United Kingdom)

    1996-06-01

    Between 1978 and 1991 reactor-related solid radioactive waste was dumped by the former Soviet Union as unenclosed objects in the Pacific Ocean, east coast of Kamchatka, and the Sea of Japan. This paper presented estimates for the current (1994) inventory of activation and corrosion products contained in the reactor-related unenclosed solid objects. In addition, simple models derived for prediction of radionuclide release from marine reactors dumped in the Kara Sea are applied to certain of the dumped objects to provide estimates of radionuclide release to the Pacific Ocean, east coast of Kamchatka, and Sea of Japan environments. For the Pacific Ocean, east coast of Kamchatka, total release rates start below 0.01 GBq yr{sup -1} and over 1,000 years, fall to 100 Bq yr{sup -1}. In the Sea of Japan, the total release rate starts just above 1 GBq yr{sup - 1}, dropping off to a level less than 0.1 GBq yr{sup -1}, extending past the year 4,000.

  13. Free boundary problems in controlled release pharmaceuticals: II. swelling-controlled release

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Donald S.; Erneux, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    A problem in controlled release pharmaceutical systems is formulated and studied. The device modeled is a polymer matrix containing an initially immobilized drug. The release of the drug is achieved by countercurrent diffusion through a penetrant solvent with the release rate being determined by the rate of diffusion of the solvent in the polymer. The mathematical theory yields a free boundary problem which is studied in various asymptotic regimes.

  14. Preventing and controlling accidental gas releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, P. D.; Fthenakis, V. M.; Kalb, P. D.

    1988-07-01

    Toxic, flammable, and explosive gases may be used in photovoltaic cell research laboratories and in commercial manufacturing facilities. Accidental release of these materials can present hazards to life and property. Accidents can arise from a variety of mechanical and human related failures. These can occur from the time materials are received at the loading dock of the facility to the time treated gases are discharged to the atmosphere through a stack. Each type of initiating event may require a different control approach. These may range from the training and certification of plant workers charged with the handling of gas cylinder hookups to installation of emergency pollution control systems. Since engineering options for controlling released materials are limited, emphasis should be placed on administrative and engineering approaches for preventing such accidents. These are likely to be the most effective approaches for protecting life and property.

  15. GENII-LIN-2.1: an open source software system for calculating radiation dose and risk from radionuclides released to the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodori, Francesco; Sumini, Marco

    2008-12-01

    GENII-LIN is an open source radiation protection environmental software system running on the Linux operating system. It has capabilities for calculating radiation dose and risk to individuals or populations from radionuclides released to the environment and from pre-existing environmental contamination. It can handle exposure pathways that include ingestion, inhalation and direct exposure to air, water and soil. The package is available for free and is completely open source, i.e., transparent to the users, who have full access to the source code of the software.

  16. 1{sup st} annual workshop proceedings of the collaborative project ''Fast/instant release of safety relevant radionuclides from spent nuclear fuel'' (7{sup th} EC FP CP FIRST-Nuclides)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzler, Bernhard; Metz, Volker; Duro, Lara; Valls, Alba (eds.)

    2013-07-01

    place at the rim of the fuel pellets. The physico-chemical properties of the fuel are further complicated by additions of gadolinium oxide and/or chromium oxide, which is used for criticality control or to adjust the UO{sub 2} grain sizes for minimizing fission gas release (FGR). Moreover, the fission products of uranium cause expansion in the UO{sub 2} crystal structure leading to disturbances of the fuel matrix. The chemical stability of the fission products oxides in the UO{sub 2} matrix, can be classified into different groups: (i) the rare earth elements and Y, Zr, Ba and Sr, whose oxides form either solid solutions with UO{sub 2} or single phase precipitates; (ii) Mo, Cs and Rb, which are either oxidized or not, depending on the O/U ratio; and (iii) elements like Ru, with unstable oxides which form metallic precipitates within the UO{sub 2}. The CP is organized in six workpackages (WP): WP1, ''Samples and tools'' deals with the selection, characterization and preparation of the materials to be studied and the set-up of experimental and organisational tools. In this sense, one of the essential requirements of the project is that typical and sufficiently well characterized spent nuclear fuel is being used for the experiments and modelling studies. WP2 covers the ''Gas release and rim and grain boundary diffusion experiments'' and WP3 addresses ''Dissolution based release studies''. This includes determining the chemical form of released radionuclides, fission gases, {sup 135}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 14}C, {sup 79}Se, {sup 99}Tc and {sup 126}Sn. WP4 ''Modelling'' deals with modelling of release/retention processes of fission products in the spent fuel structure. Special attention is attributed to fission product migration along the grain boundaries, the effects of fractures in the pellets and of holes/fractures in the cladding. The modelling work within FIRST-Nuclides will help to clarify

  17. Rate setting and regulatory control of the radionuclides content in foodstuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shandala, N. K.; Savskin, M. N.; Petukhova, E. V.; Novikova, N. Y.; Titov, A. V.

    2004-07-01

    The concept of rate setting, standardisation and regulatory control of the radionuclides content in foodstuffs consists in the following: ? the normative standards concern to 90Sr and 137Cs as biologically significant radionuclides; ? the internal exposure dose from ingestion intake of radionuclides with food should not exceed meaning of 1 mSv a-1 which is the intervention exception level concerning trading foodstuffs; ? for few consumed foodstuffs (wild berries, mushrooms, teas) is established, that the dose caused by their consumption is outside of dose limits of 1 mSv a-1 and it should not exceed 1 % for each product; ? the nutrition structure of population including seven basic components of a diet (bread and grain products, dairy products, potatoes, vegetables, meat, fish, fruit and berries) is taken into account as a source of ingestion intake of the radionuclides; ? The conformity to the established standard is determined on a parameter ?f the summary contents of 90Sr and 137Cs in foodstuff. With the purpose of the operative control of an internal exposure of population the permissible levels of specific activity of 90Sr and 137Cs in more than 120 kinds of foodstuff were developed. These standards are obligatory in Russia for domestic and imported foodstuffs. So, permissible levels of specific activity of 90Sr and 137Cs in bread make, accordingly, 20 and 40 Bq kg-1; in milk - 25 and 100 Bq kg-1; in meat - 50 and 160 Bq kg-1; in potatoes and vegetables - 40 and 120 Bq kg-1. Monitoring of contamination of foodstuffs by 137Cs and 90Sr is one of the basic measures on maintenance of radiation safety of population in Russia. State system of sanitary-epidemiological control carries out constant supervision over the content of the radionuclides in food production. By the carried out researches was shown that true levels of the contents of 90Sr or 137Cs in the main foodstuffs in territory of Russia, except for the territories, injures of the radiation accidents, make

  18. Controlled release fertilizer workshop, 1991: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheib, R.M. [ed.

    1991-11-01

    Over the last 20 years the Tennessee Valley Authority`s National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) has carried out a number of programs to develop controlled release fertilizers. They pioneered the development and commercialization of sulfur coated urea and conducted extensive research in an attempt to develop an economical synthesis for oxamide. In recent years there has developed an increasing interest in the environmental impact of fertilizers, particularly on the potential for ground water contamination by nitrate derived from fertilizer materials. In response to this interest NFERC`s Chemical Research Department organized a five member Controlled Release Fertilizer (CRF) Team to reassess the potential for controlled release materials in agriculture with a view to minimizing any adverse environmental impact and increasing the efficiency of nutrient utilization by the crop. This workshop was part of that reassessment program. The workshop goals were: To determine the present status of CRF research, production and use; to assess the future needs of CRF producers and consumers; and to promote communication and exchange of information. To accomplish these goals the team invited speakers from across` the United States representing academics, experimental station researchers, fertilizer producers, environmentalists, and marketing experts to present papers.

  19. Controlled release fertilizer workshop, 1991: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheib, R.M. (ed.)

    1991-11-01

    Over the last 20 years the Tennessee Valley Authority's National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) has carried out a number of programs to develop controlled release fertilizers. They pioneered the development and commercialization of sulfur coated urea and conducted extensive research in an attempt to develop an economical synthesis for oxamide. In recent years there has developed an increasing interest in the environmental impact of fertilizers, particularly on the potential for ground water contamination by nitrate derived from fertilizer materials. In response to this interest NFERC's Chemical Research Department organized a five member Controlled Release Fertilizer (CRF) Team to reassess the potential for controlled release materials in agriculture with a view to minimizing any adverse environmental impact and increasing the efficiency of nutrient utilization by the crop. This workshop was part of that reassessment program. The workshop goals were: To determine the present status of CRF research, production and use; to assess the future needs of CRF producers and consumers; and to promote communication and exchange of information. To accomplish these goals the team invited speakers from across' the United States representing academics, experimental station researchers, fertilizer producers, environmentalists, and marketing experts to present papers.

  20. Meticulous Overview on the Controlled Release Fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siafu Ibahati Sempeho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the high demand for fertilizer formulations that will exhaust the possibilities of nutrient use efficiency (NUE, regulate fertilizer consumption, and lessen agrophysicochemical properties and environmental adverse effects instigated by conventional nutrient supply to crops, this review recapitulates controlled release fertilizers (CRFs as a cutting-edge and safe way to supply crops’ nutrients over the conventional ways. Essentially, CRFs entail fertilizer particles intercalated within excipients aiming at reducing the frequency of fertilizer application thereby abating potential adverse effects linked with conventional fertilizer use. Application of nanotechnology and materials engineering in agriculture particularly in the design of CRFs, the distinctions and classification of CRFs, and the economical, agronomical, and environmental aspects of CRFs has been revised putting into account the development and synthesis of CRFs, laboratory CRFs syntheses and testing, and both linear and sigmoid release features of CRF formulations. Methodical account on the mechanism of nutrient release centring on the empirical and mechanistic approaches of predicting nutrient release is given in view of selected mathematical models. Compositions and laboratory preparations of CRFs basing on in situ and graft polymerization are provided alongside the physical methods used in CRFs encapsulation, with an emphasis on the natural polymers, modified clays, and superabsorbent nanocomposite excipients.

  1. Measurement of Volatile Radionuclides Production and Release Yields followed by a Post-Irradiation Analysis of a Pb/Bi Filled Ta Target at ISOLDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, L.; Köster, U.; David, J. C.; Tall, Y.; Andersson, M.; Berg, K.; Cormon, S.; Fallot, M.; Foucher, Y.; Frånberg, H.; Gröschel, F.; Guertin, A.; Kirchner, T.; Leray, S.; Manfrin, E.; Noah, E.; Ravn, H.; Stora, T.; Thiollière, N.; Wohlmuther, M.

    2014-05-01

    A crucial requirement in the development of liquid-metal spallation neutron target is knowledge of the composition and amount of volatile radionuclides that are released from the target during operation. It is also important to know the total amount produced, which could be released if there was an accident. One type is the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) target where different radionuclides can be produced following interaction with a high-energy proton beam, notably noble gases (Ar, Kr, Xe isotopes) and other relative volatile isotopes such as Hg and At. The results of an irradiation experiment performed at ISOLDE on a LBE target are compared with predictions from the MCNPX code using the latest developments on the Liège Intranuclear Cascade model (INCL4.6) and the CEM03 model. The calculations are able to reproduce the mass distribution of the radioisotopes produced, including the At production, where there is a significant contribution from secondary reactions. Subsequently, a post-irradiation examination of the irradiated target was performed. Investigations of both the tantalum target structure, in particular the beam window, and the lead-bismuth eutectic were performed using several experimental techniques. No sign of severe irradiation damage, previously observed in other ISOLDE targets, was found.

  2. Effect of transport-pathway simplifications on projected releases of radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository (Sweden)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selroos, Jan-Olof; Painter, Scott L.

    2012-12-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company has recently submitted an application for a license to construct a final repository for spent nuclear fuel, at approximately 500 m depth in crystalline bedrock. Migration pathways through the geosphere barrier are geometrically complex, with segments in fractured rock, deformation zones, backfilled tunnels, and near-surface soils. Several simplifications of these complex migration pathways were used in the assessments of repository performance that supported the license application. Specifically, in the geosphere transport calculations, radionuclide transport in soils and tunnels was neglected, and deformation zones were assumed to have transport characteristics of fractured rock. The effects of these simplifications on the projected performance of the geosphere barrier system are addressed. Geosphere performance is shown to be sensitive to how transport characteristics of deformation zones are conceptualized and incorporated into the model. Incorporation of advective groundwater travel time within backfilled tunnels reduces radiological dose from non-sorbing radionuclides such as I-129, while sorption in near-surface soils reduces radiological doses from sorbing radionuclides such as Ra-226. These results help quantify the degree to which geosphere performance was pessimistically assessed, and provide some guidance on how future studies to reduce uncertainty in geosphere performance may be focused.

  3. Radionuclide cystogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003832.htm Radionuclide cystogram To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A radionuclide cystogram is a special imaging test called a nuclear ...

  4. Controlled Release Formulations of Auxinic Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Witold J.; Siłowiecki, Andrzej.; Romanowska, Iwona; Glazek, Mariola; Bajor, Justyna; Cieciwa, Katarzyna; Rychter, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    Controlled release formulations are applied extensively for the release of active ingredients such as plant protection agents and fertilizers in response to growing concern for ecological problems associated with increased use of plant protection chemicals required for intensive agricultural practices [1]. We synthesized oligomeric mixtures of (R,S)-3-hydroxy butyric acid chemically bonded with 2,4-D, Dicamba and MCPA herbicides (HBA) respectively, and determined their molecular structure and molecular weight dispersion by the size exclusion chromatography, proton magnetic resonance spectrometry and electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Further we carried out bioassays of herbicidal effectiveness of the HBA herbicides vs. series of dicotyledonous weeds and crop injury tests [2, 3, 4]. Field bioassays were accomplished according to the EPPO standards [5]. Groups of representative weeds (the development stages in the BCCH scale: 10 - 30) were selected as targets. Statistical variabilities were assessed by the Fisher LSD test for plants treated with the studied herbicides in form of HBA oligomers, the reference herbicides in form of dimethyl ammonium salts (DMA), and untreated plants. No statistically significant differences in the crop injuries caused by the HBA vs. the DMA reference formulation were observed. The effectiveness of the HBA herbicides was lower through the initial period (ca. 2 weeks) relative to the DMA salts, but a significant increase in the effectiveness of the HBA systems followed during the remaining fraction of each assay. After 6 weeks all observed efficiencies approached 100%. The death of weeds treated with the HBA herbicides was delayed when compared with the DMA reference herbicides. The delayed uptake observed for the HBA oligomers relative to the DMA salts was due to controlled release phenomena. In case of the DMA salts the total amount of active ingredients was available at the target site. By contrast, the amount of an active

  5. Migration of radionuclides through a river system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    Migration behavior of several atmospherically-derived radionuclides in a river watershed was studied. A main interest was in their relocation from the ground soil of the watershed to a downstream region through a river. Studied radionuclides are: {sup 137}Cs generated by weapon tests in the atmosphere; {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be of naturally occurring radionuclides; {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am released by the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. Dominance of the form in suspended solid in river water (particulate form) was qualified for the radionuclides in the Kuji river watershed. An importance of discharge in flooding was also confirmed. A historical budget analysis for weapon test derived {sup 137}Cs was presented for the Hi-i river watershed and its accompanied lake sediment (Lake Shinji). The work afforded a scheme of a fate of {sup 137}Cs after falling on the ground soil and on the lake surface. Several controlling factors, which can influence on the chemical form of radionuclides discharged to a river, were also investigated in the vicinity of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. A special attention was paid on the association of the radionuclides with dissolved species in water. Preferential association of Pu and Am isotopes to a large molecular size of dissolved matrices, probably of humic substances, was suggested. (author)

  6. Microbial control on decomposition of radionuclides-containing oily waste in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanovskaya, Svetlana; Galitskaya, Polina

    2014-05-01

    The oily wastes are formed annually during extraction, refinement, and transportation of the oil and may cause pollution of the environment. These wastes contain different concentrations of waste oil (40-60%), waste water (30-90%), and mineral particles (5-40%). Some oily wastes also contain naturally occurring radionuclides which were incorporated by water that was pumped up with the oil. For assessment of the hazard level of waste treated soil, not only measurements of contaminants content are needed, because bioavailability of oily components varies with hydrocarbon type, and soil properties. As far as namely microbial communities control the decomposition of organic contaminants, biological indicators have become increasingly important in hazard assessment and the efficiency of remediation process. In this study the decomposition of radionuclides-containing oily waste by soil microbial communities were estimated. Waste samples collected at the Tikchonovskii petroleum production yard (Tatarstan, Russia) were mixed with Haplic greyzem soil at ratio 1:4 and incubated for 120 days. During incubation period, the total hydrocarbon content of the soil mixed with the waste reduced from 156 ± 48 g kg-1 to 54 ± 8 g kg-1 of soil. The concentrations of 226Ra and 232Th were found to be 643 ± 127, 254 ± 56 Bq kg-1 and not changed significantly during incubation. Waste application led to a soil microbial biomass carbon decrease in comparison to control (1.9 times after 1 day and 1.3 times after 120 days of incubation). Microbial respiration increased in the first month of incubation (up to 120% and 160% of control after 1 and 30 days, correspondingly) and decreased to the end of incubation period (74% of control after 120 days). Structure of bacterial community in soil and soil/waste mixture was estimated after 120 days of incubation using SSCP method. The band number decreased in contaminated soil in comparison to untreated soil. Besides, several new dominant DNA

  7. Radionuclide Mobility at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Smith, D; Rose, T; Glascoe, L; Steefel, C; Zavarin, M

    2003-11-13

    Underground nuclear tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are characterized by abundant fission product and actinide source terms. Included are {sup 99}Tc and other soluble radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I), which are presumably mobile in groundwater and potentially toxic to down-gradient receptors. NTS provides the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with an analog of the release of these radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository in the absence of engineered barriers. The investigation described in this report synthesizes a substantial body of data collected on the identity and distribution of soluble radionuclides at field scales over distances of hundreds of meters, for durations up to 40 years, and under hydrogeologic conditions very similar to the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This body of data is complemented by laboratory transport studies and a synthesis of recent modeling investigations from the NTS, with an emphasis on the ongoing Yucca Mountain Program (YMP) efforts. Overall, understanding the controls of radionuclide mobility associated with these nuclear tests will provide insight into the repository's future performance as well as bounds and calibrations for the numerical predictions of long-term radionuclide releases and migration.

  8. Effect of precipitation, sorption and stable of isotope on maximum release rates of radionuclides from engineered barrier system (EBS) in deep repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekifarsani, A; Skachek, M A

    2009-10-01

    The basic function of the engineered barrier system (EBS) in geological disposal is to prevent or limit the release of radionuclides into the underground environment. For this purpose, the vitrified waste is contained in an overpack to isolate it from contact with groundwater for a certain initial period of time. However, it is impossible to ensure complete containment for all time. Therefore, the eventual release of nuclides must be minimized after the overpack fails (AEC, 1984. Radioactive waste processing and disposal measures; JNC, 2000a. Project to establish the scientific and technical basis for HLW disposal in Japan--first progress report-H3. Geological Environment in Japan, JNC TN1410 2000-002; JNC, 2000b. H12: project to establish the scientific and technical basis for HLW disposal in Japan--repository design and engineering technology, JNC TN1410 2000-003.). Low-permeability buffer material is installed between the overpack and the host rock to ensure that radionuclide release from the vitrified waste is limited by diffusive transport rather than advective transport in groundwater. Nuclides released from the waste form precipitate when their concentrations in the porewater result in their elemental solubility limits being exceeded. This limits the concentrations of many nuclides in the buffer and thus limits the release rates to the surrounding rock. High sorption coefficients act to delay the transport of certain nuclides during their migration through the buffer (PNC, development and management of the technical knowledge base for the geological disposal of HLW. Supporting report 2: repository engineering technology). The presence of isotopes of the same element has the effect of reducing the effective solubility of some nuclides; a lower nuclide concentration is required for precipitation to occur if the presence of any isotopes of the same element is taken into account. The calculated release rates of radionuclides from the EBS (per waste package) are

  9. A Responsive Battery with Controlled Energy Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jian; Cheng, Zhihua; Chen, Nan; Qu, Liangti

    2016-11-14

    A new type of responsive battery with the fascinating feature of pressure perceptibility has been developed, which can spontaneously, timely and reliably control the power outputs (e.g., current and voltage) in response to pressure changes. The device design is based on the structure of the Zn-air battery, in which graphene-coated sponge serves as pressure-sensitive air cathode that endows the whole system with the capability of self-controlled energy release. The responsive batteries exhibit superior battery performance with high open-circuit voltage (1.3 V), and competitive areal capacity of 1.25 mAh cm(-2) . This work presents an important move towards next-generation intelligent energy storage devices with energy management function. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Methods of increasing the performance of radionuclide generators used in nuclear medicine: daughter nuclide build-up optimisation, elution-purification-concentration integration, and effective control of radionuclidic purity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Van So; Do, Zoe Phuc-Hien; Le, Minh Khoi; Le, Vicki; Le, Natalie Nha-Truc

    2014-06-10

    Methods of increasing the performance of radionuclide generators used in nuclear medicine radiotherapy and SPECT/PET imaging were developed and detailed for 99Mo/99mTc and 68Ge/68Ga radionuclide generators as the cases. Optimisation methods of the daughter nuclide build-up versus stand-by time and/or specific activity using mean progress functions were developed for increasing the performance of radionuclide generators. As a result of this optimisation, the separation of the daughter nuclide from its parent one should be performed at a defined optimal time to avoid the deterioration in specific activity of the daughter nuclide and wasting stand-by time of the generator, while the daughter nuclide yield is maintained to a reasonably high extent. A new characteristic parameter of the formation-decay kinetics of parent/daughter nuclide system was found and effectively used in the practice of the generator production and utilisation. A method of "early elution schedule" was also developed for increasing the daughter nuclide production yield and specific radioactivity, thus saving the cost of the generator and improving the quality of the daughter radionuclide solution. These newly developed optimisation methods in combination with an integrated elution-purification-concentration system of radionuclide generators recently developed is the most suitable way to operate the generator effectively on the basis of economic use and improvement of purposely suitable quality and specific activity of the produced daughter radionuclides. All these features benefit the economic use of the generator, the improved quality of labelling/scan, and the lowered cost of nuclear medicine procedure. Besides, a new method of quality control protocol set-up for post-delivery test of radionuclidic purity has been developed based on the relationship between gamma ray spectrometric detection limit, required limit of impure radionuclide activity and its measurement certainty with respect to

  11. Chernobyl radionuclide distribution and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izrael, Yury A

    2007-11-01

    The accident at Unit No. 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on 26 April 1986 presented severe challenges in radiation protection. Early activity measurements defined the contaminated areas in order to determine what persons should be evacuated on the basis of the exposure limit at that time of 100 mSv (10 rem) for accidents. The immediate definition of these areas was accomplished with specially equipped aircraft capable of measuring external gamma-exposure rate and radionuclide spectra. Over time, maps of 137Cs contamination (the most important long-lived radionuclide) have become more and more sophisticated and have been used for further determinations of the control of the consequences of the accident. About 70% of the total release of 137Cs was deposited in Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine; but there was also widespread deposition throughout the countries of Western Europe. Two atlases of contamination throughout Europe were prepared, and the Russian atlas included data on other radionuclides and on external gamma-exposure rates. The radiocesiums behaved as volatile radionuclides because of the volatility of cesium. In contrast to the typical pattern after nuclear weapons tests, 90Sr behaved only as a refractory element, as its volatile precursors krypton and rubidium had already decayed within the reactor. Nearly all of the refractory elements (strontium, plutonium, etc.) released by the accident were confined to the 30-km zone around the reactor. A proposal is made to develop a more complete atlas of 137Cs deposition from the accident that would include the entire Northern Hemisphere. Water was not an important vector of exposure to human beings following the accident.

  12. Control of noradrenaline release from hippocampal synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, D.P.; Fillenz, M.

    1981-10-01

    Potassium-evoked tritiated noradrenaline (NA) release from hippocampal synaptosomes was measured with a superfusion method. A single 2-min high-K+ pulse released 39% of the vesicular NA by a Ca2+-dependent mechanism: the Ca2+-independent release was negligible. After changing the vesicular NA store size by pretreating rats with either alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, 500 mg/kg, or tranylcypromine, 10 mg/kg, a single K+ pulse released a constant percentage of the vesicular NA. With two K+ pulses, however, there was a reduction in the percentage of vesicular NA released in response to the second pulse.

  13. MODELS SELECTED FOR CALCULATION OF DOSES, HEALTH EFFECTS AND ECONOMIC COSTS DUE TO ACCIDENTAL RADIONUCLIDE RELEASES FROM NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strenge, D L; Baker, D A; Droppo, J G; McPherson, R B; Napier, B A; Nieves, L A; Soldat, J K

    1980-05-01

    Models are described for use in site-specific environmental consequence analysis of nuclear reactor accidents of Classes 3 through 9. The models presented relate radioactivity released to resulting doses, health effects, and costs of remedial actions. Specific models are presented for the major exposure pathways of airborne releases, waterborne releases and direct irradiation from activity within the facility buildings, such as the containment. Time-dependent atmospheric dispersion parameters, crop production parameters and other variable parameters are used in the models. The environmental effects are analyzed for several accident start times during the year.

  14. Cosmogenic radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Beer, Jürg; Von Steiger, R

    2012-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides are radioactive isotopes which are produced by natural processes and distributed within the Earth system. With a holistic view of the environment the authors show in this book how cosmogenic radionuclides can be used to trace and to reconstruct the history of a large variety of processes. They discuss the way in which cosmogenic radionuclides can assist in the quantification of complex processes in the present-day environment. This book aims to demonstrate to the reader the strength of analytic tools based on cosmogenic radionuclides, their contribution to almost any f

  15. Biological control of weeds release sites : Kulm Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Table of release sites of insects for biological control of invasive plants at Kulm Wetland Management District (WMD). Insects were released on Kulm WMD to...

  16. In Vivo Stabilization of a Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist Enhances PET Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy of Prostate Cancer in Preclinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatalic, Kristell L S; Konijnenberg, Mark; Nonnekens, Julie; de Blois, Erik; Hoeben, Sander; de Ridder, Corrina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; van Gent, Dik C; Nock, Berthold A; Maina, Theodosia; van Weerden, Wytske M; de Jong, Marion

    2016-01-01

    A single tool for early detection, accurate staging, and personalized treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) would be a major breakthrough in the field of PCa. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeting peptides are promising probes for a theranostic approach for PCa overexpressing GRPR. However, the successful application of small peptides in a theranostic approach is often hampered by their fast in vivo degradation by proteolytic enzymes, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP). Here we show for the first time that co-injection of a NEP inhibitor (phosphoramidon (PA)) can lead to an impressive enhancement of diagnostic sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of the theranostic (68)Ga-/(177)Lu-JMV4168 GRPR-antagonist. Co-injection of PA (300 µg) led to stabilization of (177)Lu-JMV4168 in murine peripheral blood. In PC-3 tumor-bearing mice, PA co-injection led to a two-fold increase in tumor uptake of (68)Ga-/(177)Lu-JMV4168, 1 h after injection. In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (68)Ga-JMV4168, PA co-injection substantially enhanced PC-3 tumor signal intensity. Radionuclide therapy with (177)Lu-JMV4168 resulted in significant regression of PC-3 tumor size. Radionuclide therapy efficacy was confirmed by production of DNA double strand breaks, decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Increased survival rates were observed in mice treated with (177)Lu-JMV4168 plus PA as compared to those without PA. This data shows that co-injection of the enzyme inhibitor PA greatly enhances the theranostic potential of GRPR-radioantagonists for future application in PCa patients.

  17. Molecularly imprinted nanotubes for enantioselective drug delivery and controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Junfa; Cui, Yue; Yang, Gengliang; Wang, Hailin

    2010-11-07

    Molecularly imprinted nanotubes for enantioselective drug delivery and controlled release are fabricated by the combination of template synthesis and ATRP grafting. The release of R-propranolol from the imprinted nanotubes in rats is restricted while the release of pharmacologically active S-enantiomer is greatly promoted.

  18. Analytical solution of diffusion model for nutrient release from controlled release fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameenuddin Irfan, Sayed; Razali, Radzuan; KuShaari, KuZilati; Mansor, Nurlidia; Azeem, Babar

    2017-09-01

    An analytical method has been developed to solve the initial value problem which arises from Fick’s diffusion equation encountered in the modelling of the Controlled Release Fertilizers. The proposed analytical solution is developed using the modified Adomian decomposition method. This method does not require the discretization method, reliability and efficiency of this method is more and it also reduces the calculation time. The model has predicted the effect of granule radius and diffusion coefficient on the nutrient release and total release time of Controlled Release Fertilizer. Model has predicted that increase in the radius of granule reduces the release and vice versa in case of diffusion coefficient. Detailed understanding of these parameters helps in improved designing of Controlled Release Fertilizer.

  19. [Nutrient release characteristics and use efficiency of slow- and controlled release fertilizers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Min; Liu, Gang; Shang, Zhao-Cong; Yang, Yi

    2009-05-01

    Water extraction method and soil incubation method were used to study the nutrient release characteristics of four slow- and controlled release fertilizers (CRF1, CRF2, SCU, and IBDU), and pot experiment was conducted to assess the effects of the release characteristics on the nutrient requirements of canola (Brassica napus L.). The nutrient release curves of test fertilizers in water were S pattern for CRF1 and CRF2, burst pattern for SCU, and reverse L pattern for IBDU. The nutrient release characteristics of the four fertilizers in water and in soil all fitted binomial equations, suggesting that there existed some similarities in the nutrient release in the two media. The nutrient uptake and biomass of canola plants treated with CRF1 and CRF2 were significantly higher than those treated with SCU and IBDU, and CRF2 had the greatest effect. The nutrient release curves of CRF1 and CRF2 accorded more closely with the nutrient requirements of canola.

  20. Environmental Release Prevention and Control Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamatey, A.; Arnett, M.

    1997-10-01

    During the history of SRS, continual improvements in facilities, process, and operations, and changes in the site`s mission have reduced the amount of radioactive liquid releases. In the early years of SRS (1958 to 1965), the amount of tritium discharged to the Savannah River averaged approximately 61,000 curies a year. During the mid-1980`s (1983 to 1988), liquid releases of tritium averaged 27,000 curies a year. By 1996, liquid releases of tritium are projected to be just 3000 curies for the year. This large projected decrease is the result of the planned shut-down of all reactors and the anticipated significant decline in the amount of tritium migrating from the site seepage basins and the Solid Waste Disposal Facility.

  1. Overview study of LNG release prevention and control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelto, P.J.; Baker, E.G.; Holter, G.M.; Powers, T.B.

    1982-03-01

    The liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry employs a variety of release prevention and control techniques to reduce the likelihood and the consequences of accidental LNG releases. A study of the effectiveness of these release prevention and control systems is being performed. Reference descriptions for the basic types of LNG facilities were developed. Then an overview study was performed to identify areas that merit subsequent and more detailed analyses. The specific objectives were to characterize the LNG facilities of interest and their release prevention and control systems, identify possible weak links and research needs, and provide an analytical framework for subsequent detailed analyses. The LNG facilities analyzed include a reference export terminal, marine vessel, import terminal, peakshaving facility, truck tanker, and satellite facility. A reference description for these facilities, a preliminary hazards analysis (PHA), and a list of representative release scenarios are included. The reference facility descriptions outline basic process flows, plant layouts, and safety features. The PHA identifies the important release prevention operations. Representative release scenarios provide a format for discussing potential initiating events, effects of the release prevention and control systems, information needs, and potential design changes. These scenarios range from relatively frequent but low consequence releases to unlikely but large releases and are the principal basis for the next stage of analysis.

  2. A retrospective mathematical analysis of controlled release design and experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Sam N; Kay, Jennifer E; Schopfer, Francisco J; Freeman, Bruce A; Little, Steven R

    2012-11-01

    The development and performance evaluation of new biodegradable polymer controlled release formulations relies on successful interpretation and evaluation of in vitro release data. However, depending upon the extent of empirical characterization, release data may be open to more than one qualitative interpretation. In this work, a predictive model for release from degradable polymer matrices was applied to a number of published release data in order to extend the characterization of release behavior. Where possible, the model was also used to interpolate and extrapolate upon collected released data to clarify the overall duration of release and also kinetics of release between widely spaced data points. In each case examined, mathematical predictions of release coincide well with experimental results, offering a more definitive description of each formulation's performance than was previously available. This information may prove particularly helpful in the design of future studies, such as when calculating proper dosing levels or determining experimental end points in order to more comprehensively evaluate a controlled release system's performance.

  3. Electrospinning nanofibers for controlled drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Indrani

    Electrospinning is the most widely studied technique for the synthesis of nanofibers. Electrospinning is considered as one of the technologies that can produce nanosized drugs incorporated in polymeric nanofibers. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that the release rates of drugs from these nanofiber formulations are enhanced compared to those from original drug substance. This technology has the potential for enhancing the oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs. The electrospun mats were made using Polycaprolactone/PCL, Poly(DL-lactide)/PDL 05 and Poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide)/PLGA. The drugs incorporated in the electrospun fibers were 5-Fluorouracil and Rapamycin. The evidence of the drugs being embedded in the polymers was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The release of 5-Fluorouracil and Rapamycin were followed by UV-VIS spectroscopy.

  4. Application of advanced polymeric materials for controlled release pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, M.; Hakim, M. R.; Haris, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work was to study the capability of advanced polymeric material constituted by chitosan and natural rubber matrices for controlled release of pesticides (1-hydroxynaphthalene and 2-hydroxynaphthalene) in aqueous solution. The released amount of pesticides was measured spectrophotometrically from the absorbance spectra applying a standardized curve. The release of the pesticides was studied into refreshing and non-refreshing neutral aqueous media. Interestingly, formulation successfully indicated a consistent, controlled and prolonged release of pesticides over a period of 35 days.

  5. Regulatory Initiatives for Control and Release of Technologically Enhanced Naturally-Occurring Radioactive Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidi, P.V.

    1999-03-02

    Current drafts of proposed standards and suggested State regulations for control and release of technologically-enhanced naturally-occurring radioactive material (TENORM), and standards for release of volumetrically-contaminated material in the US are reviewed. These are compared to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Safety Series and the European Commission (EC) proposals. Past regulatory efforts with respect to TENORM in the US dealt primarily with oil-field related wastes. Currently, nine states (AK, GA, LA, MS, NM, OH, OR SC, TX) have specific regulations pertaining to TENORM, mostly based on uranium mill tailings cleanup criteria. The new US proposals are dose- or risk-based, as are the IAEA and EC recommendations, and are grounded in the linear no threshold hypothesis (LNT). TENORM wastes involve extremely large volumes, particularly scrap metal and mine wastes. Costs to control and dispose of these wastes can be considerable. The current debate over the validity of LNT at low doses and low dose rates is particularly germane to this discussion. Most standards setting organizations and regulatory agencies base their recommendations on the LNT. The US Environmental Protection Agency has released a draft Federal Guidance Report that recommends calculating health risks from low-level exposure to radionuclides based on the LNT. However, some scientific and professional organizations are openly questioning the validity of LNT and its basis for regulations, practices, and costs to society in general. It is not clear at this time how a non-linear regulatory scheme would be implemented.

  6. Controlled-release Properties of Microencapsulated Disperse Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yan; LI Chun-yan; CHEN Shui-lin

    2002-01-01

    Some disperse dyes were microencapsulated by means of in- situ polymerization. These microencapsulated disperse dyes was extracted respectively by ethanol under certain conditions. The controlled-release properties of disperse dyes through the shell of microcapsules were measured by spectrophotometer. According to the results, it was drawn that the type of disperse dyes, the auxiliaries contained in disperse dyes, the quantity of system controlling medium used and the core/shell ratio of microcapsules play important roles in controlling the release properties of microcapsules. The different controlled- release properties of microcapsules, which were prepared under given conditions, however, would in turn influence the performance of microcapsules in multiple-transfer printing.

  7. Optimal Release Control of Companion Satellite System Using Electromagnetic Forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengwen Xu,Peng Shi; Yushan Zhao∗

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic forces generated by the inter⁃action of component satellites can be used to release companion satellites. Optimal release trajectories for companion satellite system using inter⁃electromagnetic forces were investigated. Firstly, nonlinear relative motion dynamic equations of a two⁃craft electromagnetic companion satellite system were derived in spatial polar coordinates. Then principles of electromagnetic satellite formation flying were introduced. Secondly, the characteristics of the electromagnetic companion satellites release were analyzed and optimal release trajectories of companion satellites using electromagnetic forces were obtained using Gauss pseudospectral method. Three performance criteria were chosen as minimum time, minimum acceleration of the separation distance and minimum control acceleration. Finally, three release examples including expansion along separation distance, rotation in orbital plane and stable formation reconfiguration were given to demonstrate the feasibility of this method. Results indicated that the release trajectories can converge to optimal solutions effectively and the concept of release companion satellites using electromagnetic forces is practicable.

  8. Release and control of hydrogen sulfide during sludge thermal drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Huanxin; Dai, Zhixin; Ji, Zhongqiang; Gao, Caixia; Liu, Chongxuan

    2015-04-15

    The release of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) during sludge drying is a major environmental problem because of its toxicity to human health. A series of experiments were performed to investigate the mechanisms and factors controlling the H2S release. Results of this study show that: 1) the biomass and activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sludge were the major factors controlling the amount of H2S release, 2) the sludge drying temperature had an important effect on both the extent and the timing of H2S release from the sludge, and 3) decreasing sludge pH increased the H2S release. Based on the findings from this study, a new system that integrates sludge drying and H2S gas treatment was developed to reduce the amount of H2S released from sludge treatments.

  9. Modifying sorbents in controlled release formulations to prevent herbicides pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cespedes, F.F.; Sanchez, M.V.; Garcia, S.P.; Perez, M.F. [University of Almeria, Almeria (Spain). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry

    2007-10-15

    The herbicides chloridazon and metribuzin, identified as groundwater pollutants, were incorporated in alginate-based granules to obtain controlled release properties. In this research the effect of incorporation of sorbents such as bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon in alginate basic formulation were not only studied on encapsulation efficiency but also on the release rate of herbicides which was studied using water release kinetic tests. In addition, sorption studies of herbicides with bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon were made. The kinetic experiments of chloridazon and metribuzin release in water have shown that the release rate is higher in metribuzin systems than in those prepared with chloridazon, which has lower water solubility. Besides, it can be deduced that the use of sorbents reduces the release rate of the chloridazon and metribuzin in comparison to the technical product and to the alginate formulation without sorbents. The highest decrease in release rate corresponds to the formulations prepared with activated carbon as a sorbent. The water uptake, permeability, and time taken for 50% of the active ingredient to be released into water, were calculated to compare the formulations. On the basis of a parameter of an empirical equation used to fit the herbicide release data, the release of chloridazon and metribuzin from the various formulations into water is controlled by a diffusion mechanism.

  10. Best Practices for Controlling Lead and Copper Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation draft, covering summary of current state-of-the-art knowledge for the best treatment strategies for minimizing lead release and controlling copper release. The presentation is intended to aid with compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule, but also provide a guide to...

  11. Estimation of the environmental or radiological impact in the event of accidental release of radionuclides in a DCLL fusion reactor; Estimacion del impacto radiologico ambiental en caso de liberacion accidental de radionucleidos en un reactor de fusion DCLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palermo, I.; Gomez Ros, J. M.; Sanz, J.; Mota, F.

    2013-07-01

    Tritium production and activation in the LiPb products can pose a radiological risk in the event of accidental release in a fusion reactor. Within the research programme Consolider TECNO{sub F}US (CSD2008-079) fusion technology has developed a design for a reactor with regenerative wrap with dual refrigeration (DCLL). The purpose of this communication is to present estimates of the radiological impact derived from an accidental release of radionuclides from the circuit of LiPb provinients. (Author)

  12. Preparation and evaluation of controlled release tablets of carvedilol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varahala Setti M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation is to design and evaluate controlled release tablets of carvedilol, employing synthetic polymers like polyethylene oxides, of different molecular weights as release retarding materials and to select the optimized formulation based on the pharmacokinetics of carvedilol. Matrix tablets each containing 80 mg of carvedilol were formulated employing PEO N60 K, PEO 301, and PEO 303 as release-retarding polymers and β Cyclodextrin and HP β cyclodextrin as release modulators from the matrix. Carvedilol release from the formulated tablets was very slow. Hence the release was modulated with the use of cyclodextrins. The dissolution from the matrix tablets was spread over more than 24 hours and depended on the type of polymer, its concentration and the type of cyclodextrin used. All the matrix tablets prepared using polyethylene oxides showed very good controlled release over more than 24 hours. The matrix tablets prepared using HP β cyclodextrin showed a higher dissolution rate and gave a dissolution profile that was comparable to the theoretical sustained release needed for once-a-day administration of carvedilol. The drug release mechanism from the matrix tablets was found to be quasi Fickian mechanism.

  13. Photoresponsive lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles for controlled doxorubicin release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Cuiping; Wu, Ming; Zhang, Cecheng; Lin, Xinyi; Wei, Zuwu; Zheng, Youshi; Zhang, Da; Zhang, Zhenxi; Liu, Xiaolong

    2017-06-01

    Currently, photoresponsive nanomaterials are particularly attractive due to their spatial and temporal controlled drug release abilities. In this work, we report a photoresponsive lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticle for remote controlled delivery of anticancer drugs. This hybrid nanoparticle comprises three distinct functional components: (i) a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) core to encapsulate doxorubicin; (ii) a soybean lecithin monolayer at the interface of the core and shell to act as a molecular fence to prevent drug leakage; (iii) a photoresponsive polymeric shell with anti-biofouling properties to enhance nanoparticle stability, which could be detached from the nanoparticle to trigger the drug release via a decrease in the nanoparticle’s stability under light irradiation. In vitro results revealed that this core-shell nanoparticle had excellent light-controlled drug release behavior (76% release with light irradiation versus 10% release without light irradiation). The confocal microscopy and flow cytometry results also further demonstrated the light-controlled drug release behavior inside the cancer cells. Furthermore, a CCK8 assay demonstrated that light irradiation could significantly improve the efficiency of killing cancer cells. Meanwhile, whole-animal fluorescence imaging of a tumor-bearing mouse also confirmed that light irradiation could trigger drug release in vivo. Taken together, our data suggested that a hybrid nanoparticle could be a novel light controlled drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

  14. Controlled Release of Imidacloprid from Poly Styrene-Diacetone - Nanoformulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun; Guo, Yanzhen; He, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoids insecticide, which is important for the cash crops such as tomato, rape and so on. The conventional formulation does not only increase the loss of pesticide but also leads to environmental pollution. Controlled-release formulations of pesticide are highly desirable not only for attaining the most effective utilization of the pesticide, but also for reducing environmental pollution. Pesticide imidacloprid was incorporated in poly (styrene-diacetone crylamide)-based formulation to obtain controlled release properties, and the imidacloprid nanocontrolled release formulation was characterized by infrared (IR) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Factors related to loading efficiency, swelling and release behaviors of the formulation were investigated. It showed that the loading efficiency could reach about 40% (w/w). The values for the diffusion exponent "n" were in the range of 0.31-0.58, which indicated that the release of imidacloprid was diffusion-controlled. The time taken for 50% of the active ingredient to be released into water, T50, was also calculated for the comparison of formulations in different conditions. The results showed that the formulation with higher temperature and more diacetone crylamide had lower value of T50, which means a quicker release of the active ingredient. This study highlighted some pieces of evidence that improved pesticide incorporation and slower release were linked to potential interactions between the pesticide and the polymer.

  15. Encapsulated Urea-Kaolinite Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Fertilizer Formulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sempeho, Siafu Ibahati; Kim, Hee Taik; Mubofu, Egid; Pogrebnoi, Alexander; Shao, Godlisten; Hilonga, Askwar

    2015-01-01

    Urea controlled release fertilizer (CRF) was prepared via kaolinite intercalation followed by gum arabic encapsulation in an attempt to reduce its severe losses associated with dissolution, hydrolysis, and diffusion...

  16. Trigger release liposome systems: local and remote controlled delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Sagida; Lattmann, E; Mohammed, Afzal R; Perrie, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Target-specific delivery has become an integral area of research in order to increase bioavailability and reduce the toxic effects of drugs. As a drug-delivery option, trigger-release liposomes offer sophisticated targeting and greater control-release capabilities. These are broadly divided into two categories; those that utilise the local environment of the target site where there may be an upregulation in certain enzymes or a change in pH and those liposomes that are triggered by an external physical stimulus such as heat, ultrasound or light. These release mechanisms offer a greater degree of control over when and where the drug is released; furthermore, targeting of diseased tissue is enhanced by incorporation of target-specific components such as antibodies. This review aims to show the development of such trigger release liposome systems and the current research in this field.

  17. Nutrients Release from a Novel Gel-Based Slow/Controlled Release Fertilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, H.; Y. S. Zhang; Li, W. H.; Zheng, X. Z.; Wang, M. K.; Tang, L. N.; Chen, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel gel-based slow/controlled release fertilizer (G-CRF) was developed, which was produced by combining various natural, seminatural, and/or synthetic organic macromolecule materials and natural inorganic mineral with conventional NPK fertilizers. Its nutrient release characteristics were studied to compare with conventional fertilizers through the soil column leaching method. The influences of soil factors, including temperature, pH, water, and nutrient contents in the G-CRF on nutrient ...

  18. Controlling Liquid Release by Compressing Electrospun Nanowebs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.G. Kornev

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun nanowebs with pores ranging from nanometers to micrometers, constitute new materials with enhanced absorbency and ability to retain liquids in pores for a long period of time. These materials can be used as nanofluidic probes collecting minute amount of liquids. However, extraction of liquids from nanofibrous materials presents a problem: menisci in the interfiber pores create very high suction pressure which holds the liquid inside the material. This problem can be resolved if the probe is completely filled with the liquid: menisci at the probe edges become flat to establish a pressure equilibrium with the atmosphere. Therefore, one can take advantage of the nanoweb softness and extract liquid by mechanically deforming the nanowebs. We show that the liquid-saturated nanowebs follow the Voigt-type rheology upon loading. We theoretically explain this behavior and derive the relations between the Voigt phenomenological parameters, nanoweb permeability and compression modulus. We show that the limiting deformations follow the Hooke’s law which assumes linear relation between the extracted volume of liquid and the applied load. Because of this predictable behavior, the nanoweb probes can be engineered to release minute liquid doses upon compression. The developed experimental methodology can be used for characterization of nanostructured materials which otherwise impossible to analyze by using the existing instruments.

  19. Nanoporous Silicified Phospholipids and Application to Controlled Glycolic Acid Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang SangHwa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This work demonstrates the synthesis and characterization of novel nanoporous silicified phospholipid bilayers assembled inorganic powders. The materials are obtained by silicification process with silica precursor at the hydrophilic region of phospholipid bilayers. This process involves the co-assembly of a chemically active phospholipids bilayer within the ordered porosity of a silica matrix and holds promise as a novel application for controlled drug release or drug containers with a high level of specificity and throughput. The controlled release application of the synthesized materials was achieved to glycolic acid, and obtained a zero-order release pattern due to the nanoporosity.

  20. [Drug release system controlled by near infrared light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niidome, Takuro

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanorods have absorption bands in the near-infrared region; in this spectral range, light penetrates deeply into tissues. The absorbed light energy is converted into heat by gold nanorods. This is the so-called photothermal effect. Gold nanorods are therefore expected to act not only as thermal converters for photothermal therapy, but also as controllers for drug-release systems responding to irradiation with near-infrared light. To achieve a controlled-release system that could be triggered by light irradiation, the gold nanorods were modified with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). When the dsDNA-modified gold nanorods were irradiated with near-infrared light, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was released from the gold nanorods because of the photothermal effect. The release of ssDNA was also observed in tumors grown on mice after near-infrared light irradiation. We also proposed a different controlled-release system responding to near-infrared light. Gold nanorods were modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) through Diels-Alder cycloadducts. When the gold nanorods were irradiated with near-infrared light, the PEG chains were released from the gold nanorods because of the retro Diels-Alder reaction induced by the photothermal effect. Such controlled-release systems triggered by near-infrared light irradiation will be expanded for gold nanorod drug delivery system applications.

  1. Modifying sorbents in controlled release formulations to prevent herbicides pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Céspedes, F; Villafranca Sánchez, M; Pérez García, S; Fernández Pérez, M

    2007-10-01

    The herbicides chloridazon and metribuzin, identified as groundwater pollutants, were incorporated in alginate-based granules to obtain controlled release properties. In this research the effect of incorporation of sorbents such as bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon in alginate basic formulation were not only studied on encapsulation efficiency but also on the release rate of herbicides which was studied using water release kinetic tests. In addition, sorption studies of herbicides with bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon were made. The kinetic experiments of chloridazon and metribuzin release in water have shown that the release rate is higher in metribuzin systems than in those prepared with chloridazon, which has lower water solubility. Besides, it can be deduced that the use of sorbents reduces the release rate of the chloridazon and metribuzin in comparison to the technical product and to the alginate formulation without sorbents. The highest decrease in release rate corresponds to the formulations prepared with activated carbon as a sorbent. The water uptake, permeability, and time taken for 50% of the active ingredient to be released into water, T(50), were calculated to compare the formulations. On the basis of a parameter of an empirical equation used to fit the herbicide release data, the release of chloridazon and metribuzin from the various formulations into water is controlled by a diffusion mechanism. Sorption capacity of the sorbents for chloridazon and metribuzin, ranging from 0.53mgkg(-1) for the metribuzin sorption on bentonite to 2.03x10(5)mgkg(-1) for the sorption of chloridazon on the activated carbon, was the most important factor modulating the herbicide release.

  2. Assembly of bio-nanoparticles for double controlled drug release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    Full Text Available A critical limiting factor of chemotherapy is the unacceptably high toxicity. The use of nanoparticle based drug carriers has significantly reduced the side effects and facilitated the delivery of drugs. Source of the remaining side effect includes (1 the broad final in vivo distribution of the administrated nanoparticles, and (2 strong basal drug release from nanoparticles before they could reach the tumor. Despite the advances in pH-triggered release, undesirable basal drug release has been a constant challenge under in vivo conditions. In this study, functionalized single walled carbon nanohorn supported immunoliposomes were assembled for paclitaxel delivery. The immunoliposomes were formulated with polyethylene glycol, thermal stable and pH sensitive phospholipids. Each nanohorn was found to be encapsulated within one immunoliposome. Results showed a highly pH dependent release of paclitaxel in the presence of serum at body temperature with minimal basal release under physiological conditions. Upon acidification, paclitaxel was released at a steady rate over 30 days with a cumulative release of 90% of the loaded drug. The drug release results proved our hypothesized double controlled release mechanism from the nanoparticles. Other results showed the nanoparticles have doubled loading capacity compared to that of traditional liposomes and higher affinity to breast cancer cells overexpressing Her2 receptors. Internalized nanoparticles were found in lysosomes.

  3. Fabrication of ultrathin polyelectrolyte fibers and their controlled release properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunder, Anindarupa; Sarkar, Sourangsu; Yu, Yingbo; Zhai, Lei

    2007-08-01

    Ultrathin fibers comprising 2-weak polyelectrolytes, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) were fabricated using the electrospinning technique. Methylene blue (MB) was used as a model drug to evaluate the potential application of the fibers for drug delivery. The release of MB was controlled in a nonbuffered medium by changing the pH of the solution. The sustained release of MB in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution was achieved by constructing perfluorosilane networks on the fiber surfaces as capping layers. Temperature controlled release of MB was obtained by depositing temperature sensitive PAA/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAM) multilayers onto the fiber surfaces. The controlled release of drugs from electrospun fibers have potential applications as drug carriers in biomedical science.

  4. Controlled release implants based on cast lipid blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreye, F; Siepmann, F; Zimmer, A; Willart, J F; Descamps, M; Siepmann, J

    2011-05-18

    The aim of this study was to use lipid:lipid blends as matrix formers in controlled release implants. The systems were prepared by melting and casting and thoroughly characterized before and after exposure to the release medium. Based on the experimental results, a mechanistic realistic mathematical model was used to get further insight into the underlying drug release mechanisms. Importantly, broad spectra of drug release patterns could be obtained by simply varying the lipid:lipid blend ratio in implants based on Precirol ATO 5 (glyceryl palmitostearate):Dynasan 120 (hardened soybean oil) mixtures loaded with propranolol hydrochloride. Release periods ranging from a few days up to several months could be provided. Interestingly, the drug release rate monotonically decreased with increasing Dynasan 120 content, except for implants containing about 20-25% Precirol, which exhibited surprisingly high release rates. This could be attributed to the incomplete miscibility of the two lipids at these blend ratios: DSC thermograms showed phase separation in these systems. This is likely to cause differences in the implants' microstructure, which determines the mobility of water and dissolved drug as well as the mechanical stability of the systems. Purely diffusion controlled drug release was only observed at Precirol ATO 5 contents around 5-10%. In all other cases, limited drug solubility effects or matrix former erosion are also expected to play a major role. Thus, lipid:lipid blends are very interesting matrix formers in controlled release implants. However, care must be taken with respect to the mutual miscibility of the compounds: in case of phase separation, surprisingly high drug release rates might be observed.

  5. Modeling controlled nutrient release from polymer coated fertilizers: diffusion release from single granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaviv, Avi; Raban, Smadar; Zaidel, Elina

    2003-05-15

    A comprehensive model describing the complex and "non-Fickian" (mathematically nonlinear) nature of the release from single granules of membrane coated, controlled release fertilizers (CRFs) is proposed consisting of three stages: i. a lag period during which water penetrates the coating of the granule dissolving part of the solid fertilizer in it ii. a period of linear release during which water penetration into and release out occur concomitantly while the total volume of the granules remains practically constant; and iii. a period of "decaying release", starting as the concentration inside the granule starts to decrease. A mathematical model was developed based on vapor and nutrient diffusion equations. The model predicts the release stages in terms of measurable geometrical and chemophysical parameters such as the following: the product of granule radius and coating thickness, water and solute permeability, saturation concentration of the fertilizer, and its density. The model successfully predicts the complex and "sigmoidal" pattern of release that is essential for matching plant temporal demand to ensure high agronomic and environmental effectiveness. It also lends itself to more complex statistical formulations which account for the large variability within large populations of coated CRFs and can serve for further improving CRF production and performance.

  6. Stimuli-Responsive Materials for Controlled Release Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song

    2015-04-01

    The controlled release of therapeutics has been one of the major challenges for scientists and engineers during the past three decades. To address this outstanding problem, the design and fabrication of stimuli-responsive materials are pursued to guarantee the controlled release of cargo at a specific time and with an accurate amount. Upon applying different stimuli such as light, magnetic field, heat, pH change, enzymes or redox, functional materials change their physicochemical properties through physical transformation or chemical reactions, allowing the release of payload agents on demand. This dissertation studied three stimuli-responsive membrane systems for controlled release from films of macro sizes to microcapsules of nano sizes. The first membrane system is a polymeric composite film which can decrease and sustain diffusion upon light irradiation. The photo-response of membranes is based on the photoreaction of cinnamic derivatives. The second one is composite membrane which can improve diffusion upon heating. The thermo-response of membranes comes from the volume phase transition ability of hydrogels. The third one is microcapsule which can release encapsulated agents upon light irradiation. The photo-response of capsules results from the photoreaction of nitrobenzyl derivatives. The study on these membrane systems reveals that stimuli-responsive release can be achieved by utilizing different functional materials on either macro or micro level. Based on the abundant family of smart materials, designing and fabricating stimuli-responsive systems shall lead to various advanced release processes on demand for biomedical applications.

  7. Development of controlled release tablet by optimizing HPMC: consideration of theoretical release and RSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Nihar R; Nath, Lila K

    2014-04-15

    The objective of the study was to develop controlled release tablets of nateglinide, a meglitinide derivative anti-diabetic drug, considering theoretical release profile and response surface methodology (RSM). 3(2) factorial design was utilized to optimize concentration of hydroxylpropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) K15M and K100M to obtain the desired responses (drug release at one and six hours). Theoretical release profile of drug for controlled release formulation was calculated and considered as reference for the determination of similarity factor (f2) and desimilarity factor (f1). RSM, f2 and f1 were used to select the optimum formulation. Formulation containing HPMC K15M (5%) and HPMC K100M (15%) was found optimum with desired responses with f2=86.05 and drug release profile followed zero order kinetics. Excipients used were compatible with drug, confirmed initially through DSC and IST study. The optimization of experiments was validated and optimum formulation was passed the stability study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Controlled release of tocopherols from polymer blend films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obinata, Noe

    Controlled release packaging has great potential to increase storage stability of foods by releasing active compounds into foods continuously over time. However, a major limitation in development of this technology is the inability to control the release and provide rates useful for long term storage of foods. Better understanding of the factors affecting active compound release is needed to overcome this limitation. The objective of this research was to investigate the relationship between polymer composition, polymer processing method, polymer morphology, and release properties of active compounds, and to provide proof of principle that compound release is controlled by film morphology. A natural antioxidant, tocopherol was used as a model active compound because it is natural, effective, heat stable, and soluble in most packaging polymers. Polymer blend films were produced from combination of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and high density polyethylene (HDPE), polypropylene (PP), or polystyrene (PS) with 3000 ppm mixed tocopherols using conventional blending method and innovative blending method, smart blending with a novel mixer using chaotic advection. Film morphologies were visualized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Release of tocopherols into 95% ethanol as a food simulant was measured by UV/Visible spectrophotometry or HPLC, and diffusivity of tocopherols in the polymers was estimated from this data. Polymer composition (blend proportions) and processing methods have major effects on film morphology. Four different types of morphologies, dispersed, co-continuous, fiber, and multilayer structures were developed by either conventional extrusion or smart blending. With smart blending of fixed polymer compositions, different morphologies were progressively developed with fixed polymer composition as the number of rod rotations increased, providing a way to separate effects of polymer composition and morphology. The different morphologies

  9. Controlled release of curcumin from poly(HEMA-MAPA) membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caka, Müşerref; Türkcan, Ceren; Aktaş Uygun, Deniz; Uygun, Murat; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2017-05-01

    In this work, poly(HEMA-MAPA) membranes were prepared by UV-polymerization technique. These membranes were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and swelling studies. Synthesized membranes had high porous structure. These membranes were used for controlled release of curcumin which is already used as folk remedy and used as drug for some certain diseases and cancers. Curcumin release was investigated for various pHs and temperatures. Optimum drug release yield was found to be as 70% at pH 7.4 and 37 °C within 2 h period. Time-depended release of curcumin was also investigated and its slow release from the membrane demonstrated within 48 h.

  10. Nutrients Release from a Novel Gel-Based Slow/Controlled Release Fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ding

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel gel-based slow/controlled release fertilizer (G-CRF was developed, which was produced by combining various natural, seminatural, and/or synthetic organic macromolecule materials and natural inorganic mineral with conventional NPK fertilizers. Its nutrient release characteristics were studied to compare with conventional fertilizers through the soil column leaching method. The influences of soil factors, including temperature, pH, water, and nutrient contents in the G-CRF on nutrient release, were also investigated through soil-water incubation method. These results indicated that the G-CRF had better effect on controlling release of N, P, and K nutrients, and the effect was more efficient when soil-water content was lower than 45% (w/w, temperature was below 35°C, and soil pH was in the range from weak acid to neutral. In addition, considering the effect of controlling nutrient release and cost of the materials in the G-CRF, it is recommended that the most feasible NPK nutrient contents in the G-CRF ranged from 30 to 35%.

  11. Radionuclides in surface and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kate M.

    2009-01-01

    Unique among all the contaminants that adversely affect surface and water quality, radioactive compounds pose a double threat from both toxicity and damaging radiation. The extreme energy potential of many of these materials makes them both useful and toxic. The unique properties of radioactive materials make them invaluable for medical, weapons, and energy applications. However, mining, production, use, and disposal of these compounds provide potential pathways for their release into the environment, posing a risk to both humans and wildlife. This chapter discusses the sources, uses, and regulation of radioactive compounds in the United States, biogeochemical processes that control mobility in the environment, examples of radionuclide contamination, and current work related to contaminated site remediation.

  12. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Xianwen; Geng, Zhirong; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Zhilin; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2009-04-01

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  13. Design and characterization of controlled release tablet of metoprolol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Singhvi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metoprolol succinate is a selective beta-adrenergic receptor blocker useful in treatment of hypertension, angina and heart failure. The purpose of the present work was to design and evaluate controlled release matrix type tablet of Metoprolo succinate using HPMC K15M and Eudragit (RLPO and RSPO as a matrix forming agents. Effect of various polymer alone and combinations were studied in pH 1.2 buffer using USP type II paddle at 50 rpm. HPMC was used to form firm gel with Eudragit polymer. Formulation with Equal proportion (1:1 of Eudragit RSPO and RLPO showed optimum drug release t50 =7 hrs and t100 =16 hrs indicate optimum permeability for drug release from matrix. The drug release mechanism was predominantly found to be Non-Fickian diffusion controlled.

  14. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan Xianwen; Geng Zhirong; Zhao Yao; Wang Zhilin; Zhu Junjie [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, MOE Key Lab of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)], E-mail: wangzl@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: jjzhu@nju.edu.cn

    2009-04-22

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  15. FERLENT - a controlled release fertilizer produced from a polymer material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The possibility to use release controlled fertilizers in the agriculture of the tropical countries is more important than in the agriculture of the countries of the template regions. In this context, this work purpose the development of a new Fertilizer of Controlled Release named FERLENT, which was obtained starting from a polymeric material, under controlled conditions which allowed to corroborate the adjustment of the synthesis parameters under the modulate of nutrients liberation. It was characterized by, Scanning Microscopy Electron (SEM), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). (author)

  16. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Schreiner

    2001-06-27

    The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations

  17. Chemical analysis of substrates with controlled release fertilizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreij, de C.

    2004-01-01

    Water-soluble fertilizer added to media containing controlled release fertilizer cannot be analysed with the 1:1.5 volume water extract, because the latter increases the element content in the extract. During storage and stirring or mixing the substrate with the extractant, part of the controlled re

  18. Controlled release fertilizer improves quality of container longleaf pine seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Jeff Parkhurst; James P. Barnett

    2005-01-01

    In an operational trial, increasing the amount of nitrogen (N) applied to container longleaf pine seedlings by incorporating controlled release fertilizer (CRF) into the media improved seedling growth and quality. Compared with control seedlings that received 40 mg N, seedlings receiving 66 mg N through CRF supplemented with liquid fertilizer had needles that were 4 in...

  19. Chemical analysis of substrates with controlled release fertilizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreij, de C.

    2004-01-01

    Water-soluble fertilizer added to media containing controlled release fertilizer cannot be analysed with the 1:1.5 volume water extract, because the latter increases the element content in the extract. During storage and stirring or mixing the substrate with the extractant, part of the controlled re

  20. Mathematical model for predicting the probability of acute mortality in a human population exposed to accidentally released airborne radionuclides. Final report for Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipy, R.E.; Borst, F.J.; Cross, F.T.; Park, J.F.; Moss, O.R.; Roswell, R.L.; Stevens, D.L.

    1980-05-01

    A mathematical model was constructed for the purpose of predicting the fraction of human population which would die within 1 year of an accidental exposure to airborne radionuclides. The model is based on data from laboratory experiments with rats, dogs and baboons, and from human epidemiological data. Doses from external, whole-body irradiation and from inhaled, alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides are calculated for several organs. The probabilities of death from radiation pneumonitis and from bone marrow irradiation are predicted from doses accumulated within 30 days of exposure to the radioactive aerosol. The model is compared with existing similar models under hypothetical exposure conditions. Suggestions for further experiments with inhaled radionuclides are included. 25 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. [Controlled release hydromorphone for visceral, somatic and neuropathic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alon, E; Cachin, C

    2010-03-03

    The aim of this multicentre, longitudinal investigation was to document the efficacy and tolerability profiles of controlled release hydromorphone in patients with heavy visceral, somatic or neuropathic pain under practical conditions. To this end, a prospective observational study was conducted in 57 centres in Switzerland, on a total of 196 patients. After an average of 43 days of treatment with controlled release hydromorphone, the intensity of momentary pain dropped by 46.5% and that of maximum pain dropped by 41.3%, with the efficacy of the treatment being most pronounced with visceral and somatic pain. At the same time, the prevalence of sleep disorders as a result of pain decreased from initially 86.7% to 21.0%. Controlled release hydromorphone was excellently tolerated in this group of elderly (average age 70.6 years), multimorbid pain patients receiving various medical treatments (average of 2.4 drugs in addition to pain medication), even in the voluntary long-term extension study of up to 96 days. No medical interactions were reported. Six and thirteen weeks after introducing the treatment, 89.8% and 85.2%, respectively, were still taking controlled release hydromorphone. Controlled release hydromorphone is a recommendable option for practical treatment of heavy and extremely heavy pain of various genesis.

  2. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  3. Antimicrobial beeswax coated polylactide films with silver control release capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Abad, Antonio; Lagarón, Jose Maria; Ocio, María Jose

    2014-03-17

    Although the application of silver based antimicrobial systems is a widespread technology, its implementation in areas such as food packaging is still challenging. The present paper describes the fabrication of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) coated with beeswax with controlled release properties for sustained antimicrobial performance. Release of silver ions from the polymers was monitored voltammetrically under various conditions (surface contact, immersion in various liquid media and at different pH values) throughout at least 7days. A higher release was noted with decreasing pH while surface release was much slower than the release when immersed in liquid medium. While uncoated films demonstrated a high burst release which in some instances implied surpassing some current migration restrictions (beeswax layer allowed a sustained release of the antimicrobial compound. Increasing the thickness of the beeswax layer resulted in an increase in the water barrier properties of the films while reducing the relatively constant values of sustained release. Antimicrobial performance was correlated with the release of silver ions, indicating threshold concentrations for biocide action of <6μg/L and 9-14μg/L for surface contact and in liquid media, respectively. Either by surface contact or by immersion in growth medium or vegetable soup, the coated films displayed a strong bactericidal effect against Salmonella enterica. The application of this functional barrier thus offers the possibility of tuning the release profiles of the films to suit a specific application and puts forth the possible suitability of these materials for food packaging or other migration sensitive applications.

  4. Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation from radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. [Conversion factors are given for dose rates to 21 organs from 240 different radionuclides for 3 different modes of exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1979-02-01

    Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation have been calculated for 240 radionuclides of potential importance in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Dose-rate conversion factors for immersion in contaminated air, immersion in contaminated water, and exposure to a contaminated ground surface are estimated for tissue-equivalent material at the body surface of an exposed individual. For each exposure mode, photon dose-rate conversion factors are also estimated for 22 body organs. The calculations assume that the contaminated air, water, and ground surface are infinite in extent and that the radionuclide concentration is uniform. Dose-rate conversion factors for immersion in contaminated air and water are based on the requirement that all energy emitted in the decay of a radionuclide is absorbed in the infinite medium. Dose-rate conversion factors for ground-surface exposure are calculated for a height of 1 m using the point-kernel integration method and known specific absorbed fractions for photons and electrons in air. The computer code DOSFACTER written to perform the calculations is described and documented.

  5. Sintering of wax for controlling release from pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Reena; Poddar, S S; Chivate, Amit

    2007-09-14

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate incorporation of hydrophobic (ie, waxy) material into pellets using a thermal sintering technique and to evaluate the pellets in vitro for controlled release. Pellets prepared by extrusion-spheronization technology were formulated with a water-soluble drug, microcrystalline cellulose, and carnauba wax. Powdered carnauba wax (4%-20%) prepared by grinding or by emulsification was studied with an attempt to retard the drug release. The inclusion of ground or emulsified carnauba wax did not sustain the release of theophylline for more than 3 hours. Matrix pellets of theophylline prepared with various concentrations of carnauba wax were sintered thermally at various times and temperatures. In vitro drug release profiles indicated an increase in drug release retardation with increasing carnauba wax concentration. Pellets prepared with ground wax showed a higher standard deviation than did those prepared with emulsified wax. There was incomplete release at the end of 12 hours for pellets prepared with 20% ground or emulsified wax. The sintering temperature and duration were optimized to allow for a sustained release lasting at least 12 hours. The optimized temperature and duration were found to be 100 degrees C and 140 seconds, respectively. The sintered pellets had a higher hydrophobicity than did the unsintered pellets. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that the carnauba wax moved internally, thereby increasing the surface area of wax within the pellets.

  6. Controlled release of chlorhexidine from UDMA-TEGDMA resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J; Zhang, N-Z; Shen, C

    2006-10-01

    Chlorhexidine salts are available in various formulations for dental applications. This study tested the hypothesis that the release of chlorhexidine from a urethane dimethacrylate and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate resin system can be effectively controlled by the chlorhexidine diacetate content and pH. The filler concentrations were 9.1, 23.1, or 33.3 wt%, and the filled resins were exposed to pH 4 and pH 6 acetate buffers. The results showed that Fickian diffusion was the dominant release mechanism. The rates of release were significantly higher in pH 4 buffer, which was attributed to the increase of chlorhexidine diacetate solubility at lower pH. The higher level of filler loading reduced the degree of polymerization, leading to a greater loss of organic components and higher chlorhexidine release rates.

  7. Press-coating of immediate release powders onto coated controlled release tablets with adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Kenneth C; Fergione, Michael B

    2003-05-20

    A novel adhesive coating was developed that allows even small quantities of immediate-release (IR) powders to be press-coated onto controlled-release (CR), coated dosage forms without damaging the CR coating. The process was exemplified using a pseudoephedrine osmotic tablet (asymmetric membrane technology, AMT) where a powder weighing less than 25% of the core was pressed onto the osmotic tablet providing a final combination tablet with low friability. The dosage form with the adhesive plus the press-coated powder showed comparable sustained drug release rates to the untreated dosage form after an initial 2-h lag. The adhesive layer consisted of an approximately 100- microm coating of Eudragit RL, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and triethyl citrate (TEC) at a ratio of 5:3:1.2. This coating provides a practical balance between handleability before press-coating and good adhesion.

  8. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of host rocks, secondary minerals, and fluids would affect the transport of radionuclides from a previously proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Minerals in the Yucca Mountain tuffs that are important for retarding radionuclides include clinoptilolite and mordenite (zeolites), clay minerals, and iron and manganese oxides and hydroxides. Water compositions along flow paths beneath Yucca Mountain are controlled by dissolution reactions, silica and calcite precipitation, and ion-exchange reactions. Radionuclide concentrations along flow paths from a repository could be limited by (1) low waste-form dissolution rates, (2) low radionuclide solubility, and (3) radionuclide sorption onto geological media.

  9. Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

    2009-01-07

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  10. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  11. Controlled antiseptic release by alginate polymer films and beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Ioannis; Rizzello, Loris; Bayer, Ilker S; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2013-01-30

    Biodegradable polymeric materials based on blending aqueous dispersions of natural polymer sodium alginate (NaAlg) and povidone iodine (PVPI) complex, which allow controlled antiseptic release, are presented. The developed materials are either free standing NaAlg films or Ca(2+)-cross-linked alginate beads, which properly combined with PVPI demonstrate antibacterial and antifungal activity, suitable for therapeutic applications, such as wound dressing. Glycerol was used as the plasticizing agent. Film morphology was studied by optical and atomic force microscopy. It was found that PVPI complex forms well dispersed circular micro-domains within the NaAlg matrix. The beads were fabricated by drop-wise immersion of NaAlg/PVPI/glycerol solutions into aqueous calcium chloride solutions to form calcium alginate beads encapsulating PVPI solution (CaAlg/PVPI). Controlled release of PVPI was possible when the composite films and beads were brought into direct contact with water or with moist media. Bactericidal and fungicidal properties of the materials were tested against Escherichia coli bacteria and Candida albicans fungi. The results indicated very efficient antibacterial and antifungal activity within 48 h. Controlled release of PVPI into open wounds is highly desired in clinical applications to avoid toxic doses of iodine absorption by the wound. A wide variety of applications are envisioned such as external and internal wound dressings with controlled antiseptic release, hygienic and protective packaging films for medical devices, and polymer beads as water disinfectants.

  12. Biopolymers in controlled release devices for agricultural applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of biopolymers such as starch for agricultural applications including controlled release devices is growing due the environmental benefits. Recently, concerns have grown about the worldwide spread of parasitic mites (Varroa destructor) that infect colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). ...

  13. Formulation and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Controlled-Release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISSN: 1596-5996 (print); 1596-9827 (electronic) ... Purpose: To develop and optimize controlled-release (CR) oxybutynin chloride matrix tablets. Methods: ... of the tablet was developed. ... India). Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) 4KM CR and ethyl cellulose (EC) were ..... Lyrinel OROS, and OXY/CR5C4 in SGF media.

  14. Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate Interventions for Releasing Prisoners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Howard, Matthew Owen; Dunnigan, Allison; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rarely used to evaluate social and behavioral interventions designed for releasing prisoners. Objective: We use a pilot RCT of a social support intervention (Support Matters) as a case example to discuss obstacles and strategies for conducting RCT intervention evaluations that span prison and community…

  15. Composition for the controlled release of active compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovens, I.A.P.; Jongboom, R.O.J.; Stuut, P.I.

    1999-01-01

    The invention provides a composition for the controlled release of one or more biologically active substances encapsulated in a degradable biopolymer matrix, consisting of a thermoplastic and/or partly crystalline inulin. A plasticiser such as glycerol, and an emulsifier may be present. The active s

  16. Rectal absorption of morphine from controlled release suppositories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moolenaar, Frits; Meyler, Pim; Frijlink, Erik; Jauw, Tjoe Hang; Visser, Jan; Proost, Johannes

    1995-01-01

    The absorption profiles and bioavailability of morphine in human volunteers (n = 13) were described after oral administration of MS Contin tablets and rectal administration of a newly developed controlled release suppository. By manipulating the viscosity of fatty suppository base an entirely

  17. Evaluation of Sterculia foetida gum as controlled release excipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivate, Amit Ashok; Poddar, Sushilkumar Sharatchandra; Abdul, Shajahan; Savant, Gaurav

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to evaluate Sterculia foetida gum as a hydrophilic matrix polymer for controlled release preparation. For evaluation as a matrix polymer; characterization of Sterculia foetida gum was done. Viscosity, pH, scanning electronmicrographs were determined. Different formulation aspects considered were: gum concentration (10-40%), particle size (75-420 microm) and type of fillers and those for dissolution studies; pH, and stirring speed were considered. Tablets prepared with Sterculia foetida gum were compared with tablets prepared with Hydroxymethylcellulose K15M. The release rate profiles were evaluated through different kinetic equations: zero-order, first-order, Higuchi, Hixon-Crowell and Korsemeyer and Peppas models. The scanning electronmicrographs showed that the gum particles were somewhat triangular. The viscosity of 1% solution was found to be 950 centipoise and pH was in range of 4-5. Suitable matrix release profile could be obtained at 40% gum concentration. Higher sustained release profiles were obtained for Sterculia foetida gum particles in size range of 76-125 microm. Notable influences were obtained for type of fillers. Significant differences were also observed with rotational speed and dissolution media pH. The in vitro release profiles indicated that tablets prepared from Sterculia foetida gum had higher retarding capacity than tablets prepared with Hydroxymethylcellulose K15M prepared tablets. The differential scanning calorimetry results indicated that there are no interactions of Sterculia foetida gum with diltiazem hydrochloride. It was observed that release of the drug followed through surface erosion and anomalous diffusion. Thus, it could be concluded that Sterculia foetida gum could be used a controlled release matrix polymer.

  18. Improvement of waste release control in French NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, T.; Lucquin, E.; Dupin, M. [EDF/GDL (France); Florence, D. [EDF/GENV (France); Grisot, M. [EDF/CNPE Saint Laurent (France)

    2002-07-01

    The new waste release control in French NPP is more restrictive than the old one and needs heavy investment to bring plants to compliance with it. The great evolutions are a chemical follow up on more chemicals with a higher measurement frequency and with lower maximum concentrations and a specific measurement of carbon 14. Regarding radioactive releases, a new counting has been settled and activity of carbon 14 release is now measured and no longer calculated. The evolution of the French regulation leads to develop specific procedures and analytical techniques in chemistry and in radiochemistry (UV spectrometric methods, carbon 14 measurements,..) EDF NPP operators have launched a voluntarist process to reduce their releases since the beginning and before the evolution of the regulation. EDF priorities in terms of environment care lead henceforth to implement a global optimisation of the impact for a better control of releases. The new regulation will help EDF to reach its goals because it covers all the aspects in one administrative document: it is seen as a real simplification and a clarification towards public. In addition, this new regulation fits in with international practices which will allow an easier comparison of results between EDF and foreign NPP. These big environmental concerns lead EDF to create a national dedicated laboratory (LAMEN) in charge of developing specific measurement procedures to be implemented either by NPP or by sub-contractor laboratories. (authors)

  19. Multifunctional conducting fibres with electrically controlled release of ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafilzadeh, Dorna; Razal, Joselito M; Moulton, Simon E; Stewart, Elise M; Wallace, Gordon G

    2013-08-10

    We hereby present a new method of producing coaxial conducting polymer fibres loaded with an antibiotic drug that can then be subsequently released (or sustained) in response to electrical stimulation. The method involves wet-spinning of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) fibre, which served as the inner core to the electropolymerised outer shell layer of polypyrrole (Ppy). Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (Cipro) was selected as the model drug and as the dopant in the Ppy synthesis. The release of Cipro in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) from the fibres was controlled by switching the redox state of Ppy.Cipro layer. Released Cipro under passive and stimulated conditions were tested against Gram positive (Streptococcus pyogenes) and Gram negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Significant inhibition of bacterial growth was observed against both strains tested. These results confirm that Cipro retains antibacterial properties during fibre fabrication and electrochemically controlled release. In vitro cytotoxicity testing utilising the neural B35 cell line confirmed the cytocompatibility of the drug loaded conducting fibres. Electrical conductivity, cytocompatibility and tuning release profile from this flexible fibre can lead to promising bionic applications such as neuroprosthetics and localised drug delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Controlled release of ethylene via polymeric films for food packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Roberto; Bazzano, Marco; Capozzi, Luigi Carlo; Ferri, Ada; Sangermano, Marco

    2015-12-01

    In modern fruit supply chain a common method to trigger ripening is to keep fruits inside special chambers and initiate the ripening process through administration of ethylene. Ethylene is usually administered through cylinders with inadequate control of its final concentration in the chamber. The aim of this study is the development of a new technology to accurately regulate ethylene concentration in the atmosphere where fruits are preserved: a polymeric film, containing an inclusion complex of α-cyclodextrin with ethylene, was developed. The complex was prepared by molecular encapsulation which allows the entrapment of ethylene into the cavity of α-cyclodextrin. After encapsulation, ethylene can be gradually released from the inclusion complex and its release rate can be regulated by temperature and humidity. The inclusion complex was dispersed into a thin polymeric film produced by UV-curing. This method was used because is solvent-free and involves low operating temperature; both conditions are necessary to prevent rapid release of ethylene from the film. The polymeric films were characterized with respect to thermal behaviour, crystalline structure and kinetics of ethylene release, showing that can effectively control the release of ethylene within confined volume.

  1. Tailoring liquid crystalline lipid nanomaterials for controlled release of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisset, Nicole B; Boyd, Ben J; Dong, Yao-Da

    2015-11-10

    Lipid-based liquid crystalline materials are being developed as drug delivery systems. However, the use of these materials for delivery of large macromolecules is currently hindered by the small size of the water channels in these structures limiting control over diffusion behaviour. The addition of the hydration-modulating agent, sucrose stearate, to phytantriol cubic phase under excess water conditions incrementally increased the size of these water channels. Inclusion of oleic acid enabled further control of swelling and de-swelling of the matrix via a pH triggerable system where at low pH the hexagonal phase is present and at higher pH the cubic phase is present. Fine control over the release of various sized model macromolecules is demonstrated, indicating future application to controlled loading and release of large macromolecules such as antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Concrete Property and Radionuclide Migration Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Powers, Laura; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-10-01

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the DOE Complex. Part of theses services includes safe disposal of LLW and MLLW at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the requirements listed in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, a Performance Assessment (PA) analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires that continuing data collection be conducted to enhance confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied upon to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the Order. One critical assumption is that concrete will frequently be used as waste form or container material to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Data was collected to (1) quantify radionuclide migration through concrete materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the LLBG, (2) measure the properties of the concrete materials, especially those likely to influence radionuclide migration, and (3) quantify the stability of U-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  3. Halloysite clay nanotubes for controlled release of protective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lvov, Yuri M; Shchukin, Dmitry G; Möhwald, Helmuth; Price, Ronald R

    2008-05-01

    Halloysite aluminosilicate nanotubes with a 15 nm lumen, 50 nm external diameter, and length of 800 +/- 300 nm have been developed as an entrapment system for loading, storage, and controlled release of anticorrosion agents and biocides. Fundamental research to enable the control of release rates from hours to months is being undertaken. By variation of internal fluidic properties, the formation of nanoshells over the nanotubes and by creation of smart caps at the tube ends it is possible to develop further means of controlling the rate of release. Anticorrosive halloysite coatings are in development and a self-healing approach has been developed for repair mechanisms through response activation to external impacts. In this Perspective, applications of halloysite as nanometer-scale containers are discussed, including the use of halloysite tubes as drug releasing agents, as biomimetic reaction vessels, and as additives in biocide and protective coatings. Halloysite nanotubes are available in thousands of tons, and remain sophisticated and novel natural nanomaterials which can be used for the loading of agents for metal and plastic anticorrosion and biocide protection.

  4. Control of contents and release kinetics in block copolymer vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Adi

    2005-03-01

    Block copolymer vesicles have received considerable attention recently because of a wide range of potential applications. In our group, the thermodynamic aspects of vesicle formation, including curvature stabilization, as well as active loading and release from vesicles have been the focus of recent research. The vesicles are prepared from an amphiphilic diblock copolymer such as polystyrene-block-poly(acrylic acid) at a low pH (2.5) by adding water to a solution in a common solvent; then the extenal pH is raised to 6.5, and the compound, such as doxorubicin or another amine, is added. Since the compund inside the vesicle becomes ionized at the low pH, it can only escape at a rate very much slower than that of the loading process. The permeability of the wall can be controlled by the presence of plasticizers for the polystyrene wall; the plasticizers partition between the wall and the external aqueous solution with a known partition coefficient, and can be removed from the wall by dialysis. Release is then studied under perfect sink conditions and is diffusional. It is noteworthy that the rates of both loading and release can be varied by more than two orders of magnitude by controlling the plasticizer content. Also, between the loading and release processes, the vesicle wall can be hardened by removal of the plasticizer by dialysis. This degree of control makes block copolymer vesicles a promising delivery vehicle for a range of materials, including drugs.

  5. CONTROLLED RELEASE FROM PDMAEMA GELS PREPARED BY GAMMA RADIATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Liu; Min Yi; Shuang-ji Chen; Hong-fei Ha

    2002-01-01

    Poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (polyDMAEMA) hydrogels prepared by γ-irradiation showed obvious temperature-sensitivity in a temperature range of 38-40℃ and pH-sensitivity at pH = 2.5. They also showed electric response behavior although it was not typical. The hydrogels were used in controlled release at different pH, temperature, and electric voltage. The release rates of methylene blue (MB) from the gels at 52℃ and pH = 1.24 were faster than those at 20℃ and pH = 10.56, respectively. In addition, the release rate at a field voltage of 5.0 was also faster than that without electric field.

  6. Optogenetic control of serotonin and dopamine release in Drosophila larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ning; Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2014-08-20

    Optogenetic control of neurotransmitter release is an elegant method to investigate neurobiological mechanisms with millisecond precision and cell type-specific resolution. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) can be expressed in specific neurons, and blue light used to activate those neurons. Previously, in Drosophila, neurotransmitter release and uptake have been studied after continuous optical illumination. In this study, we investigated the effects of pulsed optical stimulation trains on serotonin or dopamine release in larval ventral nerve cords. In larvae with ChR2 expressed in serotonergic neurons, low-frequency stimulations produced a distinct, steady-state response while high-frequency patterns were peak shaped. Evoked serotonin release increased with increasing stimulation frequency and then plateaued. The steady-state response and the frequency dependence disappeared after administering the uptake inhibitor fluoxetine, indicating that uptake plays a significant role in regulating the extracellular serotonin concentration. Pulsed stimulations were also used to evoke dopamine release in flies expressing ChR2 in dopaminergic neurons and similar frequency dependence was observed. Release due to pulsed optical stimulations was modeled to determine the uptake kinetics. For serotonin, Vmax was 0.54 ± 0.07 μM/s and Km was 0.61 ± 0.04 μM; and for dopamine, Vmax was 0.12 ± 0.03 μM/s and Km was 0.45 ± 0.13 μM. The amount of serotonin released per stimulation pulse was 4.4 ± 1.0 nM, and the amount of dopamine was 1.6 ± 0.3 nM. Thus, pulsed optical stimulations can be used to mimic neuronal firing patterns and will allow Drosophila to be used as a model system for studying mechanisms underlying neurotransmission.

  7. Characterization of a Planetary Boundary Layer model to evaluate radionuclides releases in nuclear installations; Caracterizacao de um modelo de camada limite planetaria para avaliar liberacoes de radionuclideos em instalacoes nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnary, Leslie de

    1993-07-01

    A two layer bulk model is used to simulate numerically the time and spatial evolution of concentration of radionuclides in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) for convective and stable conditions. In this model, the closure hypothesis are based on the integrated version of the Turbulent Kinetics Energy (TKE) equation (Smeda,1979). This type of model was adopted here because it is numerically simple to be applied operationally in routine and emergency support systems of atmospheric releases at nuclear power plants, and the hypothesis of the efficiency of the vertical mixing seems to be physically reasonable to simulated PBL evolution for high wind conditions and stable conditions in Subtropical latitudes regions. In order to validate the model to the nuclear power plants of the Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA), located in Ipero, State of Sao Paulo, Brazil, numerical simulations were carried out with initial and boundary conditions based on vertical profiles of temperature and horizontal wind speed and direction obtained from tethered balloon soundings, synoptic charts at 850 hPa and surface observations. Comparisons between a 24 hour long numerical simulation and observations indicate that the model is capable of reproduce the diurnal evolution of temperature and horizontal wind during the convective regime. During stable conditions, the slab model was able to simulate the intensity of the surface inversion as a difference between the mixed layer and surface temperatures. The simulated mixed layer height matches with observations during the convective and stable regime. A daytime release of radionuclides was simulated for CEA region and the results indicated that the maximum relative concentration reaches a distance about 15 Km in 1 hour, varing from 100 times background at the moment of the release to 15 times the background. For night releases, the maximum concentration reaches the same distance in 45 minutes, varing from 100 to 30 times the background values

  8. Highly Efficient Thermoresponsive Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassine, Omar; Zaher, Amir; Li, Er Qiang; Alfadhel, Ahmed; Perez, Jose E.; Kavaldzhiev, Mincho; Contreras, Maria F.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.; Khashab, Niveen M.; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-06-01

    Highly efficient magnetic release from nanocomposite microparticles is shown, which are made of Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel with embedded iron nanowires. A simple microfluidic technique was adopted to fabricate the microparticles with a high control of the nanowire concentration and in a relatively short time compared to chemical synthesis methods. The thermoresponsive microparticles were used for the remotely triggered release of Rhodamine (B). With a magnetic field of only 1 mT and 20 kHz a drug release of 6.5% and 70% was achieved in the continuous and pulsatile modes, respectively. Those release values are similar to the ones commonly obtained using superparamagnetic beads but accomplished with a magnetic field of five orders of magnitude lower power. The high efficiency is a result of the high remanent magnetization of the nanowires, which produce a large torque when exposed to a magnetic field. This causes the nanowires to vibrate, resulting in friction losses and heating. For comparison, microparticles with superparamagnetic beads were also fabricated and tested; while those worked at 73 mT and 600 kHz, no release was observed at the low field conditions. Cytotoxicity assays showed similar and high cell viability for microparticles with nanowires and beads.

  9. Highly Efficient Thermoresponsive Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Yassine, Omar

    2016-06-23

    Highly efficient magnetic release from nanocomposite microparticles is shown, which are made of Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel with embedded iron nanowires. A simple microfluidic technique was adopted to fabricate the microparticles with a high control of the nanowire concentration and in a relatively short time compared to chemical synthesis methods. The thermoresponsive microparticles were used for the remotely triggered release of Rhodamine (B). With a magnetic field of only 1 mT and 20 kHz a drug release of 6.5% and 70% was achieved in the continuous and pulsatile modes, respectively. Those release values are similar to the ones commonly obtained using superparamagnetic beads but accomplished with a magnetic field of five orders of magnitude lower power. The high efficiency is a result of the high remanent magnetization of the nanowires, which produce a large torque when exposed to a magnetic field. This causes the nanowires to vibrate, resulting in friction losses and heating. For comparison, microparticles with superparamagnetic beads were also fabricated and tested; while those worked at 73 mT and 600 kHz, no release was observed at the low field conditions. Cytotoxicity assays showed similar and high cell viability for microparticles with nanowires and beads.

  10. Release Characteristics of Different N Forms in an Uncoated Slow/Controlled Release Compound Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yan; WANG Zheng-yin

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the release characteristics of different N forms in an uncoated slow/controlled-release compound fertilizer (UCRF) and the N uptake and N-use efficiency by rice plants. Water dissolution, soil leaching, and pot experiments were employed. The dynamics of N release from the UCRF could be quantitatively described by three equations: the first-order kinetics equation [Nt = N0 (1-e-kt)], Elovich equation (Nt = a + blnt), and parabola equation (Nt = a + bt0.5), with the best fitting by the first-order kinetics equation for different N (r= 0.9569**-0.9999**). The release potentials (N0 values estimated by the first-order kinetics equation) of different N in the UCRF decreased in the order of total N > DON > urea-N > NH4+-N > NO3--N in water, and total N > NH4+-N > DON > urea-N > NO3--N in soil, respectively,being in accordance with cumulative amounts of N release. The constants of N release rate (k values and b values) for different N forms were in decreasing order of total N > DON > NH4+-N > NO3--N in water, whereas the k values were urea-N >DON > NH4+-N > total N > NO3--N, and the b values were total N > NH4+-N > DON > NO3--N > urea-N in soil. Compared with a common compound fertilizer, the N-use efficiency, N-agronomy efficiency, and N-physiological efficiency of the UCRF were increased by 11.4%, 8.32 kg kg-1, and 5.17 kg kg-1, respectively. The ratios of different N to total N in the UCRF showed significant correlation with N uptake by rice plants. The findings showed that the first-order kinetics equation [Nt=N0(1-e-kt)] could be used to describe the release characteristics of different N forms in the fertilizer. The UCRF containing different N forms was more effective in facilitating N uptake by rice compared with the common compound fertilizer containing single urea-N form.

  11. Normal-release and controlled-release oxycodone: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mellar P; Varga, James; Dickerson, Duke; Walsh, Declan; LeGrand, Susan B; Lagman, Ruth

    2003-02-01

    Oxycodone has become one of the most popular opioids in the United States. It is superior to morphine in oral absorption and bioavailability, and similar in terms of protein binding and lipophilicity. Gender more than age influences oxycodone elimination. Unlike morphine, oxycodone is metabolized by the cytochrome isoenzyme CYP2D6, which is severely impaired by liver dysfunction. Controlled-release (CR) oxycodone has become one of the most frequently utilized sustained-release opioids in the United States. Both its analgesic benefits and its side effects are similar to those of CR morphine. CR oxycodone is similar to morphine and other opioids in its abuse potential. Deaths attributable to oxycodone are usually associated with polysubstance abuse in which oxycodone is combined with psychostimulants, other opioids, benzodiazepines or alcohol. Oxycodone's kappa receptor binding has little role in abuse or addiction. The cost of CR oxycodone is prohibitive for most American hospices.

  12. Mechanism of controlled release kinetics from medical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Raval

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of biodegradable polymers for controlled drug delivery has gained immense attention in the pharmaceutical and medical device industry to administer various drugs, proteins and other bio-molecules both systematically and locally to cure several diseases. The efficacy and toxicity of this local therapeutics depends upon drug release kinetics, which will further decide drug deposition, distribution, and retention at the target site. Drug Eluting Stent (DES presently possesses clinical importance as an alternative to Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting due to the ease of the procedure and comparable safety and efficacy. Many models have been developed to describe the drug delivery from polymeric carriers based on the different mechanisms which control the release phenomenon from DES. Advanced characterization techniques facilitate an understanding of the complexities behind design and related drug release behavior of drug eluting stents, which aids in the development of improved future drug eluting systems. This review discusses different drug release mechanisms, engineering principles, mathematical models and current trends that are proposed for drug-polymer coated medical devices such as cardiovascular stents and different analytical methods currently utilized to probe diverse characteristics of drug eluting devices.

  13. Controlled Release of Agrochemicals Intercalated into Montmorillonite Interlayer Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Wanyika

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodic application of agrochemicals has led to high cost of production and serious environmental pollution. In this study, the ability of montmorillonite (MMT clay to act as a controlled release carrier for model agrochemical molecules has been investigated. Urea was loaded into MMT by a simple immersion technique while loading of metalaxyl was achieved by a rotary evaporation method. The successful incorporation of the agrochemicals into the interlayer space of MMT was confirmed by several techniques, such as, significant expansion of the interlayer space, reduction of Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH pore volumes and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET surface areas, and appearance of urea and metalaxyl characteristic bands on the Fourier-transform infrared spectra of the urea loaded montmorillonite (UMMT and metalaxyl loaded montmorillonite (RMMT complexes. Controlled release of the trapped molecules from the matrix was done in water and in the soil. The results reveal slow and sustained release behaviour for UMMT for a period of 10 days in soil. For a period of 30 days, MMT delayed the release of metalaxyl in soil by more than 6 times. It is evident that MMT could be used to improve the efficiency of urea and metalaxyl delivery in the soil.

  14. Controlled Release of Agrochemicals Intercalated into Montmorillonite Interlayer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Periodic application of agrochemicals has led to high cost of production and serious environmental pollution. In this study, the ability of montmorillonite (MMT) clay to act as a controlled release carrier for model agrochemical molecules has been investigated. Urea was loaded into MMT by a simple immersion technique while loading of metalaxyl was achieved by a rotary evaporation method. The successful incorporation of the agrochemicals into the interlayer space of MMT was confirmed by several techniques, such as, significant expansion of the interlayer space, reduction of Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore volumes and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas, and appearance of urea and metalaxyl characteristic bands on the Fourier-transform infrared spectra of the urea loaded montmorillonite (UMMT) and metalaxyl loaded montmorillonite (RMMT) complexes. Controlled release of the trapped molecules from the matrix was done in water and in the soil. The results reveal slow and sustained release behaviour for UMMT for a period of 10 days in soil. For a period of 30 days, MMT delayed the release of metalaxyl in soil by more than 6 times. It is evident that MMT could be used to improve the efficiency of urea and metalaxyl delivery in the soil. PMID:24696655

  15. EVOLUTION OF CHEMICAL CONDITIONS AND ESTIMATED SOLUBILITY CONTROLS ON RADIONUCLIDES IN THE RESIDUAL WASTE LAYER DURING POST-CLOSURE AGING OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, M.; Millings, M.

    2012-08-28

    This document provides information specific to H-Area waste tanks that enables a flow and transport model with limited chemical capabilities to account for varying waste release from the tanks through time. The basis for varying waste release is solubilities of radionuclides that change as pore fluids passing through the waste change in composition. Pore fluid compositions in various stages were generated by simulations of tank grout degradation. The first part of the document describes simulations of the degradation of the reducing grout in post-closure tanks. These simulations assume flow is predominantly through a water saturated porous medium. The infiltrating fluid that reacts with the grout is assumed to be fluid that has passed through the closure cap and into the tank. The results are three stages of degradation referred to as Reduced Region II, Oxidized Region II, and Oxidized Region III. A reaction path model was used so that the transitions between each stage are noted by numbers of pore volumes of infiltrating fluid reacted. The number of pore volumes to each transition can then be converted to time within a flow and transport model. The bottoms of some tanks in H-Area are below the water table requiring a different conceptual model for grout degradation. For these simulations the reacting fluid was assumed to be 10% infiltrate through the closure cap and 90% groundwater. These simulations produce an additional four pore fluid compositions referred to as Conditions A through D and were intended to simulate varying degrees of groundwater influence. The most probable degradation path for the submerged tanks is Condition C to Condition D to Oxidized Region III and eventually to Condition A. Solubilities for Condition A are estimated in the text for use in sensitivity analyses if needed. However, the grout degradation simulations did not include sufficient pore volumes of infiltrating fluid for the grout to evolve to Condition A. Solubility controls for use

  16. Are fluoride releasing dental materials clinically effective on caries control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cury, Jaime Aparecido; de Oliveira, Branca Heloisa; dos Santos, Ana Paula Pires; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló

    2016-03-01

    (1) To describe caries lesions development and the role of fluoride in controlling disease progression; (2) to evaluate whether the use of fluoride-releasing pit and fissure sealants, bonding orthodontic agents and restorative materials, in comparison to a non-fluoride releasing material, reduces caries incidence in children or adults, and (3) to discuss how the anti-caries properties of these materials have been evaluated in vitro and in situ. The search was performed on the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and on Medline via Pubmed. Caries is a biofilm-sugar dependent disease and as such it provokes progressive destruction of mineral structure of any dental surface - intact, sealed or restored - where biofilm remains accumulated and is regularly exposed to sugar. The mechanism of action of fluoride released from dental materials on caries is similar to that of fluoride found in dentifrices or other vehicles of fluoride delivery. Fluoride-releasing materials are unable to interfere with the formation of biofilm on dental surfaces adjacent to them or to inhibit acid production by dental biofilms. However, the fluoride released slows down the progression of caries lesions in tooth surfaces adjacent to dental materials. This effect has been clearly shown by in vitro and in situ studies but not in randomized clinical trials. The anti-caries effect of fluoride releasing materials is still not based on clinical evidence, and, in addition, it can be overwhelmed by fluoride delivered from dentifrices. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Controlled exosome release from the retinal pigment epithelium in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Christina J; Congrove, Nicole R; Dismuke, W Michael; Bowen, Trent J; Stamer, W Daniel; McKay, Brian S

    2014-12-01

    Retinal Pigment Epithelial cells (RPE) express both GPR143 and myocilin, which interact in a signal transduction-dependent manner. In heterologous systems, activation of GPR143 with ligand causes transient recruitment of myocilin to internalized receptors, which appears to be the entry point of myocilin to the endocytic pathway. In some but not all cells, myocilin also traffics through the multivesicular body (MVB) and is released on the surface of exosomes in a signal transduction-dependent fashion. Little is known regarding the role of exosomes in RPE, but they likely serve as a mode of communication between the RPE and the outer retina. In this study, we used posterior poles with retina removed from fresh human donor eyes as a model to test the relationship between GPR143, myocilin, and exosomes in an endogenous system. We isolated exosomes released by RPE using differential centrifugation of media conditioned by the RPE for 25 min, and then characterized the exosomes using nanoparticle tracking to determine the number and size of the exosomes. Next, we tested whether ligand stimulation of GPR143 using l-DOPA altered RPE exosome release. Finally, we investigated whether myocilin was present on the exosomes released by RPE and whether l-DOPA stimulation of GPR143 caused recruitment of myocilin to the endocytic pathway, as we have previously observed using cultured cells. Activation of GPR143 halted RPE exosome release, while simultaneously recruiting myocilin to the endocytic compartment. Together, our results indicate that GPR143 and myocilin function in a signal transduction system that can control exosome release from RPE.

  18. Encapsulated Urea-Kaolinite Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Fertilizer Formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Siafu Ibahati Sempeho; Hee Taik Kim; Egid Mubofu; Alexander Pogrebnoi; Godlisten Shao; Askwar Hilonga

    2015-01-01

    Urea controlled release fertilizer (CRF) was prepared via kaolinite intercalation followed by gum arabic encapsulation in an attempt to reduce its severe losses associated with dissolution, hydrolysis, and diffusion. Following the beneficiation, the nonkaolinite fraction decreased from 39.58% to 0.36% whereas the kaolinite fraction increased from 60.42% to 99.64%. The X-ray diffractions showed that kaolinite was a major phase with FCC Bravais crystal lattice with particle sizes ranging betwee...

  19. Hybrid Porous Materials for Controlled Release and Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Rui

    2010-01-01

    First reported in 1992, ordered mesoporous materials exhibit unique features, such as regular pore geometry, high surface area, and large pore volume, and have shown great potential in various applications. This dissertation combines the knowledge from the field of ordered mesoporous materials and several other research areas to design advanced hybrid porous materials for controlled release and catalysis applications.The demand for better treatment of illness has led to ever-increasing effort...

  20. Smart nanofibers with a photoresponsive surface for controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guo-Dong; Xu, Li-Qun; Yao, Fang; Li, Guo-Liang; Kang, En-Tang

    2009-11-01

    A novel photocontrolled "ON-OFF" release system for the alpha-cyclodextrin-5-fluorouracial (alpha-CD-5FU) prodrug, based on host-guest interaction on the photoresponsive and cross-linked nanofiber surface, was demonstrated. The nanofibers with a stimuli-responsive surface were electrospun from the block copolymer prepared via controlled radical polymerization, followed by surface modification via "Click Chemistry", and loading of the prodrug via host-guest interaction.

  1. Hybrid Porous Materials for Controlled Release and Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Rui

    2010-01-01

    First reported in 1992, ordered mesoporous materials exhibit unique features, such as regular pore geometry, high surface area, and large pore volume, and have shown great potential in various applications. This dissertation combines the knowledge from the field of ordered mesoporous materials and several other research areas to design advanced hybrid porous materials for controlled release and catalysis applications.The demand for better treatment of illness has led to ever-increasing effort...

  2. Encapsulated Urea-Kaolinite Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Fertilizer Formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Siafu Ibahati Sempeho; Hee Taik Kim; Egid Mubofu; Alexander Pogrebnoi; Godlisten Shao; Askwar Hilonga

    2015-01-01

    Urea controlled release fertilizer (CRF) was prepared via kaolinite intercalation followed by gum arabic encapsulation in an attempt to reduce its severe losses associated with dissolution, hydrolysis, and diffusion. Following the beneficiation, the nonkaolinite fraction decreased from 39.58% to 0.36% whereas the kaolinite fraction increased from 60.42% to 99.64%. The X-ray diffractions showed that kaolinite was a major phase with FCC Bravais crystal lattice with particle sizes ranging betwee...

  3. An oral controlled release matrix pellet formulation containing nanocrystalline ketoprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergote, G J; Vervaet, C; Van Driessche, I; Hoste, S; De Smedt, S; Demeester, J; Jain, R A; Ruddy, S; Remon, J P

    2001-05-21

    A controlled release pellet formulation using a NanoCrystal colloidal dispersion of ketoprofen was developed. In order to be able to process the aqueous NanoCrystal colloidal dispersion into a hydrophobic solid dosage form a spray drying procedure was used. The in vitro dissolution profiles of wax based pellets loaded with nanocrystalline ketoprofen are compared with the profiles of wax based pellets loaded with microcrystalline ketoprofen and of a commercial sustained release ketoprofen formulation. Pellets were produced using a melt pelletisation technique. All pellet formulations were composed of a mixture of microcrystalline wax and starch derivatives. The starch derivatives used were waxy maltodextrin and drum dried corn starch. Varying the concentration of drum dried corn starch increased the release rate of ketoprofen but the ketoprofen recovery remained problematic. To increase the dissolution yield surfactants were utilised. The surfactants were either added during the production process of the NanoCrystal colloidal dispersion (sodium laurylsulphate) or during the pellet manufacturing process (Cremophor RH 40). Both methods resulted in a sustained but complete release of nanocrystalline ketoprofen from the matrix pellet formulations.

  4. Controlled release of 5-flurouracil from biomedical polyurethanes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reddy Seetharamareddy Harisha; Kallappa Mahadevappa Hosamani; Rangappa Sangappa Keri; Namdev Shelke; Vijay Kumar Wadi; Tejaraj M Aminabhavi

    2010-03-01

    Novel biodegradable aliphatic poly(ether-urethane)s (PEUs) based on pluronic F-68 (PLF68) and castor oil were synthesized by the solution polymerization technique. These polymers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic spectroscopy (1HNMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) to confirm the PEU formation and the molecular weight. Moderate molecular weight PEUs were obtained and converted into microspheres by solvent evaporation method to study the controlled release (CR) characteristics for 5-flurouracil (5-FU). PLF-68 acts as amphiphilic filler, which enhances the release of a hydrophobic drug such as 5-FU. Sizes of the microspheres as measured by laser light scattering technique ranged between 15 and 42 m. An increase in the size of particles was observed with increasing molar ratio of PLF-68 with respect to castor oil. The percentage encapsulation efficiency varied between 71 and 98. Surface morphology of the microspheres as studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the spherical nature of the particles with wrinkles on their surfaces. The release of 5-FU through the microspheres was investigated in pH 7.4-phosphate buffer. An increase in release rate was observed with increasing molar ratio of PLF68 with respect to castor oil.

  5. Encapsulation efficiency and controlled release characteristics of crosslinked polyacrylamide particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairam, Malladi; Babu, V Ramesh; Vijaya, Boya; Naidu, Kumar; Aminabhavi, Tejraj M

    2006-08-31

    Polyacrylamide (pAAm) particles crosslinked with N,N-methylenebis-acrylamide/ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (NNMBA/EGDMA) have been prepared in water-methanol medium by the dispersion polymerization using poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP as a steric stabilizer. 5-fluorouracil an anticancer drug, has been loaded in situ into the crosslinked pAAm particles. Plain as well as drug loaded microparticles have been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction studies (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). DSC and XRD studies have indicated a molecular level dispersion of the drug in pAAm particles during in situ loading and SEM pictures have shown the formation of spherical and oval-shaped particles. In vitro release of 5-fluorouracil from the crosslinked pAAm particles has been carried out in 7.4 pH buffer medium. Both encapsulation efficiency and release patterns are found to depend on the nature of the crosslinking agent, amount of crosslinking agent used and the amount of drug loaded. In vitro release studies indicated the controlled release of 5-fluorouracil up to 12 h.

  6. Encapsulated Urea-Kaolinite Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Fertilizer Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siafu Ibahati Sempeho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urea controlled release fertilizer (CRF was prepared via kaolinite intercalation followed by gum arabic encapsulation in an attempt to reduce its severe losses associated with dissolution, hydrolysis, and diffusion. Following the beneficiation, the nonkaolinite fraction decreased from 39.58% to 0.36% whereas the kaolinite fraction increased from 60.42% to 99.64%. The X-ray diffractions showed that kaolinite was a major phase with FCC Bravais crystal lattice with particle sizes ranging between 14.6 nm and 92.5 nm. The particle size varied with intercalation ratios with methanol intercalated kaolinite > DMSO-kaolinite > urea-kaolinite (KPDMU. Following intercalation, SEM analysis revealed a change of order from thick compact overlapping euhedral pseudohexagonal platelets to irregular booklets which later transformed to vermiform morphology and dispersed euhedral pseudohexagonal platelets. Besides, dispersed euhedral pseudohexagonal platelets were seen to coexist with blocky-vermicular booklets. In addition, a unique brain-form agglomeration which transformed into roundish particles mart was observed after encapsulation. The nanocomposites decomposed between 48 and 600°C. Release profiles showed that 100% of urea was released in 97 hours from KPDMU while 87% was released in 150 hours from the encapsulated nanocomposite. The findings established that it is possible to use Pugu kaolinite and gum arabic biopolymer to prepare urea CRF formulations.

  7. Comparison of ICRP2 and ICRP30 for estimating the dose and adverse health effects from potential radionuclide releases from a geologic waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runkle, G.E.; Soldat, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the calculated risk of adverse health effects from the radionuclides considered in the inventory of a high-level waste repository using the ICRP2 and ICRP30 internal dosimetry models. A CRPC (cancer risk per curie) index was calculated to compare the two models. The CRPC indices for the ICRP30 model are approximately 2 to 20 times higher than the ICRP2 indices for most radionuclides for ingestion intakes. However, the /sup 237/Np index is approximately 200 times greater for the ICRP30 model and the /sup 228/Ra and /sup 226/Ra indices are approximately 30 to 90 times greater for the ICRP2 model. Generally, there is closer agreement of the CRPC indices for the inhalation intakes. A scenario that considers a U-tube effect and withdrawal of water from wells downdip from the repository was analyzed. This analysis, based on a hypothetical waste disposal site, considered groundwater transport and environmental transport with subsequent uptake by the human via ingestion and inhalation. The ICRP30 risks are higher by approximately 20 at 10,000 years post closure for the ingestion pathway. However, the ICRP2 risks are higher by factors of approximately 2 to 10 at times greater than 50,000 years. Differences in the mathematical modeling assumptions, gut uptakes and other metabolic parameters between the two models account for most of the variability in the risk estimates.

  8. Hybrid nanostructured drug carrier with tunable and controlled drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depan, D.; Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu

    2012-08-01

    We describe here a transformative approach to synthesize a hybrid nanostructured drug carrier that exhibits the characteristics of controlled drug release. The synthesis of the nanohybrid architecture involved two steps. The first step involved direct crystallization of biocompatible copolymer along the long axis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), followed by the second step of attachment of drug molecule to the polymer via hydrogen bonding. The extraordinary inorganic-organic hybrid architecture exhibited high drug loading ability and is physically stable even under extreme conditions of acidic media and ultrasonic irradiation. The temperature and pH sensitive characteristics of the hybrid drug carrier and high drug loading ability merit its consideration as a promising carrier and utilization of the fundamental aspects used for synthesis of other promising drug carriers. The higher drug release response during the application of ultrasonic frequency is ascribed to a cavitation-type process in which the acoustic bubbles nucleate and collapse releasing the drug. Furthermore, the study underscores the potential of uniquely combining CNTs and biopolymers for drug delivery. - Graphical abstract: Block-copolymer crystallized on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Nanohybrid drug carrier synthesized by attaching doxorubicin (DOX) to polymer crystallized CNTs. Crystallized polymer on CNTs provide mechanical stability. Triggered release of DOX. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The novel synthesis of a hybrid nanostructured drug carrier is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The drug carrier exhibits high drug loading ability and is physically stable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The high drug release is ascribed to a cavitation-type process.

  9. Design of a controlled release liquid formulation of lamotrigine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Kumar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available "n  "n  Background and the purpose of the study: Lamotrigine is a broad spectrum anticonvulsant drug widely used as mono- or adjunct- therapy in adults and children. The aim of this study was to develop controlled release liquid formulation of lamotrigine to improve bioavailability and compliance of pediatric and geriatric epileptic patients. "n  Methods: Multiple (w/o/w emulsion was prepared using one step emulsification technique. It was evaluated for entrapment efficiency (EE, morphology, zeta potential (ZP, polydispersity index (PI, rheology, thermal property, in vitro drug release behavior and stability. In vivo studies in albino mice were carried out using maximal electroshock seizure (MES test and strychnine induced seizure (SIS pattern test and results were compared with marketed formulation. "n  Results: The EE of the formulations varied from 84.37% to 98.11%. The ZP and PI values of the prepared batches were in the range of +23.46 to +28.07 and 0.256 and 0.365, respectively. Microscopic observation clearly indicated the stability of the emulsions during the storage period. All batches exhibited controlled in vitro drug release up to 12 hrs. Batch C11 exhibited significantly longer duration of protection of seizure in mice against MES and exhibited comparable efficacy in SIS as compared to the marketed formulation. "n  Major Conclusion: Multiple emulsion of lamotrigine compared to the marketed tablet showed plasma drug concentration within therapeutic range for longer time and comparable efficacy.

  10. Development of controlled drug release systems based on thiolated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernkop-Schnürch, A; Scholler, S; Biebel, R G

    2000-05-03

    The purpose of the present study was to generate mucoadhesive matrix-tablets based on thiolated polymers. Mediated by a carbodiimide, L-cysteine was thereby covalently linked to polycarbophil (PCP) and sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The resulting thiolated polymers displayed 100+/-8 and 1280+/-84 micromol thiol groups per gram, respectively (means+/-S.D.; n=6-8). In aqueous solutions these modified polymers were capable of forming inter- and/or intramolecular disulfide bonds. The velocity of this process augmented with increase of the polymer- and decrease of the proton-concentration. The oxidation proceeded more rapidly within thiolated PCP than within thiolated CMC. Due to the formation of disulfide bonds within thiol-containing polymers, the stability of matrix-tablets based on such polymers could be strongly improved. Whereas tablets based on the corresponding unmodified polymer disintegrated within 2 h, the swollen carrier matrix of thiolated CMC and PCP remained stable for 6.2 h (mean, n=4) and more than 48 h, respectively. Release studies of the model drug rifampicin demonstrated that a controlled release can be provided by thiolated polymer tablets. The combination of high stability, controlled drug release and mucoadhesive properties renders matrix-tablets based on thiolated polymers useful as novel drug delivery systems.

  11. Dopamine control of LH release in the tench (Tinca tinca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podhorec, Peter; Socha, Magdalena; Sokolowska-Mikolajczyk, Miroslawa; Policar, Tomas; Svinger, Viktor W; Drozd, Borek; Kouril, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Tench (Tinca tinca) is apparently the only known member of the Cyprinidae in which ovulation is stimulated following administration of a low dose of GnRH analogue (GnRHa) without a dopamine inhibitor. This study evaluated LH release effectiveness of the most commonly used GnRHa and clarified whether LH secretion followed by ovulation is subject to inhibitory dopaminergic control in tench. Fish were intraperitoneally injected with three types of GnRHa, GnRHa with dopamine inhibitor metoclopramide (combined treatment), or the dopamine inhibitor metoclopramide alone. LH concentrations at five sampling times (0, 6, 12, 24, and 33 h) together with ovulation success and fecundity index were recorded. The combined treatment triggered an almost immediate LH release peak with a gradual decline, and resulted in a high ovulation rate. In contrast to the combined treatment, an application of GnRHa alone at 10 μg kg(-1) induced gradual increase of LH concentrations with peaks close to ovulation time, and with high ovulation success. Significant differences in LH concentrations at 6 and 12h and no differences in ovulation success were found between the combined and the GnRHa alone treatments. Metoclopramide alone induced a small increase in LH with no ovulation. The study presents clear evidence of dopaminergic control of LH release in tench, with a high ovulation rate obtained after application of GnRHa alone or in combination with dopamine inhibitor.

  12. Optical control of insulin release using a photoswitchable sulfonylurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broichhagen, Johannes; Schönberger, Matthias; Cork, Simon C; Frank, James A; Marchetti, Piero; Bugliani, Marco; Shapiro, A M James; Trapp, Stefan; Rutter, Guy A; Hodson, David J; Trauner, Dirk

    2014-10-14

    Sulfonylureas are widely prescribed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Through their actions on ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, sulfonylureas boost insulin release from the pancreatic beta cell mass to restore glucose homeostasis. A limitation of these compounds is the elevated risk of developing hypoglycemia and cardiovascular disease, both potentially fatal complications. Here, we describe the design and development of a photoswitchable sulfonylurea, JB253, which reversibly and repeatedly blocks KATP channel activity following exposure to violet-blue light. Using in situ imaging and hormone assays, we further show that JB253 bestows light sensitivity upon rodent and human pancreatic beta cell function. Thus, JB253 enables the optical control of insulin release and may offer a valuable research tool for the interrogation of KATP channel function in health and T2DM.

  13. Controlled release of hydrophilic guest molecules from photoresponsive nucleolipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yawei; Yan, Yongfeng; Wang, Mingqing; Chen, Cuixia; Xu, Hai; Lu, Jian R

    2013-07-10

    Amphiphilic hybrid nucleolipids bear the structural and functional hallmarks of both lipids and nucleic acids and hold great potential for biotechnological applications. However, further tailoring of their structures and properties for specific applications represents a major challenge. We here report a novel design and synthesis of a light-responsive nucleolipid by introducing an o-nitrobenzyl group that acts as a linker between a nucleotide and a lipid. The nucleolipid was applied readily to preparing smart vesicles and encapsulating hydrophilic guest molecules 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF) in their inner aqueous phase. Upon light irradiation, their vesicular structure was disrupted as a result of the photolytic degradation of the nucleotide, resulting in CF release. Furthermore, temporally controlled CF release from these vesicles could be readily realized by turning on and off light. By demonstrating the molecular assembly and photodisassembly cycle, this report aims to stimulate further research exploring practical applications of nucleolipids.

  14. Chitosan Hydrogels for Chondroitin Sulphate Controlled Release: An Analytical Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Bianchera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analytical characterization of chitosan scaffolds obtained by freeze-gelation toward the uptake and the controlled release of chondroitin sulphate (CS, as cartilage repair agent, under different pH conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR, and liquid chromatography-UV spectrophotometry (LC-UV techniques were exploited to obtain qualitative and quantitative descriptions of polymer and drug behaviour in the biomaterial. As for morphology, SEM analysis allowed the evaluation of scaffold porosity in terms of pore size and distribution both at the surface (Feret diameter 58±19 μm and on the cross section (Feret diameter 106±51 μm. LC and ATR-FTIR evidenced a pH-dependent CS loading and release behaviour, strongly highlighting the role of electrostatic forces on chitosan/chondroitin sulphate interactions.

  15. Graphene as a photothermal switch for controlled drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, Paolo; Tatini, Francesca; Cavigli, Lucia; Ottaviano, Stefania; Ghini, Giacomo; Pini, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    Graphene has recently emerged as a novel material in the biomedical field owing to its optical properties, biocompatibility, large specific surface area and low cost. In this paper, we provide the first demonstration of the possibility of using light to remotely trigger the release of drugs from graphene in a highly controlled manner. Different drugs including chemotherapeutics and proteins are firmly adsorbed onto reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets dispersed in a biopolymer film and then released by individual millisecond-long light pulses generated by a near infrared (NIR) laser. Here graphene plays the dual role of a versatile substrate for temporary storage of drugs and an effective transducer of NIR-light into heat. Drug release appears to be narrowly confined within the size of the laser spot under noninvasive conditions and can be precisely dosed depending on the number of pulses. The approach proposed paves the way for tailor-made pharmacological treatments of chronic diseases, including cancer, anaemia and diabetes.Graphene has recently emerged as a novel material in the biomedical field owing to its optical properties, biocompatibility, large specific surface area and low cost. In this paper, we provide the first demonstration of the possibility of using light to remotely trigger the release of drugs from graphene in a highly controlled manner. Different drugs including chemotherapeutics and proteins are firmly adsorbed onto reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets dispersed in a biopolymer film and then released by individual millisecond-long light pulses generated by a near infrared (NIR) laser. Here graphene plays the dual role of a versatile substrate for temporary storage of drugs and an effective transducer of NIR-light into heat. Drug release appears to be narrowly confined within the size of the laser spot under noninvasive conditions and can be precisely dosed depending on the number of pulses. The approach proposed paves the way for tailor

  16. Thermal post-treatment alters nutrient release from a controlled-release fertilizer coated with a waterborne polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zijun; Du, Changwen; Li, Ting; Shen, Yazhen; Zhou, Jianmin

    2015-09-01

    Controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) use a controlled-release technology to enhance the nutrient use efficiency of crops. Many factors affect the release of nutrients from the waterborne polymer-coated CRF, but the effects of thermal post-treatments remain unclear. In this study, a waterborne polyacrylate-coated CRF was post-treated at different temperatures (30 °C, 60 °C, and 80 °C) and durations (2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h) after being developed in the Wurster fluidized bed. To characterize the polyacrylate membrane, and hence to analyze the mechanism of nutrient release, Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy were employed. The nutrient-release model of CRF post-treated at 30 °C was the inverse “L” curve, but an increased duration of the post-treatment had no effect. The nutrient-release model was “S” curve and nutrient-release period was enhanced at higher post-treatment temperatures, and increased post-treatment duration lengthened slowed nutrient release due to a more compact membrane and a smoother membrane surface as well as a promoted crosslinking action. CRF equipped with specified nutrient-release behaviors can be achieved by optimizing the thermal post-treatment parameters, which can contribute to the development and application of waterborne polymer-coated CRF and controlled-release technologies.

  17. Radionuclides transfer into halophytes growing in tidal salt marshes from the Southwest of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Carlos J; Vaca, Federico; García-Trapote, Ana; Hierro, Almudena; Bolívar, Juan P; Castellanos, Eloy M

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries are sinks of materials and substances which are released directly into them or transported from rivers that drain the basin. It is usual to find high organic matter loads and fine particles in the sediments. We analyzed radionuclide concentrations ((210)Po, (230)Th, (232)Th, (234)U, (238)U, (226)Ra, (228)Th, (228)Ra, (40)K) in sediments and three different organs (roots, stems and leaves) of three species of halophytes plants (Spartina maritima, Spartina densiflora and Sarcocornia perennis). The study was carried out in two tidal salt marshes, one polluted by U-series radionuclides and another nearby that was unpolluted and was used as a control (or reference) area. The Tinto River salt marsh shows high levels of U-series radionuclides coming from mining and industrial discharges. On the contrary, the unperturbed Piedras River salt marsh is located about 25 km from the Tinto marsh, and shows little presence of contaminants and radionuclides. The results of this work have shown that natural radionuclide concentrations (specially the U-isotopes) in the Tinto salt marsh sediments are one order of magnitude higher than those in the Piedras marsh. These radionuclide enhancements are reflected in the different organs of the plants, which have similar concentration increases as the sediments where they have grown. Finally, the transfer factor (TF) of the most polluted radionuclides (U-isotopes and (210)Po) in the Tinto area are one order of magnitude higher than in the Piedras area, indicating that the fraction of each radionuclide in the sediment originating from the pollution is more available for the plants than the indigenous fraction. This means that the plants of the salt marshes are unhelpful as bioindicators or for the phytoremediation of radionuclides.

  18. A Quality Control Assay to Access the HCl Molarity of Radionuclide Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Fitzsimmons

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Strontium-82 is produced by proton activation of a rubidium chloride target in an accelerator or cyclotron and purified by ion exchange chromatography. The Strontrium-82 is used in Cardigen generators to produce Rubidium-82 for cardiac imaging. Quality control testing of the purified Strontium-82 is performed with Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES and gamma spectroscopy. To meet Department of Energy specifications for HCl molarity the purified Strontium-82 solution needs to be tested to determine if the isotope is in the 0.05–0.5 M HCl range. This manuscript reports a simple HCl molarity test to determine if the purified Strontium-82 solution meets specifications. Validation of the assay was performed by evaluating all solutions associate with Strontium-82 processing.

  19. INVITED PAPER: Control of sudden releases in channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katopodes, Nikolaos D.

    2009-12-01

    We present a method for the detection and real-time control of chemical releases in channel flow. Sensor arrays capable of detecting a broad menu of chemical agents are required at strategic locations of the channel. The sensors detect the instantaneous, spatially distributed concentration of the chemical agent and transmit the associated information to a predictive control model. The model provides optimal operation scenarios for computer controlled bleed valves mounted on the channel walls and connected to a common manifold. Control and elimination of the chemical cloud are achieved by optimal blowing and suction of ambient fluid. Gradient information is obtained by use of adjoint equations, so optimization of the control actions is achieved with the highest possible efficiency. The control is optimized over a finite prediction horizon and instructions are sent to the valve manifold. Next, the sensor arrays detect all changes effected by the control and report them to the control model, which advances the process over the next control horizon. Non-reflective boundary conditions for the adjoint equations are derived by a characteristic analysis, which minimizes spurious information in the computation of sensitivities.

  20. Collagen scaffolds with controlled insulin release and controlled pore structure for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Himansu Sekhar; Chen, Shangwu; Zhang, Qin; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    Controlled and local release of growth factors and nutrients from porous scaffolds is important for maintenance of cell survival, proliferation, and promotion of tissue regeneration. The purpose of the present research was to design a controlled release porous collagen-microbead hybrid scaffold with controlled pore structure capable of releasing insulin for application to cartilage tissue regeneration. Collagen-microbead hybrid scaffold was prepared by hybridization of insulin loaded PLGA microbeads with collagen using a freeze-drying technique. The pore structure of the hybrid scaffold was controlled by using preprepared ice particulates having a diameter range of 150-250 μ m. Hybrid scaffold had a controlled pore structure with pore size equivalent to ice particulates and good interconnection. The microbeads showed an even spatial distribution throughout the pore walls. In vitro insulin release profile from the hybrid scaffold exhibited a zero order release kinetics up to a period of 4 weeks without initial burst release. Culture of bovine articular chondrocytes in the hybrid scaffold demonstrated high bioactivity of the released insulin. The hybrid scaffold facilitated cell seeding and spatial cell distribution and promoted cell proliferation.

  1. Collagen Scaffolds with Controlled Insulin Release and Controlled Pore Structure for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himansu Sekhar Nanda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled and local release of growth factors and nutrients from porous scaffolds is important for maintenance of cell survival, proliferation, and promotion of tissue regeneration. The purpose of the present research was to design a controlled release porous collagen-microbead hybrid scaffold with controlled pore structure capable of releasing insulin for application to cartilage tissue regeneration. Collagen-microbead hybrid scaffold was prepared by hybridization of insulin loaded PLGA microbeads with collagen using a freeze-drying technique. The pore structure of the hybrid scaffold was controlled by using preprepared ice particulates having a diameter range of 150–250 μm. Hybrid scaffold had a controlled pore structure with pore size equivalent to ice particulates and good interconnection. The microbeads showed an even spatial distribution throughout the pore walls. In vitro insulin release profile from the hybrid scaffold exhibited a zero order release kinetics up to a period of 4 weeks without initial burst release. Culture of bovine articular chondrocytes in the hybrid scaffold demonstrated high bioactivity of the released insulin. The hybrid scaffold facilitated cell seeding and spatial cell distribution and promoted cell proliferation.

  2. Voltage-Responsive Controlled Release Film with Cargo Release Self-Monitoring Property Based on Hydrophobicity Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiangyu; Li, Yanan; Li, Fengyu; Sun, Ruijuan; Wang, Wenqian; Wen, Yongqiang; Song, Yanlin; Zhang, Xueji

    2017-03-16

    Herein, voltage-responsive controlled release film was constructed by grafting ferrocene on the mesoporous inverse opal photonic crystal (mIOPC). The film achieved free-blockage controlled release and realized the monitoring of cargo release without external indicator. Free-blockage was attributed to the voltage switchable nanovalves which undergo hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transition when applying voltage. Monitoring of cargo release was attributed to the optical property of mIOPC, the bandgap of mIOPC had a red shift when the solution invaded in. The film was hydrophobic enough to stop solution intrusion. Once the voltage was applied, the film became hydrophilic, leading to invasion of the solution. As a result, the cargos were released and the bandgap of mIOPC was red-shifted. Therefore, in this paper both a free-blockage controlled release film and a release sensing system was prepared. The study provides new insights into highly effective controlled release and release sensing without indicator.

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF CLOZAPINE PELLETS FOR CONTROLLED RELEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Gowda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This research work was done to design oral controlled release matrix pellets of water insoluble drug Clozapine, using blend of Hydroxypropyl cellulose and glyceryl palmito stearate as as matrix polymers, methyl crystalline cellulose as spheronizer enhancer,sodium lauryl sulphate as pore forming agent. Clozapine formulations developed by the pellitization technique by drug loaded pellets were characterized with regard to the drug content, size distribution, Scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Xray Diffraction study. Stability studies were carried out on the optimized formulation for aperiod of 90 days, 40 ± 2 oC and 75 ± 5% relative humidity. The drug content was in the range of 95.34 – 98.12 %. The mean particle size of drug loaded pellets was in the range 1018 to 1065 mm. SEM photographs and calculated sphericity factor confirms that the prepared formulations were spherical in nature. The drug loaded pellets were stable and compatible as confirmed by DSC and FTIR studies. XRD patterns revealed the crystalline nature of pure clozapine. Loose surface crystal study indicated that crystalline clozapine was observed in all formulation and more clear in formulation A5. Higher amount of clozapine released was observed from formulation A5 and Syclop® 25 mg tablet as compared to all other formulations and mechanism of drug release followed Fickian diffusion. It can be concluded that formulation A5 is an ideal formulation for once a day administration.

  4. Tunable controlled release of molecular species from Halloysite nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elumalai, Divya Narayan

    Encouraged by potential applications in rust coatings, self-healing composites, selective delivery of drugs, and catalysis, the transport of molecular species through Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), specifically the storage and controlled release of these molecules, has attracted strong interest in recent years. HNTs are a naturally occurring biocompatible nanomaterial that are abundantly and readily available. They are alumosilicate based tubular clay nanotubes with an inner lumen of 15 nm and a length of 600-900 nm. The size of the inner lumen of HNTs may be adjusted by etching. The lumen can be loaded with functional agents like antioxidants, anticorrosion agents, flame-retardant agents, drugs, or proteins, allowing for a sustained release of these agents for hours. The release times can be further tuned for days and months by the addition of tube end-stoppers. In this work a three-dimensional, time-quantified Monte Carlo model that efficiently describes diffusion through and from nanotubes is implemented. Controlled delivery from Halloysite Nanotubes (HNT) is modeled based on interactions between the HNT's inner wall and the nanoparticles (NP) and among NPs themselves. The model was validated using experimental data published in the literature. The validated model is then used to study the effect of multiple parameters like HNT diameter and length, particle charge, ambient temperature and the creation of smart caps at the tube ends on the release of encapsulated NPs. The results show that release profiles depend on the size distribution of the HNT batch used for the experiment, as delivery is sensitive to HNT lumen and length. The effect of the addition of end-caps to the HNTs, on the rate of release of encapsulated NPs is also studied here. The results show that the release profiles are significantly affected by the addition of end caps to the HNTs and is sensitive to the end-cap pore lumen. A very good agreement with the experiment is observed when a weight

  5. Electrically controlled drug release from nanostructured polypyrrole coated on titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Pareta, Rajesh; Webster, Thomas J.

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown out of anodized nanotubular titanium (MWNT-Ti) can be used as a sensing electrode for various biomedical applications; such sensors detected the redox reactions of certain molecules, specifically proteins deposited by osteoblasts during extracellular matrix bone formation. Since it is known that polypyrrole (PPy) can release drugs upon electrical stimulation, in this study antibiotics (penicillin/streptomycin, P/S) or an anti-inflammatory drug (dexamethasone, Dex), termed PPy[P/S] or PPy[Dex], respectively, were electrodeposited in PPy on titanium. The objective of the present study was to determine if such drugs can be released from PPy on demand and (by applying a voltage) control cellular behavior important for orthopedic applications. Results showed that PPy films possessed nanometer-scale roughness as analyzed by atomic force microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of P/S and Dex encapsulated within the PPy films. Results from cyclic voltammetry showed that 80% of the drugs were released on demand when sweep voltages were applied for five cycles at a scan rate of 0.1 V s - 1. Furthermore, osteoblast (bone-forming cells) and fibroblast (fibrous tissue-forming cells) adhesion were determined on the PPy films. Results showed that PPy[Dex] enhanced osteoblast adhesion after 4 h of culture compared to plain Ti. PPy-Ti (with or without anionic drug doping) inhibited fibroblast adhesion compared to plain Ti. These in vitro results confirmed that electrodeposited PPy[P/S] and PPy[Dex] can release drugs on demand to potentially fight bacterial infection, reduce inflammation, promote bone growth or reduce fibroblast functions, further implicating the use of such materials as implant sensors.

  6. Electrically controlled drug release from nanostructured polypyrrole coated on titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Pareta, Rajesh; Webster, Thomas J, E-mail: Thomas_Webster@Brown.edu [School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Previous studies have demonstrated that multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown out of anodized nanotubular titanium (MWNT-Ti) can be used as a sensing electrode for various biomedical applications; such sensors detected the redox reactions of certain molecules, specifically proteins deposited by osteoblasts during extracellular matrix bone formation. Since it is known that polypyrrole (PPy) can release drugs upon electrical stimulation, in this study antibiotics (penicillin/streptomycin, P/S) or an anti-inflammatory drug (dexamethasone, Dex), termed PPy[P/S] or PPy[Dex], respectively, were electrodeposited in PPy on titanium. The objective of the present study was to determine if such drugs can be released from PPy on demand and (by applying a voltage) control cellular behavior important for orthopedic applications. Results showed that PPy films possessed nanometer-scale roughness as analyzed by atomic force microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of P/S and Dex encapsulated within the PPy films. Results from cyclic voltammetry showed that 80% of the drugs were released on demand when sweep voltages were applied for five cycles at a scan rate of 0.1 V s{sup -1}. Furthermore, osteoblast (bone-forming cells) and fibroblast (fibrous tissue-forming cells) adhesion were determined on the PPy films. Results showed that PPy[Dex] enhanced osteoblast adhesion after 4 h of culture compared to plain Ti. PPy-Ti (with or without anionic drug doping) inhibited fibroblast adhesion compared to plain Ti. These in vitro results confirmed that electrodeposited PPy[P/S] and PPy[Dex] can release drugs on demand to potentially fight bacterial infection, reduce inflammation, promote bone growth or reduce fibroblast functions, further implicating the use of such materials as implant sensors.

  7. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment: Radionuclide Release Sensitivity to Diminished Brine and Gas Flows to/from Transuranic Waste Disposal Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad A. Day

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository releases are evaluated through the application of modified parameters to simulate accelerated creep closure, include capillary pressure effects on relative permeability, and increase brine and gas saturation in the operations and experimental (OPS/EXP areas. The modifications to the repository model result in increased pressures and decreased brine saturations in waste areas and increased pressures and brine saturations in the OPS/EXP areas. Brine flows up the borehole during a hypothetical drilling intrusion are nearly identical and brine flows up the shaft are decreased. The modified parameters essentially halt the flow of gas from the southern waste areas to the northern nonwaste areas, except as transported through the marker beds and anhydrite layers. The combination of slightly increased waste region pressures and very slightly decreased brine saturations result in a modest increase in spallings and no significant effect on direct brine releases, with total releases from the Culebra and cutting and caving releases unaffected. Overall, the effects on total high-probability mean releases from the repository are insignificant, with total low-probability mean releases minimally increased. It is concluded that the modified OPS/EXP area parameters have an insignificant effect on the prediction of total releases.

  9. Waste isolation pilot plant performance assessment: Radionuclide release sensitivity to diminished brine and gas flows to/from transuranic waste disposal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, Brad A.; Camphouse, R. C.; Zeitler, Todd R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository releases are evaluated through the application of modified parameters to simulate accelerated creep closure, include capillary pressure effects on relative permeability, and increase brine and gas saturation in the operations and experimental (OPS/EXP) areas. The modifications to the repository model result in increased pressures and decreased brine saturations in waste areas and increased pressures and brine saturations in the OPS/EXP areas. Brine flows up the borehole during a hypothetical drilling intrusion are nearly identical and brine flows up the shaft are decreased. The modified parameters essentially halt the flow of gas from the southern waste areas to the northern nonwaste areas, except as transported through the marker beds and anhydrite layers. The combination of slightly increased waste region pressures and very slightly decreased brine saturations result in a modest increase in spallings and no significant effect on direct brine releases, with total releases from the Culebra and cutting and caving releases unaffected. Overall, the effects on total high-probability mean releases from the repository are insignificant, with total low-probability mean releases minimally increased. It is concluded that the modified OPS/EXP area parameters have an insignificant effect on the prediction of total releases.

  10. Evaluation of a soil incubation method to characterize nitrogen release patterns of slow- and controlled-release fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, L Carolina; Sartain, Jerry B; Obreza, Thomas A; Hall, William L; Thiex, Nancy J

    2014-01-01

    Several technologies have been proposed to characterize the nutrient release patterns of slow-release fertilizers (SRF) and controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) during the last few decades. These technologies have been developed mainly by manufacturers, and are product-specific, based on the regulation and analysis of each SRF and CRF product. Despite previous efforts to characterize SRF and CRF materials, no standardized, validated method exists to assess their nutrient release patterns. However, the increased production and distribution of these materials in specialty and nonspecialty markets requires an appropriate method to verify product claims and material performance. A soil incubation column leaching procedure was evaluated to determine its suitability as a standard method to estimate nitrogen (N) release patterns of SRFs and CRFs during 180 days. The influence of three soil/sand ratios, three incubation temperatures, and four soils on method behavior was assessed using five SRFs and three CRFs. In general, the highest soil/sand ratio increased the N release rate of all materials, but this effect was more marked for the SRFs. Temperature had the greatest influence on N release rates. For CRFs, the initial N release rates and the percentage N released/day increased as temperature increased. For SRFs, raising the temperature from 25 to 35 degreesC increased initial N release rate and the total cumulative N released, and almost doubled the percentage released/day. The percentage N released/day from all products generally increased as the texture of the soil changed from sandy to loamy (lowa>California>Pennsylvania>Florida). The soil incubation technique was demonstrated to be robust and reliable for characterizing N release patterns from SRFs and CRFs. The method was reproducible, and variations in soil/sand ratio, temperature, and soil had little effect on the results.

  11. Gelatin methacrylate microspheres for controlled growth factor release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh H; McKinney, Jay; Miller, Tobias; Bongiorno, Tom; McDevitt, Todd C

    2015-02-01

    Gelatin has been commonly used as a delivery vehicle for various biomolecules for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications due to its simple fabrication methods, inherent electrostatic binding properties, and proteolytic degradability. Compared to traditional chemical cross-linking methods, such as the use of glutaraldehyde (GA), methacrylate modification of gelatin offers an alternative method to better control the extent of hydrogel cross-linking. Here we examined the physical properties and growth factor delivery of gelatin methacrylate (GMA) microparticles (MPs) formulated with a wide range of different cross-linking densities (15-90%). Less methacrylated MPs had decreased elastic moduli and larger mesh sizes compared to GA MPs, with increasing methacrylation correlating to greater moduli and smaller mesh sizes. As expected, an inverse correlation between microparticle cross-linking density and degradation was observed, with the lowest cross-linked GMA MPs degrading at the fastest rate, comparable to GA MPs. Interestingly, GMA MPs at lower cross-linking densities could be loaded with up to a 10-fold higher relative amount of growth factor than conventional GA cross-linked MPs, despite the GA MPs having an order of magnitude greater gelatin content. Moreover, a reduced GMA cross-linking density resulted in more complete release of bone morphogenic protein 4 and basic fibroblast growth factor and accelerated release rate with collagenase treatment. These studies demonstrate that GMA MPs provide a more flexible platform for growth factor delivery by enhancing the relative binding capacity and permitting proteolytic degradation tunability, thereby offering a more potent controlled release system for growth factor delivery.

  12. Controlled iodine release from polyurethane sponges for water decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviv, Oren; Laout, Natalia; Ratner, Stanislav; Harik, Oshrat; Kunduru, Konda Reddy; Domb, Abraham J

    2013-12-28

    Iodinated polyurethane (IPU) sponges were prepared by immersing sponges in aqueous/organic solutions of iodine or exposing sponges to iodine vapors. Iodine was readily adsorbed into the polymers up to 100% (w/w). The adsorption of iodine on the surface was characterized by XPS and SEM analyses. The iodine loaded IPU sponges were coated with ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), in order to release iodine in a controlled rate for water decontamination combined with active carbon cartridge, which adsorbs the iodine residues after the microbial inactivation. The EVA coated IPU were incorporated in a water purifier and tested for iodine release to water and for microbial inactivation efficiency according to WQA certification program against P231/EPA for 250l, using 25l a day with flow rate of 6-8min/1l. The antimicrobial activity was also studied against Escherichia coli and MS2 phage. Bacterial results exceeded the minimal requirement for bacterial removal of 6log reduction throughout the entire lifespan. At any testing point, no bacteria was detected in the outlet achieving more than 7.1 to more than 8log reduction as calculated upon the inlet concentration. Virus surrogate, MS2, reduction results varied from 4.11log reduction under tap water, and 5.11log reduction under basic water (pH9) to 1.32 for acidic water (pH5). Controlled and stable iodine release was observed with the EVA coated IPU sponges and was effective in deactivating the bacteria and virus present in the contaminated water and thus, these iodinated PU systems could be used in water purification to provide safe drinking water. These sponges may find applications as disinfectants in medicine.

  13. Influence of alcohol on the release of tramadol from 24-h controlled-release formulations during in vitro dissolution experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, M J; Brown, M B; Pannala, A; Beck, P; Martin, G P

    2008-08-01

    Recent warnings by regulatory bodies and a product recall by the FDA have generated much interest in the area of dose dumping from controlled-release opioid analgesic formulations when coingested with alcohol. It was the aim of this study to address this issue and in doing so, gain understanding on how alcohol-induced effects may be avoided. In this study, tramadol release from Ultram ER tablets and T-long capsules was significantly increased in the presence of ethanol. Conversely, a decrease in the rate of tramadol release was seen from Tridural extended-release tablets in the presence of alcohol.

  14. Contact lenses as drug controlled release systems: a narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Prior Filipe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Topically applied therapy is the most common way to treat ocular diseases, however given the anatomical and physiological constraints of the eye, frequent dosing is required with possible repercussions in terms of patient compliance. Beyond refractive error correction, contact lenses (CLs have, in the last few decades emerged as a potential ophthalmic drug controlled release system (DCRS. Extensive research is underway to understand how to best modify CLs to increase residence time and bioavailability of drugs within therapeutic levels on the ocular surface.These devices may simultaneously correct ametropia and have a role in managing ophthalmic disorders that can hinder CL wear such as dry eye, glaucoma, ocular allergy and cornea infection and injury. In this narrative review the authors explain how the ocular surface structures determine drug diffusion in the eye and summarize the strategies to enhance drug residence time and bioavailability. They synthesize findings and clinical applications of drug soaked CLs as DCRS combined with delivery diffusion barriers, incorporation of functional monomers, ion related controlled release, molecular imprinting, nanoparticles and layering. The authors draw conclusions about the impact of these novel ophthalmic agents delivery systems in improving drug transport in the target tissue and patient compliance, in reducing systemic absorption and undesired side effects, and discuss future perspectives.

  15. A concise review on smart polymers for controlled drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghabegi Moghanjoughi, Arezou; Khoshnevis, Dorna; Zarrabi, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Design and synthesis of efficient drug delivery systems are of critical importance in health care management. Innovations in materials chemistry especially in polymer field allows introduction of advanced drug delivery systems since polymers could provide controlled release of drugs in predetermined doses over long periods, cyclic and tunable dosages. To this end, researchers have taken advantages of smart polymers since they can undergo large reversible, chemical, or physical fluctuations as responses to small changes in environmental conditions, for instance, in pH, temperature, light, and phase transition. The present review aims to highlight various kinds of smart polymers, which are used in controlled drug delivery systems as well as mechanisms of action and their applications.

  16. Modeling controlled nutrient release from a population of polymer coated fertilizers: statistically based model for diffusion release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaviv, Avi; Raban, Smadar; Zaidel, Elina

    2003-05-15

    A statistically based model for describing the release from a population of polymer coated controlled release fertilizer (CRF) granules by the diffusion mechanism was constructed. The model is based on a mathematical-mechanistic description of the release from a single granule of a coated CRF accounting for its complex and nonlinear nature. The large variation within populations of coated CRFs poses the need for a statistically based approach to integrate over the release from the individual granules within a given population for which the distribution and range of granule radii and coating thickness are known. The model was constructed and verified using experimentally determined parameters and release curves of polymer-coated CRFs. A sensitivity analysis indicated the importance of water permeability in controlling the lag period and that of solute permeability in governing the rate of linear release and the total duration of the release. Increasing the mean values of normally distributed granule radii or coating thickness, increases the lag period and the period of linear release. The variation of radii and coating thickness, within realistic ranges, affects the release only when the standard deviation is very large or when water permeability is reduced without affecting solute permeability. The model provides an effective tool for designing and improving agronomic and environmental effectiveness of polymer-coated CRFs.

  17. Effects of Control Release Fertilizers on Nutrient Leaching, Palm Growth and Production Cost

    OpenAIRE

    Pushpa Soti; Angie Fleurissaint; Stewart Reed; Krish Jayachandran

    2015-01-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different controlled release fertilizer technologies on nutrient leaching and plant growth parameters of two palm species, Chinese Fan (Livistona chinensis) and Queen (Syagrus romanzoffiana). We compared Nutri-Pak (12-4-12 controlled release packet) and Harrell’s (12-4-12 controlled release polymer coated urea) against Atlantic (8-4-12 controlled release polymer coated urea, coated sulfate of potash), the most commonly used palm fertilize...

  18. Estimates of Columbia River radionuclide concentrations: Data for Phase 1 dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, M.C.; Walters, W.H.

    1991-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project to estimate the radiation doses people may have received from historical Hanford Site operations. Under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel, the project is being conducted in phases. The objective of the first phase is to assess the feasibility of the project-wide technical approach for acquiring data and developing models needed to calculate potential radiation doses. This report summarizes data that were generated for the Phase 1 dose calculations. These included monthly average concentrations of specific radionuclides in Columbia River water and sediments between Priest Rapids Dam and McNary Dam for the years 1964 to 1966. Nine key radionuclides were selected for analysis based on estimation of their contribution to dose. Concentrations of these radionuclides in the river were estimated using existing measurements and hydraulic calculations based on the simplifying assumption that dilution and decay were the primary processes controlling the fate of radionuclides released to the river. Five sub-reaches between Priest Rapids Dam and McNary Dam, corresponding to population centers and tributary confluences, were identified and monthly average radionuclide concentrations were calculated for each sub-reach. The hydraulic calculations were performed to provide radionuclide concentration estimates for time periods and geographic locations where measured data were not available. The validity of the calculation method will be evaluated in Phase 2. 12 refs., 13 figs., 49 tabs.

  19. Thermal post-treatment alters nutrient release from a controlled-release fertilizer coated with a waterborne polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Zijun Zhou; Changwen Du; Ting Li; Yazhen Shen; Jianmin Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) use a controlled-release technology to enhance the nutrient use efficiency of crops. Many factors affect the release of nutrients from the waterborne polymer-coated CRF, but the effects of thermal post-treatments remain unclear. In this study, a waterborne polyacrylate-coated CRF was post-treated at different temperatures (30 °C, 60 °C, and 80 °C) and durations (2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h) after being developed in the Wurster fluidized bed. To characterize the ...

  20. Thermal post-treatment alters nutrient release from a controlled-release fertilizer coated with a waterborne polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Zijun Zhou; Changwen Du; Ting Li; Yazhen Shen; Jianmin Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) use a controlled-release technology to enhance the nutrient use efficiency of crops. Many factors affect the release of nutrients from the waterborne polymer-coated CRF, but the effects of thermal post-treatments remain unclear. In this study, a waterborne polyacrylate-coated CRF was post-treated at different temperatures (30 °C, 60 °C, and 80 °C) and durations (2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h) after being developed in the Wurster fluidized bed. To characterize the ...

  1. Oral suspensions of morphine hydrochloride for controlled release: rheological properties and drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, M E; López, G; Gallardo, V; Ruiz, M A

    2011-04-04

    Recent developments in pharmaceutical technology have facilitated the design and production of modified release formulas for drugs whose physical, chemical or biological properties impede release and thus might compromise their efficacy or safety. One such drug is morphine, whose short half-life requires repeated doses at short intervals. The use of biocompatible polymers such as ethylcellulose has made it possible to develop microencapsulated formulations which facilitate liquid, sustained-release pharmaceutical formulas for oral administration. We developed a stable final formulation of morphine with an acceptable release profile by comparing the rheological properties and stability of formulations with different thickeners (xanthan gum, Carbopol, and carboxymethylcellulose with microcrystalline cellulose) at different concentrations from 0.25% to 1.0%. Release assays in a Franz-type cell were done to determine the most suitable release profile for the formulation.

  2. Properties and controlled release of chitosan microencapsulated limonene oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson M. Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan microcapsules containing limonene essential oil as active ingredient were prepared by coacervation using three different concentrations of NaOH (0.50, 1.00, 1.45 wt% and fixed concentrations of chitosan and surfactant of 0.50 wt%. The produced microcapsules were fully characterized in their morphology and chemical composition, and the kinetic release analysis of the active ingredient was evaluated after deposition in a non-woven cellulose fabric. The concentration of 1.00 and 1.45 wt% clearly show the best results in terms of dimension and shape of the microcapsules as well as in the volatility results. However, at the concentration of 1 wt% a higher number of microcapsules were produced as confirmed by FTIR and EDS analysis. Free microcapsules are spherical in size with disperse diameters between 2 and 12 μm. Immobilized microcapsules showed sizes from 4 to 7 μm, a rough surface and loss of spherical shape with pore formation in the chitosan walls. SEM analysis confirms that at higher NaOH concentrations, the larger the size of the microcapsules. This technique shows that by tuning NaOH concentration it is possible to efficiently control the release rate of encapsulated active agents demonstrating great potential as insect repellent for textiles.

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals and other compounds labelled with short-lived radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals and Other Compounds Labelled with Short-Lived Radionuclides covers through both review and contributed articles the potential applications and developments in labeling with short-lived radionuclides whose use is restricted to institutions with accelerators. The book discusses the current and potential use of generator-produced radionuclides as well as other short-lived radionuclides, and the problems of quality control of such labeled compounds. The book is useful to nuclear medicine physicians.

  4. Radionuclides: Accumulation and Transport in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D K; Chatterjee, S; Datta, S; Voronina, A V; Walther, C

    Application of radioactive elements or radionuclides for anthropogenic use is a widespread phenomenon nowadays. Radionuclides undergo radioactive decays releasing ionizing radiation like gamma ray(s) and/or alpha or beta particles that can displace electrons in the living matter (like in DNA) and disturb its function. Radionuclides are highly hazardous pollutants of considerable impact on the environment, food chain and human health. Cleaning up of the contaminated environment through plants is a promising technology where the rhizosphere may play an important role. Plants belonging to the families of Brassicaceae, Papilionaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Poaceae, and Asteraceae are most important in this respect and offer the largest potential for heavy metal phytoremediation. Plants like Lactuca sativa L., Silybum marianum Gaertn., Centaurea cyanus L., Carthamus tinctorius L., Helianthus annuus and H. tuberosus are also important plants for heavy metal phytoremediation. However, transfer factors (TF) of radionuclide from soil/water to plant ([Radionuclide]plant/[Radionuclide]soil) vary widely in different plants. Rhizosphere, rhizobacteria and varied metal transporters like NRAMP, ZIP families CDF, ATPases (HMAs) family like P1B-ATPases, are involved in the radio-phytoremediation processes. This review will discuss recent advancements and potential application of plants for radionuclide removal from the environment.

  5. Externally controlled triggered-release of drug from PLGA micro and nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Hua

    Full Text Available Biofilm infections are extremely hard to eradicate and controlled, triggered and controlled drug release properties may prolong drug release time. In this study, the ability to externally control drug release from micro and nanoparticles was investigated. We prepared micro/nanoparticles containing ciprofloxacin (CIP and magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid PLGA. Both micro/nanoparticles were observed to have narrow size distributions. We investigated and compared their passive and externally triggered drug release properties based on their different encapsulation structures for the nano and micro systems. In passive release studies, CIP demonstrated a fast rate of release in first 2 days which then slowed and sustained release for approximately 4 weeks. Significantly, magnetic nanoparticles containing systems all showed ability to have triggered drug release when exposed to an external oscillating magnetic field (OMF. An experiment where the OMF was turned on and off also confirmed the ability to control the drug release in a pulsatile manner. The magnetically triggered release resulted in a 2-fold drug release increase compared with normal passive release. To confirm drug integrity following release, the antibacterial activity of released drug was evaluated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro. CIP maintained its antimicrobial activity after encapsulation and triggered release.

  6. Factors controlling alkalisalt deposition in recovery boiler- release mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P.; Kylloenen, H.; Kurkela, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology Group

    1996-12-01

    As part of a cooperative effort to develop a model to describe the behaviour of inorganic compounds in kraft recovery boilers, an experimental investigation of the release of sulphur during black liquor pyrolysis has been undertaken. Previous to these studies, the mechanisms of sulphur release and the reasons for the observed effects of process conditions on sulphur release were very poorly understood. On the basis of the experimental results, the main reactions leading to sulphur release have been elucidated with a fair degree of certainty. Logical explanations for the variations of sulphur release with temperature and with liquor solids content have been proposed. The influence of pressure has been investigated in order to gain insights into the effects of mass transfer on the sulphur-release rate. In the near future, the research will be aimed at generating the kinetic data necessary for modelling the release of sulphur in the recovery furnace. (author)

  7. Temporal control of drug release from biodegradable polymer: multicomponent diclofenac sodium releasing PLGA 80/20 rod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkola, Lila; Viitanen, Petrus; Ashammakhi, Nureddin

    2009-05-01

    In our previous studies we have reported on the development of diclofenac sodium (DS) releasing rods. However, their drug release profiles were unsatisfactory. To enhance the drug release properties of the implant, we have developed a system whereby various elements can be combined into one implant. Melt extruded, self-reinforced (SR), and sterilized (S) DS-containing SR-PLGA 80/20 billets were combined to produce multicomponent implants with various compositions. These components were basically heat pressed together to form multicomponent rods. Drug release from single component and multicomponent rods was defined using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer. DS was released from individual components within 82-111 days and from multicomponent rods within 50-70 days. Thermal properties were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The melting temperature (T(m)) of multicomponent implants was about 157 degrees C, change in heat fusion (DeltaH) was 13.3 J/g, and the glass transition temperature (T(g)) was 55.4 degrees C. Mechanical strength was measured for 2 weeks and it decreased from 55 to 15 MPa. In conclusion, by compression molding three components with different release rates it is possible to control the temporal release from multicomponent rods. Released DS concentrations were within range for 49-74 days depending on the fractions of individual components used.

  8. Reaction-Multi Diffusion Model for Nutrient Release and Autocatalytic Degradation of PLA-Coated Controlled-Release Fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Ameenuddin Irfan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for the reaction-diffusion equation is developed to describe the nutrient release profiles and degradation of poly(lactic acid (PLA-coated controlled-release fertilizer. A multi-diffusion model that consists of coupled partial differential equations is used to study the diffusion and chemical reaction (autocatalytic degradation simultaneously. The model is solved using an analytical-numerical method. Firstly, the model equation is transformed using the Laplace transformation as the Laplace transform cannot be inverted analytically. Numerical inversion of the Laplace transform is used by employing the Zakian method. The solution is useful in predicting the nutrient release profiles at various diffusivity, concentration of extraction medium, and reaction rates. It also helps in explaining the transformation of autocatalytic concentration in the coating material for various reaction rates, times of reaction, and reaction-multi diffusion. The solution is also applicable to the other biodegradable polymer-coated controlled-release fertilizers.

  9. EVOLUTION OF CHEMICAL CONDITIONS AND ESTIMATED SOLUBILITY CONTROLS ON RADIONUCLIDES IN THE RESIDUAL WASTE LAYER DURING POST-CLOSURE AGING OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, M.; Millings, M.

    2012-08-28

    This document provides information specific to H-Area waste tanks that enables a flow and transport model with limited chemical capabilities to account for varying waste release from the tanks through time. The basis for varying waste release is solubilities of radionuclides that change as pore fluids passing through the waste change in composition. Pore fluid compositions in various stages were generated by simulations of tank grout degradation. The first part of the document describes simulations of the degradation of the reducing grout in post-closure tanks. These simulations assume flow is predominantly through a water saturated porous medium. The infiltrating fluid that reacts with the grout is assumed to be fluid that has passed through the closure cap and into the tank. The results are three stages of degradation referred to as Reduced Region II, Oxidized Region II, and Oxidized Region III. A reaction path model was used so that the transitions between each stage are noted by numbers of pore volumes of infiltrating fluid reacted. The number of pore volumes to each transition can then be converted to time within a flow and transport model. The bottoms of some tanks in H-Area are below the water table requiring a different conceptual model for grout degradation. For these simulations the reacting fluid was assumed to be 10% infiltrate through the closure cap and 90% groundwater. These simulations produce an additional four pore fluid compositions referred to as Conditions A through D and were intended to simulate varying degrees of groundwater influence. The most probable degradation path for the submerged tanks is Condition C to Condition D to Oxidized Region III and eventually to Condition A. Solubilities for Condition A are estimated in the text for use in sensitivity analyses if needed. However, the grout degradation simulations did not include sufficient pore volumes of infiltrating fluid for the grout to evolve to Condition A. Solubility controls for use

  10. Reduced cognitive and psychomotor impairment with extended-release oxymorphone versus controlled-release oxycodone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoedel, Kerri A; McMorn, Stephen; Chakraborty, Bijan; Zerbe, Kathleen; Sellers, Edward M

    2010-01-01

    Opioids provide effective pain control, yet have risks including adverse events (AEs) (e.g., constipation, nausea/vomiting, sedation) and cognitive/psychomotor effects. To compare cognitive and psychomotor effects of oxymorphone extended release (OM-ER) versus oxycodone controlled release (OC-CR). Randomized, double-blind, 5-way crossover Single inpatient research unit Nondependent recreational opioid users were administered single intact oral tablets of placebo, OM-ER (15 and 30 mg), and OC-CR (30 and 60 mg), separated by a 7- to 21-day washout. The divided attention (DA) test measured psychomotor impairment (e.g., manual tracking [e.g., percentage over road], target accuracy [e.g., target hits], reaction time [hit latency]). Visual analog scales measured alertness/drowsiness, agitation/relaxation, and dizziness. Sedative, stimulant, and dysphoric effects were measured using the Addiction Research Center Inventory Pentobarbital-Chlorpromazine-Alcohol (PCAG), Benzedrine Group (BG), and Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD) scales, respectively. Comparisons were made between equianalgesic doses (OM-ER 15 mg vs OC-CR 30 mg; OM-ER 30 mg vs OC-CR 60 mg), within active drug doses, and between active drugs and placebo using least squares (LS) mean difference of the peak maximum (Emax) or minimum (Emin) effect using linear mixed model analysis of covariance. Thirty-five participants received all 5 treatments. Peak cognitive and psychomotor impairment (LS mean [SE]) was less with OM-ER than equianalgesic doses of OC-CR for reaction time (Emax hit latency, longer if impaired; 571.2 [13.4] vs 588.1 ms [13.4], P=0.03 for OM-ER 15 mg vs OC-CR 30 mg, respectively; 572.4 [13.4] vs 604.3 ms [13.4], P=0.03 for OM-ER 15 mg vs OC-CR 30 mg, respectively; 572.4 [13.4] vs 604.3 ms [13.4], PLSD, P<0.001 for both equianalgesic dose groups), and sedation (Emax, PCAG; P<0.001 for both equianalgesic dose groups) and less stimulation (BG, Emin; P=0.01 for OM-ER 15 mg vs OC-CR mg; P<0.001 for OM

  11. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) for controlled drug delivery--drug release and release mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    zur Mühlen, A; Schwarz, C; Mehnert, W

    1998-03-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) are particulate systems for parenteral drug administration with mean particle diameters ranging from 50 up to 1000 nm. The model drugs tetracaine, etomidate and prednisolone were incorporated (1, 5 and 10%) to study the drug load, effect of drug incorporation on the structure of the lipid matrix and the release profiles and mechanism. SLN were produced by high pressure homogenization of aqueous surfactant solutions containing the drug-loaded lipids in the melted or in the solid state (500/1500 bar, 3/10 cycles). In case of tetracaine and etomidate, high drug loadings up to 10% could be achieved when using Compritol 888 ATO and Dynasan 112 as matrix material. The melting behavior of the drug loaded particles revealed that little or no interactions between drug and lipid occurred. A burst drug release (100% release < 1 min) was observed with tetracaine and etomidate SLN, which was attributed to the large surface area of the nanoparticles and drug enrichment in the outer shell of the particles. In contrast, prednisolone loaded SLN showed a distinctly prolonged release over a monitored period of 5 weeks. Depending on the chemical nature of the lipid matrix, 83.8 and 37.1% drug were released (cholesterol and compritol, respectively). These results demonstrate the principle suitability of SLN as a prolonged release formulation for lipophilic drugs.

  12. Release mechanisms behind polysaccharides-based famotidine controlled release matrix tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmowafy, Enas M; Awad, Gehanne A S; Mansour, Samar; El-Shamy, Abd El-Hamid A

    2008-01-01

    Polysaccharides, which have been explored to possess gelling properties and a wide margin of safety, were used to formulate single-unit floating matrix tablets by a direct compression technique. This work has the aim to allow continuous slow release of famotidine above its site of absorption. The floating approach was achieved by the use of the low density polypropylene foam powder. Polysaccharides (kappa-carrageenan, gellan gum, xyloglucan, and pectin) and blends of polysaccharides (kappa-carrageenan and gellan gum) and cellulose ethers (hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose, hydroxypropylcellulose, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose) were tried to modulate the release characteristics. The prepared floating tablets were evaluated for their floating behavior, matrix integrity, swelling studies, in vitro drug release studies, and kinetic analysis of the release data. The differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed that changing the polymer matrix system by formulation of polymers blends resulted in formation of molecular interactions which may have implications on drug release characteristics. This was obvious from the retardation in drug release and change in its mechanistics.

  13. Controlled Release of the Indomethacin Microencapsulation Based on Layer-by-layer Assembly by Polyelectrolyte Multilayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN You-fang; LIN Xian-fu

    2007-01-01

    Indomethacin has been encapsulated with polyelectrolyte multilayers for controlled release. Gelatin and alginate were alternatively deposited on indomethacin microcrystals. The released amount of indomethacin from coated microcrystals in pH6. 8phosphate buffer solution (PBS) was measured with a UV spectrophometer. The polyelectrolyte multilayer capsule thickness was proved to control the release rate. The effects of osmotic pressure existed during the release process of indomethacin from microcapsules coated by (gelatin/alginate) 4.

  14. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2010-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. The information presented in the report provides data that 1) quantify radionuclide retention within concrete waste form materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG); 2) measure the effect of concrete waste form properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and 3) quantify the stability of uranium-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  15. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  16. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emission Points and Sampling Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2009-04-08

    Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development laboratories in Richland, Washington, including those associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Department of Energy’s Hanford Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all effluent release points that have the potential for radionuclide emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission point system performance, operation, and design information. A description of the buildings, exhaust points, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered or deregistered facility emission point. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided.

  17. Quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, P.M.; Rerych, S.K.; Moran, J.F.; Newman, G.E.; Douglas, J.M.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    This study introduces a new method for calculating actual left ventricular volumes and cardiac output from data recorded during a single transit of a radionuclide bolus through the heart, and describes in detail current radionuclide angiocardiography methodology. A group of 64 healthy adults with a wide age range were studied to define the normal range of hemodynamic parameters determined by the technique. Radionuclide angiocardiograms were performed in patients undergoing cardiac catherization to validate the measurements. In 33 patients studied by both techniques on the same day, a close correlation was documented for measurement of ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume. To validate the method of volumetric cardiac output calcuation, 33 simultaneous radionuclide and indocyanine green dye determinations of cardiac output were performed in 18 normal young adults. These independent comparisons of radionuclide measurements with two separate methods document that initial transit radionuclide angiocardiography accurately assesses left ventricular function.

  18. Novel anhydrous emulsions: formulation as controlled release vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suitthimeathegorn, Orawan; Jaitely, Vikas; Florence, Alexander T

    2005-07-25

    Novel anhydrous emulsions, which may offer some advantages as depot or reservoir vehicles for lipophilic drugs in controlled delivery systems, were formulated using castor oil as the disperse phase and dimethicone or cyclopentasiloxane as the continuous phase. Among the emulsifiers studied only silicone surfactants (cyclomethicone/dimethicone copolyols) which were miscible in silicone oil stabilized the emulsions. Cyclomethicone/PEG/PPG-18/18 Dimethicone and Cyclopentasiloxane/PEG/PPG-18/18 Dimethicone were more effective in lowering the interfacial tension between castor oil and both dimethicone and cyclopentasiloxane. Emulsions formulated using either of these two surfactants were found to be stable against phase separation and exhibited least globule growth over 168 h. The average particle size was found to be 2-6 microm in these systems formed by probe sonication. Slow release patterns of 3H-dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and 3H-dexamethasone solubilized in the disperse castor oil phase into an aqueous dialyzing medium were observed over 48 h.

  19. Mechanoresponsive materials for drug delivery: Harnessing forces for controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Julia; Kaplan, Jonah A; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2017-01-01

    Mechanically-activated delivery systems harness existing physiological and/or externally-applied forces to provide spatiotemporal control over the release of active agents. Current strategies to deliver therapeutic proteins and drugs use three types of mechanical stimuli: compression, tension, and shear. Based on the intended application, each stimulus requires specific material selection, in terms of substrate composition and size (e.g., macrostructured materials and nanomaterials), for optimal in vitro and in vivo performance. For example, compressive systems typically utilize hydrogels or elastomeric substrates that respond to and withstand cyclic compressive loading, whereas, tension-responsive systems use composites to compartmentalize payloads. Finally, shear-activated systems are based on nanoassemblies or microaggregates that respond to physiological or externally-applied shear stresses. In order to provide a comprehensive assessment of current research on mechanoresponsive drug delivery, the mechanical stimuli intrinsically present in the human body are first discussed, along with the mechanical forces typically applied during medical device interventions, followed by in-depth descriptions of compression, tension, and shear-mediated drug delivery devices. We conclude by summarizing the progress of current research aimed at integrating mechanoresponsive elements within these devices, identifying additional clinical opportunities for mechanically-activated systems, and discussing future prospects.

  20. PH-triggered micellar membrane for controlled release microchips

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaoqiang

    2011-01-01

    A pH-responsive membrane based on polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) block copolymer was developed on a model glass microchip as a promising controlled polymer delivery system. The PS-b-P4VP copolymer assembles into spherical and/or worm-like micelles with styrene block cores and pyridine coronas in selective solvents. The self-assembled worm-like morphology exhibited pH-responsive behaviour due to the protonation of the P4VP block at low pH and it\\'s deprotonation at high pH and thus constituting a switchable "off/on" system. Doxorubicin (Dox) was used as cargo to test the PS-b-P4VP membrane. Luminescence experiments indicated that the membrane was able to store Dox molecules within its micellar structure at neutral pH and then release them as soon as the pH was raised to 8.0. The performance of the cast membrane was predictable and most importantly reproducible. The physiochemical and biological properties were also investigated carefully in terms of morphology, cell viability and cell uptake. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Development of scenarios for long-term release of radionuclides from the proposed waste isolation pilot plant in southeastern New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, F.W.; Barr, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    As fault-tree analysis had its faults, the WIPP group switched its attention to the construction of event trees and of scenarios from the cut sets of these event trees. The scenarios were grouped into three classes for computer modeling: those that expose waste directly to the biosphere, those that begin with water flow between two aquifers at the site, and those that begin with water flow from only one aquifer. Each of the scenarios can be modeled by one of four general models. The current analyses of the long-term effects of the WIPP repository are derived from these models. Predicted doses from these hypothetical releases fall far below those from natural background radiation. (DLC)

  2. A Preliminary Study on Natural Matrix Materials for Controlled Release Nitrogen Fertilizers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Chang-Wen; ZHOU Jian-Min; WANG Huo-Yan; LI Shou-Tian

    2004-01-01

    A controlled release N fertilizer was developed by the carrier method using natural polysaccharides (PS)and urea. The results showed that mixing of PS and urea led to significant control of urea release. When a cross-linker (boric acid or glutaraldehyde) was added, a better control effect was observed. During a 30 min leaching time the nitrogen release rate from the controlled release fertilizer was nearly constant, which was significantly different from normal urea. One of the controlled release mechanisms was related to space resistance from a large molecular structure. Infrared (IR) analysis indicated that interaction of PS with urea was through a hydrogen bond or a covalent bond. These bonds created an α-helix or high molecular network fertilizer carrier system, which was another reason for a controlled nutrient release. Pot experiment showed that nitrogen use efficiency could increase significantly with a carrier fertilizer.

  3. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) controlled release systems: experimental and modeling insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Daniel J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) has been the most successful polymeric biomaterial for use in controlled drug delivery systems. There are several different chemical and physical properties of PLGA that impact the release behavior of drugs from PLGA delivery devices. These properties must be considered and optimized in drug release device formulation. Mathematical modeling is a useful tool for identifying, characterizing, and predicting the mechanisms of controlled release. The advantages and limitations of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) for controlled release are reviewed, followed by a review of current approaches in controlled release technology that utilize PLGA. Mathematical modeling applied towards controlled release rates from PLGA-based devices will also be discussed to provide a complete picture of state of the art understanding of the control achievable with this polymeric system, as well as the limitations. PMID:23614648

  4. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid-controlled-release systems: experimental and modeling insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Daniel J; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) has been the most successful polymeric biomaterial used in controlled drug delivery systems. There are several different chemical and physical properties of PLGA that impact the release behavior of drugs from PLGA delivery devices. These properties must be considered and optimized in the formulation of drug release devices. Mathematical modeling is a useful tool for identifying, characterizing, and predicting mechanisms of controlled release. The advantages and limitations of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) for controlled release are reviewed, followed by a review of current approaches in controlled-release technology that utilize PLGA. Mathematical modeling applied toward controlled-release rates from PLGA-based devices also will be discussed to provide a complete picture of a state-of-the-art understanding of the control that can be achieved with this polymeric system, as well as the limitations.

  5. Controlled-release NPK fertilizer encapsulated by polymeric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosiewicz, Anna; Tomaszewska, Maria

    2003-01-15

    The commercial granular fertilizer NPK6-20-30 was coated using polysulfone (PSF), polyacrylonitrile (PAN), and cellulose acetate (CA). The coatings were formed from the polymer solutions by the phase inversion technique. Measurements of the thickness and porosity of the prepared coatings and a microphotographic observation of the coatings were performed. The physical properties of the coatings influence the release rate of macronutrients which are present in the core of the coated fertilizer. In the case of PAN coating with 60.45% porosity, prepared from a 16% polymer solution, 100% of NH(4)(+) and P(2)O(5) was released after 4 h of test and 99.7% of K(+) after 5 h of test, whereas in the case of coating with 48.8% porosity, 31.8% of NH(4)(+), 16.7% of P(2)O(5), and 11.6% of K(+) was released after 5 h. In all experiments, different selectivities of the coatings in terms of the release of components were observed. The release of potassium through the coatings made of PSF and PAN was the slowest. The same tendency was observed for the release of nitrogen through a coating of CA. The release of fertilizer active components was the slowest in the case of PSF. The lowest porosity coating was prepared from the 18% PSF solution.

  6. Preparation and characterization of metoprolol controlled-release solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Faghihian, Hossein; Rastgoo, Kobra

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, great attention has been paid to using solid dispersions to make sustained-release drugs. The objective of this study is to produce sustained-release systems of metoprolol tartrate using solid dispersion techniques and to evaluate their physicochemical characteristics. The solid dispersions were produced by melting and solvent methods, containing 7%, 15%, or 25% of the drug and different ratios of Eudragit RLPO and RSPO in ratios of 0:10, 3:7, 5:5, 7:3, and 10:0. Drug release profiles were determined by USP XXIII rotating paddle method in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8). XRD, DSC, IR, and microscopic observations were performed to evaluate the physical characteristics of solid dispersions. Results showed that the drug release from dispersions was at a slower rate than pure drug and physical mixtures. Moreover, the formulations containing greater ratios of Eudragit RSPO showed slower release rates and smaller DE8% but larger mean dissolution time than those containing greater ratios of Eudragit RLPO. Dispersions with particle size of less than 100 microm containing 7% of metoprolol and Eudragit RL:RS 5:5 (solvent method) and those with the ratio of 3:7 (melting method) had similar release pattern to Lopressor sustained-release tablets by zero-order and Higuchi kinetics, respectively.

  7. Effect of diluents on tablet integrity and controlled drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y E; Schwartz, J B

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of diluents and wax level on tablet integrity during heat treatment and dissolution for sustained-release formulations and the resultant effect on drug release. Dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), and lactose were evaluated for their effect on tablet integrity during drug dissolution and heat treatment in wax matrix formulations. A newly developed direct compression diluent, dibasic calcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA), was also evaluated. Compritol 888 ATO was used as the wax matrix material, with phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride (PPA) as a model drug. Tablets were made by direct compression and then subjected to heat treatment at 80 degrees C for 30 min. The results showed that MCC, lactose, and DCPA could maintain tablets intact during heat treatment above the melting point of wax (70 degrees C-75 degrees C). However, DCPD tablets showed wax egress during the treatment. MCC tablets swelled and cracked during drug dissolution and resulted in quick release. DCPD and lactose tablets remained intact during dissolution and gave slower release than MCC tablets. DCPA tablets without heat treatment disintegrated very quickly and showed immediate release. In contrast, heat-treated DCPA tablets remained intact through the 24-hr dissolution test and only released about 80% PPA at 6 hr. In the investigation of wax level, DCPD was used as the diluent. The drug release rate decreased as the wax content increased from 15% to 81.25%. The dissolution data were best described by the Higuchi square-root-of-time model. Diluents showed various effects during heat treatment and drug dissolution. The integrity of the tablets was related to the drug release rate. Heat treatment retarded drug release if there was no wax egress.

  8. Recent developments in assessment of long-term radionuclide behavior in the geosphere-biosphere subsystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G M; Smith, K L; Kowe, R; Pérez-Sánchez, D; Thorne, M; Thiry, Y; Read, D; Molinero, J

    2014-05-01

    Decisions on permitting, controlling and monitoring releases of radioactivity into the environment rely on a great variety of factors. Important among these is the prospective assessment of radionuclide behavior in the environment, including migration and accumulation among and within specific environmental media, and the resulting environmental and human health impacts. Models and techniques to undertake such assessments have been developed over several decades based on knowledge of the ecosystems involved, as well as monitoring of previous radionuclide releases to the environment, laboratory experiments and other related research. This paper presents developments in the assessment of radiation doses and related research for some of the key radionuclides identified as of potential significance in the context of releases to the biosphere from disposal facilities for solid radioactive waste. Since releases to the biosphere from disposal facilities involve transfers from the geosphere to the biosphere, an important aspect is the combined effects of surface hydrology, near-surface hydrogeology and chemical gradients on speciation and radionuclide mobility in the zone in which the geosphere and biosphere overlap (herein described as the geosphere-biosphere subsystem). In turn, these aspects of the environment can be modified as a result of environmental change over the thousands of years that have to be considered in radioactive waste disposal safety assessments. Building on the experience from improved understanding of the behavior of the key radionuclides, this paper proceeds to describe development of a generic methodology for representing the processes and environmental changes that are characteristic of the interface between the geosphere and the biosphere. The information that is provided and the methodology that is described are based on international collaborative work implemented through the BIOPROTA forum, www.bioprota.org.

  9. CONTROLLED-RELEASE OF PARACETAMOL FROM AMYLODEXTRIN TABLETS - IN-VITRO AND IN-VIVO RESULTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERVEEN, J; EISSENS, AC; LERK, CF

    1994-01-01

    Amylodextrin is a suitable excipient for the design of solid controlled-release systems. The release of paracetamol from tablets containing 30% drug and 70% amylodextrin was studied in vitro and in vivo. In vitro dissolution profiles showed almost-constant drug release rates during 8 hr, when measur

  10. Use of natural and biobased materials for controlled-release of urea in water: Environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urea pearls were encapsulated in cloisite-based matrices using different natural materials (lignin, beeswax and latex) to control the release of urea over time. It was found that all cloisite-based fertilizer tablets showed better release profiles than neat urea tablets. The best release profile was...

  11. Effects of Controlled Release Fertilizer on the Flag Leaves Senescence in Dry-land Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Dandan Liu; Yan Shi

    2013-01-01

    In order to select a reasonable controlled release fertilizer application method to slow down the senescence of flag leaf in dry-land wheat. The effects of controlled release fertilizer on soluble protein content, MDA content, the Catalase (CAT) activity, the Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) activity on the flag leaves senescence in dry-land wheat had been studied in the open field with the variety wheat Jimai22. The results indicated that, the combination application of controlled release fertiliz...

  12. Materials for Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms: Molecular Pharmaceutics and Controlled Release Drug Delivery Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P. DeLuca

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled release delivery is available for many routes of administration and offers many advantages (as microparticles and nanoparticles over immediate release delivery. These advantages include reduced dosing frequency, better therapeutic control, fewer side effects, and, consequently, these dosage forms are well accepted by patients. Advances in polymer material science, particle engineering design, manufacture, and nanotechnology have led the way to the introduction of several marketed controlled release products and several more are in pre-clinical and clinical development.

  13. Effects of Controlled Release Fertilizer on the Flag Leaves Senescence in Dry-land Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Dandan Liu; Yan Shi

    2013-01-01

    In order to select a reasonable controlled release fertilizer application method to slow down the senescence of flag leaf in dry-land wheat. The effects of controlled release fertilizer on soluble protein content, MDA content, the Catalase (CAT) activity, the Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) activity on the flag leaves senescence in dry-land wheat had been studied in the open field with the variety wheat Jimai22. The results indicated that, the combination application of controlled release fertiliz...

  14. Remediation of radionuclide pollutants through biosorption - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Nilanjana [Environmental Biotechnology Division, School of Biosciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore (India)

    2012-01-15

    The development of nuclear science and technology has led to the increase of nuclear wastes containing radionuclides to be released and disposed in the environment. Pollution caused by radionuclides is a serious problem throughout the world. To solve the problem, substantial research efforts have been directed worldwide to adopt sustainable technologies for the treatment of radionuclide containing wastes. Biosorption represents a technological innovation as well as a cost effective excellent remediation technology for cleaning up radionuclides from aqueous environment. A variety of biomaterials viz. algae, fungi, bacteria, plant biomass, etc. have been reported for radionuclide remediation with encouraging results. This paper reviews the achievements and current status of radionuclide remediation through biosorption which will provide insights into this research frontier. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Controlled-release of Avermectin from Organically Modified Hydrotalcite-like Compound Nanohybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU,Depeng; LI,Yonghai; FU,Xiying; JIANG,Zhen; ZHAO,Xinyan; WANG,Tian; HOU,Wanguo

    2009-01-01

    The intercalation of avermectin (AVM)into sodium dodecyl sulfate(SDS)modified hydrotalcite-like com-pounds(HTlc) was carried out using an evaporating solvent enhanced intercalation method to obtain AVM-SDS-HTlc nanohybrids. It was found that the nanohybrids could well control the release of avermectin, showing the nanohybrids are a potential pesticide controlled-release formulation.The release of avermectin from AVM-SDS-HTlc nanohybrids is dependent on the pH.temperature and the presence of electrolyte in release me-dium. Acidic medium and higher temperature and the presence of electrolytes may induce the higher release rate of avermectin. The release process of avermectin from AVM-SDS-HTlc nanohybrids can be described by pseudo-first-order release kinetics, and the activation energy of release is 279 kJ/mol.

  16. Remotely Triggered Scaffolds for Controlled Release of Pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Hoskins

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fe3O4-Au hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs have shown increasing potential for biomedical applications such as image guided stimuli responsive drug delivery. Incorporation of the unique properties of HNPs into thermally responsive scaffolds holds great potential for future biomedical applications. Here we successfully fabricated smart scaffolds based on thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (pNiPAM. Nanoparticles providing localized trigger of heating when irradiated with a short laser burst were found to give rise to remote control of bulk polymer shrinkage. Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using wet chemical precipitation methods followed by electrochemical coating. After subsequent functionalization of particles with allyl methyl sulfide, mercaptodecane, cysteamine and poly(ethylene glycol thiol to enhance stability, detailed biological safety was determined using live/dead staining and cell membrane integrity studies through lactate dehydrogenase (LDH quantification. The PEG coated HNPs did not show significant cytotoxic effect or adverse cellular response on exposure to 7F2 cells (p < 0.05 and were carried forward for scaffold incorporation. The pNiPAM-HNP composite scaffolds were investigated for their potential as thermally triggered systems using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. These studies show that incorporation of HNPs resulted in scaffold deformation after very short irradiation times (seconds due to internal structural heating. Our data highlights the potential of these hybrid-scaffold constructs for exploitation in drug delivery, using methylene blue as a model drug being released during remote structural change of the scaffold.

  17. Studies on pectins as potential hydrogel matrices for controlled-release drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungthongjeen, S; Pitaksuteepong, T; Somsiri, A; Sriamornsak, P

    1999-12-01

    Polymeric hydrogels are widely used as controlled-release matrix tablets. In the present study, we investigated high-methoxy pectins for their potential value in controlled-release matrix formulations. The effects of compression force, ratio of drug to pectin, and type of pectin on drug release from matrix tablets were also investigated. The results of the in vitro release studies show that the drug release from compressed matrix tablets prepared from pectin can be modified by changing the amount and the type of pectin in the matrix tablets. However, compression force did not significantly affect the drug release. The mechanisms controlling release rate were discussed with respect to drug diffusion through the polymer matrices, but may be more complex.

  18. An overview of BORIS: Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamponnet, C. [Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, DEI/SECRE, CADARACHE, B.P. 1, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, Cedex (France)], E-mail: christian.tamponnet@irsn.fr; Martin-Garin, A.; Gonze, M.-A. [Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, DEI/SECRE, CADARACHE, B.P. 1, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, Cedex (France); Parekh, N. [Center for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Vallejo, R.; Sauras-Yera, T.; Casadesus, J. [Department of Plant Biology, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Plassard, C.; Staunton, S. [INRA, UMR Rhizosphere and Symbiosis, Place Viala, 34060 Montpellier (France); Norden, M. [Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, 171 16 Stockholm (Sweden); Avila, R. [Facilia AB, Valsgaerdevaegen 12, 168 53 Bromma, Stockholm (Sweden); Shaw, G. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    The ability to predict the consequences of an accidental release of radionuclides relies mainly on the level of understanding of the mechanisms involved in radionuclide interactions with different components of agricultural and natural ecosystems and their formalisation into predictive models. Numerous studies and databases on contaminated agricultural and natural areas have been obtained, but their use to enhance our prediction ability has been largely limited by their unresolved variability. Such variability seems to stem from incomplete knowledge about radionuclide interactions with the soil matrix, soil moisture, and biological elements in the soil and additional pollutants, which may be found in such soils. In the 5th European Framework Programme entitled Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils (BORIS), we investigated the role of the abiotic (soil components and soil structure) and biological elements (organic compounds, plants, mycorrhiza, and microbes) in radionuclide sorption/desorption in soils and radionuclide uptake/release by plants. Because of the importance of their radioisotopes, the bioavailability of three elements, caesium, strontium, and technetium has been followed. The role of one additional non-radioactive pollutant (copper) has been scrutinised in some cases. Role of microorganisms (e.g., K{sub d} for caesium and strontium in organic soils is much greater in the presence of microorganisms than in their absence), plant physiology (e.g., changes in plant physiology affect radionuclide uptake by plants), and the presence of mycorrhizal fungi (e.g., interferes with the uptake of radionuclides by plants) have been demonstrated. Knowledge acquired from these experiments has been incorporated into two mechanistic models CHEMFAST and BIORUR, specifically modelling radionuclide sorption/desorption from soil matrices and radionuclide uptake by/release from plants. These mechanistic models have been incorporated into an assessment model to enhance

  19. Desktop 3D printing of controlled release pharmaceutical bilayer tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Shaban A; Burley, Jonathan C; Alexander, Morgan R; Roberts, Clive J

    2014-01-30

    Three dimensional (3D) printing was used as a novel medicine formulation technique for production of viable tablets capable of satisfying regulatory tests and matching the release of standard commercial tablets. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC 2208) (Methocel™ K100M Premium) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) (Carbopol(®) 974P NF) were used as a hydrophilic matrix for a sustained release (SR) layer. Hypromellose(®) (HPMC 2910) was used as a binder while microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) (Pharmacel(®) 102) and sodium starch glycolate (SSG) (Primojel(®)) were used as disintegrants for an immediate release (IR) layer. Commercial guaifenesin bi-layer tablets (GBT) were used as a model drug (Mucinex(®)) for this study. There was a favourable comparison of release of the active guaifenesin from the printed hydrophilic matrix compared with the commercially available GBT. The printed formulations were also evaluated for physical and mechanical properties such as weight variation, friability, hardness and thickness as a comparison to the commercial tablet and were within acceptable range as defined by the international standards stated in the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP). All formulations (standard tablets and 3D printed tablets) showed Korsmeyer-Peppas n values between 0.27 and 0.44 which indicates Fickian diffusion drug release through a hydrated HPMC gel layer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Factors controlling alkali salt deposition in recovery boilers. Release mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P.; Kurkela, M.; Kylloenen, H.; Tapola, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology Group

    1997-10-01

    The research was part of an ongoing cooperative research effort aimed at developing a model to describe the behaviour of inorganic compounds in kraft recovery boilers. During 1996 experimental investigations of sulphur release were continued. Experiments at elevated pressures and employing larger particle sizes were performed in order to gain information about mass transfer effects. The first experiments yielding data on the rates of the sulphur-release reactions were performed. This data will be used as the basis of a drop model for sulphur release being developed in cooperation with another research group. The other part of the work during 1996 explored the possibility of using chemical equilibrium calculations to predict the release of sodium, potassium and chlorine in the recovery furnace. The approach is essentially different from that employed in earlier studies in that the effects of fume formation are taken into account. So far, the predictions of the chemical equilibrium release model have, in no way, conflicted with field measurements. (orig.)

  1. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF DICLOFENAC CONTROLLED RELEASE TABLETS EMPLOYING OLIBANUM RESIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.P.R. Chowdary and G. Rami Reddy *

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to evaluate Olibanum resin, a natural resin polymer as matrix polymer for controlled release tablets and to design matrix tablets of diclofenac for controlled release. Matrix tablets of diclofenac were formulated employing Olibanum resin in different proportions of drug and polymer and the tablets were evaluated for drug release kinetics and mechanism .Two diluents namely lactose (water soluble and DCP (water insoluble were included in the formulations to assess their influence on drug release characteristics of olibanum resin matrix tablets. Matrix tablets were found t¬o be non- disint-egrating in water, acidic (pH 1.2 and alkaline (pH 7.4 fluids and were considered suitable for oral controlled release. Diclofenac release from the matrix tablets formulated was slow and spread over 24 h and depended on the concentration (% of olibanum resin in the matrix tablets and nature/type of diluent. As the concentration of olibanum resin in the matrix tablets was increased, drug release was decreased. Release was relatively faster with water soluble diluent lactose when compared to water insoluble diluent DCP at all concentrations of olibanum resin. Drug release from the tablets followed first order kinetics and followed non - Fickian (anomalous diffusion release mechanism. Good linear relationships were observed between percent polymer and release rate in each case. The results of the study thus indicated olibanum resin could be used as rate controlling matrix in design of controlled release tablets. Both water soluble and water insoluble diluents can be included in the olibanum resin matrix tablets without affecting its rate controlling efficiency. Matrix tablets formulated employing olibanum resin(DF2 are considered suitable for controlled release of diclofenac over 24 h (i.e. once-a-day administration.

  2. Control-release microcapsule of famotidine loaded biomimetic synthesized mesoporous silica nanoparticles: Controlled release effect and enhanced stomach adhesion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wang, Hongyu; Yang, Baixue; Xu, Lu; Zheng, Nan; Chen, Hongtao; Li, Sanming

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, control-release microcapsule of famotidine (FMT) loaded biomimetic synthesized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (B-MSNs) was developed, and controlled release effect and stomach adhesion of this formulation in vitro were mainly investigated. B-MSN was previously synthesized and it was amorphous mesoporous nanoparticles with helical channels. Cytotoxicity of B-MSN was studied using human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) and the result indicated that cytotoxicity of B-MSN can be neglected. After loading FMT into B-MSN, specific surface area, pore volume and pore diameter of B-MSN were obviously reduced. In vitro dissolution test showed that B-MSN had the ability to slow down FMT release for 15 min. In order to prolong controlled release effect and remained the advantage of B-MSN (improve drug stability due to its rigid silica framework), the combined application of control-release microcapsule (using cellulose and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose K15M as excipients) with B-MSN was designed. It was obvious that newly designed formulation significantly controlled FMT release with Fickian diffusion mechanism and showed enhanced stomach adhesion in vitro, which has significant value in widening the application of B-MSN in formulation design.

  3. The blend modification of EVA-150/starch and controlled-release of imazethapyr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAI Li-min; ZHU Xiu-yun

    2008-01-01

    The EVA-150 and starch were extruded by extruding press and the bio-degra-dation composite material was prepared to use as the controlled-release matrix of imazethapyr. The compatibility and crystallinity of EVA-150/starch blending were analyzed by SEM and DSC, and the controlled-released performance of imazethapyr in the carriers was also investigated by UV analysis. The results show that EVA-150/starch composite matrix has the obvious controlled-released function and the release rates of imazethapyr all exceed 50% in the environment of pH4, pH7, or pH9 after nine days.

  4. The blend modification of EVA-150/starch and controlled-release of imazethapyr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAI LI-min; ZHU Xiu-yun

    2008-01-01

    The EVA-150 and starch were extruded by extruding press and the bio-degradation composite material was prepared to use as the controlled-release matrix of imazethapyr.The compatibility and crystallinity of EVA-150/starch blending were analyzed by SEM and DSC,and the controlled-released performance of imazethapyr in the carriers was also investigated by UV analysis.The results show that EVA-150/starch composite matrix has the obvious controlled-released function and the release rates of imazethapyr all exceed 50% in the environment of pH4,pH7,or pH9 after nine days.

  5. Controlling benthic release of phosphorus in different Baltic Sea scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitkänen, Heikki; Bendtsen, Jørgen; Hansen, Jørgen L. S.

    The general aim of the PROPPEN project was to study whether it is possible to counteract near-bottom anoxia and excess benthic nutrient release ("internal loading") in the Baltic Sea by artificial oxygenation in cost-efficient and socio-economically beneficial ways. Two pilot sites were selected ...... to counteract anoxia and benthic release of nutrients in coastal marine conditions in the Baltic Sea. The project undertook monitoring of the pilot tests, modelling of effects at different scales, risk management, cost effectiveness and cost benefit analysis....

  6. Controlling benthic release of phosphorus in different Baltic Sea scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitkänen, Heikki; Bendtsen, Jørgen; Hansen, Jørgen L. S.;

    to counteract anoxia and benthic release of nutrients in coastal marine conditions in the Baltic Sea. The project undertook monitoring of the pilot tests, modelling of effects at different scales, risk management, cost effectiveness and cost benefit analysis.......The general aim of the PROPPEN project was to study whether it is possible to counteract near-bottom anoxia and excess benthic nutrient release ("internal loading") in the Baltic Sea by artificial oxygenation in cost-efficient and socio-economically beneficial ways. Two pilot sites were selected...

  7. Fabrication and Evaluation of Multilayer Nanofiber-Hydrogel Meshes with a Controlled Release Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigumula Wu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Controlled release drug delivery systems enable the sustained release of bioactive molecules, and increase bioavailability over an extended length of time. Biocompatible and biodegradable materials such as polycaprolactone (PCL nanofibers and alginate hydrogel play a significant role in designing controlled release systems. Prolonged release of bioactive molecules is observed when these polymer materials are used as matrices independently. However, there has not been a report in the literature that shows how different molecules are released at various rates over time. The goal of this study is to demonstrate a novel drug delivery system that has a property of releasing designated drugs at various rates over a defined length of time. We fabricated multilayer nanofiber-hydrogel meshes using electrospun PCL nanofiber and alginate hydrogel, and evaluated their controlled release properties. The multilayer meshes are composed of sandwiched layers of alternating PCL nanofibers and alginate hydrogel. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP, encapsulated in the designated hydrogel layers, is used as a mock drug for the release study. The exposed top layer of the meshes demonstrates a dramatically higher burst release and shorter release time compared to the deeper layers. Such properties of the different layers within the meshes can be employed to achieve the release of multiple drugs at different rates over a specified length of time.

  8. A CFD approach to the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides in the vicinity of NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio, Paulo A.B. de; Goncalves Junior, Milton A.; Lapa, Celso M.F. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: sampaio@ien.gov.br; miago@ien.gov.br; lapa@ien.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    Most studies of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides released from Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) are based on Gaussian plume models or on the use of a convection-diffusion equation. Such methods, which do not involve solving the flow problem, are useful in the atmospheric mesoscale, of the order of 2-2000 km from the NPP. However, they do not account for the turbulence generated by the interaction of the wind with obstacles and with the released material stream, which are the dominant factors in the local scale, of the order of 0-2 km from the source of emission. In order to study the dispersion of radionuclides in the vicinity of NPPs, the authors advocate the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The physical model is based on the Navier- Stokes equations, a convection-diffusion energy equation, and transport equations for the radionuclides. The stabilized finite element formulation employed results in a Large Eddy Simulation procedure, where no explicit subgrid modeling is required. The code uses adaptive techniques combining error estimation and remeshing. It has been implemented in a Beowulf parallel computing system using domain decomposition and the Message Passing Interface (MPI) for communication among processors. Both controlled emissions from a chimney and severe accidents have been simulated, showing the importance of the local phenomena on the dispersion of radionuclides. (author)

  9. Biodegradable hollow fibres for the controlled release of drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakenraad, J.M.; Oosterbaan, J.A.; Nieuwenhuis, P.; Molenaar, I.; Olijslager, J.; Potman, W.; Eenink, M.J.D.; Feijen, Jan

    1988-01-01

    Biodegradable hollow fibres of poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) filled with a suspension of the contraceptive hormone levonorgestrel in castor oil were implanted subcutaneously in rats to study the rate of drug release, rate of biodegradation and tissue reaction caused by the implant. The in vivo drug

  10. A Remote Controlled Valve in Liposomes for Triggered Liposomal Release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koçer, Armağan

    2007-01-01

    In order to reduce the toxicity and increase the efficacy of drugs, there is a need for smart drug delivery systems. Liposomes are one of the promising tools for this purpose. An ideal liposomal delivery system should be stable, long-circulating, accumulate at the target site and release its drug in

  11. Control of oxygen release from peroxides using polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steg, Hilde; Buizer, Arina T.; Woudstra, Willem; Veldhuizen, Albert G.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    An important limitation in cell therapy for the regeneration of tissue is the initial lack of oxygen. After implantation of large 3D cell-seeded structures, cells die rather than contribute to tissue regenerating. Here we've tested oxygen-releasing materials to improve cell survival and growth after

  12. Control of oxygen release from peroxides using polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steg, Hilde; Buizer, A.T.; Woudstra, W.; Veldhuizen, A.G.; Bulstra, S.K.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, R.

    2015-01-01

    An important limitation in cell therapy for the regeneration of tissue is the initial lack of oxygen. After implantation of large 3D cell-seeded structures, cells die rather than contribute to tissue regenerating. Here we’ve tested oxygen-releasing materials to improve cell survival and growth after

  13. Biodegradable hollow fibres for the controlled release of drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakenraad, J.M.; Oosterbaan, J.A.; Nieuwenhuis, P.; Molenaar, I.; Olijslager, J.; Potman, W.; Eenink, M.J.D.; Feijen, J.

    1988-01-01

    Biodegradable hollow fibres of poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) filled with a suspension of the contraceptive hormone levonorgestrel in castor oil were implanted subcutaneously in rats to study the rate of drug release, rate of biodegradation and tissue reaction caused by the implant. The in vivo drug rele

  14. Control of oxygen release from peroxides using polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steg, Hilde; Buizer, A.T.; Woudstra, W.; Veldhuizen, A.G.; Bulstra, S.K.; Grijpma, D.W.; Kuijer, R.

    2015-01-01

    An important limitation in cell therapy for the regeneration of tissue is the initial lack of oxygen. After implantation of large 3D cell-seeded structures, cells die rather than contribute to tissue regenerating. Here we’ve tested oxygen-releasing materials to improve cell survival and growth after

  15. Concerning Workload Control and Order Release : The Pre-Shop Pool Sequencing Decision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thürer, Matthias; Land, Martin J.; Stevenson, Mark; Fredendall, Lawrence D.; Godinho Filho, Moacir

    2015-01-01

    Every production planning concept that incorporates controlled order release will initially withhold jobs from the shop floor and create a pre-shop pool. Order release is a key component of the Workload Control concept that aims to maintain work-in-process within limits while ensuring due dates are

  16. Application of waterborne acrylic emulsions in coated controlled release fertilizer using reacted layer technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yazhen Shen; Cong Zhao; Jianmin Zhou; Changwen Du

    2015-01-01

    Waterborne acrylic emulsions modified with organic siloxanes and aziridine crosslinker were synthesized and applied as coating of controlled release fertilizer. The free films were characterized and the nutrient release pro-files of the coated fertilizers were determined. The results show that methyl silicone oil and methylsilanolate so-dium could not improve water resistance performance and glass transition temperature Tg of coatings, while the firmness is enhanced. Aziridine crosslinker improves the water resistance performance, firmness and Tg. Incorpo-ration of methyl silicone oil and aziridine crosslinker gives an excellent aqueous acrylic emulsion for coated con-trol ed release fertilizer, with the 30-day cumulative nutrient release reduced to 16%and an estimated nutrient release duration over 190 days. Therefore, this waterborne coating is promising to meet the requirements for controlled release of nutrient and environmental protection.

  17. Designer protein delivery: From natural to engineered affinity-controlled release systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakulska, Malgosia M; Miersch, Shane; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-03-18

    Exploiting binding affinities between molecules is an established practice in many fields, including biochemical separations, diagnostics, and drug development; however, using these affinities to control biomolecule release is a more recent strategy. Affinity-controlled release takes advantage of the reversible nature of noncovalent interactions between a therapeutic protein and a binding partner to slow the diffusive release of the protein from a vehicle. This process, in contrast to degradation-controlled sustained-release formulations such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres, is controlled through the strength of the binding interaction, the binding kinetics, and the concentration of binding partners. In the context of affinity-controlled release--and specifically the discovery or design of binding partners--we review advances in in vitro selection and directed evolution of proteins, peptides, and oligonucleotides (aptamers), aided by computational design.

  18. Radionuclides in US coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisselle, C. A.; Brown, R. D.

    1984-03-01

    The current state of knowledge with respect to radionuclide concentrations in US coals is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the levels of uranium in coal (and lignite) which are considered to represent a concern resulting from coal combustion; areas of the US where such levels have been found; and possible origins of high radionuclide levels in coal. The report reviews relevant studies and presents new data derived from a computerized search of radionuclide content in about 4000 coal samples collected throughout the coterminous US. 103 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  19. Forest Fires and Resuspension of Radionuclides into the Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando P. Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Forest fires are especially frequent around the Mediterranean Sea basin in the summer period and might be able to release naturally-occurring and man-made radionuclides from plant biomass and inject them into the atmosphere. The impact of this radioactivity on populations was not investigated before. Approach: Radionuclide analysis was performed in plants, in smoke from plant burning and in cigarette smoke to determine radionuclide concentrations by alpha spectrometry. Results: Concentrations of 210Pb and 210Po in trees such as olive trees, showed low concentrations in roots, trunk and leaves and minor translocation of radionuclides from the root to aerial parts. Soil to plant transfer ratios for 210Po and 210Pb in several plants were in the range from 10-4 to 10-2. Radionuclides from atmospheric depositions may be accumulated in plants by foliar uptake and for 210Pb this seems the main pathway, with plant aerial parts displaying 210Po/210Pb ratios around 0.1, which is similar to the radionuclide ratios determined in atmospheric depositions. Experimental burning of wood from several tree species showed enhanced radionuclide concentrations in smoke compared to plant materials. Investigation of 210Po release from tobacco leaves used in cigarettes, showed especially enhanced concentrations of this radionuclide in the cigarette smoke particles. Conclusion: Radionuclide concentrations in cigarette smoke expose the lung tissues of regular smokers to high concentrations of 210Po that were considered carcinogenic. Although radionuclide concentrations in other plants analyzed were generally lower than in tobacco, globally the radionuclide activity in the plant biomass is elevated. Inhaled smoke particles from forest fires are likely to contribute to enhanced radiation doses in the human lung.

  20. Controlled drug release on amine functionalized spherical MCM-41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szegedi, Agnes; Popova, Margarita; Goshev, Ivan; Klébert, Szilvia; Mihály, Judit

    2012-10-01

    MCM-41 silica with spherical morphology and small particle sizes (100 nm) was synthesized and modified by post-synthesis method with different amounts of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). A comparative study of the adsorption and release of a model drug, ibuprofen, was carried out. The modified and drug loaded mesoporous materials were characterized by XRD, TEM, N2 physisorption, elemental analysis, thermal analysis and FT-IR spectroscopy. A new method was developed for the quantitative determination of amino groups in surface modified mesoporous materials by the ninhydrin reaction. Good correlation was found between the amino content of the MCM-41 materials determined by the ninhydrin method and their ibuprofen adsorption capacity. Amino modification resulted in high degree of ibuprofen loading and slow release rate in comparison to the parent non-modified MCM-41.

  1. Gastrin release: Antrum microdialysis reveals a complex neural control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ericsson, P; Håkanson, R; Rehfeld, Jens F.;

    2010-01-01

    in serum regardless of the prandial state. The rats were conscious during microdialysis except when subjected to electrical vagal stimulation. Acid blockade (omeprazole treatment of freely fed rats for 4 days), or bilateral sectioning of the abdominal vagal trunks (fasted, 3 days post-op.), raised...... the gastrin concentration in blood as well as microdialysate. The high gastrin concentration following omeprazole treatment was not affected by vagotomy. Vagal excitation stimulated the G cells: electrical vagal stimulation and pylorus ligation (fasted rats) raised the gastrin concentration transiently...... microdialysate gastrin concentration in omeprazole-treated rats by 65%. We conclude that activated gastrin release, unlike basal gastrin release, is highly dependent on a neural input: 1) Vagal excitation has a transient stimulating effect on the G cells. The transient nature of the response suggests...

  2. Formation, release and control of dioxins in cement kilns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstensen, Kåre Helge

    2008-01-01

    Co-processing of hazardous wastes in cement kilns have for decades been thought to cause increased emissions of PCDD/PCDFs--a perception that has been evaluated in this study. Hundreds of PCDD/PCDF measurements conducted by the cement industry and others in the last few years, on emissions and solid materials, as well as recent test burns with hazardous wastes in developing countries do not support this perception. Newer data has been compared with older literature data and shows in particular that many emission factors have to be reconsidered. Early emission factors for cement kilns co-processing hazardous waste, which are still used in inventories, are shown to be too high compared with actual measurements. Less than 10 years ago it was believed that the cement industry was the main contributor of PCDD/PCDFs to air; data collected in this study indicates however that the industry contributes with less than 1% of total emissions to air. The Stockholm Convention on POPs presently ratified by 144 parties, classifies cement kilns co-processing hazardous waste as a source category having the potential for comparatively high formation and release of PCDD/PCDFs. This classification is based on early investigations from the 1980s and 1990s where kilns co-processing hazardous waste had higher emissions compared to those that did not burn hazardous waste. However, the testing of these kilns was often done under worst case scenario conditions known to favour PCDD/PCDF formation. More than 2000 PCDD/PCDF cement kiln measurements have been evaluated in this study, representing most production technologies and waste feeding scenarios. They generally indicate that most modern cement kilns co-processing waste today can meet an emission level of 0.1ngI-TEQ/m(3), when well managed and operated. In these cases, proper and responsible use of waste including organic hazardous waste to replace parts of the fossil fuel does not seem to increase formation of PCDD/PCDFs. Modern preheater

  3. Sandwich Structure-like Meshes Fabricated via Electrospinning for Controllable Release of Zoledronic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jian; LIU Jian-guo; SONG Xiao-feng; CHEN Xue-si; WU Xiao-dong

    2011-01-01

    Novel sandwich structure-like nanofiber multilayered meshes were fabricated via electrospinning. The purpose of the present work was to control zoledronic acid release via the novel structure of sandwich structure-like meshes. The in vitro release experiments reveal that the drug release speed and initial burst release were controllable by adjusting the thicknesses of electrospun barrier mesh and drug-loaded mesh. Compared with those of other drug delivery systems, the main advantages of the sandwich structure-like fiber meshes are facile preparation conditions and the generality for hydrophobic and hydrophilic pharmaceuticals.

  4. Model-based computer-aided design for controlled release of pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muro Sunè, Nuria; Gani, Rafiqul; Bell, G.;

    2005-01-01

    In the field of controlled release technology for pesticides or active ingredients (AI), models that can predict its delivery during application are important for purposes of design and marketing of the pesticide product. Appropriate models for the controlled release of pesticides, if available, ...... extended models have been developed and implemented into a computer-aided system. The total model consisting of the property models embedded into the release models are then employed to study the release of different combinations of AIs and polymer-based microcapsules....

  5. Phenobarbital loaded microemulsion: development, kinetic release and quality control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Alves Figueiredo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to obtain and characterize a microemulsion (ME containing phenobarbital (PB. The PB was incorporated in the proportion of 5% and 10% in a microemulsion system containing Labrasol(r, ethanol, isopropyl myristate and purified water. The physicochemical characterization was performed and the primary stability of the ME was evaluated. An analytical method was developed using spectrophotometry in UV = 242 nm. The kinetics of the in vitro release (Franz model of the ME and the emulsion (EM containing PB was evaluated. The incorporation of PB into ME at concentrations of 5 and 10% did not change pH and resistance to centrifugation. There was an increase in particle size, a decrease of conductivity and a change in the refractive index in relation to placebo ME. The ME remained stable in preliminary stability tests. The analytical method proved to be specific, linear, precise, accurate and robust. Regarding the kinetics of the in vitro release, ME obtained an in vitro release profile greater than the EM containing PB. Thus, the obtained ME has a potential for future transdermal application, being able to compose a drug delivery system for the treatment of epilepsy.

  6. Electrospun biodegradable nanofiber nonwovens for controlled release of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maretschek, Sascha; Greiner, Andreas; Kissel, Thomas

    2008-04-21

    Electrospinning of emulsions composed of an organic poly(l-lactide) solution and an aqueous protein solution yielded protein containing nanofiber nonwovens (NNs) having a mean fiber diameter of approximately 350 nm. Cytochrome C was chosen as a hydrophilic model protein for encapsulation. SEM imaging and gas adsorption measurements were carried out to determine morphology and surface characteristics of the different nanofiber nonwovens. Transmission electron microscopy was used to clarify the localization of the protein within the NN. PLLA NNs exhibited a highly hydrophobic surface which led to a slow wetting. It was shown that the protein release was dependent on the surface tension of the release medium. Electrospinning of emulsions consisting of an organic solution of PLLA and an aqueous solution of hydrophilic polymers yielded fibers composed of a polymer blend. The resulting NNs exhibited a less hydrophobic surface, which gave us the opportunity to tailor the release profile via this technology. Furthermore it was investigated how the addition of different amounts of hydrophilic polymer to the aqueous phase influenced the morphology of the resulting NNs.

  7. A novel and alternative approach to controlled release drug delivery system based on solid dispersion technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Kumar Giri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The solid dispersion method was originally used to improve the dissolution properties and the bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs by dispersing them into water soluble carriers. In addition to the above, dissolution retardation through solid dispersion technique using water insoluble and water swellable polymer for the development of controlled release dosage forms has become a field of interest in recent years. Development of controlled release solid dispersion has a great advantage for bypassing the risk of a burst release of drug; since the structure of the solid dispersion is monolithic where drug molecules homogeneously disperse. Despite the remarkable potential and extensive research being conducted on controlled release solid dispersion system, commercialization and large scale production are limited. The author expects that recent technological advances may overcome the existing limitations and facilitate the commercial utilization of the techniques for manufacture of controlled release solid dispersions. This article begins with an overview of the different carriers being used for the preparation of controlled release solid dispersion and also different techniques being used for the purpose. Kinetics of drug release from these controlled release solid dispersions and the relevant mathematical modeling have also been reviewed in this manuscript.

  8. Controlled release of folic acid through liquid-crystalline folate nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Rahul; Katyal, Henna; Mohanty, Sanat

    2014-11-01

    The present study explores folate nanoparticles as nano-carriers for controlled drug delivery. Cross-linked nanoparticles of liquid crystalline folates are composed of ordered stacks. This paper shows that the folate nanoparticles can be made with less than 5% loss in folate ions. In addition, this study shows that folate nanoparticles can disintegrate in a controlled fashion resulting in controlled release of the folate ions. Release can be controlled by the size of nanoparticles, the extent of cross-linking and the choice of cross-linking cation. The effect of different factors like agitation, pH, and temperature on folate release was also studied. Studies were also carried out to show the effect of release medium and role of ions in the release medium on disruption of folate assembly.

  9. Halloysite Nanotube Composited Thermo-responsive Hydrogel System for Controlled-release

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林茜; 巨晓洁; 谢锐; 江明月; 魏竭; 褚良银

    2013-01-01

    Halloysite nanotube-composited thermo-responsive hydrogel system has been successfully developed for controlled drug release by copolymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) with silane-modified halloysite nanotubes (HNT) through thermally initiated free-radical polymerization. With methylene blue as a model drug, thermo-responsive drug release results demonstrate that the drug release from the nanotubes in the composited hy-drogel can be well controlled by manipulating the environmental temperature. When the hydrogel network is swol-len at temperature below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), drug releases steadily from lumens of the embedded nanotubes, whereas the drug release stops when hydrogel shrinks at temperature above the LCST. The release of model drug from the HNT-composited hydrogel matches well with its thermo-responsive volume phase transition, and shows characteristics of well controlled release. The design strategy and release results of the pro-posed novel HNT-composited thermo-responsive hydrogel system provide valuable guidance for designing respon-sive nanocomposites for controlled-release of active agents.

  10. Preparation and characterization of controlled release matrices based on novel seaweed interpolyelectrolyte complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Héctor J; Matulewicz, María C; Bonelli, Pablo R; Cukierman, Ana L

    2012-06-15

    Novel interpolyelectrolyte complexes (IPECs) between naturally sulfated polysaccharides of the seaweed Polysiphonia nigrescens (PN) and cationized agaroses (CAG) and Eudragit E (EE) were prepared using an organic solvent free process, characterized, and explored for controlled drug release. Tablets containing model drug ibuprofen and IPECs were prepared by direct compression. Drug release in acid medium was low owing to the low solubility of ibuprofen in that condition and to the matrix action. Zero order drug release was determined in the buffer stage (pH=6.8), with Fickian diffusion predominating over relaxation during the initial phases. Relaxation appears to increase along the release process and even overcomes diffusion for some systems. Drug release profiles could be controlled by varying the content of IPECs in the tablets. Also, the change in molecular weight and the degree of substitution of the components allowed altering the release profiles.

  11. Evaluation of absorption of radionuclides via roots of plants at different growth stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambe, Shizuko [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    For the environmental risk assessment of radionuclides and toxic elements which were released by nuclear power plants and factories, the absorption of trace elements by plants has been studied by a multitracer technique. The selective absorption coefficient, which is a parameter of an uptake model of radionuclides by plants, was determined for various radionuclides. The selective absorption coefficients of some elements varied greatly in experimental runs. Therefore, the selective absorption coefficients of radionuclides by komatsuna at different growth stages were determined. Moreover, the soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides in komatsuna at different growth stages was studied. Extraction of the radionuclides from the soil was carried out in order to study the correlation between the transfer factor and the aging effect of the radionuclides in soil. The effect of soil acidity on the absorption of radionuclides in soybean and tomato was studied using the plants at different growth stages. (author)

  12. Controlled Release of Salicylic Acid from Biodegradable Cross-Linked Polyesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Queeny; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Madras, Giridhar

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this work was to develop a family of cross-linked poly(xylitol adipate salicylate)s with a wide range of tunable release properties for delivering pharmacologically active salicylic acid. The synthesis parameters and release conditions were varied to modulate polyester properties and to understand the mechanism of release. Varying release rates were obtained upon longer curing (35% in the noncured polymer to 10% in the cured polymer in 7 days). Differential salicylic acid loading led to the synthesis of polymers with variable cross-linking and the release could be tuned (100% release for the lowest loading to 30% in the highest loading). Controlled release was monitored by changing various factors, and the release profiles were dependent on the stoichiometric composition, pH, curing time, and presence of enzyme. The polymer released a combination of salicylic acid and disalicylic acid, and the released products were found to be nontoxic. Minimal hemolysis and platelet activation indicated good blood compatibility. These polymers qualify as "bioactive" and "resorbable" and can, therefore, find applications as immunomodulatory resorbable biomaterials with tunable release properties.

  13. Controlled growth factor release from synthetic extracellular matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Peters, Martin C.; Anderson, Kenneth W.; Mooney, David J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric matrices can be used to grow new tissues and organs, and the delivery of growth factors from these matrices is one method to regenerate tissues. A problem with engineering tissues that exist in a mechanically dynamic environment, such as bone, muscle and blood vessels, is that most drug delivery systems have been designed to operate under static conditions. We thought that polymeric matrices, which release growth factors in response to mechanical signals, might provide a new approach to guide tissue formation in mechanically stressed environments. Critical design features for this type of system include the ability to undergo repeated deformation, and a reversible binding of the protein growth factors to polymeric matrices to allow for responses to repeated stimuli. Here we report a model delivery system that can respond to mechanical signalling and upregulate the release of a growth factor to promote blood vessel formation. This approach may find a number of applications, including regeneration and engineering of new tissues and more general drug-delivery applications.

  14. Coordinated coupling control of tethered space robot using releasing characteristics of space tether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Panfeng; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiudong; Meng, Zhongjie; Liu, Zhengxiong; Hu, Yongxin

    2016-04-01

    Tethered space robot (TSR) is a new concept of space robot, which is released from the platform satellite, and retrieved via connected tether after space debris capture. In this paper, we propose a new coordinate control scheme for optimal trajectory and attitude tracking, and use releasing motor torque to instead the tension force, since it is difficult to track in practical. Firstly, the 6-DOF dynamics model of TSR is derived, in which the dynamics of tether releasing system is taken into account. Then, we propose and design the coordinated coupled controller, which is composed of a 6-DOF sliding mode controller and a PD controller tether's releasing. Thrust is treated as control input of the 6-DOF sliding mode controller to control the in-plane and out-of-plane angle of the tether and attitude angles of the TSR. The torque of releasing motor is used as input of PD controller, which controls the length rate of space tether. After the verification of the control scheme, finally, the simulation experiment is presented in order to validate the effectiveness of this control method. The results show that TSR can track the optimal approaching trajectory accurately. Simultaneously, the attitude angles can be changed to the desired attitude angles in control period, and the terminal accuracy is ±0.3°.

  15. Sustained and controlled release of lipophilic drugs from a self-assembling amphiphilic peptide hydrogel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briuglia, Maria-Lucia; Urquhart, Andrew; Lamprou, Dimitrios A.

    2014-01-01

    . In this work, we have investigated the diffusion properties of Pindolol, Quinine and Timolol maleate from RADA16 in PBS and in BSS-PLUS at 37°C. A sustained, controlled, reproducible and efficient drug release has been detected for all the systems, which allows to understand the dependence of release kinetics...

  16. Releasable Kinetic Energy-Based Inertial Control of a DFIG Wind Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jinsik; Muljadi, Eduard; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbine generators (WTGs) in a wind power plant (WPP) contain different levels of releasable kinetic energy (KE) because of the wake effects. This paper proposes a releasable KE-based inertial control scheme for a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) WPP that differentiates the contributions...

  17. Using polymer-coated controlled-release fertilizers in the nursery and after outplanting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Landis; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2009-01-01

    Controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) are the newest and most technically advanced way of supplying mineral nutrients to nursery crops. Compared to conventional fertilizers, their gradual pattern of nutrient release better meets plant needs, minimizes leaching, and therefore improves fertilizer use efficiency. In our review of the literature, we found many terms used...

  18. Releases of natural enemies in Hawaii since 1980 for classical biological control of weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Conant; J. N. Garcia; M. T. Johnson; W. T. Nagamine; C. K. Hirayama; G. P. Markin; R. L. Hill

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive review of biological control of weeds in Hawaii was last published in 1992, covering 74 natural enemy species released from 1902 through 1980. The present review summarizes releases of 21 natural enemies targeting seven invasive weeds from 1981 to 2010. These projects were carried out by Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA), USDA Forest Service (USFS...

  19. Computer-aided and predictive models for design of controlled release of pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suné, Nuria Muro; Gani, Rafiqul

    2004-01-01

    In the field of pesticide controlled release technology, a computer based model that can predict the delivery of the Active Ingredient (AI) from fabricated units is important for purposes of product design and marketing. A model for the release of an M from a microcapsule device is presented...

  20. Controlled release of insect sex pheromones from paraffin wax and emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atterholt, C A; Delwiche, M J; Rice, R E; Krochta, J M

    1999-02-22

    Paraffin wax and aqueous paraffin emulsions can be used as controlled release carriers for insect sex pheromones for mating disruption of orchard pests. Paraffin can be applied at ambient temperature as an aqueous emulsion, adheres to tree bark or foliage, releases pheromone for an extended period of time, and will slowly erode from bark and biodegrade in soil. Pheromone emulsions can be applied with simple spray equipment. Pheromone release-rates from paraffin were measured in laboratory flow-cell experiments. Pheromone was trapped from an air stream with an adsorbent, eluted periodically, and quantified by gas chromatography. Pheromone release from paraffin was partition-controlled, providing a constant (zero-order) release rate. A typical paraffin emulsion consisted of 30% paraffin, 4% pheromone, 4% soy oil, 1% vitamin E, 2% emulsifier, and the balance water. Soy oil and vitamin E acted as volatility suppressants. A constant release of oriental fruit moth pheromone from paraffin emulsions was observed in the laboratory for more than 100 days at 27 degreesC, with release-rates ranging from 0.4 to 2 mg/day, depending on the concentration and surface area of the dried emulsion. The use of paraffin emulsions is a viable method for direct application of insect pheromones for mating disruption. Sprayable formulations can be designed to release insect pheromones to the environment at a rate necessary for insect control by mating disruption. At temperatures below 38 degreesC, zero-order release was observed. At 38 degreesC and higher, pheromone oxidation occurred. A partition-controlled release mechanism was supported by a zero-order pheromone release-rate, low air/wax partition coefficients, and pheromone solubility in paraffin.

  1. Expected shortage based pre-release strategy for reservoir flood control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Frederick N.-F.; Wu, Chia-Wen

    2013-08-01

    In Taiwan, an increase in the frequency of severe flooding over the past decade has prompted demand for improved reservoir operation to control flood-related damage. Flood protection of reservoir can be enhanced by pre-releasing its storage to more adequately accommodate an impending flood. A procedure is proposed in this paper to evaluate the impact of pre-releases of flood control operation on water supply. A basic criterion used is that the pre-release of reservoir storage should not cause intolerable increment of water shortage risk. The shortage risks for different pre-release scenarios are simulated according to the uncertainties of storm rainfall and post-flood ordinary inflow till the end of next dry season. Two operational objectives are provided to help determining the target pre-released level. One of which identifies the minimum allowable pre-released threshold. The other seeks the pre-released level which maximizes the probability that the reservoir release during flood is below the non-damaging discharge and the end-of-operation storage target can still be achieved. This paper evaluated the operations of Tsengwen Reservoir of southern Taiwan during four typhoons from 2007 to 2012 to illustrate the significant contribution of pre-releases in reducing downstream flood potential.

  2. Controls on Fe(II)-Activated Trace Element Release from Goethite and Hematite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

    2012-03-26

    Electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxides induces surface growth and dissolution that affects trace element fate and transport. We have recently demonstrated Ni(II) cycling through goethite and hematite (adsorbed Ni incorporates into the mineral structure and preincorporated Ni releases to solution) during Fe(II)-Fe(III) ETAE. However, the chemical parameters affecting net trace element release remain unknown. Here, we examine the chemical controls on Ni(II) and Zn(II) release from Ni- and Zn-substituted goethite and hematite during reaction with Fe(II). Release follows a rate law consistent with surface reaction limited mineral dissolution and suggests that release occurs near sites of Fe(III) reductive dissolution during Fe(II)-Fe(III) ETAE. Metal substituent type affects reactivity; Zn release is more pronounced from hematite than goethite, whereas the opposite trend occurs for Ni. Buildup of Ni or Zn in solution inhibits further release but this resumes upon fluid exchange, suggesting that sustained release is possible under flow conditions. Mineral and aqueous Fe(II) concentrations as well as pH strongly affect sorbed Fe(II) concentrations, which directly control the reaction rates and final metal concentrations. Our results demonstrate that structurally incorporated trace elements are mobilized from iron oxides into fluids without abiotic or microbial net iron reduction. Such release may affect micronutrient availability, contaminant transport, and the distribution of redox-inactive trace elements in natural and engineered systems.

  3. SOLID POLYMERIC MATRIX BASED ON CHITOSAN AND XANTHAN FOR CONTROLLED RELEASE OF FERTILIZERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana A. Melaj

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work was to optimize the preparation conditions of solid polymeric matrix based on Chitosan and Xanthan, to be used in the controlled release of fertilizers. KNO3 was chosen as model agrochemical to be released. Both individual polymers and the Xanthan:Chitosan complex are biocompatible, leaving a residue on the soil which is non-toxic. The influence of different variables on the release pattern was studied: the type of polymer, the pressed conditions of the tablets and the presence of a drug-free polymeric coating. The polymer that presented a more promising release profile was Xanthan. The compression pressure applied to prepare the tablets was a more relevant variable than the compression time, in its effect on the kinetics of release. It was determined that the coating of the polymer matrix with crosslinked chitosan-glutaraldehyde allows getting a larger release time.

  4. Munc13 controls the location and efficiency of dense-core vesicle release in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bospoort, Rhea; Farina, Margherita; Schmitz, Sabine K; de Jong, Arthur; de Wit, Heidi; Verhage, Matthijs; Toonen, Ruud F

    2012-12-10

    Neuronal dense-core vesicles (DCVs) contain diverse cargo crucial for brain development and function, but the mechanisms that control their release are largely unknown. We quantified activity-dependent DCV release in hippocampal neurons at single vesicle resolution. DCVs fused preferentially at synaptic terminals. DCVs also fused at extrasynaptic sites but only after prolonged stimulation. In munc13-1/2-null mutant neurons, synaptic DCV release was reduced but not abolished, and synaptic preference was lost. The remaining fusion required prolonged stimulation, similar to extrasynaptic fusion in wild-type neurons. Conversely, Munc13-1 overexpression (M13OE) promoted extrasynaptic DCV release, also without prolonged stimulation. Thus, Munc13-1/2 facilitate DCV fusion but, unlike for synaptic vesicles, are not essential for DCV release, and M13OE is sufficient to produce efficient DCV release extrasynaptically.

  5. Composite films of poly(vinyl alcohol)-chitosan-bacterial cellulose for drug controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavaloiu, Ramona-Daniela; Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Dobre, Tanase

    2014-07-01

    Mono and multilayer composite films of poly(vinyl alcohol)-chitosan-bacterial cellulose (PVA/chitosan/BC) have been prepared to achieve controlled release of ibuprofen sodium salt (IbuNa) as model drug. The composite films have been characterized by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Equilibrium swelling was measured in water at two different pH values and in vitro release of IbuNa in pH 1.2 and pH 7.4 media was studied. The release experiments revealed that drug release is pH sensitive. The release kinetics of IbuNa could be described by the Fickian model of diffusion with a good agreement. The IbuNa release rate was decreasing for all the films as the BC concentration was increased in the films composition, the decrease being higher for the multilayer films.

  6. Design and in vitro evaluation of controlled release alginate beads of diltiazem hydrochloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.Nagasamy Venkatesh; A.Kalaivani; Kritika D.Kalro; Lalitha Chintha; James Tharani; M.K. Samanta; B.Suresh

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Oral slow and sustained release drug delivery system can release their drug content with a controlled manner,producing a desirable blood serum level,reduction in drug toxicity and improving the patient compli-ance by prolonging dosing intervals.The major drawback of orally administered drug like diltiazem as a calcium channel blocker for the treatment of angina pectoris,arrhythmia and hypertension.Its has higher aqueous solu-bility and shorter elimination half-life.Methods:To overcome these drawbacks associated with diltiazem,an attempt has been made to develop a sustained release dosage form of diltiazem embedded alginate microbeads by ionotropic gelation technique employing various concentrations of polymer and keeping the drug concentra-tion constant.Results:The beads were characterized for its particle size,drug content and in vitro release stud-ies.The results revealed that the surface adhering drug was found to release immediately and a steady state of release was obtained up to 12 h from all the batches.The results indicated there was an inverse relationship be-tween the concentration of alginate and drug release.The drug release was found to follow non-fickian diffusion obeying first order kinetics.Conclusion:The developed alginate microbeads offered a sustained release of dilti-azem.Hence,the formulated microbeads were found to be potential,cost effective,possess satisfactory in vitro release studies.

  7. Immobilization and controlled release of drug using plasma polymerized thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myung, Sung-Woon [Department of Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, MRC Center, Chosun University, 309 Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Sang-Chul [Department of Environmental Engineering, Sunchon National University, Sunchon 540-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Hoon, E-mail: kim5055@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, MRC Center, Chosun University, 309 Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    In this study, plasma polymerization of acrylic acid was employed to immobilize drug and control its release. Doxorubicin (DOX) was immobilized covalently on the glass surface deposited with plasma polymerized acrylic acid (PPAAc) thin film containing the carboxylic group. At first, the PPAAc thin film was coated on a glass surface at a pressure of 1.33 Pa and radio frequency (RF) discharge power of 20 W for 10 min. DOX was immobilized on the PPAAc deposition in a two environment of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solutions. The DOX immobilized surface was characterized by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The DOX molecules were more immobilized in PBS than DMSO solution. The different immobilization and release profiles of DOX result from the solubility of hydrophobic DOX in aqueous and organic solutions. Second, in order to control the release of the drug, PPAAc thin film was covered over DOX dispersed layer. Different thicknesses and cross-linked PPAAc thin films by adjusting deposition time and RF discharge power were covered on the DOX layer dispersed. PPAAc thin film coated DOX layer reduced the release rate of DOX. The thickness control of plasma deposition allows controlling the release rate of drug. - Highlights: • Doxorubicin was immobilized on the surface of plasma polymerized acrylic acid thin film. • Release profile of doxorubicin was affected by aqueous and organic solutions. • Plasma polymerized acrylic acid thin film can be used to achieve controlled release.

  8. Design of cationic microspheres based on aminated gelatin for controlled release of peptide and protein drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Chono, Sumio; Kosai, Tadashi; Seki, Toshinobu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2008-02-01

    Two different types of cationized microspheres based on a native cationic gelatin (NGMS) and aminated gelatin with ethylendiamine (CGMS) were investigated for the controlled release of three model acidic peptide/protein drugs with different molecular weights (MWs) and isoelectric points (IEPs). Recombinant human (rh)-insulin (MW: 5.8 kDa, IEP: 5.3), bovine milk lactoalbumin, BMLA (MW: 14 kDa, IEP: 4.3), and bovine serum albumin (BSA MW: 67 kDa, IEP: 4.9) were used as model acidic peptide/protein drugs. The in vitro release profiles of these acidic peptide/protein drugs from NGMS and CGMS were compared and different periods of cross-linking were obtained. The slower release of these acidic peptide/protein drugs from CGMS compared with those from NGMS with cross-linking for 48 hr. was caused by the suppression of burst release during the initial phase. The degree of suppression of burst release of the three peptide/protein drugs during the initial phase by CGMS was in the following order: (rh)-insulin > BMLA > BSA. The release of insulin with a lower molecular weight from CGMS was particularly suppressed compared with the other two drugs with higher molecular weights in the initial phase. The control of the release rate of acidic peptide/protein drugs from gelatin microsphere can be achieved by amination of gelatin. Therefore, CGMS is useful for the controlled release of acidic peptide/ protein drugs.

  9. Controlled-release fertilizer composition substantially coated with an impermeable layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankeny, Mark

    2016-03-29

    A controlled-release fertilizer composition is provided that is substantially coated with an impermeable layer. The fertilizer composition may further include one or more hollow sections to allow for root penetration and efficient delivery of nutrients.

  10. Self-assembled nanoparticles of glycol chitosan – Ergocalciferol succinate conjugate, for controlled release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinones, Javier Perez; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager; Kjems, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Glycol chitosan was linked to vitamin D2 hemisuccinate (ergocalciferol hemisuccinate) for controlled release through water-soluble carbodiimide activation. The resulting conjugate formed self-assembled nanoparticles in aqueous solution with particle size of 279 nm and ergocalciferol hemisuccinate...

  11. ITE CHARACTERIZATION TO SUPPORT CONCEPTUAL MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR SUBSURFACE RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remediation of radionuclide contaminants in ground water often begins with the development of conceptual and analytical models that guide our understanding of the processes controlling radionuclide transport. The reliability of these models is often predicated on the collection o...

  12. PREPARATION AND EVALUATION OF HPMC-ALGINATE MUCOADHESIVE MICROCAPSULES OF DICLOFENAC FOR CONTROLLED RELEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.P.R. Chowdary

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new, novel promising technology for obtaining controlled release and enhancing the bioavailability is a combination of mucoadhesion principle and microencapsulation to result in mucoadhesive microcapsules. Mucoadhesive microcapsules consist of either entirely of a mucoadhesive polymer or having an outer coating enclosing the drug particles. They facilitate an intimate and prolonged contact with the absorption surface to provide controlled release and enhanced bioavailability of the contained drug over longer period of time to prolong its therapeutic action. The objective of the present work is to prepare HPMC based mucoadhesive microcapsules of diclofenac and to evaluate the microcapsules for mucoadhesiveness and controlled drug release characteristics. Spherical HPMC-alginate mucoadhesive micro- capsules of diclofenac could be prepared by the orifice – ionic gelation method. Microencapsulation efficiency was in the range 98.7 % - 103.5 %. Drug release from the HPMC – alginate microcapsules was slow and spread over a period of 12 h and depended on core: coat ratio and wall thickness of the microcapsules. Drug release mechanism from these microcapsules was by non- Fickian diffusion. Good linear relationships were observed between wall thickness of the microcapsules and release rate [K0 and K1] of the microcapsules. Mucoadhesion testing by in vitro wash-off test indicated good mucoadhesive property of HPMC-alginate microcapsules with a slower wash-off when compared to non-mucoadhesive EVA microcapsules. Thus controlled release mucoadhesive microcapsules of diclofenac could be designed employing HPMC-alginate. HPMC-alginate microcapsules of diclofenac exhibited good mucoadhesion and controlled release characteristics and were found suitable for oral controlled release of diclofenac.

  13. [Research advances on controlled-release mechanisms of nutrients in coated fertilizers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Wu, Zhijie; Liang, Wenju; Xie, Hongtu

    2003-12-01

    Using encapsulation techniques to coat easily soluble fertilizers is an important way to improve fertilizer use efficiency while reduce environmental hazards. Based on a wide range of literature collection on coated fertilizer research, the theories, processes, and characters of nutrient controlled-release from coated fertilizer were discussed, and the factors affecting nutrient controlled-release and the mathematical simulations on it were reviewed. The main tendencies related to this research in China were also put forward.

  14. PREPARATION AND EVALUATION OF HPMC-ALGINATE MUCOADHESIVE MICROCAPSULES OF DICLOFENAC FOR CONTROLLED RELEASE

    OpenAIRE

    K.P.R. Chowdary

    2011-01-01

    A new, novel promising technology for obtaining controlled release and enhancing the bioavailability is a combination of mucoadhesion principle and microencapsulation to result in mucoadhesive microcapsules. Mucoadhesive microcapsules consist of either entirely of a mucoadhesive polymer or having an outer coating enclosing the drug particles. They facilitate an intimate and prolonged contact with the absorption surface to provide controlled release and enhanced bioavailability of the containe...

  15. Laser-activated nano-biomaterials for tissue repair and controlled drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Rossi, F; Pini, R [Institute of Applied Physics ' Nello Carrara' , National Research Council, via Madonna del Piano 10 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2014-07-31

    We present recent achievements of minimally invasive welding of biological tissue and controlled drug release based on laser-activated nano-biomaterials. In particular, we consider new advancements in the biomedical application of near-IR absorbing gold nano-chromophores as an original solution for the photothermal repair of surgical incisions and as nanotriggers of controlled drug release from hybrid biopolymer scaffolds. (laser biophotonics)

  16. Controlled-Release Oxycodone and Naloxone in the Treatment of Chronic Low Back Pain: A Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Cloutier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For Canadian regulatory purposes, an analgesic study was required to complement previously completed, pivotal studies on bowel effects and analgesia associated with controlled-release (CR oxycodone/CR naloxone.

  17. Mitofilin regulates cytochrome c release during apoptosis by controlling mitochondrial cristae remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui-feng; Zhao, Guo-wei; Liang, Shu-ting; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Li-hong [National Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), 5 Dong Dan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China); Chen, Hou-zao, E-mail: houzao@gmail.com [National Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), 5 Dong Dan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China); Liu, De-pei, E-mail: liudp@pumc.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), 5 Dong Dan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitofilin deficiency caused disruption of the cristae structures in HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitofilin deficiency reduced cell proliferation and increased cell sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitofilin deficiency accelerated the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitofilin deficiency accelerated STS-induced intrinsic apoptotic pathway without interfering with the activation of Bax. -- Abstract: Mitochondria amplify caspase-dependent apoptosis by releasing proapoptotic proteins, especially cytochrome c. This process is accompanied by mitochondrial cristae remodeling. Our studies demonstrated that mitofilin, a mitochondrial inner membrane protein, acted as a cristae controller to regulate cytochrome c release during apoptosis. Knockdown of mitofilin in HeLa cells with RNAi led to fragmentation of the mitochondrial network and disorganization of the cristae. Mitofilin-deficient cells showed cytochrome c redistribution between mitochondrial cristae and the intermembrane space (IMS) upon intrinsic apoptotic stimuli. In vitro cytochrome c release experiments further confirmed that, compared with the control group, tBid treatment led to an increase in cytochrome c release from mitofilin-deficient mitochondria. Furthermore, the cells with mitofilin knockdown were more prone to apoptosis by accelerating cytochrome c release upon the intrinsic apoptotic stimuli than controls. Moreover, mitofilin deficiency did not interfere with the activation of proapoptotic member Bax upon intrinsic apoptotic stimuli. Thus, mitofilin distinctly functions in cristae remodeling and controls cytochrome c release during apoptosis.

  18. NAIL AS A PROMISING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM FOR CONTROLLED RELEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sai Krishna*, P. Prem Kumar, K. Bala Murugan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The effectiveness of topical therapies is limited by minimal drug permeability through the nail plate. Nail permeability is however quite low and limits topical therapy to early/mild disease states such as onychomycosis (fungal infections of the nail. Current research on nail permeation that focuses on altering the nail plate barrier by means of chemical treatments, penetration enhancers as well as physical and mechanical methods is reviewed also the recent research into ungual drug delivery is reviewed, a new method of nail sampling is examined. Topical therapy is worth pursuing however, as local action is required in many nail disorders. Drug transport into the nail plate can be assisted by filing the nail plate before topical application of drug formulations as well as by the use of chemical enhancers. Finally limitations of current ungual drug permeability studies are briefly discussed and the factors, which affect drug uptake and permeation through the nail plate such as solute molecular size, hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity, charge, and the nature of the vehicle, are then discussed, and drug-containing nail lacquers which, like cosmetic varnish, are brushed onto the nail plates to form a film, and from which drug is released and penetrates into the nail are reviewed. The nail plate behaves like a concentrated hydrogel to permeating molecules and diffusion of molecules through the nail plate has been compared to the diffusion of non-electrolytes through polymer gels. Thus, for optimal ungual permeation and uptake, drug molecules must be of small size and be uncharged.

  19. Radionuclide therapy revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefnagel, C.A. (Nederlands Kanker Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1991-06-01

    Apart from its use in endocrinology and rheumatology, therapeutic nuclear medicine is developing rapidly as an additional treatment modality in oncology. Many different specific tumour-seeking radiopharmaceuticals are being applied both for diagnostic scintigraphy and treatment, using multiple routes and mechanisms to target radionuclides at tumours. After a brief introduction of some basic principles of radionuclide targeting, the therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals available are reviewed according to the accumulation site in relation to the cell nucleus; the results of their current clinical use for therapy are also reviewed. The response observed to a number of these applications, the non-invasiveness of the procedure and the relative lack of toxicity and late effects in comparison with chemotherapy and external beam radiotherapy make radionuclide therapy an attractive and realistic alternative in the management of malignant disease, as well as in the treatment of a few benign disorders. (orig.).

  20. Radionuclides in house dust

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Hammond, D J

    1985-01-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, alt...

  1. Affinity hydrogels for controlled protein release using nucleic acid aptamers and complementary oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soontornworajit, Boonchoy; Zhou, Jing; Snipes, Matthew P; Battig, Mark R; Wang, Yong

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials for the precise control of protein release are important to the development of new strategies for treating human diseases. This study aimed to fundamentally understand aptamer--protein dissociation triggered by complementary oligonucleotides, and to apply this understanding to develop affinity hydrogels for controlled protein release. The results showed that the oligonucleotide tails of the aptamers played a critical role in inducing intermolecular hybridization and triggering aptamer--protein dissociation. In addition, the attachment of the oligonucleotide tails to the aptamers and the increase of hybridizing length could produce a synergistic effect on the dissociation of bound proteins from their aptamers. More importantly, pegylated complementary oligonucleotides could successfully trigger protein release from the aptamer-functionalized hydrogels at multiple time points. Based on these results, it is believed that aptamer-functionalized hydrogels and complementary oligonucleotides hold great potential of controlling the release of protein drugs to treat human diseases.

  2. 2006 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David P. Fuehne

    2007-06-30

    This report describes the impacts from emissions of radionuclides at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2006. This report fulfills the requirements established by the Radionuclide National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad-NESHAP). This report is prepared by LANL's Rad-NESHAP compliance team, part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an off-site member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. LANL's EDE was 0.47 mrem for 2006. The annual limit established by the EPA is 10 mrem per year. During calendar year 2006, LANL continuously monitored radionuclide emissions at 28 release points, or stacks. The Laboratory estimates emissions from an additional 58 release points using radionuclide usage source terms. Also, LANL uses a network of air samplers around the Laboratory perimeter to monitor ambient airborne levels of radionuclides. To provide data for dispersion modeling and dose assessment, LANL maintains and operates meteorological monitoring systems. From these measurement systems, a comprehensive evaluation is conducted to calculate the EDE for the Laboratory. The EDE is evaluated as any member of the public at any off-site location where there is a residence, school, business, or office. In 2006, this location was the Los Alamos Airport Terminal. The majority of this dose is due to ambient air sampling of plutonium emitted from 2006 clean-up activities at an environmental restoration site (73-002-99; ash pile). Doses reported to the EPA for the past 10 years are shown in Table E1.

  3. Critical Radionuclide and Pathway Analysis for the Savannah River Site, 2016 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, Tim [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hartman, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-08

    During the operational history of Savannah River Site, many different radionuclides have been released from site facilities. However, as shown in this analysis, only a relatively small number of the released radionuclides have been significant contributors to doses to the offsite public. This report is an update to the 2011 analysis, Critical Radionuclide and Pathway Analysis for the Savannah River Site. SRS-based Performance Assessments for E-Area, Saltstone, F-Tank Farm, H-Tank Farm, and a Comprehensive SRS Composite Analysis have been completed. The critical radionuclides and pathways identified in those extensive reports are also detailed and included in this analysis.

  4. [Effects of slow/controlled release fertilizers on the growth and nutrient use efficiency of pepper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shuan-Hu; Zhang, Fa-Bao; Huang, Xu; Chen, Jian-Sheng; Xu, Pei-Zhi

    2008-05-01

    Pot trails were conducted from 2003 to 2005 to study the effects of slow/controlled release fertilizers on the growth and nutrient use efficiency of pepper. The results indicated that in comparison with conventional splitting fertilization (T1), basal application of polymer-coated controlled release fertilizer (T2) enhanced the single fruit mass and vitamin C concentration, improved the root activity, and increased the fruit yield by 8.4%, but no significant effect was observed on the dissoluble sugar concentration in fruit. NH4MgPO4-coated controlled release fertilizer (T3) increased the dissoluble sugar concentration by 5.67%, but had less effect on single fruit mass and vitamin C concentration. Under the application of T3, the root system had a vigorous growth at early stages but became infirm at later stages, resulting in a lower yield. Comparing with T1, the application of 3 slow release fertilizers increased the dissoluble sugar concentration in fruit, enhanced the root activity, but had less effect on the yield. All test slow/controlled release fertilizers increased the use efficiency of N, P, and K significantly, with an exception for T2 which increased the use efficiency of N and K but decreased that of P. It was demonstrated that an appropriate application of slow/controlled release fertilizers could enhance pepper' s root activity and improve nutrient use efficiency.

  5. Microfluidic synthesis of microfibers for magnetic-responsive controlled drug release and cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Sheng Lin

    Full Text Available This study demonstrated the fabrication of alginate microfibers using a modular microfluidic system for magnetic-responsive controlled drug release and cell culture. A novel two-dimensional fluid-focusing technique with multi-inlets and junctions was used to spatiotemporally control the continuous laminar flow of alginate solutions. The diameter of the manufactured microfibers, which ranged from 211 µm to 364 µm, could be well controlled by changing the flow rate of the continuous phase. While the model drug, diclofenac, was encapsulated into microfibers, the drug release profile exhibited the characteristic of a proper and steady release. Furthermore, the diclofenac release kinetics from the magnetic iron oxide-loaded microfibers could be controlled externally, allowing for a rapid drug release by applying a magnetic force. In addition, the successful culture of glioblastoma multiforme cells in the microfibers demonstrated a good structural integrity and environment to grow cells that could be applied in drug screening for targeting cancer cells. The proposed microfluidic system has the advantages of ease of fabrication, simplicity, and a fast and low-cost process that is capable of generating functional microfibers with the potential for biomedical applications, such as drug controlled release and cell culture.

  6. Preparation and characterization of controlled-release fertilizers coated with marine polysaccharide derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Song; Qin, Yukun; Chen, Xiaolin; Xing, Rong'e.; Yu, Huahua; Li, Kecheng; Li, Pengcheng

    2017-09-01

    Encapsulation of water-soluble nitrogen fertilizers by membranes can be used to control the release of nutrients to maximize the fertilization effect and reduce environmental pollution. In this research, we formulated a new double-coated controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) by using food-grade microcrystalline wax (MW) and marine polysaccharide derivatives (calcium alginate and chitosan-glutaraldehyde copolymer). The pellets of water-soluble nitrogen fertilizer were coated with the marine polysaccharide derivatives and MW. A convenient and eco-friendly method was used to prepare the CRF. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to characterize the morphology and composition of the products. The nitrogen-release properties were determined in water using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The controlled-release properties of the fertilizer were improved dramatically after coating with MW and the marine polysaccharide derivatives. The results show that the double-coated CRFs can release nitrogen in a controlled manner, have excellent controlled-release features, and meet the European Standard for CRFs.

  7. Preparation and characterization of controlled-release fertilizers coated with marine polysaccharide derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Song; Qin, Yukun; Chen, Xiaolin; Xing, Rong'e.; Yu, Huahua; Li, Kecheng; Li, Pengcheng

    2016-10-01

    Encapsulation of water-soluble nitrogen fertilizers by membranes can be used to control the release of nutrients to maximize the fertilization effect and reduce environmental pollution. In this research, we formulated a new double-coated controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) by using food-grade microcrystalline wax (MW) and marine polysaccharide derivatives (calcium alginate and chitosan-glutaraldehyde copolymer). The pellets of water-soluble nitrogen fertilizer were coated with the marine polysaccharide derivatives and MW. A convenient and eco-friendly method was used to prepare the CRF. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to characterize the morphology and composition of the products. The nitrogen-release properties were determined in water using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The controlled-release properties of the fertilizer were improved dramatically after coating with MW and the marine polysaccharide derivatives. The results show that the double-coated CRFs can release nitrogen in a controlled manner, have excellent controlled-release features, and meet the European Standard for CRFs.

  8. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  9. Solution combustion synthesis of calcium phosphate particles for controlled release of bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Junfeng, E-mail: daidai02304@163.com [School of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Zhao, Junjie; Qian, Yu; Zhang, Xiali; Zhou, Feifei; Zhang, Hong [School of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Lu, Hongbin [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing (China); Chen, JianHua; Wang, XuHong [School of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Yu, Wencong [School of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China)

    2015-05-01

    Four different phase compositions of calcium phosphate (CaP) particles were prepared via a solution combustion method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld analysis results revealed that the variations in the nominal Ca/P (molar) ratios were found to provide a favorable control in the different proportions of CaP materials. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein to study the loading and release behavior. The release profile indicated that the BSA release rates depended on the phase compositions of the CaP particles, and showed an order of TCP-BSA > BCP-1-BSA > BCP-2-BSA > HA-BSA. The results suggested that the BSA protein release rate can be controlled by varying the phase compositions of CaP carriers. Moreover, the release process involved two stages: firstly surface diffusion via ion exchange and secondly intraparticle diffusion. - Highlights: • Solution combustion method was an efficient way to produced CaP powders. • Ca/P (molar) ratios provided a favorable control in the different proportions of phase composition. • BSA release rate varied depending on the phase composition of the CaP particles. • Two kinetic models were chosen to simulate the release kinetics of the drugs from CaP carriers.

  10. Design and evaluation of controlled onset extended release multiparticulate systems for chronotherapeutic delivery of ketoprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumar H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An oral controlled onset extended release dosage form intended to approximate the chronobiology of rheumatoid arthritis is proposed for site-specific release to the colon. The multiparticulate system consisting of drug-loaded cellulose acetate cores encapsulated within Eudragit S-100 microcapsules was designed for chronotherapeutic delivery of ketoprofen. Drug-loaded cellulose acetate cores were prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation technique in an oily phase at different drug:polymer ratios (1:1, 2:1 and 4:1. These cores were successfully microencapsulated with Eudragit S-100 following the same technique at the core:coat ratio of 1:5. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed that the cellulose acetate cores were discrete, uniform and spherical with a porous and rough surface, whereas the Eudragit microcapsules were discrete and spherical with a smooth and dense surface. In vitro drug release studies of the Eudragit microcapsules were performed in different pH conditions following pH-progression method for a period of 16 h. The release studies indicated that the microcapsules posses both pH-sensitive and controlled-release properties, showing limited drug release below pH 7.0 (6.40 to 8.94%, following which the cellulose acetate cores effectively controlled the drug release for a period of 11 h in pH 7.5. The differential scanning calorimetric and powder X-ray diffraction studies demonstrated that ketoprofen was present in dissolved state in the cellulose acetate polymeric matrix, which could explain the controlled drug release from the cores. The release of ketoprofen from Eudragit microcapsules in pH 7.5 depended on the cellulose acetate levels and was characterized by Higuchi′s diffusion model.

  11. Atmospheric transport modelling for the CTBT radionuclide network in routine operation and after the Fukushima releases; Atmosphaerische Transportmodellierung fuer das Radionuklidmessnetz zur Ueberwachung des Kernwaffenteststoppvertrages im Regelbetrieb und nach den Freisetzungen in Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, J.O.; Ceranna, L.; Boennemann, C. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany). B4.3; Schlosser, C. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS), Freiburg (Germany). SW2.5

    2014-01-20

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) bans all types of nuclear explosions. For verification of compliance with Treaty the International Monitoring System (IMS) is being built up by the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) of the CTBT-Organisation in Vienna. The IMS observes waveform signals (seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic) of explosions and traces of radionuclides in the atmosphere to proof the nuclear character of an event. The International Data Centre (IDC) provides analysis products for the IMS data such as various event bulletins, radionuclide reports, and atmospheric transport modeling (ATM) results confining the possible source region of detected radionuclides. The judgment on the character of a suspicious event remains with the member states. The German National Data Centre for verification of CTBT is hosted by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) in Hannover. The BGR operates four IMS stations (IS26, IS27, PS19, and AS35) and cooperates closely with the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) who operates the radionuclide station RN33 at mount Schauinsland and supports the NDC with radionuclide expertise. In response to the Fukushima accident caused by the large magnitude 9.0 Tohuku Earthquake and Tsunami the HSYSPLIT model driven by 0.5 degree NCEP data was used at the German NDC to simulate the primary transport pathways of potentially emitted radioisotopes. The analysis focuses on arrival times and dilution ratios at the radionuclide stations of the IMS. The arrival times were predicted correctly at most stations for ten days after the accident. Traces of the Fukushima emissions were detected at all IMS radionuclide stations on the Northern Hemisphere end of March. In April also some stations on the Southern Hemisphere detected some traces which passed the ITCZ. In respect to the CTBT context the influence of the Tohoku earthquake and the Fukushima emissions on the network capability to detect a

  12. Effects of Controlled Release Fertilizer on the Flag Leaves Senescence in Dry-land Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Liu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to select a reasonable controlled release fertilizer application method to slow down the senescence of flag leaf in dry-land wheat. The effects of controlled release fertilizer on soluble protein content, MDA content, the Catalase (CAT activity, the Superoxide Dismutase (SOD activity on the flag leaves senescence in dry-land wheat had been studied in the open field with the variety wheat Jimai22. The results indicated that, the combination application of controlled release fertilizer with conventional complex fertilizer on wheat was more conducive to the promotion of the soluble protein synthesis and it controlled the increasing of MDA content in flag leaf more effectively than the application of conventional complex fertilizer or controlled-release fertilizer alone on wheat. And it was more conductive to control or delay the process of flag leaf senescence with better maintenance of the SOD activity. The treatments in application of controlled release fertilization alone were conducive to these treatments with conventional complex fertilizer alone. Among these treatments, T6 was the best fertilization method with the lowest flag leaf senescence speed.

  13. Transfer into the biosphere of radionuclides released from deep storage of radioactive wastes. Bibliographical study; Transfert dans la biosphere des radionucleides issus des stockages profonds de dechets radioactifs. Etude bibliographique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedon, V.; Siclet, F.

    1995-03-01

    Most countries with civilian nuclear programs today are encountering difficulty in implementing a nuclear waste management policy that is both technically safe in the long term and accepted by the public. To meet both criteria, the solution most generally envisaged is deep storage either of untreated spent nuclear fuel or of highly radioactive wastes resulting from reprocessing. In order to predict the potential impact of such storage on man, one needs to understand the path followed by radionuclides in the geosphere, and later in the biosphere. Given the time scales involved and the critical nature of the elements concerned, it is indispensable to turn to mathematical modeling of the phenomena. This report presents what is hoped to be a complete inventory of the radionuclides contained in ``high level`` wastes (categories B AND C). The elements concerned in studies on deep storage are essentially long-life radionuclides (both actinides and certain fission and activation products). Their physico-chemical characteristics and their behavior in various ecological compartments are examined. Bibliographical data bearing on: solubility (in an oxidizing, reducing medium), distribution factors (water/rock-sediment-soil), concentration and transfer factors (in aquatic and terrestrial mediums), dose conversion factors (in the case of internal and external irradiation), principal paths of exposure for each radionuclide studied, are presented in this report. Initial results from international projects to model what happens to radionuclides in the biosphere are also presented. In general, they are optimistic as to the future, but nonetheless point to a need to improve the conceptual base of the models, to ensure that all major phenomena and processes are taken into consideration and to examine any possible amplification (author). 67 refs., 39 figs., 20 tabs.

  14. Controlled release of an anti-cancer drug from DNA structured nano-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Younghyun; Lee, Jong Bum; Hong, Jinkee

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the generation of systemically releasable anti-cancer drugs from multilayer nanofilms. Nanofilms designed to drug release profiles in programmable fashion are promising new and alternative way for drug delivery. For the nanofilm structure, we synthesized various unique 3-dimensional anti cancer drug incorporated DNA origami structures (hairpin, Y, and X shaped) and assembled with peptide via layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method. The key to the successful application of these nanofilms requires a novel approach of the influence of DNA architecture for the drug release from functional nano-sized surface. Herein, we have taken first steps in building and controlling the drug incorporated DNA origami based multilayered nanostructure. Our finding highlights the novel and unique drug release character of LbL systems in serum condition taken full advantages of DNA origami structure. This multilayer thin film dramatically affects not only the release profiles but also the structure stability in protein rich serum condition.

  15. Controlled-Release Personal Use Arthropod Repellent Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-25

    deodorant , or other cosmetic enhancers, and rinsed with 70% ethanol. For each subject control site, (5 cm in diameter), anG two test sites, 6 x 16.7 cm...Camouflage 0-1 c) Polyurethane Rifle Stocks 51 Metals S-1 a) Aluminum General Equipeent 6) Natural Products -- I a) Leather Boots 7) Textiles T-1 a...The area was slightly tacky to touch and a definite loss of gloss was noted. * e. metals Aluminum was not visibly affected by all three solutions. f

  16. Transfer of radionuclides from high polluted bottom sediments to marine organisms through benthic food chain in post Fukushima period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezhenar, Roman; Jung, Kyung Tae; Maderich, Vladimir; Willemsen, Stefan; de With, Govert; Qiao, Fangli

    2015-04-01

    A catastrophic earthquake and tsunami occurred on March 11, 2011 and severely damaged the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) that resulted in an uncontrolled release of radioactivity into air and ocean. Around 80% of the radioactivity released due to the FDNPP accident in March-April 2011 was either directly discharged into the ocean or deposited onto the ocean surface from the atmosphere. A large amount of long-lived radionuclides (mainly Cs-137) were released into the environment. The concentration of radionuclides in the ocean reached a maximum in mid-April of 2011, and then gradually decreased. From 2011 the concentration of Cs-137 in water essentially fell except the area around the FDNPP where leaks of contaminated water are continued. However, in the bottom sediment high concentrations of Cs-137 were found in the first months after the accident and slowly decreased with time. Therefore, it should be expected that a time delay is found of sediment-bound radionuclides in marine organisms. For the modeling of radionuclide transfer from highly polluted bottom sediments to marine organisms the dynamical food chain model BURN-POSEIDON (Heling et al, 2002; Maderich et al., 2014) was extended. In this model marine organisms are grouped into a limited number of classes based on their trophic level and type of species. These include: phytoplankton, zooplankton, fishes (two types: piscivorous and non-piscivorous), crustaceans, and molluscs for pelagic food chain and bottom sediment invertebrates, demersal fishes and bottom predators for benthic food chain and whole water column predators feeding by pelagial and benthic fishes. Bottom invertebrates consume organic parts of bottom sediments with adsorbed radionuclides which then migrate through the food chain. All organisms take radionuclides directly from water as well as via food. In fishes where radioactivity is not homogeneously distributed over all tissues of the organism, it is assumed that radionuclide

  17. Controlling pH in shake flasks using polymer-based controlled-release discs with pre-determined release kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klee Doris

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are significant differences in the culture conditions between small-scale screenings and large-scale fermentation processes. Production processes are usually conducted in fed-batch cultivation mode with active pH-monitoring and control. In contrast, screening experiments in shake flasks are usually conducted in batch mode without active pH-control, but with high buffer concentrations to prevent excessive pH-drifts. These differences make it difficult to compare results from screening experiments and laboratory and technical scale cultivations and, thus, complicate rational process development. In particular, the pH-value plays an important role in fermentation processes due to the narrow physiological or optimal pH-range of microorganisms. To reduce the differences between the scales and to establish a pH-control in shake flasks, a newly developed easy to use polymer-based controlled-release system is presented in this paper. This system consists of bio-compatible silicone discs embedding the alkaline reagent Na2CO3. Since the sodium carbonate is gradually released from the discs in pre-determined kinetics, it will ultimately compensate the decrease in pH caused by the biological activity of microorganisms. Results The controlled-release discs presented here were successfully used to cultivate E. coli K12 and E. coli BL21 pRSET eYFP-IL6 in mineral media with glucose and glycerol as carbon (C sources, respectively. With glucose as the C-source it was possible to reduce the required buffer concentration in shake flask cultures by 50%. Moreover, with glycerol as the C-source, no buffer was needed at all. Conclusions These novel polymer-based controlled-release discs allowed buffer concentrations in shake flask media to be substantially reduced or omitted, while the pH remains in the physiological range of the microorganisms during the whole cultivation time. Therefore, the controlled-release discs allow a better control of

  18. Controlled poorly soluble drug release from solid self-microemulsifying formulations with high viscosity hydroxypropylmethylcellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tao; Wan, Jiangling; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2008-08-07

    The objective of this work was the development of a controlled release system based on self-microemulsifying mixture aimed for oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. HPMC-based particle formulations were prepared by spray drying containing a model drug (nimodipine) of low water solubility and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) of high viscosity. One type of formulations contained nimodipine mixed with HPMC and the other type of formulations contained HPMC and nimodipine dissolved in a self-microemulsifying system (SMES) consisting of ethyl oleate, Cremophor RH 40 and Labrasol. Based on investigation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction, differences were found in the particle structure between both types of formulations. In vitro release was performed and characterized by the power law. Nimodipine release from both types of formulations showed a controlled release profile and the two power law parameters, n and K, correlated to the viscosity of HPMC. The parameters were also influenced by the presence of SMES. For the controlled release solid SMES, oil droplets containing dissolved nimodipine diffused out of HPMC matrices following exposure to aqueous media. Thus, it is possible to control the in vitro release of poorly soluble drugs from solid oral dosage forms containing SMES.

  19. Controlled release properties of zein-fatty acid blend films for multiple bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcan, Iskender; Yemenicioğlu, Ahmet

    2014-08-13

    To develop edible films having controlled release properties for multiple bioactive compounds, hydrophobicity and morphology of zein films were modified by blending zein with oleic (C18:1)Δ⁹, linoleic (C18:2)Δ(9,12), or lauric (C₁₂) acids in the presence of lecithin. The blend zein films showed 2-8.5- and 1.6-2.9-fold lower initial release rates for the model active compounds, lysozyme (LYS) and (+)-catechin (CAT), than the zein control films, respectively. The change of fatty acid chain length affected both CAT and LYS release rates while the change of fatty acid double bond number affected only the CAT release rate. The film morphologies suggested that the blend films owe their controlled release properties mainly to the microspheres formed within their matrix and encapsulation of active compounds. The blend films showed antilisterial activity and antioxidant activity up to 81 μmol Trolox/cm². The controlled release of multiple bioactive compounds from a single film showed the possibility of combining application of active and bioactive packaging technologies and improving not only safety and quality but also health benefits of packed food.

  20. Radionuclide Migration through Sediment and Concrete: 16 Years of Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovich, Elizabeth C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mattigod, Shas V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle MV [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Powers, Laura [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Whyatt, Greg A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wellman, Dawn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Part of these services includes safe disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, performance assessment analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires continuing data collection to increase confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied on to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the order. Cement-based solidification and stabilization is considered for hazardous waste disposal because it is easily done and cost-efficient. One critical assumption is that concrete will be used as a waste form or container material at the Hanford Site to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The radionuclides iodine-129, selenium-75, technetium-99, and uranium-238 have been identified as long-term dose contributors (Mann et al. 2001; Wood et al. 1995). Because of their anionic nature in aqueous solutions, these constituents of potential concern may be released from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and migrate into the surrounding subsurface environment (Serne et al. 1989; 1992; 1993a, b; 1995). Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. Each of the

  1. Radionuclide Migration through Sediment and Concrete: 16 Years of Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Snyder, Michelle MV; Powers, Laura; Whyatt, Greg A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-11-06

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Part of these services includes safe disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, performance assessment analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires continuing data collection to increase confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied on to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the order. Cement-based solidification and stabilization is considered for hazardous waste disposal because it is easily done and cost-efficient. One critical assumption is that concrete will be used as a waste form or container material at the Hanford Site to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The radionuclides iodine-129, selenium-75, technetium-99, and uranium-238 have been identified as long-term dose contributors (Mann et al. 2001; Wood et al. 1995). Because of their anionic nature in aqueous solutions, these constituents of potential concern may be released from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and migrate into the surrounding subsurface environment (Serne et al. 1989; 1992; 1993a, b; 1995). Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. Each of the

  2. E-Control: First Public Release of Remote Control Software for VLBI Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidhardt, Alexander; Ettl, Martin; Rottmann, Helge; Ploetz, Christian; Muehlbauer, Matthias; Hase, Hayo; Alef, Walter; Sobarzo, Sergio; Herrera, Cristian; Himwich, Ed

    2010-01-01

    Automating and remotely controlling observations are important for future operations in a Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). At the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, in cooperation with the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, a software extension to the existing NASA Field System has been developed for remote control. It uses the principle of a remotely accessible, autonomous process cell as a server extension for the Field System. The communication is realized for low transfer rates using Remote Procedure Calls (RPC). It uses generative programming with the interface software generator idl2rpc.pl developed at Wettzell. The user interacts with this system over a modern graphical user interface created with wxWidgets. For security reasons the communication is automatically tunneled through a Secure Shell (SSH) session to the telescope. There are already successful test observations with the telescopes at O Higgins, Concepcion, and Wettzell. At Wettzell the software is already used routinely for weekend observations. Therefore the first public release of the software is now available, which will also be useful for other telescopes.

  3. Controlled release from aspirin based linear biodegradable poly(anhydride esters) for anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Queeny; Movva, Sahitya; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Madras, Giridhar

    2017-08-07

    This work reports the synthesis of a novel, aspirin-loaded, linear poly (anhydride ester) and provides mechanistic insights into the release of aspirin from this polymer for anti-inflammatory activity. As compared to conventional drug delivery systems that rely on diffusion based release, incorporation of bioactives in the polymer backbone is challenging and high loading is difficult to achieve. In the present study, we exploit the pentafunctional sugar alcohol (xylitol) to provide sites for drug (aspirin) attachment at its non-terminal OH groups. The terminal OH groups are polymerized with a diacid anhydride. The hydrolysis of the anhydride and ester bonds under physiological conditions release aspirin from the matrix. The resulting poly(anhydride ester) has high drug loading (53%) and displays controlled release kinetics of aspirin. The polymer releases 8.5 % and 20%, of the loaded drug in one and four weeks, respectively and has a release rate constant of 0.0035h(-0.61). The release rate is suitable for its use as an anti-inflammatory agent without being cytotoxic. The polymer exhibits good cytocompatibility and anti-inflammatory properties and may find applications as injectable or as an implantable bioactive material. The physical insights into the release mechanism can provide development of other drug loaded polymers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasmon excitation of supported gold nanoparticles can control molecular release from supramolecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Daniela T; Carrillo, Adela I; Scaiano, Juan C

    2013-08-20

    Hybrid mesoporous silica materials containing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been investigated as potential molecular delivery systems. The photophysical properties of AuNPs, particularly their plasmon band transitions, have been used to control the rate of the release of naproxen from the pores of mesoporous silica matrices. Two different approaches were employed to incorporate AuNPs into the silica network: that is, grafting (using 3-aminopropyltriethoxisilane) and direct absorption. In this research, the anti-inflamatory drug naproxen serves as a test molecule, showing how localized plasmon heating could be used to modify diffusion kinetics within mesoporous materials. Beyond naproxen release, the methodology developed could be employed to release other drugs, sensors, or active molecules, not just in medicine, but in many other fields where nanotechnology is leading to many innovative applications. The hybrid materials developed show a new simple system to efficiently control the release of active cargo from mesoporous silica matrices.

  5. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  6. Intercalation and controlled release properties of vitamin C intercalated layered double hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaorui; Lei, Lixu; O'Hare, Dermot; Xie, Juan; Gao, Pengran; Chang, Tao

    2013-07-01

    Two drug-inorganic composites involving vitamin C (VC) intercalated in Mg-Al and Mg-Fe layered double hydroxides (LDHs) have been synthesized by the calcination-rehydration (reconstruction) method. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy indicate a successful intercalation of VC into the interlayer galleries of the LDH host. Studies of VC release from the LDHs in deionised water and in aqueous CO32- solutions imply that Mg3Al-VC LDH is a better controlled release system than Mg3Fe-VC LDH. Analysis of the release profiles using a number of kinetic models suggests a solution-dependent release mechanism, and a diffusion-controlled deintercalation mechanism in deionised water, but an ion exchange process in CO32- solution.

  7. Smart electrospun nanofibers for controlled drug release: recent advances and new perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lin; Xie, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    In biological systems, chemical molecules or ions often release upon certain conditions, at a specific location, and over a desired period of time. Electrospun nanofibers that undergo alterations in the physicochemical characteristics corresponding to environmental changes have gained considerable interest for various applications. Inspired by biological systems, therapeutic molecules have been integrated with these smart electrospun nanofibers, presenting activation-modulated or feedback-regulated control of drug release. Compared to other materials like smart hydrogels, environment-responsive nanofiber-based drug delivery systems are relatively new but possess incomparable advantages due to their greater permeability, which allows shorter response time and more precise control over the release rate. In this article, we review the mechanisms of various environmental parameters functioning as stimuli to tailor the release rates of smart electrospun nanofibers. We also illustrate several typical examples in specific applications. We conclude this article with a discussion on perspectives and future possibilities in this field.

  8. Formulation optimization of hydrodynamically balanced oral controlled release bioadhesive tablets of tramadol hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupinder; Rani, Ashu; Babita; Ahuja, Naveen; Kapil, Rishi

    2010-01-01

    The directly compressible floating-bioadhesive tablets of tramadol were formulated using varying amounts Carbopol 971P (CP) and hydroxy-propylmethyl cellulose (HPMC), along with other requisite excipients. In vitro drug release profile, floatational characteristics and ex vivo bioadhesive strength using texture analyzer were determined, and systematically optimized using a 3(2) central composite design (CCD). The studies indicated successful formulation of gastroretentive compressed matrices with excellent controlled release, mucoadhesion and hydrodynamic balance. Comparison of the dissolution profiles of the optimized formulation, with optimal composition of CP:HPMC :: 80.0:125.0, with that of the marketed controlled release formulation other indicated analogy of drug release performance with each other. Validation of optimization study using eight confirmatory experimental runs indicated very high degree of prognostic ability of CCD with mean  SEM of â0.06%  0.37. Further, the study successfully unravels the effect of the polymers on the selected response variables.

  9. FABRICATION AND EVALUATION OF GLIPIZIDE ABELMOSCHUS ESCULENTUS FRUIT MUCILAGE POVIDONE CONTROLLED RELEASE MATRIX TABLETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hindustan Abdul Ahad

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was aimed to prepare matrix type controlled release tablets of Glipizide with Abelmoschus esculentus fruit mucilage and Povidone. The polymers were studied for its functionality as a matrix forming property to sustain the Glipizide release from the dosage form. Physicochemical properties of dried powdered mucilage of Abelmoschus esculentus fruit mucilage and Povidone blend were studied. Various formulations of Glipizide Abelmoschus esculentus fruit mucilage and Povidone were prepared. The prepared tablets were found to have better pharmacopoeial parameters with low standard deviation values. The swelling behavior and release rate characteristics were studied. The in-vitro dissolution study proved that the dried Abelmoschus esculentus fruit mucilage and Povidone in combination can be used as a matrix forming polymers for making controlled release matrix tablets.

  10. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  11. Photo-controlled release of fipronil from a coumarin triggered precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhenhong; Yuan, Pengtao; Wang, Donghui; Xu, Zhiping; Li, Zhong; Shao, Xusheng

    2017-06-01

    Developing efficient controlled release system of insecticide can facilitate the better use of insecticide. We described here a first example of photo-controlled release of an insecticide by linking fipronil with photoresponsive coumarin covalently. The generated coumarin-fipronil (CF) precursor could undergo cleavage to release free fipronil in the presence of blue light (420nm) or sunlight. Photophysical studies of CF showed that it exhibited strong fluorescence properties. The CF had no obvious activity against mosquito larvae under dark, but it can be activated by light inside the mosquito larvae. The released Fip from CF by blue light irradiation in vitro retained its activity to armyworm (Mythimna separate) with LC50 value of 24.64μmolL(-1). This photocaged molecule provided an alternative delivery method for fipronil. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Controlled release of simvastatin from biomimetic β-TCP drug delivery system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Chou

    Full Text Available Simvastatin have been shown to induce bone formation and there is currently a urgent need to develop an appropriate delivery system to sustain the release of the drug to increase therapeutic efficacy whilst reducing side effects. In this study, a novel drug delivery system for simvastatin by means of hydrothermally converting marine exoskeletons to biocompatible beta-tricalcium phosphate was investigated. Furthermore, the release of simvastatin was controlled by the addition of an outer apatite coating layer. The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction analysis, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and mass spectroscopy confirming the conversion process. The in-vitro dissolution of key chemical compositional elements and the release of simvastatin were measured in simulated body fluid solution showing controlled release with reduction of approximately 25% compared with un-coated samples. This study shows the potential applications of marine structures as a drug delivery system for simvastatin.

  13. Rosin and rosin derivatives as hydrophobic matrix materials for controlled release of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Y V; Dorle, A K

    1990-09-01

    The evaluation of rosin, a rosin hard paraffin adduct, and four rosin esters as hydrophobic matrix materials for the controlled release of drugs is reported, using aspirin as a drug model. Aspirin matrix tablets were prepared using a wet granulation (nonaqueous) method, and were evaluated for various pharmaceutical parameters. Dissolution studies in pH 7.2 phosphate buffer showed that all formulations had hardness greater than 6 kg/cm2 and disintegration time greater than 150 min. Release of aspirin from the formulations obeyed a diffusion controlled first order kinetic and linear to the square root of time function. Two of the resin ester formulations had a T80% of more than 4 hr. The results suggest that these esters may find application in the development of sustained release formulations for the local treatment of dental diseases, or--as tablet matrices suitably coated with acid resistant material--in the development of oral sustained release drug delivery systems.

  14. The Preparation of Salbutamol Sulfate Controlled Release TabletsCoated with Cellulose Acetate Aqueous Dispersion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangFengyu; WuTao; PanWeisan; ChenJimin; ZhangRuhua

    2001-01-01

    In this study, emulsion-solvent evaporation method was applied to prepare the cellulose acetate(CA) aqueous dispersion. Upon the analyzing of the character of the aqueous dispersion, a controlled releaseformulation of salbutamol sulfate coated with cellulose acetate aqueous dispersion was prepared through orthogonalexperiment design. The factors that control the drug release character of the tablets were investigated. The drugrelease mechanism of the formulation was also studied. The experimental results indicated that CA aqueousdispersion had excellent film-forming ability under the effect of plasticizer. The drug release profile of the controlledrelease tablets coated with CA aqueous dispersion exhibited zero-order release character and the drug release rate wasmodulated by the osmotic pressure of the dissolution medium.

  15. Controlled release of bovine serum albumin from hydroxyapatite microspheres for protein delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonsongrit, Yaowalak [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Abe, Hiroya [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Cooperative Research Center of Life Sciences, Kobe Gakuin University, Minatojima 1-1-3, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan)], E-mail: h-abe@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sato, Kazuyoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Naito, Makio [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Cooperative Research Center of Life Sciences, Kobe Gakuin University, Minatojima 1-1-3, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan); Yoshimura, Masahiro [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Ichikawa, Hideki; Fukumori, Yoshinobu [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kobe Gakuin University, Minatojima 1-1-3, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan); Cooperative Research Center of Life Sciences, Kobe Gakuin University, Minatojima 1-1-3, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan)

    2008-02-25

    Desorption behavior of a model protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA) on commercial hydroxyapatite (HAp) microspheres and its control were investigated for protein delivery system. The desorption behavior related strongly to the phosphate concentration in phosphate buffer solution: the amount of desorbed BSA increased when the phosphate concentration increased. In physiological buffer solution, which contains 10 mM phosphate, the initial burst release of BSA was observed: 70% of BSA was rapidly desorbed after 0.5 h, and 80% after 24 h. In contrast, the extremely low release profile of BSA was observed in distilled water. For the controlled release of BSA in physiological condition, the BSA-loaded HAp microspheres were encapsulated with a biodegradable polymer, poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) by a solid-in oil-in water (S/O/W) emulsion solvent evaporation method. The initial burst was significantly reduced, and the BSA release was remarkably prolonged by the encapsulation.

  16. Preparation of acetylsalicylic acid-acylated chitosan as a novel polymeric drug for drug controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changkun; Wu, Yiguang; Zhao, Liyan; Huang, Xinzheng

    2015-01-01

    The acetylsalicylic acid-acylated chitosan (ASACTS) with high degree of substitution (DS) was successfully synthesized, and characterized with FTIR, (1)H NMR and elemental analysis methods. The optimum synthesis conditions were obtained which gave the highest DS (about 60%) for ASACTS. Its drug release experiments were carried out in simulated gastric and intestine fluids. The results show that the drugs in the form of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and salicylic acid (SA) were released in a controlled manner from ASACTS only in simulated gastric fluid. The release profile can be best fitted with logistic and Weibull model. The research results reveal that ASACTS can be a potential polymeric drug for the controlled release of ASA and SA in the targeted gastric environment.

  17. Polysaccharide-based nanocomplexes for co-encapsulation and controlled release of 5-Fluorouracil and Temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, Antonio; Pavelkova, Alena; Maciulyte, Sandra; Budriene, Saulute; Sedlarik, Vladimir

    2016-09-20

    Polysaccharide-based nanocomplexes, intended for simultaneous encapsulation and controlled release of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Temozolomide (TMZ) were developed via the complexation method using chitosan, alginic and polygalacturonic acid. Investigation focused on the influence of polysaccharides on the properties of the system and amelioration of the stability of the drugs, in particular TMZ. The dimensions of particles and their ζ-potential were found to range between 100 and 200nm and -25 to +40mV, respectively. Encapsulation efficiency varied from 16% to over 70%, depending on the given system. The influence of pH on the release and co-release of TMZ and 5-FU was evaluated under different pH conditions. The stability of the loaded drug, in particular TMZ, after release was evaluated and confirmed by LC-MS analysis. Results suggested that the amount of loaded drug(s) and the release rate is connected with the weight ratio of polysaccharides and the pH of the media. One-way ANOVA analysis on the obtained data revealed no interference between the drugs during the encapsulation and release process, and in particular no hydrolysis of TMZ occurred suggesting that CS-ALG and CS-PGA would represent interesting carriers for multi-drug controlled release and drugs protection.

  18. A Study on the Control of Pseudoephedrine Hydrochloride Release from Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose Matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, H.; Chung, Y.S. [Department of Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea); Bang, M.S. [Department of Industrial Chemistry, Chonan National Technical College, Chonnam (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    Hydroxypropylmethylcelluloses (HPMC) are cellulose ethers which may be used as the basis for hydrophilic matrices for controlled release oral delivery and offer the advantages of being non-toxic and relatively inexpensive. In this work, we designed new drug release system using HPMC as matrix, manufactured by direct compression technology and have investigated the effects of the controlling factors on drug release from a swellable hydrophillic delivery system. It was found that the release rate of the drug decreased with increasing the polymer molecular weight and the polymer content in tablets, and was independent of compaction pressure and pH of dissolution fluids. Especially, the ability of the anionic surfactant, sodium laurylsulfate, to retard the release of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride from HPMC was characterised. With increasing the concentration of the sodium laurylsulfate within the matrix, drug release rate decreased. It is believed that, provided the pseudoephedrine hydrochloride and the sodium laurylsulfate are oppositely charged, they will bind together in situ within the HPMC matrix, leading to reduced drug release rates. 23 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Mucoadhesive Microcapsules of Indomethacin: Evaluation for Controlled Release and Ulcerogenic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.P.R. Chowdary

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucoadhesive microcapsules of indomethacin were prepared by an emulsification-ionic gelation process employing sodium carboxy methylcellulose, methylcellulose, Carbopol and hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose along with alginate and the microcapsules were evaluated for release kinetics and ulcerogenic activity. The resulting microcapsules were discrete, free flowing, multinucleate, monolithic and spherical. Microencapsulation efficiency was 41-70 % and relatively high with alginate-sodium carboxymethylcellulose. Indomethacin release from these mucoadhesive microcapsules was found to be slow and extended over longer periods of time and depended on the composition of coat and size of the microcapsules. Drug release was diffusion controlled and followed first order kinetics. Alginate-methyl cellulose and alginate-sodium carboxymethylcellulose microcapsules were found suitable for oral controlled release. The microcapsules exhibited good mucoadhesive property in the in vitro wash-off test. Release from some microcapsules fulfilled the official (USP 23 drug release test-2 requirement of indomethacin extended release capsules. A 62-80 % reduction in ulcerogenic activity was observed with these microcapsules when compared to pure drug indomethacin.

  20. Hydrophobic Drug-Loaded PEGylated Magnetic Liposomes for Drug-Controlled Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiansyah, Andri; Yang, Ming-Chien; Liu, Ting-Yu; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Huang, Li-Ying; Chan, Tzu-Yi

    2017-05-01

    Less targeted and limited solubility of hydrophobic-based drug are one of the serious obstacles in drug delivery system. Thus, new strategies to enhance the solubility of hydrophobic drug and controlled release behaviors would be developed. Herein, curcumin, a model of hydrophobic drug, has been loaded into PEGylated magnetic liposomes as a drug carrier platform for drug controlled release system. Inductive magnetic heating (hyperthermia)-stimulated drug release, in vitro cellular cytotoxicity assay of curcumin-loaded PEGylated magnetic liposomes and cellular internalization-induced by magnetic guidance would be investigated. The resultant of drug carriers could disperse homogeneously in aqueous solution, showing a superparamagnetic characteristic and could inductive magnetic heating with external high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF). In vitro curcumin release studies confirmed that the drug carriers exhibited no significant release at 37 °C, whereas exhibited rapid releasing at 45 °C. However, it would display enormous (three times higher) curcumin releasing under the HFMF exposure, compared with that without HFMF exposure at 45 °C. In vitro cytotoxicity test shows that curcumin-loaded PEGylated magnetic liposomes could efficiently kill MCF-7 cells in parallel with increasing curcumin concentration. Fluorescence microscopy observed that these drug carriers could internalize efficiently into the cellular compartment of MCF-7 cells. Thus, it would be anticipated that the novel hydrophobic drug-loaded PEGylated magnetic liposomes in combination with inductive magnetic heating are promising to apply in the combination of chemotherapy and thermotherapy for cancer therapy.

  1. Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

  2. PECTIN MICROGELS CONTAINING SYNTHETIC POLYMERS BASED ON NANOCAPSULES FOR THE CONTROLLED RELEASE OF INDOMETHACIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela HOLBAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanocapsule-based Eudragit RS100 and Eudragit E100 containing indomethacin have been prepared. The nanosuspensions have been included into pectin microgels of different polysaccharide concentrations, 28-61 µm-ranged polymer microgels with size and size polydispersity highly depending on the pectin amount being thus obtained. Study of the drug release revealed that indomethacin was released at a slower and more controlled rate from the microgels containing nanocapsules than from the empty pectin microgels. Also, the rate of released indomethacin increased with the augmentation of pectin amount into the microgels.

  3. Controlled oxygen release from pyridone endoperoxides promotes cell survival under anoxic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Benz, Sebastian; Noetzli, Sarah; Siegel, Jay; Eberli, Daniel; Jessen, Henning Jacob

    2013-01-01

    In tissue engineering, survival of larger constructs remains challenging due to limited supply with oxygen caused by a lack of early vascularization. Controlled release of oxygen from small organic molecules represents a possible strategy to prevent cell death under anoxic conditions. A comprehensive study of methylated pyridone-derived endoperoxides has led to the development of water-soluble molecules that undergo retro Diels-Alder reactions in aqueous environment releasing oxygen in high y...

  4. Design and evaluation of controlled release mucoadhesive microspheres of amoxicillin for anti Helicobacter pylori therapy

    OpenAIRE

    N Venkateswaramurthy; Sambathkumar, R.; Perumal, P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop controlled release mucoadhesive microspheres of amoxicillin trihydrate for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease caused by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Microspheres were prepared by solvent evaporation technique using carbopol 974P, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose K4M (HPMC K4M) and Eudragit RS 100. The prepared microspheres were subjected to evaluation for particle size, incorporation efficiency, in vitro mucoadhesion and in vitro drug release characte...

  5. Controlled release behaviour and antibacterial effects of antibiotic-loaded titania nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenchao; Geng, Zhen; Li, Zhaoyang; Cui, Zhenduo; Zhu, Shengli; Liang, Yanqin; Liu, Yunde; Wang, Renfeng; Yang, Xianjin

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infections have been identified as the main cause of orthopaedic implant failure. Owing to their high antibiotic delivery efficiency, titania nanotubes loaded with antibiotics constitute one of the most promising strategies for suppressing bacterial infections. However, it is difficult to control the drug-release behaviour of such nanotubes. Although sealing the nanotubes with a polymer solution provides sustained release effects to a certain extent, it inevitably influences their initial antibacterial activity. This study reports on the controlled release of gentamicin sulphate (GS) from titania nanotube surfaces whereby their initial antibacterial activity remains unaffected. Titania nanotubes were fabricated via electrochemical anodization and loaded with GS through physical adsorption. Experimental results showed that this loading method is feasible and efficient. The GS-loaded titania nanotubes were further covered by a thin film comprising a mixture of GS and chitosan (GSCH). The release kinetics confirmed that the drug release could be controlled by this thin film. Moreover, such a film was shown to not only inhibit initial bacterial adherence owing to its strong antibacterial properties but also enhance cell viability. Thus, GS-loaded titania nanotubes coated with GSCH have considerable potential as biomaterials for preventing initial release and peri-implant infection in the field of orthopaedics.

  6. Controlled release by novel lysostaphin-loaded hydroxyapatite/chitosan composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Cheng; Xue, Bai; Ge, Kui-Kui; Wang, Yi-Han; Li, Guo-Dong; Huang, Qing-Shan

    2014-09-01

    Lysostaphin is highly effective on eliminating methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In order to achieve controlled release of lysostaphin, a biocompatible drug carrier is needed. Hydroxyapatite/chitosan (HA/CS) composites were chosen to carry lysostaphin and sample composites with different weight ratios of HA to CS, including 80/20, 70/30, 60/40, and 40/60, were prepared. Multiple analyses were performed to determine the structural and physicochemical properties of the composites, including scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. We immersed HA/CS composites loaded with 1 wt% lysostaphin to test in vitro release activity and cultured MC3T3-E1 cells to carry out biocompatibility test. The result of the release behavior of the composites revealed that the controlled release of lysostaphin from 60/40 HA/CS composites was the highest release rate of (87.4 ± 2.8)%, which lasted for 120 hours. In biocompatibility testing, MC3T3-E1 cells were able to proliferate on the surface of these composites, and the extract liquid from the composites could increase the growth of the cells. These results demonstrate the controlled release of lysostaphin from HA/CS composites and their biocompatibility, suggesting the potential application of these composites to bone injury and infection applications.

  7. Improving the controlled release of water-insoluble emodin from amino-functionalized mesoporous silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yunqiang; Wang Chunfeng [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemistry, Shandong Polytechnic University, Jinan 250353, Shandong (China); Zhou Guowei, E-mail: guoweizhou@hotmail.com [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemistry, Shandong Polytechnic University, Jinan 250353, Shandong (China); Wu Yue; Chen Jing [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemistry, Shandong Polytechnic University, Jinan 250353, Shandong (China)

    2012-06-15

    Several types of amino-functionalized mesoporous silica, including F5-SBA-15, F10-SBA-15, and F15-SBA-15 were prepared through co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) in varying molar ratios (5 mol%, 10 mol%, and 15 mol%) via a hydrothermal process. The materials obtained were characterized by means of small-angle X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, Fourier transformed infrared spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Increasing APTES molar ratios decreased the degree of orderliness of the functionalized mesoporous silica. Pure and amino-functionalized SBA-15 samples were employed as supports for the controlled release of water-insoluble drug emodin. Loading experiments showed that drug loading capacities mainly depended on the surface areas and pore diameters of the carriers. Controlled release profiles of emodin-loaded samples were studied in phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4), and results indicated that the emodin release rate could be controlled by surface amino-functionalized carriers. Emodin loaded on functionalized mesoporous supports exhibited a lower release rate than that of loaded on pure SBA-15, emodin loaded on F10-SBA-15 showed the smallest release amount (71.74 wt%) after stirring in PBS for 60 h. Findings suggest that functionalized mesoporous SBA-15 is a promising carrier for achieving prolonged release time periods.

  8. Formulation and evaluation of controlled release floating microspheres of tolperisone hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Jani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Main aim of this study was to develop controlled release (CR floating multiparticulate drug delivery system of tolperisone hydrochloride. Microspheres were prepared by nonaqueous solvent evaporation technique consisting of porous calcium silicate (Florite or FLR as porous carrier, tolperisone hydrochloride (API, Ethyl cellulose (EC, and HPMC 15 cPs as rate controlling polymers. 2 3 full factorial design was applied for optimization of formulation. The effect of various formulation and process variables on the particle morphology, micromeritic properties, in vitro floating behavior, entrapment efficiency, and in vitro drug release were studied. The size of microspheres was varied from 300 to 500 μm. The microspheres were found to be highly porous and regular in shape. All the formulations showed excellent flow properties. The percentage entrapment efficiency of all batches was greater than 80%. The percentage buoyancy varied from 85% to 98% at the end of 12 h. The release rate was determined in simulated gastric fluids. The formulation demonstrated favorable in vitro floating and release characteristics. Different kinetic models were applied to study the release mechanism. All formulations followed Higuchi model, which indicates the diffusion control release of water soluble drug from polymer matrix. Multiple regression analysis was applied for study of the effect of independent variables on the dependent variables.

  9. Chitosan-polycarbophil complexes in swellable matrix systems for controlled drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z; Chen, W; Hamman, J H

    2007-10-01

    A prerequisite for progress in the design of novel drug delivery systems is the development of excipients that are capable of fulfilling multifunctional roles such as controlling the release of the drug according to the therapeutic needs. Although several polymers have been utilised in the development of specialised drug delivery systems, their scope in dosage form design can be enlarged through combining different polymers. When a polymer is cross-linked or complexed with an oppositely charged polyelectrolyte, a three-dimensional network is formed in which the drug can be incorporated to control its release. The swelling properties and release kinetics of two model drugs with different water solubilities (i.e. diltiazem and ibuprofen) from monolithic matrix tablets consisting of an interpolyelectrolyte complex between chitosan and polycarbophil are reported. Matrix tablets consisting of this polymeric complex without drug or excipients exhibited extremely high swelling properties that are completely reversible upon drying. The drug release from matrix systems with different formulations depended on the concentration of the chitosan-polycarbophil interpolyelectrolyte complex and approached zero order release kinetics for both model drugs. The chitosan-polycarbophil interpolyelectrolyte complex has demonstrated a high potential as an excipient for the production of swellable matrix systems with controlled drug release properties.

  10. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides (/sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 3/H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay.

  11. Controlled release from triple layer, donut-shaped tablets with enteric polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cherng-ju

    2005-10-22

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate triple layer, donut-shaped tablets (TLDSTs) for extended release dosage forms. TLDSTs were prepared by layering 3 powders sequentially after pressing them with a punch. The core tablet consisted of enteric polymers, mainly hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate, and the bottom and top layers were made of a water-insoluble polymer, ethyl cellulose. Drug release kinetics were dependent on the pH of the dissolution medium and the drug properties, such as solubility, salt forms of weak acid and weak base drugs, and drug loading. At a 10% drug loading level, all drugs, regardless of their type or solubility, yielded the same release profiles within an acceptable level of experimental error. As drug loading increased from 10% to 30%, the drug release rate of neutral drugs increased for all except sulfathiazole, which retained the same kinetics as at 10% loading. HCl salts of weak base drugs had much slower release rates than did those of neutral drugs (eg, theophylline) as drug loading increased. The release of labetalol HCl retarded as drug loading increased from 10% to 30%. On the other hand, Na salts of weak acid drugs had much higher release rates than did those of neutral drugs (eg, theophylline). Drug release kinetics were governed by the ionization/erosion process with slight drug diffusion, observing no perfect straight line. A mathematical expression for drug release kinetics (erosion-controlled system) of TLDSTs is presented. In summary, a TLDST is a good design to obtain zero-order or nearly zero-order release kinetics for a wide range of drug solubilities.

  12. Control of the risk of exposure to alpha emitting radionuclides in French nuclear power plants: example of Cattenom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guen, B; Roupioz, A; Rabu, B; Bouvy, A; Labouglie, J F; Garcier, Y

    2003-01-01

    Control of the risk of internal exposure of EDF PWR plant maintenance workers by alpha-emitting radioactive elements is based on identification and quantification of the contamination of the systems. In 2001, an experiment carried out at Cattenom Power Plant during a unit outage in the presence of a leaking fuel cladding, based on measurement of alpha-emitting radioactive elements, made it possible to determine a realistic particle resuspension coefficient. A resuspension coefficient of 10(-6) m(-1) was adopted for operational radiological protection. An appropriate monitoring system for workers was set in place in collaboration with the occupational medicine and radiological protection department. It was based on prior estimation of the level of alpha contamination, and confirmed by swipe measurements, atmospheric surveillance by monitors, and collective analysis by nose blow samples from workers selected on the basis of their workstations, as well as supplementary individual measurements (monitoring of faeces). This surveillance made it possible to validate an appropriate work area monitoring system.

  13. Reducing Runoff Loss of Applied Nutrients in Oil Palm Cultivation Using Controlled-Release Fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled-release fertilizers are expected to minimize nutrient loss from crop fields due to their potential to supply plant-available nutrients in synchrony with crop requirements. The evaluation of the efficiency of these fertilizers in tropical oil palm agroecological conditions is not yet fully explored. In this study, a one-year field trial was conducted to determine the impact of fertilization with water soluble conventional mixture and controlled-release fertilizers on runoff loss of nutrients from an immature oil palm field. Soil and nutrient loss were monitored for one year in 2012/2013 under erosion plots of 16 m2 on 10% slope gradient. Mean sediments concentration in runoff amounted to about 6.41 t ha−1. Conventional mixture fertilizer posed the greatest risk of nutrient loss in runoff following fertilization due to elevated nitrogen (6.97%, potassium (13.37%, and magnesium (14.76% as percentage of applied nutrients. In contrast, this risk decreased with the application of controlled-release fertilizers, representing 0.75–2.44% N, 3.55–5.09% K, and 4.35–5.43% Mg loss. Meanwhile, nutrient loss via eroded sediments was minimal compared with loss through runoff. This research demonstrates that the addition of controlled-release fertilizers reduced the runoff risks of nutrient loss possibly due to their slow-release properties.

  14. Ibuprofen-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid films for controlled drug release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang JM

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Jianmei Pang1, Yuxia Luan1, Feifei Li1, Xiaoqing Cai1, Jimin Du2, Zhonghao Li31School of Pharmaceutical Science, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province, PR China; 2School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Henan Province, PR China; 3School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province, PR ChinaAbstract: Ibuprofen- (IBU loaded biocompatible poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA films were prepared by spreading polymer/ibuprofen solution on the nonsolvent surface. By controlling the weight ratio of drug and polymer, different drug loading polymer films can be obtained. The synthesized ibuprofen-loaded PLGA films were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. The drug release behavior of the as-prepared IBU-loaded PLGA films was studied to reveal their potential application in drug delivery systems. The results show the feasibility of the as-obtained films for controlling drug release. Furthermore, the drug release rate of the film could be controlled by the drug loading content and the release medium. The development of a biodegradable ibuprofen system, based on films, should be of great interest in drug delivery systems.Keywords: ibuprofen, controlled release, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, films

  15. Application of photoremovable protecting group for controlled release of plant growth regulators by sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, Sanghamitra; Ikbal, Mohammed; Kumar, Ashutosh; Pradeep Singh, N D

    2012-06-01

    We report a novel technique for controlled release of plant growth regulators (PGRs) by sunlight using photoremovable protecting group (PRPG) as a delivery device. In the present work, carboxyl-containing PGRs of the auxin group [indoleacetic acid (IAA) and naphthoxyacetic acid (NOAA)] were chemically caged using PRPGs of coumarin derivatives. Photophysical studies showed that caged PGRs exhibited good fluorescence properties. Irradiation of caged PGRs by sunlight in both aqueous ethanol and soil media resulted in controlled release of PGRs. The results of the bioactivity experiments indicated that caged PGRs showed better enhancement in the root and shoot length growth of Cicer arietinum compared to PGRs after 10days of sunlight exposure. Our results indicated that use of PRPG as a delivery device for controlled release of PGRs by sunlight in soil holds great interest for field application since it can overcome the rapid loss of PGRs in environmental conditions.

  16. Laponite-based nanohybrid for enhanced solubility and controlled release of itraconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Choy, Young Bin; Hwang, Seong-Ju; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2008-02-12

    Laponite, a form of layered aluminosilicates, and itraconazole, a water insoluble drug, were hybridized through an interfacial reaction at the boundary between water and a water-immiscible liquid. The reaction was carried out under a controlled pH to maintain both physical and chemical stability of the drug. The X-ray diffraction patterns and spectroscopic analyses indicated that itraconazole was intercalated into the interlayer space of clay with a lateral monolayer structure. No significant chemical structural change of itraconazole was seen through the formation of the hybrid. The hybrid system exhibited enhanced solubility and controlled release of itraconazole. The released amount of itraconazole could be controlled in the range from 18 to 75%, depending on the kinds of cations in the release media.

  17. Extracellular control of intracellular drug release for enhanced safety of anti-cancer chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qian; Qi, Haixia; Long, Ziyan; Liu, Shang; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Junfeng; Wang, Chunming; Dong, Lei

    2016-06-01

    The difficulty of controlling drug release at an intracellular level remains a key challenge for maximising drug safety and efficacy. We demonstrate herein a new, efficient and convenient approach to extracellularly control the intracellular release of doxorubicin (DOX), by designing a delivery system that harnesses the interactions between the system and a particular set of cellular machinery. By simply adding a small-molecule chemical into the cell medium, we could lower the release rate of DOX in the cytosol, and thereby increase its accumulation in the nuclei while decreasing its presence at mitochondria. Delivery of DOX with this system effectively prevented DOX-induced mitochondria damage that is the main mechanism of its toxicity, while exerting the maximum efficacy of this anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent. The present study sheds light on the design of drug delivery systems for extracellular control of intracellular drug delivery, with immediate therapeutic implications.

  18. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF METOPROLOL SUCCINATE CONTROLLED RELEASE TABLETS USING NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC POLYMER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sathyaraj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study to develop controlled release tablets of Metoprolol succinate using Natural polymer, guar gum and synthetic polymer, carbopol as a rate controlling polymers.. It was also desired to study the effect of polymer concentration. Metoprolol succinate, β1- selective adrenergic receptor- blocking agent used in the management of hypertension, angina pectoris, cardiac arrthymias, myocardial infarction, heart failure, hyperthyroidism and in the prophylactic treatment of migraine. The half-life of drug is relatively short approximately 4-6 hrs and in normal course of therapy drug administration is required every 4-6 hrs, thus warrants the use of controlled release formulation for prolong action and to improve patient compliance. In the present investigation Natural polymer, guar gum and synthetic polymer, carbopol have been selected as matrix forming materials for the drug. The formulations are made by employing the conventional wet granulation method, to achieve prolonged release of medicaments.

  19. Controlled Release of Ciprofloxacin from Core-Shell Nanofibers with Monolithic or Blended Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupančič, Špela; Sinha-Ray, Sumit; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Kristl, Julijana; Yarin, Alexander L

    2016-04-04

    Sustained controlled drug release is one of the prominent contributions for more successful treatment outcomes in the case of several diseases. However, the incorporation of hydrophilic drugs into nanofibers, a promising novel delivery system, and achieving a long-term sustained release still pose a challenging task. In this work we demonstrated a robust method of avoiding burst release of drugs and achieving a sustained drug release from 2 to 4 weeks using core-shell nanofibers with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) shell and monolithic poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) core or a novel type of core-shell nanofibers with blended (PVA and PMMA) core loaded with ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (CIP). It is also shown that, for core-shell nanofibers with monolithic core, drug release can be manipulated by varying flow rate of the core PVA solution, whereas for core-shell nanofibers with blended core, drug release can be manipulated by varying the ratios between PMMA and PVA in the core. During coaxial electrospinning, when the solvent from the core evaporates in concert with the solvent from the shell, the interconnected pores spanning the core and the shell are formed. The release process is found to be desorption-limited and agrees with the two-stage desorption model. Ciprofloxacin-loaded nanofiber mats developed in the present work could be potentially used as local drug delivery systems for treatment of several medical conditions, including periodontal disease and skin, bone, and joint infections.

  20. Controlled-release phentermine/topiramate in severely obese adults: a randomized controlled trial (EQUIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, David B; Gadde, Kishore M; Garvey, William Timothy; Peterson, Craig A; Schwiers, Michael L; Najarian, Thomas; Tam, Peter Y; Troupin, Barbara; Day, Wesley W

    2012-02-01

    A 56-week randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate safety and efficacy of a controlled-release combination of phentermine and topiramate (PHEN/TPM CR) for weight loss (WL) and metabolic improvements. Men and women with class II and III obesity (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2)) were randomized to placebo, PHEN/TPM CR 3.75/23 mg, or PHEN/TPM CR 15/92 mg, added to a reduced-energy diet. Primary end points were percent WL and proportions of patients achieving 5% WL. Secondary end points included waist circumference (WC), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), fasting glucose, and lipid measures. In the primary analysis (randomized patients with at least one postbaseline weight measurement who took at least one dose of assigned drug or placebo), patients in the placebo, 3.75/23, and 15/92 groups lost 1.6%, 5.1%, and 10.9% of baseline body weight (BW), respectively, at 56 weeks (P fasting glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The most common adverse events were paresthesia, dry mouth, constipation, dysgeusia, and insomnia. Dropout rate from the study was 47.1% for placebo patients, 39.0% for 3.75/23 patients, and 33.6% of 15/92 patients. PHEN/TPM CR demonstrated dose-dependent effects on weight and metabolic variables in the direction expected to be beneficial with no evidence of serious adverse events induced by treatment.

  1. Controlled release of NELL-1 protein from chitosan/hydroxyapatite-modified TCP particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulong; Dong, Rui; Park, Yujin; Bohner, Marc; Zhang, Xinli; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia; Wu, Benjamin M

    2016-09-10

    NEL-like molecule-1 (NELL-1) is a novel osteogenic protein that showing high specificity to osteochondral cells. It was widely used in bone regeneration research by loading onto carriers such as tricalcium phosphate (TCP) particles. However, there has been little research on protein controlled release from this material and its potential application. In this study, TCP was first modified with a hydroxyapatite coating followed by a chitosan coating to prepare chitosan/hydroxyapatite-coated TCP particles (Chi/HA-TCP). The preparation was characterized by SEM, EDX, FTIR, XRD, FM and Zeta potential measurements. The NELL-1 loaded Chi/HA-TCP particles and the release kinetics were investigated in vitro. It was observed that the Chi/HA-TCP particles prepared with the 0.3% (wt/wt) chitosan solution were able to successfully control the release of NELL-1 and maintain a slow, steady release for up to 28 days. Furthermore, more than 78% of the loaded protein's bioactivity was preserved in Chi/HA-TCP particles over the period of the investigation, which was significantly higher than that of the protein released from hydroxyapatite coated TCP (HA-TCP) particles. Collectively, this study suggests that the osteogenic protein NELL-1 showed a sustained release pattern after being encapsulated into the modified Chi/HA-TCP particles, and the NELL-1 integrated composite of Chi/HA-TCP showed a potential to function as a protein delivery carrier and as an improved bone matrix for use in bone regeneration research.

  2. Synthetic Zeolites as Controlled-Release Delivery Systems for Anti-Inflammatory Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaverdi, Elham; Soleimani, Hossein Ali; Mohammadpour, Fatemeh; Hadizadeh, Farzin

    2016-06-01

    Scientists have always been trying to use artificial zeolites to make modified-release drug delivery systems in the gastrointestinal tract. An ideal carrier should have the capability to release the drug in the intestine, which is the main area of absorption. Zeolites are mineral aluminosilicate compounds with regular structure and huge porosity, which are available in natural and artificial forms. In this study, soaking, filtration and solvent evaporation methods were used to load the drugs after activation of the zeolites. Weight measurement, spectroscopy FTIR, thermogravimetry and scanning electronic microscope were used to determine drug loading on the systems. Finally, consideration of drug release was made in a simulated gastric fluid and a simulated intestinal fluid for all matrixes (zeolites containing drugs) and drugs without zeolites. Diclofenac sodium (D) and piroxicam (P) were used as the drug models, and zeolites X and Y as the carriers. Drug loading percentage showed that over 90% of drugs were loaded on zeolites. Dissolution tests in stomach pH environment showed that the control samples (drug without zeolite) released considerable amount of drugs (about 90%) within first 15 min when it was about 10-20% for the matrixes. These results are favorable as NSAIDs irritate the stomach wall and it is ideal not to release much drugs in the stomach. Furthermore, release rate of drugs from matrixes has shown slower rate in comparison with control samples in intestine pH environment.

  3. Zinc polycarboxylate dental cement for the controlled release of an active organic substance: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad Naseem; Edwards, Mark; Nicholson, John W

    2010-04-01

    The potential of employing zinc polycarboxylate dental cement as a controlled release material has been studied. Benzalkonium chloride was used as the active ingredient, and incorporated at concentrations of 1, 2 and 3% by mass within the cement. At these levels, there was no observable effect on the speed of setting. Release was followed using an ion-selective electrode to determine changes in chloride ion concentration with time. This technique showed that the additive was released when the cured cement was placed in water, with release occurring by a diffusion mechanism for the first 3 h, but continuing beyond that for up to 1 week. Diffusion coefficients were in the range 5.62 x 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) (for 1% concentration) to 10.90 x 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) (for 3% concentration). Up to 3% of the total loading of benzalkonium chloride was released from the zinc polycarboxylate after a week, which is similar to that found in previous studies with glass-ionomer cement. It is concluded that zinc polycarboxylate cement is capable of acting as a useful material for the controlled release of active organic compounds.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a HAp-based biomarker with controlled drug release for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Maykel [Dept. of Molecular Engineering of Materials, Center of Applied Physics and Advanced Technology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (CFATA-UNAM), Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Merino, Ulises [Dept. of Molecular Engineering of Materials, Center of Applied Physics and Advanced Technology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (CFATA-UNAM), Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); University of the Valley of Mexico (UVM), Boulevard Villas del Mesón 1000, Juriquilla, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro 76320 (Mexico); Vargas, Susana [Dept. of Molecular Engineering of Materials, Center of Applied Physics and Advanced Technology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (CFATA-UNAM), Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Quintanilla, Francisco [University of the Valley of Mexico (UVM), Boulevard Villas del Mesón 1000, Juriquilla, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro 76320 (Mexico); Rodríguez, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelior@unam.mx [Dept. of Molecular Engineering of Materials, Center of Applied Physics and Advanced Technology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (CFATA-UNAM), Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2016-04-01

    A biocompatible hybrid porous polymer–ceramic material was synthesized to be used as a biomarker in the treatment of breast cancer. This device was equipped with the capacity to release medicaments locally in a controlled manner. The biomaterial was Hydroxyapatite(HAp)-based and had a controlled pore size and pore volume fraction. It was implemented externally using a sharp end and a pair of barbed rings placed opposite each other to prevent relative movement once implanted. The biomarker was impregnated with cis-diamine dichloride platinum (II) [Cl{sub 2}-Pt-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}]; the rate of release was obtained using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and release occurred over the course of three months. Different release profiles were obtained as a function of the pore volume fraction. The biomaterial was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. - Highlights: • A novel biocompatible hybrid porous polymer–ceramic material was synthesized. • The polymer–ceramic (HAp-based) material was used to prepare a biomarker. • The biomarker was impregnated with cis-diamine dichloride platinum (II). • The rate of cisplatin release was determined using inductively coupled plasma. • The kinetics of the cisplatin release was studied varying the biomarker porosity.

  5. Design and evaluation of osmotic pump-based controlled release system of Ambroxol Hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiongkai; Sun, Min; Gao, Yan; Cao, Fengliang; Zhai, Guangxi

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to design and evaluate an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system for controlling the release of Ambroxol Hydrochloride (Amb). Citric acid, lactose and polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000) were employed as osmotic agents. Surelease EC containing polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400) controlling the membrane porosity was used as semi-permeable membrane. The formulation of tablet core was optimized by orthogonal design and evaluated by weighted mark method. The influences of the amount of PEG 400 and membrane thickness on Amb release were investigated. The optimal osmotic pump tablet (OPT) was evaluated in different release media and at different stirring rates. The major release power confirmed was osmotic pressure. The release of Amb from OPT was verified at a rate of approximately zero-order, and cumulative release percentage at 12?h was 92.6%. The relative bioavailability of Amb OPT in rabbits relative to the commercial sustained capsule was 109.6%. Our results showed that Amb OPT could be a practical preparation with a good prospect.

  6. Preparation and evaluation of waxes/fat microspheres loaded with lithium carbonate for controlled release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowda D

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To minimize the unwanted toxic effects of anti maniac drug lithium carbonate by kinetic control of drug release, it was entrapped into gastro resistant, biodegradable, waxes and fat such as beeswax, cetostearyl alcohol, spermaceti and cetylalcohol microspheres using meltable emulsified dispersion cooling induced solidification technique utilizing a wetting agent. Solid, discrete, reproducible free flowing microspheres were obtained. The yield of the microspheres was up to 90.0%. More than 98.0% of the isolated microspheres were of particle size range 115 to 855 mm. The microspheres had smooth surfaces, with free flowing and good packing properties. Scanning electron microscope confirmed their spherical structures within a size range of 339-355 mm. The drug loaded in waxes and fat microspheres was stable and compatible, as confirmed by DSC and FTIR studies. The release of drug was controlled for more than 8 hours. Intestinal drug release from waxes/ fat microspheres was studied and compared with the releases behavior of commercially available formulation Intalith CR ®-450. The release kinetics followed different transport mechanisms. The drug release performance was greatly affected by the materials used in microsphere preparations, which allows absorption in the intestinal tract.

  7. Controlled release/removal technology; Seigyo hoshutsu {center_dot} jokyo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tojo, K. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Fukuoka (Japan)

    2000-02-05

    The controlled release is to control optimally releasing velocity of active ingredient in medication or agricultural chemicals for therapy or vermin control. The novel transdermal therapeutic system can be developed considering diapause term of medication setting type or time pharmacology by storing information of time lag for medication permeability in medication keeping layer. Furthermore by resent iontophoresis technology using electric fields for controlling drug permeability through the skin, migration volume of active ingredient to blood can be controlled pulsed shape by On- Off of electric fields. In another hand, it comes to be clarified that drugs in the body can be extracted by contrarotating operation of electrodes. From now, effective removal system of barren materials from organism or time controlling therapeutic system with feed buck function can be realized by being optimal novel technology of medical engineering therapy. (NEDO)

  8. Role of nitric oxide in control of prolactin release by the adenohypophysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvilanski, B H; Zambruno, C; Seilicovich, A; Pisera, D; Lasaga, M; Diaz, M C; Belova, N; Rettori, V; McCann, S M

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase-containing cells were visualized in the anterior pituitary gland by immunocytochemistry. Consequently, we began an evaluation of the possible role of NO in the control of anterior pituitary function. Prolactin is normally under inhibitory hypothalamic control, and in vitro the gland secretes large quantities of the hormone. When hemipituitaries were incubated for 30 min in the presence of sodium nitroprusside, a releaser of NO, prolactin release was inhibited. This suppression was completely blocked by the scavenger of NO, hemoglobin. Analogs of arginine, such as NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA, where NG is the terminal guanidino nitrogen) and nitroarginine methyl ester, inhibit NO synthase. Incubation of hemipituitaries with either of these compounds significantly increased prolactin release. Since in other tissues most of the actions of NO are mediated by activation of soluble guanylate cyclase with the formation of cyclic GMP, we evaluated the effects of cyclic GMP on prolactin release. Cyclic GMP (10 mM) produced an approximately 40% reduction in prolactin release. Prolactin release in vivo and in vitro can be stimulated by several peptides, which include vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and substance P. Consequently, we evaluated the possible role of NO in these stimulations by incubating the glands in the presence of either of these peptides alone or in combination with NMMA. In the case of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, the significant stimulation of prolactin release was augmented by NMMA to give an additive effect. In the case of substance P, there was a smaller but significant release of prolactin that was not significantly augmented by NMMA. We conclude that NO has little effect on the stimulatory action of these two peptides on prolactin release. Dopamine (0.1 microM), an inhibitor of prolactin release, reduced prolactin release, and this inhibitory action was significantly blocked by either hemoglobin (20 micrograms/ml) or

  9. Synthesis and Performance of Polyurethane Coated Urea as Slow/controlled Release Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qingshan; WU Shu; RU Tiejun; WANG Limin; XING Guangzhong; WANG Jinming

    2012-01-01

    Polyurethane coated urea slow/controlled release fertilizer was prepared based on urea granules,isocyanate,polyols and paraffin.Isocyanate reacted with polyols to synthesize the polyurethane skin layer on urea granules surface.Paraffin serves as a lubricant during syntheses of polyurethane skin layers.The structure and nutrient release characteristics of the polyurethane skin layers were investigated by FTIR,SEM and TG.Urea nitrogen slow-release behavior of the polyurethane coated urea was tested.The experimental results indicated that compact and dense polyurethane skin layers with a thickness of 10-15 μm were formed on urea surface,the urea nitrogen slow-release time can reach 40-50 days.Paraffin proves to play a key role in inhibiting water to penetrate into urea,but excessive addition would decrease the polyurethane crosslinking density.

  10. Control of neurotransmitter release by an internal gel matrix in synaptic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, David; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Gorostiza, Pau; Verdaguer, Albert; Gómez de Aranda, Inmaculada; Pineda, Oriol; Vilarrasa, Jaume; Marsal, Jordi; Blasi, Joan; Aleu, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-03-18

    Neurotransmitters are stored in synaptic vesicles, where they have been assumed to be in free solution. Here we report that in Torpedo synaptic vesicles, only 5% of the total acetylcholine (ACh) or ATP content is free, and that the rest is adsorbed to an intravesicular proteoglycan matrix. This matrix, which controls ACh and ATP release by an ion-exchange mechanism, behaves like a smart gel. That is, it releases neurotransmitter and changes its volume when challenged with small ionic concentration change. Immunodetection analysis revealed that the synaptic vesicle proteoglycan SV2 is the core of the intravesicular matrix and is responsible for immobilization and release of ACh and ATP. We suggest that in the early steps of vesicle fusion, this internal matrix regulates the availability of free diffusible ACh and ATP, and thus serves to modulate the quantity of transmitter released.

  11. Misrepresentation of randomized controlled trials in press releases and news coverage: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavchitz, Amélie; Boutron, Isabelle; Bafeta, Aida; Marroun, Ibrahim; Charles, Pierre; Mantz, Jean; Ravaud, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that in published reports, trial results can be distorted by the use of "spin" (specific reporting strategies, intentional or unintentional, emphasizing the beneficial effect of the experimental treatment). We aimed to (1) evaluate the presence of "spin" in press releases and associated media coverage; and (2) evaluate whether findings of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) based on press releases and media coverage are misinterpreted. We systematically searched for all press releases indexed in the EurekAlert! database between December 2009 and March 2010. Of the 498 press releases retrieved and screened, we included press releases for all two-arm, parallel-group RCTs (n = 70). We obtained a copy of the scientific article to which the press release related and we systematically searched for related news items using Lexis Nexis. "Spin," defined as specific reporting strategies (intentional or unintentional) emphasizing the beneficial effect of the experimental treatment, was identified in 28 (40%) scientific article abstract conclusions and in 33 (47%) press releases. From bivariate and multivariable analysis assessing the journal type, funding source, sample size, type of treatment (drug or other), results of the primary outcomes (all nonstatistically significant versus other), author of the press release, and the presence of "spin" in the abstract conclusion, the only factor associated, with "spin" in the press release was "spin" in the article abstract conclusions (relative risk [RR] 5.6, [95% CI 2.8-11.1], p < 0.001). Findings of RCTs based on press releases were overestimated for 19 (27%) reports. News items were identified for 41 RCTs; 21 (51%) were reported with "spin," mainly the same type of "spin" as those identified in the press release and article abstract conclusion. Findings of RCTs based on the news item was overestimated for ten (24%) reports. "Spin" was identified in about half of press releases and media coverage. In

  12. Misrepresentation of randomized controlled trials in press releases and news coverage: a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Yavchitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies indicate that in published reports, trial results can be distorted by the use of "spin" (specific reporting strategies, intentional or unintentional, emphasizing the beneficial effect of the experimental treatment. We aimed to (1 evaluate the presence of "spin" in press releases and associated media coverage; and (2 evaluate whether findings of randomized controlled trials (RCTs based on press releases and media coverage are misinterpreted. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We systematically searched for all press releases indexed in the EurekAlert! database between December 2009 and March 2010. Of the 498 press releases retrieved and screened, we included press releases for all two-arm, parallel-group RCTs (n = 70. We obtained a copy of the scientific article to which the press release related and we systematically searched for related news items using Lexis Nexis. "Spin," defined as specific reporting strategies (intentional or unintentional emphasizing the beneficial effect of the experimental treatment, was identified in 28 (40% scientific article abstract conclusions and in 33 (47% press releases. From bivariate and multivariable analysis assessing the journal type, funding source, sample size, type of treatment (drug or other, results of the primary outcomes (all nonstatistically significant versus other, author of the press release, and the presence of "spin" in the abstract conclusion, the only factor associated, with "spin" in the press release was "spin" in the article abstract conclusions (relative risk [RR] 5.6, [95% CI 2.8-11.1], p < 0.001. Findings of RCTs based on press releases were overestimated for 19 (27% reports. News items were identified for 41 RCTs; 21 (51% were reported with "spin," mainly the same type of "spin" as those identified in the press release and article abstract conclusion. Findings of RCTs based on the news item was overestimated for ten (24% reports. CONCLUSION: "Spin" was identified in

  13. Controlled release from drug microparticles via solventless dry-polymer coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Maxx; Barrows, Jason; Davé, Rajesh N

    2015-04-01

    A novel solvent-less dry-polymer coating process employing high-intensity vibrations avoiding the use of liquid plasticizers, solvents, binders, and heat treatments is utilized for the purpose of controlled release. The main hypothesis is that such process having highly controllable processing intensity and time may be effective for coating particularly fine particles, 100 μm and smaller via exploiting particle interactions between polymers and substrates in the dry state, while avoiding breakage yet achieving conformal coating. The method utilizes vibratory mixing to first layer micronized polymer onto active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) particles by virtue of van der Waals forces and to subsequently mechanically deform the polymer into a continuous film. As a practical example, ascorbic acid and ibuprofen microparticles, 50-500 μm, are coated with the polymers polyethylene wax or carnauba wax, a generally recognized as safe material, resulting in controlled release on the order of seconds to hours. As a novelty, models are utilized to describe the coating layer thickness and the controlled-release behavior of the API, which occurs because of a diffusion-based mechanism. Such modeling would allow the design and control of the coating process with application for the controlled release of microparticles, particularly those less than 100 μm, which are difficult to coat by conventional solvent coating methods. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Doses of controlled-release fertilizer for production of rubber tree rootstocks

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Luis Grisi Macedo; Elainy Botelho Carvalho Pereira; Ailton Vitor Pereira; Nelson Venturin; Antonio Nilson Zamunér Filho

    2012-01-01

    This experimental study aimed to evaluate the effects of doses of controlled-release fertilizer (ALL) on the development of rubber tree rootstocks. The fertilizer used was Osmocote®, scheduled to be released for 8-9 months and with the following composition: N (15%), P2O5 (9%), K2O (12%), Mg (1%), S (2.3%), B (0.02%), Cu (0.05%), Fe (1%), Mn (0.06%), Mo (0.02%) and Zn (0.05%). A randomized block design was used, with four treatments and eight replicates of 20 plants per plot. The controlled-r...

  15. Formulation and evaluation of controlled release matrix mucoadhesive tablets of domperidone using Salvia plebeian gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurpreet Arora

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to prepare controlled release matrix mucoadhesive tablets of domperidone using Salvia plebeian gum as natural polymer. Tablets were formulated by direct compression technology employing the natural polymer in different concentrations (5, 10, 15 and 20% w/w. The prepared batches were evaluated for drug assay, diameter, thickness, hardness and tensile strength, swelling index, mucoadhesive strength (using texture analyzer and subjected to in vitro drug release studies. Real-time stability studies were also conducted on prepared batches. In vitro drug release data were fitted in various release kinetic models for studying the mechanism of drug release. Tensile strength was found to increase from 0.808 ± 0.098 to 1.527 ± 0.10 mN/cm 2 and mucoadhesive strength increased from 13.673 ± 1.542 to 40.378 ± 2.345 N, with an increase in the polymer concentration from 5 to 20% (A1 to A4. Swelling index was reported to increase with both increase in the concentration of gum and the time duration. The in vitro drug release decreased from 97.76 to 83.4% (A1 to A4 with the increase in polymer concentration. The drug release from the matrix tablets was found to follow zero-order and Higuchi models, indicating the matrix-forming potential of natural polymer. The value of n was found to be between 0.5221 and 0.8992, indicating the involvement of more than one drug release mechanism from the formulation and possibly the combination of both diffusion and erosion. These research findings clearly indicate the potential of S. plebeian gum to be used as binder, release retardant and mucoadhesive natural material in tablet formulations.

  16. Ciprofloxacin Controlled-Solid Lipid Nanoparticles: Characterization, In Vitro Release, and Antibacterial Activity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to formulate ciprofloxacin (CIP) in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) in an attempt to develop a controlled drug delivery system. An ultrasonic melt-emulsification method was used for preparing CIP-loaded SLNs. Key findings included that SLNs were successfully produced with average particle sizes ranging from 165 to 320 nm and polydispersity index in the range of 0.18–0.33. High entrapment efficiency values were reported in all formulations. The atomic force scanning microscopic images showed spherical shape with the size range closer to those found by the particle size analyzer. CIP release exhibited controlled-release behavior with various lipids. Ciprofloxacin solid lipid nanoparticles formula containing stearic acid (CIPSTE) displayed the strongest burst effect and the most rapid release rate. The release data revealed a better fit to the Higuchi diffusion model. After storing the CIPSTE formula at room temperature for 120 days, no significant difference in particle size and zeta potential was found. CIP-loaded SLNs exhibited superior antibacterial activity. Incorporation of CIP into SLNs leads to controlled release and a superior antibacterial effect of CIP. PMID:28194408

  17. A controlled release system of titanocene dichloride by electrospun fiber and its antitumor activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Wu, Qing-Sheng; Ding, Ya-Ping; Chu, Maoquan; Huang, Zheng-Ming; Hu, Wen

    2010-11-01

    In order to improve both safety and efficacy of cancer chemotherapy of titanocene dichloride and overcome the shortcomings such as instability and short half-life in the human body, we report a controlled release system of titanocene dichloride by electrospun fiber and its in vitro antitumor activity against human lung tumor spca-1 cells. The system was developed by electrospinning. The release profiles of titanocene dichloride in PBS were researched by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. In vitro antitumor activities of the fibers were examined by MTT method. Titanocene dichloride was well incorporated in biodegradable poly(L-lactic acid) fibers. XRD results suggest that titanocene dichloride exists in the amorphous form in the fibers. The controlled release of titanocene dichloride can be gained for long time. MTT showed actual titanocene dichloride content 40, 80, 160 and 240 mg/L from the fibers mat, cell growth inhibition rates of 11.2%, 22.1%, 44.2% and 68.2% were achieved, respectively. The titanocene dichloride released has obvious inhibition effect against lung tumor cells. The system has an effect of controlled release of titanocene dichloride and may be used as an implantable anticancer drug in clinical applications in the future.

  18. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF ORAL CONTROLLED RELEASE DOSAGE FORM OF ANTI-HYPERTENSIVE AGENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Parvathi A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present investigation is preparation, characterization and evaluation of oral controlled release matrix tablets of Propranolol HCl in order to improve efficacy and to reduce the side effects. Tablets were prepared by direct compression method using different polymers like Guar gum, HPMC K4M, PVP and MCC used as the directly compressible vehicle. The granules were evaluated for pre-formulation characteristics and the tablets were subjected to post compression parameters, drug content and in-vitro dissolution release studies. In-vitro dissolution studies were carried out for 12 hrs and the results showed that among the nine formulations F8 and F9 showed good dissolution profile to control the drug release respectively. The drug release follows first order kinetics and the mechanism was found to be diffusion controlled for all the formulations (except F-9. The mechanism of drug release from F-9 was diffusion coupled with erosion. The Stability studies were carried out according to ICH guideline which indicates that the selected formulations (F8 and F9 were stable. In conclusion the results suggest that the developed matrix tablets of Propranolol HCl could perform therapeutically better than conventional dosage form, leading to improved efficacy and better patient compliance.

  19. Ciprofloxacin Controlled-Solid Lipid Nanoparticles: Characterization, In Vitro Release, and Antibacterial Activity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal A. Shazly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to formulate ciprofloxacin (CIP in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs in an attempt to develop a controlled drug delivery system. An ultrasonic melt-emulsification method was used for preparing CIP-loaded SLNs. Key findings included that SLNs were successfully produced with average particle sizes ranging from 165 to 320 nm and polydispersity index in the range of 0.18–0.33. High entrapment efficiency values were reported in all formulations. The atomic force scanning microscopic images showed spherical shape with the size range closer to those found by the particle size analyzer. CIP release exhibited controlled-release behavior with various lipids. Ciprofloxacin solid lipid nanoparticles formula containing stearic acid (CIPSTE displayed the strongest burst effect and the most rapid release rate. The release data revealed a better fit to the Higuchi diffusion model. After storing the CIPSTE formula at room temperature for 120 days, no significant difference in particle size and zeta potential was found. CIP-loaded SLNs exhibited superior antibacterial activity. Incorporation of CIP into SLNs leads to controlled release and a superior antibacterial effect of CIP.

  20. Intercalation of urea into kaolinite for preparation of controlled release fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdavi Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study urea was intercalated between layers of kaolinite by dry grinding technique to be used for preparing controlled release fertilizer. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD patterns confirmed the intercalation of urea into kaolinite by the significant expansion of the basal spacing of kaolinite layers from 0.710 nm to 1.090 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR also confirmed the hydrogen bonding between urea and kaolinite. Based on CHNS elemental analysis, 20% (wt. urea was intercalated between kaolinite layers. The urea-intercalated kaolinite was mixed with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC binder and was granulated to prepare the nitrogen-based controlled release fertilizer. To study the nitrogen release behavior of granules, ultraviolet/visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy was used through the diacetyl monoxime (DAM colorimetric method. The result of UV-Vis spectroscopy showed that intercalation of urea into kaolinite decreased the nitrogen release from 25.50 to 13.66 % after 24 hours and from 98.15 to 70.01% after 30 days incubation in water. According to the results, the prepared controlled release fertilizer (CRF behaved according to the standard for CRFs.

  1. Fallout radionuclide-based techniques for assessing the impact of soil conservation measures on erosion control and soil quality: an overview of the main lessons learnt under an FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dercon, G; Mabit, L; Hancock, G; Nguyen, M L; Dornhofer, P; Bacchi, O O S; Benmansour, M; Bernard, C; Froehlich, W; Golosov, V N; Haciyakupoglu, S; Hai, P S; Klik, A; Li, Y; Lobb, D A; Onda, Y; Popa, N; Rafiq, M; Ritchie, J C; Schuller, P; Shakhashiro, A; Wallbrink, P; Walling, D E; Zapata, F; Zhang, X

    2012-05-01

    This paper summarizes key findings and identifies the main lessons learnt from a 5-year (2002-2008) coordinated research project (CRP) on "Assessing the effectiveness of soil conservation measures for sustainable watershed management and crop production using fallout radionuclides" (D1.50.08), organized and funded by the International Atomic Energy Agency through the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The project brought together nineteen participants, from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Japan, Morocco, Pakistan, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States of America and Vietnam, involved in the use of nuclear techniques and, more particularly, fallout radionuclides (FRN) to assess the relative impacts of different soil conservation measures on soil erosion and land productivity. The overall objective of the CRP was to develop improved land use and management strategies for sustainable watershed management through effective soil erosion control practices, by the use of ¹³⁷Cs (half-life of 30.2 years), ²¹⁰Pb(ex) (half-life of 22.3 years) and ⁷Be (half-life of 53.4 days) for measuring soil erosion over several spatial and temporal scales. The environmental conditions under which the different research teams applied the tools based on the use of fallout radionuclides varied considerably--a variety of climates, soils, topographies and land uses. Nevertheless, the achievements of the CRP, as reflected in this overview paper, demonstrate that fallout radionuclide-based techniques are powerful tools to assess soil erosion/deposition at several spatial and temporal scales in a wide range of environments, and offer potential to monitor soil quality. The success of the CRP has stimulated an interest in many IAEA Member States in the use of these methodologies to identify factors and practices that can enhance sustainable agriculture and minimize land degradation.

  2. Radionuclide transfer. Radionuklid Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG)

  3. Controlled Release of Benzocaine from Monomer and Copolymer Carriers in Synthetic Gastro-intestinal Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houaria Merine

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available New dosage forms able to control drug release in the gastro-intestinal media have been prepared and investigated in this paper. Two different type of medicinal agent bonding (MA, in our case Benzocaine (Bz, were chosen in order to examine drug release. i MA attached to ethylenic monomer (m,p-vinylbenzaldehyde, condensation reaction. ii The copolymer carrier (Cp is obtained by copolymerizing this monomer. These two carriers were well characterized by microanalysis, FTIR, DSC (Tg and GPC (Ip and the two fraction α and β were calculated from elemental analyses of Cp. The results showed good polydispersity and low average molecular weight. MA linked to an organic product by the azomethine function (C=N, hydrolytically sensitive, allowed controlled release of Bz, from the monomer carrier and from the bending Schiff bases groups. Theoretical and experimental analyses of controlled release of Bz kinetics from monomer and copolymer carriers were conducted for the case of contact with synthetic gastro-intestinal fluids at various pH (1,2; 6,0 and 8,0 at 37°C. The process was found to be controlled by the nature of media (heterogeneous, which involved the preliminary hydrolysis, and the drug (Bz diffusing out of structure of copolymer (Cp to the external aqueous media. The results obtained on the rate of delivery showed a clear difference between pH = 1,2 and pH = 6,0 and 8,0 based on: i The cation of p-aminoniumbenzoic acid (PABAH+ release at pH = 1,2 ii Bz release at pH = 6,0 and 8,0

  4. Controlled release profiles of dipyridamole from biodegradable microspheres on the base of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Novel biodegradable microspheres on the base of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB designed for controlled release of antithrombotic drug, namely dipyridamole (DPD, have been kinetically studied. The profiles of release from the microspheres with different diameters 4, 9, 63, and 92 µm present the progression of nonlinear and linear stages. Diffusionkinetic equation describing both linear (PHB hydrolysis and nonlinear (diffusion stages of the DPD release profiles from the spherical subjects has been written down as the sum of two terms: desorption from the homogeneous sphere in accordance with diffusion mechanism and the zero-order release. In contrast to the diffusivity dependence on microsphere size, the constant characteristics (k of linearity are scarcely affected by the diameter of PHB microparticles. The view of the kinetic profiles as well as the low rate of DPD release are in satisfactory agreement with kinetics of weight loss measured in vitro for the PHB films. Taking into account kinetic results, we suppose that the degradation of both films and PHB microspheres is responsible for the linear stage of DPD release profiles. In the nearest future, combination of biodegradable PHB and DPD as a representative of proliferation cell inhibitors will give possibility to elaborate the novel injectable therapeutic system for a local, long-term, antiproliferative action.

  5. The Transcription Factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 Controls Border-Like Cell Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karve, Rucha; Suárez-Román, Frank; Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali S

    2016-07-01

    The root cap covers the tip of the root and functions to protect the root from environmental stress. Cells in the last layer of the root cap are known as border cells, or border-like cells (BLCs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These cells separate from the rest of the root cap and are released from its edge as a layer of living cells. BLC release is developmentally regulated, but the mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we show that the transcription factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 (NLP7) is required for the proper release of BLCs in Arabidopsis. Mutations in NLP7 lead to BLCs that are released as single cells instead of an entire layer. NLP7 is highly expressed in BLCs and is activated by exposure to low pH, a condition that causes BLCs to be released as single cells. Mutations in NLP7 lead to decreased levels of cellulose and pectin. Cell wall-loosening enzymes such as CELLULASE5 (CEL5) and a pectin lyase-like gene, as well as the root cap regulators SOMBRERO and BEARSKIN1/2, are activated in nlp7-1 seedlings. Double mutant analysis revealed that the nlp7-1 phenotype depends on the expression level of CEL5 Mutations in NLP7 lead to an increase in susceptibility to a root-infecting fungal pathogen. Together, these data suggest that NLP7 controls the release of BLCs by acting through the cell wall-loosening enzyme CEL5.

  6. Controlled drug-release system based on pH-sensitive chloride-triggerable liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehunt, Mark P; Winschel, Christine A; Khan, Ali K; Guo, Tai L; Abdrakhmanova, Galya R; Sidorov, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    New pH-sensitive lipids were synthesized and utilized in formulations of liposomes suitable for controlled drug release. These liposomes contain various amounts of NaCl in the internal aqueous compartments. The release of the drug model is triggered by an application of HCl cotransporter and exogenous physiologically relevant NaCl solution. HCl cotransporter allows an uptake of HCl by liposomes to the extent of their being proportional to the transmembrane Cl(-) gradient. Therefore, each set of liposomes undergoes internal acidification, which, ultimately, leads to the hydrolysis of the pH-sensitive lipids and content release at the desired time. The developed system releases the drug model in a stepwise fashion, with the release stages separated by periods of low activity. These liposomes were found to be insensitive to physiological concentrations of human serum albumin and to be nontoxic to cells at concentrations exceeding pharmacological relevance. These results render this new drug-release model potentially suitable for in vivo applications.

  7. Formulation and evaluation of dorzolamide hydrochloride-loaded nanoparticles as controlled release drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza A Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to prepare anti-glaucomatous dorzolamide hydrochloride-(Dorzo loaded nanoparticles as a controlled release system. Eudragit RS 100 (RS and/or RL 100 (RL were used in formulations by an opportunely adapted Quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion technique. The formulations were evaluated in terms of particle size, zeta potential, drug entrapment, and release profile. All formulations showed tiny particle size varying from 114 to 395 nm for RS and 65 to 277 nm for RL. Positive zeta potential was +19 to +32 mV for RS and +23 to +42 mV for RL formulations. It was demonstrated that increasing polymer concentration lead to increase the percentage of drug entrapped in all batches, to a certain extent (drug: polymer 1:4. Nanoparticles prepared using RL showed lower entrapment efficiency than RS. In contrast, increasing the stirring rate resulted in an increase in the percentage of Dorzo entrapped. A prolonged drug release was shown by all the formulations. Increasing the polymer concentration caused a decrease in the release rate. Moreover, it was evident that increasing RL content increased the amount of Dorzo released. Dorzo-loaded nanoparticles could represent promising drug ophthalmic carriers, due to small particle size, positive zeta potential, and sustained release profile; hence, expecting prolonged corneal contact time, more therapeutically efficient, decreased frequency of administration per day, and better patient compliance.

  8. Novel layered pesticide slow/controlled release materials--supramolecular structure and slow release property of glyphosate intercalated layered double hydroxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Jinhong; ZHANG Hui; David G. Evans; DUAN Xue

    2005-01-01

    Two different interlayer structured glyphosate (GLY) intercalated MgAl layered double hydroxides, as novel pesticide slow/controlled release materials, have been synthesized by co-precipitation method under various reaction pH values. The slow/controlled release properties have been tested in Na2CO3 aqueous solution. The release mechanism has been interpreted on the basis of the ion-exchange between the guest GLY anions in the lamellar host and in the release media, and the diffusion process of GLY anions in the interstice and interlayer of GLY intercalates, i.e. diffusion through the particles, is the rate-limiting step of GLY release process. The GLY intercalate assembled at lower pH, possessing higher interlayer gallery height and vertical monolayered arrangement of guest anions in the interlayer with larger packing density, exhibits better slow release property than that assembled at higher pH. The results reveal that the layered double hydroxides have potential application in the pesticide slow/controlled release area.

  9. Escitalopram versus paroxetine controlled release in major depressive disorder: a randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Taro; Matsuda, Yuki; Matsunaga, Shinji; Moriwaki, Masatsugu; Otake, Yoichiro; Akamatsu, Kaku; Okochi, Tomo; Hirano, Shigeki; Funahashi, Toshihiko; Okuda, Momoko; Tabuse, Hideaki; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Nakao

    2017-01-01

    Objective There are no direct comparisons between escitalopram and paroxetine controlled release in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods We conducted a 24-week, rater-masked, randomized trial of escitalopram (5–20 mg/day) versus paroxetine controlled release (12.5–50 mg/day) in patients with MDD (UMIN000011191). Patients with the diagnosis of moderate-to-severe MDD (a 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [HAMD-17], with total score at baseline being ≥20) were recruited to participate in a parallel, randomized, controlled trial. The primary outcome for efficacy was an improvement in the 21-item HAMD (HAMD-21) total score at 24 weeks. The secondary outcomes were the response, remission, and discontinuation rates and the incidence of individual adverse events. Results A total of 88 patients with MDD (males, 61.4%; mean age, 40.8±13.4 years) were recruited. The discontinuation rate was 58.0% (escitalopram, 55.8%; paroxetine controlled release, 60.0%). Both escitalopram and paroxetine controlled-release treatment groups exhibited significant reduction in the HAMD-21 total score at 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks from the baseline. However, there were no significant differences in the HAMD-21 total score, response rate, remission rate, and discontinuation rate at any time point between the groups. In addition, there were no significant differences in the incidence of any individual adverse events (eg, nausea, vomiting, and somnolence) between the treatment groups. Conclusion Our results suggest that escitalopram and paroxetine controlled release had similar efficacy and safety profiles in patients with MDD. One of the primary limitations of this study is the small sample size. PMID:28123299

  10. Effects of Control Release Fertilizers on Nutrient Leaching, Palm Growth and Production Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpa Soti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different controlled release fertilizer technologies on nutrient leaching and plant growth parameters of two palm species, Chinese Fan (Livistona chinensis and Queen (Syagrus romanzoffiana. We compared Nutri-Pak (12-4-12 controlled release packet and Harrell’s (12-4-12 controlled release polymer coated urea against Atlantic (8-4-12 controlled release polymer coated urea, coated sulfate of potash, the most commonly used palm fertilizer in South Florida. Plants were grown in 25 cm (11 L pots under 70% shade, watered weekly, with pest and weed control done as required. Plant growth parameters: number of leaves, leaf length and width, and basal diameter, were measured every two months. Leachate was collected weekly after irrigation and a two-month composite sample was analyzed for nutrient concentrations. There was no difference in the growth parameters among the three fertilizers for Chinese Fan plants. However for Queen, Atlantic and Harrell’s had significantly thicker basal diameter than Nutri-Pak. Significant difference in the concentration of nutrients in the leachate was observed among the fertilizer types. Throughout the study period, Nutri-Pak had a lower concentration of nutrients in the leachate than Atlantic and Harrell’s. Our research indicates that Nutri-Pak control release fertilizer is comparable to other commercial fertilizers in Chinese Fan growth, but the larger Queen palms likely require an additional packet. Nutri-Pak fertilizer resulted in less nutrient leaching and could be a better environmental choice.

  11. Wireless platform for controlled nitric oxide releasing optical fibers for mediating biological response to implanted devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrett, Michael A; Nielsen, Matthew; Smeenge, David M; Romanowicz, Genevieve E; Frost, Megan C

    2012-12-01

    Despite the documented potential to leverage nitric oxide generation to improve in vivo performance of implanted devices, a key limitation to current NO releasing materials tested thus far is that there has not been a means to modulate the level of NO release after it has been initiated. We report the fabrication of a wireless platform that uses light to release NO from a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) optical fiber coated with an S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine derivatized polydimethylsiloxane (SNAP-PDMS). We demonstrate that a VAOL-5GSBY4 LED (λ(dominant)=460 nm) can be used as a dynamic trigger to vary the level of NO released from 500 μm diameter coated PMMA. The ability to generate programmable sequences of NO flux from the surface of these coated fibers offers precise spatial and temporal control over NO release and provides a platform to begin the systematic study of in vivo physiological response to implanted devices. NO surface fluxes up to 3.88 ± 0.57 × 10(-10)mol cm(-2)min(-1) were achieved with -100 μm thick coatings on the fibers and NO flux was pulsed, ramped and held steady using the wireless platform developed. We demonstrate the NO release is linearly proportional to the drive current applied to the LED (and therefore level of light produced from the LED). This system allow the surface flux of NO from the fibers to be continuously changed, providing a means to determine the level and duration of NO needed to mediate physiological response to blood contacting and subcutaneous implants and will ultimately lead to the intelligent design of NO releasing materials tailored to specific patterns of NO release needed to achieve reliable in vivo performance for intravascular and subcutaneous sensors and potentially for a wide variety of other implanted biomedical devices.

  12. Effects of Controlled Release Fertilizer on the Post-Production Performance of Impatiens Wallerana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Controlled release fertilizers (CRF) in production systems have been known to reduce environmental contamination. However, there is a lot to be explored as per its use in bedding plant production. Bedding plant growers have not adapted CRF use because there is little information about its use and ...

  13. Longevity of controlled release fertilizer influences the growth of bedding Impatiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) have not been extensively used in floriculture production, perhaps due to lack of grower experience and research-based information with their use in herbaceous plant production. Any information about the correct use of CRF should increase growers’ confidence in ...

  14. Substrates and controlled-release fertilizations on the quality of eucalyptus cuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson B. G. da Silva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To produce cuttings with quality, the most appropriate nutritional management strategies should be sought to reduce wastage of fertilizer, while accounting for the characteristics of each substrate. This study evaluated the effect of substrates and doses of controlled-release fertilizer on the quality of Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden x Eucalyptus urophylla S. T. Blake cuttings. The substrates consisted of several mixtures: vermiculite+carbonized rice chaff+coconut fibre (1:1:1; vermiculite+coconut fibre (1:1; and vermiculite+carbonized rice chaff (1:1. These mixtures were added to 2, 4, 6 and 8 kg of controlled-release fertilizer per cubic meter of substrate. The substrates that do not support root development and have lower water retention, independently of the dose of controlled-release fertilizer, reduce the quality of the root system. For substrates with proper values of water retention, such as vermiculite+coconut fibre (1:1 and vermiculite+carbonised rice chaff+coconut fibre (1:1:1, the utilization of dose 2 kg of controlled-release fertilizer to each cubic meter is enough to promote cuttings with greater quality of the root systems and proper heights and stem diameters.

  15. Timing of insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system : a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Pahh; Geomini, Pmaj; Herman, M C; Veersema, S; Bongers, M Y

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to assess whether patient-perceived pain during the insertion of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) depends on the timing during the menstrual cycle. DESIGN: A stratified two-armed non-inferiority randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Large

  16. Evaluation of Dosing Guidelines for Use of Controlled-Release Codeine in Chronic Noncancer Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Russell

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The clinical utility of guidelines for conversion of patients from a combination analgesic preparation of acetaminophen 300 mg plus codeine 30 mg every 4 h to 6h as needed to scheduled controlled-release (CR codeine every 12 h was evaluated.

  17. Supramolecular Controlled Cargo Release via Near Infrared Tunable Cucurbit[7]uril-Gold Nanostars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanwei; Yang, Xiran; Liu, Yingzhu; Ai, Qiushuang; Liu, Simin; Sun, Chunyan; Liang, Feng

    2016-02-26

    The near infrared (NIR) absorption and average particle size of gold nanostars (GNSs) can be precisely controlled by varying the molar ratios of cucurbit[7]urils (CB[7]) and GNSs in aqueous solution. GNSs modified with CB[7] achieved high cargo loading with thermally activated release upon the NIR laser irradiation.

  18. EVALUATION OF BIOREMEDIATION STRATEGIES OF A CONTROLLED OIL RELEASE IN A WETLAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    A controlled petroleum release was conducted to evaluate bioremediation in a wetland near Houston, Texas. The 140-day study was conducted using a randomized, complete block design to test three treatments with six replicates per treatment. The three treatment strategies were in...

  19. Biological control of tropical soda apple (Solanaceae) in Florida: Post-release evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) was released as a biological control agent against tropical soda apple (TSA) (Solanum viarum Dunal (Solanaceae)) in Sumter County, FL in 2006. Evaluation of beetle feeding damage to TSA plants and changes in the beetle po...

  20. Series elasticity of the human triceps surae muscle : Measurement by controlled-release vs. resonance methods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL; Boom, H; Robinson, C; Rutten, W; Neuman, M; Wijkstra, H

    1997-01-01

    With a newly developed Controlled-Release Ergometer the complete characteristic of the series elastic component can be measured in human muscles. Previous estimates were based on the resonance method: muscle elasticity was assessed from the resonance frequency of the muscle elasticity connected to a

  1. Dynamics of controlled release systems based on water-in-water emulsions: A general theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Phase-separated biopolymer solutions, and aqueous dispersions of hydrogel beads, liposomes, polymersomes, aqueous polymer microcapsules, and colloidosomes are all examples of water-in-water emulsions. These systems can be used for encapsulation and controlled release purposes, in for example food or

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Oxidized Starch Polymer Microgels for Encapsulation and Controlled Release of Functional Ingredients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Yuan; de Vries, Renko; Slaghek, Ted; Timmermans, Johan; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen; Norde, Willem

    A novel biocompatible and biodegradable microgel system has been developed for controlled uptake and release of especially proteins. It contains TEMPO-oxidized potato starch polymers, which are chemically cross-linked by sodium trimetaphosphate (STMP). Physical chemical properties have been

  3. Controlled release of Pantoea agglomerans E325 for biocontrol of fire blight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microencapsulation and controlled release of Pantoea agglomerans strain E325 (E325), which is an antagonist to bacterial pathogen (Erwinia amylovora) of fire blight, a devastating disease of apple and pear, have been investigated. Uniform core-shell alginate microcapsules (AMCs), 60-300 µm in diamet...

  4. Design Project on Controlled-Release Drug Delivery Devices: Implementation, Management, and Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingxing; Liang, Youyun; Tong, Yen Wah; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2010-01-01

    A design project that focuses on the subject of controlled-release drug delivery devices is presented for use in an undergraduate course on mass transfer. The purpose of the project is to introduce students to the various technologies used in the fabrication of drug delivery systems and provide a practical design exercise for understanding the…

  5. [Effects of applying controlled-release compound fertilizer on Platycodon grandiflorum growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-xiang; Wang, Jian-hua

    2010-09-01

    A pot experiment was conducted in 2008 to study the effects of applying controlled-release compound fertilizer (N:P2O5:K2O = 14:14:14) on the growth of Platycodon grandiflorum in the medicinal herbal farm of Shandong Agricultural University. Comparing with the application of common compound fertilizer (N:P2O5: K2O=15: 15: 15), applying equivalent amount of the controlled-release fertilizer increased the leaf chlorophyll content, root volume, root activity, and root diameter of P. grandiflorum at the late growth stage, but decreased the root length. When the N application rate was 0.24 and 0.32 g x kg(-1) soil, applying the controlled-release compound fertilizer increased the root yield by 26.78% and 22.50%, and the root soluble sugar, protein, and total saponin contents by 9.77% and 6.99%, 11.38% and 2.20%, and 8.85% and 5.47%, respectively, compared with applying the common compound fertilizer. More nitrogen application made the root soluble sugar content decreased but the total saponin content increased. Under our experimental condition, applying the controlled-release compound fertilizer with an application rate of 0.24 g N x kg(-1) soil could obtain the best effect for P. grandiflorum.

  6. Hydrogel based drug carriers for controlled release of hydrophobic drugs and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ke Peng,

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare in situ forming hydrogels based on biocompatible polymers for the controlled release of hydrophobic drug and proteins. In order to load hydrophobic drug to the hydrophilic hydrogel matrix, beta-cyclodextrin and human serum albumin was introduced to the hydrogel ne

  7. Controlled release fungicide, soil amendments and biofumigation effects on cotton root rot suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cotton root rot pathogen (Phymatotrichopsis ominora) causes major losses in cotton produced in the Southwest. Granular controlled release formulations (CRF) of the fungicide, Propiconazole, developed to be soil applied at planting were studied at 1.0 and 3.0 lb a.i./ac. applications and with tw...

  8. Convex quadratic programming relaxations for parallel machine scheduling with controllable processing times subject to release times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Feng; CHEN Feng; TANG Guochun

    2004-01-01

    Scheduling unrelated parallel machines with controllable processing times subject to release times is investigated. Based on the convex quadratic programming relaxation and the randomized rounding strategy, a 2-approximation algorithm is obtained for a special case with the all-or-none property and then a 3-approximation algorithm is presented for general problem.

  9. 78 FR 56541 - Concept Release on Risk Controls and System Safeguards for Automated Trading Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... September 12, 2013 Part IV Commodity Futures Trading Commission 17 CFR Chapter I Concept Release on Risk Controls and System Safeguards for Automated Trading Environments; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 177 / Thursday, September 12, 2013 / Proposed Rules#0;#0; ] COMMODITY FUTURES...

  10. Scientific Analysis Cover Sheet for Radionuclide Screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ragan

    2002-08-09

    The waste forms under consideration for disposal in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain contain scores of radionuclides (Attachments V and VI). It would be impractical and highly inefficient to model all of these radionuclides in a total system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this radionuclide screening analysis is to remove from further consideration (screen out) radionuclides that are unlikely to significantly contribute to radiation dose to the public from the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The remaining nuclides (those screened in) are recommended for consideration in TSPA modeling for license application. This analysis also covers radionuclides that are not screened in based on dose, but need to be included in TSPA modeling for other reasons. For example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations require consideration of the combined activity of Ra-226 and Ra-228 in groundwater (40 CFR 197.30, 10 CFR 63.331). Also, Cm-245, Pu-241, and U-235 decay indirectly to potentially important radionuclides, and are not identified by the screening analysis as important. The radionuclide screening analysis separately considers two different postclosure time periods: the 10,000-y regulatory period for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain and the period after 10,000 y up to 1 million y after emplacement. The incremental effect of extending the screening for the regulatory period to 20,000 y is also addressed. Four release scenarios are considered: (1) the nominal scenario, which entails long-term degradation of disposal containers and waste forms, (2) a human-intrusion scenario, (3) an intrusive igneous event, and (4) an eruptive igneous event. Because the first three scenarios require groundwater transport, they are called groundwater scenarios below. The screening analysis considers the following waste forms: spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel, spent

  11. Controlled release of verapamil hydrochloride from waxy microparticles prepared by spray congealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passerini, Nadia; Perissutti, Beatrice; Albertini, Beatrice; Voinovich, Dario; Moneghini, Mariarosa; Rodriguez, Lorenzo

    2003-03-01

    In this work, the potential of waxes for preparing with the ultrasonic spray congealing technique microparticles for controlling the in vitro release of verapamil HCl was investigated. The first part of the study encompassed the optimisation of the formulation to achieve an efficient drug incorporation together with a satisfactory in vitro drug release rate. In particular, microcrystalline wax, stearyl alcohol and mixtures of the two were used. Also a surfactant (soya lecithin) was added to the formulations. After the particle size analysis, the characterisation of the microparticles involved the study of the solid state of drug and carriers in the systems (DSC, HSM and XRD) and the morphological and chemical analyses of the microparticle surface (SEM and XPS). Finally, the drug release mechanism from these devices was evaluated using the statistical moment analysis. The results of this study show that by selecting the type and the amount of the carriers, microparticles with a spherical shape and a good encapsulation efficiency were observed. These particles showed a zero-order release for 8 h, without modifying the solid state properties of the drug. Therefore, waxy microparticles prepared by the ultrasonic spray congealing technique are promising solvent-free devices for controlling the release of verapamil HCl.

  12. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Kiara F.; Rodriguez, Alexandra L.; Parish, Clare L.; Williams, Richard J.; Nisbet, David R.

    2016-09-01

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine.

  13. Multi-Drug-Loaded Microcapsules with Controlled Release for Management of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jong-Suep; Choo, Chee Chong; Qian, Cheng; Tan, Nguan Soon; Shen, Zexiang; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive disease of the nervous system, and is currently managed through commercial tablets that do not sufficiently enable controlled, sustained release capabilities. It is hypothesized that a drug delivery system that provides controlled and sustained release of PD drugs would afford better management of PD. Hollow microcapsules composed of poly-l-lactide (PLLA) and poly (caprolactone) (PCL) are prepared through a modified double-emulsion technique. They are loaded with three PD drugs, i.e., levodopa (LD), carbidopa (CD), and entacapone (ENT), at a ratio of 4:1:8, similar to commercial PD tablets. LD and CD are localized in both the hollow cavity and PLLA/PCL shell, while ENT is localized in the PLLA/PCL shell. Release kinetics of hydrophobic ENT is observed to be relatively slow as compared to the other hydrophilic drugs. It is further hypothesized that encapsulating ENT into PCL as a surface coating onto these microcapsules can aid in accelerating its release. Now, these spray-coated hollow microcapsules exhibit similar release kinetics, according to Higuchi's rate, for all three drugs. The results suggest that multiple drug encapsulation of LD, CD, and ENT in gastric floating microcapsules could be further developed for in vivo evaluation for the management of PD.

  14. Secondary Uranium-Phase Paragenesis and Incorporation of Radionuclides into Secondary Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Finch

    2001-06-05

    The purpose of this analysis/model report (AMR) is to assess the potential for uranium (U) (VI) compounds, formed during the oxidative corrosion of spent uranium-oxide (UO{sub 2}) fuels, to sequester certain radionuclides and, thereby, limit their release. The ''unsaturated drip tests'' being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) provide the basis of this AMR (Table 1). The ANL drip tests on spent fuel are the only experiments on fuel corrosion from which solids have been analyzed for trace levels of radionuclides. Brief summaries are provided of the results from other selected corrosion and dissolution experiments on spent UO{sub 2} fuels, specifically those conducted under nominally oxidizing conditions. Discussions of the current understanding of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of U(VI) compounds is provided in order to outline the scientific basis for modeling precipitation and dissolution of potential radionuclide-bearing phases under repository-relevant conditions. Attachment I provides additional information on corrosion mechanisms and behaviors of radionuclides in the tests at ANL. Attachment II reviews occurrence, formation, and alteration (collectively known as paragenesis) of naturally occurring U(VI) minerals because natural mineral occurrences can be used to assess the possible long-term behaviors of U(VI) compounds formed in short-term laboratory experiments and to extrapolate experimental results to repository-relevant time scales. This AMR develops a model for calculating dissolved concentrations of radionuclides that are incorporated into U(VI) compounds, which is an alternative to models currently used in TSPA to calculate dissolved concentration limits for certain radionuclides. In particular, the model developed in this AMR applies to Np (neptunium) concentrations being controlled by solid uranyl oxyhydroxides that are known to contain trace levels of Np. The results of this AMR and the conceptual model

  15. CDK5 serves as a major control point in neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Ryan, Timothy A

    2010-09-09

    CDK5 is an important kinase in nervous system function, controlling neural development and postsynaptic signal integration. Here we show that CDK5 plays a major role in controlling neurotransmitter release. Inhibition of CDK5 activity, by either acute or genetic means, leads to profound potentiation of presynaptic function, including unmasking of previously "silent" synapses. Removal of CDK5 activity additionally unlocks access to the resting synaptic vesicle pool, which normally remains recalcitrant to exocytosis and recycling even following prolonged action potential stimuli. Presynaptic CDK5 levels are additionally severely depleted by chronic neuronal silencing, a treatment that is functionally similar to CDK5 knockdown with regard to presynaptic potentiation. Thus CDK5 appears to be an integral element in presynaptic homeostatic scaling, and the resting vesicle pool appears to provide a potent functional presynaptic homeostatic control parameter. These studies thus pinpoint CDK5 as a major control point for modulation of neurotransmitter release in mammalian neurons.

  16. Release and distribution of Lilioceris cheni (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of air potato (Dioscorea bulbilfera: Dioscoreaceae), in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    From 2012 to 2015, 429,668 Lilioceris cheni Gressit and Kimoto (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were released in Florida for biological control of air potato [Dioscorea bulbilfera L. (Dioscoreaceae)]. The spatial distribution of releases was highly aggregated, with several areas of high density releases ...

  17. The Effects of Different Amounts of Controlled Release Fertilizer on the Root Growth and the Filling Rate in Winter Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Li; Jingtian Yang; Liyuan Yan; Yan Shi

    2014-01-01

    In order to increase the fertilizer use efficiency and yield in winter wheat, the effects of controlled release fertilizer on the root growth and the filling rate in winter wheat by applying different amounts of controlled release fertilizer had been studied in open field. The results indicated that conventional complex fertilizer and controlled release fertilizer could cause corresponding changes of the wheat root activity, dry root weight, root-shoot ratio and filling rate, but the fertiliz...

  18. The Effects of Different Amounts of Controlled Release Fertilizer on the Root Growth and the Filling Rate in Winter Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Li; Jingtian Yang; Liyuan Yan; Yan Shi

    2014-01-01

    In order to increase the fertilizer use efficiency and yield in winter wheat, the effects of controlled release fertilizer on the root growth and the filling rate in winter wheat by applying different amounts of controlled release fertilizer had been studied in open field. The results indicated that conventional complex fertilizer and controlled release fertilizer could cause corresponding changes of the wheat root activity, dry root weight, root-shoot ratio and filling rate, but the fertiliz...

  19. Chitosan-genipin microspheres for the controlled release of drugs: clarithromycin, tramadol and heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ruth; Lecumberri, Elena; Heras, Angeles

    2010-05-26

    The aim of this study was to first evaluate whether the chitosan hydrochloride-genipin crosslinking reaction is influenced by factors such as time, and polymer/genipin concentration, and second, to develop crosslinked drug loaded microspheres to improve the control over drug release. Once the crosslinking process was characterized as a function of the factors mentioned above, drug loaded hydrochloride chitosan microspheres with different degrees of crosslinking were obtained. Microspheres were characterized in terms of size, morphology, drug content, surface charge and capacity to control in vitro drug release. Clarithromycin, tramadol hydrochloride, and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) were used as model drugs. The obtained particles were spherical, positively charged, with a diameter of 1-10 microm. X-Ray diffraction showed that there was an interaction of genipin and each drug with chitosan in the microspheres. In relation to the release profiles, a higher degree of crosslinking led to more control of drug release in the case of clarithromycin and tramadol. For these drugs, optimal release profiles were obtained for microspheres crosslinked with 1 mM genipin at 50 °C for 5 h and with 5 mM genipin at 50 °C for 5 h, respectively. In LMWH microspheres, the best release profile corresponded to 0.5 mM genipin, 50 °C, 5 h. In conclusion, genipin showed to be eligible as a chemical-crosslinking agent delaying the outflow of drugs from the microspheres. However, more studies in vitro and in vivo must be carried out to determine adequate crosslinking conditions for different drugs.

  20. Chitosan-Genipin Microspheres for the Controlled Release of Drugs: Clarithromycin, Tramadol and Heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Harris

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to first evaluate whether the chitosan hydrochloride-genipin crosslinking reaction is influenced by factors such as time, and polymer/genipin concentration, and second, to develop crosslinked drug loaded microspheres to improve the control over drug release. Once the crosslinking process was characterized as a function of the factors mentioned above, drug loaded hydrochloride chitosan microspheres with different degrees of crosslinking were obtained. Microspheres were characterized in terms of size, morphology, drug content, surface charge and capacity to control in vitro drug release. Clarithromycin, tramadol hydrochloride, and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH were used as model drugs. The obtained particles were spherical, positively charged, with a diameter of 1–10 μm. X-Ray diffraction showed that there was an interaction of genipin and each drug with chitosan in the microspheres. In relation to the release profiles, a higher degree of crosslinking led to more control of drug release in the case of clarithromycin and tramadol. For these drugs, optimal release profiles were obtained for microspheres crosslinked with 1 mM genipin at 50 ºC for 5 h and with 5 mM genipin at 50 ºC for 5 h, respectively. In LMWH microspheres, the best release profile corresponded to 0.5 mM genipin, 50 ºC, 5 h. In conclusion, genipin showed to be eligible as a chemical-crosslinking agent delaying the outflow of drugs from the microspheres. However, more studies in vitro and in vivo must be carried out to determine adequate crosslinking conditions for different drugs.

  1. Hydrologically Controlled Arsenic Release in Deltaic Wetlands and Coastal Riparian Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, J.; LeMonte, J. J.; Yu, X.; Schaefer, M.; Kocar, B. D.; Benner, S. G.; Rinklebe, J.; Tappero, R.; Michael, H. A.; Fendorf, S. E.; Sparks, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Wetland and riparian zone hydrology exerts critical controls on the biogeochemical cycling of metal contaminants including arsenic. The role of wetlands in driving geogenic arsenic release to groundwater has been debated in the deltas of South and Southeast Asia where the largest impacted human population resides. In addition, groundwater in coastal areas worldwide, such as those in South and Southeast Asia and the Mid-Atlantic of the U.S., is at risk to largely unexplored biogeochemical and hydrologic impacts of projected sea level rise. First, we present data from fresh-sediment incubations, in situ model sediment incubations and a controlled field experiment with manipulated wetland hydrology and organic carbon inputs in the minimally disturbed upper Mekong Delta. Here we show that arsenic release is limited to near-surface sediments of permanently saturated wetlands where both organic carbon and arsenic-bearing solids are sufficiently reactive for microbial oxidation of organic carbon and reduction of arsenic-bearing iron oxides. In contrast, within the deeper aquifer or seasonally saturated sediments, reductive dissolution of iron oxides is observed only when either more reactive exogenous forms of iron oxides or organic carbon are added, revealing a potential thermodynamic restriction to microbial metabolism. Second, in order to assess the potential impacts of sea level rise on arsenic release to groundwater, we determined the changes in arsenic speciation and partitioning in sediment collected from an anthropogenically contaminated coastal riparian zone under controlled Eh regimes in both seawater and freshwater systems. Here we show greater arsenic release under anoxic/suboxic conditions in the freshwater system than in the seawater system, potentially due to high salinity induced microbial inhibition. Collectively, our work shows that shifting hydrologic conditions in deltaic wetlands and tidally influenced zones impacts the extent of arsenic release to

  2. Redox controls on arsenic enrichment and release from aquifer sediments in central Yangtze River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael V.; Guo, Xinxin; Gan, Yiqun; Benner, Shawn G.; Griffin, Aron M.; Gorski, Christopher A.; Wang, Yanxin; Fendorf, Scott

    2017-05-01

    More than 100 million people in Asia are presently exposed to groundwater with arsenic (As) concentrations exceeding the World Health Organization standard of 10 μg L-1. Arsenic contaminated groundwater within basins of the central portion of the Yangtze River has recently been reported, but the processes controlling arsenic concentrations have yet to be resolved. We examined the hydrologic and geochemical factors controlling arsenic within the Jianghan Plain, an inland sedimentary basin of the Yangtze River, where arsenic concentrations exhibit strong seasonal variability driven by surface and groundwater mixing (Schaefer et al., 2016). Hydrologic fluctuations alter redox conditions in the aquifer, leading to oscillations between arsenic/iron reduction and oxidation. Here we investigate the depth-distribution of solid and aqueous phase iron and arsenic species and, through a series of laboratory manipulations, constrain the biogeochemical processes controlling seasonal changes in groundwater arsenic concentrations. In sediment incubations from ∼20 m below the surface, where solid-phase arsenic concentrations exceed 100 mg kg-1, both unamended and glucose-amended sediment samples result in arsenic release to the aqueous phase. In situ carbon was capable of promoting As release in the sediment. In contrast, sediment batch incubations from other depths resulted in limited As release. Solid phase arsenic in the enriched zone was relatively oxidized but may become reduced over short time periods. In sediments below the As-enriched zone, glucose amendment resulted in arsenic reduction, but arsenic release to the aqueous phase was restricted by the subsequent formation of arsenic sulfide minerals. Buried sedimentary arsenic coupled with anaerobic microbial respiration of subsurface organic carbon within the Jianghan Plain aquifer leads to rapid release of As to groundwater. Arsenic release from sediments at ∼20 m depth is sufficient to explain arsenic concentrations

  3. Effects of Controlled Release Urea on Wheat Yield and Nitrogen Utilization Efficiency Under Different Applied Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIA Wei-guang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The field trial was conducted to study the effects of different nitrogen fertilizer applications on winter wheat yield, nitrogen utilization efficiency and economic benefit. 7 treatments were designed as CK(no nitrogen fertilizer applied, 100%PU10/0(conventional urea applied before sowing, N rate was 240 kg·hm-2, 100%PU6/4(conventional urea applied before sowing and at jointing with the ratio of 6∶4, N rate was 240 kg·hm-2, 80%PU6/4(conventional urea applied before sowing and at jointing with the ratio of 6∶4, N rate was 192 kg·hm-2, 100%CRU(resin coated controlled release urea applied before sowing, N rate was 240 kg·hm-2, 80%CRU(resin coated controlled release urea applied before sowing, N rate was 192 kg·hm-2, and 40%CRU+40%PU(resin coated controlled release urea and conventional urea applied before sowing, N rate was 192 kg·hm-2. The results showed that no matter on the efficiency of yield or that of nitrogen, resin coated controlled-release urea(CRU was better when compared with conventional urea(PU. Especially, the combined application treatment(40%CRU+40%PUwas the best with achieving the highest wheat yield of 7 709 kg·hm-2, the highest N fertilizer utilization efficiency of 36.44% and the maximum net income of 15 946 yuan·hm-2. And it could not only increase winter wheat yield with reducing the nitrogen fertilizer application, but also improve N fertilizer utilization efficiency and owe the highest ratio of output to input. Therefore, the combined application of the resin coated controlled-release urea and conventional urea(40%CRU+40%PUwas the optimal nitrogen fertilizer treatment under the conditions of this experiment.

  4. Assessment of artificial radionuclides issued from French nuclear bomb testing at Mururoa (French Polynesia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.-M.; Thomas, A.J. (Ecole Normale Superieure, Montrouge (France). Inst. de Biogeochimie Marine); Charrier, B.; Cousteau, J.-Y.; Sarano, F. (Fondation Cousteau, Paris (France))

    1990-03-01

    The Mururoa lagoon was sampled immediately after a nuclear test. {sup 131}I was found in sediments and plankton. Official French sources explain its occurrence by an accidental release during a control operation. Long-lived nuclides ({sup 137}Cs, Pu isotopes, etc) are ascribed to past local atmospheric tests. Their total flux to the Pacific Ocean is markedly low as compared to discharges by major reprocessing plants. Radionuclides short-term impact on Pacific ecosystems and man is insignificant. Long-term processes could not be assessed. (author).

  5. Building Adjustable Pre-storm Reservoir Flood-control Release Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shun-Nien; Chang, Li-Chiu; Chang, Fi-John; Hsieh, Cheng-Daw

    2017-04-01

    Typhoons hit Taiwan several times every year, which could cause serious flood disasters. Because mountainous terrains and steep landforms can rapidly accelerate the speed of flood flow during typhoon events, rivers cannot be a stable source of water supply. Reservoirs become the most effective floodwater storage facilities for alleviating flood damages in Taiwan. The pre-storm flood-control release can significantly increase reservoir storage capacity available to store floodwaters for reducing downstream flood damage, while the uncertainties of total forecasted rainfalls are very high in different stages of an oncoming typhoon, which may cause the risk of water shortage in the future. This study proposes adjustable pre-storm reservoir flood-control release rules in three designed operating stages with various hydrological conditions in the Feitsui Reservoir, a pivot reservoir for water supply to Taipei metropolitan in Taiwan, not only to reduce the risk of reservoir flood control and downstream flooding but also to consider water supply. The three operating stages before an oncoming typhoon are defined upon the timings when: (1) typhoon news is issued (3-7days before typhoon hit); (2) the sea warning is issued (2-4 days before typhoon hit); and (3) the land warning is issued (1-2 days before typhoon hit). We simulate 95 historical typhoon events with 3000 initial water levels and build some pre-storm flood-control release rules to adjust the amount of pre-release based on the total forecasted rainfalls at different operating stages. A great number of simulations (68.4 millions) are conducted to extract their major consequences and then build the adjustable pre-storm reservoir flood-control release rules. Accordingly, given a total forecasted rainfall and a water level, reservoir decision makers can easily identify the corresponding rule to tell the amount of pre-release in any stage. The results show that the proposed adjustable pre-release rules can effectively

  6. Dispersion of halloysite loaded with natural antimicrobials into pectins: Characterization and controlled release analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrasi, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the preparation and characterization of green composites based on pectins and nano-hybrids composed of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) loaded with rosemary essential oil. Different hybrid percentages were mixed into a pectin matrix, by ball milling in the presence of water. Cast films were obtained and analyzed. Structural organization and physical properties (thermal, mechanical, barrier to water vapor) were correlated to the nano-hybrid content. A preliminary study on the kinetics of release of the rosmarinic acid, chosen as a model molecule, was also performed. This work showed the potential of these systems in the active packaging field where controlled release of active species is required.

  7. Dynamic analysis of a kind of species control model concerning impulsively releasing pathogen and infective predator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Hongjian [Department of Mathematics, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang 464000 (China) and Department of Applied Mathematics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)], E-mail: xbghj@163.com; Chen Lansun [Department of Applied Mathematics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Song Xinyu [Department of Mathematics, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang 464000 (China)

    2009-11-15

    A kind of species control model concerning impulsive releasing pathogen and infective predator is presented. By using the Floquet theory and comparison theorem of impulsive differential equation, the extinction and permanence of system are discussed and the corresponding conditions are obtained, respectively. Finally, the practical meanings of those conditions are explained and the theoretical results are confirmed by numerical simulations. Besides, with the period of impulsive release varying, the numerical simulations also show that the system displays a series of complex phenomena which include period-doubling cascade, chaos and periodic window, etc.

  8. Mimicking Biological Delivery Through Feedback-Controlled Drug Release Systems Based on Molecular Imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryscio, David R; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2009-06-01

    Intelligent drug delivery systems (DDS) are able to rapidly detect a biological event and respond appropriately by releasing a therapeutic agent; thus, they are advantageous over their conventional counterparts. Molecular imprinting is a promising area that generates a polymeric network which can selectively recognize a desired analyte. This field has been studied for a variety of applications over a long period of time, but only recently has it been investigated for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Recent work in the area of molecularly imprinted polymers in drug delivery highlights the potential of these recognitive networks as environmentally responsive DDS that can ultimately lead to feedback controlled recognitive release systems.

  9. Statistical correlation of the soil incubation and the accelerated laboratory extraction methods to estimate nitrogen release rates of slow- and controlled-release fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, L Carolina; Sartain, Jerry; Obreza, Thomas; Hall, William L; Thiex, Nancy J

    2014-01-01

    Several technologies have been proposed to characterize the nutrient release patterns of enhanced-efficiency fertilizers (EEFs) during the last few decades. These technologies have been developed mainly by manufacturers and are product-specific based on the regulation and analysis of each EEF product. Despite previous efforts to characterize nutrient release of slow-release fertilizer (SRF) and controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) materials, no official method exists to assess their nutrient release patterns. However, the increased production and distribution of EEFs in specialty and nonspecialty markets requires an appropriate method to verify nutrient claims and material performance. Nonlinear regression was used to establish a correlation between the data generated from a 180-day soil incubation-column leaching procedure and 74 h accelerated lab extraction method, and to develop a model that can predict the 180-day nitrogen (N) release curve for a specific SRF and CRF product based on the data from the accelerated laboratory extraction method. Based on the R2 > 0.90 obtained for most materials, results indicated that the data generated from the 74 h accelerated lab extraction method could be used to predict N release from the selected materials during 180 days, including those fertilizers that require biological activity for N release.

  10. A biodegradable device for the controlled release of Piper nigrum (Piperaceae standardized extract to control Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauê Muller Custódio

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: The significant increase in dengue, Zika, and chikungunya and the resistance of the Aedes aegypti mosquito to major insecticides emphasize the importance of studying alternatives to control this vector. The aim of this study was to develop a controlled-release device containing Piper nigrum extract and to study its larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti. METHODS: Piper nigrum extract was produced by maceration, standardized in piperine, and incorporated into cotton threads, which were inserted into hydrogel cylinders manufactured by the extrusion of carrageenan and carob. The piperine content of the extract and thread reservoirs was quantified by chromatography. The release profile from the device was assessed in aqueous medium and the larvicidal and residual activities of the standardized extract as well as of the controlled-release device were examined in Aedes aegypti larvae. RESULTS The standardized extract contained 580mg/g of piperine and an LC50 value of 5.35ppm (24h and the 3 cm thread reservoirs contained 13.83 ± 1.81mg of piperine. The device showed zero-order release of piperine for 16 days. The P. nigrum extract (25ppm showed maximum residual larvicidal activity for 10 days, decreasing progressively thereafter. The device had a residual larvicidal activity for up to 37 days. CONCLUSIONS: The device provided controlled release of Piper nigrum extract with residual activity for 37 days. The device is easy to manufacture and may represent an effective alternative for the control of Aedes aegypti larvae in small water containers.

  11. Design of a gastroretentive mucoadhesive dosage form of furosemide for controlled release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad S. Darandale

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop and characterize a gastroretentive dosage form suitable for controlled drug release. It consists of a drug loaded polymeric film made up of a bilayer of immediate (IR and controlled release (CR layers folded into a hard gelatin capsule. Gastroretention results from unfolding and swelling of the film and its bioadhesion to the gastric mucosa. Furosemide, a drug with a narrow absorption window, was selected as the model drug. Inclusion of hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin in both layers and Carbopol® 971P NF in the CR layer of the bilayer film resulted in optimum drug release, bioadhesion and mechanical properties. The film with zig-zag folding in the capsule was shown to unfold and swell under acidic conditions and provide IR of drug over 1 h and CR for up to 12 h in acidic medium. X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy revealed uniform dispersion of furosemide in the polymeric matrices. The results indicate the dosage form is gastroretentive and can provide controlled release of drugs with narrow therapeutic windows.

  12. Clean Photothermal Heating and Controlled Release from Near-Infrared Dye Doped Nanoparticles without Oxygen Photosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Samit; Shaw, Scott K; Spence, Graeme T; Roland, Felicia M; Smith, Bradley D

    2015-07-21

    The photothermal heating and release properties of biocompatible organic nanoparticles, doped with a near-infrared croconaine (Croc) dye, were compared with analogous nanoparticles doped with the common near-infrared dyes ICG and IR780. Separate formulations of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles and liposomes, each containing Croc dye, absorbed strongly at 808 nm and generated clean laser-induced heating (no production of (1)O2 and no photobleaching of the dye). In contrast, laser-induced heating of nanoparticles containing ICG or IR780 produced reactive (1)O2, leading to bleaching of the dye and also decomposition of coencapsulated payload such as the drug doxorubicin. Croc dye was especially useful as a photothermal agent for laser-controlled release of chemically sensitive payload from nanoparticles. Solution state experiments demonstrated repetitive fractional release of water-soluble fluorescent dye from the interior of thermosensitive liposomes. Additional experiments used a focused laser beam to control leakage from immobilized liposomes with very high spatial and temporal precision. The results indicate that fractional photothermal leakage from nanoparticles doped with Croc dye is a promising method for a range of controlled release applications.

  13. Chitosan/alginate based multilayers to control drug release from ophthalmic lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diana; Pinto, Luís F V; Bozukova, Dimitriya; Santos, Luís F; Serro, Ana Paula; Saramago, Benilde

    2016-11-01

    In this study we investigated the possibility of using layer-by-layer deposition, based in natural polymers (chitosan and alginate), to control the release of different ophthalmic drugs from three types of lens materials: a silicone-based hydrogel recently proposed by our group as drug releasing soft contact lens (SCL) material and two commercially available materials: CI26Y for intraocular lens (IOLs) and Definitive 50 for SCLs. The optimised coating, consisting in one double layer of (alginate - CaCl2)/(chitosan+glyoxal) topped with a final alginate-CaCl2 layer to avoid chitosan degradation by tear fluid proteins, proved to have excellent features to control the release of the anti-inflammatory, diclofenac, while keeping or improving the physical properties of the lenses. The coating leads to a controlled release of diclofenac from SCL and IOL materials for, at least, one week. Due to its high hydrophilicity (water contact angle≈0) and biocompatibility, it should avoid the use of further surface treatments to enhance the useŕs comfort. However, the barrier effect of this coating is specific for diclofenac, giving evidence to the need of optimizing the chemical composition of the layers in view of the desired drug.

  14. Controlling the release of active compounds from the inorganic carrier halloysite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tescione, F.; Buonocore, G. G.; Stanzione, M.; Oliviero, M.; Lavorgna, M.

    2014-05-01

    Halloysite (HNTs), a natural material characterized by a nanotube structure, has been used as an inorganic carrier of active compounds in several applications from medicine to anticorrosion coatings. In this present work, vanillin (VAN) used as a antimicrobial model, has been encapsulated within HNTs for exploiting its applicability in the active food packaging sector. The molecule release rate has been controlled by crosslinking at the tube ends the loaded vanillin with copper ions, thus producing a stopper network. The vanillin-loaded HNTs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis. The antimicrobial release kinetics from the loaded nanoparticles (VAN/HNTs) in water was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy. The results show that the vanillin crosslinked with cupper ions is a feasible method to tailor the release rate of antimicrobial model from HTNs nanoparticles.

  15. Coaxial electrospinning for encapsulation and controlled release of fragile water-soluble bioactive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongliang; Wang, Liqun; Zhu, Kangjie

    2014-11-10

    Coaxial electrospinning is a robust technique for one-step encapsulation of fragile, water-soluble bioactive agents, including growth factors, DNA and even living organisms, into core-shell nanofibers. The coaxial electrospinning process eliminates the damaging effects due to direct contact of the agents with organic solvents or harsh conditions during emulsification. The shell layer serves as a barrier to prevent the premature release of the water-soluble core contents. By varying the structure and composition of the nanofibers, it is possible to precisely modulate the release of the encapsulated agents. Promising work has been done with coaxially electrospun non-woven mats integrated with bioactive agents for use in tissue engineering, in local delivery and in wound healing, etc. This paper reviews the origins of the coaxial electrospinning method, its updated status and potential future developments for controlled release of the class of fragile, water-soluble bioactive agents.

  16. Coaxial electrospinning multicomponent functional controlled-release vascular graft: Optimization of graft properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Anlin; Luo, Rifang; Li, Jiukai; Mo, Xiumei; Wang, Yunbing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2017-04-01

    Small diameter vascular grafts possessing desirable biocompatibility and suitable mechanical properties have become an urgent clinic demand. Herein, heparin loaded fibrous grafts of collagen/chitosan/poly(l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) were successfully fabricated via coaxial electrospinning. By controlling the concentration of heparin and the ratio of collagen/chitosan/PLCL, most grafts had the heparin encapsulation efficiency higher than 70%, and the heparin presented sustained release for more than 45 days. Particularly, such multicomponent grafts had relative low initial burst release, and after heparin releasing for 3 weeks, the grafts still showed good anti-platelet adhesion ability. In addition, along with the excellent cell biocompatibility, the fabricated grafts possessed suitable mechanical properties including good tensile strength, suture retention strength, burst pressure and compliance which could well match the native blood vessels. Thus, the optimized graft properties could be properly addressed for vascular tissue application via coaxial electrospinning.

  17. Biodegradable polymer based encapsulation of neem oil nanoemulsion for controlled release of Aza-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerobin, Jayakumar; Sureshkumar, R S; Anjali, C H; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2012-11-06

    Azadirachtin a biological compound found in neem have medicinal and pesticidal properties. The present work reports on the encapsulation of neem oil nanoemulsion using sodium alginate (Na-Alg) by cross linking with glutaraldehyde. Starch and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were used as coating agents for smooth surface of beads. The SEM images showed beads exhibited nearly spherical shape. Swelling of the polymeric beads reduced with coating which in turn decreased the rate of release of Aza-A. Starch coated encapsulation of neem oil nanoemulsion was found to be effective when compared to PEG coated encapsulation of neem oil nanoemulsion. The release rate of neem Aza-A from the beads into an aqueous environment was analyzed by UV-visible spectrophotometer (214 nm). The encapsulated neem oil nanoemulsion have the potential for controlled release of Aza-A. Neem oil nanoemulsion encapsulated beads coated with PEG was found to be toxic in lymphocyte cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Munc18-1 expression levels control synapse recovery by regulating readily releasable pool size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Ruud F. G.; Wierda, Keimpe; Sons, Michèle S.; de Wit, Heidi; Cornelisse, L. Niels; Brussaard, Arjen; Plomp, Jaap J.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Prompt recovery after intense activity is an essential feature of most mammalian synapses. Here we show that synapses with reduced expression of the presynaptic gene munc18-1 suffer from increased depression during intense stimulation at glutamatergic, GABAergic, and neuromuscular synapses. Conversely, munc18-1 overexpression makes these synapses recover faster. Concomitant changes in the readily releasable vesicle pool and its refill kinetics were found. The number of vesicles docked at the active zone and the total number of vesicles per terminal correlated with both munc18-1 expression levels and the size of the releasable vesicle pool. These data show that varying expression of a single gene controls synaptic recovery by modulating the number of docked, release-ready vesicles and thereby replenishment of the secretion capacity. PMID:17110441

  19. Controlled release and antibacterial activity of tetracycline hydrochloride-loaded bacterial cellulose composite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei; Liu, Hui; Wang, Shuxia; Wu, Jimin; Huang, Min; Min, Huihua; Liu, Xiufeng

    2016-07-10

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is widely used in biomedical applications. In this study, we prepared an antibiotic drug tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH)-loaded bacterial cellulose (BC) composite membranes, and evaluated the drug release, antibacterial activity and biocompatibility. The structure and morphology of the fabricated BC-TCH composite membranes were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The TCH release results show that the incorporation of BC matrix to load TCH is able to control the release. In vitro antibacterial assay demonstrate that the developed BC-TCH composites displayed excellent antibacterial activity solely associated with the loaded TCH drug. More importantly, the BC-TCH composite membranes display good biocompatibility. These characteristics of BC-TCH composite membranes indicate that they may successfully serve as wound dressings and other medical biomaterials.

  20. Controlled release of encapsulated methylene blue in a multilayered textile coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Adeline

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We studied the formation of multilayered coating incorporating a β-cyclodextrin polyelectrolyte onto a pretreated polyethylene terephthalate (PET textile in order to obtain reservoir and sustained release properties towards bioactive molecules. This paper describes the alternate deposition by dip-coating onto the textile of chitosan (CHT and a β-cyclodextrin polyelectrolyte (polyCTR- βCD according to the layer-by-layer (LbL principle. Textiles covered with up to 12 layers were characterized by gravimetry, infrared, zetametry. The building of the multilayer system was then achieved including methylene blue (MB as bioactive model compound, complexed with polyCTR-βCD, and a release study of BM was investigated in batch. The results showed that the release profile of BM could be controlled by the number of layers in the system.

  1. Controlling the release of active compounds from the inorganic carrier halloysite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tescione, F.; Buonocore, G. G.; Stanzione, M.; Oliviero, M.; Lavorgna, M. [National Research Council - Institute of Composites and Biomedical Materials, P.le E. Fermi, 1 80055 Portici (Naples) (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Halloysite (HNTs), a natural material characterized by a nanotube structure, has been used as an inorganic carrier of active compounds in several applications from medicine to anticorrosion coatings. In this present work, vanillin (VAN) used as a antimicrobial model, has been encapsulated within HNTs for exploiting its applicability in the active food packaging sector. The molecule release rate has been controlled by crosslinking at the tube ends the loaded vanillin with copper ions, thus producing a stopper network. The vanillin-loaded HNTs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis. The antimicrobial release kinetics from the loaded nanoparticles (VAN/HNTs) in water was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy. The results show that the vanillin crosslinked with cupper ions is a feasible method to tailor the release rate of antimicrobial model from HTNs nanoparticles.

  2. pH-Sensitive Amphiphilic Block-Copolymers for Transport and Controlled Release of Oxygen

    KAUST Repository

    Patil, Yogesh

    2017-05-31

    Saturated fluorocarbons, their derivatives and emulsions are capable of dissolving anomalously high amounts of oxygen and other gases. The mechanistic aspects of this remarkable effect remain to be explored experimentally. Here, the synthesis of a library of amphiphilic fluorous block-copolymers incorporating different fluorinated monomers is described, and the capacity of these copolymers for oxygen transport in water is systematically investigated. The structure of the fluorous monomer employed was found to have a profound effect on both the oxygen-carrying capacity and the gas release kinetics of the polymer emulsions. Furthermore, the release of O2 from the polymer dispersions could be triggered by changing the pH of the solution. This is the first example of a polymer-based system for controlled release of a non-polar, non-covalently entrapped respiratory gas.

  3. [Study on self-microemulsifying membrane controlled-release drop pill of hawthorn leaves flavonoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Xuan; Huang, Hong-Zhang; Li, Ning; Gao, Chong-Kai

    2014-03-01

    To prepare the hawthorn leaves flavonoids self-microemulsifying membrane controlled-release coated drop pill, and to study its release rate in vitro and pharmacokinetics study in vivo. In order to improve the dissolution of hawthorn leaves flavonoids, self-microemulsifying technology was used to prepare the hawthorn leaves flavonoids self-microemulsion. Hawthorn leaves flavonoids self-microemulsifying drop pill was prepared with the PEG 6000. Studies were made on the in vitro release of flavonoids from hawthorn leaves self-micro-emulsifying membrane-moderated coated drop pills and the in vivo pharmacokinetic in rats. The prescription of flavonoids from hawthorn leaves self-micro-emulsifying drop pills was 0.25 g of flavonoids from hawthorn leaves, 0.25 g of iodophenyl maleimide, 0.375 g of polyethylene glycol 400, 0.375 g of cremophor RH 40 and 2 g of polyethylene glycol 6000. The optimized prescription was 4 g of ethyl cellulose 20, 0.64 g of polyethylene glycol 400, 1.8 g of diethyl phthalate, and the weight of coating materials increased by 3.5%. Flavonoids from hawthorn leaves self-micro-emulsifying membrane-moderated coated drop pills complied with the design of sustained-release in 12 h in terms of in vitro release and in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters in rats, and its bioavailability was 2.47 times of quick-release drop pills. Slightly soluble flavonoids from hawthorn leaves could be made into sustained-release preparations by the self-micro-emulsifying and coating technology.

  4. Osteopetrosis: Radiological & Radionuclide Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Cherry; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Fogelman, Ignac; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited bone disease where bones harden and become abnormally dense. While the diagnosis is clinical, it also greatly relies on appearance of the skeleton radiographically. X-ray, radionuclide bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging have been reported to identify characteristics of osteopetrosis. We present an interesting case of a 59-year-old man with a history of bilateral hip fractures. He underwent 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate whole body scan supplemented with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of spine, which showed increased uptake in the humeri, tibiae and femora, which were in keeping with osteopetrosis. PMID:25589808

  5. Osteopetrosis: radiological & radionuclide imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Cherry; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Fogelman, Ignac; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited bone disease where bones harden and become abnormally dense. While the diagnosis is clinical, it also greatly relies on appearance of the skeleton radiographically. X-ray, radionuclide bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging have been reported to identify characteristics of osteopetrosis. We present an interesting case of a 59-year-old man with a history of bilateral hip fractures. He underwent (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate whole body scan supplemented with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of spine, which showed increased uptake in the humeri, tibiae and femora, which were in keeping with osteopetrosis.

  6. Controlled drug release from lung-targeted nanocarriers via chemically mediated shell permeabilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanpeng; Woods, Arcadia; Forbes, Ben; Jones, Stuart

    2016-09-25

    Nanocarriers can aid therapeutic agent administration to the lung, but controlling drug delivery from these systems after deposition in the airways can be problematic. The aim of this study was to evaluate if chemically mediated shell permeabilisation could help manipulate the rate and extent of nanocarrier drug release. Rifampicin was loaded into lipid shell (loading efficiency 41.0±11.4%, size 50nm) and polymer shell nanocarriers (loading efficiency 25.9±2.3%, size 250nm). The drug release at pH 7.4 (lung epithelial pH) and 4.2 (macrophage endosomal pH) with and without the chemical permeabilisers (Pluronic L62D - lipid nanocarriers; H(+)- polymer nanocarriers) was then tested. At pH 7.4 the presence of the permeabilisers increased nanocarrier drug release rate (from 3.2μg/h to 6.8μg/h for lipid shell nanocarriers, 2.3μg/h to 3.4μg/h for polymer shell nanocarriers) and drug release extent (from 50% to 80% for lipid shell nanocarriers, from 45% to 76% for polymer shell nanocarriers). These effects were accompanied by lipid nanocarrier distension (from 50 to 240nm) and polymer shell hydrolysis. At pH 4.2 the polymer nanocarriers did not respond to the permeabiliser, but the lipid nanocarrier maintained a robust drug release enhancement response and hence they demonstrated that the manipulation of controlled drug release from lung-targeted nanocarriers was possible through chemically mediated shell permeabilisation.

  7. Modulation of Tenoxicam release from hydrophilic matrix: modulator membrane versus rate-controlling membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nabarawi, Mohamed Ahmed

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes the preparation of two layered device comprising of tenoxicam containing layer and a drug free membrane layer based on Geomatrix Technology. Our device based on bilaminated films which produced by a casting/solvent evaporation technique. The drug-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) layer was covered by drug free membrane layer composed of a mixture of different ratios of HPMC and ethyl cellulose (EC). The prepared devices were evaluated for thickness, weight, drug content uniformity, water absorption capacity and in-vitro drug release. The films were also evaluated for appearance, smoothness and transparency. The influence of drug free membrane layer composition and thickness on the drug release pattern was studied on 12 devices (D1 to D12). The results indicate that, the release of drug from HPMC matrixes without the drug free membrane layer was fast and follows diffusion controlled mechanism. The release of drug from the devices D1, D4, D9 and D12 follow the same mechanism, while the release of drug from other devices become linear with time (zero order) and extended for long time especially when thickness and the ratio of EC was increased in the drug free membrane layer. From this study it is concluded that, changing the geometry of drug layer by addition of drug free membrane layer and changing its composition and thickness plays an important role in determining whether the drug free membrane layer is rate-controlling or modulator membrane. Hence it can facilitate the development of different pharmaceutical products with different release pattern.

  8. Controlled-release panel traps for the Mediterranean fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, B A; Cunningham, R T; Chambers, D L; Avery, J W; Harte, E M

    1994-10-01

    Solid, controlled-release dispensers containing 2 g of the synthetic attractant trimedlure now are used in Jackson traps to detect the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann). Panel traps consisting of trimedlure mixed in a sticky substance and spread on the surfaces of a plastic panel are used to delineate the limits of discovered insect infestations in California. We describe the development of controlled-release, polymeric panels that prolong release of trimedlure and a highly attractive analog, ceralure. Attractants were incorporated in a polyethylene matrix to form panels and in a polymer coating on cardboard panels that then were evaluated by biological and chemical assay. In addition, commercial polymer matrix panels were evaluated. Field bioassay tests conducted in Hilo, HI, using released flies and in Guatemala in a natural population showed that the polyethylene matrix panel became brittle and cracked during field exposure and that release rates of the attractants were relatively low. The coated cardboard panels were stable under field conditions and yielded high fly captures for up to 6 wk. Farma Tech commercial panels containing 12.3 and 23.4 g of trimedlure remained highly attractive throughout a 134-d test in Hawaii and appear to be a long-lasting alternative to panels coated with trimedlure in Stikem. The cost of the relatively high dose of trimedlure is offset by the prolonged active life of the panel. Commercial panels from AgriSense (10 g trimedlure and 10 g ceralure) released the attractants at a slower rate and were less attractive.

  9. Continuous twin screw granulation of controlled release formulations with various HPMC grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoorne, V; Janssens, L; Vercruysse, J; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2016-09-25

    HPMC is a popular matrix former to formulate tablets with extended drug release. Tablets with HPMC are preferentially produced by direct compression. However, granulation is often required prior to tableting to overcome poor flowability of the formulation. While continuous twin screw granulation has been extensively evaluated for granulation of immediate release formulations, twin screw granulation of controlled release formulations including the dissolution behavior of the formulations received little attention. Therefore, the influence of the HPMC grade (viscosity and substitution degree) and the particle size of theophylline on critical quality attributes of granules (continuously produced via twin screw granulation) and tablets was investigated in the current study. Formulations with 20 or 40% HPMC, 20% theophylline and lactose were granulated with water at fixed process parameters via twin screw granulation. The torque was influenced by the viscosity and substitution degree of HPMC, but was not a limiting factor for the granulation process. An optimal L/S ratio was selected for each formulation based on the granule size distribution. The granule size distributions were influenced by the substitution degree and concentration of HPMC and the particle size of theophylline. Raman and UV spectroscopic analysis on 8 sieve fractions of granules indicated an inhomogeneous distribution of theophylline over the size fractions. However, this phenomenon was not correlated with the hydration rate or viscosity of HPMC. Controlled release of theophylline could be obtained over 24h with release profiles close to zero-order. The release of theophylline could be tailored via selection of the substitution degree and viscosity of HPMC.

  10. Silicone Doped Chitosan-Acrylamide Coencapsulated Urea Fertilizer: An Approach to Controlled Release Fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sempeho Ibahati Siafu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of special management practices, urea is known to undergo chemical transformations resulting in severe losses (≈60–70% of total fertilizer applied. In an attempt to design urea controlled release fertilizers in order to counterbalance the 60–70% loss, urea was cross-linked with chitosan and acrylamide under refluxed in situ copolymerization technique; the procedures were repeated with silicone doping prior cross-linking with MBA. The particles were characterized with FTIR/ATR, EDX, XRD, and SEM. The IR bands observed within 3426–409 cm−1 revealed the formation of new bands after coencapsulation for the νγN-H, νβN-H, νOH, νsNH2, νCH2, νC=O, δ′NH2, νC=C, δNH2, νC-N, βCH3, $C-N, γNH2, νC=O, and $CH2. Crystallinity indices for urea with and without silicone doping were found to be 50.9% and 72.1%, respectively, with a distinctive split peak at (d 12.30°. The formation of Microdunes and Microballs 3D network sized 0.64 μm was noted. Release profiles demonstrated that 80% N was released in a period of 30 days at RT and pH 7. The release patterns exhibited linear and deformed sigmoid release models. Empirically, the findings demonstrated that it is possible to design urea controlled release fertilizers with varying particle sizes and morphologies by using chitosan-acrylamide coencapsulation.

  11. PREPARATION AND EVALUATION OF MUCOADHESIVE MICROCAPSULES OF IBUPROFEN FOR CONTROLLED RELEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bantu Appa Rao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate microcapsules containing ibuprofen employing sodium alginate in combination with mucoadhesive polymers namely methylcellulose, Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and sodiumcaboxymethylcellulose. The microcapsules were prepared by orifice-ionic gelation method. The microcapsules prepared are spherical, discrete, free flowing and were of multinucleate and monolithic type. Microencapsulation efficiency was in the range of 77.81-91.41 %. The in vitro drug release of the microcapsules carried out in phosphate buffer pH7.2 and drug release from the microcapsules was slow over 12 h and depends on core:coat ratio, wall thickness and size of the microcapsules. The drug release from all the microcapsules followed non-fickian diffusion. Microcapsules of alginate- methylcellulose gave relatively fast release when compared to others. The order of release rate observed with various microcapsules was sodiumcaboxymethylcellulose < Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose < methylcellulose. Results of our present study suggest that ibuprofen microcapsules can be successfully designed to develop controlled drug delivery, which can improve compliance by reducing dosing frequency.

  12. Fabrication of Glucose-Sensitive Layer-by-Layer Films for Potential Controlled Insulin Release Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talusan Timothy Jemuel E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-regulated drug delivery systems (DDS are potential alternative to the conventional method of introducing insulin to the body due to their controlled drug release mechanism. In this study, Layer-by-Layer technique was utlized to manufacture drug loaded, pH responsive thin films. Insulin was alternated with pH-sensitive, [2-(dimethyl amino ethyl aminoacrylate] (PDMAEMA and topped of with polymer/glucose oxidase (GOD layers. Similarly, films using a different polymer, namely Poly(Acrylic Acid (PAA were also fabricated. Exposure of the films to glucose solutions resulted to the production of gluconic acid causing a polymer conformation change due to protonation, thus releasing the embedded insulin. The insulin release was monitored by subjecting the dipping glucose solutions to Bradford Assay. Films exhibited a reversal in drug release profile in the presence of glucose as compared to without glucose. PAA films were also found out to release more insulin compared to that of the PDMAEMA films.The difference in the profile of the two films were due to different polymer-GOD interactions, since both films exhibited almost identical profiles when embedded with Poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate (PSS instead of GOD.

  13. Multifunctionalization of magnetic nanoparticles for controlled drug release: a general approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Alfonso; Couleaud, Pierre; Aires, Antonio; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Somoza, Álvaro

    2014-07-23

    In this study, a general approach for the multifunctionalization of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with drugs (Doxorubicin and Gemcitabine) and targeting moieties (Nucant pseudopeptide) for controlled and selective release is described. The functionalization is achieved by the formation of disulfide bonds between MNPs and drugs derivatives synthesized in this work. Our strategy consists in the introduction of a pyridyldisulfide moiety to the drugs that react efficiently with sulfhydryl groups of pre-activated MNPs. This approach also allows the quantification of the covalently immobilized drug by measuring the amount of the 2-pyridinethione released during the process. The linkers developed here allow the release of drugs without any chemical modification. This process is triggered under highly reducing environment, such as that present inside the cells. Complete release of drugs is achieved within 5-8 h under intracellular conditions whereas negligible percentage of release is observed in extracellular conditions. We propose here a modular general approach for the functionalization of nanoparticles that can be used for different types of drugs and targeting agents.

  14. Controlled antiseptic/eosin release from chitosan-based hydrogel modified fibrous substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Ilaria; Ayadi, Farouk; Rizzello, Loris; Summa, Maria; Bertorelli, Rosalia; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Brandi, Fernando; Bayer, Ilker S; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2015-10-20

    Fibers of cellulose networks were stably coated with N-methacrylate glycol chitosan (MGC) shells using subsequent steps of dip coating and photo-curing. The photo-crosslinked MGC-coated cellulose networks preserved their fibrous structure. A model hydrophilic antiseptic solution containing eosin, chloroxylenol and propylene glycol was incorporated into the shells to study the drug release dynamics. Detailed drug release mechanism into phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutions from coated and pristine fibers loaded with the antiseptic was investigated. The results show that the MGC-coated cellulose fibers enable the controlled gradual release of the drug for four days, as opposed to fast, instantaneous release from eosin coated pristine fibers. This release behavior was found to affect the antibacterial efficiency of the fibrous cellulose sheets significantly against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. In the case of the MGC-eosin functionalized system the antibacterial efficiency was as high as 85% and 90%, respectively, while for the eosin coated pristine cellulose system the efficiency was negative, indicating bacterial proliferation. Furthermore, the MGC-eosin system was shown to be efficacious in a model of wound healing in mice, reducing the levels of various pro-inflammatory cytokines that modulate early inflammatory phase responses. The results demonstrate good potential of these coated fibers for wound dressing and healing applications. Due to its easy application on common passive commercial fibrous dressings such as gauzes and cotton fibers, the method can render them active dressings in a cost effective way.

  15. Auto-Ignition and Heat Release Correlations for Controlled Auto-Ignition Combustion in Gasoline Engines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Auto-ignition and heat release correlations for controlled auto-ignition (CAI) combustion were derived from extensive in-cylinder pressure data of a four-stroke gasoline engine operating in CAI combustion mode. Abundant experiments were carried out under a wide range of air/fuel ratio,speed and residual gas fraction to ensure that the combustion correlations can be used in the entire CAI engine operation range. Furthermore, a more accurate method to compute the residual gas fraction was proposed by calculating the working fluid temperature at the exhaust valve close timing in the experiments. The heat release correlation was described in two parts, one is for the first slower heat release process at low temperature, and the other is for the second faster heat release process at high temperature. Finally the heat release correlation was evaluated on the single cylinder gasoline engine running with CAI combustion by comparing the experimental data with the 1-D engine simulation results obtained with the aid of the GT-Power simulation program. The results show that the predicted loads and ignition timings match closely with the measurements.

  16. Environmental Release Prevention and Control Plan (ERP and CP) annual review and update for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, G.T. [comp.; Mamatey, A.; Arnett, M.

    1993-10-05

    In the Environmental Release Prevention and Control Plan (ERP and CP), WSRC made a commitment to conduct the following follow-up activities and actions: (1) Complete the action items developed in response to the findings and recommendation of the Environmental Release Prevention Taskteam (WSRC-RP-92-356). (2) Complete all batch and continuous release procedure revisions to incorporate the attributes that WSRC senior management required of each procedure. (3) DOE-SR Assistance Managers and WSRC counterparts to reach consensus and closure on the identified engineered solutions documented in the ERP and CP, develop and drive implementation of facility changes per the agreements. (4) Continue to analyze releases and monitor performance in accordance with the ERP and CP, and utilize the ALARA Release Guides Committee to drive improvements. (5) Conduct annual re-evaluations of the cost benefit analyses of the identified engineered solutions, and identify new options and alternatives for each outfall in response to site mission and facility changes. This report documents the efforts that have been completed over the past year in response to these commitments.

  17. The biokinetic of incorporates radionuclides; Die Biokinetik von inkorporierten Radionukliden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breustedt, Bastian [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenforschung; Giussani, Augusto [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' ' Externe und interne Dosimetrie, Biokinetik' '

    2017-08-01

    Incorporated radionuclides from nuclear accidents, fission product releases or nuclear medical administration are distributed in the human body in organs and tissue, absorbed 9or excreted. The interpretation of incorporation monitoring results and the estimation of the internal doses that cannot be measured directly need mathematical methods and the formulation of biokinetic models.

  18. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  19. Use of hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymers for the development of controlled release tizanidine matrix tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Ali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop tizanidine controlled release matrix. Formulations were designed using central composite method with the help of design expert version 7.0 software. Avicel pH 101 in the range of 14-50% was used as a filler, while HPMC K4M and K100M in the range of 25-55%, Ethylcellulose 10 ST and 10FP in the range of 15 - 45% and Kollidon SR in the range of 25-60% were used as controlled release agents in designing different formulations. Various physical parameters including powder flow for blends and weight variation, thickness, hardness, friability, disintegration time and in-vitro release were tested for tablets. Assay of tablets were also performed as specified in USP 35 NF 32. Physical parameters of both powder blend and compressed tablets such as compressibility index, angle of repose, weight variation, thickness, hardness, friability, disintegration time and assay were evaluated and found to be satisfactory for formulations K4M2, K4M3, K4M9, K100M2, K100M3, K100M9, E10FP2, E10FP9, KSR2, KSR3 & KSR9. In vitro dissolution study was conducted in 900 ml of 0.1N HCl, phosphate buffer pH 4.5 and 6.8 medium using USP Apparatus II. In vitro release profiles indicated that formulations prepared with Ethocel 10 standard were unable to control the release of drug while formulations K4M2, K100M9, E10FP2 & KSR2 having polymer content ranging from 40-55% showed a controlled drug release pattern in the above mentioned medium. Zero-order drug release kinetics was observed for formulations K4M2, K100M9, E10FP2 & KSR2. Similarity test (f2 results for K4M2, E10FP2 & KSR2 were found to be comparable with reference formulation K100M9. Response Surface plots were also prepared for evaluating the effect of independent variable on the responses. Stability study was performed as per ICH guidelines and the calculated shelf life was 24-30 months for formulation K4M2, K100M9 and E10FP2.

  20. Combustion instability and active control: Alternative fuels, augmentors, and modeling heat release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sammy Ace

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted to explore thermo-acoustic coupling during the onset of combustion instability in various air-breathing combustor configurations. These include a laboratory-scale 200-kW dump combustor and a 100-kW augmentor featuring a v-gutter flame holder. They were used to simulate main combustion chambers and afterburners in aero engines, respectively. The three primary themes of this work includes: 1) modeling heat release fluctuations for stability analysis, 2) conducting active combustion control with alternative fuels, and 3) demonstrating practical active control for augmentor instability suppression. The phenomenon of combustion instabilities remains an unsolved problem in propulsion engines, mainly because of the difficulty in predicting the fluctuating component of heat release without extensive testing. A hybrid model was developed to describe both the temporal and spatial variations in dynamic heat release, using a separation of variables approach that requires only a limited amount of experimental data. The use of sinusoidal basis functions further reduced the amount of data required. When the mean heat release behavior is known, the only experimental data needed for detailed stability analysis is one instantaneous picture of heat release at the peak pressure phase. This model was successfully tested in the dump combustor experiments, reproducing the correct sign of the overall Rayleigh index as well as the remarkably accurate spatial distribution pattern of fluctuating heat release. Active combustion control was explored for fuel-flexible combustor operation using twelve different jet fuels including bio-synthetic and Fischer-Tropsch types. Analysis done using an actuated spray combustion model revealed that the combustion response times of these fuels were similar. Combined with experimental spray characterizations, this suggested that controller performance should remain effective with various alternative fuels

  1. Controlled release of dexamethasone from porous PLGA scaffolds under cyclic loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Poly(L-lactide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)(PLLA-PEG) microspheres containing dexamethasone(Dex) have been fabricated using a spray-drying technique.Porous poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)(PLGA) scaffolds were prepared using a method combining thermally induced phase separation and porogen leaching.A post-seeding technique was used to immobilize Dex-containing PLLA-PEG microspheres on porous PLGA scaffolds,and drug-containing microspheres-scaffolds(MS-S) were obtained.Simple Dex-containing scaffolds(D-S) were also made as the control by directly dissolving Dex in the PLGA solution during scaffold fabrication.The morphologies of microspheres and scaffolds were studied by scanning electron microscopy.Drug release profiles of both MS-S and D-S were determined under cyclic loading and shaking water bath,respectively.The cumulative release of Dex was measured using an ultraviolet visible spectrophotometer.The results show that the incorporation of Dex and microspheres had little effect on the overall morphology of the porous PLGA scaffolds.Cyclic loading significantly accelerated the release of Dex from the drug-containing scaffolds.Compared with D-S,MS-S reduced the drug release rate.The controlled drug delivery of tissue engineering scaffolds under cyclic loading is a key factor to mimic the in vivo mechanical environments and achieve optical clinical efficacy.

  2. Antibacterial quaternized gellan gum based particles for controlled release of ciprofloxacin with potential dermal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novac, O; Lisa, G; Profire, L; Tuchilus, C; Popa, M I

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of gellan gum derivatives containing quaternary ammonium groups, with the purpose of obtaining particulate controlled release systems for ciprofloxacin. Quaternized gellan derivatives were synthesized by grafting N-(3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl)-trimethyl ammonium chloride onto gellan primary hydroxyl groups by nucleophilic substitution, in the presence of alkali, under specific reaction conditions using various gellan/N-(3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl)-trimethyl ammonium chloride molar ratios. Degree of quaternization was determined by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and AgNO3 conductometric titration. Thermal behavior was investigated for all materials by thermogravimetric analysis. A study of the degree of quaternization and effect of the reaction conditions upon activation energy of quaternized gellan derivatives for the main degradation step by applying the Kissinger method at four heating rates is also reported. The novelty that this work brings refers to obtaining quaternized gellan and chitosan based particles with retention of quaternary ammonium moieties' antibacterial activity. In vitro transdermal release tests of ciprofloxacin from loaded particles were carried out on rat skin in isotonic phosphate buffer solution (pH=7.43). Ciprofloxacin was released up to 24 h, confirming quaternized gellan-chitosan particles' potential as controlled release systems for topical dermal applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. CONTROLLED RELEASE FORMULATION DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF FELODIPINE MATRIX TABLETS BY USING HYDROPHOBIC POLYMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kiran Kumar*, T. Ramarao, D.B.R.N. Bikshapathi and K.N. Jayaveera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Felodipine is a long-acting 1, 4-dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, used to control hypertension by selective action on peripheral resistance. The conventional felodipine tablet gives a rather high peak and comparatively low trough levels, due to rapid absorption and distribution. More sustained plasma concentrations might thus produce a more even effect on blood pressure. The main aim of the study was to improve dissolution rate of the dosage form in a controlled manner over extended period of 24 hrs. Matrix tablets were prepared by direct compression method,using hydrophobic polymers like Glyceryl monostearate and Carnauba wax. The prepared formulations were evaluated for hardness, thickness, weight variation, friability and in-vitro dissolution studies. Among all the formulations F8 was selected as optimized formulation based on the evaluation parameters and in-vitro release profile of 100% drug release for 24 hrs. The FTIR and DSC results of optimized formulation showed no drug-excipient interaction. For optimized formulation(F8, the drug release mechanism was explored and explained by zero-order (r2=0.984, first-order (r2=0.947, Higuchi (r2=0.967 and Korsmayer-peppas (r2=0.982 & n=0.855 equations, which explained the drug release follows zero-order and is fit for Higuchi equation & mechanism was anomalous diffusion i.e diffusion and erosion.

  4. Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose grafted with polyacrylamide: application in controlled release of 5-amino salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Raghunath; Pal, Sagar

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose grafted with polyacrylamide (HPMC-g-PAM) hydrogel was evaluated in vitro as a potential carrier for controlled release of 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA). The graft copolymer was developed by grafting PAM chains onto HPMC backbone using potassium persulphate as initiator. The swelling behaviour of hydrogel based tablet was investigated as a function of pH and time in various buffer solutions similar to that of gastric and intestinal fluids. The % equilibrium swelling was found to be higher in case of simulated intestinal fluid (pH=7.4) and lower in simulated gastric fluid (pH=1.2), making an ideal matrix as required for colon specific drug delivery. The drug release study was performed at various pH values akin to the condition of GI tract. The release kinetics of 5-ASA showed non-Fickian diffusion behaviour. This indicates that the release is controlled by a combination of polymer relaxation or erosion of the matrix and diffusion of the drug from the swollen matrix.

  5. Controlled release of doxorubicin from electrospun PEO/chitosan/graphene oxide nanocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirzadeh, Behnaz; Anaraki, Nadia Aboutalebi; Irani, Mohammad; Rad, Leila Roshanfekr; Shamshiri, Soodeh

    2015-03-01

    Polyethylene oxide (PEO)/chitosan (CS)/graphene oxide (GO) electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds were successfully developed via electrospinning process for controlled release of doxorubicin (DOX). The SEM analysis of nanofibrous scaffolds with different contents of GO (0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.7wt.%) indicated that the minimum diameter of nanofibers was found to be 85nm for PEO/CS/GO 0.5% nanofibers. The π-π stacking interaction between DOX and GO with fine pores of nanofibrous scaffolds exhibited higher drug loading (98%) and controlled release of the DOX loaded PEO/CS/GO nanofibers. The results of DOX release from nanofibrous scaffolds at pH5.3 and 7.4 indicated strong pH dependence. The hydrogen bonding interaction between GO and DOX could be unstable under acidic conditions which resulted in faster drug release rate in pH5.3. The cell viability results indicated that DOX loaded PEO/CS/GO/DOX nanofibrous scaffold could be used as an alternative source of DOX compared with free DOX to avoid the side effects of free DOX. Thus, the prepared nanofibrous scaffold offers as a novel formulation for treatment of lung cancer.

  6. Characterization of organogel as a novel oral controlled release formulation for lipophilic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Kazunori; Sumizawa, Toru; Miyazaki, Makoto; Kakemi, Masawo

    2010-03-30

    A low molecular mass gelator can form soft solids in a variety of organic liquids and vegetable oils. These soft solids are generally called organogels. In this study, we prepared organogel using 12-hydroxystearic acid (12-HSA) as a gelator for soybean oil and investigated its characteristics as a controlled release formulation for lipophilic compounds. The release rate of ibuprofen, a model lipophilic compound, from organogel decreased with the increase of 12-HSA concentration in the formulation; however, the difference in the concentration of 12-HSA in the formulation did not affect the diffusivity of ibuprofen in the organogel. The erosion constant of organogel in the intestinal tract was examined by using simulated gastric fluid and intestinal fluid. Regardless of 12-HSA concentration in the formulation, organogel is very stable in the simulated gastric fluid. On the other hand, the erosion constant of organogel in the simulated intestinal fluid increased with the decreasing concentration of 12-HSA. Therefore, it is speculated that the difference in the release rate of ibuprofen among organogels with various concentrations of 12-HSA was mainly caused by the difference in the erosion rate. To characterize the organogel effect in vivo, ibuprofen was orally administered to rats in an aqueous suspension or organogel. Ibuprofen concentration in plasma rapidly increased after administration with an aqueous suspension, whereas organogel suppressed the rapid absorption. In conclusion, organogel is clearly useful as an oral controlled release formulation for lipophilic compounds.

  7. Controlled Release of Doxorubicin from Doxorubicin/γ-Polyglutamic Acid Ionic Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavik Manocha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of drug/polymer complexes through ionic interactions has proven to be very effective for the controlled release of drugs. The stability of such drug/polymer ionic complexes can be greatly influenced by solution pH and ionic strength. The aim of the current work was to evaluate the potential of γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA as a carrier for the anticancer drug, Doxorubicin (DOX. We investigated the formation of ionic complexes between γ-PGA and DOX using scanning electron microscopy, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. Our studies demonstrate that DOX specifically interacts with γ-PGA forming random colloidal aggregates and results in almost 100% complexation efficiency. In vitro drug release studies illustrated that these complexes were relatively stable at neutral pH but dissociates slowly under acidic pH environments, facilitating a pH-triggered release of DOX from the complex. Hydrolytic degradation of γ-PGA and DOX/γ-PGA complex was also evaluated in physiological buffer. In conclusion, these studies clearly showed the feasibility of γ-PGA to associate cationic drug such as DOX and that is may serve as a new drug carrier for the controlled release of DOX in malignant tissues.

  8. Review on materials & methods to produce controlled release coated urea fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem, Babar; KuShaari, KuZilati; Man, Zakaria B; Basit, Abdul; Thanh, Trinh H

    2014-05-10

    With the exponential growth of the global population, the agricultural sector is bound to use ever larger quantities of fertilizers to augment the food supply, which consequently increases food production costs. Urea, when applied to crops is vulnerable to losses from volatilization and leaching. Current methods also reduce nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by plants which limits crop yields and, moreover, contributes towards environmental pollution in terms of hazardous gaseous emissions and water eutrophication. An approach that offsets this pollution while also enhancing NUE is the use of controlled release urea (CRU) for which several methods and materials have been reported. The physical intromission of urea granules in an appropriate coating material is one such technique that produces controlled release coated urea (CRCU). The development of CRCU is a green technology that not only reduces nitrogen loss caused by volatilization and leaching, but also alters the kinetics of nitrogen release, which, in turn, provides nutrients to plants at a pace that is more compatible with their metabolic needs. This review covers the research quantum regarding the physical coating of original urea granules. Special emphasis is placed on the latest coating methods as well as release experiments and mechanisms with an integrated critical analyses followed by suggestions for future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Controlled Release Inhalable Polymeric Microspheres for Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigal, Aparna; Ng, Wai Kiong; Tan, Reginald B H; Chan, Sui Yung

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic ailment of the lungs, exhibiting elevated arterial pressure and vascular resistance; with a mean arterial pressure above 25 mmHg at rest and above 30 mmHg during exercise. It is associated with poor prognosis, and its prevalence is estimated to be 15 cases per one million. The current treatment options for PAH are discussed with the prostanoid class of drugs being the most effective. The latter drugs act by dilating systemic and pulmonary arterial vascular beds and, with sustained long-term usage, altering pulmonary remodelling. They are administered as IV infusions or inhalation solutions. Despite their clinical effectiveness, prostanoids have short half-lives requiring frequent administration of 6-9 times daily and thus suffer from poor compliance. Controlled release inhalation delivery systems for treatment of PAH, ranging from liposomes, biodegradable nano- and microparticles, formation of co-precipitates and complexation with cyclodextrins, are explored. Arising from these formulation strategies, we developed novel polymeric microspheres for inhalation to reduce dosing frequency and improve medication compliance. These microspheres are designed with release modifiers, to reside in the lung which is the site of drug action for a longer duration so as to release the drug slowly and consistently over a prolonged period. This could lead to the development of the first commercially available controlled release inhalation product.

  10. Polymer grafted-magnetic halloysite nanotube for controlled and sustained release of cationic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizir, Meriem; Dramou, Pierre; Zhang, Kai; Sun, Cheng; Pham-Huy, Chuong; He, Hua

    2017-11-01

    In this research, novel polymer grafted-magnetic halloysite nanotubes with norfloxacin loaded (NOR-MHNTs) and controlled-release, was achieved by surface-initiated precipitation polymerization. The magnetic halloysite nanotubes exhibited better adsorption of NOR (72.10mgg(-1)) compared with the pristine HNTs (30.80mgg(-1)). Various parameters influencing the drug adsorption of the MHNTs for NOR were studied. Polymer grafted NOR-MHNTs has been designed using flexible docking in computer simulation to choose optimal monomers. NOR-MHNTs/poly (methacrylic acid or acrylamide-co-et