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Sample records for controlling partial-onset seizures

  1. Review of levetiracetam, with a focus on the extended release formulation, as adjuvant therapy in controlling partial-onset seizures

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    Carol M Ulloa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carol M Ulloa, Allen Towfigh, Joseph SafdiehDepartment of Neurology and Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Levetiracetam is a second-generation antiepileptic drug (AED with a unique chemical structure and mechanism of action. The extended release formulation of levetiracetam (Keppra XR™; UCB Pharma was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial-onset seizures in patients 16 years of age and older with epilepsy. This approval is based on a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, multinational trial. Levetiracetam XR allows for once-daily dosing, which may increase compliance and, given the relatively constant plasma concentrations, may minimize concentration-related adverse effects. Levetiracetam’s mode of action is not fully elucidated, but it has been found to target high-voltage, N-type calcium channels as well as the synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A. Levetiracetam has nearly ideal pharmacokinetics. It is rapidly and almost completely absorbed after oral ingestion, is ‹10% protein-bound, demonstrates linear kinetics, is minimally metabolized through a pathway independent of the cytochrome P450 system, has no significant drug–drug interactions, and has a wide therapeutic index. The most common reported adverse events with levetiracetam XR were somnolence, irritability, dizziness, nausea, influenza, and nasopharyngitis. Levetiracetam XR provides an efficacious and well-tolerated treatment option for adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial-onset seizures.Keywords: levetiracetam, partial-onset seizures, antiepileptic drugs

  2. Oxcarbazepine versus carbamazepine monotherapy for partial onset seizures

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    Koch, Marcus W.; Polman, Susanne K. L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Partial onset seizures are often treated with the standard antiepileptic drug carbamazepine. Oxcarbazepine is a newer antiepileptic drug related to carbamazepine that is claimed to be better tolerated. Objectives To compare efficacy and tolerability of carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine mono

  3. Oxcarbazepine versus carbamazepine monotherapy for partial onset seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus W.; Polman, Susanne K. L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Partial onset seizures are often treated with the standard antiepileptic drug carbamazepine. Oxcarbazepine is a newer antiepileptic drug related to carbamazepine that is claimed to be better tolerated. Objectives To compare efficacy and tolerability of carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine mono

  4. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of rufinamide as adjunctive therapy for refractory partial-onset seizures.

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    Biton, Victor; Krauss, Gregory; Vasquez-Santana, Blanca; Bibbiani, Francesco; Mann, Allison; Perdomo, Carlos; Narurkar, Milind

    2011-02-01

    Efficacy and safety of adjunctive rufinamide (3,200 mg/day) was assessed in adolescents and adults with inadequately controlled partial-onset seizures receiving maintenance therapy with up to three antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter study comprised a 56-day baseline phase (BP), 12-day titration phase, and 84-day maintenance phase (MP). The primary efficacy variable was percentage change in total partial seizure frequency per 28 days (MP vs. BP). Secondary efficacy outcome measures included ≥50% responder rate and reduction in mean total partial seizure frequency during the MP. Safety and tolerability evaluation included adverse events (AEs), physical and neurologic examinations, and laboratory values. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assessments were conducted. Three hundred fifty-seven patients were randomized: 176 to rufinamide and 181 to placebo. Patients had a median of 13.3 seizures per 28 days during BP; 86% were receiving ≥2 AEDs. For the intent-to-treat population, the median percentage reduction in total partial seizure frequency per 28 days was 23.25 for rufinamide versus 9.80 for placebo (p = 0.007). Rufinamide-treated patients were more than twice as likely to have had a ≥50% reduction in partial seizure frequency (32.5% vs. 14.3%; p < 0.001) and had a greater reduction in median total partial seizure rate per 28 days during the MP (13.2 vs. 5.2; p < 0.001). Treatment-emergent AEs occurring at ≥5% higher incidence in the rufinamide group compared with placebo were dizziness, fatigue, nausea, somnolence, and diplopia. Adjunctive treatment with rufinamide reduced total partial seizures in refractory patients. AEs reported were consistent with the known tolerability profile of rufinamide. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2010 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Lacosamide for the prevention of partial onset seizures in epileptic adults

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    Anna Kelemen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Anna Kelemen1, Péter Halász21National Institute of Neurosciences, Epilepsy Center, Budapest, Hungary; 2Faculty of Information Technology, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest, Hungary Abstract: Lacosamide is a newly registered antiepileptic drug with dual mechanisms of action. It selectively enhances slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels, resulting in stabilization of hyperexcitable neuronal membranes and inhibition of repetitive neuronal firing. It also binds to a collapsing-response mediator protein-2, CRMP2. Lacosamide has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile; is rapidly and completely absorbed, has a relatively long elimination half-life of 13 hours which allows twice-daily administration, linear pharmacokinetics, and has low potential for drug interactions and renal elimination. Both oral and intravenous formulations of lacosamide are being developed. In placebo-controlled clinical trials, lacosamide was effective in seizure reduction as adjunctive therapy in patients with uncontrolled partial-onset seizures. Lacosamide was generally well tolerated. The most frequently reported adverse events in placebo-controlled trials were dizziness, headache, nausea, and diplopia. Intravenous lacosamide has a comparably good safety profile.Keywords: lacosamide, epilepsy, partial onset seizures

  6. Lacosamide adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures: a meta-analysis.

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    Sawh, Sonja C; Newman, Jennifer J; Deshpande, Santosh; Jones, Philip M

    2013-01-01

    Background. The relative efficacy and safety of lacosamide as adjunctive therapy compared to other antiepileptic drugs has not been well established. Objective. To determine if lacosamide provides improved efficacy and safety, reduced length of hospital stay and improved quality of life compared with other anti-epileptic therapies for adults with partial-onset seizures. Data Sources. A systematic review of the medical literature using Medline (1946-Week 4, 2012), EMBASE (1980-Week 3, 2012), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 1 of 12, January 2012). Additional studies were identified (through to February 7, 2012) by searching bibliographies, the FDA drug approval files, clinical trial registries and major national and international neurology meeting abstracts. No restrictions on publication status or language were applied. Study Selection. Randomized controlled trials of lacosamide in adults with partial-onset seizures were included. Data Extraction. Study selection, extraction and risk of bias assessment were performed independently by two authors. Authors of studies were contacted for missing data. Data Synthesis. All pooled analyses used the random effects model. Results. Three trials (1311 patients) met inclusion criteria. Lacosamide increased the 50% responder rate compared to placebo (RR 1.68 [95% CI 1.36 to 2.08]; I(2) = 0%). Discontinuation due to adverse events was statistically significantly higher in the lacosamide arm (RR3.13 [95% CI 1.94 to 5.06]; I(2) = 0%). Individual adverse events (ataxia, dizziness, fatigue, and nausea) were also significantly higher in the lacosamide group. Limitations. All dosage arms from the included studies were pooled to make a single pair-wise comparison to placebo. Selective reporting of outcomes was found in all of the included RCTs. Conclusions. Lacosamide as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial-onset seizures increases the 50% responder rate but with significantly more adverse events compared to

  7. Lacosamide adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures: a meta-analysis

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    Sonja C. Sawh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The relative efficacy and safety of lacosamide as adjunctive therapy compared to other antiepileptic drugs has not been well established.Objective. To determine if lacosamide provides improved efficacy and safety, reduced length of hospital stay and improved quality of life compared with other anti-epileptic therapies for adults with partial-onset seizures.Data Sources. A systematic review of the medical literature using Medline (1946–Week 4, 2012, EMBASE (1980–Week 3, 2012, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 1 of 12, January 2012. Additional studies were identified (through to February 7, 2012 by searching bibliographies, the FDA drug approval files, clinical trial registries and major national and international neurology meeting abstracts. No restrictions on publication status or language were applied.Study Selection. Randomized controlled trials of lacosamide in adults with partial-onset seizures were included.Data Extraction. Study selection, extraction and risk of bias assessment were performed independently by two authors. Authors of studies were contacted for missing data.Data Synthesis. All pooled analyses used the random effects model.Results. Three trials (1311 patients met inclusion criteria. Lacosamide increased the 50% responder rate compared to placebo (RR 1.68 [95% CI 1.36 to 2.08]; I2 = 0%. Discontinuation due to adverse events was statistically significantly higher in the lacosamide arm (RR3.13 [95% CI 1.94 to 5.06]; I2 = 0%. Individual adverse events (ataxia, dizziness, fatigue, and nausea were also significantly higher in the lacosamide group.Limitations. All dosage arms from the included studies were pooled to make a single pair-wise comparison to placebo. Selective reporting of outcomes was found in all of the included RCTs.Conclusions. Lacosamide as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial-onset seizures increases the 50% responder rate but with significantly more adverse events

  8. Efficacy of Retigabine in Adjunctive Treatment of Partial Onset Seizures in Adults

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    Michele Y. Splinter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate efficacy and tolerability of retigabine (ezogabine, US adopted name in the adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults. Retigabine is the first anticonvulsant in its class, decreasing neuronal excitability by opening voltage-gated potassium channels. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE were systematically searched using search terms retigabine and ezogabine for randomized controlled trials published from 1980 through August 17, 2013. Additionally, articles relating to pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, tolerability and interactions were examined for inclusion. Published abstracts and websites of the Food and Drug Administration and European Medication Agency were reviewed for additional relevant information. Results One phase IIb and two phase III trials were identified. Retigabine has been reported to have dose dependent efficacy in adjunctive treatment of resistant partial-onset seizures in adults in doses of 600, 900 and 1200 mg/day. Similar to other anticonvulsants, the most common adverse events were central nervous system related. Retigabine has several unique adverse events compared to other anticonvulsants: urinary retention and, with extended use, pigment changes to the skin and retina. Retigabine is metabolized by glucuronidation and acetylation. There are few drug interactions with retigabine. Conclusions Retigabine has been shown to have efficacy when used as adjunctive therapy in partial-onset seizures. It has a novel mechanism of action, activation of voltage-gated potassium channels. It has less drug interactions than many other anticonvulsants because it is not metabolized through the P-450 system. Its place in therapy has yet to be determined, especially with recent reports of pigment discoloration of skin and the retina with extended use.

  9. Lacosamide: a review of its use as adjunctive therapy in the management of partial-onset seizures.

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    Hoy, Sheridan M

    2013-12-01

    Lacosamide (Vimpat(®)) is a functionalized amino acid available orally (as a syrup or tablet) and as an intravenous infusion. It is believed to exert its antiepileptic effect by selectively enhancing the slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Lacosamide is approved in several countries worldwide as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of partial-onset seizures; however, prescribing regulations differ between countries. This article reviews the use of lacosamide as indicated in adults and adolescents (aged 16-18 years) in the EU, where it is approved in this patient population as an adjunctive therapy to other AEDs in the treatment of partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalization. In three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre studies in adults and adolescents (aged 16-18 years) with partial-onset seizures, adjunctive therapy with oral lacosamide (administered for an initial titration period followed by 12 weeks' maintenance therapy) generally reduced the frequency of seizures to a significantly greater extent than placebo, with antiepileptic efficacy sustained following longer-term treatment (up to 8 years) in this patient population. Oral and intravenous lacosamide were generally well tolerated in clinical studies, with the majority of adverse events being mild or moderate in severity. Very common adverse reactions following adjunctive therapy with oral lacosamide included diplopia, dizziness, headache and nausea; the tolerability profile of intravenous lacosamide appeared consistent with that of oral lacosamide, although intravenous administration was associated with local adverse events, such as injection site discomfort or pain, irritation and erythema. Thus, oral and intravenous lacosamide as an adjunctive therapy to other AEDs provides a useful option in the treatment of patients with partial-onset seizures.

  10. Development of lacosamide for the treatment of partial-onset seizures.

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    Doty, Pamela; Hebert, David; Mathy, Francois-Xavier; Byrnes, William; Zackheim, James; Simontacchi, Kelly

    2013-07-01

    Lacosamide is an antiepileptic drug (AED) available in multiple formulations that was first approved in 2008 as adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures (POS) in adults. Unlike traditional sodium channel blockers affecting fast inactivation, lacosamide selectively enhances sodium channel slow inactivation. This mechanism of action results in stabilization of hyperexcitable neuronal membranes, inhibition of neuronal firing, and reduction in long-term channel availability without affecting physiological function. Lacosamide has a well-characterized and favorable pharmacokinetic profile, including a fast absorption rate, minimal or no interaction with cytochrome P-450 izoenzymes, and a low potential for drug-drug interactions. Lacosamide clinical development included three placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trials conducted in more than 1300 patients, each demonstrating safety and efficacy of lacosamide compared to placebo as adjunctive therapy for adults with POS. The clinical use of lacosamide may broaden, pending results of trials evaluating its use as monotherapy for POS in adults, as treatment for epilepsy in pediatric subjects, and as adjunctive treatment for uncontrolled primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures in those with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

  11. Profile of perampanel and its potential in the treatment of partial onset seizures

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    Rheims S

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sylvain Rheims,1,2 Philippe Ryvlin1,21Department of Functional Neurology and Epileptology and Institute for Children and Adolescent with Epilepsy, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France; 2Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, INSERM U1028 / CNRS UMR 5292 Translational and Integrative Group in Epilepsy Research, Lyon, FranceAbstract: Perampanel (PER is a novel antiepileptic compound that decreases neuronal excitability by modulating glutamatergic transmission through selective noncompetitive blockade of AMPA receptors. PER has been evaluated in three pivotal placebo-controlled randomized trials as adjunctive therapy in adult drug-resistant partial epilepsy. In comparison to placebo, adjunctive PER effectively reduces seizure frequency. The relative risk of the responder rate (95% confidence interval [CI] was thus 1.60 (1.08–2.36, 1.79 (1.42–2.25 and 1.66 (1.24–2.23 for once-daily PER 4 mg/day, 8 mg/day and 12 mg/day, respectively. The most common adverse events associated with PER were nonspecific central nervous system side effects. Some concerns have been raised about risk of clinically significant weight gain and of psychiatric adverse events. Long-term open-label extensions of the three pivotal trials are underway. PER has recently been approved both in Europe and in the USA for the adjunctive treatment of partial onset seizures in patients aged 12 years and above. However, in the absence of a direct comparison between PER and other licensed antiepileptic drugs’ efficacy and tolerability, the clinical advantages of PER over the other drugs in intractable partial epilepsy remains to be determined.Keywords: perampanel, epilepsy, antiepileptic drug, partial seizures

  12. Ezogabine: an evaluation of its efficacy and safety as adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures in adults.

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    Yamada, Mikiko; Welty, Timothy E

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamic properties, and clinical application of ezogabine (retigabine, INN), an antiepileptic drug approved in 2011. Published data from in vitro, animal, and clinical studies were obtained from PubMed and CINAHL searches, from January 1980 to March 31, 2012. Other relevant data regarding the safety and efficacy of ezogabine were obtained from the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medication Agency Web sites. Selected articles were prospective in vitro, animal, and controlled clinical studies of ezogabine. Non-English-language articles were excluded. In vitro and animal studies show that ezogabine activates voltagegated potassium channels, leading to reduction of seizure frequency by inhibiting hyperexcitability activity in the central nervous system. Additionally, ezogabine enhances γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) activity and de novo GABA synthesis. Eight clinical studies of ezogabine have been published, 5 being Phase 1 clinical trials in healthy subjects and 3 being Phase 3 clinical trials in patients with pharmaco-resistant partial-onset seizures. Phase 3 clinical trials demonstrated the safety and efficacy of ezogabine in patients with partial-onset seizures. Clinical trials have shown that ezogabine is efficacious as an adjunctive agent in patients with pharmacoresistant partial seizures. Careful monitoring of drug interactions and adverse reactions is necessary. While ezogabine is efficacious for partial seizures, its precise role in the management of patients with epilepsy is yet to be determined.

  13. Clinical efficacy of perampanel for partial-onset and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures

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    Besag FM

    2016-05-01

     mg group, 2.6%–4.4% of the 8 mg group, and 2.6%–6.5% of the 12 mg group. For PGTCS, the median seizure reduction was 76.5% for perampanel and 38.4% for placebo. The 50% responder rate was 64.2% for perampanel and 39.5% for placebo. Seizure freedom during maintenance phase was 30.9% for perampanel and 12.3% for placebo. Adverse effects included dose-dependent increases in the frequency of dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, irritability, falls, and probably nausea.Conclusion: Perampanel is effective in treating both partial-onset seizures and PGTCS.Keywords: perampanel, new antiepileptic drug, epilepsy, primary generalized seizures, pharmacokinetics

  14. Two-year seizure reduction in adults with medically intractable partial onset epilepsy treated with responsive neurostimulation: final results of the RNS System Pivotal trial.

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    Heck, Christianne N; King-Stephens, David; Massey, Andrew D; Nair, Dileep R; Jobst, Barbara C; Barkley, Gregory L; Salanova, Vicenta; Cole, Andrew J; Smith, Michael C; Gwinn, Ryder P; Skidmore, Christopher; Van Ness, Paul C; Bergey, Gregory K; Park, Yong D; Miller, Ian; Geller, Eric; Rutecki, Paul A; Zimmerman, Richard; Spencer, David C; Goldman, Alica; Edwards, Jonathan C; Leiphart, James W; Wharen, Robert E; Fessler, James; Fountain, Nathan B; Worrell, Gregory A; Gross, Robert E; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Duckrow, Robert B; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Bazil, Carl; O'Donovan, Cormac A; Sun, Felice T; Courtney, Tracy A; Seale, Cairn G; Morrell, Martha J

    2014-03-01

    To demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of responsive stimulation at the seizure focus as an adjunctive therapy to reduce the frequency of seizures in adults with medically intractable partial onset seizures arising from one or two seizure foci. Randomized multicenter double-blinded controlled trial of responsive focal cortical stimulation (RNS System). Subjects with medically intractable partial onset seizures from one or two foci were implanted, and 1 month postimplant were randomized 1:1 to active or sham stimulation. After the fifth postimplant month, all subjects received responsive stimulation in an open label period (OLP) to complete 2 years of postimplant follow-up. All 191 subjects were randomized. The percent change in seizures at the end of the blinded period was -37.9% in the active and -17.3% in the sham stimulation group (p = 0.012, Generalized Estimating Equations). The median percent reduction in seizures in the OLP was 44% at 1 year and 53% at 2 years, which represents a progressive and significant improvement with time (p < 0.0001). The serious adverse event rate was not different between subjects receiving active and sham stimulation. Adverse events were consistent with the known risks of an implanted medical device, seizures, and of other epilepsy treatments. There were no adverse effects on neuropsychological function or mood. Responsive stimulation to the seizure focus reduced the frequency of partial-onset seizures acutely, showed improving seizure reduction over time, was well tolerated, and was acceptably safe. The RNS System provides an additional treatment option for patients with medically intractable partial-onset seizures. © 2014 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Perampanel in the management of partial-onset seizures: a review of safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability

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    Schulze-Bonhage A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Schulze-Bonhage, Mandy Hintz Epilepsy Center, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany Abstract: Perampanel (PER is a novel antiepileptic drug recently introduced for the adjunctive treatment in epilepsy patients aged 12 years or older with partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization in the US and Europe. Its antiepileptic action is based on noncompetitive inhibition of postsynaptic AMPA receptors, decreasing excitatory synaptic transmission. Evaluation of efficacy in three placebo-controlled randomized Phase III studies showed that add-on therapy of PER decreased seizure frequencies significantly compared to placebo at daily doses between 4 mg/day and 12 mg/day. PER’s long half-life of 105 hours allows for once-daily dosing that is favorable for patient compliance with intake. Long-term extension studies showed a 62.5%–69.6% adherence of patients after 1 year of treatment, comparing favorably with other second-generation antiepileptic drugs. Whereas these trials demonstrated an overall favorable tolerability profile of PER, nonspecific central nervous system adverse effects like somnolence, dizziness, headache, and fatigue may occur. In addition, neuropsychiatric disturbances ranging from irritability to suicidality were reported in several case reports; both placebo-controlled and prospective long-term extension trials showed a low incidence of such behavioral and psychiatric complaints. For early recognition of neuropsychiatric symptoms like depression, anxiety, and aggression, slow titration and close monitoring during drug introduction are mandatory. This allows on the one hand to recognize patients particularly susceptible to adverse effects of the drug, and on the other hand to render the drug’s full potential of seizure control available for the vast majority of patient groups tolerating the drug well. Keywords: epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs, AMPA receptor, structural epilepsy, partial-onset

  16. Safety and efficacy of levetiracetam for the treatment of partial onset seizures in children from one month of age

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    Cormier J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Justine Cormier, Catherine J ChuMassachusetts General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Programs in Child Neurology and Neurophysiology, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder in the pediatric population, affecting up to one percent of children, and for which the mainstay of treatment is anticonvulsant medication. Despite the frequent use of anticonvulsant drugs, remarkably little is known about the safety and efficacy of most of these medications in the pediatric epilepsy population. Of 34 anticonvulsants currently approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA, only 13 have been approved for use in children. Although infants and young children are disproportionately affected by epilepsy, there are currently only three anticonvulsant medications that have been specifically evaluated and approved for use in children younger than 2 years of age. In 2012, the FDA approved levetiracetam as an adjunctive treatment for partial onset seizures in infants and children from one month of age. Here we review the available data on levetiracetam in the pediatric epilepsy population. We first discuss the pharmacological profile of levetiracetam, including its mechanism of action, formulations and dosing, and pharmacokinetics in children. We then review the available efficacy, safety, and tolerability data in children from one month of age with partial onset seizures. We conclude that the current data leading to the approval of levetiracetam for use in infants and children with partial onset seizures is encouraging, although more work needs to be done before definitive conclusions can be drawn about the efficacy of levetiracetam across different pediatric age groups.Keywords: levetiracetam, anticonvulsant drug, partial seizures, pediatric epilepsy

  17. Clinical utility of adjunctive retigabine in partial onset seizures in adults

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    Rejdak K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Konrad Rejdak1, Jarogniew J Luszczki2,3, Barbara Blaszczyk4, Roman Chwedorowicz5, Stanislaw J Czuczwar2,51Department of Neurology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, 2Department of Pathophysiology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, 3Isobolography Analysis Laboratory, Institute of Agricultural Medicine, Lublin, 4Faculty of Health Sciences, High School of Economics and Law, Kielce, 5Department of Physiopathology, Institute of Agricultural Medicine, Lublin, PolandAbstract: In ~30% of epileptic patients, full seizure control is not possible, which is why the search for novel antiepileptic drugs continues. Retigabine exhibits a mechanism of action that is not shared by the available antiepileptic drugs. This antiepileptic enhances potassium currents via Kv7.2–7.3 channels, which very likely results from destabilization of a closed conformation or stabilization of the open conformation of the channels. Generally, the pharmacokinetics of retigabine are linear and the drug undergoes glucuronidation and acetylation. Results from clinical trials indicate that, in the form of an add-on therapy, retigabine proves an effective drug in refractory epileptic patients. The major adverse effects of the add-on treatment are dizziness, somnolence, and fatigue. This epileptic drug is also considered for other conditions – neuropathic pain, affective disorders, stroke, or even Alzheimer’s disease.Keywords: antiepileptic drugs, epilepsy, seizure control

  18. Safety and efficacy of adjunctive lacosamide among patients with partial-onset seizures in a long-term open-label extension trial of up to 8 years.

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    Rosenfeld, William; Fountain, Nathan B; Kaubrys, Gintaras; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; McShea, Cindy; Isojarvi, Jouko; Doty, Pamela

    2014-12-01

    Long-term (up to 8 years of exposure) safety and efficacy of the antiepileptic drug lacosamide was evaluated in this open-label extension trial (SP615 [ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00552305]). Patients were enrolled following participation in a double-blind trial or one of two open-label trials of adjunctive lacosamide for partial-onset seizures. Dosage adjustments of lacosamide (100-800 mg/day) and/or concomitant antiepileptic drugs were allowed to optimize tolerability and seizure reduction. Of the 370 enrolled patients, 77%, 51%, and 39% had >1, >3, or >5 years of lacosamide exposure, respectively. Median lacosamide modal dose was 400mg/day. Common treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were dizziness (39.7%), headache (20.8%), nausea (17.3%), diplopia (17.0%), fatigue (16.5%), upper respiratory tract infection (16.5%), nasopharyngitis (16.2%), and contusion (15.4%). Dizziness (2.2%) was the only TEAE that led to discontinuation in >2% of patients. Ranges for median percent reductions in seizure frequency were 47-65%, and those for ≥ 50% responder rates were 49-63% for 1-, 3-, and 5-year completer cohorts. Exposure to lacosamide for up to 8 years was generally well tolerated, with a safety profile similar to previous double-blind trials, and efficacy was maintained.

  19. A long-term noninterventional safety study of adjunctive lacosamide therapy in patients with epilepsy and uncontrolled partial-onset seizures.

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    Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Eckhardt, Klaus; Doty, Pamela; De Backer, Marc; Brunnert, Marcus; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    This noninterventional, observational, postauthorization safety study (SP0942, NCT00771927) evaluated the incidence of predefined cardiovascular- (CV) and psychiatric-related treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), in patients with epilepsy and uncontrolled partial-onset seizures, when initiating adjunctive therapy with lacosamide or another approved antiepileptic drug (AED) according to standard medical practice. Active recording of predefined TEAEs of interest took place at three-monthly recommended visits for up to 12months. Of 1004 patients who received at least one dose of adjunctive AEDs, 511 initially added lacosamide therapy, 493 added another AED, 69 were ≥65years of age, and 72 took concomitant antiarrhythmic drugs. Patients in the lacosamide cohort had a higher median frequency of partial-onset seizures (6.0 versus 3.5 per 28days) despite taking more concomitant AEDs (84.9% versus 66.9% took ≥2) at baseline. Patients who added lacosamide took a modal dose of 200mg/day over the treatment period (n=501), and 50.1% (256/511) completed 12months of treatment. Fifty-one point nine percent (256/493) of patients who added another AED completed the study, with the most commonly added AED being levetiracetam (28.4%). Four patients (0.8%) in each cohort, all lacosamide), atrioventricular block first degree (lacosamide), and syncope (other AED) were judged to be treatment-related. Another patient in the other AED cohort reported bradycardia while taking concomitant antiarrhythmic drugs. Predefined psychiatric-related TEAEs were reported by 21 patients (4.1%) in the lacosamide cohort and 27 patients (5.5%) in the other AED cohort. Depression was the most common to be treatment-related (7/11 and 12/18 of patients reporting treatment-related psychiatric TEAEs, respectively). Serious psychiatric-related TEAEs were reported by four patients who added lacosamide (two cases of depression, two of suicide attempt) and one who added another AED (depression). Seven

  20. Retention, dosing, tolerability and patient reported seizure outcome of Zonisamide as only add-on treatment under real-life conditions in adult patients with partial onset seizures: Results of the observational study ZOOM.

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    Hamer, Hajo; Baulac, Michel; McMurray, Rob; Kockelmann, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    Zonisamide is licensed for adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalisation in patients 6 years and older and as monotherapy for the treatment of partial seizures in adult patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy, and shows a favourable pharmacokinetic profile with low interaction potential with other drugs. The aim of the present study was to gather real-life data on retention and modalities of zonisamide use when administered as only add-on treatment to a current AED monotherapy in adult patients with partial-onset seizures. This multicenter observational study was performed in 4 European countries and comprised three visits: baseline, and after 3 and 6 months. Data on patients' retention, reported efficacy, tolerability and safety, and quality of life was collected. Of 100 included patients, 93 could be evaluated. After 6 months, the retention rate of zonisamide add-on therapy was 82.8%. At this time, a reduction of seizure frequency of at least 50% was observed in 79.7% of patients, with 43.6% reporting seizure freedom over the last 3 months of the study period. Adverse events were reported by 19.4% of patients, with fatigue, agitation, dizziness, and headache being most frequent. Approximately 25% of patients were older than 60 years, many of whom suffered from late-onset epilepsy. Compared to younger patients, these patients showed considerable differences with regard to their antiepileptic drug regimen at baseline, and slightly higher responder and retention rates at 6 months. Despite limitations due to the non-interventional open-label design and the low sample size, the results show that zonisamide as only add-on therapy is well retained, indicating effectiveness in the majority of patients under real-life conditions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. A descriptive analysis of drug treatment patterns and burden of illness for pediatric patients diagnosed with partial-onset seizures in the USA

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    Angalakuditi M

    2011-12-01

    comparator CAR cohort. Variation was also observed in brand or generic medication use. LAM and TOP had the highest annual pharmacy costs of all the drugs.Keywords: epilepsy, epidemiology, antiepileptic drugs, partial-onset seizure, pediatrics

  2. Controlling Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

  3. Update on treatment of partial onset epilepsy: role of eslicarbazepine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Rauchenzauner

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Markus Rauchenzauner1,2, Gerhard Luef31Department of Pediatrics IV, Medical University Innsbruck, Austria; 2Neuropediatric Department, Schön Klinik Vogtareuth, Vogtareuth, Germany; 3Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, AustriaAbstract: Partial epilepsy comprises simple partial seizures, complex partial seizures, and secondarily generalized seizures, and covers more than 60% of patients with epilepsy. Antiepileptic drugs are generally considered to be the major therapeutic intervention for epilepsy but, despite a broad range of commonly used antiepileptic drugs, approximately 30% of adult patients and approximately 25% of children with epilepsy have inadequate seizure control. Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL is a novel voltage-gated sodium channel-blocking agent with presumed good safety and efficacy for adjunctive treatment of patients with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. ESL is a prodrug of eslicarbazepine (the active entity responsible for pharmacologic effects, and is rapidly and extensively hydrolyzed during first pass by liver esterases after oral administration. The half-life of eslicarbazepine at steady-state plasma concentrations is 20–24 hours, compatible with once-daily administration. ESL 800 mg and 1200 mg significantly reduces seizure frequency and shows a favorable safety profile in adult patients with drug-resistant partial-onset seizures, as demonstrated in previous Phase II and III trials. In children, ESL showed a clear dose-dependent decrease in seizure frequency with good tolerability. The most commonly reported adverse events associated with ESL are dizziness, somnolence, nausea, diplopia, headache, vomiting, blurred vision, vertigo, and fatigue. In conclusion, these characteristics suggest that ESL might be a valid and well tolerated treatment option for patients with drug-resistant partial-onset epilepsy. The convenience of once-daily dosing and a short, simple titration regimen would be of special

  4. Impact of seizure frequency reduction on health-related quality of life among clinical trial subjects with refractory partial-onset seizures: A pooled analysis of phase III clinical trials of eslicarbazepine acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Fulton F; Bond, T Christopher; Anastassopoulos, Kathryn P; Wang, Xuezhe; Sousa, Rui; Blum, David; Cramer, Joyce A

    2017-03-01

    Subjects who received eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) as adjunctive therapy experienced significantly greater seizure frequency reduction (SFR) than placebo in three phase III, randomized, double-blind trials. This analysis compared changes in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) between treatment responders and non-responders across the pooled, per-protocol population (N=842) using the validated Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory-31 (QOLIE-31). QOLIE-31 scores were calculated for Total Score (TS) and seven subscales; higher scores indicate better HRQOL. Mean changes from baseline were calculated. Analysis of covariance examined least square mean (LSM) differences in final scores between responders (≥50% and ≥75% SFR) and non-responders. Clinical significance was based on established minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs). Mean changes were greater among responders for TS (5.2 versus 1.4 for ≥50% SFR; 7.5 versus 1.9 for ≥75% SFR) and all subscales. Additionally, the percentage of subjects with changes meeting or exceeding MCIDs was higher among responders for TS (48.4% versus 33.9% for ≥50% SFR; 56.9% versus 35.8% for ≥75% SFR) and all subscales. Responders had significantly higher final scores for TS (LSM difference=4.0 for ≥50% SFR; LSM difference=5.7 for ≥75% SFR) and all subscales except emotional well-being at ≥50% SFR. LSM differences exceeded MCIDs at ≥75% SFR for TS and five of seven subscales, and two subscales at ≥50% SFR. In a subgroup analysis with placebo removed, LSM differences were larger overall. In clinical trials of adjunctive ESL, higher levels of SFR were associated with greater improvements in HRQOL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Emerging drugs for partial-onset epilepsy: a review of brivaracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao L

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lan Gao,1 Shuchuen Li2 1Deakin Population Health SRC, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, 2School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia Abstract: There are more than 12 new antiepileptic drugs approved in the last 2 decades. Even with these newer agents, seizure remission is still unachievable in around 30% of patients with partial-onset seizures (POS. Brivaracetam (BRV is chemically related to levetiracetam (LEV and possesses a strong binding affinity for the synaptic vesicle protein 2A tenfold above that of LEV, and other possible modes of antiepileptic actions. BRV is now under Phase III development for POS, but data from one Phase III trial also suggested its potential efficacy for primary generalized seizures. The purpose of this review is to provide updated information on the mechanisms of action of the available antiepileptic drugs, with a focus on BRV to assess its pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability in patients with uncontrolled POS. To date, six Phase IIb and III clinical trials have been performed to investigate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of BRV as an adjunctive treatment for patients with POS. Generally, BRV was well tolerated and did not show significant difference in safety profile, compared to placebo. The efficacy outcomes of BRV, although not consistent across trials, did indicate that BRV was a promising add-on therapy for patients with POS. In conclusion, the many favorable attributes of BRV, like its high oral efficacy, good tolerability, dosing regimen, and minimal drug interaction, make it a promising antiepileptic therapy for patients with uncontrolled partial-onset epilepsy. Keywords: brivaracetam, partial-onset epilepsy, drug-resistant epilepsy, randomized controlled trial, review

  6. Emerging drugs for partial-onset epilepsy: a review of brivaracetam

    OpenAIRE

    Gao L; Li SC

    2016-01-01

    Lan Gao,1 Shuchuen Li2 1Deakin Population Health SRC, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, 2School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia Abstract: There are more than 12 new antiepileptic drugs approved in the last 2 decades. Even with these newer agents, seizure remission is still unachievable in around 30% of patients with partial-onset seizures (POS). Brivaracetam (BRV) is chemically related to levetiracetam (LEV) ...

  7. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  8. New developments in the management of partial-onset epilepsy: role of brivaracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coppola G

    2017-03-01

    mg daily has been extensively assessed in two Phase IIb and four Phase III randomized controlled studies. Long-term extension studies show sustained efficacy of brivaracetam. Overall, the drug is generally well tolerated with only mild-to-moderate side effects. This is true also by intravenous route. Brivaracetam has not yet been evaluated as monotherapy or in comparison with other new anticonvulsant drugs. Keywords: brivaracetam, partial-onset seizures, epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs, adjunctive therapy 

  9. Update on the role of eslicarbazepine acetate in the treatment of partial-onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambucci, Renato; Basti, Claudia; Maresca, Maria; Coppola, Giangennaro; Verrotti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a once daily new third generation antiepileptic drug that shares the basic chemical structure of carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine - a dibenzazepine nucleus with the 5-carboxamide substituent, but is structurally different at the 10,11-position. ESL is a pro-drug metabolized to its major active metabolite eslicarbazepine. Despite the fact that the exact mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated, it is thought to involve inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). ESL inhibits sodium currents in a voltage-dependent way by an interaction predominantly with the inactivated state of the VGSC, thus selectively reducing the activity of rapidly firing (epileptic) neurons. ESL reduces VGSC availability through enhancement of slow inactivation. In Phase III studies, adjunctive therapy with ESL 800 or 1,200 mg/day leads to a significant decrease in the seizure frequency in adults with refractory partial onset epilepsy. Based on these results, ESL has been approved in Europe (by the European Medicines Agency) and in the United States (by the US Food and Drug Administration) as add-on therapy. Data on efficacy and safety have been confirmed by 1-year extension and real life observational studies. Recently, based on results from two randomized, double-blind, historical control Phase III trials, ESL received US Food and Drug Administration approval also as a monotherapy for patients with partial onset epilepsy. In the pediatric setting, encouraging results have been obtained suggesting its potential role in the management of epileptic children. Overall ESL was generally well tolerated. The most common adverse events were dizziness, somnolence, headache, nausea, diplopia, and vomiting. Adverse events can be minimized by appropriate titration. In conclusion, ESL seems to overcome some drawbacks of the previous antiepileptic drugs, suggesting a major role of ESL in the management of focal onset epilepsy for both new onset and

  10. Update on the role of eslicarbazepine acetate in the treatment of partial-onset epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambucci R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Renato Tambucci,1 Claudia Basti,1 Maria Maresca,1 Giangennaro Coppola,2 Alberto Verrotti11Department of Pediatrics, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy; 2Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry Unit, University of Salerno, Salerno, ItalyAbstract: Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL is a once daily new third generation antiepileptic drug that shares the basic chemical structure of carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine – a dibenzazepine nucleus with the 5-carboxamide substituent, but is structurally different at the 10,11-position. ESL is a pro-drug metabolized to its major active metabolite eslicarbazepine. Despite the fact that the exact mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated, it is thought to involve inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC. ESL inhibits sodium currents in a voltage-dependent way by an interaction predominantly with the inactivated state of the VGSC, thus selectively reducing the activity of rapidly firing (epileptic neurons. ESL reduces VGSC availability through enhancement of slow inactivation. In Phase III studies, adjunctive therapy with ESL 800 or 1,200 mg/day leads to a significant decrease in the seizure frequency in adults with refractory partial onset epilepsy. Based on these results, ESL has been approved in Europe (by the European Medicines Agency and in the United States (by the US Food and Drug Administration as add-on therapy. Data on efficacy and safety have been confirmed by 1-year extension and real life observational studies. Recently, based on results from two randomized, double-blind, historical control Phase III trials, ESL received US Food and Drug Administration approval also as a monotherapy for patients with partial onset epilepsy. In the pediatric setting, encouraging results have been obtained suggesting its potential role in the management of epileptic children. Overall ESL was generally well tolerated. The most common adverse events were dizziness, somnolence, headache, nausea

  11. The effects of glycemic control on seizures and seizure-induced excitotoxic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schauwecker Paula

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder after stroke, affecting more than 50 million persons worldwide. Metabolic disturbances are often associated with epileptic seizures, but the pathogenesis of this relationship is poorly understood. It is known that seizures result in altered glucose metabolism, the reduction of intracellular energy metabolites such as ATP, ADP and phosphocreatine and the accumulation of metabolic intermediates, such as lactate and adenosine. In particular, it has been suggested that the duration and extent of glucose dysregulation may be a predictor of the pathological outcome of status. However, little is known about neither the effects of glycemic control on brain metabolism nor the effects of managing systemic glucose concentrations in epilepsy. Results In this study, we examined glycemic modulation of kainate-induced seizure sensitivity and its neuropathological consequences. To investigate the relationship between glycemic modulation, seizure susceptibility and its neuropathological consequences, C57BL/6 mice (excitotoxin cell death resistant were subjected to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, followed by systemic administration of kainic acid to induce seizures. Glycemic modulation resulted in minimal consequences with regard to seizure severity but increased hippocampal pathology, irrespective of whether mice were hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic prior to kainate administration. Moreover, we found that exogenous administration of glucose following kainic acid seizures significantly reduced the extent of hippocampal pathology in FVB/N mice (excitotoxin cell death susceptible following systemic administration of kainic acid. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that modulation of the glycemic index can modify the outcome of brain injury in the kainate model of seizure induction. Moreover, modulation of the glycemic index through glucose rescue greatly diminishes the extent of seizure

  12. Postoperative seizure control in patients with tumor-associated epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Andrew; Morokoff, Andrew; O'Brien, Terence John; Kwan, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    The patterns of postoperative seizure control and response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in tumor-associated epilepsy (TAE) are poorly understood. We aim to document these characteristics in patients with supratentorial gliomas. This was a retrospective analysis of 186 patients with supratentorial gliomas. Seizure patterns were classified into four groups: A, no postoperative seizure; B, early postoperative seizure control within 6 months; C, fluctuating seizure control; and D, never seizure-free. Rates and duration of seizure freedom, subsequent seizure relapse, and response to AED were analyzed. Among patients included, 49 (26.3%) had grade II, 28 (15.1%) had grade III, and 109 (58.6%) had grade IV glioma. Outcome pattern A was observed in 95 (51.1%), B in 22 (11.8%), C in 45 (24.2%), and D in 24 (12.9%). One hundred nineteen patients had at least one seizure and were classified as having TAE. Compared to pattern A, pattern B was predicted by histologic progression; pattern C by tumor grade, preoperative seizure, and histologic progression, and pattern D by preoperative seizure and gross total resection. Among patients with TAE, 57.5% of grade II, 68.2% of grade III, and 26.3% of grade IV experienced a period of 12-month seizure freedom. After first 12-month seizure remission, 39.1%, 60.0%, and 13.3% of grade II, III, and IV gliomas, respectively, experienced subsequent seizure; 22.6% of those with TAE reached terminal seizure freedom of at least 12 months on their first postoperative AED regimen, 6.5% on their second regimen, and 5.4% on subsequent regimens. Distinct patterns of postoperative seizure control exist in gliomas; they have specific risk factor profiles, and we hypothesize these correspond to unique pathogenic mechanisms. Twelve-month seizure freedom with subsequent relapse is frequent in grade II-III gliomas. Response to AEDs is markedly poorer than with non-TAE, highlighting the complex epileptogenicity of gliomas. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016

  13. Zinc status in febrile seizure: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehiomran, Mohammad Reza; Mahzari, Masoumeh

    2013-01-01

    Febrile seizure is the most common type of seizure in children. Their incidence is 2-5%. There are different hypotheses about relationship between neurotransmitters and trace elements (such as zinc) and febrile seizure. Zinc, as a major element of some enzymes, plays an important role in the central nervous system (CNS) and can affect some inhibitory mechanisms of CNS. The aim of the present study was to determine whether there were any changes in serum zinc level in children with febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure. This case-control study was performed on 100 patients aged 6 months to 6 years. This study was conducted between January and August 2012, on 50 children with febrile seizures (case) and 50 febrile children without seizures (control), that were referred to Amirkola Children Hospital (a referral hospital in the north of Iran). Two groups were matched for age and sex. The serum zinc levels in the both groups were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. The mean serum zinc level was 0.585±0.166 mg/L and 0.704±0.179 mg/L in the case group and the control group, respectively (p=0.001). The mean serum zinc level was significantly lower in the febrile seizure group compared to the control groups. Our findings revealed that serum zinc level was significantly lower in children with simple febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure. It can emphasize the hypothesis that there is a relation between serum zinc level and febrile seizure in children.

  14. Ketogenic diet: Predictors of seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Arkilo, Dimitrios; Farooq, Osman; Gillogly, Cynthia; Kavak, Katelyn S; Weinstock, Arie

    2017-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is an effective non-pharmacologic treatment for medically resistant epilepsy. The aim of this study was to identify any predictors that may influence the response of ketogenic diet. A retrospective chart review for all patients with medically resistant epilepsy was performed at a tertiary care epilepsy center from 1996 to 2012. Patient- and diet-related variables were evaluated with respect to seizure reduction at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12-month intervals and divided into four possible outcome classes. Sixty-three patients met inclusion. Thirty-seven (59%) reported >50% seizure reduction at 3 months with 44% and 37% patients benefiting at 6-month and 12-month follow up, respectively. A trend toward significant seizure improvement was noted in 48% patients with seizure onset >1 year at 12-month (p = 0.09) interval and in 62% patients with >10 seizure/day at 6-month interval (p = 0.054). An ordinal logistic regression showed later age of seizure to have higher odds of favorable response at 1-month (p = 0.005) and 3-month (p = 0.013) follow up. Patients with non-fasting diet induction were more likely to have a favorable outcome at 6 months (p = 0.008) as do females (p = 0.037) and those treated with higher fat ratio diet (p = 0.034). Our study reports the effectiveness of ketogenic diet in children with medically resistant epilepsy. Later age of seizure onset, female gender, higher ketogenic diet ratio and non-fasting induction were associated with better odds of improved seizure outcome. A larger cohort is required to confirm these findings.

  15. Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have warning symptoms before the attack, such as: Fear or anxiety Nausea Vertigo (feeling as if you are spinning or moving) Visual symptoms (such as flashing bright lights, spots, or wavy lines before the eyes) Causes Seizures of all types are caused by disorganized and sudden electrical activity ...

  16. Risk Factors for Preoperative Seizures and Loss of Seizure Control in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Adela; Weingart, Jon D; Gallia, Gary L; Lim, Michael; Brem, Henry; Bettegowda, Chetan; Chaichana, Kaisorn L

    2017-08-01

    Metastatic brain tumors are the most common brain tumors in adults. Patients with metastatic brain tumors have poor prognoses with median survival of 6-12 months. Seizures are a major presenting symptom and cause of morbidity and mortality. In this article, risk factors for the onset of preoperative seizures and postoperative seizure control are examined. Adult patients who underwent resection of one or more brain metastases at a single institution between 1998 and 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Of 565 patients, 114 (20.2%) patients presented with seizures. Factors independently associated with preoperative seizures were preoperative headaches (P = 0.044), cognitive deficits (P = 0.031), more than 2 intracranial metastatic tumors (P = 0.013), temporal lobe location (P = 0.031), occipital lobe location (P = 0.010), and bone involvement by tumor (P = 0.029). Factors independently associated with loss of seizure control after surgical resection were preoperative seizures (P = 0.001), temporal lobe location (P = 0.037), lack of postoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.010), subtotal resection of tumor (P = 0.022), and local recurrence (P = 0.027). At last follow-up, the majority of patients (93.8%) were seizure-free. Thirty patients (5.30%) in total had loss of seizure control, and only 8 patients (1.41%) who did not have preoperative seizures presented with new-onset seizures after surgical resection of their metastases. The brain is a common site for metastases from numerous primary cancers, such as breast and lung. The identification of factors associated with onset of preoperative seizures as well as seizure control postoperatively could aid management strategies for patients with metastatic brain tumors. Patients with preoperative seizures who underwent resection tended to have good seizure control after surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-term treatment with responsive brain stimulation in adults with refractory partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergey, Gregory K; Morrell, Martha J; Mizrahi, Eli M; Goldman, Alica; King-Stephens, David; Nair, Dileep; Srinivasan, Shraddha; Jobst, Barbara; Gross, Robert E; Shields, Donald C; Barkley, Gregory; Salanova, Vicenta; Olejniczak, Piotr; Cole, Andrew; Cash, Sydney S; Noe, Katherine; Wharen, Robert; Worrell, Gregory; Murro, Anthony M; Edwards, Jonathan; Duchowny, Michael; Spencer, David; Smith, Michael; Geller, Eric; Gwinn, Ryder; Skidmore, Christopher; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Berg, Michel; Heck, Christianne; Van Ness, Paul; Fountain, Nathan; Rutecki, Paul; Massey, Andrew; O'Donovan, Cormac; Labar, Douglas; Duckrow, Robert B; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Courtney, Tracy; Sun, Felice T; Seale, Cairn G

    2015-02-24

    The long-term efficacy and safety of responsive direct neurostimulation was assessed in adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures. All participants were treated with a cranially implanted responsive neurostimulator that delivers stimulation to 1 or 2 seizure foci via chronically implanted electrodes when specific electrocorticographic patterns are detected (RNS System). Participants had completed a 2-year primarily open-label safety study (n = 65) or a 2-year randomized blinded controlled safety and efficacy study (n = 191); 230 participants transitioned into an ongoing 7-year study to assess safety and efficacy. The average participant was 34 (±11.4) years old with epilepsy for 19.6 (±11.4) years. The median preimplant frequency of disabling partial or generalized tonic-clonic seizures was 10.2 seizures a month. The median percent seizure reduction in the randomized blinded controlled trial was 44% at 1 year and 53% at 2 years (p < 0.0001, generalized estimating equation) and ranged from 48% to 66% over postimplant years 3 through 6 in the long-term study. Improvements in quality of life were maintained (p < 0.05). The most common serious device-related adverse events over the mean 5.4 years of follow-up were implant site infection (9.0%) involving soft tissue and neurostimulator explantation (4.7%). The RNS System is the first direct brain responsive neurostimulator. Acute and sustained efficacy and safety were demonstrated in adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures arising from 1 or 2 foci over a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. This experience supports the RNS System as a treatment option for refractory partial seizures. This study provides Class IV evidence that for adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures, responsive direct cortical stimulation reduces seizures and improves quality of life over a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Malignant migrating partial seizures of infancy controlled by stiripentol and clonazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdariu, Dana; Delanoë, Catherine; Mahfoufi, Nora; Bellavoine, Vanina; Auvin, Stéphane

    2013-02-01

    The syndrome of malignant migrating partial seizures of infancy (MMPSI) is characterized by early onset of multiple seizure types and overall poor prognosis. Seizures are markedly drug resistant and few reports have suggested the efficacy of some antiepileptic drugs. We report one case of MMPSI in which prolonged seizure control is obtained with an association of clonazepam, levetiracetam and stiripentol, confirming thus the possibility of complete sustained seizure control in this epileptic syndrome. Of more than 60 cases reported to date, ours is the forth in which sustained complete control of seizures was obtained.

  19. Lacosamide for the prevention of partial onset seizures in epileptic adults

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kelemen; Péter Halász

    2010-01-01

    Anna Kelemen1, Péter Halász21National Institute of Neurosciences, Epilepsy Center, Budapest, Hungary; 2Faculty of Information Technology, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest, Hungary Abstract: Lacosamide is a newly registered antiepileptic drug with dual mechanisms of action. It selectively enhances slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels, resulting in stabilization of hyperexcitable neuronal membranes and inhibition of...

  20. Mozart K.448 listening decreased seizure recurrence and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Lee, Mei-Wen; Wei, Ruey-Chang; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2014-01-13

    Increasing numbers of reports show the beneficial effects of listening to Mozart music in decreasing epileptiform discharges as well as seizure frequency in epileptic children. There has been no effective method to reduce seizure recurrence after the first unprovoked seizure until now. In this study, we investigated the effect of listening to Mozart K.448 in reducing the seizure recurrence rate in children with first unprovoked seizures. Forty-eight children who experienced their first unprovoked seizure with epileptiform discharges were included in the study. They were randomly placed into treatment (n = 24) and control (n = 24) groups. Children in the treatment group listened to Mozart K.448 daily before bedtime for at least six months. Two patients in the treatment group were excluded from analysis due to discontinuation intervention. Finally, forty-six patients were analyzed. Most of these patients (89.1%) were idiopathic in etiology. Seizure recurrence rates and reduction of epileptiform discharges were compared. The average follow-up durations in the treatment and control groups were 18.6 ± 6.6 and 20.1 ± 5.1 months, respectively. The seizure recurrence rate was estimated to be significantly lower in the treatment group than the control group over 24 months (37.2% vs. 76.8%, p = 0.0109). Significant decreases in epileptiform discharges were also observed after 1, 2, and 6 months of listening to Mozart K.448 when compared with EEGs before listening to music. There were no significant differences in gender, mentality, seizure type, and etiology between the recurrence and non-recurrence groups. Although the case number was limited and control music was not performed in this study, the study revealed that listening to Mozart K.448 reduced the seizure recurrence rate and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures, especially of idiopathic etiology. We believe that Mozart K.448 could be a promising alternative treatment in patients with

  1. Intermittent fasting: a "new" historical strategy for controlling seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam L; Rubenstein, James E; Kossoff, Eric H

    2013-05-01

    In antiquity, fasting was a treatment for epilepsy and a rationale for the ketogenic diet (KD). Preclinical data indicate the KD and intermittent fasting do not share identical anticonvulsant mechanisms. We implemented an intermittent fasting regimen in six children with an incomplete response to a KD. Three patients adhered to the combined intermittent fasting/KD regimen for 2 months and four had transient improvement in seizure control, albeit with some hunger-related adverse reactions.

  2. Absence seizure control by a brain computer interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maksimenko, V.A.; Heukelum, S. van; Makarov, V.V.; Kelderhuis, J.; Lüttjohann, A.; Koronovskii, A.A.; Hramov, A.E.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2017-01-01

    The ultimate goal of epileptology is the complete abolishment of epileptic seizures. This might be achieved by a system that predicts seizure onset combined with a system that interferes with the process that leads to the onset of a seizure. Seizure prediction remains, as of yet, unresolved in

  3. Prediction of efficacy for conversion from adjunctive therapy to monotherapy with eslicarbazepine acetate 800 mg once daily for partial-onset epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkaraneni, Soujanya; Passarell, Julie A; Ludwig, Elizabeth A; Fiedler-Kelly, Jill; Pitner, Janet K; Grinnell, Todd A; Blum, David

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a once-daily (QD) oral antiepileptic drug (AED) indicated for partial-onset seizures (POS). Clinical studies of gradual conversion to ESL 1,200 and 1,600 mg QD monotherapies were previously conducted in patients with POS who were not well-controlled by 1 or 2 AEDs. This report describes modeling and simulation of plasma eslicarbazepine (primary active metabolite of ESL) concentrations and time to monotherapy study exit to predict efficacy for conversion to ESL monotherapy at a lower dose of 800 mg, as an option for patients requiring or not tolerating higher doses since this regimen is effective in adjunctive therapy for POS. Patients and methods A previously developed population pharmacokinetic model for ESL monotherapy was used to predict minimum plasma eslicarbazepine concentration (Cmin) in 1,500 virtual patients taking 1 (n=1,000) or 2 (n=500) AEDs at baseline, treated with ESL 400 mg QD for 1 week, followed by 800 mg QD for 17 weeks (similar to ESL monotherapy trials where the other AEDs were withdrawn during the first 6 weeks following titration to the randomized ESL dose). Model-predicted Cmin as a time-varying covariate and number of baseline AEDs were used to determine the weekly probability of each patient meeting exit criteria (65.3% threshold) indicative of worsening seizure control in 500 simulated ESL monotherapy trials. A previously developed extended Cox proportional hazards exposure–response model was used to relate time-varying eslicarbazepine exposure to the time to study exit. Results For virtual patients receiving ESL monotherapy (800 mg QD), the 95% upper prediction limit for exit rate at 112 days of 34.9% in patients taking 1 AED at baseline was well below the 65.3% threshold from historical control trials, while the estimate for patients taking 2 AEDs (70.6%) was slightly above the historical control threshold. Conclusion This model-based assessment supports conversion to ESL 800 mg QD monotherapy

  4. High-fat diets and seizure control in myoclonic-astatic epilepsy: a single center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard-Tremblay, Elisabeth; Berry, Patricia; Owens, Aaron; Cook, William Byron; Sittner, Haley R; Mazzanti, Marta; Huber, Jennifer; Warner, Molly; Shurtleff, Hillary; Saneto, Russell P

    2015-02-01

    To determine the efficacy of the Modified Atkins Diet (MAD) and Ketogenic Diet (KD) in seizure control within a population of myoclonic-astatic epilepsy (MAE) patients. This was a retrospective, single center study evaluating the seizure control by high fat diets. Seizure diaries kept by the parents performed seizure counts. All patients met the clinical criteria for MAE. Nine patients met the clinical criteria. We found that both the MAD and KD were efficacious in complete seizure control and allowed other medications to be stopped in seven patients. Two patients had greater than 90% seizure control without medications, one on the KD and the other on the MAD. Seizure freedom has ranged from 13 to 36 months, and during this time four patients have been fully weaned off of diet management. One patient was found to have a mutation in SLC2A1. Our results suggest that strictly defined MAE patients respond to the MAD with prolonged seizure control. Some patients may require the KD for seizure freedom, suggesting a common pathway of increased requirement for fats. Once controlled, those fully responsive to the Diet(s) could be weaned off traditional seizure medications and in many, subsequently off the MAD or KD. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Onset of action and seizure control in Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome: focus on rufinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saneto, Russell P; Anderson, Gail D

    2009-04-01

    Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome is an electroclinical epilepsy syndrome characterized by the triad of electroencephalogram showing diffuse slow spike-and-wave discharges and paroxysmal fast activity, multiple intractable seizure types, and cognitive impairment. The intractability to seizure medications and cognitive impairment gives rise to eventual institutionalized patient care. Only a small subset of seizure medications has been shown to be helpful in seizure control. Most patients take up to 3 medications at high therapeutic dosing and are susceptible to medication-induced side effects. The lack of medication efficacy in seizure control has led one meta-analysis to conclude that there is no single medication that is highly efficacious in controlling seizures in this syndrome. On this background, a new and structurally novel seizure medication, rufinamide, has been found to be beneficial in the treatment of seizures in this syndrome. In a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study, rufinamide was found to reduce seizures by over 30%. More importantly, it reduced the frequency of the seizure type that induces most of the morbidity of this syndrome, the drop seizure, by over 40%. There were few side effects, the medication was well tolerated, and in the open labeled extension study, tolerance was not found. In this review, we describe the main electroclinical features of Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome and summarize the few controlled studies that have contributed to its rational treatment. Currently, there is no single agent or combination of agents that effectively treat the multiple seizure types and co-morbidities in this syndrome. Our focus will be on the role of the new medication rufinamide in seizure reduction in patients with Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome.

  6. Onset of action and seizure control in Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome: focus on rufinamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell P Saneto

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Russell P Saneto1, Gail D Anderson21Division of Pediatric Neurology, Seattle Children’s Hospital/University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USAAbstract: Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome is an electroclinical epilepsy syndrome characterized by the triad of electroencephalogram showing diffuse slow spike-and-wave discharges and paroxysmal fast activity, multiple intractable seizure types, and cognitive impairment. The intractability to seizure medications and cognitive impairment gives rise to eventual institutionalized patient care. Only a small subset of seizure medications has been shown to be helpful in seizure control. Most patients take up to 3 medications at high therapeutic dosing and are susceptible to medication-induced side effects. The lack of medication efficacy in seizure control has led one meta-analysis to conclude that there is no single medication that is highly efficacious in controlling seizures in this syndrome. On this background, a new and structurally novel seizure medication, rufinamide, has been found to be beneficial in the treatment of seizures in this syndrome. In a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study, rufinamide was found to reduce seizures by over 30%. More importantly, it reduced the frequency of the seizure type that induces most of the morbidity of this syndrome, the drop seizure, by over 40%. There were few side effects, the medication was well tolerated, and in the open labeled extension study, tolerance was not found. In this review, we describe the main electroclinical features of Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome and summarize the few controlled studies that have contributed to its rational treatment. Currently, there is no single agent or combination of agents that effectively treat the multiple seizure types and co-morbidities in this syndrome. Our focus will be on the role of the new medication rufinamide in

  7. Ki-67 overexpression in WHO grade II gliomas is associated with poor postoperative seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Xiang, Wang; Yanhui, Liu; Ruofei, Liang; Shuang, Liu; Yingjun, Fan; Qiao, Zhou; Yanwu, Yang; Qing, Mao

    2013-12-01

    Seizures are the most common initial symptom in patients with low-grade gliomas, and approximately 30% of these patients still suffer from epilepsy after gross-total resection of the tumour. We examined the relationship between the overexpression of ki-67 in WHO grade II gliomas and seizure control. A series of 93 histologically confirmed WHO grade II glioma tissues were analysed through immunohistochemical staining for ki-67 expression. Follow-up visits regarding seizure control were scheduled at 12 months. The Engel classification was used to categorise patients' seizure status. Of the 93 patients analysed, 65 (66.3%) patients initially presented with seizures. A total of 36 patients were diagnosed with WHO grade II oligodendrogliomas, 29 patients had oligoastrocytomas and 28 patients had astrocytomas. Ki-67 was over-expressed in 15 patients. One year after surgery poor seizure control was observed in 11 of these patients. In contrast, low ki-67 expression (seizure control was observed in 36 patients (difference between ki-67 over- and low expression groups P = 0.002). Logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with gross-total resection achieved better seizure control while ki-67 overexpression and age below 38 years were poor seizure control factors explained of the variance of seizure outcome (OR: 0.382, 4.354 and 1.822, respectively). In WHO grade II gliomas, Ki-67 is a molecular marker which predicts poor seizure control of glioma patients after the resection of the tumour. Gross-total resection, ki-67 overexpression and age below 38 years significantly affect seizure prognosis. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Failure of antiepileptic drugs in controlling seizures in epilepsy: What do we do next?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahyan Galindo-Mendez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Medically intractable epilepsy is a clinical condition of concern that arises when a patient with epilepsy suffers seizures, despite a trial of two or more antiepileptic drugs (AEDs suitable for the type of epilepsy that are prescribed at maximum tolerated doses, does not achieve control of seizures. This diagnosis could be related to cortical dysplasias. We report the case of a 5-year-old girl with a previous normal neurological development and no family history of epilepsy who presented with focal-type seizures at age 4. She started treatment by taking different AEDs for seizure control. She continued having frequent seizures that sometimes progressed to generalized seizures and status epilepticus. After a focal cortical resection performed in the area where interictal spikes were detected, the pathology confirmed a type IIb cortical dysplasia as the cause of the epilepsy. This article discusses cortical dysplasias as a cause of pharmacoresistant epilepsy and its treatment.

  9. Will seizure control improve by switching from the modified Atkins diet to the traditional ketogenic diet?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kossoff, Eric H; Bosarge, Jennifer L; Miranda, Maria J

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that children can maintain seizure control when the ketogenic diet (KD) is transitioned to the less-restrictive modified Atkins diet (MAD). What is unknown, however, is the likelihood of additional seizure control from a switch from the MAD to the KD. Retrospective informatio...

  10. Seizure control following radiotherapy in patients with diffuse gliomas: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudà, Roberta; Magliola, Umberto; Bertero, Luca; Trevisan, Elisa; Bosa, Chiara; Mantovani, Cristina; Ricardi, Umberto; Castiglione, Anna; Monagheddu, Chiara; Soffietti, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Background Little information is available regarding the effect of conventional radiotherapy on glioma-related seizures. Methods In this retrospective study, we analyzed the seizure response and outcome following conventional radiotherapy in a cohort of 43 patients with glioma (33 grade II, 10 grade III) and medically intractable epilepsy. Results At 3 months after radiotherapy, seizure reduction was significant (≥50% reduction of frequency compared with baseline) in 31/43 patients (72%) of the whole series and in 25/33 patients (76%) with grade II gliomas, whereas at 12 months seizure reduction was significant in 26/34 (76%) and in 19/25 (76%) patients, respectively. Seizure reduction was observed more often among patients displaying an objective tumor response on MRI, but patients with no change on MRI also had a significant seizure reduction. Seizure freedom (Engel class I) was achieved at 12 months in 32% of all patients and in 38% of patients with grade II tumors. Timing of radiotherapy and duration of seizures prior to radiotherapy were significantly associated with seizure reduction. Conclusions This study showed that a high proportion of patients with medically intractable epilepsy from diffuse gliomas derive a significant and durable benefit from radiotherapy in terms of epilepsy control and that this positive effect is not strictly associated with tumor shrinkage as shown on MRI. Radiotherapy at tumor progression seems as effective as early radiotherapy after surgery. Prospective studies must confirm and better characterize the response to radiotherapy. PMID:23897633

  11. Will seizure control improve by switching from the modified Atkins diet to the traditional ketogenic diet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossoff, Eric H; Bosarge, Jennifer L; Miranda, Maria J; Wiemer-Kruel, Adelheid; Kang, Hoon Chul; Kim, Heung Dong

    2010-12-01

    It has been reported that children can maintain seizure control when the ketogenic diet (KD) is transitioned to the less-restrictive modified Atkins diet (MAD). What is unknown, however, is the likelihood of additional seizure control from a switch from the MAD to the KD. Retrospective information was obtained from 27 patients who made this dietary change from four different institutions. Ten (37%) patients had ≥10% additional seizure reduction with the KD over the MAD, of which five became seizure-free. The five children who did not improve on the MAD failed to improve when transitioned to the KD. A higher incidence of improvement with the KD occurred for those with myoclonic-astatic epilepsy (70% vs. 12% for all other etiologies, p = 0.004), including all who became seizure-free. These results suggest that the KD probably represents a "higher dose" of dietary therapy than the MAD, which may particularly benefit those with myoclonic-astatic epilepsy.

  12. Mozart K.448 listening decreased seizure recurrence and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures: a randomized controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Lee, Mei-Wen; Wei, Ruey-Chang; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of reports show the beneficial effects of listening to Mozart music in decreasing epileptiform discharges as well as seizure frequency in epileptic children. There has been no effective method to reduce seizure recurrence after the first unprovoked seizure until now. In this study, we investigated the effect of listening to Mozart K.448 in reducing the seizure recurrence rate in children with first unprovoked seizures. Methods Forty-eight children who experienced...

  13. Correlation of Serum Zinc Level with Simple Febrile Seizures: A Hospital based Prospective Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Gattoo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Febrile seizures are one of the most common neurological conditions of childhood. It seems that zinc deficiency is associated with increased risk of febrile seizures.Aim: To estimate the serum Zinc level in children with simple Febrile seizures and to find the correlation between serum zinc level and simple Febrile seizures.Materials and Methods: The proposed study was a hospital based prospective case control study which included infants and children aged between 6 months to 5 years, at Post Graduate Department of Pediatrics, (SMGS Hospital, GMC Jammu, northern India. A total of 200 infants and children fulfilling the inclusion criteria were included. Patients were divided into 100(cases in Group A with simple febrile seizure and 100(controls in Group B of children with acute febrile illness without seizure. All patients were subjected to detailed history and thorough clinical examination followed by relevant investigations.Results: Our study had slight male prepondance of 62% in cases and 58% in controls . Mean serum zinc level in cases was 61.53±15.87 ugm/dl and in controls it was 71.90+18.50 ugm/dl .Serum zinc level was found significantly low in cases of simple febrile seizures as compaired to controls ,with p value of

  14. Prediction of efficacy for conversion from adjunctive therapy to monotherapy with eslicarbazepine acetate 800 mg once daily for partial-onset epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunkaraneni S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Soujanya Sunkaraneni,1 Julie A Passarell,2 Elizabeth A Ludwig,2 Jill Fiedler-Kelly,2 Janet K Pitner,1 Todd A Grinnell,1 David Blum1 1Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc., Marlborough, MA, USA; 2Cognigen Corporation (a SimulationsPlus company, Buffalo, NY, USA Purpose: Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL is a once-daily (QD oral antiepileptic drug (AED indicated for partial-onset seizures (POS. Clinical studies of gradual conversion to ESL 1,200 and 1,600 mg QD monotherapies were previously conducted in patients with POS who were not well-controlled by 1 or 2 AEDs. This report describes modeling and simulation of plasma eslicarbazepine (primary active metabolite of ESL concentrations and time to monotherapy study exit to predict efficacy for conversion to ESL monotherapy at a lower dose of 800 mg, as an option for patients requiring or not tolerating higher doses since this regimen is effective in adjunctive therapy for POS. Patients and methods: A previously developed population pharmacokinetic model for ESL monotherapy was used to predict minimum plasma eslicarbazepine concentration (Cmin in 1,500 virtual patients taking 1 (n=1,000 or 2 (n=500 AEDs at baseline, treated with ESL 400 mg QD for 1 week, followed by 800 mg QD for 17 weeks (similar to ESL monotherapy trials where the other AEDs were withdrawn during the first 6 weeks following titration to the randomized ESL dose. Model-predicted Cmin as a time-varying covariate and number of baseline AEDs were used to determine the weekly probability of each patient meeting exit criteria (65.3% threshold indicative of worsening seizure control in 500 simulated ESL monotherapy trials. A previously developed extended Cox proportional hazards exposure–response model was used to relate time-varying eslicarbazepine exposure to the time to study exit. Results: For virtual patients receiving ESL monotherapy (800 mg QD, the 95% upper prediction limit for exit rate at 112 days of 34.9% in patients taking 1

  15. Self-esteem, social support perception and seizure controllability perception in adolescents with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália F. Siqueira

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Compare the self-esteem of adolescents with epilepsy and adolescents without epilepsy and relate it to social support and seizure controllability perception. METHOD: The study sample consisted: case participants (34 subjects attending the pediatric epilepsy clinic of University Hospital and control participants (30 subjects from public schools in Campinas-SP. The instruments utilized were: identification card with demographic and epilepsy data, a semi-structured interview on aspects of the disease, and a Self-Esteem Multidimensional Scale. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between the two groups but majority of adolescents with epilepsy presented higher self esteem rate, have knowledge about epilepsy, presented high levels of social support and seizure controllability perception. There was no significant relationship between social support and seizure controllability perception with self-esteem. CONCLUSION: Knowledge about epilepsy, social support such good controllability seizure perception seem are important contingencies for a better evaluation of self esteem in adolescents with epilepsy.

  16. Seizure Control in a Computational Model Using a Reinforcement Learning Stimulation Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Vivek; Lamperski, Andrew; Netoff, Theoden I

    2016-11-02

    Neuromodulation technologies such as vagus nerve stimulation and deep brain stimulation, have shown some efficacy in controlling seizures in medically intractable patients. However, inherent patient-to-patient variability of seizure disorders leads to a wide range of therapeutic efficacy. A patient specific approach to determining stimulation parameters may lead to increased therapeutic efficacy while minimizing stimulation energy and side effects. This paper presents a reinforcement learning algorithm that optimizes stimulation frequency for controlling seizures with minimum stimulation energy. We apply our method to a computational model called the epileptor. The epileptor model simulates inter-ictal and ictal local field potential data. In order to apply reinforcement learning to the Epileptor, we introduce a specialized reward function and state-space discretization. With the reward function and discretization fixed, we test the effectiveness of the temporal difference reinforcement learning algorithm (TD(0)). For periodic pulsatile stimulation, we derive a relation that describes, for any stimulation frequency, the minimal pulse amplitude required to suppress seizures. The TD(0) algorithm is able to identify parameters that control seizures quickly. Additionally, our results show that the TD(0) algorithm refines the stimulation frequency to minimize stimulation energy thereby converging to optimal parameters reliably. An advantage of the TD(0) algorithm is that it is adaptive so that the parameters necessary to control the seizures can change over time. We show that the algorithm can converge on the optimal solution in simulation with slow and fast inter-seizure intervals.

  17. Comparative Study of Intranasal Midazolam and Intravenous Benzodiazepines in Control of Seizures in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janki Panchal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Seizures are very common in pediatric patients. As duration of seizures impacts morbidity and mortality to child’s life, control of seizures should be achieved as early as possible, preferably at home. Rectal diazepam and intranasal midazolam are available methods for control of seizures and can be learnt by parents. Methods: We assessed safety and efficacy of intranasal midazolam for control of seizures and also compared its effect with other benzodiazepines given by intravenous route. Results: Among 84 patients, success rate of treatment with Midazolam (intranasal was 45.5% and success rate with Benzodiazepines (intravenous was 90%. The difference is statistically significant. In present study, average time recorded to give drug after arrival at hospital in IN Midazolam group was 0.379 min, where as it was 1.598 min in IV Benzodiazepine group. Average time for cessation of seizures after giving drug was 3.001 min in IN Midazolam group, where as it was 1.009 min in IV Benzodiazepine group. Conclusion: Intra-venous route for control of seizures is most effective compare to Inta-nasal Midazolam. However intranasal Midazolam can be use full when IV access is not available at home or during transport of patient to health care centre. [Natl J of Med Res 2013; 3(1.000: 30-33

  18. A randomized controlled trial of intranasal-midazolam versus intravenous-diazepam for acute childhood seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakker, Arpita; Shanbag, Preeti

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the safety and efficacy of midazolam given intranasally with diazepam given intravenously in the treatment of acute childhood seizures. A randomized controlled study was conducted in a pediatric emergency department in a tertiary general hospital. Fifty children aged from 1 month to 12 years presenting with acute seizures of at least 10 min duration were enrolled during a 12 month period. Intranasal midazolam (0.2 mg/kg) and intravenous diazepam (0.3 mg/kg) were administered. The main outcome measures were interval between arrival at hospital and starting treatment and interval between arrival at hospital and cessation of seizures. Intranasal midazolam and intravenous diazepam were equally effective. Overall 18 of 27 seizures were controlled with midazolam and 15 of 23 with diazepam. The mean interval between arrival at hospital and starting treatment was significantly shorter in the midazolam group [3.37 min (SD 2.46)] as compared to the diazepam group [14.13 min (SD 3.39)]. The mean interval between cessation of seizures and arrival at hospital was significantly shorter in the midazolam group [6.67 min (SD 3.12)] as compared to the diazepam group [17.18 min (SD 5.09)]. The mean interval between control of seizures and administration of the drug was shorter in the diazepam group [2.67 min (SD 2.31)] as compared to the midazolam group [3.01 min (SD 2.79)]. No significant side effects were observed in either group. Seizures were controlled more quickly with intravenous diazepam than with intranasal midazolam. Midazolam was as safe and effective as diazepam. The overall interval between arrival at hospital and cessation of seizures was shorter with intranasal midazolam than with intravenous diazepam. The intranasal route can be possibly used not only in medical centres, but with appropriate instruction by the parents of children with acute seizures at home.

  19. FUNCTIONAL ELECTRICAL STIMULATION FOR CONTROL OF EPILEPTIC SEIZURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiao, Jianhang

    parameters regarding their ability to inhibit seizures. The present thesis hypothesized that the antiepileptic effects of vagus nerve stimulation and spinal cord stimulation could be improved by using higher stimulation frequencies than those that are currently used in clinic or proposed in the literature....

  20. Randomized, controlled trial of ibuprofen syrup administered during febrile illnesses to prevent febrile seizure recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: Febrile seizures recur frequently. Factors increasing the risk of febrile seizure recurrence include young age at onset, family history of febrile seizures, previous recurrent febrile seizures, time lapse since previous seizure <6 months,

  1. Dietary and medication adjustments to improve seizure control in patients treated with the ketogenic diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selter, Jessica H.; Turner, Zahava; Doerrer, Sarah C.; Kossoff, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike anticonvulsant drugs and vagus nerve stimulation, there are no guidelines regarding adjustments to ketogenic diet regimens to improve seizure efficacy once the diet has been started. A retrospective chart review was performed of 200 consecutive patients treated with the ketogenic diet at Johns Hopkins Hospital from 2007-2013. Ten dietary and supplement changes were identified, along with anticonvulsant adjustments. A total of 391 distinct interventions occurred, of which 265 were made specifically to improve seizure control. Adjustments lead to >50% further seizure reduction in-18%, but only 3% became seizure-free. The benefits of interventions did not decrease over time. There was a trend towards medication adjustments being more successful than dietary modifications (24% vs. 15%, p = 0.08). No single dietary change stood out as the most effective, but calorie changes were largely unhelpful (10% with additional benefit). PMID:24859788

  2. Dietary and medication adjustments to improve seizure control in patients treated with the ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selter, Jessica H; Turner, Zahava; Doerrer, Sarah C; Kossoff, Eric H

    2015-01-01

    Unlike anticonvulsant drugs and vagus nerve stimulation, there are no guidelines regarding adjustments to ketogenic diet regimens to improve seizure efficacy once the diet has been started. A retrospective chart review was performed of 200 consecutive patients treated with the ketogenic diet at Johns Hopkins Hospital from 2007 to 2013. Ten dietary and supplement changes were identified, along with anticonvulsant adjustments. A total of 391 distinct interventions occurred, of which 265 were made specifically to improve seizure control. Adjustments led to >50% further seizure reduction in 18%, but only 3% became seizure-free. The benefits of interventions did not decrease over time. There was a trend towards medication adjustments being more successful than dietary modifications (24% vs 15%, P = .08). No single dietary change stood out as the most effective, but calorie changes were largely unhelpful (10% with additional benefit).

  3. Regression of stroke-like lesions in MELAS-syndrome after seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Barton, Peter

    2010-12-01

    There are some indications that seizure activity promotes the development of stroke-like episodes, or vice versa, in patients with mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome or other syndromic mitochondrial disorders. A 41-year-old Caucasian female with MELAS syndrome, presenting with short stature, microcytic anaemia, increased blood-sedimentation rate, myopathy, hyper-gammaglobulinaemia, an iron-metabolism defect, migraine-like headaches, and stroke-like episodes, developed complex partial and generalised seizures at age 32 years. Valproic acid was ineffective but after switching to lamotrigine and lorazepam, she became seizure-free for five years and stroke-like episodes did not recur. Cerebral MRI initially showed enhanced gyral thickening and a non-enhanced T2-hyperintensity over the left parieto-temporo-occipital white matter and cortex and enhanced caudate heads. After two years without seizures, the non-enhanced hyperintense parieto-temporo-occipital lesion had disappeared, being attributed to consequent seizure control. The caudate heads, however, remained hyperintense throughout the observational period. This case indicates that adequate seizure control in a patient with MELAS syndrome may prevent the recurrence of stroke-like episodes and may result in the disappearance of stroke-like lesions on MRI.

  4. Seizure control and developmental trajectories after hemispherotomy for refractory epilepsy in childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramantani, Georgia; Kadish, Navah Ester; Brandt, Armin; Strobl, Karl; Stathi, Angeliki; Wiegand, Gert; Schubert-Bast, Susanne; Mayer, Hans; Wagner, Kathrin; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Stephani, Ulrich; van Velthoven, Vera; Zentner, Josef; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Bast, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the seizure control and developmental outcomes after hemispherotomy for refractory epilepsy in childhood and to identify their predictive factors. We retrospectively studied the clinical courses and outcomes of 52 children with refractory epilepsy who underwent hemispherotomy in the Epilepsy Center Freiburg between 2002 and 2011. Mean age at epilepsy onset was 1.8 years (range 0-8 years) and mean age at surgery was 6.7 years (range 6 months-18 years). The underlying etiology was congenital in 22 (42%) children, acquired in 24 (46%), and progressive in 6 (12%). At final follow-up of 1-9.8 years (mean 3.3), 43 children (83%) were seizure-free. Seizure outcome was not correlated to etiology, with the exception of hemimegalencephaly that was linked to poor seizure control. Presurgical development was impaired in all but one child. Postsurgical development highly correlated with presurgical development. Patients with acquired or progressive etiology, later epilepsy onset, and subsequent later surgery exhibited higher presurgical developmental status that substantially determined postoperative developmental outcome. Improved postsurgical development was determined by acquired etiology and seizure freedom off antiepileptic drugs. In our study, most of the selected children and adolescents achieved seizure freedom, including those with congenital etiology. Developmental outcomes, however, were superior in patients with acquired etiology and older age at surgery, underscoring that it is never too late to reap the benefits of this procedure in terms of both epilepsy and development. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Seizure control in patients with epilepsy: the physician vs. medication factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsell Christopher J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the relationship between types of healthcare providers and outcomes in patients with epilepsy. This study compares the relative effects of provider type (epileptologist vs. other neurologist and pharmacologic treatment (newer vs. older antiepileptic drugs on seizure control in patients with epilepsy. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of patients with medication-resistant epilepsy. Consecutive charts of 200 patients were abstracted using a standard case report form. For each patient, data included seizure frequency and medication use prior to, and while being treated by an epileptologist. Changes in seizure frequency were modeled using a generalized linear model. Results After transferring care from a general neurologist to specialized epilepsy center, patients experienced fewer seizures (p Conclusion Our findings suggest an association between subspecialty epilepsy care and improved seizure control in patients with medication-resistant epilepsy. Further research should prospectively determine whether patients with medication-resistant epilepsy would benefit from being routinely referred to an epilepsy specialist.

  6. Iron-deficiency Anemia in Children with Febrile Seizure: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fateme GHASEMI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Ghasemi F, Valizadeh F, Taee N. Iron-deficiency Anemia in Children with Febrile Seizure: A Case-Control Study. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Spring 8(2:38-44.ObjectiveConsidering the recurrence of febrile seizure and costs for families, many studies have attempted to identify its risk factors. Some recent studies have reported that anemia is more common in children with febrile convulsion, whereas others have reported that iron deficiency raises the seizure threshold. This study was done to compare iron-deficiency anemia in children with first FS with children having febrile illness alone and with healthy children.Materials & MethodsThis case-control study evaluated 300 children in three groups (first FS, febrile without convulsion, and healthy in Khoramabad Madani Hospital from September 2009 to September 2010. Body temperature on admission wasmeasured using the tympanic method. CBC diff, MCV, MCH, MCHC, serum iron, plasma ferritin and TIBC tests were performed for all participants. Data were analyzed by frequency, mean, standard deviation, ANOVA, and chi-square statistical tests. Odds ratios were estimated by logistic regression at a confidence level of 95%.Results Forty percent of the cases with FS had iron-deficiency anemia, compared to 26% of children with febrile illness without seizure and 12% of healthy children. The Odds ratio for iron-deficiency anemia in the patients with FS was 1.89 (95% CI, 1.04-5.17 compared to the febrile children without convulsion and 2.21 (95% CI, 1.54-3.46 compared to the healthy group. ConclusionChildren with FS are more likely to be iron-deficient than those with febrile illness alone and healthy children. Thus, iron-deficiency anemia could be a risk factor for FS.References1. Østergaard J R. Febrile Seizures. Acta Pædiatr 2009;98(5:771-3.2. Jones T, Jacobsen SJ. Childhood Febrile Seizures: Overview and Implications. Int J Med Sci. 2007; 4(2:110-4.3. Flury T, Aebi

  7. Randomized-controlled trials of levetiracetam as an adjunctive therapy in epilepsy of multiple seizure types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Youxin; Wu, Xunyi; Xu, Lan; Tang, Xinghua; Wang, Jianhong; Zhu, Guoxing; Hong, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to systematically collect and synthesize the current evidence regarding the efficacy and tolerability of levetiracetam (LEV) as an adjunctive therapy for adults and children suffering from idiopathic and secondary epilepsy of multiple seizure types. We selected randomized-controlled trials (RCT) of LEV as an adjunctive therapy in epilepsy according to predefined criteria. Outcome measures included a > or =50% reduction in seizure frequency, seizure freedom, and adverse events. Thirteen RCT were analyzed. Results showed that the efficacy of adjunctive LEV was superior to placebo both in achieving > or =50% reduction in seizure frequency (pooled odds ratio [OR] 3.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.78-4.07, Z=12.46; pseizure freedom (pooled OR 4.72, 95% CI 2.96-7.54, Z=6.50; p or =50% reduction in seizure frequency, and chi-squared=0.49, I2=0% in seizure freedom). Subgroup analysis suggested similar effects across different dosages in adults. The incidence of adverse reactions was not significantly different between the LEV group and the placebo group. The adverse events of relatively high incidence in the LEV group included somnolence, agitation, dizziness, asthenia, and infection. Incidence of serious adverse reaction such as rash and white blood cells and platelets decreasing was quite low. Adjunctive therapy with LEV was superior to placebo in reducing the frequency of seizures in patients with partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsy with effect in both adults and children, and demonstrated good tolerance in patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy and usability of buccal midazolam in controlling acute prolonged convulsive seizures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Khosroshahi, Nahid; Karimi, Parviz; Malamiri, Reza Azizi; Bavarian, Behrouz; Zarch, Anoushiravan Vakili; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Kompani, Farshid

    2010-09-01

    A Prolonged convulsive seizure is the most common neurological medical emergency with poor outcome. An ideal anticonvulsant should be easy-to-use, effective, and safe, and it should also have a long-lasting effect. Benzodiazepines, give via the intravenous or rectal route have generally been used as first-line drugs. In small children, IV access can be difficult and time consuming. Midazolam is a potent anticonvulsant and is rapidly absorbed from the rectal, nasal, and buccal mucosa. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and usability of buccal midazolam in controlling seizures in children with acute prolonged seizures, by comparing it with rectal diazepam. Ninety-eight patients were enrolled, with 49 patients in each treatment group. In the buccal midazolam group, 42 (88%) patients were controlled in less than 4 min of drug administration, and all of the patients were controlled within 5 min of drug administration. In the rectal diazepam group, 24 (49%) patients were controlled in less than 4 min and 40 (82%) patients were controlled within 5 min of drug administration. The time for drug administration and drug effect was significantly less with buccal midazolam than with rectal diazepam (p valuediazepam group, 7 (14%) parents were satisfied. Buccal midazolam was significantly more acceptable than rectal diazepam (p valuediazepam but more convenient to use in the controlling acute prolonged seizures in children, especially in situations in which there is a difficulty in gaining IV access, for example, in infants.

  9. Absence Seizure (Petit Mal Seizure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seizures are more common in girls. History of febrile seizures. Infants and children who have seizures brought on by fever are at greater risk of absence seizures. Family members who have seizures. Nearly half of ...

  10. CSF glutamate/GABA concentrations in pyridoxine-dependent seizures: etiology of pyridoxine-dependent seizures and the mechanisms of pyridoxine action in seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, T; Matsuo, N; Takahashi, T

    2001-03-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the binding affinity of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) to the active form of pyridoxine is low in cases of pyridoxine-dependent seizures (PDS) and that a quantitative imbalance between excitatory (i.e. glutamate) and inhibitory (i.e. gamma-aminobutyric acid, GABA) neurotransmitters could cause refractory seizures. However, inconsistent findings with GAD insufficiency have been reported in PDS. We report a case of PDS that is not accompanied by an elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glutamate concentration. Intravenous pyridoxine phosphate terminated generalized seizures which were otherwise refractory to conventional anti-epileptic medicines. No seizure occurred once oral pyridoxine (13.5 mg/kg per day) was started in combination with phenobarbital sodium (PB, 3.7 mg/kg per day). The electroencephalogram (EEG) normalized approximately 8 months after pyridoxine was started. The patient is gradually acquiring developmental milestones during the 15 months follow-up period. The CSF glutamate and GABA concentrations were determined on three separate occasions: (1) during status epilepticus; (2) during a seizure-free period with administration of pyridoxine and PB; and (3) 6 days after suspension of pyridoxine and PB and immediately before a convulsion. The CSF glutamate level was below the sensitivity of detection (pyridoxine supplementation, were within the normal range. We suggest that (1) PDS is not a discrete disease of single etiology in that insufficient activation of GAD may not account for seizure susceptibility in all cases and (2) mechanism(s) of anti-convulsive effect of pyridoxine, at least in some cases, may be independent of GAD activation.

  11. Iron Status and Febrile Seizure- A Case Control Study in Children Less Than 3 Years

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    Mansour SADEGHZADEH

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available  How to cite this article: Sadeghzadeh M, Khoshnevis P, Mahboubi E. Iron Status and Febrile Seizure- A Case Control Study in Children Less Than 3 Years. Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6(4:27-31.Abstract Objective: Febrile seizure is one of the most common neurological conditions of childhood. Several theories, such as iron deficiency anemia have been proposed as the pathogenesis of this condition. The aim of this study was to find the association between iron deficiency anemia and febrile seizures in children aged 6 months to 3 years admitted in Valie Asr hospital in Zanjan. Materials &Methods Hemoglobin (Hb, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, serum iron (SI, total iron binding capacity (TIBC and SI/TIBC ratio were assessed in one hundred children with febrile seizures and compared to the values of one hundred healthy children presenting in a heath care center in the same period as the control group. Results A total of 6% of cases had iron deficiency anemia which was similar to the control group. In the case group SI/TIBC ratio below 12% was seen in 58% of children which was significantly higher than that of the control group (29%. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that although anemia was not common among febrile seizure patients, iron deficiency was more frequent in these patients. ReferencesBidabadi E, Mashouf M.. Association between iron deficiency anemia and first febrile convulsion: A case-control study. Seizure. 2009 Jan;18(5:347-51.Sadeghzadeh M, Khoshnevisasl P, Moussavinassab N, Koosha A, Norouzi M. The Relation Between Serum Zinc Level and Febrile Seizures in Children Admitted to Zanjan Valie-Asr Hospital. J Zanjan Uni Med Sci. 2011;19(74:17-24.Kumari PL, Nair MK, Nair SM, Kailas L, Geetha S. Iron deficiency as a risk factor for simple febrile seizures-a case control study. Indian Pediatr. 2012 Jan;49(1:17-9.Pisacane A, Sansone R, Impagliazzo N, Coppola A, Rolando P, D'Apuzzo A, Tregrossi C. Iron deficiency anaemia and

  12. Dynamic control of modeled tonic-clonic seizure states with closed-loop stimulation

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    Bryce eBeverlin II

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Seizure control using deep brain stimulation (DBS provides an alternative therapy to patients with intractable and drug resistant epilepsy. This paper presents novel DBS stimulus protocols to disrupt seizures. Two protocols are presented: open-loop stimulation and a closed-loop feedback system utilizing measured firing rates to adjust stimulus frequency. Stimulation suppression is demonstrated in a computational model using 3000 excitatory Morris-Lecar model neurons connected with depressing synapses. Cells are connected using second order network topology to simulate network topologies measured in cortical networks. The network spontaneously switches from tonic to clonic as synaptic strengths and tonic input to the neurons decreases. To this model we add periodic stimulation pulses to simulate DBS. Periodic forcing can synchronize or desynchronize an oscillating population of neurons, depending on the stimulus frequency and amplitude. Therefore, it is possible to either extend or truncate the tonic or clonic phases of the seizure. Stimuli applied at the firing rate of the neuron generally synchronize the population while stimuli slightly slower than the firing rate prevent synchronization. We present an adaptive stimulation algorithm that measures the firing rate of a neuron and adjusts the stimulus to maintain a relative stimulus frequency to firing frequency and demonstrate it in a computational model of a tonic-clonic seizure. This adaptive algorithm can affect the duration of the tonic phase using much smaller stimulus amplitudes than the open-loop control.

  13. Surgical versus medical treatment for refractory epilepsy: outcomes beyond seizure control.

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    Perry, M Scott; Duchowny, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Nearly one third of patients with epilepsy become medically intractable, and the likelihood of achieving seizure freedom decreases with each additional medication trial. For appropriately chosen patients, epilepsy surgery affords the opportunity to achieve seizure freedom and potentially wean off medications. Epilepsy surgery, as with medical management, is not without adverse effects; to counsel patients wisely, practitioners need to understand the advantages and disadvantages of both. Randomized controlled trials in temporal lobe epilepsy reveal that epilepsy surgery achieves superior outcome compared to continued medical management. Although seizure freedom is the ultimate goal of any therapy, it represents a single outcome measure among a variety of other domains that affect patient welfare. It is imperative that providers understand the patient variables that affect these outcome measures and how these measures impact each other. Because the data comparing surgical therapy versus medical management for refractory epilepsy are limited, we review the available evidence comparing outcomes beyond seizure freedom including quality of life, cognition, psychosocial function, mortality, and financial costs. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  14. SerumTrace Elements in Febrile Seizure: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAMAKIN, Kokab; ZARDAST, Mahmoud; SHARIFZADEH, Golamreza; BIDAR, Toktam; ZARGARIAN, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Febrile seizure (FS) is one of the most common neurological problems during childhood.Pathogenesis of febrile convulsion is unknown. This study investigated some trace elements among children admitted with FS compared with thoseof febrile without seizure attacks. Materials & Methods This case-control study was conducted on48 children (6 months to 5 yrold) diagnosed with febrile seizure as the cases and 48 age-matched febrile children as the control group. Serum levels of magnesium, calcium, sodium, potassium, and serum zinc were measured. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS (version 15) using Student t-test. Results There were no significant differences between the cases and controls in terms of gender or age. The means of serum level of zinc, sodium, calcium and magnesium in the case group was lower than those of the control group. There was no significant difference onserum potassium mean level between the case and control groups. Conclusion Deficiency of trace elements was correlated significantly with febrile convulsion, while further investigations on trace elements are required. PMID:27375757

  15. Effect of vigabatrin on seizure control and safety profile in different subgroups of children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michele C; Jafarpour, Saba; Klehm, Jacquelyn; Thome-Souza, Sigride; Coughlin, Francesca; Kapur, Kush; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of vigabatrin in pediatric epilepsy. We retrospectively reviewed patients with epilepsy treated with vigabatrin over a 2-year period at a pediatric tertiary center. We assessed the relationship between seizure frequency, etiology, vigabatrin dose, adverse events, medication discontinuation reasons, and electroencephalography (EEG) characteristics. One hundred three patients followed at Boston Children's Hospital were treated with vigabatrin and had complete medical records. Within the follow-up interval, 69 (67%) of 103 patients had discontinued vigabatrin therapy. Two patients (1.9%) died during therapy for unknown reasons. Median age at vigabatrin initiation was 8 months (interquartile range [IQR] 5-15). Median starting dose was 48.1 mg/kg per day (IQR 29.8-52.3) with a median target of 100 mg/kg (IQR 81.9-107.9). Median treatment duration was 12.1 months (n = 89, IQR 5.0-22.9) overall, and 13.3 months (IQR 5.2-23.2) for patients who discontinued vigabatrin. The most common reasons for discontinuation were controlled seizures in 31 (43.7%) of 71 and unsatisfactory therapeutic effect in 23 (32.4%) of 71. Median percent seizure reduction from baseline to first follow-up was 83.3% (IQR 27.4-99.8) and 96.7% (IQR 43.3-100) to last follow-up. Twenty-four (38.7%) of 62 patients with a follow-up posttreatment remained seizure-free. Four patients who had initially achieved seizure freedom relapsed. Patients with structural/metabolic etiology had greater median percent seizure reduction at first follow-up than patients with genetic etiology (98.7% vs. 61.4%, respectively, p = 0.001). Hypsarrhythmia resolved after therapy in 18 of 20 (90%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 70-97) patients with pretreatment hypsarrhythmia, and 2 patients presented with hypsarrhythmia posttreatment. Risk of having hypsarrhythmia was reduced by 32% (95% CI 14.9-49.1) posttreatment. Vigabatrin is efficacious in all seizure types and resolved

  16. Intermittent fasting: A “new” historical strategy for controlling seizures?

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman, Adam L.; Rubenstein, James E.; Kossoff, Eric H.

    2012-01-01

    In antiquity, fasting was a treatment for epilepsy and a rationale for the ketogenic diet (KD). Preclinical data indicate the KD and intermittent fasting do not share identical anticonvulsant mechanisms. We implemented an intermittent fasting regimen in six children with an incomplete response to a KD. Three patients adhered to the combined intermittent fasting/KD regimen for 2 months and four had transient improvement in seizure control, albeit with some hunger-related adverse reactions.

  17. CORRELATION OF THE SERUM LEVEL OF CARBAMAZEPINE WITH SEIZURE CONTROL AND ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS AMONG EPILEPTICS IN IBADAN, NIGERIA

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    Joseph O. Fadare

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder requiring long-term treatment. Seizure control requires adequate blood levels of anti-seizure drugs. Carbarmazepine is one of the most prescribed antiepileptic drugs in Nigeria. This study was carried out to investigate the correlation between serum levels of carbamazepine and seizure control and adverse drug reactions among epileptics in Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, sixty-nine patients with confirmed diagnosis of epilepsy who had been on treatment with carbamazepine alone or in combination with phenytoin for at least one month were enrolled into the study and divided into two groups based on seizure control. Drug level in pre-dose (steady state venous blood was analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography. Result: The mean serum concentration of carbamazepine (CBZ and carbamazepine-epoxide (CBZ-EP was 13.5±9.3ìg/mL and 6.34±12.61ìg/mL respectively. Patients with good seizure control had mean serum CBZ concentration of 12.7 ± 9.2ìg/mL versus 15.02 ± 9.7ìg/mL among patients with poor seizure control (P=0.33. The serum concentration of CBZ-EP in patients with good seizure control was 8.05 ± 15.2ìg/mL while it was 3.11 ± 3.5ìg/mL in the second group (P=0.122. Drowsiness was the commonest adverse drug reaction (26.1% and it did not necessitate withdrawal of the drug. Conclusion The study showed that serum level of carbamazepine does not correlate with seizure control and adverse drug reactions.

  18. Clinical prediction of postoperative seizure control: structural, functional findings and disease histories.

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    Stefan, H; Hildebrandt, M; Kerling, F; Kasper, B S; Hammen, T; Dörfler, A; Weigel, D; Buchfelder, M; Blümcke, I; Pauli, E

    2009-02-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) constitutes a heterogenic entity with different clinical histories, pathomorphological hippocampal findings and varying postoperative outcome. 64 patients with MTLE, scheduled for hippocampal resection, were included. Initial precipitating injuries (IPI), structural and functional findings and neuropathological classification of hippocampal specimens were related to prediction of surgical outcome. Patients with severe hippocampal sclerosis (mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) type 1b) became completely seizure free (80% Engel Ia) significantly more often compared with approximately 40% of seizure freedom in other types of MTS or in patients without hippocampal cell loss (non-MTS), irrespective of the extent of hippocampal resection. Age at IPI was found to be related to MTS variants (psilent period of about 5 years; (3) unequivocal unilateral EEG localisation; (4) MRI signs of MTS; and (5) Wada Test indicates contralateral memory compensation and ipsilateral reduced memory capacity. MTS type 1b, characterised by severe cell loss in all hippocampal subfields including the dentate gyrus, and associated with optimal postoperative seizure control, was preoperatively clinically best differentiated from other MTS types by the Wada Memory Test.

  19. Transcranial direct current stimulation improves seizure control in patients with Rasmussen encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekturk, Pinar; Erdogan, Ezgi Tuna; Kurt, Adnan; Kocagoncu, Ece; Kucuk, Zeynep; Kinay, Demet; Yapici, Zuhal; Aksu, Serkan; Baykan, Betul; Karamursel, Sacit

    2016-03-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis is associated with severe seizures that are unresponsive to antiepileptic drugs, as well as immunosuppressants. Transcranial direct current stimulation (t-DCS) is a non-invasive and safe method tried mostly for focal epilepsies with different aetiologies. To date, there is only one published study with two case reports describing the effect of t-DCS in Rasmussen encephalitis. Our aim was to investigate the effect of t-DCS on seizures in Rasmussen encephalitis and to clarify its safety. Five patients (mean age: 19; three females), diagnosed with Rasmussen encephalitis were included in this study. Patients received first cathodal, then anodal (2 mA for 30 minutes on three consecutive days for non-sham stimulations), and finally sham stimulation with two-month intervals, respectively. Three patients received classic (DC) cathodal t-DCS whereas two patients received cathodal stimulation with amplitude modulation at 12 Hz. Afterwards, all patients received anodal stimulation with amplitude modulation at 12 Hz. In the last part of the trial, sham stimulation (a 60-second stimulation with gradually decreasing amplitude to zero in the last 15 seconds) was applied to three patients. Maximum current density was 571 mA/m2 using 70 mm x 50 mm wet sponge electrodes with 2-mA maximum, current controlled stimulator, and maximum charge density was 1028 C/m2 for a 30-minute stimulation period. After cathodal stimulation, all but one patient had a greater than 50% decrease in seizure frequency. Two patients who received modulated cathodal t-DCS had better results. The longest positive effect lasted for one month. A second trial with modulated anodal stimulation and a third with sham stimulation were not effective. No adverse effect was reported with all types of stimulations. Both classic and modulated cathodal t-DCS may be suitable alternative methods for improving seizure outcome in Rasmussen encephalitis patients.

  20. Selenium and leptin levels in febrile seizure: a case-control study in children

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    Abolfazl Khoshdel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available &lt;b&gt;Purpose&lt;/b&gt;: Febrile seizures (FS are seizures that occur between the age of 6 and 60 months, but its pathophysiology still is not fully understood. There is limited information about the correlation between levels of selenium and leptin with FS. This study aimed to determine the relationship between serum levels of selenium and leptin in children with FS. &lt;b&gt;Methods:&lt;/b&gt; This case-control study was conducted in a University Hospital in Shahrekord, Iran, in 2011. The serum levels of selenium and leptin of 25 children with simple febrile seizure (case group were compared with 25 febrile children without seizure (control group in acute phase and after three months. The levels of serum selenium and leptin were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method, respectively. &lt;b&gt;Results&lt;/b&gt;: In acute phase, the mean serum level of selenium in case and control groups were 95.88± 42.55 and 113.25±54.43 μg/dL, respectively, and difference was not significant (&lt;i&gt;P&lt;/i&gt; =0.415, but after three months, this level had a significant increase in both groups (&lt;i&gt;P&lt;/i&gt;&lt;0.001. In acute phase, the mean serum leptin level in case and control groups were 0.94±0.5 and 0.98±0.84 ng/mL, respectively, but difference was not significant (&lt;i&gt;P&lt;/i&gt; =0.405. After three months, serum leptin level had no significant change in both groups (&lt;i&gt;P&lt;/i&gt; =0.882. &lt;b&gt;Conclusion&lt;/b&gt;: These observations suggest that serum levels of selenium and leptin have not specific relation with FS but overllay is lower, however, further study is recommended. Also selenium level in stress and acute phase was significantly lower than recovery phase.

  1. Patterns of seizure control in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampus sclerosis.

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    Coan, Ana Carolina; Campos, Brunno M; Bergo, Felipe P G; Kubota, Bruno Y; Yasuda, Clarissa L; Morita, Marcia E; Guerreiro, Carlos A M; Cendes, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) may present unstable pattern of seizures. We aimed to evaluate the occurrence of relapse-remitting seizures in MTLE with (MTLE-HS) and without (MTLE-NL) hippocampal sclerosis. We evaluated 172 patients with MTLE-HS (122) or MTLE-NL (50). Relapse-remitting pattern was defined as periods longer than two years of seizure-freedom intercalated with seizure recurrence. "Infrequent seizures" was considered as up to three seizures per year and "frequent seizures" as any period of seizures higher than that. Thirty-seven (30%) MTLE-HS and 18 (36%) MTLE-NL patients had relapse-remitting pattern (X2, p = 0.470). This was more common in those with infrequent seizures (X2, p seizure remission between the first and second decade of life (X2, p = 0.06). Similar proportion of MTLE-HS or MTLE-NL patients present relapse-remitting seizures and this occurs more often in those with infrequent seizures.

  2. Risk factors associated with postoperative seizures in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who received tranexamic acid: A case-control study

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    Felix R Montes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antifibrinolytic agents are used during cardiac surgery to minimize bleeding and reduce exposure to blood products. Several reports suggest that tranexamic acid (TA can induce seizure activity in the postoperative period. To examine factors associated with postoperative seizures in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who received TA. University-affiliated hospital. Case-control study. Patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB between January 2008 and December 2009 were identified. During this time, all patients undergoing heart surgery with CPB received TA. Cases were defined as patients who developed seizures that required initiation of anticonvulsive therapy within 48 h of surgery. Exclusion criteria included subjects with preexisting epilepsy and patients in whom the convulsive episode was secondary to a new ischemic lesion on brain imaging. Controls who did not develop seizures were randomly selected from the initial cohort. From an initial cohort of 903 patients, we identified 32 patients with postoperative seizures. Four patients were excluded. Twenty-eight cases and 112 controls were analyzed. Cases were more likely to have a history of renal impairment and higher preoperative creatinine values compared with controls (1.39 ± 1.1 vs. 0.98 ± 0.02 mg/dL, P = 0.02. Significant differences in the intensive care unit, postoperative and total lengths of stay were observed. An association between high preoperative creatinine value and postoperative seizure was identified. TA may be associated with the development of postoperative seizures in patients with renal dysfunction. Doses of TA should be reduced or even avoided in this population.

  3. Rufinamide for the adjunctive treatment of partial seizures in adults and adolescents: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Martin J; Rosenfeld, William E; Vazquez, Blanca; Sachdeo, Rajesh; Perdomo, Carlos; Mann, Allison; Arroyo, Santiago

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of adjunctive treatment with rufinamide 1600 mg twice daily in subjects aged > or = 16 years with refractory partial seizures. This double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter trial included an 8-week baseline phase and a 13-week double-blind phase. Treatment was initiated with rufinamide 400 mg twice daily or placebo; rufinamide was titrated to 1600 mg twice daily. Percentage change in partial seizure frequency was the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures included total partial seizure frequency and the percentage of subjects experiencing a >/=50% reduction in partial seizure frequency. Three hundred thirteen subjects were randomized; 156 subjects received rufinamide and 157 received placebo. Rufinamide-treated subjects experienced a 20.4% median reduction in partial seizure frequency relative to baseline, while placebo-treated subjects had an increase of 1.6% (p = 0.02). Exclusion of subjects taking carbamazepine in a post hoc analysis resulted in a reduction of 29.2% versus 0.7% in the placebo group (p = 0.05), whereas the treatment difference in subjects taking carbamazepine was not significant. Of rufinamide-treated subjects, 28.2% experienced a > or = 50% decrease in partial seizure frequency versus 18.6% of placebo-treated subjects (p = 0.04). The most common adverse events associated with rufinamide treatment were dizziness, nausea, diplopia, and ataxia; they occurred primarily during the titration phase. Adjunctive therapy with rufinamide 3200 mg/day compared with matching placebo demonstrated efficacy and was generally well tolerated in adults with partial seizures. Further study of this agent in adults with partial seizures taking a range of baseline AEDs is warranted.

  4. Patterns of seizure control in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampus sclerosis

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    Ana Carolina Coan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE may present unstable pattern of seizures. We aimed to evaluate the occurrence of relapse-remitting seizures in MTLE with (MTLE-HS and without (MTLE-NL hippocampal sclerosis. Method We evaluated 172 patients with MTLE-HS (122 or MTLE-NL (50. Relapse-remitting pattern was defined as periods longer than two years of seizure-freedom intercalated with seizure recurrence. “Infrequent seizures” was considered as up to three seizures per year and “frequent seizures” as any period of seizures higher than that. Results Thirty-seven (30% MTLE-HS and 18 (36% MTLE-NL patients had relapse-remitting pattern (X2, p = 0.470. This was more common in those with infrequent seizures (X2, p < 0.001. Twelve MTLE-HS and one MTLE-NL patients had prolonged seizure remission between the first and second decade of life (X2, p = 0.06. Conclusion Similar proportion of MTLE-HS or MTLE-NL patients present relapse-remitting seizures and this occurs more often in those with infrequent seizures.

  5. Adjunctive pregabalin vs gabapentin for focal seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glue, Paul; Friedman, Daniel; Almas, Mary; Yardi, Nandan; Knapp, Lloyd; Pitman, Verne; Posner, Holly B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the comparative safety and adjunctive efficacy of pregabalin and gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency in patients with partial-onset seizures based on prestudy modeling showing superior efficacy for pregabalin. Methods: The design of this comparative efficacy and safety study of pregabalin and gabapentin as adjunctive treatment in adults with refractory partial-onset seizures was randomized, flexible dose, double blind, and parallel group. The study included a 6-week baseline and a 21-week treatment phase. The primary endpoint was the percentage change from baseline in 28-day seizure rate to the treatment phase. Results: A total of 484 patients were randomized to pregabalin (n = 242) or gabapentin (n = 242). Of these, 359 patients (187 pregabalin, 172 gabapentin) completed the treatment phase. The observed median and mean in percentage change from baseline was −58.65 and −47.7 (SD 48.3) for pregabalin and −57.43 and −45.28 (SD 60.6) for gabapentin. For the primary endpoint, there was no significant difference between treatments. The Hodges-Lehman estimated median difference was 0.0 (95% confidence interval −6.0 to 7.0). Safety profiles were comparable and consistent with prior trials. Conclusions: The absence of the anticipated efficacy difference based on modeling of prior, nearly identical trials and the larger-than-expected response rates of the 2 antiepileptic drugs were unexpected. These findings raise questions that are potentially important to consider in future comparative efficacy trials. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00537940. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with partial seizures enrolled in this study, pregabalin is not superior to gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency. Because of the atypical response rates, the results of this study are poorly generalizable to other epilepsy populations. PMID:27521437

  6. Differential impact of antiepileptic drugs on the effects of contraceptive methods on seizures: Interim findings of the epilepsy birth control registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Andrew G

    2015-05-01

    To present the interim findings of the Epilepsy Birth Control Registry (EBCR) regarding the impact of various contraceptive methods on seizures, stratified by antiepileptic drug (AED) type. This is an observational study that reports interim findings on the first 750 subjects. There are significantly greater relative risks (RR) for both seizure increase and decrease with hormonal contraception (HC) than with non-hormonal contraception (NHC). The rates of HC experiences associated with seizure increase (21.0%) are greater than with NHC (3.9%) (RR=5.39 [95% CI=3.77-7.73, poral contraceptive, perhaps related to the delivery of substantially higher concentrations of hormones, and a greater RR for seizure decrease with depomedroxyprogesterone, known to reduce seizure frequency when used in dosages which produce amenorrhea, support biological effects. All AED categories showed significantly higher frequencies of reports of seizure increase when combined with HC than with NHC. RR for seizure increase with HC was higher with valproate than with any other AED category. There were no significant differences among AEDs for seizure decrease with HC at this juncture of the study. Overall, NEIAEDs had the most favorable profile with regard to reports of seizure increase and decrease when used with HC. Interim EBCR findings suggest that contraception category and interactions between contraception category and AED category are predictive factors for changes in seizure frequency in WWE. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Ecstatic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhachev, S A; Astapenko, A V; Osos, E L; Zmachynskaya, O L; Gvishch, T G

    2015-01-01

    Ecstatic seizures is a rare manifestation of epilepsy. They were described for the first time by F.M. Dostoevsky. Currently, the description of ecstatic seizures is possible to find in the scientific literature. The description of the own observation of a patient with emotional-affective seizures is presented. A role of the anterior insular cortex in the ecstatic seizures origin is discussed. The similarities between the feelings reported during ecstatic seizures and the feelings experienced under the effect of stimulant addictive drugs are described. The possible reasons of the low frequency of emotional-affective seizures are considered.

  8. A Case-Control Study of the Association Between Serum Copper Level and Febrile Seizures in Children

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    abolfazl MAHYAR

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Mahyar A, Ayazi P, Dalirani R, Bakhtiyari H, Daneshi Khohan MM, Javadi A. A Case-Control Study of the Association Between SerumCopper Level and Febrile Seizures in Children. Iranian Journal of Child Neurology 2012;6(1:23-28.ObjectiveFebrile seizures are the most common cause of seizure in children. Identification of risk factors is very important. This study was conducted to determine the association between the serum copper level and simple febrile seizure in children.Materials & MethodsIn this study, 30 children with simple febrile seizures (case group were compared with 30 children with febrile illness without seizures (control group regarding serum copper level. This study was conducted in Qazvin children’s hospital (Qazvin, Iran.ResultsThe mean serum copper levels in the case and control groups were 141.41±30.90 and 129.43±18.97 mcg/dl, respectively. This difference was not significant statistically.ConclusionThis study revealed that there is no association between serum copper levels and febrile seizures. It seems that copper deficiency is not a risk factor for febrile seizures in children.References1. Mikati MA. Febrile seizures in: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, GemeIII JWS, Schor NF, Behrman RE. Nelson textbookof pediatrics.19th edition. Philadelphia: Saunders; 2011.p. 2017-19.2. Ferrie C, Newton R, Martland T. Febrile seizure in:Mclntosh N, Helms PJ, Smyth RL, Logan S. Forfar& Arneils textbook of pediatrics, London: ChurchillLivingstone; 2008. p. 860-1.3. Mahyar A, Ayazi P, Fallahi M, Javadi A.Risk factors ofthe first febrile seizures in Iranian children. Int J Pediatr2010;2010:862897.[Epub 2010 Jun 24].4. Siqueira LF. Febrile seizures: update on diagnosisand management. Rev Assoc Med Bras 2010 Jul-Aug;56(4:489-92.5. Daoud A, Batieha A. Iron status a possible risk factor forthe first seizure. Epilepsy 2002;43(7:740-43.6. Hartfield DS, Tan J, Yager JY, Rosychuk RJ, SpadyD, Haines C, et al. The association between

  9. Seizure control following palliative resective surgery for intractable epilepsy-a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Mohammed; Sivaswamy, Lalitha; Asano, Eishi; Sood, Sandeep; Zidan, Marwan; Chugani, Harry

    2014-09-01

    Patients with intractable epilepsy who have bilateral epileptic foci may not qualify for curative epilepsy surgery. In some cases palliative resection may be undertaken with a goal to decrease seizure frequency and improve quality of life. Here we present data on the outcome of palliative epilepsy surgery in children. We reviewed medical charts of children who underwent palliative resection for intractable epilepsy during the years 1999-2013 at Children's Hospital of Michigan. The palliative intent of resection was declared preoperatively. Outcome was assessed in terms of seizure reduction. There were 18 patients (11 males, median age of surgery was 3.5 years [range 0.5-16 years]). The median duration of follow-up after surgery was 12.5 months (range 6-60 months). Hemispherectomy was the most commonly performed palliative resection (nine patients), followed by lobectomy (six patients), multilobar resection (one patient), and tuberectomy (two patients). Reduction in seizure frequency was observed in 11 patients, with eight patients achieving seizure freedom on antiepileptic drugs and three with >50% reduction in seizure frequency. Transient improvement in seizure frequency occurred in two patients, whereas there was no benefit in five patients. Beneficial effects of epilepsy surgery may be realized in carefully selected situations wherein the most epileptogenic focus is resected to reduce seizure burden and improve quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Epileptic seizures in Neuro-Behcet disease: why some patients develop seizure and others not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Gulnihal; Semercioglu, Sencer; Ucler, Serap; Erdal, Abidin; Inan, Levent E

    2015-03-01

    Behcet disease (BD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder. Neuro BD (NBD) is seen in approximately 5% of all patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency, type and prognosis of epileptic seizures in different forms of NBD. All files of 42 patients with NBD were evaluated between 2006 and 2012, retrospectively. The demographic data, the presentation of NBD, clinical findings including seizures, EEG and neuroimaging findings were reviewed. The mean age of patients was 35.02±8.43 years. Thirty (71.4%) patients were male; the remaining 12 of them were female. Twenty-four patients had brainstem lesions; 16 patients had cerebral venous thrombosis. Spinal cord involvement was seen in two patients. Seven patients had epileptic seizures (six partial onset seizures with or without secondary generalization). Six of them had cerebral sinus thrombosis (CVT). Four patients had a seizure as the first symptom of the thrombosis. One patient had late onset seizure due to chronic venous infarct. The other patient with seizure had brainstem involvement. The remaining was diagnosed as epilepsy before the determination of NBD. CVT seen in BD seems to be the main risk factor for epileptic seizures in patients with NBD. The prognosis is usually good especially in patients with CVT. Epileptic seizures in patients with brainstem involvement may be an indicator for poor prognosis. Superior sagittal thrombosis or cortical infarct would be predictor of seizures occurrence because of the high ratio in patients with seizures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy of lacosamide by focal seizure subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Michael R; Rosenow, Felix; Faught, Edward; Hebert, David; Doty, Pamela; Isojärvi, Jouko

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this post hoc exploratory analysis was to determine the effects of the antiepileptic drug, lacosamide, on focal (partial-onset) seizure subtypes. Patient data from the three lacosamide pivotal trials were grouped and pooled by focal seizure subtype at Baseline: simple partial seizures (SPS), complex partial seizures (CPS), and secondarily generalized partial seizures (SGPS). Both efficacy outcomes (median percent change from Baseline to Maintenance Phase in seizure frequency per 28 days and the proportion of patients experiencing at least a 50% reduction in seizures) were evaluated by lacosamide dose (200, 400, or 600 mg/day) compared to placebo for each seizure subtype. An additional analysis was performed to determine whether a shift from more severe focal seizure subtypes to less severe occurred upon treatment with lacosamide. In patients with CPS or SGPS at Baseline, lacosamide 400 mg/day (maximum recommended daily dose) and 600 mg/day reduced the frequency of CPS and SGPS compared to placebo. Likewise, a proportion of patients with CPS and SGPS at Baseline experienced at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of CPS and SGPS (≥50% responder rate) in the lacosamide 400 and 600 mg/day groups compared with placebo. For both outcomes, numerically greatest responses were observed in the lacosamide 600 mg/day group among patients with SGPS at Baseline. In patients with SPS at Baseline, no difference between placebo and lacosamide was observed for either efficacy outcome. An additional exploratory analysis suggests that in patients with SPS at Baseline, CPS and SGPS may have been shifted to less severe SPS upon treatment with lacosamide. The results of these exploratory analyses revealed reductions in CPS and SGPS frequency with adjunctive lacosamide. Reduction in CPS and SGPS may confound assessment of SPS since the CPS or SGPS may possibly change to SPS by effective treatment.

  12. Hormone replacement therapy: will it affect seizure control and AED levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Cynthia L

    2008-03-01

    Interest in the years of reproductive changes for women with epilepsy (WWE), specifically perimenopause, menopause and postmenopause has been emerging in the epilepsy community. This article discusses evidence for changes in seizure frequency during perimenopause and postmenopause. Further, a catamenial epilepsy pattern during the reproductive years may be a hallmark for the observed seizure frequency change during these years; that is, an increase at perimenopause but a decrease at menopause. This finding implies that a subset of WWE are particularly susceptible to endogenous reproductive hormonal changes. An adverse effect on seizure frequency with the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during postmenopause for WWE was reported in questionnaires, and was later borne out in a clinical trial. The laboratory counterpart of this human trial, HRT in ovariectomized rodent seizure models, shows that estrogen and progesterone are neuroprotective and do not uniformly increase seizure frequency. Possible reasons for the discrepancy between "the lab and the clinic" are presented. Strategies for managing HRT in symptomatic postmenopausal WWE using estrogenic and progestogenic compounds that may be less likely to promote seizures are discussed.

  13. Triggers and techniques in termination of partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, Jenna; Tatum, William O

    2010-02-01

    Growing interest in seizure prediction exists as a means to deliver newer antiepileptic therapies, though patient self-termination of seizures has received little attention. Two hundred twenty-three patients able to recognize seizure onset were surveyed in an outpatient epilepsy clinic. A seven-question survey administered prospectively assessed self-reported seizure prediction and clinical techniques used for self-termination. Survey responses targeted percentage predictability of seizures, timing of clinical prediction, likelihood/timing of termination, frequency and effectiveness of methods used, and perspectives of patient and physician belief in self-termination. Two hundred twenty-three patients (89 males) with a mean age of 42.7 years, average duration of epilepsy of 20.8 years and monthly mean seizure frequency of 4.1 comprised the study group. Thirty-eight percent completed >75% of the survey. Prior treatment included a mean of 6.0 AEDs (40/192 had surgery); 65% had ongoing seizures. Sixty percent of 223 patients reported a history of an aura, and 39% consistently noted auras for >75% of their current seizures. Of the patients with auras, seizure triggers were reported in 74%, with worry and stress (N=69), sleep deprivation (N=60), and missed medication (N=56) most frequently cited. Seventeen percent were positive/somewhat sure they could predict onset, with approximately 20% noting rapid onset in 75% certainty) in 35% (26/75). The primary methods were lying down/resting and taking extra medication. The majority of patients with partial seizures recognize triggers of seizure onset. In addition, more than one-third believe they can effectively self-terminate their partial-onset seizures. Lying down, resting, and taking extra medication were the most common techniques instituted by patients. Correlating clinical symptoms at seizure onset with termination may help improve the sensitivity in seizure prediction. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Seizure control through genetic and pharmacological manipulation of Pumilio in Drosophila: a key component of neuronal homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsiang Lin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a significant disorder for which approximately one-third of patients do not respond to drug treatments. Next-generation drugs, which interact with novel targets, are required to provide a better clinical outcome for these individuals. To identify potential novel targets for antiepileptic drug (AED design, we used RNA sequencing to identify changes in gene transcription in two seizure models of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The first model compared gene transcription between wild type (WT and bangsenseless1 (parabss, a gain-of-function mutant in the sole fly voltage-gated sodium channel (paralytic. The second model compared WT with WT fed the proconvulsant picrotoxin (PTX. We identified 743 genes (FDR≤1% with significant altered expression levels that are common to both seizure models. Of these, 339 are consistently upregulated and 397 downregulated. We identify pumilio (pum to be downregulated in both seizure models. Pum is a known homeostatic regulator of action potential firing in both flies and mammals, achieving control of neuronal firing through binding to, and regulating translation of, the mRNA transcripts of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav. We show that maintaining expression of pum in the CNS of parabss flies is potently anticonvulsive, whereas its reduction through RNAi-mediated knockdown is proconvulsive. Using a cell-based luciferase reporter screen, we screened a repurposed chemical library and identified 12 compounds sufficient to increase activity of pum. Of these compounds, we focus on avobenzone, which significantly rescues seizure behaviour in parabss flies. The mode of action of avobenzone includes potentiation of pum expression and mirrors the ability of this homeostatic regulator to reduce the persistent voltage-gated Na+ current (INaP in an identified neuron. This study reports a novel approach to suppress seizure and highlights the mechanisms of neuronal homeostasis as potential targets for next

  15. Seizure control through genetic and pharmacological manipulation of Pumilio in Drosophila: a key component of neuronal homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Giachello, Carlo N. G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epilepsy is a significant disorder for which approximately one-third of patients do not respond to drug treatments. Next-generation drugs, which interact with novel targets, are required to provide a better clinical outcome for these individuals. To identify potential novel targets for antiepileptic drug (AED) design, we used RNA sequencing to identify changes in gene transcription in two seizure models of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The first model compared gene transcription between wild type (WT) and bangsenseless1 (parabss), a gain-of-function mutant in the sole fly voltage-gated sodium channel (paralytic). The second model compared WT with WT fed the proconvulsant picrotoxin (PTX). We identified 743 genes (FDR≤1%) with significant altered expression levels that are common to both seizure models. Of these, 339 are consistently upregulated and 397 downregulated. We identify pumilio (pum) to be downregulated in both seizure models. Pum is a known homeostatic regulator of action potential firing in both flies and mammals, achieving control of neuronal firing through binding to, and regulating translation of, the mRNA transcripts of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav). We show that maintaining expression of pum in the CNS of parabss flies is potently anticonvulsive, whereas its reduction through RNAi-mediated knockdown is proconvulsive. Using a cell-based luciferase reporter screen, we screened a repurposed chemical library and identified 12 compounds sufficient to increase activity of pum. Of these compounds, we focus on avobenzone, which significantly rescues seizure behaviour in parabss flies. The mode of action of avobenzone includes potentiation of pum expression and mirrors the ability of this homeostatic regulator to reduce the persistent voltage-gated Na+ current (INaP) in an identified neuron. This study reports a novel approach to suppress seizure and highlights the mechanisms of neuronal homeostasis as potential targets for next

  16. Low glycemic index treatment for seizure control in Angelman syndrome: A case series from the Center for Dietary Therapy of Epilepsy at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocott, Olivia R; Herrington, Katherine S; Pfeifer, Heidi H; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Thibert, Ronald L

    2017-03-01

    The low glycemic index treatment, a dietary therapy that focuses on glycemic index and reduced carbohydrate intake, has been successful in reducing seizure frequency in the general epilepsy population. Epilepsy is a common feature of Angelman syndrome and seizures are often refractory to multiple medications, especially in those with maternal deletions. Dietary therapy has become a more frequently used option for treating epilepsy, often in combination with other antiepileptic drugs, due to its efficacy and favorable side effect profile. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of the low glycemic index treatment for seizure control in Angelman syndrome. Through a retrospective medical record review of 23 subjects who utilized the low glycemic index treatment at the Clinic and Center for Dietary Therapy of Epilepsy at the Massachusetts General Hospital, we found that the high level of seizure control and favorable side effect profile make the low glycemic index treatment a viable treatment for seizures in Angelman syndrome. The majority of subjects in our cohort experienced some level of seizure reduction after initiating the diet, 5 (22%) maintained complete seizure freedom, 10 (43%) maintained seizure freedom except in the setting of illness or non-convulsive status epilepticus, 7 (30%) had a decrease in seizure frequency, and only 1 (4%) did not have enough information to determine seizure control post-initiation. The low glycemic index treatment monotherapy was successful for some subjects in our cohort but most subjects used an antiepileptic drug concurrently. Some subjects were able to maintain the same level of seizure control on a liberalized version of the low glycemic index treatment which included a larger amount of low glycemic carbohydrates. No correlation between the level of carbohydrate restriction and level of seizure control was found. Few subjects experienced side effects and those that did found them to be mild and easily treated. The

  17. Comparison of Serum Zinc Levels among Children with Simple Febrile Seizure and Control Group: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi NASEHI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Nasehi MM, Sakhaei R, Moosazadeh M, Aliramzany M. Comparison of Serum Zinc Levels among Children with Simple Febrile Seizure and Control Group: A Systematic Review. Iran J Child Neurol. 2015 Winter;9(1:17-24 .AbstractObjectiveSeveral factors are involved in the etiology of febrile seizure (FS, among themis zinc (Zn, which has been discussed in various studies. The present systematic review compares Zn levels in children with FS and a control group.Materials & MethodsWe searched keywords of febrile seizure, febrile convulsion, children, childhood,fever, trace elements, risk factor, predisposing, zinc, Zn, and epilepsy in thefollowing databases: SCOPUS, PubMed, and Google Scholar. The quality ofresearch papers was assessed using a checklist. Data was extracted from primarystudies based on demographic variables and amounts of Zn in case and controlgroups.ResultsTwenty primary studies were entered in the present study. Of which, eighteenstudies, reported that Zn serum levels were significantly lower in the case group(patients with FS than the control group.ConclusionThe present systematic review indicated that Zn is one factor for predicting FS.A low level of this element among children can be regarded as a contributingfactor for FS, a conclusion with a high consensus among different studies carriedout in different parts of the world. ReferencesHeydarian F, Ashrafzadeh F, Ghasemian A. Serum ZINC level in Patients with simple febrile seizure. Iran J Child Neurology 2010; 14(2:41-44.Mahyar A, Pahlavan AA, Varasteh-Nejad A. Serum zinc level in children with febrile seizure. Acta Medica Iranica 2008; 46(6: 477-80.Kunda GK, Rabin F, Nandi ER, Sheikh N, Akhter S. Etiology and Risk Factors of Febrile Seizure – An Update. Bangladesh J Child Health 2010; 34 (3:103-112.Abbaskhaniyan A, Shokrzadeh M, Rafati MR, Mashhadiakabr M, Arab A, Yazdani J. Survey and Relation of Serum Magnesium Level in Children with Seizure. J Mazand Univ

  18. Dopey's seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

  19. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (pFibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described.

  20. Efficacy and safety of intravenous sodium valproate versus phenobarbital in controlling convulsive status epilepticus and acute prolonged convulsive seizures in children: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamiri, Reza Azizi; Ghaempanah, Mahdieh; Khosroshahi, Nahid; Nikkhah, Ali; Bavarian, Behrouz; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza

    2012-09-01

    Status epilepticus and acute prolonged seizures are the most commonly occurring neurological emergencies in children. Such events have high morbidity and mortality rates along with poor long-term outcomes, depending on their duration and causes. Therefore, such seizures warrant urgent treatment using appropriate doses of anticonvulsants. Benzodiazepines, phenobarbital, and phenytoin are the most commonly used anticonvulsants for controlling status epilepticus and acute prolonged seizures. However, these medications have several well-known adverse effects. Previous studies on both adults and children have shown the efficacy and safety of rapid infusion of valproate in controlling status epilepticus. However, few well-designed randomised trials have been carried out in children, and there remains a paucity of data regarding intravenous sodium valproate use in children. Therefore, our aim was to compare the efficacy and safety of rapid loading of valproate with those of intravenous phenobarbital in children with status epilepticus and acute prolonged seizures. Sixty children (30 in each group) with convulsive status epilepticus and acute prolonged seizures were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either valproate or phenobarbital. The main outcome variable was termination of all convulsive activity within 20 min of starting anticonvulsant infusion. Intravenous rapid loading of valproate was successful in seizure termination in (27/30, 90%) of patients compared to phenobarbital (23/30, 77%) (p = 0.189). Clinically significant adverse effects occurred in 74% patients of the phenobarbital group and 24% patients of the valproate group (p < 0.001). In conclusion, rapid loading of valproate is effective and safe in controlling convulsive status epilepticus and acute prolonged convulsive seizures in children. Intravenous valproate should be considered as a suitable choice for terminating status epilepticus and acute prolonged seizures in children. Copyright

  1. Anti-Seizure Medications: Relief from Nerve Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anti-seizure medications: Relief from nerve pain Anti-seizure drugs often are used to help control the type of ... by damaged nerves. By Mayo Clinic Staff Anti-seizure medications were originally designed to treat people with ...

  2. Effectiveness of intermittent diazepam prophylaxis in febrile seizures: long-term prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidou, Efterpi; Tzitiridou, Maria; Panteliadis, Christos

    2006-12-01

    The efficacy of intermittent rectal diazepam prophylaxis is assessed in the prevention of febrile seizures. In a prospective randomized cohort trial, 139 children (77 girls, 62 boys) who experienced a first febrile seizure were allocated to two groups: group A, which received intermittent diazepam (n = 68), and group B, which received no prophylaxis (n = 71). All children had a 3-year follow-up. The inclusion criteria were no personal history of afebrile seizures, normal neurodevelopment, no previous anticonvulsant therapy, and age between 6 months and 3 years. Each group was stratified to low, intermediate, and high risk according to the available clinical data. The 36-month recurrence rates in the no-prophylaxis group were 83% in high-risk patients, 55% in intermediate-risk patients, and 46% in low-risk patients. In the prophylaxis group, the recurrence rates were reduced in all risk groups: 38%, 35%, and 33%, respectively. Intermittent diazepam prophylaxis reduces the recurrence rate mainly in high-risk children provided that sufficient doses are given on time and adequately.

  3. Long-term effects of electrodermal biofeedback training on seizure control in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoko; Trimble, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    We report data from two patients, followed over 3 years after electrodermal biofeedback treatment. Patients were trained three times each week for four weeks to increase their sympathetic arousal using electrodermal biofeedback. This treatment was directed at enabling the patients to change their psychophysiological state as a countermeasure to prevent seizures. Both patients voluntarily kept a record of seizure frequency over the year preceding the treatment and continued to record their seizures for up to 3 years after the termination of biofeedback treatment. Both patients showed a marked reduction in seizure frequency (54.9% and 59.8%) during the month of biofeedback treatment. This improvement was maintained over the subsequent years. We highlight the therapeutic potential of biofeedback interventions that enable patients to volitionally control their state of physiological arousal in the management of drug-resistant epilepsy.

  4. Temperature, age, and recurrence of febrile seizure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Prediction of a recurrent febrile seizure during subsequent episodes of fever. DESIGN: Study of the data of the temperatures, seizure recurrences, and baseline patient characteristics that were collected at a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen s

  5. Temperature, age, and recurrence of febrile seizure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Prediction of a recurrent febrile seizure during subsequent episodes of fever. DESIGN: Study of the data of the temperatures, seizure recurrences, and baseline patient characteristics that were collected at a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen

  6. Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Children With First Attack of Seizure and on Healthy Control Group: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh FALLAH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Fallah R, Tirandazi F, Ferdosian F, Fadavi N. Iron Deficiency And Iron Deficiency Anemia in Children With First Attack of Seizure and on Healthy Control Group : A Comparative Study. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Summer;8(3: 18-23. AbstractObjectiveSeizures are the most common pediatric neurologic problem. Research of the association between iron deficiency and seizures has shown conflicting results.This study evaluates iron status of children with a first seizure attack (febrile seizure (FS or first unprovoked afebrile seizure (FUS and healthy control group.Materials & MethodsIn a cross sectional case control study, iron status of 6–60 month year old admitted children with first seizure to Shahid Sadoughi Hospital from August 2011–December 2012 were evaluated and compared with healthy control children that were referred to primary health care center of Azadshar, Yazd, Iran.Results150 children were compared in three equal (FS, afebrile seizure, and control groups.Hemoglobin levels in FUS (11.39 ± 1.07 g/dl and FS (11.46 ± 1.18 g/dl were lower than the control group (11.9 ± 0.89 g/dl group.Serum iron levels in FS (38.52 ± 11.38 μg/dL and FUS (42.68 ± 14.76 μg/dL were lower than the control group (54.32 ± 13.46 μg/dL.Serum ferritin level in FUS (46.21 ± 27.63 ng/mL and FS (48.91 ±22.96 ng/mL was lower than the control group (75.13 ± 35.57 ng/mL.Iron deficiency (48% in FS, 44% in FUS and 28% in control group and iron deficiency anemia (26% in FUS, 22% in FS, and 10% in healthy children was more frequent in children with seizures.ConclusionIron status should be evaluated in children with a first attack of febrile or afebrile seizures.ReferencesMikati MA. Seizures in Childhood. Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, Schor NF, St. Geme JW, Behrman RE. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. Philadelphia, Saunders 2011; 19th edition, Pp: 2013-2017.Yadav D, Chandra J. Iron deficiency: beyond anemia. Indian J Pediatr 2011

  7. Statistical process control (SPC)--a simple objective method for monitoring seizure frequency and evaluating effectiveness of drug interventions in refractory childhood epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujar, Suresh; Calvert, Sophie; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Chin, Richard F M; Smith, Ralph A; Cross, J Helen; Das, Krishna; Pitt, Matthew; Scott, Rod C

    2010-10-01

    Objective assessment of seizure fluctuation in patients with refractory epilepsy in the clinical setting is difficult and subjective assessment may lead to inappropriate changes in medication. We therefore evaluated the utility of Statistical Process Control (SPC) charts as a simple objective clinical tool to demonstrate variability in seizure frequency and to assess the efficacy of drug interventions. Total weekly seizure frequencies over 1 year were collected for 38 young people with refractory epilepsy. SPC I-charts were generated and Nelson's tests for "special" causes of variability applied. In a separate analysis, run charts were reviewed by two epileptologists blinded to clinical data who were asked to identify if and when drug interventions took place. The SPC charts showed that only seven out of 38 (18%) patients had stable seizure frequencies. In the others, they identified significant but short-lived increases in seizure frequency, which were followed by rapid return towards baseline independently of drug changes. A substantial reduction in seizure frequency was associated with a drug increase in only 5 (6.5%) instances. Inter-rater agreement on whether there were drug interventions and their timing was poor (κ=0.15, p=0.4). SPC I-charts have the potential to be used as a clinical tool to monitor seizure frequency and to evaluate efficacy of drug interventions in patients with refractory epilepsy. Epilepsy is commonly an unstable condition with fluctuations in seizure frequencies which are unpredictable and usually do not require a change in treatment. Positive responses to treatment changes are uncommon. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Seizures and Meperidine: Overstated and Underutilized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlick, Konrad H; Hemmen, Thomas M; Lyden, Patrick D

    2015-12-01

    Meperidine is used for pain control and treatment of shivering. Concerns about neurotoxicity, particularly seizures, have led to efforts limiting meperidine use. We reviewed the body of evidence linking meperidine to seizures. We searched PubMed for the terms meperidine, normeperidine, pethidine, and norpethidine; each was combined with the terms: seizure, epilepsy, epileptogenic, toxicity, overdose, seizure threshold, and convulsion. Articles were assessed for relevance. Semiologies were reviewed to ascertain seizure likelihood. Our search yielded 351 articles, of which 66 were relevant. Of these, 33 had primary clinical data on meperidine-associated seizures, comprising 50 patients. Twenty events were deemed likely to be seizures, 26 indeterminate, and 4 unlikely. Most studies were case reports. Confounding comorbidities were frequent. The evidence base for meperidine-associated seizures in man is scant. Seizure risk associated with meperidine appears to be overstated. The utility of meperidine should continue to be explored, especially for therapeutic hypothermia.

  9. Delineation of the Role of Astroglial GABA Transporters in Seizure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schousboe, Arne; Madsen, Karsten K

    2017-02-11

    Studies of GABA transport in neurons and astrocytes have provided evidence that termination of GABA as neurotransmitter is brought about primarily by active transport into the presynaptic, GABAergic nerve endings. There is, however, a considerable transport capacity in the astrocytes surrounding the synaptic terminals, a transport which may limit the availability of transmitter GABA leading to a higher probability of seizure activity governed by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Based on this it was hypothesized that selective inhibition of astrocytic GABA transport might prevent such seizure activity. A series of GABA analogs of restricted conformation were synthesized and in a number of collaborative investigations between Prof. Steve White at the University of Utah and medicinal chemists and pharmacologists at the School of Pharmacy and the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, GABA analogs with exactly this pharmacological property were identified. The most important analogs identified were N-methyl-exo-THPO (N-methyl-3-hydroxy-4-amino-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1,2-benzisoxazole) and its lipophilic analog EF-1502 ((RS)-4-[N-[1,1-bis(3-methyl-2-thienyl)but-1-en-4-yl]-N-methylamino]-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol) both of which turned out to be potent anticonvulsants in animal models of epilepsy.

  10. Seizure activity post organophosphate exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, John

    2009-01-01

    Electrographic seizures are a feature of organophosphate anticholinesterase intoxication. Clinical studies of pesticide poisonings suggest that seizures are more common in children than in adults. Since flaccid paralysis, a characteristic sign of organophosphate poisoning, can mask convulsions, the most reliable indicator of seizures is the electroencephalogram, but this has not been widely used in clinical studies. Seizures can rapidly progress to status epilepticus, contributing to mortality and, in survivors, to neuronal damage and neurological impairment. Anticonvulsant drugs can significantly reduce the lethal and toxic effects of these compounds. A benzodiazepine, usually diazepam, is the treatment currently indicated for control of seizures. Animal studies have indicated that the early phase of seizure activity (0-5 min after seizure onset) is purely cholinergic, predominantly involving muscarinic mechanisms. Seizure activity subsequently progresses through mixed cholinergic and noncholinergic modulation (5-40 min) into a final noncholinergic phase. Neuropathology caused by seizures is most likely associated with glutamatergic excitotoxicity. Future prospects for improved treatments include new benzodiazepines, glutamate receptor antagonists, antimuscarinics with additional antiglutamatergic activity and adenosine receptor antagonists.

  11. Febrile Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical facility for diagnosis and treatment. Call an ambulance if the seizure is less than 5 minutes but the child does not seem to be recovering quickly. Gradually place the child on a protected surface such as the floor or ground to prevent accidental injury. Do not restrain or ...

  12. Association between hypocapnia and febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicaslan, Buket; Erol, Ilknur; Ozkale, Yasemin; Saygi, Semra; Sariturk, Cagla

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation with subsequent hypocapnia is relevant to febrile seizures in children. This is only the second study to measure pCO2 and pH values in children with febrile seizures. This prospective case-control study enrolled 18 children who presented with febrile seizures and 18 children who presented with a febrile illness without seizures. Venous blood gas analyses were measured both from the febrile seizure and control group. There was no significant difference in mean blood pH between the febrile seizure and control groups but blood pCO2 was significantly lower in the febrile seizure group. Patients with complex febrile seizures exhibited significantly lower pCO2 levels within 1 hour of seizure onset than patients with simplex febrile seizures. These data indicate that febrile seizures may be associated with hyperventilation and that the ensuing hypocapnia may contribute to the development of febrile seizures.

  13. Treating acute seizures with benzodiazepines: does seizure duration matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, David E

    2014-10-01

    Several clinical trials have shown improved seizure control and outcome by early initiation of treatment with benzodiazepines, before arrival in the emergency department and before intravenous access can be established. Here, evidence is provided and reviewed for rapid treatment of acute seizures in order to avoid the development of benzodiazepine pharmacoresistance and the emergence of self-sustaining status epilepticus. Alterations in the physiology, pharmacology, and postsynaptic level of GABA-A receptors can develop within minutes to an hour and hinder the ability of synaptic inhibition to stop seizures while also impairing the efficacy of GABAergic agents, such as benzodiazepines, to boost impaired inhibition. In addition, heightened excitatory transmission further exacerbates the inhibitory/excitatory balance and makes seizure control even more resistant to treatment. The acute increase in the surface expression of NMDA receptors during prolonged seizures also may cause excitotoxic injury, cell death, and other pathological expressions and re-arrangements of receptor subunits that all contribute to long-term sequelae such as cognitive impairment and chronic epilepsy. In conclusion, a short window of opportunity exists when seizures are maximally controlled by first-line benzodiazepine treatment. After that, multiple pathological mechanisms quickly become engaged that make seizures increasingly more difficult to control with high risk for long-term harm.

  14. Seizure-induced disinhibition of the HPA axis increases seizure susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Kate K; Hooper, Andrew; Wakefield, Seth; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Stress is the most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures. The proconvulsant actions of stress hormones are thought to mediate the effects of stress on seizure susceptibility. Interestingly, epileptic patients have increased basal levels of stress hormones, including corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and corticosterone, which are further increased following seizures. Given the proconvulsant actions of stress hormones, we proposed that seizure-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to future seizure susceptibility. Consistent with this hypothesis, our data demonstrate that pharmacological induction of seizures in mice with kainic acid or pilocarpine increases circulating levels of the stress hormone, corticosterone, and exogenous corticosterone administration is sufficient to increase seizure susceptibility. However, the mechanism(s) whereby seizures activate the HPA axis remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis involves compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons, which govern HPA axis function. Following seizure activity, there is a collapse of the chloride gradient due to changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 expression, resulting in reduced amplitude of sIPSPs and even depolarizing effects of GABA on CRH neurons. Seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis results in future seizure susceptibility which can be blocked by treatment with an NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide, or blocking the CRH signaling with Antalarmin. These data suggest that compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons following an initial seizure event may cause hyperexcitability of the HPA axis and increase future seizure susceptibility.

  15. Differential impact of contraceptive methods on seizures varies by antiepileptic drug category: Findings of the Epilepsy Birth Control Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Andrew G; Mandle, Hannah B; Cahill, Kaitlyn E; Fowler, Kristen M; Hauser, W Allen

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether categories of contraception differ in their impact on seizures in women with epilepsy and whether the impact varies by antiepileptic drug category. Retrospective survey data came from 2712 contraceptive experiences reported by 1144 women with epilepsy. We compared risk ratios for reports of increase and decrease in seizure frequency on hormonal versus nonhormonal contraception, stratified by antiepileptic drug categories. More women with epilepsy reported a change in seizures on hormonal (28.2%) than on nonhormonal contraception (9.7%) (p<0.0001). The risk ratio for seizure increase on hormonal (18.7%) versus nonhormonal contraception (4.2%) was 4.47 (p<0.0001). The risk ratio for seizure decrease on hormonal (9.5%) versus nonhormonal contraception (5.5%) was 1.71, p<0.0001. On hormonal contraception, the risk ratio for seizure increase was greater than for decrease (1.98, p<0.0001). In comparison to combined pills, both hormonal patch and progestin-only pills had greater risk ratios for seizure increase. Depomedroxyprogesterone was the only hormonal method with a greater risk ratio for seizure decrease than combined pills. Seizure increase was greater for hormonal than nonhormonal contraception for each antiepileptic drug category (p<0.001). On hormonal contraception, relative to the non-enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drug category which had the lowest rate, each of the other categories had significantly greater risks for seizure increase, especially the enzyme-inhibiting (valproate) category (risk ratio=2.53, p=0.0002). The findings provide community-based, epidemiological survey evidence that contraceptive methods may differ in their impact on seizures and that this impact may vary by antiepileptic drug category. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Health-related quality of life in childhood epilepsy: Moving beyond 'seizure control with minimal adverse effects'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenbaum Peter

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Childhood epilepsy is one of the most important and prevalent neurological conditions in the developing years. Persons with childhood onset epilepsy are at a high risk for poor psychosocial outcomes, even without experiencing co-morbidities. The goal of management of children with epilepsy should be to enable the child and the family to lead a life as free as possible from the medical and psychosocial complications of epilepsy. This comprehensive care needs to go beyond simply trying to control seizures with minimal adverse drug reactions. Seizure frequency and severity is only one important outcome variable. Other factors such as social, psychological, behavioural, educational, and cultural dimensions of their lives affect children with epilepsy, their families and their close social networks. A number of epilepsy-specific health-related quality of life (HRQL scales for children have been developed with the aim to include and measure accurately the impact and burden of epilepsy. Their target populations, details of the origin of the items, and psychometric properties vary significantly. Their strengths and weaknesses will be identified more clearly through their continued use in the clinical setting and in research studies. Only a few studies to date have utilized these or generic HRQL measures to assess the HRQL of specific populations with epilepsy. Future research needs to develop theory driven models of HRQL and identify measurable factors that have important correlations with outcomes. Since biomedical variables like seizure frequency and severity have only moderate correlations with HRQL, other independent factors including the child's resilience, co-morbid conditions, parental well-being, family factors and societal/cultural variables may play a major role. We also need to learn what encompasses comprehensive patient care, define the goals of management and evaluate the impact of different interventions. Future studies need to

  17. Predicting epileptic seizures in advance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Moghim

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6-0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling, is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance.

  18. Seizure control by derivatives of medium chain fatty acids associated with the ketogenic diet show novel branching-point structure for enhanced potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pishan; Zuckermann, Alexandra M E; Williams, Sophie; Close, Adam J; Cano-Jaimez, Marife; McEvoy, James P; Spencer, John; Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2015-01-01

    The medium chain triglyceride (MCT) ketogenic diet is a major treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy but is problematic, particularly in adults, because of poor tolerability. Branched derivatives of octanoic acid (OA), a medium chain fat provided in the diet have been suggested as potential new treatments for drug-resistant epilepsy, but the structural basis of this functionality has not been determined. Here we investigate structural variants of branched medium chain fatty acids as new seizure-control treatments. We initially employ a series of methyl-branched OA derivatives, and using the GABAA receptor antagonist pentylenetetrazol to induce seizure-like activity in rat hippocampal slices, we show a strong, branch-point-specific activity that improves upon the related epilepsy treatment valproic acid. Using low magnesium conditions to induce glutamate excitotoxicity in rat primary hippocampal neuronal cultures for the assessment of neuroprotection, we also show a structural dependence identical to that for seizure control, suggesting a related mechanism of action for these compounds in both seizure control and neuroprotection. In contrast, the effect of these compounds on histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition, associated with teratogenicity, shows no correlation with therapeutic efficacy. Furthermore, small structural modifications of the starting compounds provide active compounds without HDAC inhibitory effects. Finally, using multiple in vivo seizure models, we identify potent lead candidates for the treatment of epilepsy. This study therefore identifies a novel family of fatty acids, related to the MCT ketogenic diet, that show promise as new treatments for epilepsy control and possibly other MCT ketogenic diet-responding conditions, such as Alzheimer disease.

  19. A 24-week multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, dose-ranging study of rufinamide in adults and adolescents with inadequately controlled partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, Christian E; Stefan, Hermann; Mann, Allison; Narurkar, Milind; Sun, Yijun; Perdomo, Carlos

    2010-02-01

    To assess the efficacy, safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of adjunctive rufinamide in adults and adolescents with inadequately controlled partial seizures receiving treatment with one to three concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). A 24-week multicenter Phase II clinical study was conducted (n=647), comprising a 12-week prospective baseline phase and a 12-week randomized double-blind, parallel-group, five-arm (placebo and rufinamide 200, 400, 800, and 1600mg/day) treatment phase. The linear trend of dose response for seizure frequency per 28 days in the double-blind treatment phase - the primary efficacy outcome measure - was statistically significant in favor of rufinamide (estimated slope=-0.049, P=0.003; minimally efficacious dose, 400mg/day). Response rates, defined as a >or=50% reduction in seizure frequency per 28 days, also revealed a significant linear trend of dose response (P=0.0019, logistic regression analysis). Adverse events were comparable between placebo and all rufinamide groups except the 1600mg/day group; no safety signals were observed. These results suggest that in the dose range of 400-1600mg/day, add-on rufinamide therapy may benefit patients with inadequately controlled partial seizures and is generally well tolerated. These data also suggest that higher doses may confer additional efficacy without adversely affecting safety and tolerability.

  20. Ethanol-withdrawal seizures are controlled by tissue plasminogen activator via modulation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Robert; Melchor, Jerry P; Matys, Tomasz; Skrzypiec, Anna E; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-01-11

    Chronic ethanol abuse causes up-regulation of NMDA receptors, which underlies seizures and brain damage upon ethanol withdrawal (EW). Here we show that tissue-plasminogen activator (tPA), a protease implicated in neuronal plasticity and seizures, is induced in the limbic system by chronic ethanol consumption, temporally coinciding with up-regulation of NMDA receptors. tPA interacts with NR2B-containing NMDA receptors and is required for up-regulation of the NR2B subunit in response to ethanol. As a consequence, tPA-deficient mice have reduced NR2B, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, and seizures after EW. tPA-mediated facilitation of EW seizures is abolished by NR2B-specific NMDA antagonist ifenprodil. These results indicate that tPA mediates the development of physical dependence on ethanol by regulating NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

  1. Reduction of seizure occurrence from exposure to auditory stimulation in individuals with neurological handicaps: a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bodner, Mark; Turner, Robert P; Schwacke, John; Bowers, Christopher; Norment, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    ... by passive exposure to a specific auditory stimulus (particular music). The specific type of stimulation had been determined in previous studies to evoke anti-epileptiform/anti-seizure brain activity...

  2. Reduction of Seizure Occurrence from Exposure to Auditory Stimulation in Individuals with Neurological Handicaps: A Randomized Controlled Trial: e45303

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mark Bodner; Robert P Turner; John Schwacke; Christopher Bowers; Caroline Norment

    2012-01-01

    ... evoked by passive exposure to a specific auditory stimulus (particular music). The specific type of stimulation had been determined in previous studies to evoke anti-epileptiform/anti-seizure brain activity...

  3. FEBRILE SEIZURE IN THALASSEMIC PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroor INALOO

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveFebrile seizure is the most common seizure disorder in children. Its pathophysiology is not fully understood yet; however, some risk factors have been cited for it. Iron is one of these influential elements and is involved in the metabolism of some neurotransmitters which are reduced in irondeficiency anemia and also increases the sensitivity of neural cells during a febrile episode. The present study aimed to determine the rate of febrile seizure in thalassemic patients and to compare it with the corresponding rate in the normal population.Materials & MethodsThis descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 766 patients with thalassemia major. They were all older than 6 months and were referred to Dastghaib Cooly's Clinic, affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, from Oct 2006 to May 2007, and 766 normal and healthy children as the control group. Questionnaires containing demographic data and past history of febrile seizure, age of febrile seizure, number of episodes, hospitalization, and related family history were prepared and filled through interviewing the parents.ResultsFebrile seizure was detected in 7 cases of the patient group (0.9% versus 18 cases (2.3% of the control group. The frequency of febrile seizure in the controls was 2.5 times more than that in the thalassemia group, which was statistically significant (P ConclusionThis study showed a lower rate of febrile convulsion in thalassemic patients compared to the control group. Accordingly, it could be suggested that high iron storage is a protective factor against febrile convulsion.Keywords:seizure, febrile, thalassemia, convulsion

  4. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  5. Can Seizure-Alert Dogs predict seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen W; Goldstein, Laura H

    2011-12-01

    An index observation where a dog was trained to alert to, as well as respond to, human tonic-clonic seizures led to further research and refinement of training techniques. This was followed by anecdotal reports of pet dogs spontaneously anticipating human epileptic seizures. An industry has since developed training Seizure-Alert Dogs (SADs) to give humans warnings of their seizures. In some cases this has been accompanied by a reduction in seizure frequency. SADs may be trained along with the person with epilepsy, responding specifically to that person's seizures, or may be trained separately. Recent sceptical reports of non-epileptic seizures in some people with SADs have cast doubt on dogs' ability to anticipate true epileptic seizures. This may reflect selection criteria for training programmes as well as training methods used, but does not necessarily indicate that SADs might not be able to predict epileptic seizures. Whether the seizures are epileptic or non-epileptic, it is speculated that SADs probably alert to subtle pre-ictal human behaviour changes, but may also be sensitive to heart rate or olfactory cues. As yet, however, no rigorous data exist as to whether seizure prediction by SADS is better than chance, and what false positive and negative prediction rates might be.

  6. Deep Recurrent Neural Networks for seizure detection and early seizure detection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talathi, S. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Epilepsy is common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.6-0.8 % of world population. Epileptic patients suffer from chronic unprovoked seizures, which can result in broad spectrum of debilitating medical and social consequences. Since seizures, in general, occur infrequently and are unpredictable, automated seizure detection systems are recommended to screen for seizures during long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. In addition, systems for early seizure detection can lead to the development of new types of intervention systems that are designed to control or shorten the duration of seizure events. In this article, we investigate the utility of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) in designing seizure detection and early seizure detection systems. We propose a deep learning framework via the use of Gated Recurrent Unit (GRU) RNNs for seizure detection. We use publicly available data in order to evaluate our method and demonstrate very promising evaluation results with overall accuracy close to 100 %. We also systematically investigate the application of our method for early seizure warning systems. Our method can detect about 98% of seizure events within the first 5 seconds of the overall epileptic seizure duration.

  7. Closed-loop optogenetic control of thalamus as a new tool to interrupt seizures after cortical injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Jeanne T.; Davidson, Thomas J.; Frechette, Eric S.; Delord, Bruno; Parada, Isabel; Peng, Kathy; Deisseroth, Karl; Huguenard, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrocortical injuries, such as stroke, are a major source of disability. Maladaptive consequences can result from post-injury local reorganization of cortical circuits. For example, epilepsy is a common sequela of cortical stroke, yet mechanisms responsible for seizures following cortical injuries remain unknown. In addition to local reorganization, long-range, extra-cortical connections might be critical for seizure maintenance. Here we report in rats the first evidence that the thalamus – a structure remote from but connected to the injured cortex – is required to maintain cortical seizures. Thalamocortical neurons connected to the injured epileptic cortex undergo changes in HCN channel expression and become hyperexcitable. Targeting these neurons with a closed-loop optogenetic strategy demonstrates that reducing their activity in real-time is sufficient to immediately interrupt electrographic and behavioral seizures. This approach is of therapeutic interest for intractable epilepsy, since it spares cortical function between seizures, in contrast to existing treatments such as surgical lesioning or drugs. PMID:23143518

  8. Seizure control as a new metric in assessing efficacy of tumor treatment in low-grade glioma trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Edward K; Chamberlain, Marc; Schiff, David; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Armstrong, Terri S; Ruda, Roberta; Wen, Patrick Y; Weller, Michael; Koekkoek, Johan A F; Mittal, Sandeep; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Choucair, Ali; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; MacDonald, David R; Nishikawa, Ryo; Shah, Aashit; Vecht, Charles J; Warren, Paula; van den Bent, Martin J; DeAngelis, Lisa M

    2017-01-01

    Patients with low-grade glioma frequently have brain tumor-related epilepsy, which is more common than in patients with high-grade glioma. Treatment for tumor-associated epilepsy usually comprises a combination of surgery, anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Response to tumor-directed treatment is measured primarily by overall survival and progression-free survival. However, seizure frequency has been observed to respond to tumor-directed treatment with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. A review of the current literature regarding seizure assessment for low-grade glioma patients reveals a heterogeneous manner in which seizure response has been reported. There is a need for a systematic approach to seizure assessment and its influence on health-related quality-of-life outcomes in patients enrolled in low-grade glioma therapeutic trials. In view of the need to have an adjunctive metric of tumor response in these patients, a method of seizure assessment as a metric in brain tumor treatment trials is proposed. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The Role of Seizure-Related SEZ6 as a Susceptibility Gene in Febrile Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Mulley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty cases of febrile seizures from a Chinese cohort had previously been reported with a strong association between variants in the seizure-related (SEZ 6 gene and febrile seizures. They found a striking lack of genetic variation in their controls. We found genetic variation in SEZ6 at similar levels at the same DNA sequence positions in our 94 febrile seizure cases as in our 96 unaffected controls. Two of our febrile seizure cases carried rare variants predicted to have damaging consequences. Combined with some of the variants from the Chinese cohort, these data are compatible with a role for SEZ6 as a susceptibility gene for febrile seizures. However, the polygenic determinants underlying most cases of febrile seizures with complex inheritance remain to be determined.

  10. Ketamine Induced Seizures in an Autistic Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali S Verma

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An autistic child of eight years age, with attention deficit hyperactivity syndrome presented for tooth extraction under general anaesthesia. Ketamine was used for induction and the child developed seizures following its administration. Seizures were controlled, extraction done and post-operative period was uneventful. Ketamine was suspected to have caused seizures though safe use of Ketamine has been reported in autistic patient.

  11. FEBRILE SEIZURE IN THALASSEMIC PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroor INALOO,

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Febrile seizure is the most common seizure disorder in children. Its pathophysiology is not fully understood yet; however, some risk factors have been cited for it. Iron is one of these influential elements and is involved in the metabolism of some neurotransmitters which are reduced in irondeficiency anemia and also increases the sensitivity of neural cells during a febrile episode. The present study aimed to determine the rate of febrile seizure in thalassemic patients and to compare it with the corresponding rate in the normal population.Materials & MethodsThis descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 766 patients with thalassemia major. They were all older than 6 months and were referred to Dastghaib Cooly's Clinic, affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, from Oct 2006 to May 2007, and 766 normal and healthy children as the control group. Questionnaires containing demographic data and past history of febrile seizure, age of febrile seizure, number of episodes, hospitalization, and related family history were prepared and filled through interviewing the parents.ResultsFebrile seizure was detected in 7 cases of the patient group (0.9% versus 18 cases (2.3% of the control group. The frequency of febrile seizure in the controls was 2.5 times more than that in the thalassemia group, which was statistically significant (P < 0.05.ConclusionThis study showed a lower rate of febrile convulsion in thalassemic patients compared to the control group. Accordingly, it could be suggested that high iron storage is a protective factor against febrile convulsion.

  12. Marked Seizure Reduction after MCT Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Azzam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 43-year-old man with history of nonsurgical partial epilepsy who previously failed multiple trials of antiepileptic drugs. Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT were added to his regular diet in the form of pure oil. Subsequently, his seizure frequency was markedly reduced from multiple daily seizures to one seizure every four days. His seizures recurred after transient discontinuation of MCT over a period of ten days. His seizure improvement was achieved at a dose of four tablespoons of MCT twice daily with no reported side effects. He developed significant diarrhea and flatulence at higher doses. We conclude that MCT oil supplementation to regular diet may provide better seizure control in some patients. MCT oil supplementation may be a more tolerable alternative to the standard ketogenic diet.

  13. Low-dose esmolol bolus reduces seizure duration during electroconvulsive therapy: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W. van den Broek (Walter); A.F. Leentjens; A. Kusuma (Ari); J.A. Bruijn (Jan); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe have measured the effect of a bolus dose of esmolol 80 mg i.v. on heart rate, and systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP) and mean (MAP) arterial pressures during electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). We also assessed seizure duration using both the cuff method and tw

  14. Aggravation of atonic seizures by rufinamide: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektaş, Gonca; Çalışkan, Mine; Aydın, Ali; Pembegül Yıldız, Edibe; Tatlı, Burak; Aydınlı, Nur; Özmen, Meral

    2016-08-01

    Rufinamide is a novel antiepileptic drug used as adjunctive therapy in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and provides seizure control especially in tonic and atonic seizures. Rufinamide is expected to be effective in intractable epilepsy when atonic and tonic seizures exist. However, rufinamide induced seizure aggravation has been reported in a few patients, which was not associated with a specific type of seizure. A 12-year-old boy with intractable epilepsy had tonic and atonic seizures despite treatment with valproic acid (3000mg/day), levetiracetam (3000mg/day) and clobazam (40mg/day). Rufinamide was administered as adjuvant therapy. After 2weeks on rufinamide, he experienced atonic seizure worsening, and the frequency of epileptic discharges increased. The deterioration in seizure frequency and epileptiform discharges resolved when rufinamide was discontinued. Rufinamide may aggravate atonic seizures in patients with intractable epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased number of febrile seizures in children born very preterm: relation of neonatal, febrile and epileptic seizures and neurological dysfunction to seizure outcome at 16 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrgård, Eila A; Karvonen, Marjo; Luoma, Laila; Saavalainen, Pia; Määttä, Sara; Laukkanen, Eila; Partanen, Juhani

    2006-12-01

    In prematurely born population, a cascade of events from initial injury in the developing brain to morbidity may be followed. The aim of our study was to assess seizures in prematurely born children from birth up to 16 years and to evaluate the contribution of different seizures, and of neurological dysfunction to the seizure outcome. Pre- and neonatal data and data from neurodevelopmental examination at 5 years of 60 prospectively followed children born at or before 32 weeks of gestation, and of 60 matched term controls from the 2 year birth cohort were available from earlier phases of the study. Later seizure data were obtained from questionnaires at 5, 9, and 16 years, and from hospital records and parent interviews. In the preterm group, 16 children (27%) exhibited neonatal seizures, 10 children (17%) had seizures during febrile illness and 5 children had epilepsy. Eight children had only febrile seizures, and 3 of these had both multiple simple and complex febrile seizures and neurodevelopmental dysfunction. None of the 8 children had experienced neonatal seizures, 6 had a positive family history of seizures, but none developed epilepsy. The children with epilepsy had CP and neurocognitive problems, and all but one had experienced neonatal seizures; two of them had also had fever-induced epileptic seizures. In controls 3 children (5%) had simple febrile seizures. Children born very preterm have increased rate of febrile seizures compared to the controls. However, no cascade from initial injury via febrile seizures to epilepsy could be shown during the follow-up of 16 years. Symptomatic epilepsy in prematurely born children is characterised by neonatal seizures, major neurological disabilities and early onset of epilepsy.

  16. 43 CFR 3.16 - Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seizure. 3.16 Section 3.16 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PRESERVATION OF AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES § 3.16 Seizure. Any object of antiquity taken, or collection made, on lands owned or controlled by the United States, without...

  17. Temporal Lobe Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t respond to medication. More study is needed. Pregnancy and seizures The most important thing to remember ... have a seizure while doing them. Activities include: Swimming. If you go in water, don't go ...

  18. Early clinical experience with lacosamide as adjunctive therapy in patients with refractory focal epilepsy and nocturnal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Irene; Delgado, Rafael Toledano; Falip, Mercé; Campos, Dulce; García, María Eugenia; Gil-Nagel, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    This retrospective study reports the early experience with lacosamide (LCM) as adjunctive therapy in Spanish patients with refractory focal epilepsy. Sixty patients (mean age 38.3 years, 54% women, mean epilepsy duration 27.2 years, mean seizure rate 9.7/month, and 28% with mainly nocturnal seizures) taking ≥2 antiepileptic drugs (mean 2.2) were included. LCM maintenance doses were 200, 300, 400, and 500mg/day in 31, 16, 10, and 3 patients, respectively. Patients were followed up for 13-24 months. Twenty-eight patients (47%) reported a ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency. A ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency was reported by 65% and 40% of patients in the nocturnal seizure and diurnal seizure subgroups, respectively (p>0.05). Of the 28 responders, 2 achieved stable periods of seizure freedom of 6 and 11 months after starting LCM. Twenty patients (33%) reported drug-related adverse events (AEs); the most common was dizziness (16 patients). LCM was withdrawn in 8 patients (13%). There were no serious AEs. These results support the efficacy and safety of adjunctive LCM in patients with partial-onset seizures. 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Control of seizures in different stages of partial epilepsy: LACO-EXP, a Spanish retrospective study of lacosamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Vicente; López, Francisco Javier; Serratosa, José María; González-Giraldez, Beatriz; Campos, Dulce; Molins, Albert; Rodriguez Uranga, Juan; Mauri, José Angel; Salas-Puig, Javier; Toledo, Manuel; Sánchez-Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Antonio; Serrano-Castro, Pedro J; Saiz-Diaz, Rosa Ana; González de la Aleja, Jesús; de la Peña, Pilar; Asensio, Montserrat

    2013-11-01

    Lacosamide is approved as adjunctive therapy for focal epilepsies. The number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) tried is associated with prognosis. This multicenter, retrospective, observational study (LACO-EXP) in Spain in 500 adult patients with focal epilepsies examined the efficacy and tolerability of add-on lacosamide. Factors associated with better efficacy/tolerability were analyzed. After 12months, the responder rate (≥50% reduction in seizure frequency) was 57.1%, and the seizure-free rate was 14.9%. Efficacy was better when lacosamide was the first or second add-on AED, although there was a small chance to be seizure-free even for patients who had received ≤10 prior AEDs. The mechanism of action of concomitant AEDs is important in all the stages, but differences are smaller in the early stages. Lacosamide was generally well tolerated. A slower dosage-titration schedule was associated with a lower adverse event rate. Further investigation of the timing of initiation of lacosamide add-on therapy and ideal combinations of AEDs is required.

  20. Best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 1: intranasal lorazepam is an acceptable alternative to intravenous lorazepam in the control of acute seizures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Anna; Cullen, Jayne

    2013-09-01

    A short-cut review was carried out to determine whether intranasal lorazepam was as effective as intravenous lorazepam in the control of seizures in children. Eighteen papers were found using the reported search, of which one was directly relevant and another compared intranasal lorazepam with intramuscular paraldehyde. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses are shown in table 1. It is concluded that intranasal lorazepam appears to be a safe and effective treatment for this condition.

  1. Utility of different seizure induction protocols in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Gourav; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K

    2014-08-01

    Psychogenic non epileptic seizure (PNES) can be induced by several induction tests but their relative usefulness has not been evaluated. In this study, we report the sensitivity and specificity of various induction tests in the diagnosis of PNES and assess their discomfort level. The induction tests were: (a) compression of temple region (CTR), (b) verbal suggestion (VS), (c) tuning fork application (TFA), (d) moist swab application (MSA), (e) torch light stimulation (TLS) and (f) saline injection (SI). Up to 3 trials were done for each test except for normal saline injection which was given once. For comparison of these tests, patients with epileptic seizures were included as controls. The time to precipitate PNES was recorded and patients' discomfort levels were noted on a 0-10 scale. Video EEG was recorded in the PNES patients. 140 patients with PNES and 50 controls with epileptic seizures were included. The diagnostic yield of CTR was 65.7%, TFA 61.4%, MSA 60.7%, SI 55.6%, VS 54.3% and TLS 40.7%. These tests did not induce seizures in the controls. All these tests had 100% specificity and 100% positive predictive value in the diagnosis of PNES. The maximum discomfort was reported with SI and minimum with MSA. The similarity of efficacy and discomfort with CTR and TFA appear to be the most optimal induction techniques when compared with VS, AMS, TLS, and SI.

  2. Hippocampal Abnormalities and Seizure Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal volumetry and T2 relaxometry were performed on 84 consecutive patients (adolescents and adults with partial epilepsy submitted to antiepileptic drug (AED withdrawal after at least 2 years of seizure control, in a study at State University of Campinas-UNICAMP, Brazil.

  3. Safety Profile of Eslicarbazepine Acetate as Add-On Therapy in Adults with Refractory Focal-Onset Seizures: From Clinical Studies to 6 Years of Post-Marketing Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Helena; Vieira, Mariana; Costa, Raquel; Graça, Joana; Magalhães, Luís M; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2017-07-27

    Eslicarbazepine acetate was first approved in the European Union in 2009 as adjunctive therapy in adults with partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization. The objective of this study was to review the safety profile of eslicarbazepine acetate analyzing the data from several clinical studies to 6 years of post-marketing surveillance. We used a post-hoc pooled safety analysis of four phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies (BIA-2093-301, -302, -303, -304) of eslicarbazepine acetate as add-on therapy in adults. Safety data of eslicarbazepine acetate in special populations of patients aged ≥65 years with partial-onset seizures (BIA-2093-401) and subjects with moderate hepatic impairment (BIA-2093-111) and renal impairment (BIA-2093-112) are also considered. The incidences of treatment-emergent adverse events, treatment-emergent adverse events leading to discontinuation, and serious adverse events were analyzed. The global safety database of eslicarbazepine acetate was analyzed for all cases from post-marketing surveillance from 1 October, 2009 to 21 October, 2015. From a pooled analysis of four phase III studies, it was concluded that the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events, treatment-emergent adverse events leading to discontinuation, and adverse drug reactions were dose dependent. Dizziness, somnolence, headache, and nausea were the most common treatment-emergent adverse events (≥10% of patients) and the majority were of mild-to-moderate intensity. No dose-dependent trend was observed for serious adverse events and individual serious adverse events were reported in less than 1% of patients. Hyponatremia was classified as a possibly related treatment-emergent adverse event in phase III studies (1.2%); however, after 6 years of post-marketing surveillance it represents the most frequently (10.2%) reported adverse drug reaction, with more than half of these cases occurring with eslicarbazepine acetate at

  4. Is temperature regulation different in children susceptible to febrile seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Kevin E; Dooley, Joseph M; Wood, Ellen P; Bethune, Peggy

    2009-03-01

    To examine the relationship between the presence and magnitude of fever and susceptibility to febrile seizures, defined as a known family history of febrile seizures. Reanalysis of a case-control study dataset (Am J Dis Child. 1993; 147: 35-39). The magnitude of presenting fever was examined between the incident febrile seizure group (N = 75) and febrile control group (N = 150) for a family history of febrile seizures. The presence of fever was examined between the febrile control group (N = 150) and the afebrile control group (N = 150) for a family history of febrile seizures. Children with incident febrile seizures had a higher temperature in the emergency department than febrile controls (39.3 degrees C vs 39.0 degrees C, p = .004). Febrile control children with a known family history of febrile seizures had higher temperatures than those without a known family history (39.5 degrees C vs 38.9 degrees C, p = .04). A model of fever magnitude within the febrile group (seizures and controls) suggested that most of this relationship was on the basis of family history of febrile seizures rather than seizure or control status, with a possibility of interaction. Within the control children (febrile and afebrile), a known family history of febrile seizures was associated with fever (OR 3.4, 95% CI: 1.1,10.7). Children susceptible to febrile seizures through a known family history of febrile seizures appear more likely to present to emergency departments with fever, and when compared to their febrile counterparts, a fever of higher magnitude. This data supports Rantala's assertion "It may be that regulation of temperature is different in children susceptible to febrile seizures".

  5. Folinic acid-responsive neonatal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, O A; Miller, V S; Buist, N M; Hyland, K

    1999-08-01

    We report three cases of folinic acid-responsive intractable neonatal seizures. All patients were born at term following normal gestation and delivery. In the first infant, seizures began on the 5th day of life and were unresponsive to phenobarbital, pyridoxine, and valproate, but stopped within 24 hours of initiation of folinic acid treatment at the age of 6 months. Her sibling had died at age 6 months with intractable seizures. In the second infant, seizures began in the 2nd hour of life. These were initially controlled with phenobarbital; however, at 3 months of age she developed status epilepticus refractory to anticonvulsants, steroids, and pyridoxine and she required repeated induction of pentobarbital coma. Seizures stopped within 24 hours of starting folinic acid. Seizures and encephalopathy were noted in the third infant on the 2nd day of life. These were controlled with phenobarbital, but at 8 weeks of age seizures recurred and were difficult to control despite the addition of phenytoin. Immediately after folinic acid was initiated the seizures stopped. Breakthrough seizures in all patients have responded to increases in folinic acid; two of the three remain on standard anticonvulsants. All patients have global developmental delay. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging in the second patient shows diffuse atrophy, and in the third patient shows increased signal on T2 images in the white matter of the frontal and parietal lobes. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid from these patients using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection has consistently revealed an as-yet unidentified compound, which can be used as a marker for this condition. We suggest that cerebrospinal fluid be analyzed for the presence of this compound and a trial of folinic acid be considered in neonates with unexplained early onset intractable seizures.

  6. Seizure prediction: any better than chance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G; Chicharro, Daniel; Elger, Christian E; Mormann, Florian

    2009-08-01

    To test whether epileptic seizure prediction algorithms have true predictive power, their performance must be compared with the one expected under well-defined null hypotheses. For this purpose, analytical performance estimates and seizure predictor surrogates were introduced. We here extend the Monte Carlo framework of seizure predictor surrogates by introducing alarm times surrogates. We construct artificial seizure time sequences and artificial seizure predictors to be consistent or inconsistent with various null hypotheses to determine the frequency of null hypothesis rejections obtained from analytical performance estimates and alarm times surrogates under controlled conditions. Compared to analytical performance estimates, alarm times surrogates are more flexible with regard to the testable null hypotheses. Both approaches have similar, high statistical power to indicate true predictive power. For Poisson predictors that fulfill the null hypothesis of analytical performance estimates, the frequency of false positive null hypothesis rejections can exceed the significance level for long mean inter-alarm intervals, revealing an intrinsic bias of these analytical estimates. Alarm times surrogates offer important advantages over analytical performance estimates. The key question in the field of seizure prediction is whether seizures can in principle be predicted or whether algorithms which have been presumed to perform better than chance actually are unable to predict seizures and simply have not yet been tested against the appropriate null hypotheses. Alarm times surrogates can help to answer this question.

  7. SERUM ZINC LEVEL IN PATIENTS WITH SIMPLE FEBRILE SEIZURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad HEYDARIAN

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the serum zinc level of the patients with simple febrile seizure and compare them with febrile children without seizure.Materials & MethodsThis prospective case - control study was performed on 60 patients aged 6 months to 6 years from Apr. 2009 to Jan.2010 in Ghaem, Imam Reza and Dr. Sheikh Hospitals in Mashhad. The serum zinc level was assessed and compared between the cases (30 individuals who suffered from simple febrile seizure and the controls (30 individuals who had fever without seizure.ResultsMean serum zinc level was 663.7 µg /l and 758.33  µg /l in the case group and the control group, respectively (PConclusionIt was revealed that the serum level of zinc was significantly lower in children with simple febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure.Keywords: Simple febrile seizure, children, zinc, CSF (cerebrospinal fluid

  8. Do oral contraceptives increase epileptic seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2017-02-01

    Hormonal contraceptives are used by over 100 million people worldwide. Recently, there has been an emerging interest in studying the potential impact of oral contraceptives (OCs) on certain neurological conditions. It has been suspected for some time that hormonal birth control increases seizure activity in women with epilepsy, but there is little supportive data. Areas covered: Literature from PubMed and online sources was analyzed with respect to hormonal contraception and epilepsy or seizures. New evidence indicates that OCs can cause an increase in seizures in women with epilepsy. The epilepsy birth control registry, which surveyed women with epilepsy, found that those using hormonal contraceptives self-reported 4.5 times more seizures than those that did not use such contraceptives. A preclinical study confirmed these outcomes wherein epileptic animals given ethinyl estradiol, the primary component of OCs, had more frequent seizures that are more likely to be resistant. Expert commentary: OC pills may increase seizures in women with epilepsy and such refractory seizures are more likely to cause neuronal damage in the brain. Thus, women of child bearing age with epilepsy should consider using non-hormonal forms of birth control to avoid risks from OC pills. Additional research into the mechanisms and prospective clinical investigation are needed.

  9. Seizure semiology and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Diosely C; Jehi, Lara; Chapin, Jessica; Krishnaiengar, Suparna; Novak, Eric; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Najm, Imad

    2011-02-01

    The incidence of epilepsy is high in older individuals. However, epilepsy in the elderly may be underdiagnosed and undertreated because of diagnostic difficulties. The main goal of this study was to determine whether seizure semiology differs between older and younger adults with epilepsy in the outpatient setting. Fifty patients with focal epilepsy aged 55 years and older and 50 patients aged between 18 and 45 years were included. Review of medical records contained detailed seizure description. There were no differences in seizure semiology between groups, except that subtle perceptions of transient confusion were seen in older patients but not in younger patients (P=0.0028). Older patients had less generalized motor seizures, but the differences between groups did not reach significance (P=0.01). Older patients may present with subtle symptoms of seizures characterized by brief periods of confusion, which may contribute to greater difficulty diagnosing seizures in the elderly. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Value and limitations of seizure semiology in localizing seizure onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Elson L

    2006-08-01

    Seizure semiology has been the foundation of clinical diagnosis of seizure disorders. This article discusses the value and the limitations of behavioral features of seizure episodes in localizing seizure onset. Studies have shown that some semiologic features of seizures are highly accurate in the hemispheric lateralization and lobar localization of seizures. There is good agreement between blinded reviewers in lateralizing video-recorded seizures in temporal lobe and extratemporal lobe epilepsies. However, seizure semiology alone should not be used to determine the site of seizure onset. Each semiologic feature may falsely localize seizure onset. Seizure semiology in some patients may signify the site of seizure propagation rather than origination. Moreover, seizure semiology may not be as reliable in multifocal epilepsies as it is in unifocal epilepsies. Many semiologic features of seizures of adults are often missing in seizures of children. Seizure semiology should be analyzed and integrated with EEG and neuroimaging data to localize the seizure focus. A sample of the recorded seizures should be shown to the patient's relatives or friends to verify that it is representative of habitual seizures.

  11. Seizures in patients with cerebral hemiatrophy: A prognostic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Jaiswal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Cerebral hemiatrophy is a common childhood disease. It clinically manifests with seizures, hemiparesis and mental retardation. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, previously untreated patients with seizures and cerebral hemiatrophy were recruited. Cerebral hemiatrophy was diagnosed on the basis of hemispheric ratio. Patients with acquired hemiconvulsion, hemiplegia, and epilepsy (HHE syndrome were included in group A. Group B included patients with congenital HHE syndrome. Patients were followed up for 6 months for seizure recurrence. Results: Out of 42 patients 26 were in group A and 16 were in group B. After 6 months, there was significant reduction in seizure frequency (P < 0.0001 in both the groups. At least 50% reduction in seizure frequency was noted in all the patients. Complete seizure freedom was observed in 15 (35.7% patients. Seizure recurrences were significantly higher (P = 0.008 in group A. On univariate analysis, predictors of seizure recurrences were history of febrile seizures (P = 0.013, hippocampal sclerosis (P = 0.001, thalamic atrophy (P = 0.001, basal ganglia atrophy (P = 0.001, cerebellar atrophy (P = 0.01, ventricular dilatation (P = 0.001, epileptiform discharges at presentation (P = 0.023, complex partial seizures (P = 0.006 and status epilepticus (P = 0.02. On multivariate analysis, hemispheric ratio was the only significant factor for seizure recurrence. Conclusion: Patients with congenital hemiatrophy had better seizure control than that in patients with HHE syndrome.

  12. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psyche eLoui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG. However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here we describe an algorithm we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determine whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures vs. non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy.

  13. Nerve agent-induced seizures and their pharmacological modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonough, J.H.; Shih, T.M.; Adams, N.L.; Koviak, T.A.; Cook, L.A.

    1993-05-13

    Intoxication with nerve agents produces prolonged central nervous system seizures (status epilepticus) that can produce irreversible brain pathology (15). This report summarizes our recent findings regarding the neurotransmitter changes that occur in discrete brain regions as a function of seizure duration and the differential effectiveness of anticholinergic, benzodiazepine and excitatory amino acid (EAA) antagonist drugs in terminating soman-induced seizures when given at different times after seizure onset. These results are discussed in relation to a model we have proposed to explain the sequence of electrophysiological, biochemical and neurochemical events and mechanisms controlling nerve agent-induced seizures.

  14. Early and late postoperative seizure outcome in 97 patients with supratentorial meningioma and preoperative seizures: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhe; Chen, Peng; Fu, Weiming; Zhu, Junming; Zhang, Hong; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Jianmin

    2013-08-01

    We identified factors associated with early and late postoperative seizure control in patients with supratentorial meningioma plus preoperative seizures. In this retrospective study, univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis compared 24 clinical variables according to the occurrence of early (≤1 week) or late (>1 week) postoperative seizures. Sixty-two of 97 patients (63.9 %) were seizure free for the entire postoperative follow-up period (29.5 ± 11.8 months), while 13 patients (13.4 %) still had frequent seizures at the end of follow-up. Fourteen of 97 patients (14.4 %) experienced early postoperative seizures, and emergence of new postoperative neurological deficits was the only significant risk factor (odds ratio = 7.377). Thirty-three patients (34.0 %) experienced late postoperative seizures at some time during follow-up, including 12 of 14 patients with early postoperative seizures. Associated risk factors for late postoperative seizures included tumor progression (odds ratio = 7.012) and new permanent postoperative neurological deficits (odds ratio = 4.327). Occurrence of postoperative seizures in patients with supratentorial meningioma and preoperative seizure was associated with new postoperative neurological deficits. Reduced cerebral or vascular injury during surgery may lead to fewer postoperative neurological deficits and better seizure outcome.

  15. Fever, febrile seizures and epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Seizures induced by fever (febrile seizures) are the most common type of pathological brain activity in infants and children. These febrile seizures and their potential contribution to the mechanisms of limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy have been a topic of major clinical and scientific interest. Key questions include the mechanisms by which fever generates seizures, the effects of long febrile seizures on neuronal function and the potential contribution of these seizures to epilepsy. This revi...

  16. Viruses and febrile seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeijl, J.H. van

    2004-01-01

    We conclude that viral infections are the main cause of febrile seizures, with an important role for influenza A, HHV-6 and HHV-7. We showed that several viral infections not only contribute to initial febrile seizures, but also to recurrences. Viruses could not be detected in the CSF of children

  17. Management of provoked seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Usha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A provoked seizure may be due to structural damage (resulting from traumatic brain injury, brain tumor, stroke, tuberculosis, or neurocysticercosis or due to metabolic abnormalities (such as alcohol withdrawal and renal or hepatic failure. This article is a part of the Guidelines for Epilepsy in India. This article reviews the problem of provoked seizure and its management and also provides recommendations based on currently available information. Seizure provoked by metabolic disturbances requires correction of the triggering factors. Benzodiazepines are recommended for treatment of seizure due to alcohol withdrawal; gabapentin for seizure seen in porphyria; and antiepileptic drugs (AED, that are not inducer of hepatic enzymes, in the seizures seen in hepatic dysfunction. In severe traumatic brain injury, with or without seizure, phenytoin (PHT may be given for 7 days. In ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke one may individualize the AED therapy. In cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST, AED may be prescribed if there is seizure or computed tomographic (CT abnormalities or focal weakness; the treatment, in these cases, has to be continued for 1 year. Prophylactic AED is not recommended in cases of brain tumor and neurosurgical procedures and if patient is on an AED it can be stopped after 1 week.

  18. Reliability of seizure semiology in patients with 2 seizure foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathke, Kevin M; Schäuble, Barbara; Fessler, A James; So, Elson L

    2011-06-01

    To determine whether seizure semiology is reliable in localizing and distinguishing seizures at 2 independent brain foci in the same patient. Two masked reviewers localized seizures from 2 foci by their clinical semiology and intracranial electroencephalograms (EEGs). Epilepsy monitoring unit of referral comprehensive epilepsy program. Seventeen consecutive patients (51 seizures) with sufficient video and intracranial EEG data were identified by reviewing medical records of 366 patients older than 10 years. The primary outcome measures were interobserver agreement between the 2 masked reviewers; the proportion of seizures localized by semiology; the proportion of localized seizures concordant with intracranial EEG localization; and comparison between concordant and nonconcordant seizures in latency of intracranial EEG seizure spread. Interobserver agreement was 41% (κ score, 0.16). Only 30 of 51 seizures (59%) were localized by seizure semiology. The focus localized by semiology was concordant with the location of intracranial EEG seizure onset in 16 of 30 seizures (53%). No significant difference was observed between concordant and nonconcordant seizures in relation to the speed with which the EEG discharge spread from the location of seizure onset to another lobar region (P = .09, Wilcoxon rank sum test). Clinical seizure semiology is not as useful as intracranial EEG in localizing seizure onset in patients with dual seizure foci.

  19. The adult seizure and social outcomes of children with partial complex seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camfield, Carol S; Camfield, Peter R

    2013-02-01

    Most intellectually normal children with focal epilepsy have partial complex or focal with secondary generalization seizures without a precise epilepsy syndrome. Their long-term outcome is largely unknown. Cases were identified from the population-based Nova Scotia Childhood Epilepsy cohort. Those eligible had seizure onset at 1 month to 16 years between 1977 and 1985, normal intelligence, ≥10 years of follow-up, only focal seizures and no benign epilepsy syndromes. There were 108 patients with partial complex with or without secondary generalization as the only seizure type(s) throughout (partial complex group) and 80 with secondary generalization as the only seizure type (secondary generalization group). Average age ± standard deviation at onset was 7.3 ± 4.5 years and follow-up was 27.9 ± 5.4 years. At follow-up, 57% of the partial complex group were in remission versus 81% of the secondary generalization group (P = 0.001). The partial complex group was more likely to be intractable or have undergone epilepsy surgery (36% versus 5%, P = 0.000). In the partial complex group, 28% had seizure free versus 5% in the secondary generalized group (P = 0.000). More patients in the partial complex group had undergone mental health assessments (59% versus 32%, P = 0.000), and 33% had a psychiatric diagnosis versus 15% in the secondary generalized group (P = 0.004). More patients with partial complex seizures had specific learning disorders (63% versus 45%, P = 0.03). Seven markers of poor social outcome were more common in patients with partial complex seizures (>2 markers: 34% versus 10%, P = 0.000). During 25-30 years of follow-up, >50% of intellectually normal patients with childhood-onset partial complex seizures had difficult-to-control seizures and learning and psychiatric/social problems. Most with secondary generalized seizures only had remission and better academic and psychiatric/social outcomes.

  20. Epilepsy after Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seinfeld, S. A.; Pellock, J M; Kjeldsen, Lone Marianne Juel

    2016-01-01

    Background A history of complex febrile seizures can increase the risk of epilepsy, but the role of genetic factors is unclear. This analysis evaluated the relationship between febrile seizures and epilepsy. Methods Information on the history of seizures was obtained by a questionnaire from twin...... epilepticus. There were 78 twins who developed epilepsy. The highest rate of epilepsy (22.2%) occurred in the febrile status epilepticus group. Concordance was highest in simple group. Conclusion A twin with febrile status epilepticus is at the highest risk of developing epilepsy, but simple febrile seizures...... and emotional burden. It is currently not possible to accurately identify which children will develop recurrent febrile seizures, epilepsy, or neuropsychological comorbidities. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  1. Seizure characteristics in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate seizure characteristic among multiple sclerosis patients with coexistent seizure activity compared to control group. Materials and Methods : This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted by reviewing the clinical records of patients with definite diagnosis of MS according to McDonald′s criteria from March 2007 to June 2011, who referred to the MS clinic of the university. Results : A total of 920 patients with a diagnosis of MS were identified, among whom 29 patients (3.15% with seizure activity (case due to MS with the mean age of 32.6 ± 6.23 years were analyzed. Also, fifty MS patients without any seizure occurrence with the mean age of 33.7 ± 7.4 years were used as our control group. In case group, seizure was general tonic clonic in 23 patients (79.3%, complex partial in four (13.8%, and simple partial in two (5.9%. The 26 available interictal EEGs in MS patients showed abnormal EEG pattern in 22 (84.6% of them, including focal epileptic form discharge or focal slowing in 10 (38.5%, generalized discharge (spike-wave, polyspike, or general paroxysmal fast activity in 10 (38.5%, and general slowing activity in 10 record (38.5%. MRI reviews of the 26 available brain MRIs showed subcortical white mater lesions in 22 (84.6% of patients with seizure. All MRIs were performed within one month after the first seizure episode. Amongst 48 available MRIs in our control group, 91.7% (44 cases showed periventricular lesions and in 8.3% (4 cases subcortical white matter lesions were reported. Conclusion : The result of this study demonstrated the higher rate of subcortical whit matter lesion in MS patients with seizure occurrence compared to control group.

  2. ATPergic signalling during seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Tobias; Alves, Mariana; Sheedy, Caroline; Henshall, David C

    2016-05-01

    Much progress has been made over the last few decades in the identification of new anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). However, 30% of epilepsy patients suffer poor seizure control. This underscores the need to identify alternative druggable neurotransmitter systems and drugs with novel mechanisms of action. An emerging concept is that seizure generation involves a complex interplay between neurons and glial cells at the tripartite synapse and neuroinflammation has been proposed as one of the main drivers of epileptogenesis. The ATP-gated purinergic receptor family is expressed throughout the brain and is functional on neurons and glial cells. ATP is released in high amounts into the extracellular space after increased neuronal activity and during chronic inflammation and cell death to act as a neuro- and gliotransmitter. Emerging work shows pharmacological targeting of ATP-gated purinergic P2 receptors can potently modulate seizure generation, inflammatory processes and seizure-induced brain damage. To date, work showing the functional contribution of P2 receptors has been mainly performed in animal models of acute seizures, in particular, by targeting the ionotropic P2X7 receptor subtype. Other ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptor family members have also been implicated in pathological processes following seizures such as the P2X4 receptor and the P2Y12 receptor. However, during epilepsy, the characterization of P2 receptors was mostly restricted to the study of expressional changes of the different receptor subtypes. This review summarizes the work to date on ATP-mediated signalling during seizures and the functional impact of targeting the ATP-gated purinergic receptors on seizures and seizure-induced pathology. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'.

  3. Clinical characteristics of epileptic seizures in a case of dihydropteridine reductase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoko Furujo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the clinical characteristics and efficacy of neurotransmitters and levetiracetam in a patient with hyperphenylalaninemia due to dihydropteridine reductase (DHPR deficiency who developed epileptic seizures. A boy with DHPR deficiency, who had been successfully treated with tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4, levodopa, and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP since he was 2 months old, started having monthly episodes of blurred vision, loss of consciousness, and falls at the age of 12 years. He was taking BH4 510 mg/day, levodopa 670 mg/day, 5-HTP 670 mg/day, and entacapone 300 mg/day. We evaluated the seizure semiology, EEG findings, and efficacy of levodopa, 5-HTP, and levetiracetam (LEV. His seizures were comprised of an abrupt loss of awareness and eye deviation to the right. Interictal EEG showed slightly slow posterior-dominant rhythm in 7–8 Hz; intermittent, irregular slowing in the bilateral parieto-occipital region; and multiregional independent spikes in bilateral hemispheres. Ictal EEG showed a seizure pattern starting at the left temporal region. Brain MRI showed diffuse signal increase of deep white matter on T2-weighted and FLAIR images. Dosage increase of levodopa to 1340 mg/day, of 5-HTP to 1500 mg/day, or of both did not suppress seizures. Levetiracetam 2000 mg/day markedly reduced seizures without any adverse events. Patients with DHPR deficiency can develop epileptic seizures of partial onset which can be successfully and safely treated with LEV.

  4. On the nature of seizure dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, William C.; Quilichini, Pascale P.; Ivanov, Anton I.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between ‘normal’ and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical

  5. On the nature of seizure dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Viktor K; Stacey, William C; Quilichini, Pascale P; Ivanov, Anton I; Bernard, Christophe

    2014-08-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between 'normal' and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical

  6. SEIZURE SEVERITY AS AN ALTERNATIVE MEASURE OF OUTCOME IN EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koraliya S. Todorova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Seizure severity emerges as an important aspect of epilepsy. This is most relevant in refractory patients in whom complete remission of seizures is unlikely and reduced seizure severity may be a significant determinant of psychosocial well-being with a consequent improvement in quality of life (QOL. Thus a valid measure of seizure severity can serve both as an indicator of clinical outcome and as an evaluation tool of the interaction between seizures and the psychosocial complications of epilepsy.After a brief review of the most frequently used scales measuring seizure severity in adults with epilepsy we have explored the relationship between seizure severity and QOL in a set of 103 patients. Two self-evaluation questionnaires were applied: the Seizure Severity Questionnaire (SSQ and the Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31. The severity of the coexisting depression, an important confounder in the relationship between seizure severity and QOL, was assessed by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17.All domains of the Quality-of-Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31 correlated highly significantly with seizure severity (p≤0.01. The correlation was strong for the Overall score (r=-0.70; p≤0.001 and the Seizure worry domain (r=-0.71; p≤0.001. When the potentially confounding effect of depression was controlled for, the regression of seizure severity with the QOLIE-31 Overall score (P=0.001; R²=0.56 and the Seizure worry domain (P=0.001; R²=0.50 remained significant. These findings indicate that seizure severity is strongly associated with QOL in epilepsy and could be used as an alternative indicator of outcome in clinical research.

  7. Assimilating seizure dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Ullah

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state-the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics.

  8. Diazepam for Febrile Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy and side effects of intermittent oral diazepam for the prevention of febrile seizure recurrence were investigated in the Departments of Clinical Pharmacology, Neurosurgery, and Biostatistics, University of Tours, France.

  9. Seizures Induced by Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ogunyemi

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Musicogenic epilepsy is a rare disorder. Much remains to be learned about the electroclinical features. This report describes a patient who has been followed at our institution for 17 years, and was investigated with long-term telemetered simultaneous video-EEG recordings. She began to have seizures at the age of 10 years. She experienced complex partial seizures, often preceded by elementary auditory hallucination and complex auditory illusion. The seizures occurred in relation to singing, listening to music or thinking about music. She also had occasional generalized tonic clonic seizures during sleep. There was no significant antecedent history. The family history was negative for epilepsy. The physical examination was unremarkable. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal. During long-term simultaneous video-EEG recordings, clinical and electrographic seizure activities were recorded in association with singing and listening to music. Mathematical calculation, copying or viewing geometric patterns and playing the game of chess failed to evoke seizures.

  10. Febrile Seizure: Demographic Features and Causative Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed ESMAILI GOURABI

    2013-01-01

    parental knowledge, attitudes, concerns and practices. J Formos Med Assoc. 2006 Jan;105(1:38-48. Vaswani RK, Dharaskar PG, Kulkarni S, Ghosh K. Iron deficiency as a risk factor for first febrile seizure. Indian Pediatr. 2010 May;47(5:437-9.Sadleir LG, Scheffer IE. Febrile seizures. BMJ. 2007 Feb;334(7588:307-11.Mohebbi MR, Holden KR, Butler IJ. FIRST: a practical approach to the causes and management of febrile seizures. J Child Neurol. 2008 Dec;23(12:1484-9.Salehi Omran M, Khalilian E, Mehdipour E et al. Febrile seizures in North Iranian children: Epidemiology and clinical feature. J Pediatr Neurol. 2008;6(1:39-42.Bidabadi E, Mashouf M. Association between iron deficiency anemia and first febrile convulsion. A case-control study. Seizure. 2009 Jun;18(5:347-51.Vahidnia F, Eskenazi B, Jewell N. Maternal smoking, alcohol drinking, and febrile convulsion. Seizure. 2008 Jun;17(4:320-6.Ashrafzade F, Hashemzadeh A, Malek A. Acute otitis Media in Children with Febrile Convulsion. Iran J Otorhinolaryngol. 2002;16(35:33-9.Millichap JJ, Gordon Millichap J. Methods of investigation and management of infections causing febrile seizures. Pediatr Neurol. 2008 Dec;39(6:381-6.Hosseini Nasab A, Dai pariz M, Alidousti K. Demographic characteristics and predisposing factors of febrile seizures in children admitted to Hospital No. 1 of Kerman University of Medical Sciences. J Med Counc Islam Repub Iran. 2006;24(2:107-12.Keller A, Saucier D, Sheerin A, Yager J. Febrile convulsions affect ultrasonic vocalizations in the rat pup. Epilepsy Behav. 2004 Oct;5(5:649-54.Ogihara M, Shirakawa S, Miyajima T, Takekuma K, Hoshika A. Diurnal variation in febrile convulsions. Pediatr Neurol. 2010 Jun;42(6:409-12.Fallah R, Akhavan S, Mir Sadat Nasseri F. Clinical and demographic characteristics of first febrile seizure in children. J Shaeed Sdoughi Uni Med Sci Yazd. 2009;16(5:61-5.Khodapanahande F, VahidHarandi N, Esmaeli F. Evaluation of seasonal variation and circadian rhythm of febrile seizures in

  11. Refractory seizures associated with an organic aciduria in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Simon; McGrotty, Yvonne L; Abramson, Carley J; Jakobs, Cornelis

    2007-01-01

    A 6-month-old, female Cavalier King Charles spaniel exhibited seizures that were difficult to control with standard anticonvulsants over a 12-month period. The diagnosis of an organic aciduria with excessive excretion of hexanoylglycine was determined when the dog was 20 months old. Recurrent and cluster seizures were eventually controlled with the addition of levetiracetam to potassium bromide and phenobarbital.

  12. Unsupervised EEG analysis for automated epileptic seizure detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjandtalab, Javad; Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2016-07-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder which can, if not controlled, potentially cause unexpected death. It is extremely crucial to have accurate automatic pattern recognition and data mining techniques to detect the onset of seizures and inform care-givers to help the patients. EEG signals are the preferred biosignals for diagnosis of epileptic patients. Most of the existing pattern recognition techniques used in EEG analysis leverage the notion of supervised machine learning algorithms. Since seizure data are heavily under-represented, such techniques are not always practical particularly when the labeled data is not sufficiently available or when disease progression is rapid and the corresponding EEG footprint pattern will not be robust. Furthermore, EEG pattern change is highly individual dependent and requires experienced specialists to annotate the seizure and non-seizure events. In this work, we present an unsupervised technique to discriminate seizures and non-seizures events. We employ power spectral density of EEG signals in different frequency bands that are informative features to accurately cluster seizure and non-seizure events. The experimental results tried so far indicate achieving more than 90% accuracy in clustering seizure and non-seizure events without having any prior knowledge on patient's history.

  13. Seizure susceptibility due to antihistamines in febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tomoyuki; Sakaue, Yuko; Sokoda, Tatsuyuki; Sawai, Chihiro; Akabori, Shie; Maruo, Yoshihiro; Taga, Takashi; Ohno, Masaki; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether seizure susceptibility due to antihistamines is provoked in patients with febrile seizures. The study population comprised 14 patients with simple febrile seizures and 35 patients with complex febrile seizures. Detailed clinical manifestations were compared between patients with and without administration of antihistamine. The time from fever detection to the seizure onset was significantly shorter in the antihistamine group than that in the nonantihistamine group, and the duration of seizures was significantly longer in the antihistamine group than that in nonantihistamine group. Interleukin-1beta is thought to be associated with causing febrile seizures via its dual role as a pyrogen and convulsant substance. Moreover, interleukin-1beta may activate the turnover of hypothalamic neural histamine. These considerations, along with the present results, suggest that the depletion of hypothalamic neuronal histamine induced by antihistamines may increase neuronal excitability, thereby increasing seizure susceptibility in patients with febrile seizures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Seizures in neurofibromatosis. What is the risk?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouet, A

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence and the type of seizures associated with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and 2 (NF2) are not adequately characterized. NF1 has a birth incidence of one in 2500, and NF2 one in 25000. Seizures are an occasional complication in NF1 patients and there is no data for NF2 patients. Central nervous system tumors are always suspected, since NF1 and NF2 are caused by mutations in tumor suppressor gene controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this article is to provide a synthetic overview about epilepsy associated with NF1 and NF2 based on published studies. In NF1, the type of seizures and their response to therapy are reported, the heterogeneity of etiology is also discussed. For NF2 patients, no specific data are available; the current knowledge comes from series of NF2 patients for which seizures has revealed the disease or from isolated case reports of tumors associated with seizures. Cryptogenic epilepsy without anatomic defect is likely to be related to NF1, while seizures seem to be secondary to leptomeningeal tumors (meningioma, meningioangiomatosis) in NF2 patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Brain-responsive neurostimulation in patients with medically intractable seizures arising from eloquent and other neocortical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Barbara C; Kapur, Ritu; Barkley, Gregory L; Bazil, Carl W; Berg, Michel J; Bergey, Gregory K; Boggs, Jane G; Cash, Sydney S; Cole, Andrew J; Duchowny, Michael S; Duckrow, Robert B; Edwards, Jonathan C; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Fessler, A James; Fountain, Nathan B; Geller, Eric B; Goldman, Alica M; Goodman, Robert R; Gross, Robert E; Gwinn, Ryder P; Heck, Christianne; Herekar, Aamr A; Hirsch, Lawrence J; King-Stephens, David; Labar, Douglas R; Marsh, W R; Meador, Kimford J; Miller, Ian; Mizrahi, Eli M; Murro, Anthony M; Nair, Dileep R; Noe, Katherine H; Olejniczak, Piotr W; Park, Yong D; Rutecki, Paul; Salanova, Vicenta; Sheth, Raj D; Skidmore, Christopher; Smith, Michael C; Spencer, David C; Srinivasan, Shraddha; Tatum, William; Van Ness, Paul; Vossler, David G; Wharen, Robert E; Worrell, Gregory A; Yoshor, Daniel; Zimmerman, Richard S; Skarpaas, Tara L; Morrell, Martha J

    2017-06-01

    Evaluate the seizure-reduction response and safety of brain-responsive stimulation in adults with medically intractable partial-onset seizures of neocortical origin. Patients with partial seizures of neocortical origin were identified from prospective clinical trials of a brain-responsive neurostimulator (RNS System, NeuroPace). The seizure reduction over years 2-6 postimplantation was calculated by assessing the seizure frequency compared to a preimplantation baseline. Safety was assessed based on reported adverse events. Additional analyses considered safety and seizure reduction according to lobe and functional area (e.g., eloquent cortex) of seizure onset. There were 126 patients with seizures of neocortical onset. The average follow-up was 6.1 implant years. The median percent seizure reduction was 70% in patients with frontal and parietal seizure onsets, 58% in those with temporal neocortical onsets, and 51% in those with multilobar onsets (last observation carried forward [LOCF] analysis). Twenty-six percent of patients experienced at least one seizure-free period of 6 months or longer and 14% experienced at least one seizure-free period of 1 year or longer. Patients with lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 77% reduction, LOCF) and those with normal MRI findings (45% reduction, LOCF) benefitted, although the treatment response was more robust in patients with an MRI lesion (p = 0.02, generalized estimating equation [GEE]). There were no differences in the seizure reduction in patients with and without prior epilepsy surgery or vagus nerve stimulation. Stimulation parameters used for treatment did not cause acute or chronic neurologic deficits, even in eloquent cortical areas. The rates of infection (0.017 per patient implant year) and perioperative hemorrhage (0.8%) were not greater than with other neurostimulation devices. Brain-responsive stimulation represents a safe and effective treatment option for patients with medically intractable

  16. Predictors of seizure freedom after resection of supratentorial low-grade gliomas. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J; Berger, Mitchel S; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Chang, Edward F

    2011-08-01

    Seizures are the most frequent presenting symptom in patients with low-grade gliomas (LGGs), and significantly influence quality of life if they are uncontrolled. Achieving freedom from seizures is of utmost importance in surgical planning, but the factors associated with seizure control remain incompletely understood. The authors performed a systematic literature review of seizure outcomes after resection of LGGs causing seizures, examining 773 patients across 20 published series. Rates of seizure freedom were stratified across 7 variables: patient age, tumor location, preoperative seizure control with medication, seizure semiology, epilepsy duration, extent of resection, and the use of intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG). Gross-total resection was most predictive of complete seizure freedom, when compared with subtotal resection (OR 3.41, 95% CI 2.36-4.93). Other predictors of seizure freedom included preoperative seizure control on antiepileptic medication (OR 2.12, 95% CI 1.33-3.38) and duration of seizures of ≤ 1 year (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.22-2.79). Patients with simple partial seizure semiology achieved seizure freedom less often than those with complex partial, generalized, or mixed seizure types (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.26-0.80). No significant differences in seizure outcome were observed between adults versus children, patients with temporal lobe versus extratemporal tumors, or with the use of intraoperative ECoG. Seizure control is one of the most important considerations in planning surgery for low-grade brain tumors. Gross-total resection is a critical factor in achieving seizure freedom.

  17. MMR Vaccination and Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Hviid, Anders; Madsen, Kreesten Meldgaard

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: The rate of febrile seizures increases following measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination but it is unknown whether the rate varies according to personal or family history of seizures, perinatal factors, or socioeconomic status. Furthermore, little is known about the long-term outcome...... of febrile seizures following vaccination. OBJECTIVES: To estimate incidence rate ratios (RRs) and risk differences of febrile seizures following MMR vaccination within subgroups of children and to evaluate the clinical outcome of febrile seizures following vaccination. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS......: Incidence of first febrile seizure, recurrent febrile seizures, and subsequent epilepsy. RESULTS: A total of 439,251 children (82%) received MMR vaccination and 17,986 children developed febrile seizures at least once; 973 of these febrile seizures occurred within 2 weeks of MMR vaccination. The RR...

  18. Fever, febrile seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Céline M; Brewster, Amy L; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Baram, Tallie Z

    2007-10-01

    Seizures induced by fever (febrile seizures) are the most common type of pathological brain activity in infants and children. These febrile seizures and their potential contribution to the mechanisms of limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy have been a topic of major clinical and scientific interest. Key questions include the mechanisms by which fever generates seizures, the effects of long febrile seizures on neuronal function and the potential contribution of these seizures to epilepsy. This review builds on recent advances derived from animal models and summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying febrile seizures and of changes in neuronal gene expression and function that facilitate the enduring effects of prolonged febrile seizures on neuronal and network excitability. The review also discusses the relevance of these findings to the general mechanisms of epileptogenesis during development and points out gaps in our knowledge, including the relationship of animal models to human febrile seizures and epilepsy.

  19. Febrile and other occasional seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast, T; Carmant, L

    2013-01-01

    Seizures with fever that result from encephalitis or meningitis usually occur late in the course of febrile illness, and are focal and prolonged. Febrile seizures are by far the most common affecting 5% of the population, followed by posttraumatic seizures and those observed in the setting of a toxic, infectious, or metabolic encephalopathy. This chapter reviews the clinical presentation of the three most common forms, due to fever, trauma, and intoxication. Febrile seizures carry no cognitive or mortality risk. Recurrence risk is increased by young age, namely before 1 year of age. Febrile seizures that persist after the age of 6 years are usually part of the syndrome of Generalized epilepsy febrile seizures plus. These febrile seizures have a strong link with epilepsy since non-febrile seizures may occur later in the same patient and in other members of the same family with an autosomal dominant transmission. Complex febrile seizures, i.e., with focal or prolonged manifestations or followed by focal defect, are related to later mesial temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis; risk factors are seizure duration and brain malformation. Prophylactic treatment is usually not required in febrile seizures. Early onset of complex seizures is the main indication for AED prophylaxis. Early posttraumatic seizures, i.e., within the first week, are often focal and indicate brain trauma: contusion, hematoma, 24 hours amnesia, and depressed skull fracture are major factors of posttraumatic epilepsy. Prophylaxis with antiepileptic drugs is not effective. Various psychotropic drugs, including antiepileptics, may cause seizures.

  20. Intergenerational Transmission of Enhanced Seizure Susceptibility after Febrile Seizures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Dengchang; Feng, Bo; Dai, Yunjian; Wu, Xiaohua; Chen, Bin; Xu, Cenglin; Tang, Yangshun; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Shihong; Wang, Shuang; Luo, Benyan; Chen, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    .... Here, we demonstrate that prolonged febrile seizures induced by exposure of rat pups to a hyperthermic environment enhance seizure susceptibility not only in these hyperthermia-treated rats but also...

  1. Effects of the concurrent use of a reduced dose of propofol with divided supplemental remifentanil and moderate hyperventilation on duration and morphology of electroconvulsive therapy-induced electroencephalographic seizure activity: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Kohki; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2017-02-01

    The clinical adequacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) depends on not only seizure duration but also seizure amplitude and postictal suppression. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of combination of a reduced dose of propofol and moderate hyperventilation on seizure duration and electrical stimulus requirement for adequate ictal amplitude and postictal suppression. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Operating room at a municipal hospital. Sixty ASA physical status I or II patients scheduled to receive a total of >300 ECT treatments. Patients were randomly assigned to have the three interventions: the use of a standard dose (1mg/kg) of propofol and normoventilation (ETCO2 of 40-45mmHg) (group P/N), the use of a reduced dose (0.5mg/kg) of propofol with divided remifentanil injections and normoventilation (group RP/N), and the use of a reduced dose of propofol with divided remifentanil injections and moderate hyperventilation (ETCO2 of 30-35mmHg) (group RP/H). Patients in groups RP/N and RP/H received remifentanil 1μg/kg followed by propofol 0.5mg/kg for unconsciousness and thereafter remifentanil 1μg/kg immediately before the electrical stimulus. Patients in group RP/H had significantly longer durations of electroencephalographic (EEG) seizures in the early phase of the ECT course (Ppropofol combined with divided supplemental remifentanil under moderate hyperventilation during ECT may contribute to reduced electrical dosage due to the ability of its augmentation of seizure amplitude and postictal suppression in the late phase of the ECT course. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Management of dental patients with seizure disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Robert B; Sullivan, Steven M

    2006-10-01

    Dental practitioners from time to time must treat patients with epilepsy or similar seizure disorders. This article describes the various classification for epilepsy, explains how such disorders are evaluated and diagnosed, discusses management methods, and addresses related issues for special populations, such as pregnant women and elderly. In addition, the article offers information about what special steps dentists should take in treating such epileptic patients and others vulnerable to seizures and in preparing offices and staff for the possibility that a patient will have a seizure in the office. In general, a patient with severe, poorly controlled epilepsy should be treated in a hospital. Otherwise, a well-controlled patient should easily be treated in the office.

  3. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162...

  4. Epileptic seizures in patients with glioma: A single centre- based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmacotherapy Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Benin, Benin City, 300001 Nigeria. All rights ... Results: Preoperative seizures were noted in 33.8 % of glioma patients. ..... adverse effects and in any case, it is important to ... data or proper documentation. .... brain tumour-related epilepsy: seizure control, safety,.

  5. [Pyridoxine dependent seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K N; Ostergaard, J R; Møller, S M

    1994-10-17

    Pyridoxine dependent seizures is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Its manifestations are intractable epilepsy leading to death in status epilepticus. Treatment with pyridoxine prevents the seizures and normalizes the EEG. Early diagnosis is important for the intellectual outcome. In Denmark, the disease has occurred in a child of healthy Tamil immigrants, who are first cousins. The child's case story is described and points to awareness of increased occurrence of rare autosomal recessive disorders in immigrants from cultures with traditional consanguinity. We suggest giving a pyridoxine test dosis to all cases of severe epilepsy and status epilepticus in infants younger than 18 months.

  6. Classification of seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviello, James J

    2003-07-01

    The management of seizures and epilepsy begins with forming a differential diagnosis, making the diagnosis, and then classifying seizure type and epileptic syndrome. Classification guides treatment, including ancillary testing, management, prognosis, and if needed, selection of the appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED). Many AEDs are available, and certain seizure types or epilepsy syndromes respond to specific AEDs. The identification of the genetics, molecular basis, and pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy has resulted from classification of specific epileptic syndromes. The classification system used by the International League Against Epilepsy is periodically revised. The proposed revision changes the classification emphasis from the anatomic origin of seizures (focal vs generalized) to seizure semiology (ie, the signs or clinical manifestations). Modified systems have been developed for specific circumstances (eg, neonatal seizures, infantile seizures, status epilepticus, and epilepsy surgery). This article reviews seizure and epilepsy classification, emphasizing new data.

  7. Association between iron deficiency and febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Valia; Vargiami, Euthymia; Kontopoulos, Eleutherios; Kardaras, Panagiotis; Economou, Marina; Athanassiou-Mataxa, Miranta; Kirkham, Fenella; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between iron status and febrile seizures has been examined in various settings, mainly in the Developing World, with conflicting results. The aim of this study was to investigate any association between iron deficiency and febrile seizures (FS) in European children aged 6-60 months. Prospective, case-control study. Greek population in Thessaloniki. 50 patients with febrile seizures (cases) and 50 controls (children presenting with fever, without seizures). None. Haematologic parameters (haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, red cell distribution width), plasma iron, total iron-binding capacity, plasma ferritin, transferrin saturation and soluble transferrin receptors were compared in cases and controls. Plasma ferritin was lower (median [range]: 42.8 (3-285.7) vs 58.3 (21.4-195.3 ng/ml; p = 0.02) and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) higher (mean [Standard Deviation] 267 [58.9] vs 243 [58.45] μg/dl, p = 0.04) in cases than in controls. Results were similar for 12 complex FS cases (ferritin 30 (3-121 vs 89 (41.8-141.5ng/lL; TIBC 292.92 [68.0] vs 232.08 [36.27] μg/dL). Iron deficiency, defined as ferritin children with febrile seizures have lower Ferritin than those with fever alone, and iron deficiency, but not anaemia, is associated with recurrence. Iron status screening should be considered as routine for children presenting with or at high risk for febrile seizures. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Seizure ending signs in patients with dyscognitive focal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavvala, Jay R; Gerard, Elizabeth E; Macken, Mícheál; Schuele, Stephan U

    2015-09-01

    Signs indicating the end of a focal seizure with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness but without progression to focal or generalized motor symptoms are poorly defined and can be difficult to determine. Not recognizing the transition from ictal to postictal behaviour can affect seizure reporting accuracy by family members and may lead to delayed or a lack of examination during EEG monitoring, erroneous seizure localization and inadequate medical intervention for prolonged seizure duration. Our epilepsy monitoring unit database was searched for focal seizures without secondary generalization for the period from 2007 to 2011. The first focal seizure in a patient with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness and/or behavioural arrest, with or without automatisms, was included. Seizures without objective symptoms or inadequate video-EEG quality were excluded. A total of 67 patients were included, with an average age of 41.7 years. Thirty-six of the patients had seizures from the left hemisphere and 29 from the right. All patients showed an abrupt change in motor activity and resumed contact with the environment as a sign of clinical seizure ending. Specific ending signs (nose wiping, coughing, sighing, throat clearing, or laughter) were seen in 23 of 47 of temporal lobe seizures and 7 of 20 extra-temporal seizures. Seizure ending signs are often subtle and the most common finding is a sudden change in motor activity and resumption of contact with the environment. More distinct signs, such as nose wiping, coughing or throat clearing, are not specific to temporal lobe onset. A higher proportion of seizures during sleep went unexamined, compared to those during wakefulness. This demonstrates that seizure semiology can be very subtle and arousals from sleep during monitoring should alert staff. Patient accounts of seizure frequency appear to be unreliable and witness reports need to be taken into account. [Published with video sequences].

  9. Neuronal injury and cytogenesis after simple febrile seizures in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of juvenile rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazem, Amir; Jafarian, Amir Hossein; Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Gorji, Ali; Kheradmand, Hamed; Radmard, Mahla; Haghir, Hossein

    2012-11-01

    Although simple febrile seizures are frequently described as harmless, there is evidence which suggests that hippocampal damage may occur after simple febrile seizures. This study aimed to investigate possible neuronal damages as well as alterations in cytogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus following simple febrile seizures. Simple febrile seizure was modeled by hyperthermia-induced seizures in 22-day-old male rats. The brains were removed 2 or 15 days after hyperthermia in all rats with (n=20) and without (n=10) occurrence of seizures as well as in control animals (n=10). The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to estimate the surface numerical density of dark neurons. Ki-67 immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate changes of cytogenesis following simple febrile seizures. Hyperthermia induced behavioral seizure activities in 67 % of the rats. The numerical densities of dark neurons as well as the mean Ki-67 index (the fraction of Ki-67-positive cells) were significantly increased in dentate gyrus after induction of seizures by hyperthermia compared to both controls and rats without seizure after hyperthermia. Both the seizure duration and intensity were correlated significantly with numerical densities of dark neurons (but not with Ki-67 index). The data indicate that simple febrile seizures can cause neuronal damages and enhancement of cytogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, which were still visible for at least 2 weeks. These findings also suggest the correlation of febrile seizure intensity and duration with neuronal damage.

  10. Management of seizures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Radhi, A Sahib

    Seizures are common events in children and up to 10% of all children experience at least one seizure during their childhood. They can be triggered by many conditions such as fever, medications or injury. Febrile seizures are the most common types of seizures, affecting 3-4% of children. While epilepsy is typically recurrent and unprovoked, a single, isolated seizure is not epilepsy. Taking a detailed history of the seizure description helps establish the diagnosis. A video recording of the event can also support the diagnosis and rule out non-epileptic seizures that resemble seizures, such as pseudo-seizure. Seeing a child having a seizure, particularly if it is the first one, is usually frightening and distressing for the parents. First seizure should always be evaluated by health professionals because of a possible serious underlying cause. If the seizure occurs at home, the child should be placed in the recovery side position to prevent the swallowing of any vomit. The care of a child who does have epilepsy is best achieved by a community or hospital epilepsy specialist nurse. These nurses play a pivotal role in providing a close link between the epileptic children and their families. Such a nurse is also in an ideal position to establish a link between the doctor and affected families, offering valuable advice and support, and visiting the epileptic child at home.

  11. GELASTIC SEIZURES IN TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mironov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the historical description, nosological entity, clinical and electroencephalographic manifestations of gelastic seizures, a rare type of epileptic seizures manifesting as sudden attacks of spasmodic laughter. They describe their case of gelastic seizures in a child with tuberous sclerosis.

  12. Terminology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Ausserer, Harald; Nardone, Raffaele; Tezzon, Frediano; Bongiovanni, Luigi Giuseppe; Tinazzi, Michele; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-03-01

    Several different terms have been used to describe "psychogenic nonepileptic seizures" (PNES) in the literature. In this study, we evaluated the most common English terms used to describe PNES on Google and in PubMed using multiple search terms (https://www.google.com and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). The information prevalence of the five terms most frequently used to refer to PNES in PubMed were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by pseudo(-)seizure(s), non(-)epileptic seizure(s), psychogenic seizure(s), and non(-)epileptic event(s). The five most frequently adopted terms to describe PNES in Google were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by non(-)epileptic event(s), psychogenic attack(s), non(-)epileptic attack(s), and psychogenic non(-)epileptic attack(s). The broad spectrum of synonyms used to refer to PNES in the medical literature reflects a lack of internationally accepted, uniform terminology for PNES. In addition to "seizure(s)," lay people use the word "attack(s)" to describe PNES. Although considered obsolete, some terms, e.g., pseudoseizure(s), are still used in the recent medical literature. Adopting a uniform terminology to describe PNES could facilitate communication between epileptologists, physicians without specific expertise in epilepsy, and patients.

  13. Seizures Complicating Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical data of 116 patients, 1 month to <5 years of age, admitted for bacterial meningitis, and grouped according to those with and without seizures during hospitalization, were compared in a study at Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and other centers in Taiwan.

  14. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, R; Girija, A S

    2003-07-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent seizure is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that usually presents with neonatal intractable seizures. This syndrome results from an inborn abnormality of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase, which results in reduced pyridazine-dependent synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma amino butyric acid. The full range of symptomatology is unknown; but can be associated with autism, breath holding and severe mental retardation, bilious vomiting, transient visual agnosia, severe articulatory apraxia motor dyspraxia, microcephaly and intrauterine seizures. Parenteral pyridine injection test is a highly effective and reproducible test in confirming the diagnosis. Pyridoxine should be administered as a diagnostic test in all cases of convulsive disorders of infancy in which no other diagnosis is evident. Epileptic seizure discharges subside within 2-6 minutes after the intravenous injection of 50-100 mg of pyridaoxine. Once the diagnosis is confirmed, maintenance therapy should be continued indefinitely and doses increased with age or intercurrent illnesses. The maintenance dose of Bg needed is still not clear. There is a relatively wide range for the daily B6 dose necessary to control the seizure i.e., 10-200 mg/day.

  15. Catatonia in encephalitis and nonconvulsive seizures: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahaya, Kinshuk; Lardizabal, David

    2010-03-01

    A 20-year-old woman was admitted for psychosis. On further investigation, she was found to be have viral encephalitis and generalized nonconvulsive seizures. After the seizures were controlled, she remained in a prolonged catatonic state. Repeated intravenous benzodiazepine administration, improved her cognition dramatically. This case emphasizes that catatonia may occur after encephalitis and nonconvulsive seizures.

  16. Seizures following chloroquine treatment of type II lepra reaction: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenso, B E

    1998-06-01

    A case of tonic-clonic seizures following chloroquine treatment for leprosy reactions in a Nigerian male is reported. Seizures were controlled with phenytoin sodium capsules. A casual relationship between the seizures and chloroquine is suggested. There have been no previous reports of this adverse reaction in leprosy patients receiving chloroquine for treatment of reactions. The author recommends that chloroquine be used with caution especially in patients with seizures.

  17. A signal processing based analysis and prediction of seizure onset in patients with epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.; Hussaini, Jamal; Hussaini, Jalal; Delaviz, Ali; Delaviz, Fatemeh; Habibi, Shaghayegh; Ramezanpoor, Sara

    2015-01-01

    One of the main areas of behavioural neuroscience is forecasting the human behaviour. Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behaviour, sensations and sometimes loss of consciousness. An estimated 5% of the world population has epileptic seizure but there is not any method to cure it. More than 30% of people with epilepsy cannot control seizure. Epileptic seizure prediction, refers to fo...

  18. Brain serotonin content regulates the manifestation of tramadol-induced seizures in rats: disparity between tramadol-induced seizure and serotonin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yohei; Funao, Tomoharu; Suehiro, Koichi; Takahashi, Ryota; Mori, Takashi; Nishikawa, Kiyonobu

    2015-01-01

    Tramadol-induced seizures might be pathologically associated with serotonin syndrome. Here, the authors investigated the relationship between serotonin and the seizure-inducing potential of tramadol. Two groups of rats received pretreatment to modulate brain levels of serotonin and one group was treated as a sham control (n = 6 per group). Serotonin modulation groups received either para-chlorophenylalanine or benserazide + 5-hydroxytryptophan. Serotonin, dopamine, and histamine levels in the posterior hypothalamus were then measured by microdialysis, while simultaneously infusing tramadol until seizure onset. In another experiment, seizure threshold with tramadol was investigated in rats intracerebroventricularly administered with either a serotonin receptor antagonist (methysergide) or saline (n = 6). Pretreatment significantly affected seizure threshold and serotonin fluctuations. The threshold was lowered in para-chlorophenylalanine group and raised in benserazide + 5-hydroxytryptophan group (The mean ± SEM amount of tramadol needed to induce seizures; sham: 43.1 ± 4.2 mg/kg, para-chlorophenylalanine: 23.2 ± 2.8 mg/kg, benserazide + 5-hydroxytryptophan: 59.4 ± 16.5 mg/kg). Levels of serotonin at baseline, and their augmentation with tramadol infusion, were less in the para-chlorophenylalanine group and greater in the benserazide + 5-hydroxytryptophan group. Furthermore, seizure thresholds were negatively correlated with serotonin levels (correlation coefficient; 0.71, P seizure threshold (P seizures, and that serotonin concentrations were negatively associated with seizure thresholds. Moreover, serotonin receptor antagonism precipitated seizure manifestation, indicating that tramadol-induced seizures are distinct from serotonin syndrome.

  19. Complex partial seizures: cerebellar metabolism

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    Theodore, W.H.; Fishbein, D.; Deitz, M.; Baldwin, P.

    1987-07-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) with (/sup 18/F)2-deoxyglucose to study cerebellar glucose metabolism (LCMRglu) and the effect of phenytoin (PHT) in 42 patients with complex partial seizures (CPS), and 12 normal controls. Mean +/- SD patient LCMRglu was 6.9 +/- 1.8 mg glucose/100 g/min (left = right), significantly lower than control values of 8.5 +/- 1.8 (left, p less than 0.006), and 8.3 +/- 1.6 (right, p less than 0.02). Only four patients had cerebellar atrophy on CT/MRI; cerebellar LCMRglu in these was 5.5 +/- 1.5 (p = 0.054 vs. total patient sample). Patients with unilateral temporal hypometabolism or EEG foci did not have lateralized cerebellar hypometabolism. Patients receiving phenytoin (PHT) at the time of scan and patients with less than 5 years total PHT exposure had lower LCMRglu, but the differences were not significant. There were weak inverse correlations between PHT level and cerebellar LCMRglu in patients receiving PHT (r = -0.36; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1), as well as between length of illness and LCMRglu (r = -0.22; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1). Patients with complex partial seizures have cerebellar hypometabolism that is bilateral and due only in part to the effect of PHT.

  20. Self-esteem and psychiatric features of Turkish adolescents with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: a comparative study with epilepsy and healthy control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Say, Gokçe N; Tasdemir, Haydar A; Akbas, Seher; Yüce, Murat; Karabekiroglu, Koray

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and epilepsy are known to have psychosocial problems. The aim of the present study was to compare the psychosocial difficulties, history of stressful life events/abuse, psychiatric diagnosis, and self-esteem of adolescents with PNES to the ones with epilepsy and healthy controls at a tertiary care center in Turkey. Thirty-four adolescents with PNES diagnosed by video-EEG were compared with 23 adolescents that have epilepsy and 35 healthy volunteers. Comorbid psychiatric diagnoses of participants were examined by semi-structured interviews using Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version (KSADS-PL). Self-esteem of adolescents was evaluated by Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES). No differences in sociodemographic features were observed between the groups. The PNES group showed significantly higher rates of parental conflicts, difficulties in relationship with siblings/peers, school under-achievement, and history of stressful events/abuse. The rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders were 64.7% in PNES and 47.8% in epilepsy group. The most common disorders in both groups were attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depressive disorder. The rate of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was significantly increased in the PNES group. Additionally, adolescents with PNES displayed significantly lower levels of self-esteem than the other groups. It could be concluded that both disorders involved a high risk for developing psychiatric disorders; additionally, adolescents with PNES have higher rates of stressors and lower levels of self-esteem. Findings from this investigation point to the importance of psychiatric interventions in pediatric PNES and also epilepsy.

  1. Types of Seizures Affecting Individuals with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infantile spasms. Older children and adults may develop multiple types of seizures including generalized, complex partial and ... caused by air forced through contracted vocal cord). Limbs may be extended, ... bluish skin, possible loss of bladder or bowel control, usually lasts a ...

  2. Perampanel for tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Gregory L.; Wechsler, Robert T.; Wang, Xue-Feng; DiVentura, Bree; Brandt, Christian; Trinka, Eugen; O'Brien, Terence J.; Laurenza, Antonio; Patten, Anna; Bibbiani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess efficacy and safety of adjunctive perampanel in patients with drug-resistant, primary generalized tonic-clonic (PGTC) seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Methods: In this multicenter, double-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01393743; funded by Eisai Inc.), patients 12 years or older with PGTC seizures and IGE were randomized to placebo or perampanel during a 4-week titration period (perampanel uptitrated from 2 to 8 mg/d, or highest tolerated dose) and 13-week maintenance period. The primary endpoint was percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (titration plus maintenance vs baseline). The key secondary endpoint (primary endpoint for European Union registration) was 50% PGTC seizure responder rate (patients achieving ≥50% reduction in PGTC seizure frequency; maintenance vs baseline). Treatment-emergent adverse events were monitored. Results: Of 164 randomized patients, 162 comprised the full analysis set (placebo, 81; perampanel, 81). Compared with placebo, perampanel conferred a greater median percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (−38.4% vs −76.5%; p seizure responder rate (39.5% vs 64.2%; p = 0.0019). During maintenance, 12.3% of placebo-treated patients and 30.9% of perampanel-treated patients achieved PGTC seizure freedom. For the safety analysis (placebo, 82; perampanel, 81), the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events with perampanel were dizziness (32.1%) and fatigue (14.8%). Conclusions: Adjunctive perampanel was well tolerated and improved control of drug-resistant PGTC seizures in patients with IGE. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that adjunctive perampanel reduces PGTC seizure frequency, compared with placebo, in patients with drug-resistant PGTC seizures in IGE. PMID:26296511

  3. Study of factors responsible for recurrence of seizures in controlled epileptics for more than 1 years after withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamdhade S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available 531 epileptic patients, who had achieved remission mostly for 2 years or more were studied. The mean follow up period was 5 years. Recurrence was noted in 103 patients (19% after gradual withdrawal of AED, over a period of 3-4 months. 424 patients (81% did not have recurrence. The recurrence rate was influenced adversely by factors like adolescent age and later onset seizures, pre-treatment duration of symptoms more than 3 years, pre-treatment precipitating factors like emotional stress, lack of sleep and meals (however, number in each group is small, positive family history of epilepsy, focal neurodeficit, absence and myoclonic plus grandmal type of clinical seizures, paroxysmal generalized spike and wave discharges and generalized short polyspike and wave discharges in the pretreatment EEG, atrophic changes on CT brain scan (in small numbers, head trauma at birth or later and hereditary factors as etiology of epilepsy, and more than 30 number of seizures before achieving the remission. Factors like, sex, frequency of seizures, period of remission i.e. two years or more and number of drugs used to achieve remission, did not have any significant adverse effect. However, in the last parameter 95% remission was achieved by one or a combination of two drugs (72% and 23% respectively.

  4. Febrile seizures and genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camfield, Peter; Camfield, Carol

    2015-06-01

    To review the literature about febrile seizures and GEFS plus with special emphasis on management and outcome. Selected literature review. Febrile seizures are the most common convulsive event in humans, occurring in 2-6% of the population. The aetiology is complex with strong evidence for a heterogeneous genetic predisposition interacting with fever of any cause, with certain viral infections having a greater effect. A large amount of literature has established that febrile seizures have no long-term consequences on cognition or behaviour. Unfortunately, about 40% of children with a first febrile seizure will have a recurrence. The strongest predictor of recurrence is age febrile seizure. Epilepsy follows febrile seizures in ∼3% cases, with the concepts of simple and complex febrile seizures providing relatively weak prediction. Very prolonged febrile seizures may lead to mesial temporal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy although the degree of risk remains uncertain. Investigations beyond establishing the cause of the provoking fever are nearly always unnecessary. Treatment is mainly reassurance and there is some evidence that parents eventually "come to grips" with the fear that their children are dying during a febrile seizure. Antipyretic medications are remarkably ineffective to prevent recurrences. Daily and intermittent prophylactic medications are ineffective or have unacceptable side effects or risks. "Rescue" benzodiazepines may prevent prolonged recurrences for selected patients with a first prolonged febrile seizure although this has not been proven. Genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a complex autosomal dominant disorder usually caused by mutations in SCN1A (a voltage-gated sodium channel). One third of patients have febrile seizures only; two thirds have a variety of epilepsy syndromes, both focal and generalized. Febrile seizures may distress parents but rarely have any long-term consequences. Reassurance is the only

  5. Chronic omega-3 supplementation in seizure-prone versus seizure-resistant rat strains: a cautionary tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilby, K L; Jans, J; McIntyre, D C

    2009-10-20

    Several studies have shown fatty acid supplementation to be efficacious in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder/autism spectrum disorder (ADHD/ASD) and epilepsy. Interestingly, rats bred to be seizure-prone (Fast), unlike those bred for seizure-resistance (Slow), naturally exhibit behaviors and physiology reminiscent of ADHD/ASD in humans, suggesting a fundamental link between seizure disposition and these developmental disorders. To determine whether chronic omega-3 supplementation might ameliorate ADHD-like behaviors in the seizure-prone rat strain and/or alter natural predispositions for or against seizure in either strain, Fast and Slow weanlings were maintained on a control or omega-3-supplemented diet. As adults, rats were tested in paradigms known to elicit ADHD-like behaviors from Fast rats and then kindled from the amygdala to assess relative seizure disposition. While omega-3 supplementation did not significantly alter the relative hyperactivity, learning deficits or heightened seizure sensitivity naturally exhibited by Fast rats, it dramatically reduced their impulsivity to Slow-like levels. In contrast, typical behavioral patterns in Slow rats were largely unaffected by omega-3 supplementation yet their proclivity for seizure was greatly increased. This heightened vulnerability to seizure in Slow rats was paralleled by a drop in circulating plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) to match levels normally observed in Fast rats. These findings suggest a delicate balance between seizure predisposition and ADHD-like behaviors that can be influenced by omega-3 treatment. Further, a relationship between circulating NEFA levels and seizure susceptibility has surfaced that advocates caution when treating different genetic backgrounds with omega-3 fatty acids.

  6. Seizure disorders: update of medical and dental considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoopler, Eric T; Sollecito, Thomas P; Greenberg, Martin S

    2003-01-01

    Seizure disorders and epilepsy represent neurologic conditions that commonly are seen among patients requiring dental treatment. When dentists possess a working knowledge of seizures, in addition to an understanding of updated therapies for seizure management and oral complications associated with pharmacological therapy, they are able to treat patients with these disorders more effectively. Neurologic consultations and selecting an appropriate venue for treatment may need to be addressed prior to treatment, depending on the level of seizure control. Laboratory tests designed to evaluate medication levels, leukocyte counts, and clotting ability also may be required. Frequent recall visits may be necessary for seizure disorder patients who display adverse oral complications from medication, such as gingival hypertrophy, xerostomia, and oral yeast infections.

  7. SERUM ZINC LEVEL IN CHILDREN WITH FEBRILE SEIZURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mahyar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nFebrile seizure is the most common type of seizure in children and a variety of causes are considered to be responsible for it. There are some reports that zinc may have a role in febrile seizure. The aim of this study was to compare the serum zinc level in children with and without febrile seizure. In this case-control study, 52 children with febrile seizure compared with 52 healthy children based on serum zinc level. Both groups were matched for age, sex, weight, height, and head circumference. The age range of children was 9 months to 5 years. Serum zinc level was measured using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Of 52 children in case group, 30 (57.7% were male and 22 (42.3% female and among the control group, there was 31 (59.9% males and 21 (40.4% females. The mean age of children in case group was 27.13 ± 15.72 and in control group 28.49 ± 16.5 months. The mean zinc level in case group was 62.84 ± 18.40 mg/dl and in control group 85.70 ± 16.76 (P < 0.05. This study revealed that the serum zinc level in children afflicted with their first febrile seizure is lower than in healthy children and the difference is statistically significant. It seems that the zinc deficiency may play a role in febrile seizure.

  8. Electrocorticography and seizure outcomes in children with lesional epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelinas, Jennifer N; Battison, Andrew W; Smith, Sherry; Connolly, Mary B; Steinbok, Paul

    2011-03-01

    The use of electrocorticographically (ECoG)-guided cortical resection in children with lesional epilepsy is controversial. Given the important developmental issues associated with recurrent childhood seizures, sustained seizure control is a key therapeutic goal. We therefore evaluated the effect of the decision to perform lesionectomy or ECoG-guided cortical resection on seizure outcome and surgical morbidity in the pediatric population. We retrospectively analyzed seizure outcomes in 67 patients between the ages of 3 months and 16 years who underwent surgery for lesional epilepsy at British Columbia Children's Hospital. Thirty-four patients underwent ECoG, and 33 patients had lesionectomy without ECoG. One year post-operatively, 80% of patients who had ECoG-guided cortical resection or lesionectomy were seizure free. However, there was a trend toward improved seizure freedom in patients who had ECoG at most recent follow-up (79% patients with ECoG seizure free, vs. 61% with lesionectomy only; mean follow-up time 5.8 year, P=0.078). There was no increase in neurological morbidity in patients who had ECoG-guided cortical resection, and these patients were less likely to experience repeat epilepsy surgery. Overall, using ECoG to guide additional cortical resection may lead to more robust seizure freedom in children with lesional epilepsy without increasing their risk of surgical morbidity. © Springer-Verlag 2010

  9. [Epileptic seizures in childhood: from seizure type to diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milh, M; Ticus, I; Villeneuve, N; Hugonencq, C; Mancini, J; Chabrol, B

    2008-02-01

    Epileptic seizures can be difficult to recognize in infancy and childhood because the semeiology can be misleading. Already, in the acute phase, precise assessment of the seizure is required, with active questioning about circumstances of occurrence, clinical manifestations and postictal symptoms. Laboratory tests and toxicologic screening should only be performed according to the circumstances and clinical examination in order to distinguish between symptomatic seizure and epilepsy at the beginning. Epilepsy consists in repetition of several unprovoked epileptic seizure. Assessment of the age of onset, type of seizures, interictal EEG and the neuropsychological profile are instrumental for both the diagnosis of epileptic syndrome and the choice of the right treatment. Epileptic seizures cause distress to parents and the fear they experience of death must always be taken into account.

  10. Seizures and epilepsy in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore SA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sarah A Moore Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Seizures are a common presenting complaint in cats, although causes and options for the treatment of seizures in this species have been historically poorly described in the veterinary literature. Seizure manifestation in cats may be different than what is typically seen in dogs, but the underlying causes of seizure activity are the same. These include primary epilepsies, structural epilepsies, and reactive seizures. Although primary epilepsy was once believed to be rare in cats, we now commonly appreciate this syndrome, albeit at a lower frequency than in dogs. Because of this, a complete diagnostic work-up is recommended for all cats presenting for initial evaluation of seizures. Symptomatic treatment of seizures in cats is similar to dogs, with only a few limitations related to species-specific antiepileptic drug toxicities. The goal of this review is to summarize the recent veterinary literature related to feline seizures, with a focus on seizure classification, clinical manifestation, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment options. Keywords: antiepileptic drug, seizure classification, levetiracetam, zonisamide, phenobarbital

  11. Increased levels of HMGB1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in children with febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jieun; Min, Hyun Jin; Shin, Jeon-Soo

    2011-10-11

    Febrile seizures are the most common form of childhood seizures. Fever is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines during infection, and pro-inflammatory cytokines may trigger the development of febrile seizures. In order to determine whether active inflammation, including high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, occurs in children with febrile seizures or epilepsy, we analyzed cytokine profiles of patients with febrile seizures or epilepsy. Forty-one febrile seizure patients who visited the emergency department of Seoul National University Boramae Hospital from June 2008 to May 2009 were included in this study. Blood was obtained from the febrile seizure child patients within 30 minutes of the time of the seizure; subsequently, serum cytokine assays were performed. Control samples were collected from children with febrile illness without convulsion (N = 41) and similarly analyzed. Serum samples from afebrile status epilepticus attacks in intractable epilepsy children (N = 12), afebrile seizure attacks in generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus (GEFSP) children (N = 6), and afebrile non-epileptic controls (N = 7) were also analyzed. Serum HMGB1 and IL-1β levels were significantly higher in febrile seizure patients than in fever only controls (p febrile seizures than in fever only controls (p febrile seizure children. Although it is not possible to infer causality from descriptive human studies, our data suggest that HMGB1 and the cytokine network may contribute to the generation of febrile seizures in children. There may be a potential role for anti-inflammatory therapy targeting cytokines and HMGB1 in preventing or limiting febrile seizures or subsequent epileptogenesis in the vulnerable, developing nervous system of children.

  12. Seizure outcomes following multilobar epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkis, Rani A; Jehi, Lara; Najm, Imad M; Kotagal, Prakash; Bingaman, William E

    2012-01-01

    Outcomes following unilobar surgeries for refractory epilepsy have been well described. However, little is known about long-term seizure outcomes following multilobar resections. The aim of the current study was to identify long-term seizure control and predictors of seizure recurrence in this patient population. Records of patients who underwent multilobar epilepsy surgery at the Cleveland Clinic between 1994 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. A postoperative follow-up of at least 6 months was required. Patients were classified as seizure free if they achieved an Engel class I at last follow-up. Long-term chances of seizure freedom were illustrated using a survival analysis, and predictors of recurrence were identified using Cox proportional hazard modeling. Sixty-three patients with medically intractable epilepsy underwent multilobar surgical resections during the study period (mean follow-up of 4.6 years). Predominant resection types included extended occipital (temporoparietooccipital, parietooccipital, temporooccipital: 57%), frontotemporal (21%), and temporoparietal (17%). Mean age at surgery was 21.4 years and mean age at seizure onset was 10.1 years. Fifty-six percent of the patients underwent extraoperative invasive electroencephalography (EEG) evaluations. At 6 postoperative months, 71% (95% confidence interval (CI) 65-77) were seizure-free (SF), 64% (CI 58-70) were SF at 1 year, 52% (CI 46-59) were SF at 5 years, and 41% (CI 32-50) remained SF at 10 years. Forty-one patients had at least one breakthrough seizure after surgery (median timing of recurrence 6.1 months), with an Engel class 1 achieved again by last follow-up in 12 of these 41 cases. Nine patients required a reoperation. Patients who underwent extended occipital/posterior quadrant resections had more favorable outcomes as compared to the other groups. With multivariate analysis, the type of resection (p = 0.03), preoperative auras (p = 0.03), an incomplete resection (0.03), and the

  13. [Simple febrile seizure, complex seizure, generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus, FIRES and new syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno de Flagge, Noris

    2013-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common seizures in childhood. They have been observed in 2-5% of children before the age of 5, but in some populations this figure may increase to 15%. It is a common cause of pediatric hospital admissions and cause of anxiety for parents. Febrile seizures could be the first manifestation of epilepsy. About 13% of epileptic patients have a history of febrile seizure, and 30% have had recurrent febrile seizures. Their phenotypic characteristics allow, in the majority of cases, a classification of the seizure, an elaboration of a prognosis and to assume a specific therapeutic attitude. It is possible to describe a spectrum according to their severity, from the benign simple seizure to the more complex, febrile seizure plus, Dravet'syndrome, and FIRES. During the past decade, molecular genetic studies have contributed to the identification of genetic factors involved in febrile seizure and related disorders, making the necessity of a careful follow up of these patients in order to detect risk factors earlier. We have reviewed the medical literature to update current knowledge of febrile seizures, their prognosis and their relation to new epileptic syndromes.

  14. Seizure self-prediction: Myth or missed opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Michael; Mahlaba, Hector; Gavillet, Erika; Whittaker, Roger G

    2017-09-01

    Many patients report being able to predict their own seizures, and yet most seizures appear to strike out of the blue. This inherent contradiction makes the topic of seizure self-prediction controversial as well as difficult to study. Here we review the evidence for whether this ability exists, how many patients are capable of self-prediction and the nature of this capability, and whether this could provide a target for intervention. Systematic searches of bibliographic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO through OVID were performed to identify relevant papers which were then screened by the study authors for inclusion in the study. 18 papers were selected for inclusion as the focus of this review. On the basis of two studies, between 17% and 41% of patients demonstrate a significantly greater than chance ability to predict an upcoming seizure in the following 12-h time window. This risk is correlated with self-reported anxiety, stress, sleep deprivation, mood and certain prodromal symptoms. However, there is no evidence for any subjective experience which directly heralds an imminent seizure. Thus, while patients may be aware of seizure risk, and have some ability to predict seizure occurrence over a wide time window, they are unable to subjectively recognise seizure onset in advance. Utilising subjectively acquired knowledge of seizure risk may provide a widely implementable tool for targeted intervention. The risk fluctuates over a time course appropriate for pharmacotherapy which may improve seizure control and the side-effect profile of anti-epileptic medication. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of Plasma Melatonin Levels in Children With Afebrile and Febrile Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabak, Orçun; Altun, Demet; Arslan, Mutluay; Yaman, Halil; Vurucu, Sabahattin; Yesilkaya, Ediz; Unay, Bulent

    2016-04-01

    Melatonin modulates central nervous system neuronal activity. We compared the melatonin levels of patients with febrile and afebrile seizures during and after seizure with those of healthy controls. We enrolled 59 individuals with afebrile and febrile seizures (mean age, 6.09 ± 4.46 years) and 28 age-, sex-, and weight-matched healthy children. Melatonin levels were measured near the time of a seizure (0 to 1 hour) and at 12 and 24 hours post-seizure, and control melatonin levels were measured from a single venous blood sample. Plasma melatonin levels increased during seizures in the study group (P seizure plasma melatonin levels were significantly lower in the study group than in the control group (P seizures who had and had not used antiepileptic drugs. Daytime (8 AM to 8 PM) and nighttime (8 PM to 8 AM) post-seizure melatonin levels were not significantly different. Melatonin levels were lower in pediatric patients prone to seizures than in healthy children and increased during seizures. Further research is needed to test the role of melatonin in the pathophysiology and treatment of epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis mimicking breakthrough seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamille Abdool

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with a past history of primary generalized seizures, who had been seizure-free for 2 years on sodium valproate and presented with generalized tonic clonic seizures suggestive of breakthrough seizures. Examination revealed hypertension, impetiginous lesions of the lower limbs, microscopic hematuria, elevated antistreptolysin O titre and low complement levels consistent with acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated changes consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Hypertension was controlled with intravenous nitroglycerin followed by oral captopril and amlodipine. Brain MRI changes returned normal within 2 weeks. The nephritis went in to remission within 2 months and after 8 months the patient has been seizure free again. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome appeared to have neither short nor intermediate effect on seizure control in this patient. The relationship between posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and seizures is reviewed.

  17. The association between seizures and deposition of collagen in the brain in porcine Taenia solium neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Nina M; Trevisan, Chiara; Leifsson, Páll S; Johansen, Maria V

    2016-09-15

    Neurocysticercosis caused by infection with Taenia solium is a significant cause of epilepsy and seizures in humans. The aim of this study was to assess the association between seizures and the deposition of collagen in brain tissue in pigs with T. solium neurocysticercosis. In total 78 brain tissue sections from seven pigs were examined histopathologically i.e. two pigs with epileptic seizures and T. solium cysts, four pigs without seizures but with cysts, and one non-infected control pig. Pigs with epileptic seizures had a larger amount of collagen in their brain tissue, showing as large fibrotic scars and moderate amount of collagen deposited around cysts, compared to pigs without seizures and the negative control pig. Our results indicate that collagen is likely to play a considerable part in the pathogenesis of seizures in T. solium neurocysticercosis.

  18. Psychogenic seizures--why women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, M

    2000-01-01

    The only consistent finding in studies of psychogenic seizures is the approximately threefold higher incidence in women. Therefore, why women? Charcot and Freud emphasized the sexual aspects of the seizure as has the current interest in childhood sexual abuse. From case studies and review of the literature the author believes that psychogenic seizures in women express rage, fear, and helplessness against the dominant and abusive male rather than sexual conflicts. Emphasizing the aggressive component of seizures does not minimize the traumatic effects of sexual abuse but rather includes it as leading to rage and helplessness.

  19. Patterns of muscle activation during generalized tonic and tonic–clonic epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Wolf, Peter; Sams, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    was recorded from the deltoid muscles, on both sides, during 63 seizures from 20 patients with epilepsy (10 with generalized tonic and 10 with tonic–clonic seizures). Twenty age‐ and gender‐matched normal controls simulated 100 generalized tonic seizures. To characterize the signal properties we calculated...... the root mean square (RMS) of the amplitudes, the median frequency (MF), and the coherence. Based on the spectrograms of both epileptic and simulated seizures, we chose to determine the relative spectral power (RP) in the higher (100–500 Hz) frequency domain. Key Findings: During the tonic seizures...

  20. Effects of seizure severity and seizure freedom on the health-related quality of life of an African population of people with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawale, Michael B; Owolabi, Mayowa O; Ogunniyi, Adesola

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed at determining the effects of seizure severity and seizure freedom on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of people with epilepsy (PWE) in the presence of perceived stigma in a sub-Saharan African culture. Health-related quality of life was assessed using QOLIE-31 in 93 consecutive adults (56 males and 37 females) with epilepsy. They were stratified into seizure-free, low-moderate seizure severity, and high seizure severity groups based on the seizure type and the number of seizures in the previous 6months. Other illness variables and sociodemographic variables were also obtained. A 3-item perceived stigma scale was administered. A modified QOLIE-31 (excluding the epilepsy-specific items) was given to 102 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. There was moderate negative correlation between seizure severity and mean total HRQOL score as well as scores on the Seizure Worry (p=.000), Overall Quality of Life (p=.000), and Social Function (p=.001) subscales of QOLIE-31. Overall, the healthy control subjects had a higher mean HRQOL score compared with the PWE put together (71.0+11.1 vs 64.2±13.6, p=.001). However, there was no difference in the mean HRQOL score between the seizure-free individuals and the healthy controls (p=.270). Seizure severity was associated with HRQOL independent of perceived stigma on a multiple regression analysis. This study provides evidence that seizure severity relates to health-related quality of life in an inverse, graded manner and independent of perceived stigma. Seizure-free people with epilepsy can have quality of life comparable with healthy individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Seizures and Teens: Using Technology to Develop Seizure Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Patricia O.; Schachter, Steven C.

    2007-01-01

    Most people learn about seizures from their doctors, but others know only what they have seen on television. Unfortunately, visits to doctor's office aren't long enough to learn all that is needed, and often times, doctors and nurses aren't available to teach this information. Seizures are often represented inaccurately and too dramatically on…

  2. Characteristics of the initial seizure in familial febrile seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); E. van Beijeren; N.H. Wils; G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractComplex seizure characteristics in patients with a positive family history were studied to define familial phenotype subgroups of febrile seizures. A total of 51 children with one or more affected first degree relatives and 177 without an affected first degree relative

  3. Hypocalcemia-Induced Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Han

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is essential for both neurotransmitter release and muscle contraction. Given these important physiological processes, it seems reasonable to assume that hypocalcemia may lead to reduced neuromuscular excitability. Counterintuitively, however, clinical observation has frequently documented hypocalcemia’s role in induction of seizures and general excitability processes such as tetany, Chvostek’s sign, and bronchospasm. The mechanism of this calcium paradox remains elusive, and very few pathophysiological studies have addressed this conundrum. Nevertheless, several studies primarily addressing other biophysical issues have provided some clues. In this review, we analyze the data of these studies and propose an integrative model to explain this hypocalcemic paradox.

  4. Epileptic seizures precipited by eating: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Carlos Aleixo Sepulveda

    1981-03-01

    Full Text Available The case of one 23 year-old girl who had epileptic manifestations is reported. At first, generalized tonic seizures; afterwards, epileptic seizures precipited by eating. The electroencephalograms showed left temporal lobe disfunctions. Different types of drugs were used with no sucess. The best results were obtained by association of sodium valproate, clonazepan and phenobarbital. Comments are made about clinic and etiopathogenesis, believing the authors in the hipothesis of nervous structures chronic hiperactivity. To Walker8 the hiperactivity was reached by hormones production under neural control of specific cerebral centers. The continuous bombardment of epileptic discharges to hypothalamic centers is the probably responsible by epileptic seizures precipited by eating.

  5. Management Of Post Stroke Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of seizures in relation to stroke is 8.9%, with a frequency of 10.6 and 8.6% in haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, respectively. In subarachnoid haemorrhage the incidence is 8.5%. Due to the fact that infarcts are significantly more frequent than haemorrhages, seizures are mainly related to occlusive vascular disease of the brain. The general view is to consider stroke-related seizures as harmless complications in the course of a prolonged vascular disease involving the heart and brain. Seizures can be classified as those of early and those of late onset in a paradigm comparable to post-traumatic epilepsy, with an arbitrary dividing point of two weeks after the event. Most early-onset seizures occur during the first day after the stroke. Late-onset seizures occur three times more often than early-onset ones. A first late-onset epileptic event is most likely to take place between six months and two years after the stroke. However, up to 28% of patients develop their first seizure several years later. Simple partial seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, account for about 50% of total seizures, while complex partial spells, with or without secondary generalisation, and primary generalised tonic–clonic insults account for approximately 25% each. Status epilepticus occurs in 12% of stroke patients, but the recurrence rate after an initial status epilepticus is not higher than after a single seizure. Inhibitory seizures, mimicking transient ischaemic attacks, are observed in 7.1% of cases. The only clinical predictor of late-onset seizures is the initial presentation of partial anterior circulation syndrome due to a territorial infarct. Patients with total anterior circulation syndrome have less chance of developing epileptic spells, not only due to their shorter life expectancy but also due to the fact that the large infarcts are sharply demarcated in these patients. The optimal timing and type of antiepileptic drug

  6. Widespread changes in network activity allow non-invasive detection of mesial temporal lobe seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Alice D; Zepeda, Rodrigo; Cole, Andrew J; Cash, Sydney S

    2016-10-01

    Decades of experience with intracranial recordings in patients with epilepsy have demonstrated that seizures can occur in deep cortical regions such as the mesial temporal lobes without showing any obvious signs of seizure activity on scalp electroencephalogram. Predicated on the idea that these seizures are purely focal, currently, the only way to detect these 'scalp-negative seizures' is with intracranial recordings. However, intracranial recordings are only rarely performed in patients with epilepsy, and are almost never performed outside of the context of epilepsy. As such, little is known about scalp-negative seizures and their role in the natural history of epilepsy, their effect on cognitive function, and their association with other neurological diseases. Here, we developed a novel approach to non-invasively identify scalp-negative seizures arising from the mesial temporal lobe based on scalp electroencephalogram network connectivity measures. We identified 25 scalp-negative mesial temporal lobe seizures in 10 patients and obtained control records from an additional 13 patients, all of whom underwent recordings with foramen ovale electrodes and scalp electroencephalogram. Scalp data from these records were used to train a scalp-negative seizure detector, which consisted of a pair of logistic regression classifiers that used scalp electroencephalogram coherence properties as input features. On cross-validation performance, this detector correctly identified scalp-negative seizures in 40% of patients, and correctly identified the side of seizure onset for each seizure detected. In comparison, routine clinical interpretation of these scalp electroencephalograms failed to identify any of the scalp-negative seizures. Among the patients in whom the detector raised seizure alarms, 80% had scalp-negative mesial temporal lobe seizures. The detector had a false alarm rate of only 0.31 per day and a positive predictive value of 75%. Of the 13 control patients, false

  7. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20-25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure.

  8. Fluoxetine Overdose-Induced Seizure

    OpenAIRE

    Suchard, Jeffrey R

    2008-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman experienced a witnessed generalized seizure in the Emergency Department three hours after ingesting approximately 1400 mg of fluoxetine in a suicide attempt. Although the majority of fluoxetine ingestions are benign, seizures may occur after large intentional overdoses. [WestJEM. 2008;9:154-156

  9. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Aminiahidashti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20-25 cc lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure.

  10. Localization of pediatric seizure semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrame, Martina; Zarowski, Marcin; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; Wyllie, Elaine; Kothare, Sanjeev V; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between semiology of seizures in children and adolescents to the corresponding EEG localization. Charts of 225 consecutive pediatric epilepsy patients undergoing Video-EEG monitoring (VEM) over 2 years were reviewed. Seizure semiology recorded during VEM was classified according to ILAE seizure semiology terminology and EEG localization, and analyzed based on onset as defined by the EEG data (generalized, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital or multilobar). A total of 1008 seizures were analyzed in 225 children (mean age 8.5 years, range 0-20), with 50% boys. Auras and seizures with automatisms arose predominantly from the temporal lobes (psemiologies relate to specific brain regions, with overlap between focal and generalized semiological seizure types, as identified electrographically. Semiology of seizures can provide important information for epilepsy localization, and should not be overlooked, especially in patients undergoing pre-surgical evaluation. Separation of clinical seizure description and EEG findings may be useful, in particular when only incomplete information is available. i.e. during the first office visit. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Curcumin inhibits amygdaloid kindled seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Peng; Li, Xin; Lin, Hao-Jie; Peng, Wei-Feng; Liu, Jian-Ying; Ma, Yu; Fan, Wei; Wang, Xin

    2009-06-20

    Curcumin can reduce the severity of seizures induced by kainate acid (KA), but the role of curcumin in amygdaloid kindled models is still unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of curcumin on the development of kindling in amygdaloid kindled rats. With an amygdaloid kindled Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat model and an electrophysiological method, different doses of curcumin (10 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) and 30 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) as low dose groups, 100 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) and 300 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) as high dose groups) were administrated intraperitoneally during the whole kindling days, by comparison with the course of kindling, afterdischarge (AD) thresholds and the number of ADs to reach the stages of class I to V seizures in the rats between control and experimental groups. One-way or two-way ANOVA and Fisher's least significant difference post hoc test were used for statistical analyses. Curcumin (both 100 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) and 300 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1)) significantly inhibited the behavioral seizure development in the (19.80 +/- 2.25) and (21.70 +/- 2.21) stimulations respectively required to reach the kindled state. Rats treated with 100 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) curcumin 30 minutes before kindling stimulation showed an obvious increase in the stimulation current intensity required to evoke AD from (703.3 +/- 85.9) microA to (960.0 +/- 116.5) microA during the progression to class V seizures. Rats treated with 300 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) curcumin showed a significant increase in the stimulation current intensity required to evoke AD from (735.0 +/- 65.2) microA to (867.0 +/- 93.4) microA during the progression to class V seizures. Rats treated with 300 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) curcumin required much more evoked ADs to reach the stage of class both IV (as (199.83 +/- 12.47) seconds) and V seizures (as (210.66 +/- 10.68) seconds). Rats treated with 100 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) curcumin required much more evoked ADs to reach the stage of class V seizures (as (219.56 +/- 18.24) seconds). Our study suggests that curcumin has

  12. Rufinamide for generalized seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauser, T; Kluger, G; Sachdeo, R; Krauss, G; Perdomo, C; Arroyo, S

    2008-05-20

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is a catastrophic pediatric epilepsy syndrome characterized by multiple types of treatment-resistant seizures and high rates of seizure-related injury. Current available treatments are inadequate, leaving patients with few treatment options and opportunities. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the antiepileptic drug rufinamide in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Eligible patients between 4 and 30 years of age had multiple types of seizures (including tonic-atonic and atypical absence seizures) with a minimum of 90 seizures in the month before baseline and a recent history of a slow spike-and-wave pattern on EEG. After a 28-day baseline period, 139 eligible patients were randomized; 138 patients received either rufinamide (n = 74) or placebo (n = 64) in addition to their other antiepileptic drugs. The median percentage reduction in total seizure frequency was greater in the rufinamide therapy group than in the placebo group (32.7% vs 11.7%, p = 0.0015). There was a difference (p or=10% of patients receiving rufinamide) were somnolence (24.3% with rufinamide vs 12.5% with placebo) and vomiting (21.6% vs 6.3%). Rufinamide was an effective and well-tolerated treatment for seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  13. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SLEEP PROBLEMS AND NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL FUNCTIONING IN CHILDREN WITH FIRST RECOGNIZED SEIZURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byars, Anna W.; Byars, Kelly C.; Johnson, Cynthia S.; deGrauw, Ton J.; Fastenau, Philip S.; Perkins, Susan; Austin, Joan K.; Dunn, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy is associated with sleep disturbance, but little is known about how early this relationship develops and how it affects neuropsychological functioning. This study documented the frequency and types of sleep problems and examined how sleep problems are associated with seizures and neuropsychological functioning in 331 children following their first recognized seizure (ages 6 to 14) and in 225 sibling controls. Formal neuropsychological batteries were administered to all subjects. Sleep was measured using the Sleep Behavior Questionnaire and the Child Behavior Checklist. Sleep problems were more frequent in the seizure sample relative to siblings and previously published norms; bedtime difficulties, daytime somnolence and parasomnias were the most frequently occurring sleep problems. In the seizure group, sleep problems were related to seizure parameters and to neuropsychological functioning. Seizure patients with significant sleep problems had worse neuropsychological functioning on all measures. Findings demonstrate the significant impact of sleep disturbance on children with newly recognized seizures. PMID:18687412

  14. Moonstruck? The effect of the lunar cycle on seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxendale, Sallie; Fisher, Jennifer

    2008-10-01

    Recent reports on the effects of the lunar cycle on seizure occurrence have yielded mixed results. If the moon phase is influential, we hypothesized that this would be due to the moon's contribution to nocturnal illumination, rather than its waxing or waning state, and that significant correlations would not be apparent if local cloud cover were controlled for. We found a significant negative correlation between the mean number of seizures and the fraction of the moon illuminated by the sun (rho=-0.09, P<0.05) in 1571 seizures recorded in a dedicated epilepsy inpatient unit over 341 days. This correlation disappeared when we controlled for the local clarity of the night sky, suggesting that it is the brightness of the night and the contribution the moon phase makes to nocturnal luminance, rather than the moon phase per se, that may influence the occurrence of epileptic seizures.

  15. Nonepileptic Seizures: An Updated Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L.; LaFrance, W. Curt

    2016-01-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are a Functional Neurological Disorder/ Conversion Disorder subtype, which are neurobehavioral conditions at the interface of Neurology and Psychiatry. Significant advancements over the past decade have been made in the diagnosis, management and neurobiological understanding of PNES. This article reviews published PNES research focusing on semiologic features that distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures, consensus diagnostic criteria, the intersection of PNES and other comorbidities, neurobiological studies, evidence-based treatment interventions and outcome studies. Epidemiology and health care utilization studies highlight a continued unmet medical need in the comprehensive care of PNES. Consensus guidelines for diagnostic certainty are based on clinical history, semiology of witnessed typical event(s), and EEG findings. While certain semiologic features may aid the diagnosis of PNES, the gold standard remains capturing a typical event on video electroencephalography (EEG) showing the absence of epileptiform activity with history and semiology consistent with PNES. Medical-neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities are prevalent in PNES and should be assessed in diagnostic evaluations, and integrated into treatment interventions and prognostic considerations. Several studies, including a pilot multicenter, randomized clinical trial, have now demonstrated that a cognitive behavioral therapy informed psychotherapy is an efficacious treatment for PNES, and additional efforts are necessary to evaluate the utility of pharmacologic and other psychotherapy treatments. Neuroimaging studies, while requiring replication, suggest that PNES may occur in the context of alterations within and across sensorimotor, emotion regulation/processing, cognitive control and multimodal integration brain systems. Future research could investigate similarities and differences between PNES and other somatic symptom disorders. PMID:26996600

  16. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  17. Extent of surgical resection predicts seizure freedom in low-grade temporal lobe brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J; Han, Seunggu J; Berger, Mitchel S; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Chang, Edward F

    2012-04-01

    Achieving seizure control in patients with low-grade temporal lobe gliomas or glioneuronal tumors remains highly underappreciated, because seizures are the most frequent presenting symptom and significantly impact patient quality-of-life. To assess how the extent of temporal lobe resection influences seizure outcome. We performed a quantitative, comprehensive systematic literature review of seizure control outcomes in 1181 patients with epilepsy across 41 studies after surgical resection of low-grade temporal lobe gliomas and glioneuronal tumors. We measured seizure-freedom rates after subtotal resection vs gross-total lesionectomy alone vs tailored resection, including gross-total lesionectomy with hippocampectomy and/or anterior temporal lobe corticectomy. Included studies were observational case series, and no randomized, controlled trials were identified. Although only 43% of patients were seizure-free after subtotal tumor resection, 79% of individuals were seizure-free after gross-total lesionectomy (OR = 5.00, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.33-7.14). Furthermore, tailored resection with hippocampectomy plus corticectomy conferred additional benefit over gross-total lesionectomy alone, with 87% of patients achieving seizure freedom (OR = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.23-2.70). Overall, extended resection with hippocampectomy and/or corticectomy over gross-total lesionectomy alone significantly predicted seizure freedom (OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.11-1.26). Age seizure outcome. Gross-total lesionectomy of low-grade temporal lobe tumors results in significantly improved seizure control over subtotal resection. Additional tailored resection including the hippocampus and/or adjacent cortex may further improve seizure control, suggesting dual pathology may sometimes allow continued seizures after lesional excision.

  18. Increased seizure latency and decreased severity of pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice after essential oil administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroumanidou, Eleni; Kimbaris, Athanasios; Kortsaris, Alexandros; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Polissiou, Moschos; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos; Pagonopoulou, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with essential oils (EOs) from eight aromatic plants on the seizure latency and severity of pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ-) induced seizures in mice was evaluated. Weight-dependent doses of Rosmarinus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Mentha pulegium, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, Origanum dictamnus, and Origanum vulgare, isolated from the respective aromatic plants from NE Greece, were administered 60 minutes prior to intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a lethal dose of PTZ to eight respective groups of Balb-c mice. Control group received only one i.p. PTZ injection. Motor and behavioral activity of the animals after EOs administration, development of tonic-clonic seizures, seizure latency and severity, and percentage of survival after PTZ administration were determined for each group. All groups of mice treated with the EOs showed reduced activity and stability after the administration of the oil, except for those treated with O. vulgare (100% mortality after the administration of the oil). After PTZ administration, mice from the different groups showed increased latency and reduced severity of seizures (ranging from simple twitches to complete seizures). Mice who had received M. piperita demonstrated no seizures and 100% survival. The different drastic component and its concentration could account for the diversity of anticonvulsant effects.

  19. Increased Seizure Latency and Decreased Severity of Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures in Mice after Essential Oil Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroumanidou, Eleni; Kimbaris, Athanasios; Kortsaris, Alexandros; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Polissiou, Moschos; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with essential oils (EOs) from eight aromatic plants on the seizure latency and severity of pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ-) induced seizures in mice was evaluated. Weight-dependent doses of Rosmarinus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Mentha pulegium, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, Origanum dictamnus, and Origanum vulgare, isolated from the respective aromatic plants from NE Greece, were administered 60 minutes prior to intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a lethal dose of PTZ to eight respective groups of Balb-c mice. Control group received only one i.p. PTZ injection. Motor and behavioral activity of the animals after EOs administration, development of tonic-clonic seizures, seizure latency and severity, and percentage of survival after PTZ administration were determined for each group. All groups of mice treated with the EOs showed reduced activity and stability after the administration of the oil, except for those treated with O. vulgare (100% mortality after the administration of the oil). After PTZ administration, mice from the different groups showed increased latency and reduced severity of seizures (ranging from simple twitches to complete seizures). Mice who had received M. piperita demonstrated no seizures and 100% survival. The different drastic component and its concentration could account for the diversity of anticonvulsant effects. PMID:23819045

  20. Increased Seizure Latency and Decreased Severity of Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures in Mice after Essential Oil Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Koutroumanidou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of pretreatment with essential oils (EOs from eight aromatic plants on the seizure latency and severity of pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ- induced seizures in mice was evaluated. Weight-dependent doses of Rosmarinus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Mentha pulegium, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, Origanum dictamnus, and Origanum vulgare, isolated from the respective aromatic plants from NE Greece, were administered 60 minutes prior to intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of a lethal dose of PTZ to eight respective groups of Balb-c mice. Control group received only one i.p. PTZ injection. Motor and behavioral activity of the animals after EOs administration, development of tonic-clonic seizures, seizure latency and severity, and percentage of survival after PTZ administration were determined for each group. All groups of mice treated with the EOs showed reduced activity and stability after the administration of the oil, except for those treated with O. vulgare (100% mortality after the administration of the oil. After PTZ administration, mice from the different groups showed increased latency and reduced severity of seizures (ranging from simple twitches to complete seizures. Mice who had received M. piperita demonstrated no seizures and 100% survival. The different drastic component and its concentration could account for the diversity of anticonvulsant effects.

  1. Seizure outcome in 175 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy--a long-term observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfler, Julia; Unterberger, Iris; Dobesberger, Judith; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Walser, Gerald; Trinka, Eugen

    2014-12-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a genetic generalized epilepsy syndrome. Under appropriate antiepileptic drugs (AED) up to 85% of patients become seizure-free, but many may have a relapse after AED withdrawal. We retrospectively studied 242 patients with JME at the Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Austria (1975-2006). We analyzed age at seizure onset, age at last follow up, seizure types, photosensitivity, seizure outcome and neuroimaging findings; inclusion criterion was a medical treatment period of >2 years; exclusion criteria were traumatic or infectious brain injury before the onset of JME and/or gross structural pathology on neuroimaging. We identified 175 patients (111 women) with a median age at seizure onset of 15 years, (range 3-46) and a median age at follow-up (FU) of 38 years (range 14-87; median FU 8 years, range 2-38). Fourteen percent showed (24/175) photosensitivity on routine EEG. Seizure outcome: 62% (109/175) were seizure-free of myoclonic seizures (MS), generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCS) and absence seizures (AS) for >1 year, and 53% (94/175) for >2 years, including 16 patients (9%) without AEDs. Thirty-one percent (54/175) were seizure-free between 2 and 5 years, 15% (26/175) between 6 and 10, and 8% (14/175) >10 years; 38% (66/175) were not seizure-free. Not seizure-free patients had more often MS, AS and GTCS within the first year of epilepsy than those who were seizure-free at last FU (11% vs. 3%, Chi(2)=4.679, df=1, p=0.043). Seizure-free patients had more often MS and GTCS as last seizure types in the year before becoming seizure-free (37% vs. 15%, p=0.003), whereas in not seizure-free group MS only and GTCS only persisted. JME does not always need lifelong treatment, as a substantial minority of patients remain seizure-free without AEDs. AS, MS and GTCS at onset of the disease are indicators of poor long-term seizure control. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical and psychosocial characteristics of children with nonepileptic seizures

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    Chinta Sri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to present a comprehensive profile of clinical and psychosocial characteristics of children with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and to assess the short-term outcome of these patients. Materials and Methods: The subjects were consecutive cases of children with a diagnosis of nonepileptic seizures (N=17, mean age = 10.7 years, S.D. = 1.26 and two groups of control groups matched on age and sex: true seizure group and healthy controls. All the children were recruited from the out-patient services of the Department of Pediatrics of a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India. Detailed history taking and clinical examination was done in the case of every child. A standard 18 channel EEG was done in all the children and a video EEG was done in 12 cases of children with nonepileptic seizures. The Childhood Psychopathology Measurement Schedule (CPMS and Life Events Scale for Indian Children (LESIC were used to measure the children′s emotional and behavioral functioning at home, and the number of life events and the stress associated with these events in the preceding year and the year before that. Short-term outcome was examined three to six months after the diagnosis of nonepileptic seizures was made. Results: Unresponsiveness without marked motor manifestations was the most common "ictal" characteristic of the nonepileptic seizures. Pelvic thrusting, upper and lower limb movements, head movements, and vocalization were observed in less than one-third of the patients. Increased psychosocial stress and significantly higher number of life events in the preceding year were found to characterize children with nonepileptic seizures, as compared to the two control groups. The nonepileptic seizures and true seizures groups had a higher proportion of children with psychopathology scores in the clinically significant maladjustment range, as compared to those in the healthy control group. A majority of the patients

  3. Seizure characteristics and outcomes in 508 Chinese adult patients undergoing primary resection of low-grade gliomas: a clinicopathological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Gan; Sha, Zhi-Yi; Yan, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yong-Zhi; Li, Shao-Wu; Sang, Lin; Wang, Zi; Li, Gui-Lin; Li, Shou-Wei; Song, Yi-Jun; Kang, Chun-Sheng; Jiang, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Seizure is a common presenting manifestation and plays an important role in the clinical presentation and quality of life for patients with low-grade gliomas (LGGs). The authors set out to identify factors that influence preoperative seizure characteristics and postoperative seizure control. Cases involving adult patients who had undergone initial surgery for LGGs in a single institution between 2005 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with preoperative seizures and postoperative seizure control. Of the 508 patients in the series, 350 (68.9%) presented with seizures. Age less than 38 years and cortical involvement of tumor were more likely to be associated with seizures (P = .003 and .001, respectively, multivariate logistic analysis). For the cohort of 350 patients with seizures, Engel classification was used to evaluate 6- and 12-month outcome after surgery: completely seizure free (Engel class I), 65.3% and 62.5%; not seizure free (Engel classes II, III, IV), 34.7% and 37.5%. After multivariate logistic analysis, favorable seizure prognosis was more common in patients with secondary generalized seizure (P = .006) and with calcification on MRI (.031). With respect to treatment-related variables, patients achieved much better seizure control after gross total resection than after subtotal resection (P seizure control in the patients with a history of seizure if overexpressed but was not a predictor for those without preoperative seizures. These factors may provide insight into developing effective treatment strategies aimed at prolonging patients' survival. PMID:22187341

  4. Semiology of hypermotor (hyperkinetic) seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqadi, Khalid; Sankaraneni, Ram; Thome, Ursula; Kotagal, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Hypermotor seizures (HMSs) consist of complex movements involving proximal segments of the limbs and trunk that appear violent and inappropriate for the situation. We analyzed hypermotor seizure videos in seizure-free patients (Engel class I) following resective epilepsy surgery. After completion of video analysis, we reviewed EEG and neuroimaging data. Search of our epilepsy surgery database yielded 116 patients classified as having hypermotor seizures between 1996 and 2013. From this subset, 17/31 (55%) patients had been seizure-free for >6months (mean follow-up: 3.3years). Mean seizure duration was 35s (range: 6-91s), of which the HM phase lasted a mean of 22s (range: 3-53s). In 16 patients (95%), hypermotor activity was seen at or within 10s of clinical seizure onset. Type I semiology occurred in 6 patients, type II semiology in 10 patients, and 1 patient exhibited features of both. Type I and type II semiologies were noted in patients who had frontal lobe as well as extrafrontal resections. Nonversive head and body turning occurred in 10 patients (ranging from 90° to 270°) which was ipsilateral to the side of resection in all patients and seen both in frontal and extrafrontal resections. Six out of eleven patients with abnormal MRI and 4/6 patients with nonlesional MRI underwent invasive EEG evaluation. Eight patients (47%) had frontal lobe resection, 4/17 (23%) patients had temporal lobe resection, and one patient each had parietal lobe, insular, temporoparietooccipital, or motor sparing resection; 1 patient had functional hemispherectomy. Hypermotor semiology typically occurs at or within 10s after seizure onset. Ipsilateral head/body turning appears to be of lateralizing value whereas asymmetry of limb movement was not lateralizing. Hypermotor semiology is most often seen in frontal lobe epilepsy but may occur in seizures arising from other locations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Convulsive seizures with a therapeutic dose of isoniazid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubouchi, Kazuya; Ikematsu, Yuuki; Hashisako, Mikiko; Harada, Eiji; Miyagi, Hiroto; Fujisawa, Nobumitsu

    2014-01-01

    An 86-year-old woman who had been treated for tuberculous peritonitis and pulmonary tuberculosis, exhibited a disturbance of consciousness and tonic-clonic convulsions seven days after the administration of the antituberculous drug isoniazid. As her serum vitamin B6 level was remarkably low, she was diagnosed with convulsive seizures due to vitamin B6 deficiency associated with isoniazid treatment. Seizures refractory to standard anticonvulsant therapy were controlled with the administration of pyridoxine. Most reported cases of isoniazid-induced convulsive seizures occurred as a result of an overdose due to attempted suicide. This report presents a case of convulsive seizures that occurred in association with the short-term administration of a therapeutic dose of isoniazid.

  6. Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) adversely effects on pilocarpine seizure-induced hippocampal neuronal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Dong Won; Choi, Bo Young; Sohn, Min; Lee, Song Hee; Choi, Hui Chul; Song, Hong Ki; Suh, Sang Won

    2015-01-21

    Citicoline (CDP-choline; cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine) is an important intermediate in the biosynthesis of cell membrane phospholipids. Citicoline serves as a choline donor in the biosynthetic pathways of acetylcholine and neuronal membrane phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylcholine. The ability of citicoline to reverse neuronal injury has been tested in animal models of cerebral ischemia and clinical trials have been performed in stroke patients. However, no studies have examined the effect of citicoline on seizure-induced neuronal death. To clarify the potential therapeutic effects of citicoline on seizure-induced neuronal death, we used an animal model of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was induced by intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine (25mg/kg) in adult male rats. Citicoline (100 or 300 mg/kg) was injected into the intraperitoneal space two hours after seizure onset and a second injection was performed 24h after the seizure. Citicoline was injected once per day for one week after pilocarpine- or kainate-induced seizure. Neuronal injury and microglial activation were evaluated at 1 week post-seizure. Surprisingly, rather than offering protection, citicoline treatment actually enhanced seizure-induced neuronal death and microglial activation in the hippocampus compared to vehicle treated controls. Citicoline administration after seizure-induction increased immunoglobulin leakage via BBB disruption in the hippocampus compared with the vehicle-only group. To clarify if this adverse effect of citicoline is generalizable across alternative seizure models, we induced seizure by kainate injection (10mg/kg, i.p.) and then injected citicoline as in pilocarpine-induced seizure. We found that citicoline did not modulate kainate seizure-induced neuronal death, BBB disruption or microglial activation. These results suggest that citicoline may not have neuroprotective effects after seizure and that clinical application of citicoline after

  7. FOCAL MOTOR SEIZURES WITH TYPICAL AUTOMATISMS (FOCAL AUTOMOTOR SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mironov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the study of a group of patients with focal automotor seizures, by taking into consideration their nosological, anamnestic, clinical, electroencephalographic, and neuroimaging features.

  8. Relationship between common viral upper respiratory tract infections and febrile seizures in children from Suzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jihong; Yan, Wenhua; Li, Yan; Zhang, Bingbing; Gu, Qing

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the potential predisposing factors for the development of febrile seizures among children with upper respiratory tract infection in the eastern Chinese region. Participants were individuals aged 6 months and 6 years (n = 189) who were diagnosed with febrile seizure, complicated with upper respiratory tract infection, and 174 age-matched children who had upper respiratory tract infection without seizures as controls. The viral antigens including influenza A and B, parainfluenza, adenovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus were detected from nasopharyngeal aspirates. The incidence of influenza A infection was much higher in patients with febrile seizure than controls, especially those children aged >36 months. Patients with influenza A infection had higher body temperatures at seizure occurrence, shorter seizure duration, and shorter fever duration before seizure onset. Influenza A infections are frequently associated with febrile seizure in children with upper respiratory tract infection. During an influenza epidemic, effective vaccination of children, especially those with a past history of febrile seizure, may minimize the development of febrile seizure. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Seizure freedom reduces illness intrusiveness and improves quality of life in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poochikian-Sarkissian, Sonia; Sidani, Souraya; Wennberg, Richard; Devins, Gerald M

    2008-07-01

    Chronic illnesses are associated with multiple stressors that compromise quality of life (QOL). Implicit in many of these stressors is the concept of illness intrusiveness: the disruption of lifestyles, activities, and interests due to the constraints imposed by chronic disease and its treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine illness intrusiveness and QOL in epilepsy in patients with different levels of seizure control. Cross-sectional data were obtained and compared between two groups of patients categorized by presence of seizures: seizure freedom or continued seizures (N = 145). Standard instruments measured the following variables: illness intrusiveness, perceived personal control, subjective well-being, and disease specific QOL. Illness intrusiveness varied inversely and significantly with seizure control. Complete seizure freedom, whether achieved by pharmacological or surgical treatment, was associated with the lowest levels of illness intrusiveness. Seizure freedom was also associated with increased perceived control, positive affect, self-esteem and QOL in epilepsy. The most robust benefits of decreased illness intrusiveness in epilepsy occur when treatment leads to complete seizure control. Therefore every effort should be made by health care providers to achieve seizure freedom to reduce illness intrusiveness and improve QOL in epilepsy.

  10. Recent Research on Febrile Seizures: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syndi Seinfeld, DO; Pellock, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures are common and mostly benign. They are the most common cause of seizures in children less than five years of age. There are two categories of febrile seizures, simple and complex. Both the International League against Epilepsy and the National Institute of Health has published definitions on the classification of febrile seizures. Simple febrile seizures are mostly benign, but a prolonged (complex) febrile seizure can have long term consequences. Most children who have a febrile seizure have normal health and development after the event, but there is recent evidence that suggests a small subset of children that present with seizures and fever may have recurrent seizure or develop epilepsy. This review will give an overview of the definition of febrile seizures, epidemiology, evaluation, treatment, outcomes and recent research. PMID:25383238

  11. Iron Deficiency and Acute Seizures: Results from Children Living in Rural Kenya and a Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idro, Richard; Gwer, Samson; Williams, Thomas N.; Otieno, Tuda; Uyoga, Sophie; Fegan, Gregory; Kager, Piet A.; Maitland, Kathryn; Kirkham, Fenella; Neville, Brian G. R.; Newton, Charles R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background There are conflicting reports on whether iron deficiency changes susceptibility to seizures. We examined the hypothesis that iron deficiency is associated with an increased risk of acute seizures in children in a malaria endemic area. Methods We recruited 133 children, aged 3–156 months, who presented to a district hospital on the Kenyan coast with acute seizures and frequency-matched these to children of similar ages but without seizures. We defined iron deficiency according to the presence of malarial infection and evidence of inflammation. In patients with malaria, we defined iron deficiency as plasma ferritinfebrile seizures in children. Results In our Kenyan case control study, cases and controls were similar, except more cases reported past seizures. Malaria was associated with two-thirds of all seizures. Eighty one (30.5%) children had iron deficiency. Iron deficiency was neither associated with an increased risk of acute seizures (45/133[33.8%] cases were iron deficient compared to 36/133[27.1%] controls, p = 0.230) nor status epilepticus and it did not affect seizure semiology. Similar results were obtained when children with malaria, known to cause acute symptomatic seizures in addition to febrile seizures were excluded. However, in a meta-analysis that combined all eight case-control studies that have examined the association between iron deficiency and acute/febrile seizures to-date, iron deficiency, described in 310/1,018(30.5%) cases and in 230/1,049(21.9%) controls, was associated with a significantly increased risk of seizures, weighted OR 1.79(95%CI 1.03–3.09). Conclusions Iron deficiency is not associated with an increased risk of all acute seizures in children but of febrile seizures. Further studies should examine mechanisms involved and the implications for public health. PMID:21103365

  12. Iron deficiency and acute seizures: results from children living in rural Kenya and a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idro, Richard; Gwer, Samson; Williams, Thomas N; Otieno, Tuda; Uyoga, Sophie; Fegan, Gregory; Kager, Piet A; Maitland, Kathryn; Kirkham, Fenella; Neville, Brian G R; Newton, Charles R J

    2010-11-16

    There are conflicting reports on whether iron deficiency changes susceptibility to seizures. We examined the hypothesis that iron deficiency is associated with an increased risk of acute seizures in children in a malaria endemic area. We recruited 133 children, aged 3-156 months, who presented to a district hospital on the Kenyan coast with acute seizures and frequency-matched these to children of similar ages but without seizures. We defined iron deficiency according to the presence of malarial infection and evidence of inflammation. In patients with malaria, we defined iron deficiency as plasma ferritiniron deficiency and febrile seizures in children. In our Kenyan case control study, cases and controls were similar, except more cases reported past seizures. Malaria was associated with two-thirds of all seizures. Eighty one (30.5%) children had iron deficiency. Iron deficiency was neither associated with an increased risk of acute seizures (45/133[33.8%] cases were iron deficient compared to 36/133[27.1%] controls, p = 0.230) nor status epilepticus and it did not affect seizure semiology. Similar results were obtained when children with malaria, known to cause acute symptomatic seizures in addition to febrile seizures were excluded. However, in a meta-analysis that combined all eight case-control studies that have examined the association between iron deficiency and acute/febrile seizures to-date, iron deficiency, described in 310/1,018(30.5%) cases and in 230/1,049(21.9%) controls, was associated with a significantly increased risk of seizures, weighted OR 1.79(95%CI 1.03-3.09). Iron deficiency is not associated with an increased risk of all acute seizures in children but of febrile seizures. Further studies should examine mechanisms involved and the implications for public health.

  13. Propofol Anesthesia-Induced Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1994-01-01

    A case of a healthy young man who developed seizures and generalized paroxysmal fast activity in the EEG following use of propofol for anesthesia in minor surgery is reported from the Department of Neurology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL.

  14. Galactosemia and phantom absence seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Aydin-Özemir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized and focal seizures can rarely be seen in galactosemia patients, but absence seizures were not reported previously. An 18-year-old male was diagnosed as galactosemia at the age of 8 months. No family history of epilepsy was present. His absence seizures realized at the age of 9 years. Generalized 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges were identified in his electroencephalography. Homozygous mutation at exon 6 c. 563A > G was identified. The electroencephalogram of his sibling was unremarkable. Our aim was to present the long-term follow-up of a patient diagnosed with galactosemia, who had phantom absence seizures and typical 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges in his electroencephalogram to draw attention to this rare association.

  15. Management of Reflex Anoxic Seizures

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Roald Dahl EEG Unit, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation, Liverpool, UK, review the definition, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of reflex anoxic seizures (RAS in children.

  16. Reading-Induced Absence Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1995-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl with a 2-year history of absence seizures induced by reading and diagnosed by video EEG is reported from The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, and Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia.

  17. Temporal seizure focus and status epilepticus are associated with high-sensitive troponin I elevation after epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-09-01

    Postictal elevation of high-sensitive troponin I (TNI), a highly specific biomarker for myocardial ischemia, has been reported. We aimed at evaluating its association of high-sensitive troponin I (TNI) with seizure type and focus, as well as vascular risk factors. TNI was measured in 247 patients admitted to our clinic via the emergency room with an acute epileptic seizure. TNI control measurements were performed in 61.5% of cases. All patients underwent electroencephalography and cerebral imaging. Seizure focus - when possible - was determined using results from these examinations as well as clinical data. Of 247 patients, 133 (53.8%) were men, the mean age was 59 ± 18 years. 70 (28.3%) patients had focal and 177 (71.7%) generalized seizures. Status epilepticus was present in 38 cases (15.4%). Mean TNI was 0.05 ± 0.17. TNI was elevated in 27 patients (10.9%). Higher age, status epilepticus and temporal seizure focus were significantly associated with TNI elevation in multivariate analysis. In 21 (13.8%) of the patients with TNI control measurement, TNI was continuously elevated. Higher age and temporal seizure focus were significantly associated with continuously high TNI. Coronary heart disease and vascular risk factors were significantly associated with high TNI only in univariate analysis. No patient had a symptomatic myocardial ischemia. Postictal TNI elevation is relatively common in older patients with status epilepticus or temporal seizure focus. These data support the concept of relevant and possibly dangerous ictal effects on cardiac function especially in temporal lobe seizures. Although the risk of manifest postictal myocardial infarction seems to be very low, selected patients could profit from closer monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment of febrile seizures with intermittent clobazam

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Fifty children, 24 female and 26 male, with ages varying from 6 to 72 months (mean=23.7 m.) that experienced at least one febrile seizure (FS) entered a prospective study of intermittent therapy with clobazam. Cases with severe neurological abnormalities, progressive neurological disease, afebrile seizures, symptomatic seizures of other nature, or seizures during a central nervous system infection were excluded. Seizures were of the simple type in 25 patients, complex in 20 and unclassified i...

  19. Dissociation of spontaneous seizures and brainstem seizure thresholds in mice exposed to eight flurothyl-induced generalized seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, Sridhar B; Ferland, Russell J

    2017-03-01

    C57BL/6J mice exposed to eight flurothyl-induced generalized clonic seizures exhibit a change in seizure phenotype following a 28-day incubation period and subsequent flurothyl rechallenge. Mice now develop a complex seizure semiology originating in the forebrain and propagating into the brainstem seizure network (a forebrain→brainstem seizure). In contrast, this phenotype change does not occur in seizure-sensitive DBA/2J mice. The underlying mechanism(s) was the focus of these studies. DBA2/J mice were exposed to eight flurothyl-induced seizures (1/day) followed by 24-hour video-electroencephalographic recordings for 28-days. Forebrain and brainstem seizure thresholds were determined in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice following one or eight flurothyl-induced seizures, or after eight flurothyl-induced seizures, a 28-day incubation period, and final flurothyl rechallenge. Similar to C57BL/6J mice, DBA2/J mice expressed spontaneous seizures. However, unlike C57BL/6J mice, DBA2/J mice continued to have spontaneous seizures without remission. Because DBA2/J mice do not express forebrain→brainstem seizures following flurothyl rechallenge after a 28-day incubation period, this indicated that spontaneous seizures were not sufficient for the evolution of forebrain→brainstem seizures. Therefore, we determined whether brainstem seizure thresholds were changing during this repeated-flurothyl model and whether this could account for the expression of forebrain→brainstem seizures. Brainstem seizure thresholds were not different between C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice on day one or on the last induction seizure trial (day eight). However, brainstem seizure thresholds did differ significantly on flurothyl rechallenge (day 28) with DBA/2J mice showing no lowering of their brainstem seizure thresholds. These results demonstrated that DBA/2J mice exposed to the repeated-flurothyl model develop spontaneous seizures without evidence of seizure remission and provide a new model of

  20. Population dose-response analysis of daily seizure count following vigabatrin therapy in adult and pediatric patients with refractory complex partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jace C; Hutmacher, Matthew M; Wesche, David L; Tolbert, Dwain; Patel, Mahlaqa; Kowalski, Kenneth G

    2015-01-01

    Vigabatrin is an irreversible inhibitor of γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) and is used as an adjunctive therapy for adult patients with refractory complex partial seizures (rCPS). The purpose of this investigation was to describe the relationship between vigabatrin dosage and daily seizure rate for adults and children with rCPS and identify relevant covariates that might impact seizure frequency. This population dose-response analysis used seizure-count data from three pediatric and two adult randomized controlled studies of rCPS patients. A negative binomial distribution model adequately described daily seizure data. Mean seizure rate decreased with time after first dose and was described using an asymptotic model. Vigabatrin drug effects were best characterized by a quadratic model using normalized dosage as the exposure metric. Normalized dosage was an estimated parameter that allowed for individualized changes in vigabatrin exposure based on body weight. Baseline seizure rate increased with decreasing age, but age had no impact on vigabatrin drug effects after dosage was normalized for body weight differences. Posterior predictive checks indicated the final model was capable of simulating data consistent with observed daily seizure counts. Total normalized vigabatrin dosages of 1, 3, and 6 g/day were predicted to reduce seizure rates 23.2%, 45.6%, and 48.5%, respectively. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  1. Trial of Cannabidiol for Drug-Resistant Seizures in the Dravet Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Devinsky, O.; Cross, J. H.; Laux, L.; E Marsh; Miller, I.; Nabbout, R.; Scheffer, I. E.; Thiele, E.A.; Wright, S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Dravet syndrome is a complex childhood epilepsy disorder that is associated with drug-resistant seizures and a high mortality rate. We studied cannabidiol for the treatment of drug-resistant seizures in the Dravet syndrome. METHODS: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 120 children and young adults with the Dravet syndrome and drug-resistant seizures to receive either cannabidiol oral solution at a dose of 20 mg per kilogram...

  2. Pyridoxine Dependent Seizures-Report Of A Case And Brief Review Of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent seizure is a rare autosornal recessive disorder that usually presents as neonatal intractable seizures. This syndrome is due to an inborn abnormality of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase, which results in reduced pyridoxine-dependent synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma amino butyric acid. We report a girl child who had seizures on the second post natal day which was controlled with oral pyridoxine. She had status epilepticus twice when the drug was ...

  3. Seizures and Teens: When Medicines Don't Work--Devices & Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    When medicines do not work, the search for seizure control should not stop. Special diets or medical devices may be recommended to help control seizures. While not a cure for epilepsy, they may be able to help, especially for those who are not candidates for surgery or when surgery does not work. This article provides an overview of the devices…

  4. Healthcare-seeking behavior after seizures in children

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    Bavdekar Sandeep

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hardly any Indian data is available regarding practices employed by parents for preventing injuries and aspiration and controlling convulsions in children. Aims: To describe the health care-seeking behavior and practices employed by parents when a child has convulsions. Settings and Design: Prospective questionnaire-based study in a tertiary care hospital setting. Materials and Methods: Parents of children (age: 1 month -12 years admitted with history of convulsions were enrolled and information regarding demographic characteristics, time lag, preferred health care provider and measures taken in a convulsing child was elicited using a pretested questionnaire. Statistical Analysis Used: Demographic parameters and measures employed described as percentages. Results: One hundred and forty parents were interviewed. Seventy-six children had first episode. Forty-nine of 64 children with subsequent seizures had contact with a health care provider during the previous seizure episode. The median duration of seizures was 10 minutes (Mean: 54.15±366.39 min; but children were brought to the hospital after a median of 2 hours (Mean: 5.22±10.37 h. Measures such as smelling onions, oral administration of cold water, reading religious texts and insertion of mouth gag were employed. Although 45 with previous seizure-related health care contact agreed that they were informed about measures to be taken, none of them could remember more than one measure for preventing injuries and aspiration and controlling seizures. Only four narrated "per-rectal administration of diazepam" as a measure, although only one implemented it. Only four general practitioners used per-rectal diazepam to control seizures. Conclusions: Children with seizures reach health care providers after a considerable delay putting them at higher risk for developing neurological sequel. There is a need to develop appropriate strategies for disseminating information about "first aid

  5. [Neurophysiological markers of generalized and focal epileptic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsova, E Yu; Shulakova, K V

    To identify neurophysiological markers of focal and generalized epileptic seizures in the inter-epileptic period. Sixty-four patients, including 36 with isolated generalized tonic-clonic seizures and 28 with focal seizures, were examined. The control group consisted of 27 healthy people. EEG-video monitoring and bioelectric activity analysis of the brain during wakefulness and day sleep, spectral EEG analysis, quantitative and quality indicators of sleep were used. In generalized epileptic seizures, alpha rhythm is predominantly recorded in the left hemisphere. In wakefulness, the focal epileptiform activity develops during the first two stages of day sleep. In focal epileptic seizures, delta and beta-2 rhythms were recorded in the left hemisphere, regional epileptiform changes are aggravated during the 1st and 2nd stages of slow sleep initiated in the frontal regions. A focal component of the epileptiform activity in the inter-epileptic period in patients with different types of seizures should be taken into account in examination and treatment planning of patients who had difficulties with the diagnosis of epilepsy type.

  6. Mutations affecting GABAergic signaling in seizures and epilepsy

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    Galanopoulou, Aristea S.

    2010-01-01

    The causes of epilepsies and epileptic seizures are multifactorial. Genetic predisposition may contribute in certain types of epilepsies and seizures, whether idiopathic or symptomatic of genetic origin. Although these are not very common, they have offered a unique opportunity to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. Among the implicated gene mutations, a number of GABAA receptor subunit mutations have been recently identified that contribute to several idiopathic epilepsies, febrile seizures, and rarely to certain types of symptomatic epilepsies, like the severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy. Deletion of GABAA receptor genes has also been linked to Angelman syndrome. Furthermore, mutations of proteins controlling chloride homeostasis, which indirectly defines the functional consequences of GABAA signaling, have been identified. These include the chloride channel 2 (CLCN2) and the potassium chloride cotransporter KCC3. The pathogenic role of CLCN2 mutations has not been clearly demonstrated and may represent either susceptibility genes or, in certain cases, innocuous polymorphisms. KCC3 mutations have been associated with hereditary motor and sensory polyneuropathy with corpus callosum agenesis (Andermann syndrome) that often manifests with epileptic seizures. This review summarizes the recent progress in the genetic linkages of epilepsies and seizures to the above genes and discusses potential pathogenic mechanisms that contribute to the age, sex, and conditional expression of these seizures in carriers of these mutations. PMID:20352446

  7. Regulation of emotions in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

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    Urbanek, Monika; Harvey, Martin; McGowan, John; Agrawal, Niruj

    2014-08-01

    Despite the long history of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), relatively little is known about the mechanisms that cause and maintain this condition. Emerging research evidence suggests that patients with PNES might have difficulties in regulating their emotions. However, much remains to be learned about the nature of these difficulties and the emotional responses of individuals with PNES. This study aimed to gain a detailed understanding of emotion regulation processes in patients with PNES by examining differences between patients with PNES and a healthy control group with regard to intensity of emotional reactions, understanding of one's emotional experience, beliefs about emotions, and managing emotions by controlling emotional expression. A cross-sectional design was used to compare the group with PNES (n=56) and the healthy control group (n=88) on a range of self-report measures. Participants with a diagnosis of PNES reported significantly poorer understanding of their emotions, more negative beliefs about emotions, and a greater tendency to control emotional expression compared to the control group. While intensity of emotions did not discriminate between the groups, poor understanding and negative beliefs about emotions were found to be significant predictors of PNES, even after controlling for age, education level, and emotional distress. Furthermore, the presence of some emotion regulation difficulties was associated with self-reported seizure severity. The results of this study are largely consistent with previous literature and provide evidence for difficulties in emotion regulation in patients with PNES. However, this research goes further in bringing together different aspects of emotion regulation, including beliefs about emotions, which have not been examined before. As far as it is known, this is the first study to suggest that levels of alexithymia in a population with PNES are positively associated with self-reported seizure severity. The

  8. Early-Onset Convulsive Seizures Induced by Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia in Aging Mice: Effects of Anticonvulsive Treatments.

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    Justin Wang

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with an increased risk of seizures/epilepsy. Stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic and cardiac arrest related brain injury are two major causative factors for seizure development in this patient population. With either etiology, seizures are a poor prognostic factor. In spite of this, the underlying pathophysiology of seizure development is not well understood. In addition, a standardized treatment regimen with anticonvulsants and outcome assessments following treatment has yet to be established for these post-ischemic seizures. Previous studies have modeled post-ischemic seizures in adult rodents, but similar studies in aging/aged animals, a group that mirrors a higher risk elderly population, remain sparse. Our study therefore aimed to investigate early-onset seizures in aging animals using a hypoxia-ischemia (HI model. Male C57 black mice 18-20-month-old underwent a unilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery followed by a systemic hypoxic episode (8% O2 for 30 min. Early-onset seizures were detected using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG monitoring. Brain injury was assessed histologically at different times post HI. Convulsive seizures were observed in 65% of aging mice post-HI but not in control aging mice following either sham surgery or hypoxia alone. These seizures typically occurred within hours of HI and behaviorally consisted of jumping, fast running, barrel-rolling, and/or falling (loss of the righting reflex with limb spasms. No evident discharges during any convulsive seizures were seen on cortical-hippocampal EEG recordings. Seizure development was closely associated with acute mortality and severe brain injury on brain histological analysis. Intra-peritoneal injections of lorazepam and fosphenytoin suppressed seizures and improved survival but only when applied prior to seizure onset and not after. These findings together suggest that seizures are a major contributing factor to acute

  9. Early-Onset Convulsive Seizures Induced by Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia in Aging Mice: Effects of Anticonvulsive Treatments.

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    Wang, Justin; Wu, Chiping; Peng, Jessie; Patel, Nisarg; Huang, Yayi; Gao, Xiaoxing; Aljarallah, Salman; Eubanks, James H; McDonald, Robert; Zhang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increased risk of seizures/epilepsy. Stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic) and cardiac arrest related brain injury are two major causative factors for seizure development in this patient population. With either etiology, seizures are a poor prognostic factor. In spite of this, the underlying pathophysiology of seizure development is not well understood. In addition, a standardized treatment regimen with anticonvulsants and outcome assessments following treatment has yet to be established for these post-ischemic seizures. Previous studies have modeled post-ischemic seizures in adult rodents, but similar studies in aging/aged animals, a group that mirrors a higher risk elderly population, remain sparse. Our study therefore aimed to investigate early-onset seizures in aging animals using a hypoxia-ischemia (HI) model. Male C57 black mice 18-20-month-old underwent a unilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery followed by a systemic hypoxic episode (8% O2 for 30 min). Early-onset seizures were detected using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring. Brain injury was assessed histologically at different times post HI. Convulsive seizures were observed in 65% of aging mice post-HI but not in control aging mice following either sham surgery or hypoxia alone. These seizures typically occurred within hours of HI and behaviorally consisted of jumping, fast running, barrel-rolling, and/or falling (loss of the righting reflex) with limb spasms. No evident discharges during any convulsive seizures were seen on cortical-hippocampal EEG recordings. Seizure development was closely associated with acute mortality and severe brain injury on brain histological analysis. Intra-peritoneal injections of lorazepam and fosphenytoin suppressed seizures and improved survival but only when applied prior to seizure onset and not after. These findings together suggest that seizures are a major contributing factor to acute mortality in aging

  10. Evaluation of Risk Factors Associated with First Episode Febrile Seizure.

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    Sharawat, Indar Kumar; Singh, Jitender; Dawman, Lesa; Singh, Amitabh

    2016-05-01

    Febrile seizure (FS) is the single most common type of seizure seen in children between 6 months to 5 years of age. The purpose of our study was to identify the risk factors associated with the first episode of febrile seizures, which would help in the better management and preventive measures in children at risk for FS episodes. To evaluate the risk factors associated with the first episode of febrile seizures in Indian children. This was a hospital based, case control study. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with the first FS episode in children. Seventy (70) children between age 6 months to 5 years with their first episode of FS were compared with 70 children with fever but without seizures based on various risk factors. The mean age was 24.90±16.11 months in cases and 26.34±16.93 months in controls. Male: female ratio was 2:1. A positive family history was found in 31.4% of first degree and 11.4% in second degree relatives. Mean maximum temperature was 102.06±1.1°F and URI (upper respiratory infection) was most common cause of fever. Antenatal complication was significantly higher in the case group. RBC (Red Blood Cells) indices like lower mean haemoglobin, MCV (Mean Corpuscular Volume), MCH (Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin concentration) and higher RDW (Red Cell Distribution Width) values were seen in patients. Serum sodium, Serum calcium and random blood sugar values of the cases were significantly lower than those of controls (pfebrile seizures, peak body temperature, underlying cause of fever, antenatal complications, low serum calcium, sodium, blood sugar and microcytic hypochromic anaemia are the risk factors associated with the occurrence of first episode of febrile seizure and, thus, preventive measures in removing these risk factors could lead to a decrease in incidence of FS.

  11. The Effect of Simple Febrile Seizure on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD in Children

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    Bahman Salehi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Febrile seizure is one of the most prevalent childhood convulsions. There are controversy about possible relation between febrile seizure and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD. The aim of this study was to find the effect of simple febrile seizure on ADHD in children. Materials and Methods In a case-control study all children of 3-12 years old with febrile seizure referring Amir-Kabir hospital, Arak-Iran. Among these children, 103 of them with no corporeal or psychiatric disorders were compared to 103 children of the same age and gender admitted due to disease other than febrile seizure utilizing DSM-IV criteria for ADHD. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16. Results This study shows that the hyperactivity disorder in the same order were 34.3% and 16.7%, respectively, which also denotes a significant relation between simple febrile seizure and hyperactivity(P

  12. Evaluation of first nonfebrile seizures.

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    Wilden, Jessica A; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2012-08-15

    Nonfebrile seizures may indicate underlying disease or epilepsy. The patient history can often distinguish epileptic seizures from nonepileptic disorders by identifying the events directly preceding the convulsion, associated conditions, and details of the seizure, including triggers, length, and type of movements. Laboratory testing, lumbar puncture, and neuroimaging may be indicated depending on the presentation, suspected etiology, and patient's age. Electroencephalography should be performed 24 to 48 hours after a first seizure because of its substantial yield and ability to predict recurrence. Neuroimaging is recommended for adults, infants, and children who have cognitive or motor developmental delay or a focal seizure. Neuroimaging may be scheduled on an outpatient basis for patients with stable vital signs who are awake and have returned to neurologic baseline. Emergent neuroimaging should be performed in patients with persistent decreased mental status or a new focal neurologic abnormality. Although magnetic resonance imaging is generally preferred to head computed tomography because of its greater sensitivity for intracranial pathology, computed tomography should be performed if intracranial bleeding is suspected because of recent head trauma, coagulopathy, or severe headache. Treatment with an antiepileptic drug after a first seizure does not prevent epilepsy in the long term, but it decreases the short-term likelihood of a second seizure. Adults with an unremarkable neurologic examination, no comorbidities, and no known structural brain disease who have returned to neurologic baseline do not need to be started on antiepileptic therapy. Treatment decisions should weigh the benefit of decreased short-term risk of recurrence against the potential adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs.

  13. The Anticonvulsant Effects of SR 57227 on Pentylenetetrazole-Induced Seizure in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bingjin; Wang, Liang; Sun, Zhihui; Zhou, Yang; Shao, Dongyuan; Zhao, Jing; Song, Yunong; Lv, Jiayin; Dong, Xue; Liu, Changhong; Wang, Pu; ZHANG, XINGYI; Cui, Ranji

    2014-01-01

    Recently, studies have shown that serotonin plays an important role in the control of seizure. However, the specific role of 5-HT receptor subtypes is not yet well described, in particular that of the 5-HT3 receptor. The present study was aimed to investigate the role of 5-HT3 receptor on the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure in mice. Firstly, seizure latency was significantly prolonged by a 5-HT3 receptor agonist SR 57227 in a dose-dependent manner. Seizure score and mortality were al...

  14. Risk of seizure recurrence after achieving initial seizure freedom on the ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Katherine S; Kessler, Sudha Kilaru; Bergqvist, A G Christina

    2014-04-01

    Few studies have examined the long-term sustainability of complete seizure freedom on the ketogenic diet (KD). The purpose of this study was to describe the risk of seizure recurrence in children who achieved at least 1 month of seizure freedom on the KD, and to assess clinical features associated with sustained seizure freedom. Records of patients initiated on the KD at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) from 1991 to 2009 were reviewed. Subjects who attained seizure freedom for at least 1 month within 2 years were included in the study. Seizure frequency was recorded based on caregiver-reported seizure diaries as unchanged, improved, or worse compared to baseline. Those patients with seizure freedom ≥1 year were compared to those with seizure freedom seizure onset, number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) prior to KD, and epilepsy classification. Of 276 patients initiated on the KD, 65 patients (24%) attained seizure freedom for a minimum of 1 month. The majority of these patients had daily seizures. The median time to seizure freedom after KD initiation was 1.5 months. Seizures recurred in 53 patients (82%), with a median time to seizure recurrence of 3 months. However, seizure frequency after initial recurrence remained far less than baseline. No clinical features were identified as risk factors for seizure recurrence. Seizure recurrence on the KD after 1 month of seizure freedom most often occurred as occasional breakthrough seizures and not a return to baseline seizure frequency. This study provides evidence to support the continued use of the KD in patients with initial seizure freedom even after breakthrough seizures. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Intergenerational Transmission of Enhanced Seizure Susceptibility after Febrile Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dengchang; Feng, Bo; Dai, Yunjian; Wu, Xiaohua; Chen, Bin; Xu, Cenglin; Tang, Yangshun; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Shihong; Wang, Shuang; Luo, Benyan; Chen, Zhong

    2017-03-01

    Environmental exposure early in development plays a role in susceptibility to disease in later life. Here, we demonstrate that prolonged febrile seizures induced by exposure of rat pups to a hyperthermic environment enhance seizure susceptibility not only in these hyperthermia-treated rats but also in their future offspring, even if the offspring never experience febrile seizures. This transgenerational transmission was intensity-dependent and was mainly from mothers to their offspring. The transmission was associated with DNA methylation. Thus, our study supports a "Lamarckian"-like mechanism of pathogenesis and the crucial role of epigenetic factors in neurological conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Botulinum Toxin Injections for Simple Partial Motor Seizures Associated with Pain

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    Edward C. Mader

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intractable epilepsy with painful partial motor seizures is a relatively rare and difficult disorder to treat. We evaluated the usefulness of botulinum toxin to reduce ictal pain. Two patients received two or four botulinum toxin (BTX injections at one-to-two-month intervals. Patient 1 had painful seizures of the right arm and hand. Patient 2 had painful seizures involving the left foot and leg. Injections were discontinued after improved seizure control following resective surgery. Both patients received significant pain relief from the injections with analgesia lasting at least two months. Seizure severity was reduced, but seizure frequency and duration were unaffected. For these patients, BTX was effective in temporarily relieving pain associated with muscle contraction in simple partial motor seizures. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that modulation of motor end-organ feedback affects focal seizure generation. BTX is a safe and reversible treatment that should be considered as part of adjunctive therapy after failure to achieve control of painful partial motor seizures.

  17. Factors associated with seizure freedom in the surgical resection of glioneuronal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J; Berger, Mitchel S; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Chang, Edward F

    2012-01-01

    Gangliogliomas (GGs) and dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNETs) are low-grade brain tumors of glioneuronal origin that commonly present with seizures. Achieving seizure control in patients with glioneuronal tumors remains underappreciated, as tumor-related epilepsy significantly affects patients' quality-of-life. We performed a quantitative and comprehensive systematic literature review of seizure outcomes after surgical resection of GGs and DNETs associated with seizures. We evaluated 910 patients from 39 studies, and stratified outcomes according to several potential prognostic variables. Overall, 80% of patients were seizure-free after surgery (Engel class I), whereas 20% continued to have seizures (Engel class II-IV). We observed significantly higher rates of seizure-freedom in patients with ≤1 year duration of epilepsy compared to those with >1 year of seizures [odds ratio (OR) 9.48; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.26-39.66], and with gross-total resection over subtotal lesionectomy (OR 5.34; 95% CI 3.61-7.89). In addition, the presence of secondarily generalized seizures preoperatively predicted a lower rate of seizure-freedom after surgery (OR 0.40; 95% CI 0.24-0.66). Outcomes did not differ significantly between adults and children, patients with temporal lobe versus extratemporal tumors, pathologic diagnosis of GG versus DNET, medically controlled versus refractory seizures, or with the use of electrocorticography (ECoG). Extended resection of temporal lobe tumors, with hippocampectomy and/or corticectomy, conferred additional benefit. These results suggest that early operative intervention and gross-total resection are critically important factors in achieving seizure-freedom, and thus improving quality-of-life, in patients with glioneuronal tumors causing epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Effect of vaccinations on seizure risk and disease course in Dravet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Nienke E; van der Maas, Nicoline A T; Sonsma, Anja C M; Ippel, Elly; Vermeer-de Bondt, Patricia E; Hagebeuk, Eveline; Jansen, Floor E; Geesink, Huibert H; Braun, Kees P; de Louw, Anton; Augustijn, Paul B; Neuteboom, Rinze F; Schieving, Jolanda H; Stroink, Hans; Vermeulen, R Jeroen; Nicolai, Joost; Brouwer, Oebele F; van Kempen, Marjan; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Kemmeren, Jeanet M; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Knoers, Nine V; Lindhout, Dick; Gunning, W Boudewijn; Brilstra, Eva H

    2015-08-18

    To study the effect of vaccination-associated seizure onset on disease course and estimate the risk of subsequent seizures after infant pertussis combination and measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccinations in Dravet syndrome (DS). We retrospectively analyzed data from hospital medical files, child health clinics, and the vaccination register for children with DS and pathogenic SCN1A mutations. Seizures within 24 hours after infant whole-cell, acellular, or nonpertussis combination vaccination or within 5 to 12 days after MMR vaccination were defined as "vaccination-associated." Risks of vaccination-associated seizures for the different vaccines were analyzed in univariable and in multivariable logistic regression for pertussis combination vaccines and by a self-controlled case series analysis using parental seizure registries for MMR vaccines. Disease courses of children with and without vaccination-associated seizure onset were compared. Children who had DS (n = 77) with and without vaccination-associated seizure onset (21% and 79%, respectively) differed in age at first seizure (median 3.7 vs 6.1 months, p vaccination-associated seizures was significantly lower for acellular pertussis (9%; odds ratio 0.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.05-0.71) and nonpertussis (8%; odds ratio 0.11, 95% CI 0.02-0.59) than whole-cell pertussis (37%; reference) vaccines. Self-controlled case series analysis showed an increased incidence rate ratio of seizures of 2.3 (95% CI 1.5-3.4) within the risk period of 5 to 12 days following MMR vaccination. Our results suggest that vaccination-associated earlier seizure onset does not alter disease course in DS, while the risk of subsequent vaccination-associated seizures is probably vaccine-specific. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Serotonin neurones have anti-convulsant effects and reduce seizure-induced mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Gordon F; Murray, Nicholas M; Hajek, Michael A; Richerson, George B

    2014-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading cause of death in patients with refractory epilepsy. Defects in central control of breathing are important contributors to the pathophysiology of SUDEP, and serotonin (5-HT) system dysfunction may be involved. Here we examined the effect of 5-HT neurone elimination or 5-HT reduction on seizure risk and seizure-induced mortality. Adult Lmx1bf/f/p mice, which lack >99% of 5-HT neurones in the CNS, and littermate controls (Lmx1bf/f) were subjected to acute seizure induction by maximal electroshock (MES) or pilocarpine, variably including electroencephalography, electrocardiography, plethysmography, mechanical ventilation or pharmacological therapy. Lmx1bf/f/p mice had a lower seizure threshold and increased seizure-induced mortality. Breathing ceased during most seizures without recovery, whereas cardiac activity persisted for up to 9 min before terminal arrest. The mortality rate of mice of both genotypes was reduced by mechanical ventilation during the seizure or 5-HT2A receptor agonist pretreatment. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram reduced mortality of Lmx1bf/f but not of Lmx1bf/f/p mice. In C57BL/6N mice, reduction of 5-HT synthesis with para-chlorophenylalanine increased MES-induced seizure severity but not mortality. We conclude that 5-HT neurones raise seizure threshold and decrease seizure-related mortality. Death ensued from respiratory failure, followed by terminal asystole. Given that SUDEP often occurs in association with generalised seizures, some mechanisms causing death in our model might be shared with those leading to SUDEP. This model may help determine the relationship between seizures, 5-HT system dysfunction, breathing and death, which may lead to novel ways to prevent SUDEP. PMID:25107926

  20. Seizures after liver transplantation: a clinicopathologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estol, C J; Lopez, O; Brenner, R P; Martinez, A J

    1989-10-01

    We reviewed the clinical and neuropathologic findings in 21 patients who had seizures after orthotopic liver transplants. Tonic-clonic seizures were the most common seizure type. Six patients developed status epilepticus. In 9 patients, seizures occurred within 1 week following transplantation. We found CNS lesions that were probably responsible for the occurrence of seizures in most patients; some had more than 1 finding. Neuropathologic examination revealed ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes in 18 patients, central pontine myelinolysis in 5, and CNS infections in 5. Multiple metabolic abnormalities were a contributing factor to the onset of seizures in some patients.

  1. Automated seizure detection systems and their effectiveness for each type of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulate-Campos, A; Coughlin, F; Gaínza-Lein, M; Fernández, I Sánchez; Pearl, P L; Loddenkemper, T

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy affects almost 1% of the population and most of the approximately 20-30% of patients with refractory epilepsy have one or more seizures per month. Seizure detection devices allow an objective assessment of seizure frequency and a treatment tailored to the individual patient. A rapid recognition and treatment of seizures through closed-loop systems could potentially decrease morbidity and mortality in epilepsy. However, no single detection device can detect all seizure types. Therefore, the choice of a seizure detection device should consider the patient-specific seizure semiologies. This review of the literature evaluates seizure detection devices and their effectiveness for different seizure types. Our aim is to summarize current evidence, offer suggestions on how to select the most suitable seizure detection device for each patient and provide guidance to physicians, families and researchers when choosing or designing seizure detection devices. Further, this review will guide future prospective validation studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Seizures in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ang, J; Claassen, J

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients with seizures are either admitted to the intensive care unit because of uncontrolled seizures requiring aggressive treatment or are admitted for other reasons and develop seizures secondarily. These patients may have multiorgan failure and severe metabolic and electrolyte disarrangements, and may require complex medication regimens and interventions. Seizures can be seen as a result of an acute systemic illness, a primary neurologic pathology, or a medication side-effect and can present in a wide array of symptoms from convulsive activity, subtle twitching, to lethargy. In this population, untreated isolated seizures can quickly escalate to generalized convulsive status epilepticus or, more frequently, nonconvulsive status epileptics, which is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Status epilepticus (SE) arises from a failure of inhibitory mechanisms and an enhancement of excitatory pathways causing permanent neuronal injury and other systemic sequelae. Carrying a high 30-day mortality rate, SE can be very difficult to treat in this complex setting, and a portion of these patients will become refractory, requiring narcotics and anesthetic medications. The most significant factor in successfully treating status epilepticus is initiating antiepileptic drugs as soon as possible, thus attentiveness and recognition of this disease are critical.

  3. Clinical characteristics of children with febrile seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, D; Dhakal, A K; Shakya, H; Shakya, A; Shah, S C; Mehata, S

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizure is common in children below five years of age. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical profile of children presenting with febrile seizure in a teaching hospital. This was a descriptive retrospective study among children presenting with febrile seizure in a teaching hospital from July 2009 to June 2013. Children between six months to six years were included in the study while patients with prior episodes of afebrile seizures, abnormal neurodevelopment and not meeting the age criteria were excluded. Patient's demographic and clinical data were collected from the in-patients records and analyzed. This study included 103 children with febrile seizure. Out of which 67% were male. Simple febrile seizure and complex febrile seizure were observed in 76.7% and 23.3% of patients respectively. Majority of children (71.8%)had generalized tonic clonic seizure followed by tonic seizures. Most of children (72.8%) who developed first episode of seizure were below 24 months of age with the mean age of 20.7 (±12.1) months. Overall 33% of patients developed recurrence of febrile seizure and first episode of febrile seizure at age one year or below was associated with the seizure recurrence. Upper respiratory tract infections were the commonest cause of fever in these children. Febrile seizure was observed predominantly in children below age of two years and simple febrile seizure was the ommonest variety. Recurrence of febrile seizure was common and significantly associated with the first episode of febrile seizure at the age of one year or below.

  4. Varying seizure semiology according to age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordli, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of seizures change in a predictable fashion with advancing age. For focal seizures these changes can be summarized into domains similar to those used in developmental models. These include fine motor, communication, and gross motor manifestations. Instead of socialization the fourth domain for seizure semiology concerns synchronization. Focal seizures in the very young tend to be simpler with fewer fine motor manifestations. Auras are uncommon, even in young children with some linguistic skill and it is often difficult to discern alteration of consciousness. Infantile focal seizures can present with spasms or even diffuse tonic seizures. In terms of synchronization, orderly secondary generalization is rarely seen so that primary generalized clonic seizures are rarely recorded in infants. Amongst so-called "generalized" seizures spasms are most often seen in the first year of life. Absence seizures, myoclonic-astatic and generalized tonic-clonic seizures are all usually not seen until after age 2 years. A full description of the clinical details of seizures is probably the most important part of the epilepsy history. A detailed knowledge of seizure semiology can make the history more effective and also in the identification of the correct seizure classification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Explosive Blast Neuropathology and Seizures

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    S. Krisztian eKovacs

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies.

  6. Refractory Seizures in Tramadol Poisoning: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Majidi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tramadol, an analgesic drug abused by opioid addicts, is also abused accidentally or for suicidal purposes. Tramadol poisoning can induce CNS depression, seizures, coma, and ultimately death. Case: In this report, a 30-year-old male was admitted to the emergency department due to suicidal attempt with ingestion of 14000 mg (140 tablet 100 mg of tramadol. He had history of suicidal attempts in past years as well as depression in his past medical history, but he had not abused tramadol and other drugs in his history. There was no history of epilepsy or head trauma in. He presented with generalized seizures two hours post ingestion, and, then, he was referred to hospital four hours later. Generalized seizures were poorly controlled by multiple medications. Due to respiratory arrest, endotracheal tube was inserted and he was admitted to the ICU immediately. At admission, he experienced hypovolemic shock, hypoglycemia, coma, apnea, refractory seizures, muscle spasms, acute respiratory distress syndrome, coagolative disorder, rhabdomyolysis, and acute renal failure. Despite medical managements, he died 38 days after ingestion. Conclusion: In this report, despite using inhalational anesthetic drugs, seizures continued and were very poorly controlled. Cause of death in this patient can be seen as the side effects of tramadol poisoning.

  7. Lacosamide: A Review in Focal Seizures in Patients with Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lesley J

    2015-12-01

    Lacosamide (Vimpat(®)) is a functionalized amino acid available orally (as a solution or tablets) and as an intravenous infusion for use as monotherapy (only in the USA) or adjunctive therapy for the treatment of focal seizures in adult and adolescent (aged ≥17 years in the USA) patients with epilepsy. As adjunctive therapy to other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), lacosamide provided effective seizure control and was generally well tolerated in adults and adolescents (aged ≥16 years) in randomized clinical trials and in the real-world setting. In clinical trials, adjunctive lacosamide provided significantly greater reductions in 28-day seizure rates than adjunctive placebo, with these benefits maintained after up to 8 years of therapy in open-label extension studies. Moreover, patients were effectively switched from oral to short-term intravenous adjunctive therapy at the same dosage, which may be particularly beneficial in situations where oral therapy is not suitable. Conversion to lacosamide monotherapy was superior to a historical-control cohort in patients with focal seizures converting from previous AED therapy. In the absence of head-to-head comparisons with other AEDs, the exact position of lacosamide relative to other AEDs remains to be fully determined. In the meantime, oral and intravenous lacosamide provides a useful option as monotherapy (only in the USA) or adjunctive therapy for the treatment of focal seizures in adult and adolescent (aged ≥17 years in the USA) patients with epilepsy.

  8. The effects of inferior olive lesion on strychnine seizure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.C.; Chung, E.Y.; Van Woert, M.H. (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Bilateral inferior olive lesions, produced by systemic administration of the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine (3AP) produce a proconvulsant state specific for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus. We have proposed that these phenomena are mediated through increased excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, through activation of glutamate receptors, in response to climbing fiber deafferentation. An increase in quisqualic acid (QA)-displaceable ({sup 3}H)AMPA ((RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid) binding in cerebella from inferior olive-lesioned rats was observed, but no difference in ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding displaced by glutamate, kainic acid (KA) or glutamate diethylester (GDEE) was seen. The excitatory amino acid antagonists GDEE and MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclo-hepten-5,10 imine) were tested as anticonvulsants for strychnine-induced seizures in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned and control rats. Neither drug effected seizures in control rats, however, both GDEE and MK-801 produced a leftward shift in the strychnine-seizure dose-response curve in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned rats. GDEE also inhibited strychnine-induced myoclonus in the lesioned group, while MK-801 had no effect on myoclonus. The decreased threshold for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus in the 3AP-inferior olive-lesioned rats may be due to an increase in glutamate receptors as suggested by the ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding data.

  9. Intractable Seizures and Rehabilitation in Ciguatera Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derian, Armen; Khurana, Seema; Rothenberg, Joshua; Plumlee, Charles

    2016-08-31

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is the most frequently reported seafood toxin illness associated with the ingestion of contaminated tropical fish. Diagnosis relies on a history of recent tropical fish ingestion and subsequent development of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and neurological symptoms. Ciguatera poisoning usually has a self-limited time course, and its management involves symptomatic control and supportive care. This case report presents an uncommon case of ciguatera poisoning with prolonged intractable seizures refractory to standard antiseizure medications. The patient also had significant functional decline that responded to rigorous inpatient rehabilitation not previously described in literature.

  10. Predictors of seizure freedom after surgery for malformations of cortical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Edward F; Wang, Doris D; Barkovich, A James; Tihan, Tarik; Auguste, Kurtis I; Sullivan, Joseph E; Garcia, Paul A; Barbaro, Nicholas M

    2011-07-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) are a major cause of medically refractory epilepsy. Our aim was to examine a surgical series of patients with cortical malformations to determine the prognostic factors associated with long-term seizure control. We conducted a retrospective review of 143 patients with MCD who underwent resective surgery for medically refractory epilepsy. Demographic, imaging, histopathologic, and surgical variables were analyzed for potential association with seizure freedom. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated in a blind fashion and classified according to a new imaging/embryologic MCD classification system. Gray-white blurring on MRI, smaller lesions, complete resection of structural lesions, complete resection of abnormal electrocorticographic areas, and locally confined electrocorticographic abnormalities are favorable prognosticators of seizure freedom on univariate analysis. Imaging features consistent with abnormal proliferation (Barkovich class I) were associated with better outcome compared to those related to abnormal neuronal migration (class II) or abnormal cortical organization (class III). Multivariate logistic regression revealed complete resection of tissue manifesting electrocorticographic and/or MRI anatomic abnormalities as the main independent predictor of seizure freedom. Other histopathologic or demographic factors were not associated with seizure control. Long-term follow-up of patients demonstrated sustained overall rates of seizure control (72% at 2 years, 65% at 5 years, and 67% at 10 years). Surgery for MCDs can result in high rates of seizure freedom. Complete resection of electrocorticographic and anatomic abnormalities appears to be most predictive of long-term seizure control. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  11. THE I)IilTI51RMINAN'I'S OF SEIZURE SIIt'.VERITY IN NIGERIAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    frequency has been the traditional index of epilepsy control. severity of seizures is probably ... The eight items of the national hospital seizure severity scale were applied in this study to ... quality of life and self~esteem of subjects with epilepsy.

  12. European Stroke Organisation guidelines for the management of post-stroke seizures and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtkamp, Martin; Beghi, Ettore; Benninger, Felix

    2017-01-01

    seizures is higher in intracranial haemorrhage (10–16%) than in ischaemic stroke (2–4%). Acute symptomatic seizures and unprovoked seizure may be associated with unfavourable functional outcome and increased mortality. In view of the clinical relevance, the European Stroke Organisation has issued evidence...... and prevention of mortality. Recommendations are based on findings in randomised controlled trials and observational studies using the grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation approach. Results In the absence of adequately powered randomised controlled trials, evidence for all...... needs to be considered. Conclusion Due to very low evidence, these guidelines only give some weak recommendations on prevention of occurrence and recurrence of post-stroke acute symptomatic seizures and unprovoked seizure. Adequately powered randomised controlled trials are required to assess...

  13. Traditional and non-traditional treatments for autism spectrum disorder with seizures: an on-line survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasula Swapna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the high prevalence of seizure, epilepsy and abnormal electroencephalograms in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD, there is little information regarding the relative effectiveness of treatments for seizures in the ASD population. In order to determine the effectiveness of traditional and non-traditional treatments for improving seizures and influencing other clinical factor relevant to ASD, we developed a comprehensive on-line seizure survey. Methods Announcements (by email and websites by ASD support groups asked parents of children with ASD to complete the on-line surveys. Survey responders choose one of two surveys to complete: a survey about treatments for individuals with ASD and clinical or subclinical seizures or abnormal electroencephalograms, or a control survey for individuals with ASD without clinical or subclinical seizures or abnormal electroencephalograms. Survey responders rated the perceived effect of traditional antiepileptic drug (AED, non-AED seizure treatments and non-traditional ASD treatments on seizures and other clinical factors (sleep, communication, behavior, attention and mood, and listed up to three treatment side effects. Results Responses were obtained concerning 733 children with seizures and 290 controls. In general, AEDs were perceived to improve seizures but worsened other clinical factors for children with clinical seizure. Valproic acid, lamotrigine, levetiracetam and ethosuximide were perceived to improve seizures the most and worsen other clinical factors the least out of all AEDs in children with clinical seizures. Traditional non-AED seizure and non-traditional treatments, as a group, were perceived to improve other clinical factors and seizures but the perceived improvement in seizures was significantly less than that reported for AEDs. Certain traditional non-AED treatments, particularly the ketogenic diet, were perceived to improve both seizures and other clinical

  14. Febrile Seizures: Controversy and Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Omer A.

    1983-01-01

    Although febrile convulsions are a relatively common complaint, the approach to their management is far from uniform and highly controversial. This article reviews the consensus statement on febrile convulsions arrived at by the Consensus Development Conference held in 1980 by the National Institutes of Health, together with other literature of interest to family physicians. Guidelines are given for the assessment, diagnosis and emergency treatment of febrile seizures. Epilepsy and atypical febrile convulsions are distinguished from simple febrile seizures. Prognosis, prevention, and the importance of counselling parents are discussed, as well as the controversial issue of prophylactic treatment. PMID:21286583

  15. The influence of seizure frequency on anterograde and remote memory in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltzenlogel, Virginie; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Hirsch, Edouard; Manning, Liliann

    2014-10-01

    Seizure frequency, although considered as an important factor in memory impairment in mesial temporal epilepsy (mTLE), is mostly confounded with other clinical variables, making it unclear to what extent recurrent seizures actually interfere with memory. The present study focuses on the influence of seizure frequency, studied as a main variable, on anterograde and remote memory. Seventy-one patients with unilateral mTLE were divided into two subgroups, as a function of their seizure frequency (monthly versus weekly seizures). Other seizure-related variables were controlled, namely, lateralisation and type of lesion, age at onset, years of ongoing seizures, etiologic factors, and number of AED. A comprehensive neuropsychological examination, including anterograde memory (verbal and non verbal recognition memory and free recall) tasks together with a large range of tests exploring different domains of remote memory, was carried out. Despite similar results on IQ, executive functions and attention, the low seizure-frequency group performed significantly better than the high seizure-frequency group on anterograde memory tests. Loss of autobiographical episodes and public-events memory, concomitant with spared personal semantic knowledge, was observed in both patient groups compared with healthy subjects. A worsening effect of high seizure frequency was recorded for autobiographical incidents and news-events memory, but unexpectedly, not for memory for famous people. The study of seizure frequency as the main variable leads us to suggest that high seizure frequency, itself, potentiates the effects of mesial temporal lobe damage on episodic memory deficits. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Closed-loop neural stimulation for pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pineda

    2013-01-01

    Neural stimulation can reduce the frequency of seizures in persons with epilepsy, but rates of seizure-free outcome are low. Vagus nerve stimulation prevents seizures by continuously activating noradrenergic projections from the brainstem to the cortex. Cortical norepinephrine then increases GABAergic transmission and increases seizure threshold. Another approach, responsive nervous stimulation, prevents seizures by reactively shocking the seizure onset zone in precise synchrony with seizure onset. The electrical shocks abort seizures before they can spread and manifest clinically. The goal of this study was to determine whether a hybrid platform in which brainstem activation triggered in response to impending seizure activity could prevent seizures. We chose the zebrafish as a model organism for this study because of its ability to recapitulate human disease, in conjunction with its innate capacity for tightly controlled high-throughput experimentation. We first set out to determine whether electrical stimulation of the zebrafish hindbrain could have an anticonvulsant effect. We found that pulse train electrical stimulation of the hindbrain significantly increased the latency to onset of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures, and that this apparent anticonvulsant effect was blocked by noradrenergic antagonists, as is also the case with rodents and humans. We also found that the anticonvulsant effect of hindbrain stimulation could be potentiated by reactive triggering of single pulse electrical stimulations in response to impending seizure activity. Finally, we found that the rate of stimulation triggering was directly proportional to pentylenetetrazole concentration and that the stimulation rate was reduced by the anticonvulsant valproic acid and by larger stimulation currents. Taken as a whole, these results show that that the anticonvulsant effect of brainstem activation can be efficiently utilized by reactive triggering, which suggests that alternative

  17. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures and microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hüseyin; Kardaş, Fatih; Büyükavci, Mustafa; Karakelleoğlu, Cahit

    2004-09-01

    Pyridoxine dependency is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder causing intractable seizures in neonates and infants. This case report describes an infant with pyridoxine-dependent seizures with microcephaly and discusses a probable pathogenetic mechanism of microcephaly in this condition.

  18. Seizure complicating interscalene brachail plexus block | Idehen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seizure complicating interscalene brachail plexus block. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL · RESOURCES ... We describe a case of seizure occurring immediately after completion of ...

  19. Unexpected marked seizure improvement in paediatric epilepsy surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Mathiasen, René; Uldall, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Epilepsy surgery is performed based on the assumption that medical refractory epilepsy will continue. Rarely seizure freedom occurs before surgery is performed, while the patient is being evaluated as an epilepsy surgery candidate. The aim of this study was to describe the number of children withdrawn from an epilepsy surgery programme due to unexpected seizure improvement. We retrospectively studied 173 children under 18 years with medical refractory epilepsy referred for epilepsy surgery between 1996 and 2010. Medical records were reviewed in 2012 and 2015. At the first evaluation point in 2012, 13 patients were withdrawn from the epilepsy surgery programme due to unexpected marked improvement. In 2015, 6 of them were still seizure free. They had unexpected seizure freedom due to change in AED treatment (n=3) or after a febrile episode (n=3). The mean number of years they had had seizures was 3.4 years (range 0.6-6.2 years) and the number of seizures at inclusion was 209 per month (range 6-750 per month). The duration of follow-up was 6.6 years after inclusion into the epilepsy surgery programme (range 4.0-13.0 years). The aetiology of the epilepsy for these patients was heterotopia (n=1), focal cortical dysplasia (n=3), infarction (n=1) and unknown, with normal MRI (n=1). They all had an IQ in the normal range. Two of the remaining 7 children were operated later. Unexpected seizure control may occur during epilepsy surgery evaluation. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Epileptic Seizures from Abnormal Networks: Why Some Seizures Defy Predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    are provoked (e.g. medications and alcohol) and less than half of these patients have recurrent seizures. The life- time cumulative risk of developing... microwire and clinical macroelectrode recordings. Brain 131 (Pt 4), 928—937. Worrell, G.A., Parish, L., Cranstoun, S.D., Jonas, R., Bal- tuch, G., Litt

  1. Perioperative seizures in patients with a history of a seizure disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesen, Adam D; Jacob, Adam K; Aho, Lucyna E; Botten, Emily J; Nase, Karen E; Nelson, Julia M; Kopp, Sandra L

    2010-09-01

    The occurrence of perioperative seizures in patients with a preexisting seizure disorder is unclear. There are several factors unique to the perioperative period that may increase a patient's risk of perioperative seizures, including medications administered, timing of medication administration, missed doses of antiepileptic medications, and sleep deprivation. We designed this retrospective chart review to evaluate the frequency of perioperative seizures in patients with a preexisting seizure disorder. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients with a documented history of a seizure disorder who received an anesthetic between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2007. Patients excluded from this study include those who had an outpatient procedure or intracranial procedure, ASA classification of V, pregnant women, and patients younger than 2 years of age. The first hospital admission of at least 24 hours during which an anesthetic was provided was identified for each patient. Patient demographics, character of the seizure disorder, details of the surgical procedure, and clinically apparent seizure activity in the perioperative period (within 3 days after the anesthetic) were recorded. During the 6-year study period, 641 patients with a documented seizure disorder were admitted for at least 24 hours after an anesthetic. Twenty-two patients experienced perioperative seizure activity for an overall frequency of 3.4%(95% confidence interval, 2.2%-5.2%). The frequency of preoperative seizures (P seizure (P seizure. As the number of antiepileptic medications increased, so did the frequency of perioperative seizures (P seizures in this patient population. We conclude that the majority of perioperative seizures in patients with a preexisting seizure disorder are likely related to the patient's underlying condition. The frequency of seizures is not influenced by the type of anesthesia or procedure. Because patients with frequent seizures at baseline are

  2. Neonatal Seizures. Advances in Mechanisms and Management.

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Seizures occur in approximately 1–5 per 1,000 live births, and are among the most common neurologic conditions managed by a neonatal neurocritical care service. There are several, age-specific factors that are particular to the developing brain, which influence excitability and seizure generation, response to medications, and impact of seizures on brain structure and function. Neonatal seizures are often associated with serious underlying brain injury such as hypoxia-ischemia, stroke or hemor...

  3. The Life Time Prevalence of Childhood Seizure

    OpenAIRE

    P AlizadehTaheri; Naseri, M; M Lahooti; Sadeghi, M

    2009-01-01

    "nBackground: Seizure is the most common pediatric neurologic disorder. Epidemiological studies of childhood epilepsy are of importance to compare incidence and prevalence rates, age distribution, inheritance, seizure types, epilepsy syn­dromes and treatment strategies. Since there is little information about prevalence of childhood seizure in Iran, this study was aimed to determine the life time prevalence of childhood seizure and some of its determining factors in Tehran, Iran....

  4. Treatment of seizures in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus W.; Polman, Susanne K. L.; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; De Keyser, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Background Epileptic seizures occur in only a minority of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), but can have serious consequences. The available literature suggests an association of seizures in MS with cortical and subcortical demyelinating lesions, which suggest that seizures in MS are probably m

  5. Common variants associated with general and MMR vaccine-related febrile seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feenstra, Bjarke; Pasternak, Björn; Geller, Frank; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Wang, Tongfei; Huang, Fen; Eitson, Jennifer L.; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Svanström, Henrik; Vestergaard, Mogens; Hougaard, David M.; Schoggins, John W.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Melbye, Mads; Hviid, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures represent a recognized serious adverse event following measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination. We conducted a series of genome-wide association scans comparing children with MMR-related febrile seizures, children with febrile seizures unrelated to vaccination, and controls with no history of febrile seizures. Two loci were distinctly associated with MMR-related febrile seizures, harboring the interferon-stimulated gene IFI44L (rs273259; P = 5.9×10−12 vs. controls; P =1.2×10−9 vs. MMR-unrelated febrile seizures) and the measles virus receptor CD46 (rs1318653; P = 9.6×10−11 vs. controls; P = 1.6×10−9 vs. MMR-unrelated febrile seizures). Furthermore, four loci were associated with febrile seizures in general implicating the sodium channel genes SCN1A (rs6432860; P = 2.2×10−16) and SCN2A (rs3769955; P = 3.1×10−10), a TMEM16 family gene (TMEM16C; rs114444506; P = 3.7×10−20), and a region associated with magnesium levels (12q21.33; rs11105468; P = 3.4×10−11). Finally, functional relevance of TMEM16C was demonstrated with electrophysiological experiments in wild-type and knockout rats. PMID:25344690

  6. Migrating Partial Seizures of Infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A national surveillance study in conjunction with the British Paediatric Neurology Unit was undertaken to further define the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic features of migrating partial seizures of infancy (MPSI, a rare early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with poor prognosis.

  7. Vagus nerve stimulation for partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Mariangela; Rigby, Alexandra; Weston, Jennifer; Marson, Anthony G

    2015-04-03

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a neuromodulatory treatment that is used as an adjunctive therapy for treating people with medically refractory epilepsy. VNS consists of chronic intermittent electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, delivered by a programmable pulse generator. The majority of people given a diagnosis of epilepsy have a good prognosis, and their seizures will be controlled by treatment with a single antiepileptic drug (AED), but up to 20%-30% of patients will develop drug-resistant epilepsy, often requiring treatment with combinations of AEDs. The aim of this systematic review was to overview the current evidence for the efficacy and tolerability of vagus nerve stimulation when used as an adjunctive treatment for people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. This is an updated version of a Cochrane review published in Issue 7, 2010. To determine:(1) The effects on seizures of VNS compared to controls e.g. high-level stimulation compared to low-level stimulation (presumed sub-therapeutic dose); and(2) The adverse effect profile of VNS compared to controls e.g. high-level stimulation compared to low-level stimulation. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialised Register (23 February 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 23 February 2015), MEDLINE (1946 to 23 February 2015), SCOPUS (1823 to 23 February 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov (23 February 2015) and ICTRP (23 February 2015). No language restrictions were imposed. The following study designs were eligible for inclusion: randomised, double-blind, parallel or crossover studies, controlled trials of VNS as add-on treatment comparing high and low stimulation paradigms (including three different stimulation paradigms - duty cycle: rapid, mid and slow) and VNS stimulation versus no stimulation or a different intervention. Eligible participants were adults or children with drug-resistant partial seizures not eligible for surgery or who failed

  8. Serum interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in febrile seizures: is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahyar, Abolfazl; Ayazi, Parviz; Orangpour, Reza; Daneshi-Kohan, Mohammad Mahdi; Sarokhani, Mohammad Reza; Javadi, Amir; Habibi, Morteza; Talebi-Bakhshayesh, Mousa

    2014-10-01

    Febrile seizures are induced by fever and are the most common type of seizures in children. Although numerous studies have been performed on febrile seizures, their pathophysiology remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that cytokines may play a role in the pathogenesis of febrile seizures. The present study was conducted to identify potential links between serum interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and febrile seizures. Ninety-two patients with simple or complex febrile seizures (46 patients per seizure type), and 46 controls with comparable age, sex, and severity of temperature were enrolled. The median concentrations of serum IL-1β in the simple, complex febrile seizure, and control groups were 0.05, 0.1, and 0.67 pg/mL, respectively (P=0.001). Moreover, the median concentrations of TNF-α in the simple, complex febrile seizure, and control groups were 2.5, 1, and 61.5 pg/mL, respectively (P=0.001). Furthermore, there were significant differences between the case groups in serum IL-1β and TNF-α levels (Pfebrile seizures.

  9. Long-Term Effects of Ketogenic Diet on Subsequent Seizure-Induced Brain Injury During Early Adulthood: Relationship of Seizure Thresholds to Zinc Transporter-Related Gene Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Li, Li-Li; Zhang, Shu-Qi; Ni, Hong

    2016-12-01

    The divalent cation zinc is associated with cortical plasticity. However, the mechanism of zinc in the pathophysiology of cortical injury-associated neurobehavioral damage following neonatal seizures is uncertain. We have previously shown upregulated expression of ZnT-3; MT-3 in hippocampus of neonatal rats submitted to flurothyl-induced recurrent seizures, which was restored by pretreatment with ketogenic diet (KD). In this study, utilizing a novel "twist" seizure model by coupling early-life flurothyl-induced seizures with later exposure to penicillin, we further investigated the long-term effects of KD on cortical expression of zinc homeostasis-related genes in a systemic scale. Ten Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned each averagely into the non-seizure plus normal diet (NS + ND), non-seizure plus KD (NS + KD), recurrent seizures plus normal diet (RS + ND) and recurrent seizures plus KD (RS + KD) group. Recurrent seizures were induced by volatile flurothyl during P9-P21. During P23-P53, rats in NS + KD and RS + KD groups were dieted with KD. Neurological behavioral parameters of brain damage (plane righting reflex, cliff avoidance reflex, and open field test) were observed at P43. At P63, we examined seizure threshold using penicillin, then the cerebral cortex were evaluated for real-time RT-PCR and western blot study. The RS + ND group showed worse performances in neurological reflex tests and reduced latencies to myoclonic seizures induced by penicillin compared with the control, which was concomitant with altered expressions of ZnT-7, MT-1, MT-2, and ZIP7. Specifically, there was long-term elevated expression of ZIP7 in RS + ND group compared with that in NS + ND that was restored by chronic ketogenic diet (KD) treatment in RS + KD group, which was quite in parallel with the above neurobehavioral changes. Taken together, these findings indicate that the long-term altered expression of the metal transporter ZIP7 in adult cerebral cortex might

  10. Pretreatment seizure semiology in childhood absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Sudha Kilaru; Shinnar, Shlomo; Cnaan, Avital; Dlugos, Dennis; Conry, Joan; Hirtz, Deborah G; Hu, Fengming; Liu, Chunyan; Mizrahi, Eli M; Moshé, Solomon L; Clark, Peggy; Glauser, Tracy A

    2017-07-19

    To determine seizure semiology in children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy and to evaluate associations with short-term treatment outcomes. For participants enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, comparative-effectiveness trial, semiologic features of pretreatment seizures were analyzed as predictors of treatment outcome at the week 16 to 20 visit. Video of 1,932 electrographic absence seizures from 416 participants was evaluated. Median seizure duration was 10.2 seconds; median time between electrographic seizure onset and clinical manifestation onset was 1.5 seconds. For individual seizures and by participant, the most common semiology features were pause/stare (seizure 95.5%, participant 99.3%), motor automatisms (60.6%, 86.1%), and eye involvement (54.9%, 76.5%). The interrater agreement for motor automatisms and eye involvement was good (72%-84%). Variability of semiology features between seizures even within participants was high. Clustering analyses revealed 4 patterns (involving the presence/absence of eye involvement and motor automatisms superimposed on the nearly ubiquitous pause/stare). Most participants experienced more than one seizure cluster pattern. No individual semiologic feature was individually predictive of short-term outcome. Seizure freedom was half as likely in participants with one or more seizure having the pattern of eye involvement without motor automatisms than in participants without this pattern. Almost all absence seizures are characterized by a pause in activity or staring, but rarely is this the only feature. Semiologic features tend to cluster, resulting in identifiable absence seizure subtypes with significant intraparticipant seizure phenomenologic heterogeneity. One seizure subtype, pause/stare and eye involvement but no motor automatisms, is specifically associated with a worse treatment outcome. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Risk factors of recurrent seizure, co-morbidities, and mortality in new onset seizure in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phabphal, Kanitpong; Geater, Alan; Limapichat, Kitti; Sathirapanya, Pornchai; Setthawatcharawanich, Suwanna

    2013-09-01

    To determine the risk factors of seizure recurrence and the most common comorbidities in elderly patients with epilepsy. We did a retrospective study of 278 patients older than 65 years with first seizure. We evaluated electrolytes, blood glucose, urea and creatinine levels, and performed electrocardiography (ECG), and routine electroencephalogram (EEG) on all patients. We evaluated seizure recurrence and comorbidities at 2 years. Univariate analysis found that significant (Pseizure recurrence were etiology of seizure, EEG, and status epilepticus at first presentation. In multivariate regression analysis, etiology of seizure and EEG were significant statistical factors in seizure recurrence at 2 years follow up. Age, sex, duration of time between first seizure and diagnosis of seizure, seizure type, misdiagnosis of non-epileptic seizure, and use of antiepileptic drugs were not significant factors for predicting seizure recurrence. Depression and anxiety were the most common comorbidities in our study, followed by sleep-related disorders and stroke. There were no statistically significantly differences in comorbidities between patients who remained seizure free and patients who had recurrent seizure. Most of the new onset seizures in our elderly patients were focal onset. Acute symptomatic etiology, remote symptomatic etiology, progressive symptomatic etiology and abnormal EEG features were powerful predictors of seizure recurrence, and mood disorder, sleep disorder and stroke were the common comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanism of RDX-Induced Seizures in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    37.5 mg/ml in 1% methylcellulose, 0.1% Tween 80 in distilled water (vehicle). Control animals were dosed with the vehicle exclusively. Dosing...methylcelluose/0.2% Tween 80 ; this dose induced seizure in all animals with an average time to seizure onset of 11 min. For the present mechanistic study...animals were pair-dosed by oral gavage with either vehicle (1% methylcelluose/0.2% Tween 80 , 2 ml/kg, n=8) or RDX at 75 mg/kg (37.5 mg/ml, 2 ml/kg) in 1

  13. Panchagavya Ghrita, an Ayurvedic formulation attenuates seizures, cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in pentylenetetrazole induced seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, R; Reeta, K H; Sharma, S K; Tripathi, M; Gupta, Y K

    2015-07-01

    Panchagavya Ghrita (PG), according to Ayurvedic formulary of India (AFI), is used to treat epilepsy (apasmara), fever (jvara), mania (unmade) and jaundice (kamala). In the present study, we examined its effect on convulsions, oxidative stress and cognitive impairment in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced seizures in rats. PG @ 250, 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg/kg was administered orally for 7 days to male Wistar rats. On day 7, PTZ (60 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 2 h after the last dose of PG. Sodium valproate (300 mg/kg) was used as positive control. Latency to myoclonic jerks, clonus and generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCS) were recorded for seizure severity. Cognitive impairment was assessed using elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests. Malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels were measured in rat brain. The results have shown that pretreatment with PG @ 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg/kg exhibited 16.6, 33.3, 50 and 100% protection against occurrence of GTCS. The pretreatment with PG has significantly improved cognitive functions and the oxidative stress induced by seizures demonstrating its protective effect against PTZ induced seizures, and further, use of PG as an anticonvulsant in Ayurvedic system of medicine.

  14. Pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in developing rats prenatally exposed to valproic acid

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    Angel A. Puig-Lagunes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Epidemiological evidence indicates epilepsy is more common in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD (20–25% than in the general population. The aim of this project was to analyze seizure susceptibility in developing rats prenatally exposed to valproic acid (VPA as autism model. Methods Pregnant females were injected with VPA during the twelfth embryonic day. Seizures were induced in fourteen-days-old rat pups using two models of convulsions: pentylenetetrazole (PTZ and lithium-pilocarpine (Li-Pilo. Results Two subgroups with different PTZ-induced seizure susceptibility in rats exposed to VPA were found: a high susceptibility (VPA+ (28/42, seizure severity 5 and a low susceptibility (VPA− (14/42, seizure severity 2. The VPA+ subgroup exhibited an increased duration of the generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS; 45 ± 2.7 min, a higher number of rats showed several GTCS (14/28 and developed status epilepticus (SE after PTZ injection (19/27 compared with control animals (36.6 ± 1.9 min; 10/39; 15/39, respectively. No differences in seizure severity, latency or duration of SE induced by Li-Pilo were detected between VPA and control animals. Discussion Prenatal VPA modifies the susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures in developing rats, which may be linked to an alteration in the GABAergic transmission. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the comorbidity between autism and epilepsy.

  15. Low-Dose Pyridoxine Masks Pyridoxine-Dependent Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    A 4-month-old male infant with pyridoxine dependency and seizures from birth was controlled with extremely low-dose pyridoxine (0.5 mg/day) given as a vitamin supplement, in a report from Joana de Gusmao Children’s Hospital, Florianopolis, Brazil.

  16. Withdrawal of valproic acid treatment during pregnancy and seizure outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomson, Torbjörn; Battino, Dina; Bonizzoni, Erminio

    2016-01-01

    Based on data from the EURAP observational International registry of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and pregnancy, we assessed changes in seizure control and subsequent AED changes in women who underwent attempts to withdraw valproic acid (VPA) during the first trimester of pregnancy. Applying Bayesi...

  17. Recurrence rate of seizure following discontinuation of anti-epileptic drugs in patients with normal long term electroencephalography

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    V Abdul Gafoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The usefulness of electroencephalography (EEG in predicting seizure recurrence after antiepileptic drugs (AED tapering is a controversial subject. There have been no studies which tested the additional yield of long-term over routine EEG recordings in predicting seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal. Objective: The primary objective of our study is to determine the recurrence rate of seizure following AED withdrawal in patients with focal epilepsy, unknown cause who had normal long-term electroencephalography (LTEEG and secondary objective is to analyze the variables that would predict seizure recurrence. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study. A total of 91 patients were included. 62 patients who had normal routine and LTEEG entered the final phase of the study were followed-up regularly for 1 year or until seizure recurrence whichever was earlier. Results: A total number of 91 patients were enrolled for the first phase of the study. Of these, 13 (14.29% patients had an abnormal routine EEG. Of the remaining patients, another 16 (17.58% had abnormal LTEEG. The remaining 62 patients with normal routine and long-term EEG entered the final phase of the study. Of these, 17 patients (27.41% had seizure recurrence during the follow-up while 45 (72.58% remained seizure free until the end of the 1 year follow-up. The significant variables associated with a higher risk of seizure relapse were a positive past history of seizure recurrence on prior drug withdrawal (relative risk: 2.19, confidence interval: 1.01-4.74, P < 0.05 and the duration of epilepsy until seizure control was achieved (P < 0.009. Conclusions: The recurrence rate of seizure in patients with a normal LTEEG is 27.41%. A positive past history of seizure recurrence and a longer time to achieve seizure freedom with AED increased the risk of seizure recurrence.

  18. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Eisenstadt, M.L. [Knoxville Neurology Clinic, St. Mary`s Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  19. Recurrence Risk of Febrile Seizures in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, J; Poudel, P; Shah, G S; Yadav, S; Chaudhary, S; Kafle, S

    2016-09-01

    Identifying children with febrile seizure who are at risk for recurrence is important so that special attention can be given to them. The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors for recurrence of febrile seizures in children. This prospective hospital based study was conducted from July 2013 to August 2014 'among children of 6 months to 6 years of age at Bishweshwar Prasad Koirala Institute of Health Sciences (BPKIHS), Nepal. Children meeting the selection criteria were enrolled in study. Clinical, investigation, treatment and outcome parameters were analyzed. A total of 92 children with febrile seizure were enrolled in study. Males accounted for 70% and females 30%. Simple febrile seizure was present in 48% and complex febrile seizures were seen in 52%. Recurrence of seizure was seen in one third of cases. Loss of consciousness was most common post-ictal phenomenon followed by confusion and lethargy. Upper respiratory infection was the most common precipitating factor. Generalized Tonic Clonic Seizure was the most common seizure type present in 79% of cases. Significant risk factors for recurrence occurred in males (p=0.088), age less than 1 year (p=0.003). Most of the recurrence occurred within one year of first seizure. Febrile Seizure is common in males. Almost one third of children with febrile seizure are at risk for recurrence. The significant risk factors for recurrences are male gender and age <1year.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates hyperthermia-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Baik-Lin; Abraham, Jayne; Mlsna, Lauren; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sookyong

    2015-08-01

    Prolonged febrile seizures (FS) have both acute and long-lasting effects on the developing brain. Because FS are often associated with peripheral infection, we aimed to develop a preclinical model of FS that simulates fever and immune activation in order to facilitate the implementation of targeted therapy after prolonged FS in young children. The innate immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to postnatal day 14 rat (200 μg/kg) and mouse (100 μg/kg) pups 2-2.5 h prior to hyperthermic seizures (HT) induced by hair dryer or heat lamp. To determine whether simulation of infection enhances neuronal excitability, latency to seizure onset, threshold temperature and total number of seizures were quantified. Behavioral seizures were correlated with electroencephalographic changes in rat pups. Seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was assessed in blood samples at various time points after HT. Seizure-induced microglia activation in the hippocampus was quantified using Cx3cr1(GFP/+) mice. Lipopolysaccharide priming increased susceptibility of rats and mice to hyperthemic seizures and enhanced seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation. Peripheral inflammation appears to work synergistically with hyperthermia to potentiate seizures and to exacerbate seizure-induced immune responses. By simulating fever, a regulated increase in body temperature from an immune challenge, we developed a more clinically relevant animal model of prolonged FS.

  1. Localizing epileptic seizure onsets with Granger causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Bhim M.; Epstein, Charles M.; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2013-09-01

    Accurate localization of the epileptic seizure onset zones (SOZs) is crucial for successful surgery, which usually depends on the information obtained from intracranial electroencephalography (IEEG) recordings. The visual criteria and univariate methods of analyzing IEEG recordings have not always produced clarity on the SOZs for resection and ultimate seizure freedom for patients. Here, to contribute to improving the localization of the SOZs and to understanding the mechanism of seizure propagation over the brain, we applied spectral interdependency methods to IEEG time series recorded from patients during seizures. We found that the high-frequency (>80 Hz) Granger causality (GC) occurs before the onset of any visible ictal activity and causal relationships involve the recording electrodes where clinically identifiable seizures later develop. These results suggest that high-frequency oscillatory network activities precede and underlie epileptic seizures, and that GC spectral measures derived from IEEG can assist in precise delineation of seizure onset times and SOZs.

  2. Glycolysis in energy metabolism during seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng Yang; Jiongxing Wu; Ren Guo; Yufen Peng; Wen Zheng; Ding Liu; Zhi Song

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that glycolysis increases during seizures, and that the glycolytic metabolite lactic acid can be used as an energy source. However, how lactic acid provides energy for seizures and how it can participate in the termination of seizures remains unclear. We reviewed possible mechanisms of glycolysis involved in seizure onset. Results showed that lactic acid was involved in seizure onset and provided energy at early stages. As seizures progress, lactic acid reduces the pH of tissue and induces metabolic acidosis, which terminates the seizure. The specific mechanism of lactic acid-induced acidosis involves several aspects, which include lactic acid-induced inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme 6-diphosphate kinase-1, inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, activation of the acid-sensitive 1A ion channel, strengthening of the receptive mechanism of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid, and changes in the intra- and extracellular environment.

  3. INHIBITORY MOTOR SEIZURES: SEMIOLOGY AND THERAPY

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    K. Yu. Мukhin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to rare and unique type of epileptic seizures – inhibitory motor seizures, characterized by the inability to execute a voluntary movement with preserved consciousness. The exact prevalence of this type of seizures is not known, but many cases are unrecognized or non-correctly diagnosed as Todd's paralysis. Therefore practical doctors should know the clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of this type of seizures andtake them into account in the differential diagnoses . The authors presented a detailed review of the literature, including the historical data, etiology, pathogenesis and proposed mechanisms of formation of inhibitory motor seizures, clinical and EEG characteristics, therapeutic approaches. Antiepileptic drugs of choice used in the treatment of inhibitory motor seizures are valproic acid (preferably depakine chronosphere – original prolonged form of valproate. The authors also presented their observations of patients with inhibitory motor seizures.

  4. Anti-mullerian hormone is higher in seizure-free women with epilepsy compared to those with ongoing seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Cynthia L; Pennell, Page B; French, Jacqueline A; Davis, Anne; Lau, Connie; Llewellyn, Nichelle; Kaufman, Benjamin; Bagiella, Emilia; Kirshenbaum, Ariel

    2016-11-01

    To determine if anti-mullerian hormone (AMH), a neuroactive peptide hormone and a measure of ovarian reserve, is different between women with epilepsy (WWE) and healthy controls (HC) seeking pregnancy and to evaluate epilepsy-related factors associated with AMH concentrations. Subjects were participants in Women with Epilepsy: Pregnancy Outcomes and Deliveries (WEPOD), a multi-center prospective, observational cohort study evaluating fecundity in WWE compared to HC, ages 18-40 years. WWE were divided into a Sz+ group or a Sz- group, dependent on whether they had seizures within the 9 months prior to enrollment. Serum was collected, and AMH concentrations were measured as an exploratory analysis. Linear and logistic regression models were used to assess associations and control for covariates. Serum AMH concentrations were measured in 72 out of 90 enrolled WWE and 97 out of 109 HC; the remaining subjects became pregnant before serum was obtained. Thirty WWE were in the Sz+ group and 40 in the Sz- group (retrospective seizure information was missing for two). All AMH concentrations were within the range, however, the normal inverse correlation between age and AMH was present in the HC and in the Sz- groups, but was lacking in the Sz+ group. Mean AMH concentration was higher in the Sz- group (3982pg/ml (SD+/-2452)) compared to the Sz+ group of WWE (2776pg/ml (SD+/-2308)) and HCs (3241 (SD±2647)). All values were within the expected range for age. In WWE, by linear regression, after controlling for age and BMI, seizure occurrence remained associated with AMH (p=0.025). In the prospective phase of the study, AMH concentrations were also associated with seizure occurrence during the menstrual cycle in which the serum sample was obtained (p=0.012). Antiepileptic drugs and other epilepsy factors were not associated with AMH concentrations. When analyzing the Sz- WWE group and the HC group by linear regression with AMH as the dependent variable, after controlling for age

  5. Perampanel for tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jacqueline A; Krauss, Gregory L; Wechsler, Robert T; Wang, Xue-Feng; DiVentura, Bree; Brandt, Christian; Trinka, Eugen; O'Brien, Terence J; Laurenza, Antonio; Patten, Anna; Bibbiani, Francesco

    2015-09-15

    To assess efficacy and safety of adjunctive perampanel in patients with drug-resistant, primary generalized tonic-clonic (PGTC) seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). In this multicenter, double-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01393743; funded by Eisai Inc.), patients 12 years or older with PGTC seizures and IGE were randomized to placebo or perampanel during a 4-week titration period (perampanel up titrated from 2 to 8 mg/d, or highest tolerated dose) and 13-week maintenance period. The primary endpoint was percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (titration plus maintenance vs baseline). The key secondary endpoint (primary endpoint for European Union registration) was 50% PGTC seizure responder rate (patients achieving $50% reduction in PGTC seizure frequency; maintenance vs baseline). Treatment-emergent adverse events were monitored. Of 164 randomized patients, 162 comprised the full analysis set (placebo, 81; perampanel, 81). Compared with placebo, perampanel conferred a greater median percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (238.4%vs 276.5%; p , 0.0001) and greater 50%PGTC seizure responder rate (39.5% vs 64.2%; p 5 0.0019). During maintenance, 12.3% of placebo treated patients and 30.9%of perampanel-treated patients achieved PGTC seizure freedom. For the safety analysis (placebo, 82; perampanel, 81), the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events with perampanel were dizziness (32.1%) and fatigue (14.8%). Adjunctive perampanel was well tolerated and improved control of drug-resistant PGTC seizures in patients with IGE. This study provides Class I evidence that adjunctive perampanel reduces PGTC seizure frequency, compared with placebo, in patients with drug-resistant PGTC seizures in IGE.

  6. Association between iron deficiency anemia and febrile seizure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Abaskhanian, Ali; Alimohammadi, Hosein; ModanlooKordi, Mona

    2012-08-01

    Febrile convulsion (FC) is a common cause of seizure in young children, with an excellent prognosis. In addition to genetic predisposition, FCs are generally thought to be induced by elemental changes such as iron deficiency. Regarding the high prevalence of febrile seizure and iron deficiency anemia in children, the aim was to investigate the role of iron deficiency anemia in FC patients. This case-control study was performed in 500 children with febrile seizures (case) and 500 febrile children without seizures (control), referred to Mofid hospital in Tehran during one year (Nov 2009-Nov 2010). All children were aged between 6-60 months. The groups were matched in age and gender and use of supplemental iron. Laboratory tests consisted of Complete Blood Count (CBC). Serum iron, plasma ferritin and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) analyses were done in each patient. The patients and controls were 26.49+12.65 and 26.84+11.70 months of mean age, respectively. The amount of Hb, Hct, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RBC count, serum iron and plasma ferritin were significantly higher and TIBC was significantly lower among the cases with febrile convulsion than the controls. The incidence of iron deficiency anemia was significantly higher in controls compared with the cases (p less than 0.016). The mean of temperature peak on admission was significantly higher in the febrile convulsion group than controls. The results of this study suggest that the risk of febrile seizure occurrence in anemic children is less common as compared to non-anemic ones.

  7. Respiratory alkalosis in children with febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Hauck, Sarah; Henning, Stephan; Grüters-Kieslich, Annette; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Schmitz, Dietmar; Kaila, Kai

    2011-11-01

    Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common type of convulsive events in children. FS are suggested to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying FS remain unclear. Using an animal model of experimental FS, it was demonstrated that hyperthermia causes respiratory alkalosis with consequent brain alkalosis and seizures. Here we examine the acid-base status of children who were admitted to the hospital for FS. Children who were admitted because of gastroenteritis (GE), a condition known to promote acidosis, were examined to investigate a possible protective effect of acidosis against FS. We enrolled 433 age-matched children with similar levels of fever from two groups presented to the emergency department. One group was admitted for FS (n = 213) and the other for GE (n = 220). In the FS group, the etiology of fever was respiratory tract infection (74.2%), otitis media (7%), GE (7%), tonsillitis (4.2%), scarlet fever (2.3%) chickenpox (1.4%), urinary tract infection (1.4%), postvaccination reaction (0.9%), or unidentified (1.4%). In all patients, capillary pH and blood Pco(2) were measured immediately on admission to the hospital. Respiratory alkalosis was found in children with FS (pH 7.46 ± 0.04, [mean ± standard deviation] Pco(2) 29.5 ± 5.5 mmHg), whereas a metabolic acidosis was seen in all children admitted for GE (pH 7.31 ± 0.03, Pco(2) 37.7 ± 4.3 mmHg; p seizure triggering factors, each of these patients had an alkalotic blood pH when admitted because of FS, whereas they had an acidotic pH (and no FS) when admitted because of GE (pH 7.47 ± 0.05 vs. pH 7.33 ± 0.03, p seizures when they have GE-induced fever that is associated with acidosis. The present demonstration of a close link between FS and respiratory alkalosis may pave the way for further clinical studies and attempts to design novel therapies for the treatment of FS by controlling the systemic acid-base status. Wiley

  8. Seizure burden is independently associated with short term outcome in critically ill children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Eric T.; Zhao, Xiu Yan; Frndova, Helena; McBain, Kristin; Sharma, Rohit; Hutchison, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures are common among critically ill children, but their relationship to outcome remains unclear. We sought to quantify the relationship between electrographic seizure burden and short-term neurological outcome, while controlling for diagnosis and illness severity. Furthermore, we sought to determine whether there is a seizure burden threshold above which there is an increased probability of neurological decline. We prospectively evaluated all infants and children admitted to our paediatric and cardiac intensive care units who underwent clinically ordered continuous video-electroencephalography monitoring over a 3-year period. Seizure burden was quantified by calculating the maximum percentage of any hour that was occupied by electrographic seizures. Outcome measures included neurological decline, defined as a worsening Paediatric Cerebral Performance Category score between hospital admission and discharge, and in-hospital mortality. Two hundred and fifty-nine subjects were evaluated (51% male) with a median age of 2.2 years (interquartile range: 0.3 days–9.7 years). The median duration of continuous video-electroencephalography monitoring was 37 h (interquartile range: 21–56 h). Seizures occurred in 93 subjects (36%, 95% confidence interval = 30–42%), with 23 (9%, 95% confidence interval = 5–12%) experiencing status epilepticus. Neurological decline was observed in 174 subjects (67%), who had a mean maximum seizure burden of 15.7% per hour, compared to 1.8% per hour for those without neurological decline (P seizure burden threshold of 20% per hour (12 min), both the probability and magnitude of neurological decline rose sharply (P seizure burden. Seizure burden was not associated with mortality (odds ratio: 1.003, 95% confidence interval: 0.99–1.02, P = 0.613). We conclude that in this cohort of critically ill children, increasing seizure burden was independently associated with a greater probability and magnitude of neurological decline. Our

  9. Seizure characteristics of epilepsy in childhood after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuji; Natsume, Jun; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Naoko; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Tsuji, Takeshi; Okumura, Akihisa; Kubota, Tetsuo; Ando, Naoki; Saitoh, Shinji; Miura, Kiyokuni; Negoro, Tamiko; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify characteristics of post-encephalopathic epilepsy (PEE) in children after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), paying particular attention to precise diagnosis of seizure types. Among 262 children with acute encephalopathy/encephalitis registered in a database of the Tokai Pediatric Neurology Society between 2005 and 2012, 44 were diagnosed with AESD according to the clinical course and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and were included in this study. Medical records were reviewed to investigate clinical data, MRI findings, neurologic outcomes, and presence or absence of PEE. Seizure types of PEE were determined by both clinical observation by pediatric neurologists and ictal video-electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. Of the 44 patients after AESD, 10 (23%) had PEE. The period between the onset of encephalopathy and PEE ranged from 2 to 39 months (median 8.5 months). Cognitive impairment was more severe in patients with PEE than in those without. Biphasic seizures and status epilepticus during the acute phase of encephalopathy did not influence the risk of PEE. The most common seizure type of PEE on clinical observation was focal seizures (n = 5), followed by epileptic spasms (n = 4), myoclonic seizures (n = 3), and tonic seizures (n = 2). In six patients with PEE, seizures were induced by sudden unexpected sounds. Seizure types confirmed by ictal video-EEG recordings were epileptic spasms and focal seizures with frontal onset, and all focal seizures were startle seizures induced by sudden acoustic stimulation. Intractable daily seizures remain in six patients with PEE. We demonstrate seizure characteristics of PEE in children after AESD. Epileptic spasms and startle focal seizures are common seizure types. The specific seizure types may be determined by the pattern of diffuse subcortical white matter injury in AESD and age-dependent reorganization of the brain

  10. Severe burns as a consequence of seizures in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, M C

    1992-01-01

    We report 10 seizure-related thermal injuries severe enough to require hospitalization in patients with epilepsy. Eight of the ten incidents were with patients who had had seizures with impaired consciousness two or more times a month. This suggests that seizure frequency is a risk factor and implies the importance of striving for optimal seizure control. Two burns each occurred from an electric iron, a hand-held hair dryer, and stove-top cooking. Minimizing these activities, especially in patients with frequent consciousness-altering seizures, may be useful. Three burns occurred while showering; these resulted in the most severe injuries, with hospital stays of 29, 30, and 41 days. Simple plumbing devices may have prevented these injuries.

  11. Dynamics of muscle activation during tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai; Jennum, Poul; Wolf, Peter; Farina, Dario; Beniczky, Sándor

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to elucidate the dynamics of muscle activation during generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). We recorded surface electromyography (EMG) from the deltoid muscle during 26 GTCS from 13 patients and compared it with GTCS-like events acted by 10 control subjects. GTCS consisted of a sequence of phases best described quantitatively by dynamics of the low frequency (LF) wavelet component (2-8Hz). Contrary to the traditional view, the tonic phase started with a gradual increase in muscle activity. A longer clonic phase was associated with a shorter onset of the tonic phase and a higher seizure occurrence. Increase in LF occurred during the onset phase and during the transition from the tonic to the clonic phase, corresponding to the vibratory movements. The clonic phase consisted of EMG discharges of remarkably constant duration (0.2s) separated by silent periods (SP) of exponentially increasing duration - features that could not be reproduced voluntarily. The last SP was longer in seizures with higher EMG peak frequency whereas the energy of the last clonus was higher in seizures with a short clonic phase. We found specific features of muscle activation dynamics during GTCS. Our findings suggest that the same inhibitory mechanisms that contribute to GTCS termination counteract seizure initiation, accounting for the gradual onset. Both active inhibition and mechanisms related to metabolic depletion act synergistically to stop the seizure. Analysis of the ictal EMG dynamics is a valuable tool for monitoring the balance between pro-convulsive and anti-convulsive factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Vagus nerve stimulation for generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+ accompanying seizures with impaired consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Hanaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+ is characterized by childhood-onset epilepsy syndrome. It involves febrile seizures and a variety of afebrile epileptic seizure types within the same pedigree with autosomal-dominant inheritance. Approximately 10% of individuals with GEFS+ harbor SCN1A, a gene mutation in one of the voltage-gated sodium channel subunits. Considerably less common are focal epilepsies including focal seizures with impaired consciousness. We report vagus nerve stimulation (VNS in a 6-year-old girl with GEFS+ who exhibited drug-resistant generalized tonic-clonic seizures and focal seizures with impaired consciousness.

  13. Epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures: three patients treated with the ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, Roberto; Noli, Daniel; Cachia, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    We present three patients with epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures treated with the ketogenic diet. Between February 1, 2012 and January 31, 2014, three patients who met the diagnostic criteria for migrating focal seizures in infancy at our department were placed on the ketogenic diet and followed for a minimum of seven months. Two of the three children responded well to the ketogenic diet. One of these patients became seizure-free and his neuropsychological performance also significantly improved. The other child had a seizure reduction of 75% to 99% with only weekly seizures and moderate psychomotor improvement. For these two patients who responded well to the ketogenic diet, hospital admission was not required. The remaining patient had a seizure reduction of less than 50%. Tolerability of the diet was good in all three patients. Early treatment with the ketogenic diet should be considered for epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures to control seizures and status epilepticus, and avoid progressive cognitive impairment.

  14. Refractory seizures in children

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    Seyed Ebrahim Mansoorinejad

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is described as a heterogeneous clinical syndrome results from various cerebral destructions. It is categorized to partial and generalized forms. Degree of neural system impairment and affected area determine the severity and pattern of symptoms. Patients might experience sensory, motor, or both signs and symptoms. About 60% of epileptic patients suffer from partial type. It is estimated that up to 30% of epilepsy cases would not be controlled adequately despite sufficient and proper management. Anacyclus pyrethrum, Citrus aurantium var. amara, Paeonia officinalis, Rosa Damascena and Nigella Sativa are some of herbal drugs which have antiepileptic effect. Natural agents are valuable sources to treat chronic diseases and a huge number of world`s population believe herbs are effective and safe for daily primary health care needs. There is not enough evidence about their efficacy and safety obtained from randomized control trials.

  15. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording.

  16. Effect of Phenylbutazone on Pentylenetetrazole-Induced Seizure in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khayatnouri Mirhadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The Cyclooxygenases (COXs, the key enzymes that convert arachidonic acid to Prostaglandins (PGs, had been implicated in physiological and pathophysiological functions in the CNS. Non-Stesoidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs, COX inhibitors, were used largely to treat febrile condition, pain state and for prevention of and therapeutics of many diseases. However the role of PGs and NSAIDs in the seizure activity has been disputed. The aim of this study was to evaluation the effect of intraperitoneally injection of different doses of Phenylbutazone on PTZ-induced seizure threshold in mice. Approach: Mice were divided into 9 groups randomly: The first group received saline normal (ip (control group; the second group received Carboxy Methyl Cellulose (CMC 0.5% (ip (vehicle group and the next groups received respectively different doses of Phenylbutazone (5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mg kg-1 ip 45 min before determination of seizure threshold induced by PTZ. Results: Results showed that PTZ-induced seizure threshold in control mice was 34.75±1.54 mg kg-1. Intraperitoneal injection of Phenylbutazone showed significant (pConclusion: Phenylbutazone has anticonvulsant effects on mice. Nevertheless, new studies must be carried out in order to determine the beneficial effects of NSAIDs in treatment of epilepsy.

  17. Uncontrolled seizures resulting from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicating neurobrucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Faraji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare form of stroke caused by thrombosis in venous sinuses of the brain. In this study, we reported on a patient with venous sinus thrombosis and brucellosis who presented with uncontrolled seizure despite being treated with anti-epileptic drugs at high doses. The case was a 33-year-old woman with a history of controlled complex partial seizure who presented with headache, asthenia, and uncontrolled seizure for one month. She was febrile and a brain CT scan indicated hemorrhagic focus in the left posterior parietal and the temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography also proved venous sinus thrombosis in the left transverse sinus. Besides [In addition], a laboratory assessment confirmed brucellosis. Following the treatment with anti-coagulant, anti-brucellosis, and anti-epileptic agents, the patient was discharged in good condition with medical orders. Clinical suspicion and accurate evaluation of a patient′s history is the most important clue in diagnosis and treatment of brucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, especially in uncontrolled seizure in patients who had previously been under control.

  18. Cognitive performance and convulsion risk after experimentally-induced febrile-seizures in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajab, Ebrahim; Abdeen, Zahra; Hassan, Zuhair; Alsaffar, Yousif; Mandeel, Mohammad; Al Shawaaf, Fatima; Al-Ansari, Sali; Kamal, Amer

    2014-05-01

    Many reports indicated that small percentage of children with febrile seizures develop epilepsy and cognitive disorders later in adulthood. In addition, the neuronal network of the hippocampus was reported to be deranged in adult animals after being exposed to hyperthermia-induced seizures in their neonatal life. The aims of this study were to investigate (1) latency and probability of seizures, (2) spatial learning and memory, in adult rats after neonatal hyperthermia-induced febrile seizures (FS). Prolonged FS were elicited in 10-day old, male Sprague Dawleys (n=11/group) by exposure to heated air (48-52 °C) for 30 min; control rats were exposed to 30 °C air. After 1.5 months the animal's cognitive performance was assessed by 5 day trial in the Morris water maze. In another experiment the latency and probability of seizures were measured in response to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) injections (increased doses ranged from 7 to 140 mg/kg; i.p.). In water maze, both groups showed improvements in escape latency and distance swam to reach the platform; effects were significantly greater in control versus hyperthermia-treated animals on days 3 and 4. Latency and probability of PTZ-induced seizures were shorter and higher respectively, in hyperthermia-treated animals compared to controls. We concluded that FS in neonatal rats leads to enhanced susceptibility for seizures, as well as cognitive deficits in adults.

  19. Channel selection for automatic seizure detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjaer, Troels Wesenberg; Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the performance of epileptic seizure detection using only a few of the recorded EEG channels and the ability of software to select these channels compared with a neurophysiologist. Methods: Fifty-nine seizures and 1419 h of interictal EEG are used for training and testing...... of an automatic channel selection method. The characteristics of the seizures are extracted by the use of a wavelet analysis and classified by a support vector machine. The best channel selection method is based upon maximum variance during the seizure. Results: Using only three channels, a seizure detection...... sensitivity of 96% and a false detection rate of 0.14/h were obtained. This corresponds to the performance obtained when channels are selected through visual inspection by a clinical neurophysiologist, and constitutes a 4% improvement in sensitivity compared to seizure detection using channels recorded...

  20. Seizure detection algorithms based on EMG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    Background: the currently used non-invasive seizure detection methods are not reliable. Muscle fibers are directly connected to the nerves, whereby electric signals are generated during activity. Therefore, an alarm system on electromyography (EMG) signals is a theoretical possibility. Objective......: to show whether medical signal processing of EMG data is feasible for detection of epileptic seizures. Methods: EMG signals during generalised seizures were recorded from 3 patients (with 20 seizures in total). Two possible medical signal processing algorithms were tested. The first algorithm was based...... on the amplitude of the signal. The other algorithm was based on information of the signal in the frequency domain, and it focused on synchronisation of the electrical activity in a single muscle during the seizure. Results: The amplitude-based algorithm reliably detected seizures in 2 of the patients, while...

  1. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a) General applicability. If it shall appear to any officer authorized to board conveyances and make seizures that there...

  2. Seizure characteristics in Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candee, Meghan S; Carey, John C; Krantz, Ian D; Filloux, Francis M

    2012-12-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a congenital disorder attributed to supernumerary isochromosome 12p mosaicism. Craniofacial dysmorphism, learning impairment and seizures are considered cardinal features. However, little is known regarding the seizure and epilepsy patterns in PKS. To better define the prevalence and spectrum of seizures in PKS, we studied 51 patients (39 male, 12 female; median age 4 years and 9 months; age range 7 months to 31 years) with confirmed 12p tetrasomy. Using a parent-based structured questionnaire, we collected data regarding seizure onset, frequency, timing, semiology, and medication therapy. Patients were recruited through our practice, at PKS Kids family events, and via the PKS Kids website. Epilepsy occurred in 27 (53%) with 23 (85%) of those with seizures having seizure onset prior to 3.5 years of age. Mean age at seizure onset was 2 years and 4 months. The most common seizure types were myoclonic (15/27, 56%), generalized convulsions (13/27, 48%), and clustered tonic spasms (similar to infantile spasms; 8/27, 30%). Thirteen of 27 patients with seizures (48%) had more than one seizure type with 26 out of 27 (96%) ever having taken antiepileptic medications. Nineteen of 27 (70%) continued to have seizures and 17/27 (63%) remained on antiepileptic medication. The most commonly used medications were: levetiracetam (10/27, 37%), valproic acid (10/27, 37%), and topiramate (9/27, 33%) with levetiracetam felt to be "most helpful" by parents (6/27, 22%). Further exploration of seizure timing, in-depth analysis of EEG recordings, and collection of MRI data to rule out confounding factors is warranted.

  3. Family history and recurrence of febrile seizures.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    To determine the value of a detailed family history for the assessment of the risk of recurrence of febrile seizures, 115 children who visited the emergency room of an academic children's hospital were studied prospectively. The recurrence risk of febrile seizures was analysed in relation to the child's family history and the proportion of relatives affected by febrile seizures using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard models. A first degree family history positive for febrile ...

  4. Seizures and X-linked intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Roger E; Holden, Kenton R.; Rogers, R. Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual disability occurs as an isolated X-linked trait and as a component of recognizable X-linked syndromes in the company of somatic, metabolic, neuromuscular, or behavioral abnormalities. Seizures accompany intellectual disability in almost half of these X-linked disorders. The spectrum of seizures found in the X-linked intellectual disability syndromes is broad, varying in time of onset, type of seizure, and response to anticonvulsant therapy. The majority of the genes associated wi...

  5. Suppression of epileptogenesis-associated changes in response to seizures in FGF22-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara H Lee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the developing hippocampus, fibroblast growth factor (FGF 22 promotes the formation of excitatory presynaptic terminals. Remarkably, FGF22 knockout (KO mice show resistance to generalized seizures in adults as assessed by chemical kindling, a model that is widely used to study epileptogenesis (Terauchi et al., 2010. Repeated injections of low dose pentylenetetrazol (PTZ induce generalized seizures ("kindled" in wild type (WT mice. With additional PTZ injections, FGF22KO mice do show moderate seizures, but they do not kindle. Thus, analyses of how FGF22 impacts seizure susceptibility will contribute to the better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of epileptogenesis. To decipher the roles of FGF22 in the seizure phenotype, we examine four pathophysiological changes in the hippocampus associated with epileptogenesis: enhancement of dentate neurogenesis, hilar ectopic dentate granule cells (DGCs, increase in hilar cell death, and formation of mossy fiber sprouting (MFS. Dentate neurogenesis is enhanced, hilar ectopic DGCs appeared, and hilar cell death is increased in PTZ-kindled WT mice relative to PBS-injected WT mice. Even in WT mice with fewer PTZ injections, which showed only mild seizures (so were not kindled, neurogenesis, hilar ectopic DGCs, and hilar cell death are increased, suggesting that mild seizures are enough to induce these changes in WT mice. In contrast, PTZ-injected FGF22KO mice do not show these changes despite having moderate seizures: neurogenesis is rather suppressed, hilar ectopic DGCs do not appear, and hilar cell death is unchanged in PTZ-injected FGF22KO mice relative to PBS-injected FGF22KO mice. These results indicate that FGF22 plays important roles in controlling neurogenesis, ectopic migration of DGCs, and hilar cell death after seizures, which may contribute to the generalized seizure-resistant phenotype of FGF22KO mice and suggests a possibility that inhibition of FGF22 may alleviate

  6. Seizure semiology and electroencephalography in young children with lesional temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Rui-Juan; Sun, Zhen-Rong; Cui, Tao; Shao, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to discuss the clinical features of seizure semiology and electroencephalography (EEG) in young children with lesional temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Children with lesional TLE received presurgical evaluation for intractable epilepsy. They were followed up for more than one year after temporal lobectomy. We reviewed the medical history and video-EEG monitoring of children with TLE to analyze the semiology of seizures and EEG findings and compared the semiology of seizures and EEG findings of childhood TLE and adult TLE. A total of 84 seizures were analyzed in 11 children (aged 23-108 months). The age of seizure onset was from 1 month to 26 months (a mean of 17.6 months). All of the patients exhibited prominent motor manifestations including epileptic spasm, tonic seizure, and unilateral clonic seizure. Seven children manifested behavioral arrest similar to an automotor seizure in adult TLE but with a shorter duration and higher frequency. The automatisms were typically orofacial, whereas manual automatisms were rarely observed. The EEG recordings revealed that diffuse discharge patterns were more common in younger children, whereas focal or unilateral patterns were more typical in older children. All of the patients were seizure-free after temporal lobectomy with more than one-year follow-up. All of the children had a mental development delay or regression; however, there was improvement after surgery, especially in those with surgery performed early. In contrast to TLE in adults, young children with lesional TLE probably represent a distinct nosological and probably less homogeneous syndrome. Although they had generalized clinical and electrographic features, resective epilepsy surgery should be considered as early as possible to obtain seizure control and improvement in mental development. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. In-hospital outcomes and delayed neurologic sequelae of seizure-related endosulfan poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, J M; Chun, B J; Lee, S D

    2017-07-29

    This study investigated the predictive factors for progression from seizure-related endosulfan poisoning to status epilepticus (SE) and refractory SE (RSE). This study also investigated delayed neurologic sequelae in seizure-related endosulfan poisoning. This retrospective, observational case series consisted of 73 patients who developed at least one seizure after endosulfan ingestion. The progression rates from seizure-related endosulfan poisoning to SE and from SE-related endosulfan poisoning to RSE were 78.1% and 54.4%, respectively. The SE and RSE fatality rates were 19.2% and 41.9%, respectively. No patients reported the development of delayed neurological sequelae at least six months after discharge. Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score were identified as an independent factor for progression from seizure-related endosulfan poisoning to SE and from SE-related endosulfan poisoning to RSE. Lorazepam administration was independently associated with preventing progression from SE-related endosulfan poisoning to RSE. Seizure-related endosulfan poisoning had higher progression rates to SE and RSE and higher fatality rates than other drug-induced seizures. However, delayed neurologic sequelae after discharge were not demonstrated. Due to the high progression rates from seizure-related endosulfan poisoning to SE and RSE and the absence of an established treatment for SE-related endosulfan poisoning, physicians should aggressively treat patients who experience a seizure after endosulfan poisoning and who present with decreased GCS score. Lorazepam should be considered a first-line anti-epileptic drug for controlling seizures in patients with endosulfan poisoning. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel seizure detection algorithm informed by hidden Markov model event states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassano, Steven; Wulsin, Drausin; Ung, Hoameng; Blevins, Tyler; Brown, Mesha-Gay; Fox, Emily; Litt, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Recently the FDA approved the first responsive, closed-loop intracranial device to treat epilepsy. Because these devices must respond within seconds of seizure onset and not miss events, they are tuned to have high sensitivity, leading to frequent false positive stimulations and decreased battery life. In this work, we propose a more robust seizure detection model. Approach. We use a Bayesian nonparametric Markov switching process to parse intracranial EEG (iEEG) data into distinct dynamic event states. Each event state is then modeled as a multidimensional Gaussian distribution to allow for predictive state assignment. By detecting event states highly specific for seizure onset zones, the method can identify precise regions of iEEG data associated with the transition to seizure activity, reducing false positive detections associated with interictal bursts. The seizure detection algorithm was translated to a real-time application and validated in a small pilot study using 391 days of continuous iEEG data from two dogs with naturally occurring, multifocal epilepsy. A feature-based seizure detector modeled after the NeuroPace RNS System was developed as a control. Main results. Our novel seizure detection method demonstrated an improvement in false negative rate (0/55 seizures missed versus 2/55 seizures missed) as well as a significantly reduced false positive rate (0.0012 h versus 0.058 h-1). All seizures were detected an average of 12.1 ± 6.9 s before the onset of unequivocal epileptic activity (unequivocal epileptic onset (UEO)). Significance. This algorithm represents a computationally inexpensive, individualized, real-time detection method suitable for implantable antiepileptic devices that may considerably reduce false positive rate relative to current industry standards.

  9. A seizure response dog: video recording of reacting behaviour during repetitive prolonged seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vito, Lidia; Naldi, Ilaria; Mostacci, Barbara; Licchetta, Laura; Bisulli, Francesca; Tinuper, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    Seizure response and alerting behaviour may spontaneously develop in dogs living with children or adults with epilepsy. Some dogs can also be reliably trained to respond and anticipate seizures. We describe the case of a dog, not previously trained for assistance work, showing complex seizure response behaviour. This is the first release of a home video recording of a dog reacting to its owner's seizure.

  10. Seizure-Induced Neuronal Injury: Vulnerability to Febrile Seizures in an Immature Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Toth, Zsolt; Yan, Xiao-Xin; Haftoglou, Suzie; Ribak, Charles E.; Tallie Z. Baram

    1998-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common seizure type in young children. Whether they induce death of hippocampal and amygdala neurons and consequent limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy has remained controversial, with conflicting data from prospective and retrospective studies. Using an appropriate-age rat model of febrile seizures, we investigated the acute and chronic effects of hyperthermic seizures on neuronal integrity and survival in the hippocampus and amygdala via molecular and neuroanatomic...

  11. Treating seizures in Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus C. Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures are known to occur in Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD. In the setting of a rapidly progressive condition with no effective therapy, determining appropriate treatment for seizures can be difficult if clinical morbidity is not obvious yet the electroencephalogram (EEG demonstrates a worrisome pattern such as status epilepticus. Herein, we present the case of a 39-year-old man with CJD and electrographic seizures, discuss how this case challenges conventional definitions of seizures, and discuss a rational approach toward treatment. Coincidentally, our case is the first report of CJD in a patient with Stickler syndrome.

  12. Diagnosing Functional Seizures in Children and Adolescent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichaidit, Bianca Taaning; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka; Ostergaard, John R

    2014-01-01

    Functional seizures (FS) is a condition where the child experiences seizure-like events, without abnormal electrical discharge as measured by EEG, and with high risk of misdiagnosis. Diagnosing FS contains: 1) video-EEG, 2) anamnestic evaluation, focusing on the presence of psychosocial stressors......, psychiatric co-morbidity and functional symptoms other than FS, and 3) evaluation of seizure characteristics such as long duration, seizure initiation during wakefulness and in the presence of witnesses asynchronous movements, and no incontinence, tongue bite and injury related to the event....

  13. Febrile seizures: risks, evaluation, and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Reese C; Oehler, Karen; Tingle, Leslie E

    2012-01-15

    Febrile seizures are common in the first five years of life, and many factors that increase seizure risk have been identified. Initial evaluation should determine whether features of a complex seizure are present and identify the source of fever. Routine blood tests, neuroimaging, and electroencephalography are not recommended, and lumbar puncture is no longer recommended in patients with uncomplicated febrile seizures. In the unusual case of febrile status epilepticus, intravenous lorazepam and buccal midazolam are first-line agents. After an initial febrile seizure, physicians should reassure parents about the low risk of long-term effects, including neurologic sequelae, epilepsy, and death. However, there is a 15 to 70 percent risk of recurrence in the first two years after an initial febrile seizure. This risk is increased in patients younger than 18 months and those with a lower fever, short duration of fever before seizure onset, or a family history of febrile seizures. Continuous or intermittent antiepileptic or antipyretic medication is not recommended for the prevention of recurrent febrile seizures.

  14. Febrile seizures: Mechanisms and relationship to epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Céline M.; Brewster, Amy L.; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of febrile seizures have been driven by two major enigmas: first, how these most common of human seizures are generated by fever has not been known. Second, epidemiological studies have linked prolonged febrile seizures with the development of temporal lobe epilepsy, yet whether long or recurrent febrile seizures cause temporal lobe epilepsy has remained unresolved. To investigate these questions, a model of prolonged (complex) febrile seizures was developed in immature rats and mice, permitting mechanistic examination of the potential causal relationships of fever and seizures, and of febrile seizures and limbic epilepsy. Although the model relied on hyperthermia, it was discovered that the hyperthermia-induced secretion of endogenous fever mediators including interleukin-1β, which contributed to the generation of these ‘febrile’ seizures. In addition, prolonged experimental febrile seizures provoked epilepsy in a third of the animals. Investigations of the mechanisms of this epileptogenesis demonstrated that expression of specific ion (HCN) channels and of endocannabinoid signaling, may be involved. These may provide novel drug targets for intervention in the epileptogenic process. PMID:19232478

  15. Cellular and network mechanisms of electrographic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenov, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor; Fröhlich, Flavio; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2008-01-01

    Epileptic seizures constitute a complex multiscale phenomenon that is characterized by synchronized hyperexcitation of neurons in neuronal networks. Recent progress in understanding pathological seizure dynamics provides crucial insights into underlying mechanisms and possible new avenues for the development of novel treatment modalities. Here we review some recent work that combines in vivo experiments and computational modeling to unravel the pathophysiology of seizures of cortical origin. We particularly focus on how activity-dependent changes in extracellular potassium concentration affects the intrinsic dynamics of neurons involved in cortical seizures characterized by spike/wave complexes and fast runs. PMID:19190736

  16. Erdosteine ameliorates PTZ-induced oxidative stress in mice seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Atilla; Aladag, M Arif; Kocer, Abdulkadir; Boluk, Ayhan; Gurel, Ahmet; Armutcu, Ferah

    2005-05-30

    The role of oxygen-derived free radicals has been suggested in genesis of epilepsy and in the post seizure neuronal death. The aim of this study was to investigate whether erdosteine has a preventive effect against epilepsy and postepileptic oxidative stress. The mice (n=27) were divided into three groups: (i) PTZ-induced-epilepsy group (n=9); (ii) PTZ-induced-epilepsy+erdosteine group (n=9); (iii) control group (n=9). The animals were observed for a period of 30 min for latency to first seizure onset, total seizure duration, the number of seizure episodes. Then they were sacrificed and the brains were quickly removed, and frozen for biochemical analysis. Malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and xanthine oxidase (XO) activities were carried out in the brain tissue. The latent period between PTZ induction and seizure are longer in the PTZ+erdosteine group than in PTZ-induced-epilepsy group (Perdosteine group. SOD level did not change in this group. While MDA and XO levels are significantly lower, SOD level is significantly higher in the PTZ+erdosteine group compared to PTZ and control groups (Perdosteine treatment both may increase latent interval between seizures and may decrease oxidative stress, thus may ameliorate neuronal death in brain during seizures. It may be used as an adjunct therapy in epilepsy.

  17. Comparison of impact on seizure frequency and epileptiform discharges of children with epilepsy from topiramate and phenobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y-Y; Wang, M-G; Yao, D; Huang, X-X; Zhang, T; Deng, X-Q

    2016-03-01

    To study the impact on seizure frequency and epileptiform discharges of children with epilepsy from topiramate (TPM) and phenobarbital (PB). Two hundred cases children with epilepsy from August 2010 to August 2013 in our hospital were sampled and randomly divided into two groups. The observation group was treated with TPM while the control group with PB, and then comparing seizure frequency, efficiency, and adverse reactions of two groups. The reduced number of partial seizures, generalized seizures, and total seizures in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group, and the rate of cure, markedly effective and total efficiency in observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group. However, the adverse reactions in observation group were significantly lower than those in the control group. Thus, differences were statistically significant (p<0.05). Compared with PB, TPM showed a better effect on epilepsy treatment with less adverse reactions which were worthy of clinical recommendation.

  18. ROSA DAMASCENA OIL: AN ADJUNCTIVE THERAPY FOR PEDIATRIC REFRACTORY SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ashrafzadeh MD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveSeveral investigations have demonstrated that Rosa damascena has an inhibitory effect on the hypothalamus and on pituitary system reactivity in the rat; it has also been shown that the essential oil of Rosa damascena has significant antiepileptic effects on pentylentetrazole (PTZ induced seizures in rats. We aimed at assessing the effects of the essential oil of Rosa damascena when used as an adjunct treatment to treat children with refractory seizuresMaterials and MethodsIn this double-blind clinical trial, conducted as a pilot study between April 2004 and March 2005, we administered essential oil of Rosa damascena to sixteen children with refractory epilepsy as an adjunct therapy, and evaluated its effects.Results16 patients, age range 3-13 years, were enrolled; 56.3% (n=9 girls and 43.8% (n=7 boys. All has been under treatment for 3-6 weeks (baseline phase. They received either the essential oil or placebo for a period of 4 weeks and in between these periods, they took only their pre-existing antiepileptic drugs for two weeks (washout phase.The mean frequency of seizures in those using essential oil, showed significant decrease as compared to the controls using placeboes (p=0.00.ConclusionIt can be concluded that the essential oil of Rosa Damascena has beneficial antiepileptic effect in children with refractory seizures.Keywords:Rosa damascena, refractory epilepsy, children, oil.

  19. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures associated with hypophosphatasia in a newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Magda Lahorgue; Mugnol, Fabiana; Bica, Igor; Fiori, Renato Machado

    2002-03-01

    Pyridoxine dependency and congenital hypophosphatasia are unusual metabolic disorders. We report a female infant born from healthy consanguineous parents with shortening of limbs, detected during pregnancy by ultrasonography. Immediately after delivery, the baby was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit because of respiratory distress. A bone radiograph showed hypomineralization of all bones, and serum alkaline phosphatase was very low (10 U/L). Within the first day of life, seizures (focal clonic and tonic) started. The seizures were refractory to phenobarbital and other antiepileptic drugs. The first electroencephalogram (EEG) showed a burst-suppression pattern. Pyridoxine was administered (50 mg/kg) and completely controlled the seizures. Antiepileptic drugs were discontinued, and a maintenance dose of pyridoxine (10 mg/day) was established. A postpyridoxine EEG revealed the disappearance of the burst-suppression pattern. The patient died at age 26 days. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures, when recognized early and treated, have a more favorable prognosis. However, hypophosphatasia detected at birth almost always has a lethal outcome.

  20. Iron deficiency and acute seizures: results from children living in rural Kenya and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Idro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are conflicting reports on whether iron deficiency changes susceptibility to seizures. We examined the hypothesis that iron deficiency is associated with an increased risk of acute seizures in children in a malaria endemic area. METHODS: We recruited 133 children, aged 3-156 months, who presented to a district hospital on the Kenyan coast with acute seizures and frequency-matched these to children of similar ages but without seizures. We defined iron deficiency according to the presence of malarial infection and evidence of inflammation. In patients with malaria, we defined iron deficiency as plasma ferritin<30 µg/ml if plasma C-reactive protein (CRP was<50 mg/ml or ferritin<273 µg/ml if CRP≥50 mg/ml, and in those without malaria, as ferritin<12 µg/ml if CRP<10 mg/ml or ferritin<30 µg/ml if CRP≥10 mg/ml. In addition, we performed a meta-analysis of case-control studies published in English between January 1966 and December 2009 and available through PUBMED that have examined the relationship between iron deficiency and febrile seizures in children. RESULTS: In our Kenyan case control study, cases and controls were similar, except more cases reported past seizures. Malaria was associated with two-thirds of all seizures. Eighty one (30.5% children had iron deficiency. Iron deficiency was neither associated with an increased risk of acute seizures (45/133[33.8%] cases were iron deficient compared to 36/133[27.1%] controls, p = 0.230 nor status epilepticus and it did not affect seizure semiology. Similar results were obtained when children with malaria, known to cause acute symptomatic seizures in addition to febrile seizures were excluded. However, in a meta-analysis that combined all eight case-control studies that have examined the association between iron deficiency and acute/febrile seizures to-date, iron deficiency, described in 310/1,018(30.5% cases and in 230/1,049(21.9% controls, was associated with a

  1. Genetics Home Reference: genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus Printable PDF Open ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a ...

  2. Complex partial seizure, disruptive behaviours and the Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complex partial seizure, disruptive behaviours and the Nigerian Legal System. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... Background: Complex partial seizure is an epileptic seizure which results in ...

  3. Severe hypoglycemia in a juvenile diabetic rat model: presence and severity of seizures are associated with mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Maheandiran

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that insulin-induced hypoglycemia can result in seizures. However, the effects of the seizures, as well as possible treatment strategies, have yet to be elucidated, particularly in juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM. Here we establish a model of diabetes in young rats, to examine the consequences of severe hypoglycemia in this age group; particularly seizures and mortality. Diabetes was induced in post-weaned 22-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats by streptozotocin (STZ administered intraperitoneally (IP. Insulin IP (15 U/kg, in rats fasted (14-16 hours, induced hypoglycemia, defined as <3.5 mM blood glucose (BG, in 68% of diabetic (STZ and 86% of control rats (CON. Seizures occurred in 86% of STZ and all CON rats that reached hypoglycemic levels with mortality only occurring post-seizure. The fasting BG levels were significantly higher in STZ (12.4 ± 1.3 mM than in CON rodents (6.3 ± 0.3 mM, resulting in earlier onset of hypoglycemia and seizures in the CON group. However, the BG at seizure onset was statistically similar between STZ (1.8 ± 0.2 mM and CON animals (1.6 ± 0.1 mM as well as between those that survived (S+S and those that died (S+M post-seizure. Despite this, the S+M group underwent a significantly greater number of seizure events than the S+S group. 25% glucose administered at seizure onset and repeated with recurrent seizures was not sufficient to mitigate these continued convulsions. Combining glucose with diazepam and phenytoin significantly decreased post-treatment seizures, but not mortality. Intracranial electroencephalograms (EEGs were recorded in 10 CON and 9 STZ animals. Predictive EEG changes were not observed in these animals that underwent seizures. Fluorojade staining revealed damaged cells in non-seizing STZ animals and in STZ and CON animals post-seizure. In summary, this model of hypoglycemia and seizures in juvenile diabetic rats provides a paradigm for further study of

  4. Frontal gray matter abnormalities predict seizure outcome in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle E. Doucet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing more reliable predictors of seizure outcome following temporal lobe surgery for intractable epilepsy is an important clinical goal. In this context, we investigated patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE before and after temporal resection. In detail, we explored gray matter (GM volume change in relation with seizure outcome, using a voxel-based morphometry (VBM approach. To do so, this study was divided into two parts. The first one involved group analysis of differences in regional GM volume between the groups (good outcome (GO, e.g., no seizures after surgery; poor outcome (PO, e.g., persistent postoperative seizures; and controls, N = 24 in each group, pre- and post-surgery. The second part of the study focused on pre-surgical data only (N = 61, determining whether the degree of GM abnormalities can predict surgical outcomes. For this second step, GM abnormalities were identified, within each lobe, in each patient when compared with an ad hoc sample of age-matched controls. For the first analysis, the results showed larger GM atrophy, mostly in the frontal lobe, in PO patients, relative to both GO patients and controls, pre-surgery. When comparing pre-to-post changes, we found relative GM gains in the GO but not in the PO patients, mostly in the non-resected hemisphere. For the second analysis, only the frontal lobe displayed reliable prediction of seizure outcome. 81% of the patients showing pre-surgical increased GM volume in the frontal lobe became seizure free, post-surgery; while 77% of the patients with pre-surgical reduced frontal GM volume had refractory seizures, post-surgery. A regression analysis revealed that the proportion of voxels with reduced frontal GM volume was a significant predictor of seizure outcome (p = 0.014. Importantly, having less than 1% of the frontal voxels with GM atrophy increased the likelihood of being seizure-free, post-surgery, by seven times. Overall, our results suggest

  5. Evaluation of safety and efficacy of zonisamide in adult patients with partial, generalized, and combined seizures: an open labeled, noncomparative, observational Indian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash A

    2016-02-01

    .92% of patients received zonisamide as monotherapy or alternative monotherapy and 59.85% patients received zonisamide as first adjunctive therapy. Compared with baseline, 41.22% of patients achieved seizure freedom and 78.6% as responder rate at the end of 24 week study. Most commonly reported adverse events were loss of appetite, weight loss, sedation, and dizziness, but discontinuation due to adverse events of drug was seen in 0.92% of patients. This open label real-world study suggests that zonisamide is an effective and well-tolerated antiepileptic drug in Indian adults for treatment of partial, generalized as well as combined seizures type. No new safety signals were observed. Keywords: zonisamide, partial onset seizures, generalized seizures, responder rate, monotherapy, adjunctive therapy

  6. Long-term seizure outcome in patients with juvenile absence epilepsy; a retrospective study in a tertiary referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhofer, Pavlína; Brázdil, Milan; Ošlejšková, Hana; Kuba, Robert

    2014-06-01

    The study aim was to evaluate pharmacotherapy effects and long-term seizure outcomes in patients with juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE) during a five-year follow-up period. The secondary aim was to identify factors from patient history and determine their influence on seizure control. We retrospectively studied 46 patients with JAE in the period between 2006 and 2011. The age at seizure onset, onset seizure type, family history of epilepsy, status epilepticus in history, medication history, and the rate of seizure control were studied. There were 30 females (65.2%) and 16 males (34.8%) in the study. The mean age at seizure onset was 12.9±5.6 years (ranged from 3 to 28 years). In 30 patients (65.2%), seizure onset was with absences, in 15 patients (32.6%) with generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS), and in 1 patient (2.2%) with absence status. In 43 patients (93.5%), GTCS occurred in the course of the disease. Family history for epilepsy was positive in 10 patients (21.7%). In the five-year follow-up period, seizure freedom (Group 1) was achieved in 7 patients (15.2%). In total, 22 patients (47.8%) were classified into the groups involving very poor seizure control and antiepileptic drug resistance (Groups 5 and 6). The mean number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) used in the course of the disease in appropriate therapeutic doses was 3.8±2.3 (1-10 AEDs). The study results show that almost half of JAE patients have poor seizure control with a high rate of pharmacoresistance. The outcome of JAE can be very uncertain. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. eEF2K/eEF2 Pathway Controls the Excitation/Inhibition Balance and Susceptibility to Epileptic Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Christopher; Taha, Elham; Murru, Luca; Ponzoni, Luisa; Cattaneo, Angela; Guarnieri, Fabrizia C; Montani, Caterina; Mossa, Adele; Vezzoli, Elena; Ippolito, Giulio; Zapata, Jonathan; Barrera, Iliana; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Cook, James; Poe, Michael; Stephen, Michael Rajesh; Kopanitsa, Maksym; Benfante, Roberta; Rusconi, Francesco; Braida, Daniela; Francolini, Maura; Proud, Christopher G; Valtorta, Flavia; Passafaro, Maria; Sala, Mariaelvina; Bachi, Angela; Verpelli, Chiara; Rosenblum, Kobi; Sala, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    Alterations in the balance of inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders such as epilepsy. Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) is a highly regulated, ubiquitous kinase involved in the control of protein translation. Here, we show that eEF2K activity negatively regulates GABAergic synaptic transmission. Indeed, loss of eEF2K increases GABAergic synaptic transmission by upregulating the presynaptic protein Synapsin 2b and α5-containing GABAA receptors and thus interferes with the excitation/inhibition balance. This cellular phenotype is accompanied by an increased resistance to epilepsy and an impairment of only a specific hippocampal-dependent fear conditioning. From a clinical perspective, our results identify eEF2K as a potential novel target for antiepileptic drugs, since pharmacological and genetic inhibition of eEF2K can revert the epileptic phenotype in a mouse model of human epilepsy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Update on the Neurobiology of Alcohol Withdrawal Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Abrupt cessation of alcohol intake after prolonged heavy drinking may trigger alcohol withdrawal seizures. Generalized tonic–clonic seizures are the most characteristic and severe type of seizure that occur in this setting. Generalized seizures also occur in rodent models of alcohol withdrawal. In these models, the withdrawal seizures are triggered by neuronal networks in the brainstem, including the inferior colliculus; similar brainstem mechanisms may contribute to alcohol withdrawal seizur...

  9. De novo psychogenic seizures after epilepsy surgery: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MONTENEGRO MARIA AUGUSTA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of de novo psychogenic seizures after epilepsy surgery is rare, and is estimated in 1.8% to 3.6%. Seizures after epilepsy surgery should be carefully evaluated, and de novo psychogenic seizures should be considered especially when there is a change in the ictal semiology. We report a patient with de novo psychogenic seizures after anterior temporal lobe removal for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Once psychogenic seizures were diagnosed and psychiatric treatment was started, seizures stopped.

  10. Long-term seizure outcome in 211 patients with focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauser, Susanne; Essang, Charles; Altenmüller, Dirk-Matthias; Staack, Anke Maren; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Strobl, Karl; Bast, Thomas; Schubert-Bast, Susanne; Stephani, Ulrich; Wiegand, Gert; Prinz, Marco; Brandt, Armin; Zentner, Josef; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is currently recognized as the most common cause of neocortical pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Epilepsy surgery has become an increasingly successful treatment option. Herein, the largest patient cohort reported to date is analyzed regarding long-term outcome and factors relevant for long-term seizure control. Two hundred eleven children and adults undergoing epilepsy surgery for histologically proven FCD and a follow-up period of 2-12 years were analyzed regarding the longitudinal course of seizure control, effects of FCD type, localization, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), timing of surgery, and postoperative antiepileptic treatment. After 1 year, Engel class I outcome was achieved in 65% of patients and the percentage of seizure-free patients remained stable over the following (up to 12) years. Complete resection of the assumed epileptogenic area, lower age at surgery, and unilobar localization were positive prognostic indicators of long-term seizure freedom. Seizure recurrence was 12% after the first year, whereas 8% achieved late seizure freedom either following additional introduction of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (4%), a reoperation (2%), or a running down phenomenon (2%). Thirty-nine percent of patients had a reduction of AED from polytherapy to monotherapy or a complete cessation of AED treatment. Late seizure relapse was seen in nine patients during reduction of AEDs (i.e., in 12% of all patients with AED tapering); in four of them seizures persisted after reestablishment of antiepileptic medication. Postoperative long-term seizure outcome was favorable in patients with FCD and remained stable in 80% of patients after the first postoperative year. Several preoperative factors revealed to be predictive for the postoperative outcome and may help in the preoperative counseling of patients with FCD and in the selection of ideal candidates for epilepsy surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. Stress as a seizure precipitant: Identification, associated factors, and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Heather R; Privitera, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Stress is a common and important seizure precipitant reported by epilepsy patients. Studies to date have used different methodologies to identify relationships between epilepsy and stress. Several studies have identified anxiety, depression, and childhood trauma as being more common in patients with epilepsy who report stress as a seizure precipitant compared to patients with epilepsy who did not identify stress as a seizure precipitant. In one survey study it was found that a majority of patients with stress-triggered seizures had used some type of stress reduction method on their own and, of those who tried this, an even larger majority felt that these methods improved their seizures. Additionally, small to moderate sized prospective trials, including randomized clinical trials, using general stress reduction methods have shown promise in improving outcomes in patients with epilepsy, but results on seizure frequency have been inconsistent. Based on these studies, we recommend that when clinicians encounter patients who report stress as a seizure precipitant, these patients should be screened for a treatable mood disorder. Furthermore, although seizure reduction with stress reduction methods has not been proven in a randomized controlled trial, other important endpoints like quality of life were improved. Therefore, recommending stress reduction methods to patients with epilepsy appears to be a reasonable low risk adjunctive to standard treatments. The current review highlights the need for future research to help further clarify biological mechanisms of the stress-seizure relationship and emphasizes the need for larger randomized controlled trials to help develop evidence based treatment recommendations for our epilepsy patients. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term outcomes of surgical treatment for epilepsy in adults with regard to seizures, antiepileptic drug treatment and employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmgren, Kristina; Edelvik, Anna

    2017-01-01

    There is Class I evidence for short-term efficacy of epilepsy surgery from two randomized controlled studies of temporal lobe resection. Long-term outcome studies are observational. The aim of this narrative review was to summarise long-term outcomes taking the study methodology into account. A PubMed search was conducted identifying articles on long-term outcomes of epilepsy surgery in adults with regard to seizures, antiepileptic drug treatment and employment. Definitions of seizure freedom were examined in order to identify the proportions of patients with sustained seizure freedom. The quality of the long-term studies was assessed. In a number of high-quality studies 40-50% of patients had been continuously free from seizures with impairment of consciousness 10 years after resective surgery, with a higher proportion seizure-free at each annual follow-up. The proportion of seizure-free adults in whom AEDs have been withdrawn varied widely across studies, from 19-63% after around 5 years of seizure freedom. Few long-term vocational outcome studies were identified and results were inconsistent. Some investigators found no postoperative changes, others found decreased employment for patients with continuing seizures, but no change or increased employment for seizure-free patients. Having employment at baseline and postoperative seizure freedom were the strongest predictors of employment after surgery. Long-term studies of outcomes after epilepsy surgery are by necessity observational. There is a need for more prospective longitudinal studies of both seizure and non-seizure outcomes, considering individual patient trajectories in order to obtain valid outcome data needed for counselling patients about epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Using Lorenz plot and Cardiac Sympathetic Index of heart rate variability for detecting seizures for patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Jesper; Beniczky, Sandor; Johansen, Peter; Sidenius, Per; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Tachycardia is often seen during epileptic seizures, but it also occurs during physical exercise. In order to assess whether focal epileptic seizures can be detected by short term moving window Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis, we modified the geometric HRV method, Lorenz plot, to consist of only 30, 50 or 100 R-R intervals per analyzed window. From each window we calculated the longitudinal (L) and transverse (T) variability of Lorenz plot to retrieve the Cardiac Sympathetic Index (CSI) as (L/T) and "Modified CSI" (described in methods), and compared the maximum during the patient's epileptic seizures with that during the patient's own exercise and non-seizure sessions as control. All five analyzed patients had complex partial seizures (CPS) originating in the temporal lobe (11 seizures) during their 1-5 days long term video-EEG monitoring. All CPS with electroencephalographic correlation were selected for the HRV analysis. The CSI and Modified CSI were correspondently calculated after each heart beat depicting the prior 30, 50 and 100 R-R intervals at the time. CSI (30, 50 and 100) and Modified CSI (100) showed a higher maximum peak during seizures than exercise/non-seizure (121-296%) for 4 of the 5 patients within 4 seconds before till 60 seconds after seizure onset time even though exercise maximum HR exceeded that of the seizures. The results indicate a detectable, sudden and inordinate shift towards sympathetic overdrive in the sympathovagal balance of the autonomic nervous system just around seizure-onset for certain patients. This new modified moving window Lorenz plot method seems promising way of constructing a portable ECG-based epilepsy alarm for certain patients with epilepsy who needs aid during seizure.

  14. Seizure phenotypes, periodicity, and sleep-wake pattern of seizures in Kcna-1 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Samantha; Wallace, Eli; Hwang, Youngdeok; Maganti, Rama

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to describe seizure phenotypes, natural progression, sleep-wake patterns, as well as periodicity of seizures in Kcna-1 null mutant mice. These mice were implanted with epidural electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) electrodes, and simultaneous video-EEG recordings were obtained while animals were individually housed under either diurnal (LD) condition or constant darkness (DD) over ten days of recording. The video-EEG data were analyzed to identify electrographic and behavioral phenotypes and natural progression and to examine the periodicity of seizures. Sleep-wake patterns were analyzed to understand the distribution and onset of seizures across the sleep-wake cycle. Four electrographically and behaviorally distinct seizure types were observed. Regardless of lighting condition that animals were housed in, Kcna-1 null mice initially expressed only a few of the most severe seizure types that progressively increased in frequency and decreased in seizure severity. In addition, a circadian periodicity was noted, with seizures peaking in the first 12h of the Zeitgeber time (ZT) cycle, regardless of lighting conditions. Interestingly, seizure onset differed between lighting conditions where more seizures arose out of sleep in LD conditions, whereas under DD conditions, the majority occurred out of the wakeful state. We suggest that this model be used to understand the circadian pattern of seizures as well as the pathophysiological implications of sleep and circadian disturbances in limbic epilepsies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Seizure Clustering on Epilepsy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A prospective, long-term population-based study was performed to determine whether seizure clustering (3 or more afebrile seizures during a 24 hour period is associated with drug resistance and increased mortality in childhood-onset epilepsy, in a study at University of Turku, Finland, and the Epilepsy Research Group, Berlin, Germany.

  16. Febrile Seizures: clinical and genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractFebrile seizures are described as a temporary seizure disorder of childhood; the attacks occur by definition in association with fever and are usually accompanied by sudden tonic-clonic muscle contractions and reduced consciousness, usually lasting not longer than 5 to 10 minutes. Accord

  17. Febrile Seizures: clinical and genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractFebrile seizures are described as a temporary seizure disorder of childhood; the attacks occur by definition in association with fever and are usually accompanied by sudden tonic-clonic muscle contractions and reduced consciousness, usually lasting not longer than 5 to 10 minutes.

  18. Childhood Febrile Seizures: Overview and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tonia; Jacobsen, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the latest knowledge and understanding of childhood febrile seizures. This review also discusses childhood febrile seizure occurrence, health services utilization and treatment costs. Parental reactions associated with its occurrence and how healthcare providers can assist parents with dealing effectively with this potentially frightening and anxiety-producing event are also discussed. PMID:17479160

  19. ROLE OF MRI IN EVALUATION OF SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avadhesh Pratap Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Seizure is a paroxysmal alteration in neurologic function resulting from abnormal excessive neuronal electrical activity. Epilepsy is a chronic condition characterized by recurrent seizures unprovoked by an acute systemic or neurologic insult.1 An epileptic seizure is a clinical manifestation of abnormal, excessive neuronal activity arising in the grey matter of the cerebral cortex. MATERIALS AND METHODS Prospective studies of 100 patients with clinical impression of seizures were examined by 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. RESULT A total of 100 patients satisfying the inclusion criteria were included in the study. The age range of patients was from neonate to elderly with male predominance, male 64 (64% and female 36 (36%. GTCS was the most common clinical diagnosis constituting (80% cases. The common abnormalities were cerebral infarction with gliosis (16%, infections – NCC (7% and tuberculoma (10%, cerebral atrophy (1%, developmental cortical malformations (2%, venous thrombosis (4%, low-grade glioma (9%, meningioma (3%. CONCLUSION MRI is the investigation of choice in patients with seizure disorder. The sensitivity of MRI in detecting abnormalities in patients with seizure disorder is in part associated to the underlying pathologies and by the MRI techniques and experience of the interpreting physician. Accurate diagnosis of the cause of seizure is crucial for finding an effective treatment. With its high spatial resolution, excellent inherent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging capability and lack of ionizing radiation, MR imaging has emerged as a versatile tool in the evaluation of patients with seizure disorder.

  20. Treatment of drug-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsien-Yi; Albertson, Timothy E; Olson, Kent R

    2016-03-01

    Seizures are a common complication of drug intoxication, and up to 9% of status epilepticus cases are caused by a drug or poison. While the specific drugs associated with drug-induced seizures may vary by geography and change over time, common reported causes include antidepressants, stimulants and antihistamines. Seizures occur generally as a result of inadequate inhibitory influences (e.g., gamma aminobutyric acid, GABA) or excessive excitatory stimulation (e.g. glutamate) although many other neurotransmitters play a role. Most drug-induced seizures are self-limited. However, status epilepticus occurs in up to 10% of cases. Prolonged or recurrent seizures can lead to serious complications and require vigorous supportive care and anticonvulsant drugs. Benzodiazepines are generally accepted as the first line anticonvulsant therapy for drug-induced seizures. If benzodiazepines fail to halt seizures promptly, second line drugs include barbiturates and propofol. If isoniazid poisoning is a possibility, pyridoxine is given. Continuous infusion of one or more anticonvulsants may be required in refractory status epilepticus. There is no role for phenytoin in the treatment of drug-induced seizures. The potential role of ketamine and levetiracetam is promising but not established.

  1. Transient inhibitory seizures mimicking crescendo TIAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H; Lerner, A

    1990-01-01

    Somatic inhibitory seizures are thought to occur rarely. We describe a patient with somatic inhibitory seizures who initially presented with a clinical picture of crescendo transient ischemic attacks. He did not improve with anticoagulation, but the episodes ceased promptly after the administration of an anticonvulsant.

  2. Redefining outcome of first seizures by acute illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Emily T; Kerin, Tara; Christakis, Dimitri A; Blume, Heidi K; Gospe, Sidney M; Vinje, Jan; Bowen, Michael D; Gentsch, Jon; Zerr, Danielle M

    2010-12-01

    Seizures are common in children, but the causes and recurrence risk for children with a nonfebrile first seizure remain poorly understood. In a prospective longitudinal study of children who presented with a first-time seizure, we investigated the viral etiology of associated infectious illnesses and sought to determine the risk of recurrent seizures stratified by fever and type of illness. Children (aged 6 months to 6 years) were enrolled at the time of evaluation for their first seizure and followed monthly for up to 5 years. Seizure and illness data were collected through parent interviews and medical-record reviews. Stool, serum, and cerebrospinal fluid collected within 48 hours of the first seizure were evaluated for viral gastrointestinal pathogens. Of the 117 children enrolled, 78 (67%) had febrile seizures, 34 (29%) had nonfebrile-illness seizures, and 5 (4%) had unprovoked seizures. Children with nonfebrile-illness seizures were more likely than those with febrile seizures to have acute gastroenteritis (47% and 28%, respectively; P = .05). No significant differences in seizure recurrence were found between children with or without a fever at first seizure. Children with acute gastroenteritis at first seizure, regardless of fever, had a lower risk of seizure recurrence compared with children with other acute illnesses (hazard ratio: 0.28; 95% confidence interval: 0.09-0.80). Our results confirm the role of gastrointestinal illness as a distinguishing feature in childhood seizures. Children with this distinct presentation have a low rate of seizure recurrence and few neurologic complications.

  3. Predictors of seizures during pregnancy in women with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sanjeev V; Syam, Unnikrishnan; Devi, J Sucharitha

    2012-05-01

    We aimed to characterize the seizure pattern during pregnancy in a large cohort of women with epilepsy (WWE) and identify possible predictors of seizure relapse during pregnancy. We recorded the antiepileptic drug (AED) use and seizure frequency for WWE during the prepregnancy month and pregnancy. The seizure profile was correlated with the clinical details and seizure type as abstracted from the clinical records maintained in the registry. Of the 1,297 pregnancies in WWE with complete seizure data, 47.8% were seizure-free during pregnancy. Seizure relapse was highest during the three peripartum days. Women with partial seizures-had higher risk of relapse (odds ratio [OR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.0) than those with generalized seizures. They had two peaks of seizure relapse (second to third month and sixth month). Those with generalized seizures had one peak at first trimester. Those who were on polytherapy had increased risk of seizures (OR 2.98, 95% CI 2.3-3.9) when compared to those on monotherapy. Those who had seizures in the prepregnancy month had higher risk (OR 15, 95% CI 9-25.1) of seizures during pregnancy when compared to those who were seizure-free during that period. On multiple logistic regression, prepregnancy seizure was the most important predictor of seizures during pregnancy.

  4. Do recurrent seizure-related head injuries affect seizures in people with epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, David E.; Chiang, Sharon; Tobias, Ronnie S.

    2015-01-01

    Seizure-related head injuries (SRHIs) are among the most commonly encountered injuries in people with epilepsy (PWE). Whether head injury has an effect on preexisting epilepsy is not known. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess for any possible effects of SRHIs on seizure frequency and seizure semiology over a 2-year period. We identified 204 patients who have been followed at the Baylor Comprehensive Epilepsy Center from 2008 to 2010. SRHI occurred in 18.1% of the cohort. Most injuries (91%) were classified as mild. Though seizure frequency varied following head injury, overall seizure frequency was not significantly impacted by presence or absence of SRHI over the 2-year study period. Changes in seizure semiology were not observed in those with SRHIs. Although mild SRHI is common among PWE, it does not appear to have an effect on seizure characteristics over a relatively short period. PMID:22227592

  5. Computing network-based features from intracranial EEG time series data: Application to seizure focus localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Stephanie; Subramanian, Sandya; Jordan, Austin; Santaniello, Sabato; Yaffe, Robert; Jouny, Christophe C; Bergey, Gregory K; Anderson, William S; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2014-01-01

    The surgical resection of the epileptogenic zone (EZ) is the only effective treatment for many drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) patients, but the pre-surgical identification of the EZ is challenging. This study investigates whether the EZ exhibits a computationally identifiable signature during seizures. In particular, we compute statistics of the brain network from intracranial EEG (iEEG) recordings and track the evolution of network connectivity before, during, and after seizures. We define each node in the network as an electrode and weight each edge connecting a pair of nodes by the gamma band cross power of the corresponding iEEG signals. The eigenvector centrality (EVC) of each node is tracked over two seizures per patient and the electrodes are ranked according to the corresponding EVC value. We hypothesize that electrodes covering the EZ have a signature EVC rank evolution during seizure that differs from electrodes outside the EZ. We tested this hypothesis on multi-channel iEEG recordings from 2 DRE patients who had successful surgery (i.e., seizures were under control with or without medications) and 1 patient who had unsuccessful surgery. In the successful cases, we assumed that the resected region contained the EZ and found that the EVC rank evolution of the electrodes within the resected region had a distinct "arc" signature, i.e., the EZ ranks first rose together shortly after seizure onset and then fell later during seizure.

  6. Neonatal caffeine exposure alters seizure susceptibility in rats in an age-related manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, R

    1995-10-27

    Early developmental exposure to caffeine in rats results in decreased susceptibility to certain chemically-induced seizures in the adult. To determine whether this effect first appears in adulthood or is present during preceding developmental stages, we exposed neonatal rats to caffeine and determined seizure thresholds in animals 28, 42 and 70-90 days of age. Rats were unhandled or received either vehicle (water) or caffeine (15-20 mg/kg/day) by gavage (0.05 ml/10 g) over postnatal days 2-6. At 28, 42, or 70-90 days of age, rats were infused intravenously with picrotoxin (PIC), bicuculline (BIC), pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), caffeine (CAFF), strychnine (STR), or kainic acid (KA). Seizure thresholds for each compound were analyzed as a function of neonatal treatment, sex, and age. At 28 days, neonatally caffeine-exposed rats had a higher seizure threshold only for PTZ (P PIC (P < 0.0007) and PTZ (P < 0.0001) than did controls. These results at 28 and 42 days are compared with previously reported data that demonstrated that in adulthood, rats neonatally exposed to caffeine have higher thresholds for seizure induction with CAFF, PTZ, and KA. Thus, early developmental exposure to caffeine results in decreases in seizure susceptibility that are agent specific and may result in a delay in the decrease in seizure threshold that occurs for many agents between late juvenile ages and adulthood.

  7. Effect of various antiepileptic drugs in zebrafish PTZ-seizure model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently zebrafish larvae have emerged as a high-throughput model for screening pharmacological activities. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of established anticonvulsants, such as valproic acid, carbamazepine, gabapentin, diazepam, lacosamide and pregabalin against pentylenetetrazole (6 mM seizures in adult zebrafish. Different phases of seizures (increase swim activity, rapid whirlpool-like circling swim behaviour and brief clonus-like seizures leading to loss of posture were elicited in zebrafish on exposure for 15 min to 6 mM pentylenetetrazole. The exposure of zebrafish to an increasing concentration of the anticonvulsants alongside 6 mM pentylenetetrazole showed concentration-dependent elevation of seizure latency against pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures except for pregabalin, which failed to produce any anticonvulsant activity in zebrafish. Moreover the proconvulsant activity of caffeine was also evaluated using suboptimal concentration (4 mM of pentylenetetrazole in adult zebrafish. Decrease in seizure latency of different phases of seizures was observed with increasing concentration of caffeine compared with its respective control group. In view of the above findings, the results of the present study suggested that adult zebrafish produce the expected anticonvulsive and proconvulsive effects and could potentially be used as a screen in future epilepsy research.

  8. Seizure Freedom Rates and Prognostic Indicators After Resection of Gangliogliomas: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonney, Phillip A; Glenn, Chad A; Ebeling, Peter A; Conner, Andrew K; Boettcher, Lillian B; Cameron, Drew M; Battiste, James D; Sughrue, Michael E

    2015-12-01

    Gangliogliomas are rare tumors that comprise up to 40% of lesional epilepsy. Seizure control represents an important quality-of-life determinant in patients with these tumors. Here we present results of a literature review addressing rates of seizure freedom in in patients with gangliogliomas. Across studies, seizure freedom occurred in 63%-100% of patients. Many studies included follow-up times of greater than 5 years, suggesting that the responses are durable. We discuss potential prognostic factors associated with seizure freedom, including the duration of epilepsy, patient age, frequency and semiology of seizures, tumor location, extent of surgical resection, and operative strategy, including surgical approach and use of invasive monitoring. Although significant differences in study populations and treatments preclude meta-analysis, we discuss prognostic factors identified in individual studies. Increased extent of resection, lesser duration of epilepsy, and younger age at surgery have been associated with increased seizure freedom rates in at least 2 studies each. Although all studies were retrospective in nature and are consequently limited by the weaknesses inherent to such investigations, the literature suggests that surgery is able to relieve most ganglioglioma patients--regardless of patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and operative variables--of seizures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Seizure outcomes of lesionectomy in pediatric lesional epilepsy with brain tumor -- single institute experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Kyung Il; Shin, Hyung Jin; Hong, Seung-Chyul

    2013-09-01

    To determine the clinical characteristics, surgical strategy, and outcome in pediatric lesional epilepsy patients younger than 5years of age undergoing surgery in a single institute. Retrospective data were collected and analyzed on patients younger than 5years of age who underwent lesionectomy for lesional epilepsy at single institute from January 2001 to August 2010. Fourteen pediatric lesional epilepsy patients were enrolled in this study. Engel classification was used to classify seizure outcome. Median preoperative seizure period was 1month (range, 1-21). Median post-operative follow up period was 35months (range 13-84). Ten patients who underwent gross total resection of tumor showed Engel class Ia seizure outcome without any antiepileptic drug (AED). Subtotal resection was performed in four patients to avoid eloquent area injury. Two of these four patients with subtotal removal became seizure-free (Engel class Ia) without AED, while two were in Engel class Ib with AED medication. There was no significant surgical morbidity or mortality. Lesionectomy in children younger than 5years of age is relatively safe and effective in controlling seizures. Short preoperative seizure periods and total removal of tumor might be associated with good outcome. Therefore, early and complete lesionectomy alone may help allow for seizure freedom and optimal brain development in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of isoniazid on the pharmacodynamics of cefazolin-induced seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwata, Yasuyoshi; Nagata, Masashi; Yasuhara, Masato

    2005-04-01

    Both isoniazid (INH) and cefazolin (CEZ) can have serious adverse effects on the central nervous system (CNS), causing seizures. In this study, we investigated the effect of INH on the pharmacodynamics of CEZ-induced seizures in rats. Male Wistar rats pretreated with INH (150 mg/kg i.p.) or saline received an intravenous infusion of CEZ at 3.2 g/h/rat until the onset of seizures, then samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), blood (for serum), and brain were obtained immediately. The administration of INH was associated with a reduction in the total dose of CEZ required to produce seizures. The concentrations of CEZ in serum, brain, and CSF in INH-treated rats at the onset of seizures were significantly lower than those in control rats. In rats coadministered with pyridoxine (150 mg/kg s.c.), the concentration of CEZ in CSF at the onset of seizures was significantly higher than that in rats administered INH only. These results suggest that INH potentiates the sensitivity of the CNS to CEZ-induced seizures, and that the increased sensitivity is associated with the inhibition of vitamin B(6) metabolism by INH.

  11. Rufinamide: treatment of seizures associated with Lennox and ndash;Gastaut syndrome

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    Haritha Allu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rufinamide (RUF is FDA-approved for adjunctive management of seizures related with Lennox and ndash;Gastaut syndrome (LGS. This new anti-epileptic drug (AED adds to the AEDs previously used for LGS together with valproic acid, lamotrigine, felbamate, and topiramate. Its mechanism of action includes preventive the excessive firing of sodium-dependent action potentials, but RUF also exhibits a broad spectrum of action in animal models. The plasma concentration of other AEDs does not change by the RUF. Dizziness, nausea, diplopia, and ataxia vomiting and somnolence are most common adverse effects taking place with RUF. Status epilepticus has been reported, but were uncommon (0.9%. A recent randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of RUF in patients with LGS and generalized seizures, including atypical absence and tonic-atonic seizures, showed a 32.7% median percentage decreased in total seizures and a 42.5% median percentage decreased in tonic-atonic seizures. RUF also considerably decreased seizure severity. RUF has been studied as adjunctive therapy for partial seizures in adults and adolescents. In a study of three healthy volunteers, an oral dose of 600 mg RUF recognized high absorption and monoexponential elimination with a mean half-life (t and frac12; of 9 hrs. Excretion was mainly renal (85% and complete (98% within 7 days. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(6.000: 937-942

  12. INTRACTABLE SEIZURE DISORDERS: EFFICACY OF THE CLASSIC KETOGENIC DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Karimzadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low carbohydrate, adequate protein diet,developed in the 1920s for the management of intractable seizure disorders in children. To evaluate efficacy and tolerability of the classic ketogenic diet, we analyzed records of the children started on the diet from 1999 to 2006 at the Mofid children's hospital.Materials & MethodsThe subjects were 87 children, mean age 55 months. Before initiation of the diet, 55% of the patients had seizures, at least 1-4 times per day, 36% - 5 or more per day and 9% - 2 to 4 times per week. Mean number of Anti Epileptic Drugs (AEDs tried for them was 8 and 67% were receiving three or more drugs.ResultsThe ketogenic diet showed drastic improvement, with at least 50% reduction in seizure frequency in 87% of our patients, 39% of whom showed complete seizure control in the third month. After one year, in 80% of the patients who returned, improvement continued, with 26% of them being seizure free; besides, 23% had one AED decreased, 36% had two or three AEDs decreased, and 25% (one child had all AEDs discontinued. Of the 30 improved cases, 20%, at the end of the first year, had improved behavior as well, and 23% of them had become more alert. The median diet duration of the improved group was 15 months.ConclusionThe improvement in our patients, low side effects, and the duration of diet by families reveal that the ketogenic diet can still be a very useful alternative therapy in certain epileptic children.

  13. Metalloproteinase inhibition prevents inhibitory synapse reorganization and seizure genesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Emily; Everest, Michelle; Brown, Arthur; Poulter, Michael O

    2014-10-01

    The integrity and stability of interneurons in a cortical network are essential for proper network function. Loss of interneuron synaptic stability and precise organization can lead to disruptions in the excitation/inhibition balance, a characteristic of epilepsy. This study aimed to identify alterations to the GABAergic interneuron network in the piriform cortex (PC: a cortical area believed to be involved in the development of seizures) after kindling-induced seizures. Immunohistochemistry was used to mark perineuronal nets (PNNs: structures in the extracellular matrix that provide synaptic stability and restrict reorganization of inhibitory interneurons) and interneuron nerve terminals in control and kindled tissues. We found that PNNs were significantly decreased around parvalbumin-positive interneurons after the induction of experimental epilepsy. Additionally, we found layer-specific increases in GABA release sites originating from calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin interneurons, implying that there is a re-wiring of the interneuronal network. This increase in release sites was matched by an increase in GABAergic post-synaptic densities. We hypothesized that the breakdown of the PNN could be due to the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and that the prevention of PNN breakdown may reduce the rewiring of interneuronal circuits and suppress seizures. To test this hypothesis we employed doxycycline, a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor, to stabilize PNNs in kindled rats. We found that doxycycline prevented PNN breakdown, re-organization of the inhibitory innervation, and seizure genesis. Our observations indicate that PNN degradation may be necessary for the development of seizures by facilitating interneuron plasticity and increased GABAergic activity.

  14. Assessing Anticonvulsant Effect of Aqueous Extract of Datura Stramonium Seed on PTZ-Induced Seizures in the Male Mice

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    S Namvar Aghdash

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders that affect social, economic and biological aspects of the human life. Many epileptic patients have uncontrolled seizures and medication-related side effects despite adequate pharmacological treatment. The use of plant extracts is proposed as a therapeutic modality in order to treat different diseases. Datura plant has long been used in the traditional medicine in regard with some nervous disorders like epilepsy. Thus, this study aimed to provide a scientific basis investigating the effect of Datura aqueous extract on PTZ-induced seizures in the male mice. Methods: In this experimental study, 40 male mice were randomly allocated into 5 equal groups including: one control group, one sham group and three experimental groups. The experimental groups received 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg of aqueous extract of Datura Stramonium seed via gavage for 30 days, and the sham group received stilled water via gavage. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ 35 mg/kg, i.p were injected into control, sham and experimental groups 30 minutes after gavage in order to induce the seizure. Then latency time of seizure onset, seizure duration and seizure phases were measured and recorded in the experimental, sham and control groups. The data analysis was carried out via one way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests.  Moreover, difference less than 0.05 (P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The study findings revealed that the aqueous extract of Datura Stramonium seed produced a significant effect on PTZ-induced seizure. In addition, Datura increases latency time of seizure onset (P˂0.01, inhibits progress of seizure stages (P˂0.05 and decreases seizure duration (P˂0.001. Conclusion: The results obtained from the present study indicated that extract of this plant has anticonvulsant effects on PTZ-induced seizure. As a result, it seems to be beneficial to the epilepsy treatment.

  15. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis as a novel indicator of oxidative stress in children with simple febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmas, Bahri; Erel, Özcan; Ersavaş, Dilek; Yürümez, Yusuf

    2017-08-14

    Simple febrile seizures are generally benign, but during the seizure, elevated levels of glutamate and high levels of oxygen use due to the high metabolic brain activity result in oxidative stress. However, the relationship between febrile seizures and oxidative stress remains unclear. In this study, we investigated thiol/disulfide homeostasis as a new oxidative stress parameter in patients with simple febrile seizures. This study was performed between February 2016 and May 2016 at the Pediatric Emergency Unit. The study population consisted of 40 patients with a diagnosis of simple febrile seizure and 30 control participants aged 8-59 months. Total thiol, native thiol and disulfide levels, disulfide/native thiol, disulfide/total thiol, and native thiol/total thiol ratios were used as thiol/disulfide homeostasis parameters and were quantified in patient and control groups. Furthermore, correlations with seizure duration were investigated. In the patient group, native and total thiol levels and native thiol/total thiol ratios were low, and disulfide levels, disulfide/native thiol, and disulfide/total thiol ratios were significantly higher than in the control group. Negative correlations were observed between seizure duration, total and native thiol levels, and native thiol/total thiol ratio, whereas positive correlations were observed between seizure duration and disulfide/native thiol and disulfide/total thiol ratio. The sensitivities of both disulfide/native thiol and disulfide/total thiol ratios were high for simple febrile seizures. Simple febrile seizures may cause impairment in favor of disulfide bonds in thiol/disulfide homeostasis. Overall, these changes may contribute to neuronal cell damage after simple febrile seizures.

  16. A critical role for network structure in seizure onset: a computational modelling approach

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    George ePetkov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent clinical work has implicated network structure as critically important in the initiation of seizures in people with idiopathic generalized epilepsies. In line with this idea, functional networks derived from the electroencephalogram (EEG at rest have been shown to be significantly different in people with generalized epilepsy compared to controls. In particular, the mean node degree of networks from the epilepsy cohort was found to be statistically significantly higher than those of controls. However, the mechanisms by which these network differences can support recurrent transitions into seizures remain unclear. In this study we use a computational model of the transition into seizure dynamics to explore the dynamic consequences of these differences in functional networks. We demonstrate that networks with higher mean node degree are more prone to generating seizure dynamics in the model and therefore suggest a mechanism by which increased mean node degree of brain networks can cause heightened ictogenicity.

  17. The assessment of laboratory parameters in children with fever and febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontko-Romanowska, Krystyna; Żaba, Zbigniew; Panieński, Paweł; Steinborn, Barbara; Szemień, Michał; Łukasik-Głębocka, Magdalena; Ratajczak, Krystian; Górny, Jacek

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the research paper was to assess selected laboratory results in children with fever without seizures and febrile seizure. The paper presents an analysis of a group of 306 children aged 6 months - 5 years who were admitted with diagnosed fever without seizures and febrile seizures in Specialized Health Care Centre for Mother and Child in Poznan between 1st January 2008 and 31st December 2009. Out of the diagnostics procedures performed in children the following ones were taken into consideration: BCC and CRP. Of the analyzed group of 306 children, 59.48% were boys and 40.52% were girls. In the studied group 61.93% were boys and control group 56.15% were boys. Mean age of admitted children was 22 months. In the study group mean body temperature was 39.0°C and in the control group 38.6°C. A statistically significant difference was found between body temperature of study and control group (p = .005). The mean C-reactive protein level in the study group was 15.73 mg/L and in the control group 58.20 mg/L. There was a statistically significant difference (p seizures. The number of lymphocytes was lower in children with FS than in children with fever without seizures.

  18. A Comparison of Buccal Midazolam and Intravenous Diazepam for the Acute Treatment of Seizures in Children

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    Mohammad Ghofrani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study is to compare efficacy and safety of buccal midazolam with intravenous diazepam in control of seizures in Iranian children.Methods: This is a randomized clinical trial. 92 patients with acute seizures, ranging from 6 months to 14 years were randomly assigned to receive either buccal midazolam (32 cases or intravenous diazepam (60 cases at the emergency department of a children's hospital. The primary outcome of this study was cessation of visible seizure activity within 5 minutes from administration of the first dosage. The second dosage was used in case the seizure remained uncontrolled 5 minutes after the first one.Findings: In the midazolam group, 22 (68.8% patients were relieved from seizures in 10 minutes.Meanwhile, diazepam controlled the episodes of 42 (70% patients within 10 minutes. The difference was,however, not statistically significant (P=0.9. The mean time required to control the convulsive episodes after administration of medications was not statistically significant (P=0.09. No significant side effects were observed in either group. Nevertheless, the risk of respiratory failure in intravenous diazepam is greater than in buccal midazolam.Conclusion: Buccal midazolam is as effective as and safer than intravenous diazepam in control of seizures.

  19. Moxifloxacin Induced Seizures -A Case Report.

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    Jiana Shi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old female patient developed a generalized tonic-clonic seizure on the 6th day after treatment with moxifloxacin 400 mg daily intravenously for appendicitis. This patient had atrial fibrillation and history of a surgery for intracerebral hemorrhage, with impaired renal function and liver function, but without history of seizures. Moxifloxacin was discontinued and switched to cefuroxime. The patient remained seizure-free at discharge four days later. The naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale score was 4, indicating a possible adverse reaction to moxifloxacin. The potential risk factors related to moxifloxacin-induced seizures are discussed. It highlights that preexisting central nervous system disease, elderly female with lower bodyweight and severe renal impairment may be the risk factors involved in moxifloxacin-induced seizures.

  20. Detection and Prediction of Epileptic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas

    monitoring of their brain waves. More specifically, three issues were investigated: The feasibility of automatic seizure prediction, optimization of automatic seizure detection algorithms, and the link between intra- and extracranial EEG. Regarding feasibility of automatic seizure prediction, neither...... seizure prediction algorithms. More promising results were obtained in the investigating of possible use of an outpatient EEG monitoring device for idiopathic generalized epilepsy patients. Combined with an automatic seizure detection algorithm such a device can give an objective account of the paroxysm...... frequency, duration, and time of occurrence. Based on standard EEG data from 20 patients recorded in the clinic, the log-sum of wavelet transform coefficients were used as feature input to a classifier consisting of a support vector machine. 97% of paroxysms lasting more than two seconds were correctly...

  1. Gelastic seizures involving the left parietal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, René Andrade; Astencio, Adriana Goicoechea

    2012-01-01

    Gelastic seizures have been described in various epilepsies arising from the temporal or frontal lobes, although the most commonly encountered form is related to the presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma. We describe a patient with gelastic seizures involving the left parietal lobe. Our patient, an 8-year-old girl, underwent interictal video/EEG monitoring and MRI. The seizures consisted of brief staring followed by smiling and laughing. Electroencephalography during the gelastic seizures showed rhythmic spikes and waves in the left parietal lobe. MRI revealed the characteristic features of focal cortical dysplasia. Our findings suggest that the left parietal lobe may actively participate in the particular epileptogenic network generating gelastic seizures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Febrile seizures and risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Christensen, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Febrile seizure is a benign condition for most children, but experiments in animals and neuroimaging studies in humans suggest that some febrile seizures may damage the hippocampus, a brain area of possible importance in schizophrenia. METHODS: A population-based cohort of all children...... born in Denmark between January 1977 and December 1986 was followed until December 2001 by using data from nationwide registries. RESULTS: We followed 558,958 persons including 16,429 with a history of febrile seizures for 2.8 million person-years and identified 952 persons who were diagnosed...... with schizophrenia. A history of febrile seizures was associated with a 44% increased risk of schizophrenia [relative risk (RR)=1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.95] after adjusting for confounding factors. The association between febrile seizures and schizophrenia remained virtually unchanged when...

  3. Febrile seizures and risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Christensen, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    with schizophrenia. A history of febrile seizures was associated with a 44% increased risk of schizophrenia [relative risk (RR)=1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.95] after adjusting for confounding factors. The association between febrile seizures and schizophrenia remained virtually unchanged when...... restricting the analyses to people with no history of epilepsy. A history of both febrile seizures and epilepsy was associated with a 204% increased risk of schizophrenia (RR=3.04; 95% CI, 1.36-6.79) as compared with people with no such history. CONCLUSIONS: We found a slightly increased risk of schizophrenia......BACKGROUND: Febrile seizure is a benign condition for most children, but experiments in animals and neuroimaging studies in humans suggest that some febrile seizures may damage the hippocampus, a brain area of possible importance in schizophrenia. METHODS: A population-based cohort of all children...

  4. Optical triggered seizures using a caged 4-Aminopyridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingrui; McGarry, Laura M.; Ma, Hongtao; Harris, Samuel; Berwick, Jason; Yuste, Rafael; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of epilepsy are critical not only for understanding the fundamental mechanism of epilepsy but also for testing the efficacy of new antiepileptic drugs and novel therapeutic interventions. Photorelease of caged molecules is widely used in biological research to control pharmacologic events with high spatio-temporal resolution. We developed a technique for in vivo optical triggering of neocortical seizures using a novel caged compound based on ruthenium photochemistry (RuBi-4AP). Epileptiform events in mouse cortex were induced with blue light in both whole brain and focal illumination. Multi-electrode array recording and optical techniques were used to characterize the propagation of these epileptic events, including interictal spikes, polyspikes, and ictal discharges. These results demonstrate a novel optically-triggered seizure model, with high spatio-temporal control, that could have widespread application in the investigation of ictal onset, propagation and to develop novel light-based therapeutic interventions. PMID:25698919

  5. Risk of subsequent asthma in children with febrile seizures: a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Ya; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Ku, Yi-Chia; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2014-12-01

    No study has reported a relationship between febrile seizures and asthma; thus, we examined the association between these two disorders. We identified 991 cases of children with febrile seizures as the case cohort, and the control group was matched according to age, sex, urbanization level, and their parents' occupation at a 1:4 ratio. We applied the Cox proportional hazards regression model to estimate the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for asthma among the children with febrile seizures. After 11 years of follow-up, the asthma incidence in the febrile seizure group was approximately 5% higher than that in the control group (log-rank test, P febrile seizure group was 1.41 times higher than that in the control group (95% confidence interval, 1.21-1.65; P febrile seizure-related medical visits (one to two visits vs more than four visits; P Febrile seizures may be associated with an increase in the risk of future asthma occurrence in children. We observed a significantly higher cumulative incidence of asthma occurrence in children with more febrile seizure-related medical visits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Noninvasive transcranial focal stimulation via tripolar concentric ring electrodes lessens behavioral seizure activity of recurrent pentylenetetrazole administrations in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Liu, Xiang; Besio, Walter G.

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We have been developing a noninvasive transcranial focal electrical stimulation with our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes as an alternative/complementary therapy for seizure control. In this study we demonstrate the effect of focal stimulation on behavioral seizure activity induced by two successive pentylenetetrazole administrations in rats. Seizure onset latency, time of the first behavioral change, duration of seizure, and maximal seizure severity score were studied and compared for focal stimulation treated (n = 9) and control groups (n = 10). First, we demonstrate that no significant difference was found in behavioral activity for focal stimulation treated and control groups after the first pentylenetetrazole administration. Next, comparing first and second pentylenetetrazole administrations, we demonstrate there was a significant change in behavioral activity (time of the first behavioral change) in both groups that was not related to focal stimulation. Finally, we demonstrate focal stimulation provoking a significant change in seizure onset latency, duration of seizure, and maximal seizure severity score. We believe that these results, combined with our previous reports, suggest that transcranial focal stimulation may have an anticonvulsant effect. PMID:22692938

  7. The effect of subchronic supplementation with folic acid on homocysteine induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasic-Markovic, A; Rankov-Petrovic, B; Hrncic, D; Krstic, D; Colovic, M; Macut, Dj; Djuric, D; Stanojlovic, Olivera

    2015-06-01

    Influence of folic acid on the CNS is still unclear. Folate has a neuroprotective effect, while on the other hand excess folate can exacerbate seizures in epileptics. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of subchronic administration of folic acid on behavioural and electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics of DL homocysteine thiolactone induced seizures in adult rats. The activity of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and Mg²⁺-ATPase in different brain regions was investigated. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into groups: 1. Controls (C, 0.9% NaCl); 2. DL homocysteine-thiolactone 8.0 mmol/kg (H); 3. Subchronic supplementation with folic acid 5 mg/kg for 7 days (F) and 4. Subchronic supplementation with F + single dose of H (FH). Seizure behaviour was assessed by incidence, latency, number and intensity of seizure episodes. Seizure severity was described by a descriptive scale with grades 0-4. For EEG recordings, three gold-plated recording electrodes were implanted into the skull. Subchronic supplementation with folic acid did not affect seizure incidence, median number of seizure episodes and severity in FH, comparison with H (p > 0.05). The majority of seizure episodes in all groups were of grade 2. There were no significant differences in lethal outcomes at 24 h upon H injection in the FH vs. H group. The activity of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and Mg²⁺-ATPase was significantly increased in almost all examined structures in the FH vs. H group. Subchronic folic acid administration did not exacerbate H induced seizures and completely recovered the activity of ATPases.

  8. Dynamics of muscle activation during tonic-clonic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai; Jennum, Poul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to elucidate the dynamics of muscle activation during generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). We recorded surface electromyography (EMG) from the deltoid muscle during 26 GTCS from 13 patients and compared it with GTCS-like events acted by 10 control subjects. GTCS ...... is a valuable tool for monitoring the balance between pro-convulsive and anti-convulsive factors....

  9. Classification of clinical semiology in epileptic seizures in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Lakshmi; Palumbo, Linda; Ghosh, Soumya

    2012-03-01

    The clinical semiology of 61 neonatal seizures with EEG correlates, in 24 babies was analysed. Most seizures (89%) had multiple features during the EEG discharge. The seizures were classified using the prominent clinical feature at onset, and all features seen during the seizure, using an extended classification scheme. Orolingual features occurred most frequently at onset (30%), whereas ocular phenomena occurred most often during the seizure (70%). Orolingual, ocular and autonomic features were seen at onset in 55% of the seizures. Seizure onsets with clonic, tonic and hypomotor features were seen in 20%, 8% and 18% respectively. Clinico-electrical correlations were as follows. The EEG discharge involved both hemispheres in 54% of all seizures, in clonic seizures this was 93%. Focal clonic seizures were associated with EEG seizure onset from the contralateral hemisphere. Majority of the clonic and hypomotor seizures had a left hemisphere ictal EEG onset. Orolingual seizures frequently started from the right hemisphere, whereas ocular and autonomic seizures arose from either hemisphere. There was no significant difference in mortality, morbidity, abnormal neuroimaging and EEG background abnormalities in babies with or without clonic seizures. This study provides insights into neuronal networks that underpin electroclinical seizures, by analysing and classifying the obvious initial clinical features and those during the seizure. Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid purine metabolite and neuron-specific enolase concentrations after febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, A; Cid, E; Rodríguez-García, J; Camiña, F; Rodríguez-Segade, S; Castro-Gago, M

    2000-10-01

    If febrile seizures cause significant compromise of neuronal metabolism (whether permanent or reversible), this should be reflected in an increase in the cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and/or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown products. In the present study, AMP, IMP, inosine, adenosine, guanosine, adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and NSE concentrations were determined in the cerebrospinal fluid of 90 children 1 h after febrile seizure (73 simple febrile seizures (SFS); 17 complex febrile seizures (CFS)), and in a control group of 160 children. There was no statistically significant difference between the SFS group and the control group for any of the substances determined, suggesting that SFS neither significantly depletes neuronal ATP concentration, nor significantly increases NSE concentration; thus, SFS do not appear to constitute a threat to neuronal integrity. However, patients with CFS showed significantly lower IMP concentrations and significantly higher adenine concentrations than controls, and significantly higher AMP concentrations than SFS patients; these results suggest that CFS may affect energy metabolism in the brain. However, NSE concentrations were normal in the cerebrospinal fluid of both SFS and CFS patients, suggesting that neither type of seizure causes significant neuronal damage, at least early after the seizure.

  11. Neuronal conditional knockout of NRSF decreases vulnerability to seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Liu; Zhejin Sheng; Lei Cai; Kai Zhao; Yu Tian; Jian Fei

    2012-01-01

    Neuron restrictive silencer factor (NRSF),also known as repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor,has been reported to modulate neuronal excitability and acts as endogenous anticonvulsant in kainic acid-induced or kindling-evoked seizure activity.However,whether NRSF functions in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizure activity has never been studied.To investigate the role of endogenous NRSF in the epileptogenesis induced by PTZ,in our experiment,NRSF neuronal conditional knockout mice (NRSF cKO) were adopted,in which NRSF was specifically deleted in neurons by the Cre-loxP system.Seizure threshold for PTZ,including the dose-response convulsions and the threshold dose,was compared between NRSF cKO and control mice.The threshold dose of PTZ that induced clonic and tonic seizures was significantly higher in NRSF cKO mice compared with the control.Similarly,the median lethal dose (LD50) of PTZ in NRSF cKO mice was also considerably higher than that of the control mice.These results revealed that NRSF cKO mice are of higher resistance to convulsions induced by PTZ.Our work first demonstrated the function of NRSF in PTZ-induced seizure and provided new evidence for differential pathways in diverse types of seizure.

  12. New onset seizures in HIV--seizure semiology, CD4 counts, and viral loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Mala; Mochan, Andre; Modi, Girish

    2009-05-01

    Thirty-seven HIV-positive patients with new-onset seizures (NOS) were prospectively identified during a 1-year study period. The patients were categorized according to the different mechanisms causing NOS in HIV, namely focal brain lesion (FBL) in 21 patients (57%), meningitis in 6 patients (16%), metabolic derangement (no patient), and no identified cause (NIC) other than HIV itself (10 patients, 27%). Seizure semiology, CD4 counts, and blood and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) viral loads were studied to identify any special characteristics of the different categories. With respect to seizure semiology, all NIC patients had generalized seizures. Two-thirds of the meningitis patients had generalized seizures with one-third having focal seizures. Half of the patients with FBL had generalized seizures and one-third had focal seizures. Status epilepticus was strongly associated with FBL. No significant difference could be detected between the subgroups with respect to CD4 counts and serum and CSF viral loads. The median CD4 count in all patients was 108 cells/ml, indicating advanced immunosuppression. In the FBL group this was 104 cells/ml. In the meningitis group the median CD4 count was 298 cells/ml, and in the NIC group this was 213 cells/ml. Similarly, no differences were noted in the NOS categories with respect to serum and CSF viral loads. Seizures in HIV are a nonspecific manifestation of the seizure mechanism.

  13. Detecting Neonatal Seizures With Computer Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temko, Andriy; Lightbody, Gordon

    2016-10-01

    It is now generally accepted that EEG is the only reliable way to accurately detect newborn seizures and, as such, prolonged EEG monitoring is increasingly being adopted in neonatal intensive care units. Long EEG recordings may last from several hours to a few days. With neurophysiologists not always available to review the EEG during unsociable hours, there is a pressing need to develop a reliable and robust automatic seizure detection method-a computer algorithm that can take the EEG signal, process it, and output information that supports clinical decision making. In this study, we review existing algorithms based on how the relevant seizure information is exploited. We start with commonly used methods to extract signatures from seizure signals that range from those that mimic the clinical neurophysiologist to those that exploit mathematical models of neonatal EEG generation. Commonly used classification methods are reviewed that are based on a set of rules and thresholds that are either heuristically tuned or automatically derived from the data. These are followed by techniques to use information about spatiotemporal seizure context. The usual errors in system design and validation are discussed. Current clinical decision support tools that have met regulatory requirements and are available to detect neonatal seizures are reviewed with progress and the outstanding challenges are outlined. This review discusses the current state of the art regarding automatic detection of neonatal seizures.

  14. Oxaliplatin-Induced Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad K. Rahal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin is a common chemotherapy drug used for colon and gastric cancers. Common side effects are peripheral neuropathy, hematological toxicity, and allergic reactions. A rare side effect is seizures which are usually associated with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES. A 50-year-old male patient presented with severe abdominal pain. CT scan of the abdomen showed acute appendicitis. Appendectomy was done and pathology showed mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was started with Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX. During the third cycle of FOLFOX, the patient developed tonic-clonic seizures. Laboratory workup was within normal limits. EEG and MRI of the brain showed no acute abnormality. The patient was rechallenged with FOLFOX but he had tonic-clonic seizures for the second time. His chemotherapy regimen was switched to Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Irinotecan (FOLFIRI. After 5 cycles of FOLFIRI, the patient did not develop any seizures, making Oxaliplatin the most likely culprit for his seizures. Oxaliplatin-induced seizures rarely occur in the absence of PRES. One case report has been described in the literature. We present a rare case of tonic-clonic seizures in a patient receiving Oxaliplatin in the absence of PRES.

  15. Intranasal midazolam compared with intravenous diazepam in patients suffering from acute seizure: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadeh, Mohsen; Sheibani, Kourosh; Hashemieh, Mozhgan; Saneifard, Hedyeh

    2012-03-01

    Acute seizure attack is a stressful experience both for health care personnel and parents. These attacks might cause morbidity and mortality among patients, so reliable methods to control the seizure preferably at home should be developed. This study was performed to measure the time needed to control seizure attacks using intranasal midazolam compared to the common treatment (intravenous diazepam) and to evaluate its probable side effects. This study was conducted as a not blind randomized clinical trial among 60 patients coming to Imam Ali Hospital, Zahedan, Iran. The patients were 2 months to 15 years old children coming to our emergency department suffering from an acute seizure episode. Intranasal midazolam was administered 0.2 mg/kg equally dropped in both nostrils for case group and intravenous diazepam was administered 0.3mg/kg via IV line for control group. After both treatments the time needed to control the seizure was registered by the practitioner. Pulse rate and O2 saturation were recorded at patients' entrance and in minutes 5 and 10 after drug administration. The time needed to control seizure using intranasal midazolam (3.16±1.24) was statistically shorter than intravenous diazepam (6.42±2.59) if the time needed to establish IV line in patients treated by intravenous diazepam is taken into account (P<0.001). The readings for O2 saturation or heart rate did not indicate a statistically significant difference between two groups of patients either at entrance or 5 and 10 minutes after drug administration. Considering the shorter time needed to control acute seizure episodes compared to intravenous diazepam and its safety record, intranasal midazolam seems to be a good candidate to replace diazepam, as the drug of choice, in controlling this condition.

  16. Individualised prediction model of seizure recurrence and long-term outcomes after withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs in seizure-free patients: a systematic review and individual participant data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberink, Herm J; Otte, Willem M; Geerts, Ada T; Pavlovic, Milen; Ramos-Lizana, Julio; Marson, Anthony G; Overweg, Jan; Sauma, Letícia; Specchio, Luigi M; Tennison, Michael; Cardoso, Tania M O; Shinnar, Shlomo; Schmidt, Dieter; Geleijns, Karin; Braun, Kees P J

    2017-07-01

    People with epilepsy who became seizure-free while taking antiepileptic drugs might consider discontinuing their medication, with the possibility of increased quality of life because of the elimination of adverse events. The risk with this action, however, is seizure recurrence. The objectives of our study were to identify predictors of seizure recurrence and long-term seizure outcomes and to produce nomograms for estimation of individualised outcomes. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis, and identified eligible articles and candidate predictors, using PubMed and Embase databases with a last update on Nov 6, 2014. Eligible articles had to report on cohorts of patients with epilepsy who were seizure-free and had started withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs; articles also had to contain information regarding seizure recurrences during and after withdrawal. We excluded surgical cohorts, reports with fewer than 30 patients, and reports on acute symptomatic seizures because these topics were beyond the scope of our objective. Risk of bias was assessed using the Quality in Prognosis Studies system. Data analysis was based on individual participant data. Survival curves and proportional hazards were computed. The strongest predictors were selected with backward selection. Models were converted to nomograms and a web-based tool to determine individual risks. We identified 45 studies with 7082 patients; ten studies (22%) with 1769 patients (25%) were included in the meta-analysis. Median follow-up was 5·3 years (IQR 3·0-10·0, maximum 23 years). Prospective and retrospective studies and randomised controlled trials were included, covering non-selected and selected populations of both children and adults. Relapse occurred in 812 (46%) of 1769 patients; 136 (9%) of 1455 for whom data were available had seizures in their last year of follow-up, suggesting enduring seizure control was not regained by this timepoint. Independent predictors of seizure recurrence were

  17. Ionic changes during experimentally induced seizure activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, H D; Heinemann, U

    1978-01-01

    Changes in intra- and extracellular ionic activity and their relation to generation and termination of seizure phenomena can be studied with the help of ion-selective microelectrodes. Transient changes in extracellular potassium activity (aK) of the cortex regularly accompany paroxysmal activity induced by electrical stimulation and pentylenetetrazol injections or occur within active penicillin and aluminum foci. A rise of aK from baseline levels of about 3 mmoles/l up to ceiling levels of 8--12 mmoles/l, followed by subnormal K activity, is typically found during seizure discharge. Extracellular K accumulation during seizures facilitates the spread into extrafocal regions. Ceiling levels of extracellular aK are characterized by pronounced K reabsorption which is probably a limiting mechanism for the rise in extracellular aK. It may be a consequence of a simultaneous rise in intracellular Na activity that an electrogenic Na--K exchange process is involved in the termination of ictal activity. Seizures are also accompanied by significant reductions in extracellular Ca2+ activity (aCa) to as low as 0.7 mmoles/l (resting aCa 1.25 mmoles/l). There is no critical level of lowered aCa at which a seizure ultimately results. However, unlike changes in aK reductions in aCa can precede ictal activity. Thus, a fall of aCa occurs before the onset of paroxysmal periods during cyclical spike driving in a penicillin focus and before seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol. Ca2+-dependent mechanisms may contribute to seizure generation. In addition to changes in aK and aCa, intracellular chloride activity (aCl) can increase during seizure activity, as a result of an impaired chloride extrusion mechanism, which would lead to a reduced efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission and, therefore, to facilitation of seizure generation.

  18. Instantaneous frequency based newborn EEG seizure characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Mostefa; O'Toole, John M.; Colditz, Paul B.; Boashash, Boualem

    2012-12-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG), used to noninvasively monitor brain activity, remains the most reliable tool in the diagnosis of neonatal seizures. Due to their nonstationary and multi-component nature, newborn EEG seizures are better represented in the joint time-frequency domain than in either the time domain or the frequency domain. Characterising newborn EEG seizure nonstationarities helps to better understand their time-varying nature and, therefore, allow developing efficient signal processing methods for both modelling and seizure detection and classification. In this article, we used the instantaneous frequency (IF) extracted from a time-frequency distribution to characterise newborn EEG seizures. We fitted four frequency modulated (FM) models to the extracted IFs, namely a linear FM, a piecewise-linear FM, a sinusoidal FM, and a hyperbolic FM. Using a database of 30-s EEG seizure epochs acquired from 35 newborns, we were able to show that, depending on EEG channel, the sinusoidal and piecewise-linear FM models best fitted 80-98% of seizure epochs. To further characterise the EEG seizures, we calculated the mean frequency and frequency span of the extracted IFs. We showed that in the majority of the cases (>95%), the mean frequency resides in the 0.6-3 Hz band with a frequency span of 0.2-1 Hz. In terms of the frequency of occurrence of the four seizure models, the statistical analysis showed that there is no significant difference( p = 0.332) between the two hemispheres. The results also indicate that there is no significant differences between the two hemispheres in terms of the mean frequency ( p = 0.186) and the frequency span ( p = 0.302).

  19. Children with seizures exhibit preferences for foods compatible with the ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Adrianna; Dahlquist, Lynnda; Kossoff, Eric H; Vining, Eileen P G; Trescher, William H; Slifer, Keith J

    2007-08-01

    Although highly effective for the treatment of intractable epilepsy, the ketogenic diet is not always included in the treatment option hierarchy presented to families, in part due to perceptions that children will find the high-fat/low-carbohydrate regimen unpalatable. This study assessed if children with seizures exhibit food preferences compatible with the diet, as well as if caregivers were accurate in predicting preferences. Children aged 2-17, with (n=29) and without (n=30) a history of seizures, participated in a paired choice food preference assessment while parents estimated child preferences verbally. Children with seizures exhibited significantly higher preferences for fat versus carbohydrate foods compared with controls, and parents demonstrated low accuracy. Future studies could use similar assessment methods to prospectively track whether such preferences predict diet compliance and/or efficacy. Research into the underlying metabolic basis for this preference and possible related neurophysiological mechanisms in seizure etiology and treatment is warranted.

  20. Shorter epilepsy duration is associated with better seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Crociati Meguins

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the influence of patient’s age and seizure onset on surgical outcome of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Method A retrospective observational investigation performed from a cohort of patients from 2000 to 2012. Results A total of 229 patients were included. One-hundred and eleven of 179 patients (62% were classified as Engel I in the group with < 50 years old, whereas 33 of 50 (66% in the group with ≥ 50 years old group (p = 0.82. From those Engel I, 88 (61% reported epilepsy duration inferior to 10 years and 56 (39% superior to 10 years (p < 0.01. From the total of patients not seizure free, 36 (42% reported epilepsy duration inferior to 10 years and 49 (58% superior to 10 years (p < 0.01. Conclusion Patients with shorter duration of epilepsy before surgery had better postoperative seizure control than patients with longer duration of seizures.

  1. Exposure to rufinamide and risks of CNS adverse events in drug-resistant epilepsy: a meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaad, Abdulaziz M S; Koren, Gideon

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy is a complex disease necessitating continuous development of new therapeutic strategies to encounter drug-resistant cases. Among new adjuvant antiepileptic drugs, rufinamide is structurally distinct from other antiepileptic drugs. It is used to treat partial-onset seizures and seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) in adult and children. To date, there has been no attempt to evaluate systematically the risks of adverse events with rufinamide. We performed a quantitative risk analysis of central nervous system (CNS) adverse events of rufinamide from all randomized, double-blind, add-on, placebo-controlled trials. The meta-analysis was undertaken with fixed effects models. Of the 886 publications reviewed, 99 papers were retrieved and five articles met the inclusion criteria. One thousand two hundred and fifty-two patients were included. Our study showed that exposure to rufinamide was associated with a significant increase in risk of somnolence [relative ratio (RR) 1.87; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.33, 2.62; P = 0.0003], dizziness (RR 2.66; 95% CI 2.00, 3.55; P = 0.00001), fatigue (RR 2.14; 95% CI 1.57, 2.91; P = 0.01) and headache (RR 1.28; 95% CI 1.02, 1.59, P = 0.03). In addition, exposure to rufinamide was associated with higher treatment discontinuation rates as compared with placebo (RR 2.65; 95% CI 1.74, 4.03; P = 0.00001). The risk of CNS adverse events appears to be increased in patients exposed to rufinamide as well as the treatment discontinuation rates. However, although statistical associations were significant, additional long term safety studies are required to confirm the clinical significance of these findings, as most reports described only mild and moderate adverse events. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Dose Supplemental Zinc Prevent Recurrence of Febrile Seizures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak SHIVA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Shiva S, Barzegar M, Zokaie N, Shiva Sh. Dose Supplemental Zinc Prevents Recurrence of Febrile Seizures? Iranian Journal ofChild Neurology 2011;5(4:11-14. Objective Febrile seizures (FS are the most common form of seizures in children. Previous studies have suggested that zinc may play a role in the prevention of FS. However, there is limited information on the preventative effects of zinc against FS. This study aimed to determine whether prescribing zinc supplements could prevent FS.Materials & Methods In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 100 children who had experienced simple FS for the first time were recruited. Children in the case group (50 patients were orally administered1mg/kg/day zinc sulfate for 1 year, and children in the control group (50 patients received a placebo. Serum zinc levels in both the control and case groups were measured at the start and at the end of the study,and recurrent cases of FS were recorded. Results The case group consisted of 29 boys (58% and 21 girls (42% with a mean age of 2.06 ± 0.83, and the control group consisted of 31 boys (62% and 19 girls (38% with a mean age of 2.22 ± 1.04 years. An inverse relationship was found between febrile diseases and serum zinc levels. In other words, the occurrence of febrile diseases decreased with an increase in serum zinc levels.Eight children (16% in the case group and 8 in the control group experienced recurrent FS within a year.ConclusionSupplemental doses of zinc (1mg/kg/day reduced the rate of febrile illnesses,but did not prevent the recurrence of FS.References Margaretha L, Masloman N. Correlation between serum zinc level and simple febrile seizure in children. Paediatr Indones 2010;50(6:326-30.Prasad R, Singh A, Das B, Upadhyay R, Singh T, Mishra O. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum zinc, copper, magnesium and calcium levels in children with Idiopathic seizure. J Clin Diagn Res 2009;3:1841-6.Vestergaard M, Obel C

  3. Are afebrile seizures associated with minor infections a single seizure category? A hospital-based prospective cohort study on outcomes of first afebrile seizure in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Ma, Jiannan; Gan, Xiaoming; Xiao, Nong

    2014-07-01

    To explore if afebrile seizures associated with minor infections are a single category of seizure, or a set of different kinds of seizures. We conducted this prospective cohort study on three kinds of first afebrile seizure: first afebrile seizure associated with gastrointestinal infection (AS-GI), first afebrile seizure associated with nongastrointestinal infection (AS-nGI), and first unprovoked seizure (US). The Kaplan-Meier estimate risks of recurrent seizures were analyzed and compared pairwise. The characteristics of recurrent seizures were also compared pairwise. The Kaplan-Meier estimate risks of recurrent seizure at 2 years of the AS-GI, AS-nGI, and US groups were 6.9%, 23.7%, and 37.8%, respectively. The pairwise differences were significant between the AS-GI and US groups (p seizures in patients with recurrence, the pairwise differences were significant between the AS-GI and US groups (p seizures associated with minor infections are indeed of two distinguishable kinds: AS-GI, if free of risk factors such as a family history of epilepsy, had a better prognosis and should be categorized as an acute symptomatic seizure, whereas patients with first AS-nGI, like patients with first US, may have recurrent unprovoked seizures, which suggests this category's essential difference from AS-GI. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  4. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient.

  5. [Semiology and propagation of epileptic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellner, A-K; Fritsch, B

    2013-06-01

    The evaluation of episodic seizure-like symptoms is a common challenge in the neurologist's daily routine. The clinical signs (semiology) are the most important puzzle pieces to distinguish epileptic seizures from other episodic entities. Due to the often far-reaching health and social consequences of the diagnosis of epilepsy, the early and rigorous assessment of episodic symptoms by means of the patient history is important. This assessment is based on knowledge of the association of certain semiologies with epileptic syndromes and brain regions; however, certain limitations and pitfalls have to be considered. Typical propagation pathways of seizure activity determine the serial occurrence of semiological features and provide supplementary information.

  6. Seizure prognosis of patients with low-grade tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Fadul, Camilo E; Roberts, David W; Thadani, Vijay M; Bujarski, Krzysztof A; Scott, Rod C; Jobst, Barbara C

    2012-09-01

    Seizures frequently impact the quality of life of patients with low grade tumors. Management is often based on best clinical judgment. We examined factors that correlate with seizure outcome to optimize seizure management. Patients with supratentorial low-grade tumors evaluated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Using multiple regression analysis the patient characteristics and treatments were correlated with seizure outcome using Engel's classification. Of the 73 patients with low grade tumors and median follow up of 3.8 years (range 1-20 years), 54 (74%) patients had a seizure ever and 46 (63%) had at least one seizure before tumor surgery. The only factor significantly associated with pre-surgical seizures was tumor histology. Of the 54 patients with seizures ever, 25 (46.3%) had a class I outcome at last follow up. There was no difference in seizure outcome between grade II gliomas (astrocytoma grade II, oligodendroglioma grade II, mixed oligo-astrocytoma grade II) and other pathologies (pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymomas, DNET, gangliocytoma and ganglioglioma). Once seizures were established seizure prognosis was similar between different pathologies. Chemotherapy (p=0.03) and radiation therapy (p=0.02) had a positive effect on seizure outcome. No other parameter including significant tumor growth during the follow up period predicted seizure outcome. Only three patients developed new-onset seizures after tumor surgery that were non-perioperative. Anticonvulsant medication was tapered in 14 patients with seizures and 10 had no further seizures. Five patients underwent additional epilepsy surgery with a class I outcome in four. Two patients received a vagal nerve stimulator with >50% seizure reduction. Seizures at presentation are the most important factor associated with continued seizures after tumor surgery. Pathology does not influence seizure outcome. Use of long term prophylactic anticonvulsants is unwarranted. Chemotherapy and

  7. Lipoic acid effects on glutamate and taurine concentrations in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilocarpine-induced seizures can be mediated by increases in oxidative stress and by cerebral amino acid changes. The present research suggests that antioxidant compounds may afford some level of neuroprotection against the neurotoxicity of seizures in cellular level. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the lipoic acid (LA effects in glutamate and taurine contents in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures. Wistar rats were treated intraperitoneally (i.p. with 0.9% saline (Control, pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, Pilocarpine, LA (10 mg/kg, LA, and the association of LA (10 mg/kg plus pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, that was injected 30 min before of administration of LA (LA plus pilocarpine. Animals were observed during 24 h. The amino acid concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC. In pilocarpine group, it was observed a significant increase in glutamate content (37% and a decrease in taurine level (18% in rat hippocampus, when compared to control group. Antioxidant pretreatment significantly reduced the glutamate level (28% and augmented taurine content (32% in rat hippocampus, when compared to pilocarpine group. Our findings strongly support amino acid changes in hippocampus during seizures induced by pilocarpine, and suggest that glutamate-induced brain damage plays a crucial role in pathogenic consequences of seizures, and imply that strong protective effect could be achieved using lipoic acid through the release or decrease in metabolization rate of taurine amino acid during seizures.

  8. High doses of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride accelerate onset of CNS oxygen toxicity seizures in unanesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, R; Held, H E; Landon, C S; Dean, J B

    2013-08-29

    Pseudoephedrine (PSE) salts (hydrochloride and sulfate) are commonly used as nasal and paranasal decongestants by scuba divers. Anecdotal reports from the Divers Alert Network suggest that taking PSE prior to diving while breathing pure O₂ increases the risk for CNS oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which manifests as seizures. We hypothesized that high doses of PSE reduce the latency time to seizure (LS) in unanesthetized rats breathing 5 atmospheres absolute (ATA) of hyperbaric oxygen. Sixty-three male rats were implanted with radio-transmitters that recorded electroencephalogram activity and body temperature. After ≥7-day recovery, and 2 h before "diving", each rat was administered either saline solution (control) or PSE hydrochloride intragastrically at the following doses (mg PSE/kg): 0, 40, 80, 100, 120, 160, and 320. Rats breathed pure O₂ and were dived to 5ATA until the onset of behavioral seizures coincident with neurological seizures. LS was the time elapsed between reaching 5ATA and exhibiting seizures. We observed a significant dose-dependent decrease in the LS at doses of 100-320 mg/kg, whereas no significant differences in LS from control value were observed at doses ≤80 mg/kg. Our findings showed that high doses of PSE accelerate the onset of CNS-OT seizures in unanesthetized rats breathing 5ATA of poikilocapnic hyperoxia. Extrapolating our findings to humans, we conclude that the recommended daily dose of PSE should not be abused prior to diving with oxygen-enriched gas mixes or pure O₂.

  9. Folinic acid-responsive seizures initially responsive to pyridoxine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, J.; Kranen-Mastenbroek, V.H. van; Wevers, R.A.; Hurkx, W.A.; Vles, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a male who developed clonic seizures on the day he was born. The next day, the diagnosis of pyridoxine-dependent seizures was made. However, contradictory to this diagnosis, seizures reappeared despite treatment with pyridoxine. Seizures ceased after folinic acid was initiated.

  10. 50 CFR 12.11 - Notification of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification of seizure. 12.11 Section 12... SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES Preliminary Requirements § 12.11 Notification of seizure. Except where the owner or consignee is personally notified or seizure is made pursuant to a search warrant, the...

  11. 50 CFR 12.5 - Seizure by other agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seizure by other agencies. 12.5 Section 12... SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES General Provisions § 12.5 Seizure by other agencies. Any authorized... the laws listed in § 12.2 will, if so requested, deliver such seizure to the appropriate Special Agent...

  12. 27 CFR 478.152 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure and forfeiture... Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.152 Seizure and forfeiture. (a) Any firearm or ammunition... demonstrated by clear and convincing evidence, shall be subject to seizure and forfeiture, and all provisions...

  13. 19 CFR 162.92 - Notice of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice of seizure. 162.92 Section 162.92 Customs... (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act § 162.92 Notice of seizure. (a) Generally. Customs will send written notice of seizure as provided in this section to all known interested...

  14. Seizure semiology identifies patients with bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Anna Mira; Feddersen, Berend; Tezer, F Irsel; Hartl, Elisabeth; Rémi, Jan; Vollmar, Christian; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2015-01-01

    Laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy is usually defined by EEG and imaging results. We investigated whether the analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena identifies bilateral independent temporal lobe seizure onset. We investigated the seizure semiology in 17 patients in whom invasive EEG-video-monitoring documented bilateral temporal seizure onset. The results were compared to 20 left and 20 right consecutive temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients who were seizure free after anterior temporal lobe resection. The seizure semiology was analyzed using the semiological seizure classification with particular emphasis on the sequence of seizure phenomena over time and lateralizing seizure phenomena. Statistical analysis included chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Bitemporal lobe epilepsy patients had more frequently different seizure semiology (100% vs. 40%; psemiology for the identification of bilateral TLE was high (100%) with a specificity of 60%. Lateralizing seizure phenomena had a low sensitivity (59%) but a high specificity (89%). The combination of lateralizing seizure phenomena and different seizure semiology showed a high specificity (94%) but a low sensitivity (59%). The analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena adds important clinical information to identify patients with bilateral TLE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Neurogenesis in a young dog with epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borschensky, C M; Woolley, J S; Kipar, A; Herden, C

    2012-09-01

    Epileptic seizures can lead to various reactions in the brain, ranging from neuronal necrosis and glial cell activation to focal structural disorganization. Furthermore, increased hippocampal neurogenesis has been documented in rodent models of acute convulsions. This is a report of hippocampal neurogenesis in a dog with spontaneous epileptic seizures. A 16-week-old epileptic German Shepherd Dog had marked neuronal cell proliferation (up to 5 mitotic figures per high-power field and increased immunohistochemical expression of proliferative cell nuclear antigen) in the dentate gyrus accompanied by microglial and astroglial activation. Some granule cells expressed doublecortin, a marker of immature neurons; mitotically active cells expressed neuronal nuclear antigen. No mitotic figures were found in the brain of age-matched control dogs. Whether increased neurogenesis represents a general reaction pattern of young epileptic dogs should be investigated.

  16. Postembolization perianeurysmal edema as a cause of uncinate seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, José E; Itshayek, Eyal; Attia, Moshe; Moscovici, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    We report a patient with a giant unruptured supraclinoid aneurysm treated by endovascular embolization by means of bare coils and implantation of a flow diverterstent. Eight weeks after the embolization, she presented with uncinate seizures. Neuroradiological examination revealed de novo postembolization perianeurysmal edema, which has been described only rarely. A brief course of oral steroids successfully controlled the seizures. Perianeurysmal edema must be considered a potential complication after embolization of large aneurysms with coils and other means, and needs to be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with unusual neurological symptoms at either the acute or delayed stages. To our knowledge, this is the first report of postembolization perianeurysmal edema occurring after successful occlusion by means of bare coils and a flow diverterstent. This report contributes to the growing evidence on adverse post-coiling inflammatory reactions, and specifically on perianeurysmal edema. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Predictors of anti-convulsant treatment failure in children presenting with malaria and prolonged seizures in Kampala, Uganda

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    Byarugaba Justus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In endemic areas, falciparum malaria remains the leading cause of seizures in children presenting to emergency departments. In addition, seizures in malaria have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality in these patients. The management of seizures in malaria is sometimes complicated by the refractory nature of these seizures to readily available anti-convulsants. The objective of this study was to determine predictors of anti-convulsant treatment failure and seizure recurrence after initial control among children with malaria. Methods In a previous study, the efficacy and safety of buccal midazolam was compared to that of rectal diazepam in the treatment of prolonged seizures in children aged three months to 12 years in Kampala, Uganda. For this study, predictive models were used to determine risk factors for anti-convulsant treatment failure and seizure recurrence among the 221 of these children with malaria. Results Using predictive models, focal seizures (OR 3.21; 95% CI 1.42–7.25, p = 0.005, cerebral malaria (OR 2.43; 95% CI 1.20–4.91, p = 0.01 and a blood sugar ≥200 mg/dl at presentation (OR 2.84; 95% CI 1.11–7.20, p = 0.02 were independent predictors of treatment failure (seizure persistence beyond 10 minutes or recurrence within one hour of treatment. Predictors of seizure recurrence included: 1 cerebral malaria (HR 3.32; 95% CI 1.94–5.66, p Conclusion Specific predictors, including cerebral malaria, can identify patients with malaria at risk of anti-convulsant treatment failure and seizure recurrence.

  18. Sequential intrarectal diazepam and intravenous levetiracetam in treating acute repetitive and prolonged seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modur, Pradeep N; Milteer, Warren E; Zhang, Song

    2010-06-01

    In this retrospective study of institutionalized patients with mental retardation, we present the efficacy and safety of sequential treatment with intrarectal diazepam (IRD) gel (Diastat) and intravenous levetiracetam (IVL) in comparison with either treatment alone for acute repetitive or prolonged seizures (ARPS). We defined ARPS as >or=3 seizures of any type within 1 h or a single seizure of any type lasting >or=3 min. Eighty-eight ARPS episodes were treated in 25 patients (14 female, age 21-72 years), with mainly symptomatic generalized epilepsy. There were no adverse events directly attributable to the administration of IRD or IVL. Seizure recurrence within 4 h of treatment, the primary outcome measure, was significantly lower after combined sequential IRD + IVL treatment (3 of 36) compared to IRD alone (6 of 24, p = 0.048) or IVL alone (10 of 28, p = 0.039). There was no statistically significant difference between the individual IRD and IVL treatments (p = 0.604). The estimated odds ratio (OR) indicated that the risk of seizure recurrence was higher after IRD or IVL monotherapy compared to combined IRD + IVL treatment. Subsequent emergency room (ER) transfers following seizure recurrence were least likely after IVL treatment (10%) compared to combined IRD + IVL (67%) or IRD (83%) treatment. These findings suggest that although IRD or IVL monotherapy is efficacious, the combination is superior in controlling ARPS in this special group of institutionalized patients. In addition, we speculate that a more reliable onset of action after IVL treatment results in rapid seizure control and fewer ER transfers, despite seizure recurrence.

  19. Increased seizure susceptibility in mice 30 days after fluid percussion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib eMukherjee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI has been reported to increase seizure susceptibility and also contribute to the development of epilepsy. However, the mechanistic basis of the development of increased seizure susceptibility and epilepsy is not clear. Though there is substantial work done using rats, data are lacking regarding the use of mice in the fluid percussion injury (FPI model. It is unclear if mice, like rats, will experience increased seizure susceptibility following FPI. The availability of a mouse model of increased seizure susceptibility after FPI would provide a basis for the use of genetically modified mice to study mechanism(s of the development of post-traumatic epilepsy. Therefore, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that, mice subjected to a FPI develop increased seizure susceptibility to a subconvulsive dose of the chemoconvulsant, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ. Three groups of mice were used: FPI, sham and naïve controls. On day thirty after FPI, mice from the three groups were injected with PTZ. The results showed that FPI mice exhibited an increased severity, frequency and duration of seizures in response to PTZ injection compared with the sham and naïve control groups. Histopathological assessment was used to characterize the injury at one, three, seven and thirty days after FPI. The results show that mice subjected to the FPI had a pronounced lesion and glial response that was centered at the FPI focus and peaked at three days. By thirty days, only minimal evidence of a lesion is observed, although there is evidence of a chronic glial response. These data are the first to demonstrate an early increase in seizure susceptibility following fluid percussion injury in mice. Therefore, future studies can incorporate transgenic mice into this model to further elucidate mechanisms of TBI-induced increases in seizure susceptibility.

  20. Detection of Epileptic Seizures with Multi-modal Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    and alarm whenever a seizure starts is of great importance to these patients and their relatives, in the sense, that the alert of the seizure will make them feel more safe. Thus the objective of the project is to investigate the movements of convulsive epileptic seizures and design seizure detection...... convulsive seizures tested. Another study was performed, involving quantitative parameters in the time and frequency domain. The study showed, that there are several differences between tonic seizures and the tonic phase of GTC seizures and furthermore revealed differences of the epileptic (tonic and tonic...

  1. Towards prognostic biomarkers from BOLD fluctuations to differentiate a first epileptic seizure from new-onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lalit; Janssens, Rick; Vlooswijk, Mariëlle C G; Rouhl, Rob P W; de Louw, Anton; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Ulman, Shrutin; Besseling, René M H; Hofman, Paul A M; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, Vivianne H; Hilkman, Danny M; Jansen, Jacobus F A; Backes, Walter H

    2017-03-01

    The diagnosis of epilepsy cannot be reliably made prior to a patient's second seizure in most cases. Therefore, adequate diagnostic tools are needed to differentiate subjects with a first seizure from those with a seizure preceding the onset of epilepsy. The objective was to explore spontaneous blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fluctuations in subjects with a first-ever seizure and patients with new-onset epilepsy (NOE), and to find characteristic biomarkers for seizure recurrence after the first seizure. We examined 17 first-seizure subjects, 19 patients with new-onset epilepsy (NOE), and 18 healthy controls. All subjects underwent clinical investigation and received electroencephalography and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The BOLD time series were analyzed in terms of regional homogeneity (ReHo) and fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFFs). We found significantly stronger amplitudes (higher fALFFs) in patients with NOE relative to first-seizure subjects and healthy controls. The frequency range of 73-198 mHz (slow-3 subband) appeared most useful for discriminating patients with NOE from first-seizure subjects. The ReHo measure did not show any significant differences. The fALFF appears to be a noninvasive measure that characterizes spontaneous BOLD fluctuations and shows stronger amplitudes in the slow-3 subband of patients with NOE relative first-seizure subjects and healthy controls. A larger study population with follow-up is required to determine whether fALFF holds promise as a potential biomarker for identifying subjects at increased risk to develop epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Increased hair cortisol and antecedent somatic complaints in children with a first epileptic seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Ioannis; Pervanidou, Panagiota; Gnardellis, Charalampos; Loli, Nomiki; Theodorou, Virginia; Mantzou, Aimilia; Soukou, Faye; Sinani, Olga; Chrousos, George P

    2017-03-01

    Stress is the most frequent seizure-precipitating factor reported by patients with epilepsy, while stressful life events may increase seizure susceptibility in humans. In this study, we investigated the relations between both biological and behavioral measures of stress in children with a first epileptic seizure (hereafter called seizure). We hypothesized that hair cortisol, a biomarker of chronic stress reflecting approximately 3months of preceding exposure, might be increased in children with a first seizure. We also employed standardized questionnaires to examine presence of stress-related behavioral markers. This was a cross-sectional clinical study investigating stress-related parameters in children with a first seizure (First Epileptic Seizure Group (FESG), n=22) in comparison to healthy children without seizures (Control Group, n=29). Within 24h after a first seizure, hair samples were collected from children for the determination of cortisol. In parallel, perceived stress and anxiety and depressive symptoms were examined with appropriate self- and parent-completed questionnaires, and history of stressful life events during the past year was recorded. Emotional and behavioral problems were also assessed by parent-reported validated and widely-used questionnaires. Higher hair cortisol measurements were observed in the FESG than control children (7.5 versus 5.0pg/mg respectively, p=0.001). The former were more likely to complain of somatic problems than the latter (59.8 vs. 55.4 according to DSM-oriented Scale, p=0.021); however, there were no differences in perceived stress and anxiety or depressive symptoms between the two groups. Using ROC analysis of hair cortisol measurements for predicting disease status, the maximum sensitivity and specificity were observed for a cut-off point of 5.25pg/mg. Increased hair cortisol indicates chronic hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis prior to the first seizure. This might have contributed to

  3. S100B proteins in febrile seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkonen, Kirsi; Pekkala, Niina; Pokka, Tytti

    2011-01-01

    S100B protein concentrations correlate with the severity and outcome of brain damage after brain injuries, and have been shown to be markers of blood-brain barrier damage. In children elevated S100B values are seen as a marker of damage to astrocytes even after mild head injuries. S100B proteins...... may also give an indication of an ongoing pathological process in the brain with respect to febrile seizures (FS) and the likelihood of their recurrence. To evaluate this, we measured S100B protein concentrations in serum and cerebrospinal fluid from 103 children after their first FS. 33 children...... with acute infection without FS served as controls for the serum concentrations. In the FS patients the mean S100B concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid samples was 0.21μg/L and that in the serum samples 0.12μg/L. The mean serum concentration in the controls was 0.11μg/L (difference 0.01μg/L, 95...

  4. S100B proteins in febrile seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkonen, Kirsi; Pekkala, Niina; Pokka, Tytti

    2011-01-01

    S100B protein concentrations correlate with the severity and outcome of brain damage after brain injuries, and have been shown to be markers of blood-brain barrier damage. In children elevated S100B values are seen as a marker of damage to astrocytes even after mild head injuries. S100B proteins...... may also give an indication of an ongoing pathological process in the brain with respect to febrile seizures (FS) and the likelihood of their recurrence. To evaluate this, we measured S100B protein concentrations in serum and cerebrospinal fluid from 103 children after their first FS. 33 children...... with acute infection without FS served as controls for the serum concentrations. In the FS patients the mean S100B concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid samples was 0.21µg/L and that in the serum samples 0.12µg/L. The mean serum concentration in the controls was 0.11µg/L (difference 0.01µg/L, 95...

  5. Cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome in childhood: clinical features and risk of seizure recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, J G; duPlessis, A J; Barnes, P D; Riviello, J J

    1998-07-01

    Cyclosporin A is associated with an acute encephalopathy including seizures and alterations in mental status, herein referred to as cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome. The clinical history, electroencephalogram (EEG), and neuroimaging findings in 19 children with cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome over a 10-year period were reviewed in order to delineate clinical characteristics, imaging features, and to determine the risk of seizure recurrence in this population. All 19 had motor seizures associated with other features of cortical and subcortical dysfunction. The acute mean cyclosporin A level was 342 microg/L, but was within the "therapeutic" range in five cases. Brain imaging by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute or subacute phase revealed lesions characteristic of cyclosporin A toxicity in 14 cases. Acute EEG abnormalities were present in all and included epileptiform discharges or focal slowing. Patients were followed for a median of 49 months (1-9 years). Follow-up imaging (n = 10) showed lesion resolution or improvement in the majority while EEG (n = 10) had normalized in only three. Seizures recurred in six patients and only in those with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities. No patient had a second episode of cyclosporin A associated neurotoxicity or seizure. It appears that a significant risk of seizure recurrence exists following cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome and primarily in those children with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities.

  6. Melatonin’s Effect in Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl MAHYAR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE FA How to Cite This Article: Mahyar A, Ayazi P, Dalirani R, Gholami N, Daneshi-Kohan MM, Mohammadi N, Ahmadi MM, Sahmani AA. Melatonin’s Effect in Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Summer;8(3: 24-29. AbstractObjectiveRecognition of risk factors for febrile seizures (FS and epilepsy is essential. Studies regarding the role of melatonin in these convulsive disorders are limited.This study determines the relationship between serum melatonin levels and FS and epilepsy in children.Materials & MethodsA population of 111 children with simple FS, complex FS, and epilepsy (37 children per group, respectively were included as case groups. In addition, 37 febrile children without seizures comprised the control group. Serum melatonin levels were measured and compared between all groups.ResultsThe serum melatonin levels in the simple, complex FSs, and epilepsy groups were 2, 2.4, and 2 pg/ml, respectively. The serum melatonin level in the control group was 2.1pg/ml.Moreover, there were no significant differences observed while comparing the case groups.ConclusionThe present study reveals that there is no association between serum melatonin level and simple or complex FS and epilepsy. It appears that melatonin plays no significant role in these convulsive disorders. ReferencesBanerjee TK, Hazra A, Biswas A, Ray Jet al. Neurological disorders in children and adolescents. Indian J Pediatr2009; 76:139-46.Salehi Omran MR, Khalilian E, Mehdipour E, Ghabeli JA. Febrile seizures in North Iranian children: Epidemiology and clinical feature, Journal of Pediatric Neurology2008, 6: 39-43.Shinnar S, O’Dell C. Febrile Seizures, Pediatr Ann 2004, 33: 394-402.Millar JS. The child with febrile seizure, Pediatrics for parents 2006.24:12-14.Fetvei A. Assessment of febrile seizures in children, Eur J Pediatr2008, 167:17-27.Mikati MA. Seizures in Childhood In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, Schor NF, St

  7. Serum Prolactin in Diagnosis of Epileptic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies in databases and references concerning serum prolactin levels (PRL in patients with suspected seizures were rated for quality and analyzed by members of the Therapeutics Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Recurrence Within 24 Hours of Unprovoked Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and risk factors of acute recurrence of unprovoked seizures within 24 hours of admission to an Emergency Department (ED were analyzed by a retrospective chart review at Schneider Children’s Hospital, New York.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: benign familial neonatal seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions BFNS benign familial neonatal seizures ...

  10. Diurnal and Seasonal Occurrence of Febrile Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Millichap

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from University of Oulu, Finland, evaluated the diurnal and seasonal occurrence of the first febrile seizures (FS in 461 children in a population-based study of 1522 children.

  11. Hippocampal Abnormalities in Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC measurements were used to characterize hippocampal edema within 5 days of a prolonged febrile seizure (PFS in a study at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK.

  12. Effect of Febrile Seizures on Oxidant Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythrocyte malondialdehyde (EMA, glutathione peroxidase (GPO, and superoxide dismutase (SDM levels were assessed in 31 children with a febrile seizure and 30 without, in a study at Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey.

  13. MRI Abnormalities After Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The clinical, radiologic, and laboratory findings of 17 Asian patients with encephalopathy following a prolonged febrile seizure were reviewed retrospectively at Kameda Medical Center, and other centers in Japan and San Francisco, USA.

  14. Seizures and Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence, morbidity and mortality, diagnosis and management of cases of fabricated seizures and child abuse (Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSbp are assessed by pediatricians at the University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, UK.

  15. Automatic Detection of Seizures with Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Dale E.; Harris, John C.; Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Cristion, John A.; Lesser, Ronald P.; Webber, W. Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    There are an estimated two million people with epilepsy in the United States. Many of these people do not respond to anti-epileptic drug therapy. Two devices can be developed to assist in the treatment of epilepsy. The first is a microcomputer-based system designed to process massive amounts of electroencephalogram (EEG) data collected during long-term monitoring of patients for the purpose of diagnosing seizures, assessing the effectiveness of medical therapy, or selecting patients for epilepsy surgery. Such a device would select and display important EEG events. Currently many such events are missed. A second device could be implanted and would detect seizures and initiate therapy. Both of these devices require a reliable seizure detection algorithm. A new algorithm is described. It is believed to represent an improvement over existing seizure detection algorithms because better signal features were selected and better standardization methods were used.

  16. The electrophysiologic character of epileptic seizure%癫痫发作的神经电生理特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱俊玲; 蒋大宗

    2005-01-01

    Epilepsy is a family of neurological disorders that are common and harmful to human's health. The etiologies of epilepsy and the clinical manifestations of seizures are complex and various. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying seizure generation, lots of researches in the anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, genetic and molecular biology of epilepsy have been done over many years. However, no single hypothesis provides a unifying frmnework within which all kinds of epilepsy can be included so far. In fact, the eleetrophysiologic essence of epileptic: seizure is abnormal excess discharges of neurons. On the standpoint of electrophysiology, the reasons of abnormal discharges of neurons are of common character: depolarizing currents with long durations and high amplitudes on cell levels, which is closely related to slow waves with high amplitudes on EEG levels. This can make us understand the mechanism of epileptic seizures better, and is helpful for well control and therapy of seizures.

  17. Intermittent diazepam and continuous phenobarbital to treat recurrence of febrile seizures: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuko Alice Hatsue

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Convulsions triggered by fever are the most common type of seizures in childhood, and 20% to 30% of them have recurrence. The prophylactic treatment is still controversial, so we performed a systematic review to find out the effectiveness of continuous phenobarbital and intermittent diazepam compared to placebo for febrile seizure recurrence. METHOD: Only randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials were analyzed. The recurrence of febrile seizure was assessed for each drug. RESULTS: Ten eligible clinical trials were included. Febrile seizure recurrence was smaller in children treated with diazepam or phenobarbital than in placebo group. Prophylaxis with either phenobarbital or diazepam reduces recurrences of febrile seizures. The studies were clinical, methodological, and statistically heterogeneous. CONCLUSION: The effectiveness of phenobarbital and diazepam could not be demonstrated because clinical trials were heterogeneous, and the recommendation for treatment recurrence should rely upon the experience of the assistant physician yet.

  18. 15 CFR 904.501 - Notice of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of seizure. 904.501 Section 904... Seizure and Forfeiture Procedures § 904.501 Notice of seizure. Within 60 days from the date of the seizure, NOAA will serve the Notice of Seizure as provided in § 904.3 to the owner or consignee, if known or...

  19. Genetic effects on sleep/wake variation of seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winawer, Melodie R.; Shih, Jerry; Beck, Erin S.; Hunter, Jessica E.; Epstein, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective There is a complex bidirectional relationship between sleep and epilepsy. Sleep/wake timing of seizures has been investigated for several individual seizure types and syndromes, but few large-scale studies of the timing of seizures exist in people with varied epilepsy types. In addition, the genetic contributions to seizure timing have not been well studied. Methods Sleep/wake timing of seizures was determined for 1,395 subjects in 546 families enrolled in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP). We examined seizure timing among subjects with different epilepsy types, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, and localization. We also examined the familial aggregation of sleep/wake occurrence of seizures. Results Seizures in nonacquired focal epilepsy (NAFE) were more likely to occur during sleep than seizures in generalized epilepsy (GE), for both convulsive (odds ratio [OR] 5.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.59–7.52) and nonconvulsive seizures (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.48–7.21). Seizures occurring within 1 h of awakening were more likely to occur in patients with GE than with NAFE for both convulsive (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.54– 3.39) and nonconvulsive (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.04–2.66) seizures. Frontal onset seizures were more likely than temporal onset seizures to occur during sleep. Sleep/wake timing of seizures in first-degree relatives predicted timing of seizures in the proband. Significance We found that sleep/wake timing of seizures is associated with both epilepsy syndrome and seizure type. In addition, we provide the first evidence for a genetic contribution to sleep/wake timing of seizures in a large group of individuals with common epilepsy syndromes. PMID:26948972

  20. Occipital seizures presenting with bilateral visual loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadjikoutis S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient visual loss may occur with occipital seizures as an ictal or post-ictal phenomenon. Its duration varies from less than one minute to days, or can be permanent. We describe a 61-year-old man presenting with headache, vomiting and bilateral visual loss. EEG revealed persistent spike discharge in the occipital lobes suggesting occipital seizures. His vision improved with carbamazepine.

  1. Seizure risk from cavernous or arteriovenous malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, C.B.; Leach, J.-P.; Duncan, R.; Roberts, R.C.; Counsell, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the risk of epileptic seizures due to a brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) or cavernous malformation (CM). Methods: In a prospective population-based study of new diagnoses of AVMs (n = 229) or CMs (n = 139) in adults in Scotland in 1999–2003, we used annual medical records surveillance, general practitioner follow-up, and patient questionnaires to quantify the risk of seizures between clinical presentation and AVM/CM treatment, last follow-up, or death. Results: The 5-year risk of first-ever seizure after presentation was higher for AVMs presenting with intracranial hemorrhage or focal neurologic deficit (ICH/FND: n = 119; 23%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 9%–37%) than for incidental AVMs (n = 40; 8%, 95% CI 0%–20%), CMs presenting with ICH/FND (n = 38; 6%, 95% CI 0%–14%), or incidental CMs (n = 57; 4%, 95% CI 0%–10%). For adults who had never experienced ICH/FND, the 5-year risk of epilepsy after first-ever seizure was higher for CMs (n = 23; 94%, 95% CI 84%–100%) than AVMs (n = 37; 58%, 95% CI 40%–76%; p = 0.02). Among adults who never experienced ICH/FND and presented with or developed epilepsy, there was no difference in the proportions achieving 2-year seizure freedom over 5 years between AVMs (n = 43; 45%, 95% CI 20%–70%) and CMs (n = 35; 47%, 95% CI 27%–67%). Conclusions: AVM-related ICH confers a significantly higher risk of a first-ever seizure compared to CMs or incidental AVMs. Adults with a CM have a high risk of epilepsy after a first-ever seizure but achieve seizure freedom as frequently as those with epilepsy due to an AVM. PMID:21536634

  2. Endocannabinoid system protects against cryptogenic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, Clementina M; Perescis, Martin F J; Vinogradova, Lyudmila; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Effects of the cannabinoid antagonist rimonabant on the EEG were investigated in healthy, non-epileptic rats. The drug was administered orally at 30 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. The EEG was recorded continuously. In 3 out of 13 rats, limbic convulsive seizures, which were not related to the time of drug administration, were observed after 5-8 days. We hypothesize that an accumulation of micro-injuries in the brain is responsible for these "spontaneous" seizures.

  3. Febrile Seizure: Demographic Features and Causative Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed ESMAILI GOURABI

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveBecause of geographical and periodical variation, we prompted to determine the demographic features and causative factors for febrile seizure in Rasht.Materials & MethodsIn this cross-sectional study, all 6–month- to 6-year-old children with the diagnosis of febrile seizure admitted to 17 Shahrivar hospital in Rasht, from August, 2009 to August, 2010 were studied. Age, sex, family history of the disease, seizure types, body temperature upon admission and infectious causes of the fever were recorded. All statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software, version 16.ResultsOf the 214 children (mean age, 25.24±15.40 months, 124 were boys and 109 had a positive family history. Complex seizures were seen in 39 cases. In patients with a complex febrile seizure, 59% had the repetitive type, 20.5% had the focal type and 20.5% had more than 15 minutes duration of seizures. Most of the repetitive seizures (78.3% occurred in patients under 2 years old; the difference between under and over 2-year-old patients was statistically significant (P=0.02. Study results did not show significant differences between the two genders for simple or complex seizures. The mean body temperature upon admission was 38.2±1.32◦C (38.31±0.82 degrees in boys and 38.04±1.78 in girls. Upper respiratory infections were seen in most patients (74.29%. All cases of lower respiratory infections were boys. There was a statistically significant difference between boys and girls in causes of fever.ConclusionMost of the children had a positive family history and the most common causative factor was upper respiratory infection.

  4. The lunar cycle and seizures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devleta Hadžić

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To analyze the annual trend of hospitalization and potential influence of the lunar cycle of children treated for seizures.Methods The data of the patients treated for seizures (convulsions, epileptic seizures, disturbance of consciousness and epileptic seizures in children with neurodevelopmental disability in the Pediatrics Clinic of the University Clinical Center of Tuzla were retrospectively analyzed during 2008 in relation to seasonaldistribution, admission time (month, week, admission moment, day in a week, time of the day and the lunar cycle. Results Out f the totalof 234 treated children, 55 (23,5% were infants, 101 (43,1% were under six years of age and 78 (33,3% were of school age. The most common type of seizures were convulsions, 123 (42,6%. The seizures were numerous in the midst of the week, as opposed to weekends. Thein the midst of the week, as opposed to weekends. The highest number of children was treated in January, February, July and August, that it, in the fourth, seventh, twenty-seventh and thirty-first week of the year. Seizures occured during the day in 149 patients (63,7% and during the night in 84 (35,9% patients (p < 0,0034. The number of treated patients was significantly larger in the third and fourthlunar phases (p < 0,018. Conclusion The results suggested seasonal and weekly trends of hospitalization of patients with seizures and their relation with circadian and lunar cycles. There is a need for further prospective studies in order to get better understanding of the influence of the lunar cycle on health.

  5. Febrile seizures: A review for family physicians

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common cause of convulsions in children. Most are simple in nature, although those with focal onset, prolonged duration (³15 min) or those that recur within 24 h or within the same febrile illness are considered complex. Diagnosis of this condition is essentially clinical and based on its description provided by parents. Its pathophysiology remains unclear, but genetics plays a major role in conferring susceptibility. Although most febrile seizures are ben...

  6. Sheehan's syndrome presenting as postpartum seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, G; Singh, D; Kumar, S

    2010-05-01

    We report a case where a patient presented with generalised tonic-clonic seizures secondary to nausea, vomiting and dehydration. She had suffered a postpartum haemorrhage six months previously. On laboratory assessment hyponatraemia and low hormone concentrations suggested pituitary failure. The diagnosis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the head, which showed a partially empty sella turcica. Given the severity of the morbidity in this case we emphasise that Sheehan's syndrome should be suspected in women presenting with postpartum seizures.

  7. Seizures in horses: diagnosis and classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacombe VA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Véronique A Lacombe Department of Physiological Sciences, Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Stillwater, OK, USA Abstract: Seizures are a diverse and very common set of chronic neurologic disorders in humans and dogs but are less common in horses. Seizures refer to a specific clinical event (described as sudden and severe regardless of the etiology, which includes both intracranial and extracranial causes. Therefore, after briefly reviewing some definitions, this article aims to describe the use of a standardized classification, which could facilitate a logical approach for the clinician to establish a diagnosis, as well as to use a consistent mode of communication. For instance, seizures can be classified by type (ie, focal vs generalized or etiology (ie, reactive, symptomatic, cryptogenic, idiopathic. In particular, epilepsy, a brain disorder characterized by recurrent seizures can be classified as primary (ie, genetic origin or secondary (ie, acquired. This review further discusses the limitations associated with the clinical workup of horses with seizures. This is germane to the fact that the identification of the underlying cause remains challenging due to the technical limitations of imaging the equine adult brain. Indeed, as in man and dogs, epilepsies of unknown cause (ie, cryptogenic account for the majority of all epilepsies. Therefore, although electroencephalography and advanced brain imaging techniques (eg, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are becoming increasingly available, information obtained from the history, physical, and neurologic examinations and progression of clinical signs and response to treatment remain essential in the workup of horses with seizures. Keywords: focal seizure, generalized seizure, symptomatic, cryptogenic, electroencephalography, computed tomography

  8. Magnesium sulfate treatment reverses seizure susceptibility and decreases neuroinflammation in a rat model of severe preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbie Chapman Johnson

    Full Text Available Eclampsia, defined as unexplained seizure in a woman with preeclampsia, is a life-threatening complication of pregnancy with unclear etiology. Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4 is the leading eclamptic seizure prophylactic, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized severe preeclampsia is a state of increased seizure susceptibility due to blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption and neuroinflammation that lowers seizure threshold. Further, MgSO4 decreases seizure susceptibility by protecting the BBB and preventing neuroinflammation. To model severe preeclampsia, placental ischemia (reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure; RUPP was combined with a high cholesterol diet (HC to cause maternal endothelial dysfunction. RUPP+HC rats developed symptoms associated with severe preeclampsia, including hypertension, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and fetal and placental growth restriction. Seizure threshold was determined by quantifying the amount of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ; mg/kg required to elicit seizure in RUPP + HC ± MgSO4 and compared to normal pregnant controls (n = 6/group; gestational day 20. RUPP+HC rats were more sensitive to PTZ with seizure threshold being ∼ 65% lower vs. control (12.4 ± 1.7 vs. 36.7 ± 3.9 mg/kg PTZ; p<0.05 that was reversed by MgSO4 (