WorldWideScience

Sample records for controlling geochemical processes

  1. Geochemical Proxies for Enhanced Process Control of Underground Coal Gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronimus, A.; Koenen, M.; David, P.; Veld, H.; van Dijk, A.; van Bergen, F.

    2009-04-01

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) represents a strategy targeting at syngas production for fuel or power generation from in-situ coal seams. It is a promising technique for exploiting coal deposits as an energy source at locations not allowing conventional mining under economic conditions. Although the underlying concept has already been suggested in 1868 and has been later on implemented in a number of field trials and even at a commercial scale, UCG is still facing technological barriers, impeding its widespread application. Field UCG operations rely on injection wells enabling the ignition of the target seam and the supply with oxidants (air, O2) inducing combustion (oxidative conditions). The combustion process delivers the enthalpy required for endothermic hydrogen production under reduction prone conditions in some distance to the injection point. The produced hydrogen - usually accompanied by organic and inorganic carbon species, e.g. CH4, CO, and CO2 - can then be retrieved through a production well. In contrast to gasification of mined coal in furnaces, it is difficult to measure the combustion temperature directly during UCG operations. It is already known that geochemical parameters such as the relative production gas composition as well as its stable isotope signature are related to the combustion temperature and, consequently, can be used as temperature proxies. However, so far the general applicability of such relations has not been proven. In order to get corresponding insights with respect to coals of significantly different rank and origin, four powdered coal samples covering maturities ranging from Ro= 0.43% (lignite) to Ro= 3.39% (anthracite) have been gasified in laboratory experiments. The combustion temperature has been varied between 350 and 900 ˚ C, respectively. During gasification, the generated gas has been captured in a cryo-trap, dried and the carbon containing gas components have been catalytically oxidized to CO2. Thereafter, the

  2. Geochemical control processes and potential sediment toxicity in a mine-impacted lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke, Solomon Babatunde; Svensson, Bo H; Yekta, Sepehr Shakeri; Adeleye, Michael Mayowa

    2016-03-01

    Geochemical parameters and major ion concentrations from sediments of a freshwater lake in the town of Åtvidaberg, southeastern, Sweden, were used to identify the geochemical processes that control the water chemistry. The lake sediments are anoxic, characterized by reduced sulfur and sulfidic minerals. The hypothesis tested is that in sulfidic-anaerobic contaminated sediments, the presence of redox potential changes creates a favorable condition for sulfide oxidation, resulting in the release of potentially toxic metals. The acid volatile sulfide (AVS) contents ranged from 5.5 μmol/g to 16 μmol/g of dry sediment. Comparison of total mine tailing metals (∑mine tailing metals) with simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) in sediments indicates that up to 20% of the ∑mine tailing metals are bound to the solid phase as AVS. Consequently, the AVS and SEM analysis classified all sediment samples as potentially toxic in terms of heavy metal concentrations (i.e., SEM to AVS ratio distribution > 1). Evaluation of hydrogeochemical data suggests that calcite dissolution, iron (III) oxyhydroxysulfate mineral jarosite (H-jarosite) precipitation, hematite precipitation, and siderite precipitation are the most prevailing geochemical processes that control the geochemical interactions between the water column and sediment in a mine-impacted lake. The geochemical processes were verified and quantified using a chemical equilibrium modeling program, Visual MINTEQ, Ver 3.1, beta. The identified geochemical processes create an environment in which the characteristics of sulfate-rich waters and acidic-iron produce the geochemical conditions for acid mine drainage and mobilization of toxic metals.

  3. Geochemical Processes Controlling the Generation and Environmental Impacts of Acid Mine Drainage in Semi Arid Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Magombedze, Chris

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates the geochemical processes that control the geochemistry of acid mine drainage in semi arid conditions. The central objective is to characterise and understand the evolution of acid mine drainage and its potential environmental impacts on the Mazowe River sub-catchment, in north east Zimbabwe. The work is based on a case study at three neighbouring metal sulphide mines, namely Trojan Nickel Mine, Mazowe Gold Mine and Iron Duke Pyrites.The methodology used in this research ...

  4. Geochemical processes controlling the groundwater quality in lower Palar river basin, southern India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Senthilkumar; L Elango

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogeochemical study of groundwater was carried out in a part of the lower Palar river basin, southern India to determine the geochemical processes controlling the groundwater quality. Thirty-nine groundwater samples were collected from the study area and analysed for pH, Eh, EC, Ca, Mg, Na, K, HCO3, CO3, Cl and SO4. The analysed parameters of the groundwater in the study area were found to be well within the safe range in general with respect to the Bureau of Indian Standards for drinking water except for few locations. The results of these analyses were used to identify the geochemical processes that are taking place in this region. Cation exchange and silicate weathering are the important processes controlling the major ion distribution of the study area. Mass balance reaction model NETPATH was used to assess the ion exchange processes. High concentration of Ca in groundwater of the study area is due to the release of Ca by aquifer material and adsorption of Na due to ion exchange processes. Groundwater of the study area is suitable for drinking and irrigation purposes except for few locations.

  5. Geochemical and Isotopic (Sr, U) Tracing of Weathering Processes Controlling the Recent Geochemical Evolution of Soil Solutions in the Strengbach Catchment (Vosges, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabaux, F. J.; Prunier, J.; Pierret, M.; Stille, P.

    2012-12-01

    The characterization of the present-day weathering processes controlling the chemical composition of waters and soils in natural ecosystems is an important issue to predict and to model the response of ecosystems to recent environmental changes. It is proposed here to highlight the interest of a multi-tracer geochemical approach combining measurement of major and trace element concentrations along with U and Sr isotopic ratios to progress in this topic. This approach has been applied to the small granitic Strengbah Catchment, located in the Vosges Mountain (France), used and equipped as a hydro-geochemical observatory since 1986 (Observatoire Hydro-Géochimique de l'Environnement; http://ohge.u-strasbg.fr). This study includes the analysis of major and trace element concentrations and (U-Sr) isotope ratios in soil solutions collected within two soil profiles located on two experimental plots of this watershed, as well as the analysis of soil samples and vegetation samples from these two plots The depth variation of elemental concentration of soil solutions confirms the important influence of the vegetation cycling on the budget of Ca, K, Rb and Sr, whereas Mg and Si budget in soil solutions are quasi exclusively controlled by weathering processes. Variation of Sr, and U isotopic ratios with depth also demonstrates that the sources and biogeochemical processes controlling the Sr budget of soil solutions is different in the uppermost soil horizons and in the deeper ones, and clearly influence by the vegetation cycling.

  6. Geochemical Processes Controlling Chromium Transport in the Vadose Zone and Regional Aquifer, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, P.; Ding, M.; Rearick, M.; Vaniman, D.; Katzman, D.

    2008-12-01

    The environmental aqueous geochemistry of Cr is of considerable interest to physical scientists and toxicologists in quantifying the fate and transport of this metal in surface and subsurface environments. Chromium(VI) solutions were released from cooling towers to a stream channel within Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM from 1956 to 1971. These solutions have migrated 293 m depth through the vadose zone, containing several saturated zones, to the regional water table. Concentrations of total dissolved Cr, mainly as Cr(VI), in the regional aquifer range between 0.17 to 8.46 mM. The regional aquifer is characterized by calcium-sodium-bicarbonate solution, contains dissolved oxygen (0.09 to 0.22 mM), and has a circumneutral pH (6.8 to 8.3). Geochemical processes controlling the fate and transport of Cr in groundwater at Los Alamos include a combination of adsorption and precipitation reactions within aquifer systems. Vadose zone material containing hydrous ferric oxide, smectite, silica glass, and calcite widely range in their ability to adsorb Cr(VI) under basic pH conditions. Overall, the vadose zone at Los Alamos is relatively oxidizing, however, basalt flows are locally reducing with respect to Fe. Ferrous iron concentrated within the Cerros del Rio basalt has been shown through batch experiments to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) resulting in precipitation of chromium(III) hydroxide. Regional aquifer material, consisting of silicates, oxides, and calcite, vary in the amount of Fe(II) available in reactive minerals to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The results of our studies (1) directly assess the relationship between mineralogical characterization and transport behavior of Cr using site-specific hydrogeologic material and (2) provide site-specific adsorption and precipitation parameters obtained through the experiments to refine the fate and transport modeling of Cr within the vadose zone and regional aquifer. Natural attenuation of Cr at Los

  7. Geochemical processes controlling water salinization in an irrigated basin in Spain: Identification of natural and anthropogenic influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchán, D., E-mail: d.merchan@igme.es [Geological Survey of Spain — IGME, C/Manuel Lasala 44 9B, 50006 Zaragoza (Spain); Auqué, L.F.; Acero, P.; Gimeno, M.J. [University of Zaragoza — Department of Earth Sciences (Geochemical Modelling Group), C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Causapé, J. [Geological Survey of Spain — IGME, C/Manuel Lasala 44 9B, 50006 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2015-01-01

    Salinization of water bodies represents a significant risk in water systems. The salinization of waters in a small irrigated hydrological basin is studied herein through an integrated hydrogeochemical study including multivariate statistical analyses and geochemical modeling. The study zone has two well differentiated geologic materials: (i) Quaternary sediments of low salinity and high permeability and (ii) Tertiary sediments of high salinity and very low permeability. In this work, soil samples were collected and leaching experiments conducted on them in the laboratory. In addition, water samples were collected from precipitation, irrigation, groundwater, spring and surface waters. The waters show an increase in salinity from precipitation and irrigation water to ground- and, finally, surface water. The enrichment in salinity is related to the dissolution of soluble mineral present mainly in the Tertiary materials. Cation exchange, precipitation of calcite and, probably, incongruent dissolution of dolomite, have been inferred from the hydrochemical data set. Multivariate statistical analysis provided information about the structure of the data, differentiating the group of surface waters from the groundwaters and the salinization from the nitrate pollution processes. The available information was included in geochemical models in which hypothesis of consistency and thermodynamic feasibility were checked. The assessment of the collected information pointed to a natural control on salinization processes in the Lerma Basin with minimal influence of anthropogenic factors. - Highlights: • Salinization in Lerma Basin was controlled by the dissolution of soluble salts. • Water salinization and nitrate pollution were found to be independent processes. • High NO{sub 3}, fresh groundwater evolved to lower NO{sub 3}, higher salinity surface water. • Inverse and direct geochemical modeling confirmed the hypotheses. • Salinization was a natural ongoing process

  8. Geochemical processes controlling dissolved selenium in the Changjiang (Yangtze) Estuary and its adjacent waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiaodan; SONG Jinming; WU Bin; LI Tiegang; LI Xuegang

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved selenium in the Changjiang (Yangtze) Estuary and its adjacent waters was determined by hy-dride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry to elucidate the source, behavior in estuary, adsorp-tion-desorption process and biological role. In surface water, Se(IV ) concentration ranged 0.05-1.14 nmol/L and Se(VI) concentration varied 0.01-1.20 nmol/L, with the means of 0.76 and 0.49 nmol/L, respectively. In bottom water, Se(IV) content varied 0.03-0.27 nmol/L and Se(VI) content ranged 0.04-0.85 nmol/L, with the averages of 0.10 and 0.40 nmol/L, respectively. High level of Se(IV ) was observed near the shore with a significant decrease towards the open sea, suggesting the continental input from the adjacent rivers. Large value of Se( VI) was found in bottom water, reflecting the release from suspended sediment. Besides, high value appeared in the same latitude of the Changjiang Estuary and Hangzhou Bay illustrated the effect of lat-eral mixing and the long-distance transport of selenium. Se(VI), more soluble, occupied higher percentage in aqueous environment. The presence of Se(IV ) resulted from the degradation of residue and the reduction of Se(VI) under anaerobic condition. The positive relationship to suspended particulate material (SPM) and negative correlation to depth indicated that Se(IV ) tended to be released from the high density particulate matter. Instead, Se(VI) content did not significantly relate to SPM since it generally formed inner-sphere complex to iron hydroxide. Se(IV ) content negatively varied to salinity and largely depended on the fresh-water dilution and physical mixing. While, Se( VI) level deviated from the dilution line due to the in situ bio-geochemical process such as removal via phytoplankton uptake and inputs via organic matter regeneration. As the essential element, Se(IV) was confirmed more bioavailable to phytoplankton growth than Se(VI), and moreover, seemed to be more related to phosphorus than to nitrogen.

  9. Geochemical processes controlling water salinization in an irrigated basin in Spain: identification of natural and anthropogenic influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchán, D; Auqué, L F; Acero, P; Gimeno, M J; Causapé, J

    2015-01-01

    Salinization of water bodies represents a significant risk in water systems. The salinization of waters in a small irrigated hydrological basin is studied herein through an integrated hydrogeochemical study including multivariate statistical analyses and geochemical modeling. The study zone has two well differentiated geologic materials: (i) Quaternary sediments of low salinity and high permeability and (ii) Tertiary sediments of high salinity and very low permeability. In this work, soil samples were collected and leaching experiments conducted on them in the laboratory. In addition, water samples were collected from precipitation, irrigation, groundwater, spring and surface waters. The waters show an increase in salinity from precipitation and irrigation water to ground- and, finally, surface water. The enrichment in salinity is related to the dissolution of soluble mineral present mainly in the Tertiary materials. Cation exchange, precipitation of calcite and, probably, incongruent dissolution of dolomite, have been inferred from the hydrochemical data set. Multivariate statistical analysis provided information about the structure of the data, differentiating the group of surface waters from the groundwaters and the salinization from the nitrate pollution processes. The available information was included in geochemical models in which hypothesis of consistency and thermodynamic feasibility were checked. The assessment of the collected information pointed to a natural control on salinization processes in the Lerma Basin with minimal influence of anthropogenic factors.

  10. Modeling Low-temperature Geochemical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, D. K.

    2003-12-01

    Geochemical modeling has become a popular and useful tool for a wide number of applications from research on the fundamental processes of water-rock interactions to regulatory requirements and decisions regarding permits for industrial and hazardous wastes. In low-temperature environments, generally thought of as those in the temperature range of 0-100 °C and close to atmospheric pressure (1 atm=1.01325 bar=101,325 Pa), complex hydrobiogeochemical reactions participate in an array of interconnected processes that affect us, and that, in turn, we affect. Understanding these complex processes often requires tools that are sufficiently sophisticated to portray multicomponent, multiphase chemical reactions yet transparent enough to reveal the main driving forces. Geochemical models are such tools. The major processes that they are required to model include mineral dissolution and precipitation; aqueous inorganic speciation and complexation; solute adsorption and desorption; ion exchange; oxidation-reduction; or redox; transformations; gas uptake or production; organic matter speciation and complexation; evaporation; dilution; water mixing; reaction during fluid flow; reaction involving biotic interactions; and photoreaction. These processes occur in rain, snow, fog, dry atmosphere, soils, bedrock weathering, streams, rivers, lakes, groundwaters, estuaries, brines, and diagenetic environments. Geochemical modeling attempts to understand the redistribution of elements and compounds, through anthropogenic and natural means, for a large range of scale from nanometer to global. "Aqueous geochemistry" and "environmental geochemistry" are often used interchangeably with "low-temperature geochemistry" to emphasize hydrologic or environmental objectives.Recognition of the strategy or philosophy behind the use of geochemical modeling is not often discussed or explicitly described. Plummer (1984, 1992) and Parkhurst and Plummer (1993) compare and contrast two approaches for

  11. Importance of vertical geochemical processes in controlling the oceanic profiles of dissolved rare earth elements in the northeastern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Yoshiyuki; Alibo, Dia Sotto

    2003-01-01

    Vertical profiles of dissolved rare earth elements (REEs) were obtained in the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. The REE concentrations at various depths in the Bay of Bengal are the highest in the Indian Ocean. This is attributable ultimately to the large outflow of the Ganges-Brahmaputra and Irrawaddy rivers, but the dissolved REE flux to surface waters alone cannot explain the large and near-constant REE enrichment throughout the entire water column. The underlying fan sediments serve as not a source but a sink for dissolved REE(III)s. Absence of excess 228Ra in the deep waters suggests that lateral input of dissolved REEs from slope sediments is also small in these regions. Partial (rivers and lateral surface currents and subsequently settle through the water column, appears to be a predominant source for the dissolved REEs. Vertical profiles showing an almost linear increase with depth are common features for the light and middle REEs everywhere, but their concentration levels are variable from basin to basin and from element to element. This suggests that their oceanic distributions respond quickly to the variation of particle flux and its REE composition through reversible exchange equilibrium with suspended and sinking particles much like the case for Th. The relative importance of the vertical geochemical processes of reversible scavenging over the horizontal basin-scale ocean circulation with passive regeneration like nutrients decreases systematically from the light to the heavy REEs. Using a model, the mean oceanic residence times of REEs in the Bay of Bengal are estimated to range from 37 years for Ce to 140-1510 years for the strictly trivalent REEs. In the deep water of the Andaman Sea, isolated from the Bay of Bengal by the Andaman-Nicobar Ridge (maximum sill depth of ˜1800 m), the REE concentrations are almost uniform presumably due to rapid vertical mixing. The REE(III) concentrations are similar to that of ˜1250 m depth water in the Bay of

  12. Evapotranspiration And Geochemical Controls On Groundwater Plumes At Arid Sites: Toward Innovative Alternate End-States For Uranium Processing And Tailings Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Millings, Margaret R.; Kautsky, Mark

    2014-01-08

    Management of legacy tailings/waste and groundwater contamination are ongoing at the former uranium milling site in Tuba City AZ. The tailings have been consolidated and effectively isolated using an engineered cover system. For the existing groundwater plume, a system of recovery wells extracts contaminated groundwater for treatment using an advanced distillation process. The ten years of pump and treat (P&T) operations have had minimal impact on the contaminant plume – primarily due to geochemical and hydrological limits. A flow net analysis demonstrates that groundwater contamination beneath the former processing site flows in the uppermost portion of the aquifer and exits the groundwater as the plume transits into and beneath a lower terrace in the landscape. The evaluation indicates that contaminated water will not reach Moenkopi Wash, a locally important stream. Instead, shallow groundwater in arid settings such as Tuba City is transferred into the vadose zone and atmosphere via evaporation, transpiration and diffuse seepage. The dissolved constituents are projected to precipitate and accumulate as minerals such as calcite and gypsum in the deep vadose zone (near the capillary fringe), around the roots of phreatophyte plants, and near seeps. The natural hydrologic and geochemical controls common in arid environments such as Tuba City work together to limit the size of the groundwater plume, to naturally attenuate and detoxify groundwater contaminants, and to reduce risks to humans, livestock and the environment. The technical evaluation supports an alternative beneficial reuse (“brownfield”) scenario for Tuba City. This alternative approach would have low risks, similar to the current P&T scenario, but would eliminate the energy and expense associated with the active treatment and convert the former uranium processing site into a resource for future employment of local citizens and ongoing benefit to the Native American Nations.

  13. What Controls the Sizes and Shapes of Volcanic Ash? Integrating Morphological, Textural and Geochemical Ash Properties to Decipher Eruptive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, E. J.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash particles encompass a diverse spectrum of shapes as a consequence of differences in the magma properties and the magma ascent and eruption conditions. We show how the quantitative analysis of ash particle shapes can be a valuable tool for deciphering magma fragmentation and transport processes. Importantly, integrating morphological data with ash texture (e.g. bubble and crystal sizes) and dissolved volatile data provides valuable insights into the physical and chemical controls on the resulting ash deposit. To explore the influence of magma-water interaction (MWI) on fine ash generation, we apply this multi-component characterisation to tephra from the 2500BC Hverfjall Fires, Iceland. Here, coeval fissure vents spanned sub-aerial to shallow lacustrine environments. Differences in the size and morphology of pyroclasts thus reflect fragmentation mechanisms under different near-surface conditions. Using shape parameters sensitive to both particle roughness and internal vesicularity, we quantify the relative proportions of dense fragments, bubble shards, and vesicular grains from 2-D SEM images. We show that componentry (and particle morphology) varies as a function of grain size, and that this variation can be related back to the bubble size distribution. Although both magmatic and hydromagmatic deposits exhibit similar component assemblages, they differ in how these assemblages change with grain size. These results highlight the benefits of characterising ash deposits over a wide range of grain sizes, and caution against inferring fragmentation mechanism from a narrow grain size range. Elevated matrix glass S concentrations in hydromagmatic ash (600-1500 ppm) compared to those in magmatic ash and scoria lapilli (200-500 ppm) indicate interrupted vesiculation. In contrast to the subaerial 'dry' deposits, fragmentation during MWI likely occurred over a greater range of depths with quench rates sufficient to prevent post-fragmentation degassing. High

  14. Identification and geochemical modeling of processes controlling leaching of Cr(VI) and other major elements from chromite ore processing residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelhoed, Jeanine S.; Meeussen, Johannes C. L.; Hillier, Stephen; Lumsdon, David G.; Thomas, Rhodri P.; Farmer, John G.; Paterson, Edward

    2002-11-01

    Chromite ore processing residue (COPR) contains very high levels of chromium as Cr(III) and Cr(VI) and has a pH of ˜11.5 to 12. Millions of tonnes of COPR have in the past been deposited in urban areas. We have studied the factors that control leaching of Cr(VI), Ca, Al, Si, and Mg from COPR by means of batch experiments, mineralogical characterization of COPR via X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, and chemical equilibrium modeling. Batch experiments at a range of pH values and two liquid:solid ratios showed that mineral solubility control exists for aqueous concentrations of Cr(VI) above pH 10. Calculations indicate that the solid phases that control the solubility of Cr(VI) at pH values above 11 are Cr(VI)-substituted hydrogarnet (Ca 3Al 2(H 4O 4,CrO 4) 3) and Cr(VI)-hydrocalumite (Ca 4Al 2(OH) 12CrO 4·6 H 2O), a layered double-hydroxide clay with chromate anions held in the interlayers. In the pH range 9.5 to 11, the description of the Cr(VI) concentration in solution was strongly improved by the incorporation in the model of Cr(VI)-ettringite (Ca 6Al 2(OH) 12(CrO 4) 3·26 H 2O), which precipitates as a secondary phase when hydrocalumite dissolves. The proposed model for leaching of COPR at high pH includes Cr(VI)-bearing hydrogarnet, Cr(VI)-hydrocalumite, Cr(VI)-ettringite, brucite, calcite, Ca 2Al 2(OH) 10·3 H 2O, CaH 2SiO 4, and gehlenite hydrate (Ca 2Al 2(OH) 6SiO 8H 8·H 2O). The model accurately predicts the concentrations of Cr(VI), Ca, Al, Si, and Mg in solution in the pH range 10 to 12 as well as the pH-buffering behavior. Below pH 8, a decrease in the Cr(VI) concentration in solution is observed, which may be attributed to sorption of chromate onto freshly precipitated Al and Fe hydroxide surfaces. Sulfate and carbonate show the same type of behavior as chromate. The chemistry of COPR shows similarities with cement and high-pH municipal waste incinerator bottom ash.

  15. Geochemical characterisation and of black shales from the Tarfaya-Layoune Basin (SW Morocco) : Implications for palaeoenvironmental controls on sulfurisation process of the organic matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kolonic, S.; Wagner, T.; Kuypers, M.M.M.; Botcher, M.; Kuhn, W.; Whener, H.

    2002-01-01

    Organic geochemical and petrological investigations were carried out on Cenomanian/Turonian black shales from three sample sites in the Tarfaya Basin (SW Morocco) to characterize the sedimentary organic matter. These black shales have a variable bulk and molecular geochemical composition reflecting

  16. Importance of vertical geochemical processes in controlling the oceanic profiles of dissolved rare earth elements inferred from the study in the northeastern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Y.

    2001-12-01

    The vertical profiles of dissolved rare earth elements (REEs) were obtained in the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. The REE concentrations at various depths in the Bay of Bengal are the highest in the Indian Ocean. This is attributable ultimately to the large outflow of the Ganges-Brahmaputra and Irrawaddy Rivers, but the dissolved REE flux to surface waters alone can not explain the REE enrichment throughout the entire water column. The underlying fan sediments serve as not a source but a sink for dissolved REE(III)s. Partial dissolution of detrital partilces which are carried by the rivers and lateral currents and subsequently settling through the water column appears to be a predominant source for dissolved REEs. The vertical profiles showing an almost linear increase with depth are common features for the light and middle REEs everywhere, but their concentration levels are variable from basin to basin and from element to element. This suggest that their oceanic distributions are quickly responding to the variation of detrital particle flux and its REE composition through a reversible exchange equilibirum with suspended and sinking particles much like the case for Th. The relative importance of the vertical geochemical processes of reversible scavenging over the horizontal basin-scale ocean circulation with passive regeneration like nutrients systematically decreases from the light to the heavy REEs. Using a model, the mean oceanic residence times of REEs in the Bay of Bengal are estimated to range from 37 years for Ce to 140-1510 years for the strictly trivalent REEs. In the deep water of the Andaman Sea isolated from the Bay of Bengal by the Andaman-Nicobar Ridge (maximum sill depth of sim1800 m), the REE concentrations are almost uniform presumably due to rapid vertical mixing. The REE(III) concentrations are similar to that of ~1250 m depth water in the Bay of Bengal being consistent with other oceanographic properties. However, the REE composition of the

  17. Geochemical modeling of cyanide in tailing dam gold processing plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi, Ahmad; Monjezi, M.; Mehrpouya, H.; Dehghani, H.

    2009-09-01

    This research is aimed at investigating possible neutralization of cyanide in tailing dam of Muteh gold processing plant in Isfahan, Iran at various conditions such as pH and temperature using USEPA Visual MINTEQ geochemical model simulation. The model is based on geochemical equilibrium which uses the simultaneous solution of the non-linear mass action expressions and linear mass balance relationships to formulate and solve the multiple-component chemical equilibrium problems. In this study the concentration of aqueous species in tailing dam as an aqueous, solid and gaseous were used as input in the model. Temperature and pH variation were simulated. The results of the model indicated that cyanide may be complexes in 10 < pH < 5. In other pH values complexation is not important. The results also indicated that cyanide reduction mechanism in acidic pH and temperature above 30°C is due to cyanide acid formation which is vaporized.

  18. Geochemical, Genetic, and Community Controls on Mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Judy D.

    2014-11-10

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are soil bacteria that share two common characteristics, strict anaerobiosis and the ability to respire sulfate. The metabolic activities of these bacteria play significant roles in the global sulfur cycle, anaerobic degradation of biomass, biological metal corrosion in the environment and, recently, degradation of toxic compounds. The accumulation of evidence suggests these bacteria are also key to the production of the neurotoxin methylmercury in environmental settings. We propose to use our experience with the development of genetics in sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio to create mutations that will eliminate the methylation of mercury, thereby identifying the genes essential for this process. This information may allow the environmental monitoring of the mercury methylation potential to learn the location and quantity of the production this toxin. From these data, more accurate predictive models of mercury cycling can be generated.

  19. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

  20. Fault controlled geochemical properties in Lahendong geothermal reservoir Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehme, Maren; Deon, Fiorenza; Haase, Christoph; Wiegand, Bettina; Kamah, Yustin; Sauter, Martin; Regenspurg, Simona

    2016-03-01

    Rock and fluid geochemical data from Lahendong, Indonesia, were analyzed to evaluate the influence of fault zones on reservoir properties. It was found that these properties depend on fault-permeability controlled fluid flow. Results from measurements of spring and well water as well as rocks and their hydraulic properties were combined with hydrochemical numerical modeling. The models show that the geothermal field consists of two geochemically distinct reservoir sections. One section is characterized by acidic water, considerable gas discharge and high geothermal-power productivity—all related to increased fault zone permeability. The other section is characterized by neutral water and lower productivity. Increased fluid flow in the highly fractured and permeable areas enhances chemical reaction rates. This results in strong alteration of their surrounding rocks. Numerical models of reactions between water and rock at Lahendong indicate the main alteration products are clay minerals. A geochemical conceptual model illustrates the relation between geochemistry and permeability and their distribution within the area. Our conceptual model illustrates the relation between geochemistry and fault-zone permeability within the Lahendong area. Further mapping of fault-related permeability would support sustainable energy exploitation by avoiding low-productive wells or the production of highly corroding waters, both there and elsewhere in the world.

  1. Groundwater sources and geochemical processes in a crystalline fault aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, Clément; Aquilina, Luc; Bour, Olivier; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe; Dewandel, Benoît; Pauwels, Hélène; Labasque, Thierry; Vergnaud-Ayraud, Virginie; Hochreutener, Rebecca

    2014-11-01

    The origin of water flowing in faults and fractures at great depth is poorly known in crystalline media. This paper describes a field study designed to characterize the geochemical compartmentalization of a deep aquifer system constituted by a graben structure where a permeable fault zone was identified. Analyses of the major chemical elements, trace elements, dissolved gases and stable water isotopes reveal the origin of dissolved components for each permeable domain and provide information on various water sources involved during different seasonal regimes. The geochemical response induced by performing a pumping test in the fault-zone is examined, in order to quantify mixing processes and contribution of different permeable domains to the flow. Reactive processes enhanced by the pumped fluxes are also identified and discussed. The fault zone presents different geochemical responses related to changes in hydraulic regime. They are interpreted as different water sources related to various permeable structures within the aquifer. During the low water regime, results suggest mixing of recent water with a clear contribution of older water of inter-glacial origin (recharge temperature around 7 °C), suggesting the involvement of water trapped in a local low-permeability matrix domain or the contribution of large scale circulation loops. During the high water level period, due to inversion of the hydraulic gradient between the major permeable fault zone and its surrounding domains, modern water predominantly flows down to the deep bedrock and ensures recharge at a local scale within the graben. Pumping in a permeable fault zone induces hydraulic connections with storage-reservoirs. The overlaid regolith domain ensures part of the flow rate for long term pumping (around 20% in the present case). During late-time pumping, orthogonal fluxes coming from the fractured domains surrounding the major fault zone are dominant. Storage in the connected fracture network within the

  2. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Philip E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Banfield, Jill [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Chandler, Darrell P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, James A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hettich, Bob [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); VerBerkmoes, Nathan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jaffe, Peter R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Kerkhof, Lee J. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Kukkadapu, Ravi K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Peacock, Aaron [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yabusaki, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-02-15

    The Rifle IFRC continued to make excellent progress during the last 12 months. As noted above, a key field experiment (Best Western) was performed during 2011 as a logical follow-on to the Super 8 field experiment preformed in 2010. In the Super 8 experiment, we successfully combined desorption and bioreduction and deployed a number of novel tracer techniques to enhance our ability to interpret the biogeochemistry of the experiment. In the Best Western experiment, we used the same experimental plot (Plot C) as was used for Super 8. The overarching objective of the Best Western field experiment was to compared the impacts of abiotic vs. biotic increases in alkalinity and to assess the mass of the sorbed pool of U(VI) at Rifle at the field scale. Both of these objectives were met. Preliminary analysis of the data indicate that the underlying biogeochemical data sets were obtained that will support a mechanistic understanding of the underlying processes, including remarkable insight into previously unrecognized microbial processes taking place during acetate amendment of the subsurface for a second time.

  3. Geochemical factors controlling free Cu ion concentrations in river water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozan, Tim F.; Benoit, Gaboury

    1999-10-01

    Copper speciation was determined monthly at seven sites on four rivers in southern New England to understand which geochemical factors control free metal ion concentrations in river water. Samples were conventionally filtered (stripping voltammetry (DPASV) was used to quantify natural organic complexation and cathodic stripping square wave voltammetry (CSSWV) to measure directly both Cu sulfide complexes and total EDTA concentrations. The results showed both dissolved organic matter (DOM) and sulfide complexation dominate Cu speciation and control the concentrations of free ion. Free Cu2+ was calculated to be in the subnanomolar range for the majority of the year. Only in the winter months, when concentrations of DOM and metal sulfides complexes were at a minimum were free metal ions directly measurable by DPASV at low nanomolar concentrations. The extent of sulfide complexation appears to be dominated by the size of headwater marshes (upstream sampling sites) and by the amount of sewage treatment plant effluent (downstream sites). DOM complexation was related to the organic matter composition and followed model organic ligands. Indirect evidence suggests variations in river water pH and Ca2+ (metal competition) has only a minor role in Cu complexation. Measured concentrations of total EDTA suggest this synthetic ligand can control Cu speciation in some highly developed watersheds; however, competition from Ni (and possibly Fe) limits the extent of this complexation.

  4. Geochemical tracers to evaluate hydrogeologic controls on river salinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Stephanie J; Bassett, R L; Liu, Beiling; Wolf, Christopher P; Doremus, Dale

    2008-01-01

    The salinization of rivers, as indicated by salinity increases in the downstream direction, is characteristic of arid and semiarid regions throughout the world. Historically, salinity increases have been attributed to various mechanisms, including (1) evaporation and concentration during reservoir storage, irrigation, and subsequent reuse; (2) displacement of shallow saline ground water during irrigation; (3) erosion and dissolution of natural deposits; and/or (4) inflow of deep saline and/or geothermal ground water (ground water with elevated water temperature). In this study, investigation of salinity issues focused on identification of relative salinity contributions from anthropogenic and natural sources in the Lower Rio Grande in the New Mexico-Texas border region. Based on the conceptual model of the system, the various sources of water and, therefore, salinity to the Lower Rio Grande were identified, and a sampling plan was designed to characterize these sources. Analysis results for boron (delta(11)B), sulfur (delta(34)S), oxygen (delta(18)O), hydrogen (delta(2)H), and strontium ((87)Sr/(86)Sr) isotopes, as well as basic chemical data, confirmed the hypothesis that the dominant salinity contributions are from deep ground water inflow to the Rio Grande. The stable isotopic ratios identified the deep ground water inflow as distinctive, with characteristic isotopic signatures. These analyses indicate that it is not possible to reproduce the observed salinization by evapotranspiration and agricultural processes alone. This investigation further confirms that proper application of multiple isotopic and geochemical tracers can be used to identify and constrain multiple sources of solutes in complex river systems.

  5. GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

    1999-11-01

    Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require

  6. Geochemical processes at a fresh/seawater interface in a shallow sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Iversen, Vibeke Margrethe Nyvang; Postma, Diederik Jan

    2001-01-01

    Chemical processes in a natural fresh-/seawater mixing zone were studied in a shallow sandy aquifer. The dominant redox-processes are sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Methanogenesis produces CO2, which causes calcite dissolution. The produced calcium induces ion exchange with sodium. The final...... result of these interactions between different types of geochemical processes is an anoxic groundwater enriched in bicarbonate and sodium....

  7. Geochemical processes during five years of aquifer storage recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herczeg, Andrew L; Rattray, Karen J; Dillon, Peter J; Pavelic, Paul; Barry, Karen E

    2004-01-01

    A key factor in the long-term viability of aquifer storage recovery (ASR) is the extent of mineral solution interaction between two dissimilar water types and consequent impact on water quality and aquifer stability. We collected geochemical and isotopic data from three observation wells located 25, 65, and 325 m from an injection well at an experimental ASR site located in a karstic, confined carbonate aquifer in South Australia. The experiment involved five major injection cycles of a total of 2.5 x 10(5) m3 of storm water (total dissolved solids [TDS] approximately 150 mg/L) into the brackish (TDS approximately 2400 mg/L) aquifer. Approximately 60% of the mixture was pumped out during the fifth year of the experiment. The major effect on water quality within a 25 m radius of the injection well following injection of storm water was carbonate dissolution (35 +/- 6 g of CaCO3 dissolved/m3 of aquifer) and sulfide mineral oxidation (50 +/- 10 g as FeS2/m3 after one injection). < 0.005% of the total aquifer carbonate matrix was dissolved during each injection event, and approximately 0.2% of the total reduced sulfur. Increasing amounts of ambient ground water was entrained into the injected mixture during each of the storage periods. High 14C(DIC) activities and slightly more negative delta13C(DIC) values measured immediately after injection events show that substantial CO2(aq) is produced by oxidation of organic matter associated with injectant. There were no detectable geochemical reactions while pumping during the recovery phase in the fifth year of the experiment.

  8. From biological to lithological control of the B geochemical cycle in a forest watershed (Strengbach, Vosges)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cividini, D.; Lemarchand, D.; Chabaux, F.; Boutin, R.; Pierret, M.-C.

    2010-06-01

    There is a fast growing interest in understanding the coupling between mineralogical and biological processes responsible for the migration of elements through continental ecosystems. This issue has fundamental impacts at the soil/plant scale because it can explain the tight links between soil and plant development and at the watershed scale because it gives a direct access to the water quality. In the present study, we performed an extended investigation of the bio-geochemical cycle of boron, which is an element known to be suitable for investigating water/rock interactions and vegetation cycling. New B data are provided along the hydro-bio-geochemical continuum in a forest ecosystem (Strengbach basin, Vosges, France), from rainwaters down to the outlet of the basin including systematic analyses of throughfalls, soil solutions, springs and brooks scattered in the watershed. At the watershed scale, we evidence a relationship between the B isotopic composition of river waters and the weathering regime outlining a predominant control of the parent rock mineralogy on the B geochemical behavior. At the soil/plant scale, it appears that the B geochemical cycle is controlled by the vegetation cycling, which is characterized by an uncommon, easy to distinguish, B isotopic composition (δ 11B ranging from about +30‰ to +45‰). Each year the amount of B being involved in the vegetation cycle is about four times greater than that of B being exported out of the watershed. At 10 cm depth in soil, where the plant roots are expected to be the most active, we observe a marked seasonal oscillation of the B isotopic values, which is interpreted as resulting from the vegetation activity. A mass balance calculation based on the assumption that that 10B is preferentially accumulated in the biomass tends to indicate that the soil/plant system does not behave at steady state with respect to B. Because of the very distinct B isotopic signature of vegetation and minerals in soil, box

  9. DEEP-LEVEL GEODYNAMICS: BOUNDARIES OF THE PROCESS ACCORDING TO GEOCHEMIC AND PETROLOGIC DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei V. Ivanov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical features for volcanic rocks and petrologic data for deep-seated inclusions, which can be used to infer mass transfer between different geospheres, are reviewed. It is typically believed that slabs can subduct as deep as the core-mantle boundary with the following recycling by plumes coming up to the sublithospheric regions of magma generation. However, the petrologic evidence of the deepest accessible material is limited by the depth of the uppermost lower mantle (~650–700km, i.e. by the depth of the deepest earthquakes. Ferropericlase inclusions in some diamonds do not exclude involvement of deeper mantle horizons, yet do not unambiguously support it. No unambiguous confirmation of involvement of the lower mantle into magma generation underneath volcanically active regions is obtained from geochemical data either, while the geochemical data suggest complete chemical isolation of the Earth’s core from the upper mantle processes.

  10. Linking the climatic and geochemical controls on global soil carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doetterl, Sebastian; Stevens, Antoine; Six, Johan; Merckx, Roel; Van Oost, Kristof; Casanova Pinto, Manuel; Casanova-Katny, Angélica; Muñoz, Cristina; Boudin, Mathieu; Zagal Venegas, Erick; Boeckx, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    Climatic and geochemical parameters are regarded as the primary controls for soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover. However, due to the difference in scale between climate and geochemical-related soil research, the interaction of these key factors for SOC dynamics have rarely been assessed. Across a large geochemical and climatic transect in similar biomes in Chile and the Antarctic Peninsula we show how abiotic geochemical soil features describing soil mineralogy and weathering pose a direct control on SOC stocks, concentration and turnover and are central to explaining soil C dynamics at larger scales. Precipitation and temperature had an only indirect control by regulating geochemistry. Soils with high SOC content have low specific potential CO2 respiration rates, but a large fraction of SOC that is stabilized via organo-mineral interactions. The opposite was observed for soils with low SOC content. The observed differences for topsoil SOC stocks along this transect of similar biomes but differing geo-climatic site conditions are of the same magnitude as differences observed for topsoil SOC stocks across all major global biomes. Using precipitation and a set of abiotic geochemical parameters describing soil mineralogy and weathering status led to predictions of high accuracy (R2 0.53-0.94) for different C response variables. Partial correlation analyses revealed that the strength of the correlation between climatic predictors and SOC response variables decreased by 51 - 83% when controlling for geochemical predictors. In contrast, controlling for climatic variables did not result in a strong decrease in the strength of the correlations of between most geochemical variables and SOC response variables. In summary, geochemical parameters describing soil mineralogy and weathering were found to be essential for accurate predictions of SOC stocks and potential CO2 respiration, while climatic factors were of minor importance as a direct control, but are

  11. Salinization processes in the unconfined aquifer of Bou-Areg (NE Morocco): A geostatistical, geochemical, and tomographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Yaouti, F. [Laboratory of LGA, Faculty of Sciences, University Mohammed I, Oriental Center of Water Science and Technology (COSTE), P.B. 524, Oujda (Morocco)], E-mail: elyfouzia@yahoo.fr; El Mandour, A. [Laboratory of Hydrogeology, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, University Cadi Ayyad, P.B. 2390, Marrakech (Morocco)], E-mail: A.elmandour@ucam.ca.ma; Khattach, D. [Laboratory of LGA, Faculty of Sciences, University Mohammed I, Oriental Center of Water Science and Technology (COSTE), P.B. 524, Oujda (Morocco)], E-mail: dkhattach@yahoo.fr; Benavente, J. [Water Research Institute, University of Granada, Ramon y Cajal, 4, 18071 Granada (Spain)], E-mail: jbenaven@ugr.es; Kaufmann, O. [Polytechnic Faculty of Mons, Service of Fundamental and Applied Geology, Mons (Belgium)

    2009-01-15

    Hydrogeological and geochemical data, in conjunction with the results of an electrical imaging tomographic survey, were examined to determine the main factors and mechanisms controlling the groundwater chemistry and salinity of the unconfined aquifer of Bou-Areg, on the Mediterranean coast of NE Morocco. In addition, statistical and geochemical interpretation methods were used to identify the distribution of the salinity. Multivariate statistical analysis (cluster and principal component factors) revealed the main sources of contamination. Groups A, B, and C in the cluster analysis and Factors 1-3 (Factor 1: CE, Cl{sup -}, K{sup +}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, and Mg{sup 2+}; Factor 2: Ca{sup 2+}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, and pH; Factor 3: NO{sub 3}{sup -}) represent the 'signature' of seawater intrusion in the coastal zone, the influence of marly-gypsum outcrops in the upstream zone, and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The ionic delta, the ionic ratio, the saturation index, and Stuyfzand's method were applied to evaluate geochemical processes. The results obtained indicate, on the one hand, the phenomenon of salinization in both the coastal and the upstream zones, and on the other, the dilution of groundwater by recharge. Cation exchange is shown to modify the concentration of ions in groundwater. Locally, with respect to salinization processes in the coastal zone, the results of electrical imaging tomography show that salinity increases both with depth and laterally inland from the coastline, due to seawater intrusion.

  12. A COMSOL-GEMS interface for modeling coupled reactive-transport geochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Vahid Jafari; Li, Chang; Verba, Circe; Ideker, Jason H.; Isgor, O. Burkan

    2016-07-01

    An interface was developed between COMSOL MultiphysicsTM finite element analysis software and (geo)chemical modeling platform, GEMS, for the reactive-transport modeling of (geo)chemical processes in variably saturated porous media. The two standalone software packages are managed from the interface that uses a non-iterative operator splitting technique to couple the transport (COMSOL) and reaction (GEMS) processes. The interface allows modeling media with complex chemistry (e.g. cement) using GEMS thermodynamic database formats. Benchmark comparisons show that the developed interface can be used to predict a variety of reactive-transport processes accurately. The full functionality of the interface was demonstrated to model transport processes, governed by extended Nernst-Plank equation, in Class H Portland cement samples in high pressure and temperature autoclaves simulating systems that are used to store captured carbon dioxide (CO2) in geological reservoirs.

  13. Geochemical controls on shale groundwaters: Results of reaction path modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Damm, K.L.; VandenBrook, A.J.

    1989-03-01

    The EQ3NR/EQ6 geochemical modeling code was used to simulate the reaction of several shale mineralogies with different groundwater compositions in order to elucidate changes that may occur in both the groundwater compositions, and rock mineralogies and compositions under conditions which may be encountered in a high-level radioactive waste repository. Shales with primarily illitic or smectitic compositions were the focus of this study. The reactions were run at the ambient temperatures of the groundwaters and to temperatures as high as 250/degree/C, the approximate temperature maximum expected in a repository. All modeling assumed that equilibrium was achieved and treated the rock and water assemblage as a closed system. Graphite was used as a proxy mineral for organic matter in the shales. The results show that the presence of even a very small amount of reducing mineral has a large influence on the redox state of the groundwaters, and that either pyrite or graphite provides essentially the same results, with slight differences in dissolved C, Fe and S concentrations. The thermodynamic data base is inadequate at the present time to fully evaluate the speciation of dissolved carbon, due to the paucity of thermodynamic data for organic compounds. In the illitic cases the groundwaters resulting from interaction at elevated temperatures are acid, while the smectitic cases remain alkaline, although the final equilibrium mineral assemblages are quite similar. 10 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  14. Predictive Analysis of Geochemical Controls in an Alpine Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochems, A. P.; Sherson, L. R.; Crossey, L. J.; Karlstrom, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Alpine watersheds are increasingly relied upon for use in the American West, necessitating a more complete understanding of annual hydrologic patterns and geologic influences on water chemistry. The Jemez River is a fifth order stream in central New Mexico that flows from its source in the Jemez Mountains to its confluence with the Rio Grande north of the town of Bernalillo. Designated uses of the Jemez River include domestic water supply, recreation, and agriculture. Geothermal uses are currently being considered as well. The river recharges shallow aquifer waters used by several communities, including tribal lands of the Jemez Pueblo. The hydrogeology of the Jemez system is characterized by geothermal inputs from the Baca hydrothermal system associated with the 1.2Ma Valles caldera, as well as groundwater and surface water interactions. Freshwater input from the Rio Guadalupe and several ephemeral tributaries also influences the water chemistry of the Jemez system. Fifteen sites along a 35 km reach of the river were sampled between 2006 and 2010. Discharge of the Jemez River ranged from 10-876 cfs over the study period. The annual hydrograph is affected by annual snowmelt in the Jemez Mountains as well as surges due to monsoonal rains in July and August. Geochemical data collected over this period include temperature, conductivity, pH, dissolved oxygen (D.O.), major ions, trace elements, and stable isotopes. Continuous records of temperature, conductivity, pH, D.O. and turbidity data were collected from a water quality sonde installed in March 2010. Geochemical modeling and time series analysis were performed using PHREEQC, Geochemist’s Workbench, and MATLAB. Empirical data collected during this study gave rise to several models describing the hydrology and geochemistry of the Jemez system. Our data suggest that springs are the primary contributors to dissolved load, and that solute loading from geothermal inputs is intensified by low flows observed on

  15. Quality assurance and quality control of geochemical data—A primer for the research scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Geochemistry is a constantly expanding science. More and more, scientists are employing geochemical tools to help answer questions about the Earth and earth system processes. Scientists may assume that the responsibility of examining and assessing the quality of the geochemical data they generate is not theirs but rather that of the analytical laboratories to which their samples have been submitted. This assumption may be partially based on knowledge about internal and external quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) programs in which analytical laboratories typically participate. Or there may be a perceived lack of time or resources to adequately examine data quality. Regardless of the reason, the lack of QA/QC protocols can lead to the generation and publication of erroneous data. Because the interpretations drawn from the data are primary products to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) stakeholders, the consequences of publishing erroneous results can be significant. The principal investigator of a scientific study ultimately is responsible for the quality and interpretation of the project's findings, and thus must also play a role in the understanding, implementation, and presentation of QA/QC information about the data. Although occasionally ignored, QA/QC protocols apply not only to procedures in the laboratory but also in the initial planning of a research study and throughout the life of the project. Many of the tenets of developing a sound QA/QC program or protocols also parallel the core concepts of developing a good study: What is the main objective of the study? Will the methods selected provide data of enough resolution to answer the hypothesis? How should samples be collected? Are there known or unknown artifacts or contamination sources in the sampling and analysis methods? Assessing data quality requires communication between the scientists responsible for designing the study and those collecting samples, analyzing samples, treating data, and

  16. Geochemical controls of vanadium accumulation in fossil fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, G.N.; Wanty, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    High vanadium contents in petroleum and other fossil fuels have been attributed to organic-matter type, organisms, volcanic emanations, diffusion of sea water, and epigenetic enrichment. However, these factors are inadequate to account for the high abundance of vanadium in some fossil fuels and the paucity in others. By examining vanadium deposits in sedimentary rocks with sparse organic matter, constraints are placed on processes controlling vanadium accumulation in organic-rich sediments. Vanadium, as vanadate (V(V)), entered some depositional basins in oxidizing waters from dry, subaerial environments. Upon contact with organic matter in anoxic waters, V(V) is reduced to vanadyl (V(IV)), which can be removed from the water column by adsorption. H2S reduces V(IV) to V(III), which hydrolyzes and precipitates. The lack of V(III) in petroleum suggests that reduction of V(IV) to V(III) is inhibited by organic complexes. In the absence of strong complexing agents, V(III) forms and is incorporated in clay minerals.

  17. Geochemical controls on vanadium accumulation in fossil fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, G.N.; Wanty, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    High vanadium contents in petroleum and other fossil fuels have been attributed to organic-matter type, organisms, volcanic emanations, diffusion of sea water, and epigenetic enrichment. However, these factors are inadequate to account for the high abundance of vanadium in some fossil fuels and the paucity in others. By examining vanadium deposits in sedimentary rocks with sparse organic matter, constraints are placed on processes controlling vanadium accumulation in organic-rich sediments. Vanadium, as vanadate (V(V)), entered some depositional basins in oxidizing waters from dry, subaerial environments. Upon contact with organic matter in anoxic waters, V(V) is reduced to vanadyl (V(IV)), which can be removed from the water column by adsorption. H2S reduces V(IV) to V(III), which hydrolyzes and precipitates. The lack of V(III) in petroleum suggests that reduction of V(IV) to V(III) is inhibited by organic complexes. In the absence of strong complexing agents, V(III) forms and is incorporated in clay minerals.

  18. Co-transport of metals and organic compounds in geochemical, biochemical and environmental processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shock, E.L. [GEOPIG, St. Louis, Washington Univ., MO (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    1998-12-31

    If the environment is defined as consisting of the interdependent processes that enable life to persist, then environmental science begins where geology and biology overlap. It follows that the environmental chemistry emerges from the confluence of geochemistry and biochemistry. With increasing evidence that the biosphere extends well into what has traditionally been considered the sterile geosphere, perhaps even to thousands of meters of the crust (Ghiorse and Wilson, 1988; Pedersen and Ekendahl, 1990; Stevens and McKinley, 1995; Boone et al., 1995), many crustal geochemical processes are being re-evaluated in terms of their potential for supporting life, and microorganisms are increasingly invoked to explain the rates and mechanisms of reactions in geochemical processes (Banfield and Hamers, 1997; Barker et al.,1997; Bazylinski and Moskowitz, 1997; Fortin et al., 1997; Little et al., 1997; McCollom and Shock, 1997; Nordstrom and Southam, 1997; Tebo et al., 1997). Elemental mobility from the geosphere to the hydrosphere, biosphere and atmosphere occurs in surface reactions that are often mediated by microorganisms that actively uptake metals and other nutrients from their surrounding geochemical environments.

  19. Geochemical Modeling of Evaporation Processes on Mars: Insight From the Sedimentary Record at Meridiani Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosca, N. J.; McLennan, S. M.

    2004-12-01

    The Opportunity rover's analysis of an impure evaporite component present in the Martian sedimentary record reveals a unique geochemical system. The evaporation of basaltic weathering fluids is a process which is rare on Earth, but is likely to have played a major role in the formation of sedimentary rocks at Meridiani Planum. Adequately modeling the evaporation processes in this system must involve adding additional components to current thermodynamic models, namely Fe(II) and Fe(III). The goals of this study are to: (1) develop a thermodynamic database suitable for modeling evaporation of basaltic weathering fluids in the Meridiani system and (2) to apply the model to experimental fluid data obtained in our laboratory from weathering synthetic Martian basalt, which will allow for the testing of hypotheses related to the geochemical evolution of the Meridiani site. The evaporation of these fluids is simulated using an expanded version of the Harvie-Moller-Weare model which employs Pitzer's ion interaction approach in calculating activity coefficients in high ionic strength solutions. This model has been expanded using recent data to include Fe(II) and Fe(III). Although a full set of experimentally-derived data allowing the inclusion of Fe(III) into such models is not yet available, an adequate set of interaction parameters was built, based on viable assumptions and substitutions using analog data (e.g., Al3+, Ga3+, Cr3+). The accuracy of the thermodynamic model in predicting Fe(II) and Fe(III) activities in a multi-component system can be assessed. This is accomplished by comparing calculated Eh values (proportional to aFe2+/aFe3+) to those measured in the field from high ionic strength acid mine waters containing all of the relevant components of the model. The agreement between calculated and observed values suggests that the model calculations are adequate for reaction path calculations. New thermodynamic data for several Fe(II) and/or Fe(III) containing

  20. Selected Geochemical Data for Modeling Near-Surface Processes in Mineral Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Stuart A.; Granitto, Matthew; Eppinger, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    The database herein was initiated, designed, and populated to collect and integrate geochemical, geologic, and mineral deposit data in an organized manner to facilitate geoenvironmental mineral deposit modeling. The Microsoft Access database contains data on a variety of mineral deposit types that have variable environmental effects when exposed at the ground surface by mining or natural processes. The data tables describe quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses determined by 134 analytical laboratory and field methods for over 11,000 heavy-mineral concentrate, rock, sediment, soil, vegetation, and water samples. The database also provides geographic information on geology, climate, ecoregion, and site contamination levels for over 3,000 field sites in North America.

  1. Bacterial communities associated with subsurface geochemical processes in continental serpentinite springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazelton, William J; Morrill, Penny L; Szponar, Natalie; Schrenk, Matthew O

    2013-07-01

    Reactions associated with the geochemical process of serpentinization can generate copious quantities of hydrogen and low-molecular-weight organic carbon compounds, which may provide energy and nutrients to sustain subsurface microbial communities independently of the photosynthetically supported surface biosphere. Previous microbial ecology studies have tested this hypothesis in deep sea hydrothermal vents, such as the Lost City hydrothermal field. This study applied similar methods, including molecular fingerprinting and tag sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, to ultrabasic continental springs emanating from serpentinizing ultramafic rocks. These molecular surveys were linked with geochemical measurements of the fluids in an interdisciplinary approach designed to distinguish potential subsurface organisms from those derived from surface habitats. The betaproteobacterial genus Hydrogenophaga was identified as a likely inhabitant of transition zones where hydrogen-enriched subsurface fluids mix with oxygenated surface water. The Firmicutes genus Erysipelothrix was most strongly correlated with geochemical factors indicative of subsurface fluids and was identified as the most likely inhabitant of a serpentinization-powered subsurface biosphere. Both of these taxa have been identified in multiple hydrogen-enriched subsurface habitats worldwide, and the results of this study contribute to an emerging biogeographic pattern in which Betaproteobacteria occur in near-surface mixing zones and Firmicutes are present in deeper, anoxic subsurface habitats.

  2. Geochemical and microbiological controls on dissimilatory iron reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, Eric E.

    2006-06-01

    Recent experimental studies permit development of conceptual and quantitative models of microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction at circumneutral pH that can be compared to and contrasted with established models of abiotic mineral dissolution. The findings collectively support a model for controls on enzymatic reduction that differs fundamentally from those applied to abiotic reductive dissolution as a result of two basic phenomena: (1) the relatively minor influence of oxide mineralogical and thermodynamic properties on rates of enzymatic reduction compared to abiotic reductive dissolution, and (2) the major limitation which sorption and/or surface precipitation of biogenic Fe(II) on residual oxide and Fe(III)-reducing bacterial cell surfaces poses to enzymatic electron transfer in the presence of excess electron donor. Parallel studies with two well-characterized Fe(III)-reducing organisms ( Shewanella putrefaciens and Geobacter sulfurreducens) lead to common conclusions regarding the importance of these phenomena in regulating the rate and long-term extent of Fe(III) oxide reduction. Models in which rates of enzymatic reduction are limited by Fe(III)-reducing bacterial cell density together with the abundance of 'available' oxide surface sites (as controlled by oxide surface area and the accumulation of surface-bound biogenic Fe(II)) provide an adequate macroscopic description of controls on the initial rate and long-term extent of oxide reduction. To cite this article: E.E. Roden, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  3. Geochemical Implication of Rare Earth Elements in Process of Soil Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄成敏; 龚子同

    2001-01-01

    The geochemical characteristics and behavior of rare earth elements (REE) in soils developed on the basalts in the northern part of Hainan Island erupted in different time were studied as well as the REE partition in the soil-formation process and its implication on soil development degree. The results show that the total REE content in soils is correlative with soil age significantly and can be selected as the index to show soil evolution. With the soil developing intensively, light rare earth elements (LREE) gain and heavy rare earth elements (HREE) lose. The trends of positive Ce-anomaly and negative Eu-anomaly are remarkable with soil development.

  4. Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.

    1995-08-01

    Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

  5. Linking geochemical processes in mud volcanoes with arsenic mobilization driven by organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chuan; Kar, Sandeep; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Wang, Chung-Ho; Lee, Yao-Chang; Sracek, Ondra; Li, Zhaohui; Bundschuh, Jochen; Yang, Huai-Jen; Chen, Chien-Yen

    2013-11-15

    The present study deals with geochemical characterization of mud fluids and sediments collected from Kunshuiping (KSP), Liyushan (LYS), Wushanting (WST), Sinyangnyuhu (SYNH), Hsiaokunshui (HKS) and Yenshuikeng (YSK) mud volcanoes in southwestern Taiwan. Chemical constituents (cations, anions, trace elements, organic carbon, humic acid, and stable isotopes) in both fluids and mud were analyzed to investigate the geochemical processes and spatial variability among the mud volcanoes under consideration. Analytical results suggested that the anoxic mud volcanic fluids are highly saline, implying connate water as the probable source. The isotopic signature indicated that δ(18)O-rich fluids may be associated with silicate and carbonate mineral released through water-rock interaction, along with dehydration of clay minerals. Considerable amounts of arsenic in mud irrespective of fluid composition suggested possible release through biogeochemical processes in the subsurface environment. Sequential extraction of As from the mud indicated that As was mostly present in organic and sulphidic phases, and adsorbed on amorphous Mn oxyhydroxides. Volcanic mud and fluids are rich in organic matter (in terms of organic carbon), and the presence of humic acid in mud has implications for the binding of arsenic. Functional groups of humic acid also showed variable sources of organic matter among the mud volcanoes being examined. Because arsenate concentration in the mud fluids was found to be independent from geochemical factors, it was considered that organic matter may induce arsenic mobilization through an adsorption/desorption mechanism with humic substances under reducing conditions. Organic matter therefore plays a significant role in the mobility of arsenic in mud volcanoes.

  6. Linking geochemical processes in mud volcanoes with arsenic mobilization driven by organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chia-Chuan; Kar, Sandeep [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Jean, Jiin-Shuh, E-mail: jiinshuh@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chung-Ho [Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yao-Chang [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Sracek, Ondra [OPV s.r.o. (Groundwater Protection Ltd.), Bělohorská 31, 169 00 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Li, Zhaohui [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Geosciences, University of Wisconsin – Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Bundschuh, Jochen [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Engineering and Surveying and National Centre for Engineering in Agriculture, The University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba (Australia); Yang, Huai-Jen [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chien-Yen [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi 621, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ► Study represents geochemical characteristics and their spatial variability among six mud volcanoes of southern Taiwan. ► Anoxic mud volcanic fluids containing high NaCl imply connate water as the possible source. ► δ{sup 18}O-rich fluids is associated with silicate and carbonate mineral released through water–rock interaction. ► High As content in mud and its sequential extraction showed mostly adsorbed As on organic and sulphidic phases. ► Organic matter specially humic acid showed redox dependence and it may play an important role in binding and mobility of arsenic. -- Abstract: The present study deals with geochemical characterization of mud fluids and sediments collected from Kunshuiping (KSP), Liyushan (LYS), Wushanting (WST), Sinyangnyuhu (SYNH), Hsiaokunshui (HKS) and Yenshuikeng (YSK) mud volcanoes in southwestern Taiwan. Chemical constituents (cations, anions, trace elements, organic carbon, humic acid, and stable isotopes) in both fluids and mud were analyzed to investigate the geochemical processes and spatial variability among the mud volcanoes under consideration. Analytical results suggested that the anoxic mud volcanic fluids are highly saline, implying connate water as the probable source. The isotopic signature indicated that δ{sup 18}O-rich fluids may be associated with silicate and carbonate mineral released through water–rock interaction, along with dehydration of clay minerals. Considerable amounts of arsenic in mud irrespective of fluid composition suggested possible release through biogeochemical processes in the subsurface environment. Sequential extraction of As from the mud indicated that As was mostly present in organic and sulphidic phases, and adsorbed on amorphous Mn oxyhydroxides. Volcanic mud and fluids are rich in organic matter (in terms of organic carbon), and the presence of humic acid in mud has implications for the binding of arsenic. Functional groups of humic acid also showed variable sources of

  7. A geochemical transport model for thermo-hydro-chemical (THC) coupled processes with saline water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingliang; Kolditz, Olaf; Moog, Helge C.

    2011-02-01

    Anhydrous MgSO4 is considered as a potential sealing material for the isolation of high-level-waste repositories in salt rock. When an aqueous solution, usually a brine type, penetrates the sealing, different MgSO4 hydrates along with other mineral phases form, removing free water from the solution. The uptake of water leads to an overall increase of solid phase volume. If deformation is constrained, the pore volume decreases and permeability is reduced. In order to simulate such processes, especially for conditions without free water, a coupling between OpenGeoSys and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were implemented on the basis of the commercially available thermodynamic simulator ChemApp and the object-oriented programming finite-element method simulator OpenGeoSys. ChemApp uses the Gibbs energy minimization approach for the geochemical reaction simulation. Based on this method, the thermodynamic equilibrium of geochemical reactions can be calculated by giving the amount of each system component and the molar Gibbs energy of formation for all the possible phases and phase constituents. Activity coefficients in high-saline solutions were calculated using the Pitzer formalism. This model has the potential to handle 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D saturated and nonsaturated thermo-hydro-chemical coupled processes even with highly saline solutions under complex conditions. The model was verified by numerical comparison with other simulators and applied for the modeling of SVV experimental data.

  8. Geochemical characteristics of Guizhou Permian coal measure strata and analysis of the control factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Rui-dong; LIU Ling; WEI Huai-rui; CUI Yu-chao; CHENG Wei

    2011-01-01

    Based on element geochemical studies of the main Permian exploitable coal measure strata in Western Guizhou, the element geochemical distribution characteristics of the main exploitable coal measures were revealed in the regions of Dafang,Qianxi, Weining, Hezhang, Zhijin, etc., of Guizhou Province, and the results show that their element contents are mainly affected by terrestrial material supply. Coal measures formed in the delta plain environment where sufficient terrestrial materials are supplied contain relatively abundant trace elements and rare-earth elements, whereas those formed in the tidal-flat environment influenced greatly by seawater have relatively low contents of trace elements and rare-earth elements, mainly controlled by the geological fact that basalts the parent rocks from source regions contain high trace elements and rare-earth elements. In addition, coal measures affected by later hydrothermal activities and fault tectonics contain a large amount of harmful elements. According to the rules of distribution of elements in coal measures, a new idea was put forward to classify coal-forming environments by using the geochemical composition characteristics, which is of great significance in dissolving the problem of whether coal measures were formed either in delta environments or in tidal-flat environments in Western Guizhou. At the same time, the rules of distribution of elements in the main exploitable coal measures in Western Guizhou were fully understood, which is of direct significance in utilizing coal resources on the basis of classification of coals, as well as in developing the coal chemical industry.

  9. Major geochemical processes in the evolution of carbonate-Aquifer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanshaw, B.B.; Back, W.

    1979-01-01

    -reefs, where reflux dolomites may form, highly alkaline, on-shore and continental lakes, and sabkha flats; these dolomites are typically associated with evaporite minerals. However, these processes cannot account for most of the regionally extensive dolomites in the geologic record. A major environment of regional dolomitization is in the mixing zone (zone of dispersion) where profound changes in mineralogy and redistribution of porosity and permeability occur from the time of early emergence and continuing through the time when the rocks are well-developed aquifers. The reactions and processes, in response to mixing waters of differing chemical composition, include dissolution and precipitation of carbonate minerals in addition to dolomitization. An important control on permeability distribution in a mature aquifer system is the solution of dolomite with concomitant precipitation of calcite in response to gypsum dissolution (dedolomitization). Predictive models developed by mass-transfer calculations demonstrate the controlling reactions in aquifer systems through the constraints of mass balance and chemical equilibrium. An understanding of the origin, chemistry, mineralogy and environments of deposition and accumulation of carbonate minerals together with a comprehension of diagenetic processes that convert the sediments to rocks and geochemical, tectonic and hydrologic phenomena that create voids are important to hydrologists. With this knowledge, hydrologists are better able to predict porosity and permeability distribution in order to manage efficiently a carbonate-aquifer system. ?? 1979.

  10. Hydrochemical evaluation and identification of geochemical processes in the shallow and deep wells in the Ramganga Sub-Basin, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajmohan, Natarajan; Patel, Neelam; Singh, Gaurav; Amarasinghe, Upali A

    2017-07-26

    Groundwater samples were collected from 44 wells in the Ramganga Sub-Basin (RSB), India, and analysed for major ions, nutrients and trace metals. The primary goal of this study is to evaluate the hydrochemistry and to identify the geochemical processes that govern the water chemistry in the shallow and deep tube wells in the study area using geochemical methods. The knowledge of changes in hydrochemistry of the aquifers is important for both groundwater recharge and use in the region. This study found that there are substantial differences of water chemistry between shallow and deep wells. In the shallow wells, the average concentrations of total dissolved solid (TDS), Na, K, Ca, Mg, HCO3, Cl, SO4, NO3, PO4, F, Cu, Mn, Fe and Cr are twofold higher than the deep wells. The concentrations of dissolved silica in the groundwater do not vary with the depth, which implies that the variation in the water chemistry is not due to mineral dissolution alone. Major ion ratios and saturation indices suggest that the water chemistry is predominantly controlled by dissolution of carbonate minerals, silicate weathering and ion exchange reactions. Thermodynamic evaluation (ion activity ratios and stability filed diagrams) indicates that the kaolinite and gibbsite controlled the water chemistry in the both shallow and deep wells. In addition, the groundwater chemistry in the shallow wells is affected by the vertical infiltration of contaminated water from surface contamination sources and nitrification process. In the deep wells, absence of NO3 and low concentrations of Cl, SO4, PO4 and F imply the role of regional flow and denitrification in the groundwater. Results concluded that proper management plan is necessary to protect the shallow aquifer in the RSB since shallow aquifer pumping is less expensive than the deeper one.

  11. Permeability Changes on Wellbore Cement Fractures Modified by Geochemical and Geomechanical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rod, K. A.; Um, W.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental studies were conducted using batch reactors, X-ray microtomography (XMT), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to determine changes in cement fracture surfaces, fluid flow pathways and permeability, and cement fracture propagation with geochemical and geomechanical processes. Portland cement-basalt interface sample with artificial fractures was prepared to study the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores containing defects caused by subsurface activities. Cement-basalt interface sample was subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the chemical reaction. CFD modeling was performed to simulate flow of supercritical CO2 within the fractures before and after the application of mechanical stress. The model results highlighted the complex flow characteristics within the fracture and also changes in flow patterns due to application of geomechanical stress. The CFD model predicted ~45% increase in permeability after the application of geomechanical force, which increases the fracture aperture. The same sample was reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater with impurity H2S (1 wt.%) at 50°C and 10 MPa for 3 to 3.5 months under static conditions. XMT provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnection of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. Even after a 3.5-month reaction with CO2-H2S-saturated groundwater at 50°C and 10 MPa, CaCO3 (s) precipitation occurred more extensively within the cement fracture rather than along the cement-basalt interfaces. Micro X-ray diffraction analysis also showed that major cement carbonation products of CO2-saturated groundwater reacting with impurity H2S were calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, consistent with cement carbonation by pure CO2-saturated groundwater, while pyrite was not identified due to low H2S content. The experimental results imply that the wellbore cement with fractures is likely to be healed during exposure to CO2-saturated

  12. Geochemical study of boron isotopes in the process of loess weathering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Zhiqi; (

    2003-01-01

    [1]Palmer, M. R., Swihart, G. H., Boron isotope geochemistry: An overview, in Rev. Mineral 33, Boron Mineralogy, Petrology and Geochemistry (eds. Grew, E. S., Anovitz, L. M.), Washington, D. C.: Mineral Soc. Am., 1996, 709-744.[2]Chaussidon, M., Albarède, F., Secular boron isotope variations in the continental crust: An ion microprobe study, Earth Planet Sci. Lett., 1992, 108: 229-241.[3]Spivack, A. J., Edmond, J. M., Boron isotope exchange between seawater and the oceanic crust, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1987, 51: 1033-1043.[4]Vengosh, A., Chivas, A. R., Mcculloch, M. T. et al., Boron isotope geochemistry of Australian salt lakes, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1991, 55: 2591-2606.[5]Xiao, Y. K., Sun, D. P., Wang, Y. H. et al., Boron isotopic compositions of brine, sediments and source water in Da Qaidam Lake, Qinghai, China, Geochim Cosmochim Acta, 1992,56: 1561-1568.[6]Mcmullen, C. C., Cragg, C. B., Thode, H. G., Absolute rations of 11B/10B in Searles Lake borax, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1961, 23: 147-150.[7]Palmer, M. R., Sturchio, N. C., The boron isotope systematics of the Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming) hydrothermal system: A reconnaissance, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1990, 54: 2811-2815.[8]Arndsson, S., Andrèsdèttir, A., Processes controlling the distribution of boron and chlorine in natural waters in Iceland, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1995, 59: 4125-4146.[9]Aggarwal, J. K., Palmer, M. R., Bullen, T. D. et al., The boron isotope systematics of Iceland geothermal waters: 1. Meteoric water charged systems, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2000, 64: 579-585.[10]Spivack, A. J., Palmer, M. R., Edmond, J. M., The sedimentary cycle of the boron isotopes, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1987, 51: 1939-1949.[11]Liu Yingjun, Cao Liming, Li Zhaolin et al., Element Geochemistry (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 1984, 422-428.[12]Schwarcz, H. P., Agyei, E. K., Mcmullen, C. C., Boron isotopic fractionation during clay adsorption

  13. Digital image processing applied to analysis of geophysical and geochemical data for southern Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinness, E. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Leff, C. E.; Edwards, M. H.; Bindschadler, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Digital image-processing techniques have been used to analyze a variety of geophysical and geochemical map data covering southern Missouri, a region with important basement and strata-bound mineral deposits. Gravity and magnetic anomaly patterns, which have been reformatted to image displays, indicate a deep crustal structure cutting northwest-southeast through southern Missouri. In addition, geologic map data, topography, and Landsat multispectral scanner images have been used as base maps for the digital overlay of aerial gamma-ray and stream sediment chemical data for the 1 x 2-deg Rolla quadrangle. Results indicate enrichment of a variety of elements within the clay-rich alluvium covering many of the interfluvial plains, as well as a complicated pattern of enrichment for the sedimentary units close to the Precambrian rhyolites and granites of the St. Francois Mountains.

  14. Geochemical processes between steel projectiles and silica-rich targets in hypervelocity impact experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Matthias; Hecht, Lutz; Deutsch, Alexander; Kenkmann, Thomas; Wirth, Richard; Berndt, Jasper

    2014-05-01

    The possibility of fractionation processes between projectile and target matter is critical with regard to the classification of the impactor type from geochemical analysis of impactites from natural craters. Here we present results of five hypervelocity MEMIN impact experiments (Poelchau et al., 2013) using the Cr-V-Co-Mo-W-rich steel D290-1 as projectile and two different silica-rich lithologies (Seeberger sandstone and Taunus quartzite) as target materials. Our study is focused on geochemical target-projectile interaction occurring in highly shocked and projectile-rich ejecta fragments. In all of the investigated impact experiments, whether sandstone or quartzite targets, the ejecta fragments show (i) shock-metamorphic features e.g., planar-deformation features (PDF) and the formation of silica glasses, (ii) partially melting of projectile and target, and (iii) significant mechanical and chemical mixing of the target rock with projectile material. The silica-rich target melts are strongly enriched in the "projectile tracer elements" Cr, V, and Fe, but have just minor enrichments of Co, W, and Mo. Inter-element ratios of these tracer elements within the contaminated target melts differ strongly from the original ratios in the steel. The fractionation results from differences in the reactivity of the respective elements with oxygen during interaction of the metal melt with silicate melt. Our results indicate that the principles of projectile-target interaction and associated fractionation do not depend on impact energies (at least for the selected experimental conditions) and water-saturation of the target. Partitioning of projectile tracer elements into the silicate target melt is much more enhanced in experiments with a non-porous quartzite target compared with the porous sandstone target. This is mainly the result of higher impact pressures, consequently higher temperatures and longer reaction times at high temperatures in the experiments with quartzite as

  15. Biodiversity of benthic microbial communities in bioturbated coastal sediments is controlled by geochemical microniches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertics, Victoria J; Ziebis, Wiebke

    2009-11-01

    We used a combination of field and laboratory approaches to address how the bioturbation activity of two crustaceans, the ghost shrimp Neotrypaea californiensis and the fiddler crab Uca crenulata, affects the microbial diversity in the seabed of a coastal lagoon (Catalina Harbor, Santa Catalina Island, CA, USA). Detailed geochemical analyses, including oxygen microsensor measurements, were performed to characterize environmental parameters. We used a whole-assemblage fingerprinting approach (ARISA: amplified ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) to compare bacterial diversity along geochemical gradients and in relation to subsurface microniches. The two crustaceans have different burrowing behaviors. The ghost shrimp maintains complex, deep-reaching burrows and permanently lives subterranean, supplying its burrow with oxygen-rich water. In contrast, the fiddler crab constructs simpler, J-shaped burrows, which it does not inhabit permanently and does not actively ventilate. Our goal was to address how varying environmental parameters affect benthic microbial communities. An important question in benthic microbial ecology has been whether burrows support similar or unique communities compared with the sediment surface. Our results showed that sediment surface microbial communities are distinct from subsurface assemblages and that different burrow types support diverse bacterial taxa. Statistical comparisons by canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the availability of oxidants (oxygen, nitrate, ferric iron) play a key role in determining the presence and abundance of different taxa. When geochemical parameters were alike, microbial communities associated with burrows showed significant similarity to sediment surface communities. Our study provides implications on the community structure of microbial communities in marine sediments and the factors controlling their distribution.

  16. Soil Geochemical Control Over Nematode Populations in Bull Pass, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poage, M. A.; Barrett, J. E.; Virginia, R. A.; Wall, D. H.

    2005-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys occupy the largest ice-free region of Antarctica and are characterized by climatic conditions among the most extreme on Earth. Despite the harsh environmental conditions, some soils of the dry valleys host simple low-diversity ecosystems dominated by microbes and several taxa of metazoans, predominantly nematodes. Distributions, abundance, and diversity of these biota appear to be related to the highly variable soil geochemistry (pH, conductivity, nitrate, sulfate, chloride) of the dry valleys. Bull Pass is a glacially carved valley within the dry valleys. An ancient lake margin near the valley floor creates a continuous gradient spanning the full range of geochemical parameters found across the entire McMurdo Dry Valleys system. This unique setting provides the opportunity to systematically investigate the soil geochemical control on local biodiversity and establish, on the spatial scale of hundreds of meters, correlations between nematode populations and individual geochemical parameters that have application at the regional scale. We measured soil geochemistry and nematode population data from a 1500-meter transect across this ancient lake margin. There were significant negative correlations between live nematode abundance and concentrations of soil nitrate, sulfate and chloride as well as total soil salinity, consistent with recent laboratory experiments showing strong salinity inhibition of nematode survival. A logistical regression analysis based on a compilation of published datasets from across the dry valleys was designed to calculate the probably of live nematode populations occurring given a particular soil chemistry, using the dataset from the Bull Pass transect as a case study to field-test the model. Small-scale chemical and biological gradients can provide insights on the distribution of soil biota at much larger regional scales.

  17. Introducing Au Potential Areas, Using Remote Sensing and Geochemical Data Processing Using Fractal Methods in Chartagh, Western Azerbijan - Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Edris; Feizi, Faranak

    2016-06-01

    The studied area - Chartagh - is located in the East of Azerbaijan gharbi Province, Iran. In this paper, geology map, ASTER satellite images were used and after processing these images with ENVI softwares, geochemical data analysis consisting of lithogeochemical samples, within geological field observations. On ASTER data; using a number of selected methods including band ratio, Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) and Spectral Angle Maper (SAM) distinguished alternation zones. Geochemical anomalies were separated by number - size (N-S) fractal method. (N-S) fractal method was utilized for High intensive Au, As and Ag anomalies.

  18. Geochemical diversity in S processes mediated by culture-adapted and environmental-enrichments of Acidithiobacillus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Luc; Warren, Lesley A.

    2007-12-01

    Coupled S speciation and acid generation resulting from S processing associated with five different microbial treatments, all primarily Acidithiobacillus spp. (i.e. autotrophic S-oxidizers) were evaluated in batch laboratory experiments. Microbial treatments included two culture-adapted strains, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, their consortia and two environmental enrichments from a mine tailings lake that were determined to be >95% Acidithiobacillus spp., by whole-cell fluorescent hybridization. Using batch experiments simulating acidic mine waters with no carbon amendments, acid generation, and S speciation associated with the oxidation of three S substrates (thiosulfate, tetrathionate, and elemental S) were evaluated. Aseptic controls showed no observable pH decrease over the experimental time course (1 month) for all three S compounds examined. In contrast, pH decreased in all microbial treatments from starting pH values of 4 to 2 or less for all three S substrates. Results show a non-linear relationship between the pH dynamics of the batch cultures and their corresponding sulfate concentrations, and indicate how known microbial S processing pathways have opposite impacts, ultimately on pH dynamics. Associated geochemical modeling indicated negligible abiogenic processes contributing to the observed results, indicating strong microbial control of acid generation extending over pH ranges from 4 to less than 2. However, the observed acid generation rates and associated S speciation were both microbial treatment and substrate-specific. Results reveal a number of novel insights regarding microbial catalysis of S oxidation: (1) metabolic diversity in S processing, as evidenced by the observed geochemical signatures in S chemical speciation and rates of acid generation amongst phylogenetically similar organisms (to the genus level); (2) consortial impacts differ from those of individual strain members; (3) environmental enrichments

  19. The effects of sorting by aeolian processes on the geochemical characteristics of surface materials: a wind tunnel experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xunming; Lang, Lili; Hua, Ting; Zhang, Caixia; Li, Hui

    2017-03-01

    The geochemical characteristics of aeolian and surface materials in potential source areas of dust are frequently employed in environmental reconstructions as proxies of past climate and as source tracers of aeolian sediments deposited in downwind areas. However, variations in the geochemical characteristics of these aeolian deposits that result from near-surface winds are currently poorly understood. In this study, we collected surface samples from the Ala Shan Plateau (a major potential dust source area in Central Asia) to determine the influence of aeolian processes on the geochemical characteristics of aeolian transported materials. Correlation analyses show that compared with surface materials, the elements in transported materials (e.g., Cu, As, Pb, Mn, Zn, Al, Ca, Fe, Ga, K, Mg, P, Rb, Co, Cr, Na, Nb, Si, and Zr) were subjected to significant sorting by aeolian processes, and the sorting also varied among different particle size fractions and elements. Variations in wind velocity were significantly correlated with the contents of Cr, Ga, Sr, Ca, Y, Nd, Zr, Nb, Ba, and Al, and with the Zr/Al, Zr/Rb, K/Ca, Sr/Ca, Rb/Sr, and Ca/Al ratios. Given the great variation in the geochemical characteristics of materials transported under different aeolian processes relative to those of the source materials, these results indicate that considerable uncertainty may be introduced to analyses by using surface materials to trace the potential source areas of aeolian deposits that accumulate in downwind areas.

  20. The application of fuzzy decision-making in geochemical data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lili; Song, Liangtu; Liu, Lei; Wu, Yue

    2017-03-01

    Fuzzy similarity ratio method is a widely used method of fuzzy decision-making, not only to classification, but also to sort. In this paper, we constructed a geochemical anomaly evaluation model using the Fuzzy similarity ratio method; we also program it with C# language and applied the model to practical work. Practice has proved that the fuzzy decision-making applies to the evaluation of geochemical anomalies can effectively improve the accuracy of the evaluation.

  1. Geochemical and hydrologic controls on the mobilization of arsenic derived from herbicide application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzmaurice, Arthur G.; Bilgin, A. Azra [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., MC 138-78, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); O' Day, Peggy A.; Illera, Virginia [School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 N. Lake Road, Merced, CA 95343 (United States); Burris, David R.; Reisinger, H. James [Integrated Science and Technology, Inc., 1349 Old Highway 41, Suite 225, Marietta, GA 30060 (United States); Hering, Janet G., E-mail: Janet.Hering@eawag.ch [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., MC 138-78, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    aquifer. Sorption to JBF sediments may contribute to As sequestration, but As enrichment in JBF sediments within the plume (i.e., as compared with JBF sediments upgradient) was not observed. These results indicate that neither the persistence of As in the source area soils or the apparent stability of the plume of As-contaminated groundwater at this site can be explained by geochemical controls on As mobility. The absence of demonstrable geochemical bases for such observations suggests that possible hydrologic controls should be further investigated at this site.

  2. Modelling of leaching and geochemical processes in an aged MSWIBA subbase layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendz, David; Suer, Pascal; Sloot, Hans van der; Kosson, David; Flyhammar, Peter

    2009-07-15

    In a previous project, the accumulated effects of leaching and aging in a subbase layer of bottom ash in a test road were investigated. The test road were constructed in 1987 in Linkoeping, Sweden, and was in use until the start of the Vaendoera Q4-241 study in September 2003. The overall objective of the present study is to bring the evaluation of the previous project (Q4-241) further by taking advantage of the existing data, perform complementary laboratory experiments on four composite samples reflecting different degree of exposure to atmosphere and leaching. The specific objectives were to investigate: (i) what processes and mineral phases that govern leaching of macro- and trace elements and DOC in the bottom ash after 16 years (1987- 2003) of aging under field conditions. (ii) how the hydrologic conditions, infiltration of water and leachate production has evolved with time. The following tests were performed on the composite samples: pH-stat test, column test, Fe/Al oxide extraction and TOC fractioning. Geochemical and hydrological modelling where performed with LeachXS/Orchestra and Hydrus 2-D. Daily precipitation data from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) from the Malmslaett (Linkoeping) measurement station was used in the hydrological modelling of January 1988 to the 1st of september 2003. The hydraulic modeling results show that the bottom ash subbase layer endure seasonal wet and dry cycles. The results confirm that, depending on the boundary conditions along the shoulders the capillary potential may drive moisture either in or out of the road body. The water retention parameters for bottom ash were crucial in the hydraulic modeling and the capillary forces in bottom ash were found to be significant with a water retention curve close to silt. This explains the observed depletion of easily soluble salts in the test road. The results showed that the accumulated LS ratio for the bottom ash subbase layer reached about LS:10 in

  3. Metagenomes from high-temperature chemotrophic systems reveal geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inskeep, William P; Rusch, Douglas B; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus J; Kozubal, Mark A; Richardson, Toby H; Macur, Richard E; Hamamura, Natsuko; Jennings, Ryan deM; Fouke, Bruce W; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Roberto, Frank; Young, Mark; Schwartz, Ariel; Boyd, Eric S; Badger, Jonathan H; Mathur, Eric J; Ortmann, Alice C; Bateson, Mary; Geesey, Gill; Frazier, Marvin

    2010-03-19

    transport is consistent with the hypothesis that geochemical parameters (e.g., pH, sulfide, Fe, O2) control microbial community structure and function in YNP geothermal springs.

  4. Metagenomes from high-temperature chemotrophic systems reveal geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Roberto

    2010-03-01

    consistent with the hypothesis that geochemical parameters (e.g., pH, sulfide, Fe, O2) control microbial community structure and function in YNP geothermal springs.

  5. Metagenomes from high-temperature chemotrophic systems reveal geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P Inskeep

    electron transport is consistent with the hypothesis that geochemical parameters (e.g., pH, sulfide, Fe, O2 control microbial community structure and function in YNP geothermal springs.

  6. Geochemical modeling of leaching from MSVI air-pollution-control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Dijkstra, J.J.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an improved understanding of the leaching behavior of waste incineration air-pollution-control (APC) residues in a long-term perspective. Leaching was investigated by a series of batch experiments reflecting leaching conditions after initial washout of highly soluble salts from...... residues. Leaching experiments were performed at a range of pH-values using carbonated and noncarbonated versions of two APC residues. The leaching data were evaluated by geochemical speciation modeling and discussed with respect to possible solubility control. The leaching of major elements as well...... of Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Pb, S, Si, V, and Zn was found influenced by solubility control from Al2O3, Al(OH)3, Ba(S,Cr)O4 solid solutions, BaSO4, Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12â26H2O, CaAl2Si4O12â2H2O, Ca-(OH)2, CaSiO3, CaSO4â2H2O, CaZn2(OH)6â2H2O, KAlSi2O6, PbCO3, PbCrO4, Pb2O3, Pb2V2O7, Pb3(VO4)2, ZnO, Zn2SiO4, and Zn...

  7. Interaction of density flow and geochemical processes on islands in the Okavanga Delta, Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Langer, T.; Prommer, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses the interactions of density driven flow and geochemical reactions under evapo-concentration. A multi-species hydrodynamic flow and transport simulation model (SEAWAT) is coupled to a batch reaction model (PHREEQC) to analyze densitydriven flow on islands in the Okavango Delta......, Botswana. Evapo-concentration on the islands leads to steadily increasing concentrations until the onset of density-driven flow against the evaporation-induced upward gradient. Lag times to the onset of density-driven flow are strongly influenced by geochemical reactions. Mineral precipitation and carbon...

  8. A geochemical approach to distinguishing competing tectono-magmatic processes preserved in small eruptive centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Lucy E.; Brahm, Raimundo; Rowe, Michael C.; Handley, Heather K.; Morgado, Eduardo; Lara, Luis E.; Turner, Michael B.; Vinet, Nicolas; Parada, Miguel-Ángel; Valdivia, Pedro

    2017-06-01

    Small eruptive centres (SECs) representing short-lived, isolated eruptions are effective samples of mantle heterogeneity over a given area, as they are generally of basaltic composition and show evidence of little magmatic processing. This is particularly powerful in volcanic arcs where the original melting process generating stratovolcanoes is often obscured by additions from the down-going slab (fluids and sediments) and the overlying crust. The Pucón area of southern Chile contains active and dormant stratovolcanoes, Holocene, basaltic SECs and an arc-scale strike-slip fault (the Liquiñe Ofqui Fault System: LOFS). The SECs show unexpected compositional heterogeneity considering their spatial proximity. We present a detailed study of these SECs combining whole rock major and trace element concentrations, U-Th isotopes and olivine-hosted melt inclusion major element and volatile contents to highlight the complex inter-relations in this small but active area. We show that heterogeneity preserved at individual SECs relates to different processes: some start in the melting region with the input of slab-derived fluids, whilst others occur later in a centre's magmatic history with the influence of crustal contamination prior to olivine crystallisation. These signals are deduced through the combination of the different geochemical tools used in this study. We show that there is no correlation between composition and distance from the arc front, whilst the local tectonic regime has an effect on melt composition: SECs aligned along the LOFS have either equilibrium U-Th ratios or small Th-excesses instead of the large—fluid influenced—U-excesses displayed by SECs situated away from this feature. One of the SECs is modelled as being generated from fluid-enriched depleted mantle, a source which it may share with the stratovolcano Villarrica, whilst another SEC with abundant evidence of crustal contamination may share its plumbing system with its neighbouring

  9. The geochemical Phenomenon-Local geochemical fields in a glacier (scientific note)

    OpenAIRE

    V. N., Makarov

    2001-01-01

    Geochemical fields in alpine cold and warm glaciers were studied. Local geochemical fields of typomorphic elements were found to form in the ice and on the surface of glaciers overlying ore bodies and endogenic geochemical haloes. The formation of local cryogenic geochemical fields in the glaciers results from sharp geochemical heterogeneity and geochemical processes in underlying rocks which cause cryogenic migration of chemical elements and compounds in the glacier. The thickness of geochem...

  10. The geochemical Phenomenon-Local geochemical fields in a glacier (scientific note)

    OpenAIRE

    V. N., Makarov

    2001-01-01

    Geochemical fields in alpine cold and warm glaciers were studied. Local geochemical fields of typomorphic elements were found to form in the ice and on the surface of glaciers overlying ore bodies and endogenic geochemical haloes. The formation of local cryogenic geochemical fields in the glaciers results from sharp geochemical heterogeneity and geochemical processes in underlying rocks which cause cryogenic migration of chemical elements and compounds in the glacier. The thickness of geochem...

  11. Geochemical factors controlling the occurrence of high fluoride groundwater in the Nagar Parkar area, Sindh, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Tahir; Naseem, Shahid; Usmani, Tanzil Haider; Bashir, Erum; Khan, Farooque Ahmed; Bhanger, Muhammad Iqbal

    2009-11-15

    Fluoride concentrations in groundwater near Nagar Parkar in the Thar Desert of southeastern Pakistan range from 1.13 to 7.85 mg/l, and roughly 78% of the samples contain fluoride in concentrations that exceed the drinking water standard of 1.5mg/l set by WHO. The groundwater is alkaline (pH 7.1-8.4), brackish (TDS 449-15,933 mg/l), and classified as Na-Cl type water. This prevailing chemical character reflects the influence of saltwater intrusion, high evaporation rates, and ion exchange. Groundwater is also supersaturated with respect to calcite, which promotes the removal of Ca(2+) and HCO(3)(-) from solution. As a result, groundwater is generally undersaturated with respect to fluorite, the mineral that typically controls the upper limit of fluoride concentrations. This study examines a number of geochemical parameters in an effort to discover the controls on fluoride concentrations in groundwater. High fluoride concentrations are associated with high TDS, high pH, high Na concentrations, and high sodium absorption ratios (SAR). This suggests that elevated fluoride levels are the result of enhanced fluorite solubility due to Ca depletion and high ionic strength and the release of fluoride from colloid surfaces under high pH conditions. Contrary to what has been found in other studies, sample depth and water temperature do not appear to have a significant role in the distribution of fluoride within the groundwater.

  12. Isotopic Clues on Factors Controlling Geochemical Fluxes From Large Watersheds in Eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, E.; Helie, J.; Ghaleb, B.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Gaillardet, J.

    2008-12-01

    A monitoring and monthly sampling program of the Nelson, Ottawa, St. Lawrence, La Grande and Great Whale rivers was started in September 2007. It provides information on the seasonality and sources of geochemical fluxes into the Hudson Bay and the North Atlantic from watersheds covering more than 2.6 106 km2 of the eastern Canadian boreal domain. Measurements of pH and alkalinity, analyses of major ions, strontium and dissolved silica, 2H and 18O of water, concentrations and isotopic properties of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (13C) and uranium (234U/238U) were performed. Lithology more than latitudinal climatic gradients controls the river geochemistry. Rivers draining silicate terrains show lower dissolved U concentrations but greater 234U/238U disequilibria than rivers draining carbonates (average of 1.38 vs. 1.23). Groundwater supplies might exert some control on these U- isotope signatures. No clear seasonality is observed in 234U/238U ratios, but U concentrations are correlated to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in most rivers. Rivers draining carbonates present higher total dissolved carbon concentrations and higher 13C-contents in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in response to the dissolution of soil carbonates. DOC/DIC ratios above 2.4 are observed in rivers draining silicates; their lower 13C-DIC content directly reflects the organic matter oxidation in soils. Total dissolved solids are one order of magnitude or more greater in rivers draining carbonates, showing the strong difference in chemical weathering rates according to the geological setting. The stability in chemical fluxes and water isotopic compositions in the La Grande River, which hosts hydroelectric reservoirs covering more than 12 000 km2, indicates that it is the most buffered hydrological system among the investigated watersheds. Seasonal fluctuations are observed elsewhere, with maximum geochemical fluxes during the spring snowmelt. 2H-18O content of river water

  13. Geological and Geochemical Controls on Subsurface Microbial Life in the Samail Ophiolite, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempfert, Kaitlin R.; Miller, Hannah M.; Bompard, Nicolas; Nothaft, Daniel; Matter, Juerg M.; Kelemen, Peter; Fierer, Noah; Templeton, Alexis S.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial abundance and diversity in deep subsurface environments is dependent upon the availability of energy and carbon. However, supplies of oxidants and reductants capable of sustaining life within mafic and ultramafic continental aquifers undergoing low-temperature water-rock reaction are relatively unknown. We conducted an extensive analysis of the geochemistry and microbial communities recovered from fluids sampled from boreholes hosted in peridotite and gabbro in the Tayin block of the Samail Ophiolite in the Sultanate of Oman. The geochemical compositions of subsurface fluids in the ophiolite are highly variable, reflecting differences in host rock composition and the extent of fluid-rock interaction. Principal component analysis of fluid geochemistry and geologic context indicate the presence of at least four fluid types in the Samail Ophiolite (“gabbro,” “alkaline peridotite,” “hyperalkaline peridotite,” and “gabbro/peridotite contact”) that vary strongly in pH and the concentrations of H2, CH4, Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3-, SO42-, trace metals, and DIC. Geochemistry of fluids is strongly correlated with microbial community composition; similar microbial assemblages group according to fluid type. Hyperalkaline fluids exhibit low diversity and are dominated by taxa related to the Deinococcus-Thermus genus Meiothermus, candidate phyla OP1, and the family Thermodesulfovibrionaceae. Gabbro- and alkaline peridotite- aquifers harbor more diverse communities and contain abundant microbial taxa affiliated with Nitrospira, Nitrosospharaceae, OP3, Parvarcheota, and OP1 order Acetothermales. Wells that sit at the contact between gabbro and peridotite host microbial communities distinct from all other fluid types, with an enrichment in betaproteobacterial taxa. Together the taxonomic information and geochemical data suggest that several metabolisms may be operative in subsurface fluids, including methanogenesis, acetogenesis, and fermentation, as well as the

  14. Controls on the geochemical evolution of Prairie Pothole Region lakes and wetlands over decadal time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher; Mushet, David M.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Rover, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    One hundred sixty-seven Prairie Pothole lakes, ponds and wetlands (largely lakes) previously analyzed chemically during the late 1960’s and early to mid-1970’s were resampled and reanalyzed in 2011–2012. The two sampling periods differed climatically. The earlier sampling took place during normal to slightly dry conditions, whereas the latter occurred during and immediately following exceptionally wet conditions. As reported previously in Mushet et al. (2015), the dominant effect was expansion of the area of these lakes and dilution of their major ions. However, within that context, there were significant differences in the evolutionary pathways of major ions. To establish these pathways, we employed the inverse modeling computer code NetpathXL. This code takes the initial and final lake composition and, using mass balance constrained by the composition of diluting waters, and input and output of phases, calculates plausible geochemical evolution pathways. Despite the fact that in most cases major ions decreased, a subset of the lakes had an increase in SO42−. This distinction is significant because SO42− is the dominant anion in a majority of Prairie Pothole Region wetlands and lakes. For lakes with decreasing SO42−, the proportion of original lake water required for mass balance was subordinate to rainwater and/or overland flow. In contrast, lakes with increasing SO42− between the two sampling episodes tended to be dominated by original lake water. This suite of lakes tended to be smaller and have lower initial SO42−concentrations such that inputs of sulfur from dissolution of the minerals gypsum or pyrite had a significant impact on the final sulfur concentration given the lower dilution factors. Thus, our study provides context for how Prairie Pothole Region water bodies evolve geochemically as climate changes. Because wetland geochemistry in turn controls the ecology of these water bodies, this research contributes to the prediction of the

  15. Differentiated availability of geochemical mercury pools controls methylmercury levels in estuarine sediment and biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Sofi; Skyllberg, Ulf; Nilsson, Mats B; Lundberg, Erik; Andersson, Agneta; Björn, Erik

    2014-08-20

    Neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg) formed from inorganic divalent mercury (Hg(II)) accumulates in aquatic biota and remains at high levels worldwide. It is poorly understood to what extent different geochemical Hg pools contribute to these levels. Here we report quantitative data on MeHg formation and bioaccumulation, in mesocosm water-sediment model ecosystems, using five Hg(II) and MeHg isotope tracers simulating recent Hg inputs to the water phase and Hg stored in sediment as bound to natural organic matter or as metacinnabar. Calculations for an estuarine ecosystem suggest that the chemical speciation of Hg(II) solid/adsorbed phases control the sediment Hg pool's contribution to MeHg, but that input of MeHg from terrestrial and atmospheric sources bioaccumulates to a substantially greater extent than MeHg formed in situ in sediment. Our findings emphasize the importance of MeHg loadings from catchment runoff to MeHg content in estuarine biota and we suggest that this contribution has been underestimated.

  16. Geochemical and hydrologic factors controlling subsurface transport of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Andrea K.; Barber, Larry B.; LeBlanc, Denis R.; Sunderland, Elsie M.; Vecitis, Chad D.

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence that certain poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are associated with negative human health effects prompted the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to issue lifetime drinking water health advisories for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in 2016. Given that groundwater is a major source of drinking water, the main objective of this work was to investigate geochemical and hydrological processes governing the subsurface transport of PFASs at a former fire training area (FTA) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, where PFAS-containing aqueous film-forming foams were used historically. A total of 148 groundwater samples and 4 sediment cores were collected along a 1200-m-long downgradient transect originating near the FTA and analyzed for PFAS content. The results indicate that unsaturated zones at the FTA and at hydraulically downgradient former domestic wastewater effluent infiltration beds both act as continuous PFAS sources to the groundwater despite 18 and 20 years of inactivity, respectively. Historically different PFAS sources are evident from contrasting PFAS composition near the water table below the FTA and wastewater-infiltration beds. Results from total oxidizable precursor assays conducted using groundwater samples collected throughout the plume suggest that some perfluoroalkyl acid precursors at this site are transporting with perfluoroalkyl acids.

  17. Geochemical interactions between process-affected water from oil sands tailings ponds and North Alberta surficial sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, A A; Donahue, R B; Ulrich, A C

    2011-01-25

    In Northern Alberta, the placement of out-of-pit oil sands tailings ponds atop natural buried sand channels is becoming increasingly common. Preliminary modeling of such a site suggests that process-affected (PA) pond water will infiltrate through the underlying clay till aquitard, reaching the sand channel. However, the impact of seepage upon native sediments and groundwater resources is not known. The goal of this study is to investigate the role of adsorption and ion exchange reactions in the clay till and their effect on the attenuation or release of inorganic species. This was evaluated using batch sorption experiments (traditional and a recent modification using less disturbed sediment samples) and geochemical modeling with PHREEQC. The results show that clay till sediments have the capacity to mitigate the high concentrations of ingressing sodium (600 mg L(-1)), with linear sorption partitioning coefficients (K(d)) of 0.45 L kg(-1). Ion exchange theory was required to account for all other cation behaviour, precluding the calculation of such coefficients for other species. Qualitative evidence suggests that chloride will behave conservatively, with high concentrations remaining in solution (375 mg L(-1)). As a whole, system behaviour was found to be controlled by a combination of competitive ion exchange, dissolution and precipitation reactions. Observations, supported by PHREEQC simulations, suggest that the influx of PA water will induce the dissolution of pre-existing sulphate salts. Sodium present in the process-affected water will exchange with sediment-bound calcium and magnesium, increasing the divalent ions' pore fluid concentrations, and leading to the precipitation of a calcium-magnesium carbonate mineral phase. Thus, in similar tailings pond settings, particularly if the glacial till coverage is thin or altogether absent, it is reasonable to expect that high concentrations of sodium and chloride will remain in solution, while sulphate

  18. Multivariate Statistical Process Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahci, Murat

    2013-01-01

    As sensor and computer technology continues to improve, it becomes a normal occurrence that we confront with high dimensional data sets. As in many areas of industrial statistics, this brings forth various challenges in statistical process control (SPC) and monitoring for which the aim...... is to identify “out-of-control” state of a process using control charts in order to reduce the excessive variation caused by so-called assignable causes. In practice, the most common method of monitoring multivariate data is through a statistic akin to the Hotelling’s T2. For high dimensional data with excessive...

  19. Extraction of water and solutes from argillaceous rocks for geochemical characterisation: Methods, processes and current understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Elisa; Michelot, Jean-Luc; Pitsch, Helmut; Lalieux, Philippe; Aranyossy, Jean-François

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarises the results of a comprehensive critical review, initiated by the OECD/NEA "Clay Club," of the extraction techniques available to obtain water and solutes from argillaceous rocks. The paper focuses on the mechanisms involved in the extraction processes, the consequences on the isotopic and chemical composition of the extracted pore water and the attempts made to reconstruct its original composition. Finally, it provides some examples of reliable techniques and information, as a function of the purpose of the geochemical study. Résumé. Cet article résume les résultats d'une synthèse critique d'ensemble, lancée par le OECD/NEA "Clay Club", sur les techniques d'extraction disponibles pour obtenir l'eau et les solutés de roches argileuses. L'article est consacré aux mécanismes impliqués dans les processus d'extraction, aux conséquences sur la composition isotopique et chimique de l'eau porale extraite et aux tentatives faites pour reconstituer sa composition originelle. Finalement, il donne quelques exemples de techniques fiables et d'informations, en fonction du but de l'étude géochimique. Resúmen. Este artículo resume los resultados de una revisión crítica exhaustiva (iniciada por el "Clay Club" OECD/NEA) de las técnicas de extracción disponibles para obtener agua y solutos en rocas arcillosas. El artículo se centra en los mecanismos involucrados en los procesos extractivos, las consecuencias en la composición isotópica y química del agua intersticial extraída, y en los intentos realizados para reconstruir su composición original. Finalmente, se presentan algunos ejemplos de técnicas fiables e información, en función del propósito del estudio geoquímico.

  20. Magmatic Processes in Monogenetic Eruptions, Procida Island, Campi Flegrei, Italy: Geochemical Evidence From Melt Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severs, M. J.; Fedele, L.; Esposito, R.; Bodnar, R.; Petrosino, P.; Lima, A.; de Vivo, B.; Shimizu, N.

    2008-12-01

    Campi Flegrei is an active volcanic complex located in the greater Naples area, which has produced more than 50 eruptions over the past 60,000 years. These have ranged from small eruptions such as Monte Nuovo eruption of 1538 CE to extremely large eruptions such as the Campanian Ignimbrite (150-200 DRE; Barbieri et al., 1978). The volcanic field includes the mainland area located to the west of Naples and also the two islands of Ischia and Procida. The volcanic products range from basalts to shoshonitic phonolites and trachytes, with the more evolved magmas being more abundant. Three eruptive units from Procida Island have been studied to observe geochemical trends over time within a small area and to better understand magmatic processes between monogenetic eruptions. Juvenile samples from Pozzo Vecchio, Breccia Museo, and Solchiara were collected to examine the geochemistry of the mineral phases present and melt inclusions (MIs) found within the phenocrysts. Solchiara contained phenocrysts of olivine and clinopyroxene, whereas Breccia Museo and Pozzo Vecchio samples contained clinopyroxene and sanidine as the dominant phenocryst phases. Melt inclusions from Solchiara have narrow compositional ranges in major and trace elements (i.e., CaO, TiO2, Zr, Dy, La) over a large range in SiO2 contents (47 to 55 wt%) while MI from the Breccia Museo have a limited range of SiO2 contents (57 to 61 wt%) with a wider range for major and trace elements (i.e., FeO, Al2O3, CaO, La, Th, Rb). Pozzo Vecchio MI from clinopyroxene and sanidine define different chemical compositions, but petrographic evidence does not suggest a xenocrystic origin for either mineral phase. This suggests that Pozzo Vecchio is the result of magma mixing. Modeling of fractional crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene, and sanidine are capable of producing most of the trends in major and trace elements between the most primitive samples to the most evolved samples. Volatile concentrations between the

  1. Geochemical Modeling of Leaching from MSWI Air-Pollution-Control Residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrup, T.; Christensen, T.H. [Institute of Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Building 115, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Dijkstra, J.J.; Van der Sloot, H.A. [Energy Research Centre of The Netherlands (ECN), PO Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Comans, R.N.J. [Wageningen University, Department of Soil Quality, P.O. Box 8005, 6700 EC Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2006-04-15

    This paper provides an improved understanding of the leaching behavior of waste incineration air-pollution-control (APC) residues in a long-term perspective. Leaching was investigated by a series of batch experiments reflecting leaching conditions after initial washout of highly soluble salts from residues. Leaching experiments were performed at a range of pH-values using carbonated and noncarbonated versions of two APC residues. The leaching data were evaluated by geochemical speciation modeling and discussed with respect to possible solubility control. The leaching of major elements as well as trace elements was generally found to be strongly dependent on pH. As leaching characterization was performed in the absence of high salt levels, the presented results represent long-term leaching after initial washout from a disposal site, that is, liquid-to solid ratios above 1-2 L/kg. The leaching of Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Pb, S, Si, V, and Zn was found influenced by solubility control from Al2O3, Al(OH)3, Ba(S,Cr)O4 solid solutions, BaSO4, Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12.26H2O, CaAl2Si4O12.2H2O, Ca(OH)2, CaSiO3, CaSO4.2H2O, CaZn2(OH)6.2H2O, KAlSi2O6, PbCO3, PbCrO4, Pb2O3, Pb2V2O7, Pb3(VO4)2, ZnO, Zn2SiO4, and ZnSiO3. The presented dataset and modeling results form a thorough contribution to the assessment of long-term leaching behavior of APC residues under a wide range of conditions.

  2. Scaling filtering and multiplicative cascade information integration techniques for geological, geophysical and geochemical data processing and geological feature recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Q.

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces several techniques recently developed based on the concepts of multiplicative cascade processes and multifractals for processing exploration geochemical and geophysical data for recognition of geological features and delineation of target areas for undiscovered mineral deposits. From a nonlinear point of view extreme geo-processes such as cloud formation, rainfall, hurricanes, flooding, landslides, earthquakes, igneous activities, tectonics and mineralization often show singular property that they may result in anomalous amounts of energy release or mass accumulation that generally are confined to narrow intervals in space or time. The end products of these non-linear processes have in common that they can be modeled as fractals or multifractals. Here we show that the three fundamental concepts of scaling in the context of multifractals: singularity, self-similarity and fractal dimension spectrum, make multifractal theory and methods useful for geochemical and geophysical data processing for general purposes of geological features recognition. These methods include: a local singularity analysis based on a area-density (C-A) multifractal model used as a scaling high-pass filtering technique capable of extracting weak signals caused by buried geological features; a suite of multifractal filtering techniques based on spectrum density - area (S-A) multifractal models implemented in various domain including frequency domain can be used for unmixing geochemical or geophysical fields according to distinct generalized self-similarities characterized in certain domain; and multiplicative cascade processes for integration of diverse evidential layers of information for prediction of point events such as location of mineral deposits. It is demonstrated by several case studies involving Fe, Sn, Mo-Ag and Mo-W mineral deposits that singularity method can be utilized to process stream sediment/soil geochemical data and gravity/aeromagnetic data as high

  3. Geochemical controls on the partitioning and hydrological transport of metals in a non-acidic river system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Thorslund

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The speciation of metals, i.e. in which chemical form they occur, controls their mobility, bioavailability and toxicity. The overall objective of this study is to extend the knowledge on the spreading of metals in non-acidic river systems; this knowledge is currently much more limited than the knowledge on metal behavior under acidic conditions that for instance are found in acid mine drainage systems. We combine novel measurements of metal spreading under distinctly high-pH conditions (up to 9.6 in the Tuul River at the Zaamar Goldfield mining site (Upper Lake Baikal Drainage Basin, Mongolia with a geochemical modelling approach (Visual MINTEQ. Total mass flows of several metals (Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb and V showed net increases over the mining site, with metals in suspension generally dominating the total export from the site. Model results showed that a main difference from acid mine drainage geochemistry is that the prevailing high pH causes precipitation of ferrihydrite and gibbsite, which removed between 90 to 100% of Fe and Al from solution. This notably influenced the behavior of As, Pb and V since their solubilities are controlled by sorption onto ferrihydrite. The combined effects from such geochemical processes (precipitation, sorption hence explain the high impact of suspended transport to total transport under high pH conditions. Arsenic furthermore showed dissolved concentrations above health risk-based guideline values in several locations and can thus be of main toxic concern in the upper Lake Baikal Drainage Basin. Moreover, present modelling showed that in particular the solubility of Fe, Pb and Zn can increase considerably as DOC concentrations increase due to metal-organic complexation. In high pH systems, seasonality of DOC concentrations can therefore have a major influence on the spreading and toxicity of these metals, as can DOC trends caused by land use change. Present results also suggest that the behavior of Cr, Cu and Mo

  4. Geochemical controls on the partitioning and hydrological transport of metals in a non-acidic river system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorslund, J.; Jarsjö, J.; Wällstedt, T.; Mörth, C. M.; Lychagin, M. Y.; Chalov, S. R.

    2014-08-01

    The speciation of metals, i.e. in which chemical form they occur, controls their mobility, bioavailability and toxicity. The overall objective of this study is to extend the knowledge on the spreading of metals in non-acidic river systems; this knowledge is currently much more limited than the knowledge on metal behavior under acidic conditions that for instance are found in acid mine drainage systems. We combine novel measurements of metal spreading under distinctly high-pH conditions (up to 9.6) in the Tuul River at the Zaamar Goldfield mining site (Upper Lake Baikal Drainage Basin, Mongolia) with a geochemical modelling approach (Visual MINTEQ). Total mass flows of several metals (Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb and V) showed net increases over the mining site, with metals in suspension generally dominating the total export from the site. Model results showed that a main difference from acid mine drainage geochemistry is that the prevailing high pH causes precipitation of ferrihydrite and gibbsite, which removed between 90 to 100% of Fe and Al from solution. This notably influenced the behavior of As, Pb and V since their solubilities are controlled by sorption onto ferrihydrite. The combined effects from such geochemical processes (precipitation, sorption) hence explain the high impact of suspended transport to total transport under high pH conditions. Arsenic furthermore showed dissolved concentrations above health risk-based guideline values in several locations and can thus be of main toxic concern in the upper Lake Baikal Drainage Basin. Moreover, present modelling showed that in particular the solubility of Fe, Pb and Zn can increase considerably as DOC concentrations increase due to metal-organic complexation. In high pH systems, seasonality of DOC concentrations can therefore have a major influence on the spreading and toxicity of these metals, as can DOC trends caused by land use change. Present results also suggest that the behavior of Cr, Cu and Mo would be much

  5. Factors controlling the geochemical evolution of fumarolic encrustations, Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodosky, L.G.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1993-01-01

    Factor and canonical correlation analysis of geochemical data from eight fossil fumaroles suggest that six major factors controlled the formation and evolution of fumarolic encrustations on the 1912 ash-flow sheet in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model explains a large proportion (low of 74% for Ni to high of 99% for Si) of the individual element data variance. Although the primary fumarolic deposits have been degraded by secondary alteration reactions and up to 75 years of weathering, the relict encrustations still preserve a signature of vapor-phase element transport. This vapor-phase transport probably occurred as halide or oxyhalide species and was significant for As, Sb and Br. At least three, and possibly four, varied temperature leaching events affected the fumarolic deposits. High-temperature gases/liquids heavily altered the ejecta glass and mineral phases adjacent to the fumarolic conduit. As the fumaroles cooled. Fe-rich acidic condensate leached the ejecta and primary fumarolic deposits and resulted in the subsequent precipitation of Fe-hydroxides and/or Fe-oxides. Low- to ambient-temperature leaching and hydration reactions generated abundant hydrated amorphous phases. Up to 87% of the individual element data variance is apparently controlled by the chemistry of the ejecta on which the relict encrustations are found. This matrix chemistry factor illustrates that the primary fumarolic minerals surrounding the active VTTS vents observed by earlier workers have been effectively removed by the dissolution reactions. Element enrichment factors calculated for the VTTS relict encrustations support the statistical factor interpretations. On the average, the relict encrustations are enriched, relative to visibly unaltered matrix protolith, in As, Br, Cr, Sb, Cu, Ni, Pb, Fe, and LOI (an indirect measure of sample H2O content). ?? 1993.

  6. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110462 Chen Furong(Anhui Institute of Geological Survey,Hefei 230001,China)Ore-Search Prospects of Gold and Tungsten Geochemical Anomalies in Ningdun Area,Anhui Province(Geophysical and Geochemical Exploration,ISSN1000-8918,CN11-1906/P,34(2),2010,p.150-153,5 illus.,2 tables,6 refs.)Key words:gold ores,tungsten ores,geochemical exploration,AnhuiGeochemical anomalies of gold and tungsten in Ningdun area are dominated by the element association of Au-As-W-Bi.These anomalies are well coincident with

  7. Geochemical evidence for seasonal controls on the transportation of Holocene loess, Matanuska Valley, southern Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel; Budahn, James R.; Skipp, Gary L.; McGeehin, John

    2016-01-01

    Loess is a widespread Quaternary deposit in Alaska and loess accretion occurs today in some regions, such as the Matanuska Valley. The source of loess in the Matanuska Valley has been debated for more than seven decades, with the Knik River and the Matanuska River, both to the east, being the leading candidates and the Susitna River, to the west, as a less favorable source. We report here new stratigraphic, mineralogic, and geochemical data that test the competing hypotheses of these river sources. Loess thickness data are consistent with previous studies that show that a source or sources lay to the east, which rules out the Susitna River as a source. Knik and Matanuska River silts can be distinguished using Sc–Th–La, LaN/YbN vs. Eu/Eu∗, Cr/Sc, and As/Sb. Matanuska Valley loess falls clearly within the range of values for these ratios found in Matanuska River silt. Dust storms from the Matanuska River are most common in autumn, when river discharge is at a minimum and silt-rich point bars are exposed, wind speed from the north is beginning to increase after a low-velocity period in summer, snow depth is still minimal, and soil temperatures are still above freezing. Thus, seasonal changes in climate and hydrology emerge as critical factors in the timing of aeolian silt transport in southern Alaska. These findings could be applicable to understanding seasonal controls on Pleistocene loess accretion in Europe, New Zealand, South America, and elsewhere in North America.

  8. Geochemical evidence for seasonal controls on the transportation of Holocene loess, Matanuska Valley, southern Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Budahn, James R.; Skipp, Gary L.; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-06-01

    Loess is a widespread Quaternary deposit in Alaska and loess accretion occurs today in some regions, such as the Matanuska Valley. The source of loess in the Matanuska Valley has been debated for more than seven decades, with the Knik River and the Matanuska River, both to the east, being the leading candidates and the Susitna River, to the west, as a less favorable source. We report here new stratigraphic, mineralogic, and geochemical data that test the competing hypotheses of these river sources. Loess thickness data are consistent with previous studies that show that a source or sources lay to the east, which rules out the Susitna River as a source. Knik and Matanuska River silts can be distinguished using Sc-Th-La, LaN/YbN vs. Eu/Eu∗, Cr/Sc, and As/Sb. Matanuska Valley loess falls clearly within the range of values for these ratios found in Matanuska River silt. Dust storms from the Matanuska River are most common in autumn, when river discharge is at a minimum and silt-rich point bars are exposed, wind speed from the north is beginning to increase after a low-velocity period in summer, snow depth is still minimal, and soil temperatures are still above freezing. Thus, seasonal changes in climate and hydrology emerge as critical factors in the timing of aeolian silt transport in southern Alaska. These findings could be applicable to understanding seasonal controls on Pleistocene loess accretion in Europe, New Zealand, South America, and elsewhere in North America.

  9. Ground-water quality and geochemical processes at a municipal landfill, Town of Brookhaven, Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearsall, Kenneth A.; Aufderheide, Mary Jean

    1995-01-01

    The principal geochemical process within a plume of leachate-contaminated ground water downgradient from the municipal landfill in the Town of Brookhaven is the oxidation of organic matter. Concurrent reducing processes are the reduction of iron and manganese oxyhydroxides to soluble ferrous and manganous forms, of nitrate and nitrite to nitrogen and ammonia, of sulfate to sulfide (sulfide precipitates from solution as iron and manganese sulfides), and, under extreme conditions, of some organic matter to methane. Secondary processes unrelated to bacterial activity and redox processes are the exchange of dissolved sodium and potassium for calcium and magnesium at ion-exchange sites and the dissolution of calcium and magnesium silicate minerals; these processes cause sodium and potassium concentrations to decrease with depth and with distance from the landfill and cause calcium, magnesium, and silica concentrations to increase.

  10. Control of groundwater pH during bioremediation: Improvement and validation of a geochemical model to assess the buffering potential of ground silicate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Elsa; Brovelli, Alessandro; Holliger, Christof; Barry, D. A.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate control of groundwater pH is of critical importance for in situ biological treatment of chlorinated solvents. The use of ground silicate minerals mixed with groundwater is an appealing buffering strategy as silicate minerals may act as long-term sources of alkalinity. In a previous study, we developed a geochemical model for evaluation of the pH buffering capacity of such minerals. The model included the main microbial processes driving groundwater acidification as well as mineral dissolution. In the present study, abiotic mineral dissolution experiments were conducted with five silicate minerals (andradite, diopside, fayalite, forsterite, nepheline). The goal of the study was to validate the model and to test the buffering capacity of the candidate minerals identified previously. These five minerals increased the pH from acidic to neutral and slightly basic values. The model was revised and improved to represent better the experimental observations. In particular, the experiments revealed the importance of secondary mineral precipitation on the buffering potential of silicates, a process not included in the original formulation. The main secondary phases likely to precipitate were identified through model calibration, as well as the degree of saturation at which they formed. The predictions of the revised geochemical model were in good agreement with the observations, with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.9 in most cases. This study confirmed the potential of silicates to act as pH control agents and showed the reliability of the geochemical model, which can be used as a design tool for field applications.

  11. Control of groundwater pH during bioremediation: improvement and validation of a geochemical model to assess the buffering potential of ground silicate minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Elsa; Brovelli, Alessandro; Holliger, Christof; Barry, D A

    2014-05-01

    Accurate control of groundwater pH is of critical importance for in situ biological treatment of chlorinated solvents. The use of ground silicate minerals mixed with groundwater is an appealing buffering strategy as silicate minerals may act as long-term sources of alkalinity. In a previous study, we developed a geochemical model for evaluation of the pH buffering capacity of such minerals. The model included the main microbial processes driving groundwater acidification as well as mineral dissolution. In the present study, abiotic mineral dissolution experiments were conducted with five silicate minerals (andradite, diopside, fayalite, forsterite, nepheline). The goal of the study was to validate the model and to test the buffering capacity of the candidate minerals identified previously. These five minerals increased the pH from acidic to neutral and slightly basic values. The model was revised and improved to represent better the experimental observations. In particular, the experiments revealed the importance of secondary mineral precipitation on the buffering potential of silicates, a process not included in the original formulation. The main secondary phases likely to precipitate were identified through model calibration, as well as the degree of saturation at which they formed. The predictions of the revised geochemical model were in good agreement with the observations, with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.9 in most cases. This study confirmed the potential of silicates to act as pH control agents and showed the reliability of the geochemical model, which can be used as a design tool for field applications.

  12. Geochemical Modeling of Trivalent Chromium Migration in Saline-Sodic Soil during Lasagna Process: Impact on Soil Physicochemical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salihu Lukman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trivalent Cr is one of the heavy metals that are difficult to be removed from soil using electrokinetic study because of its geochemical properties. High buffering capacity soil is expected to reduce the mobility of the trivalent Cr and subsequently reduce the remedial efficiency thereby complicating the remediation process. In this study, geochemical modeling and migration of trivalent Cr in saline-sodic soil (high buffering capacity and alkaline during integrated electrokinetics-adsorption remediation, called the Lasagna process, were investigated. The remedial efficiency of trivalent Cr in addition to the impacts of the Lasagna process on the physicochemical properties of the soil was studied. Box-Behnken design was used to study the interaction effects of voltage gradient, initial contaminant concentration, and polarity reversal rate on the soil pH, electroosmotic volume, soil electrical conductivity, current, and remedial efficiency of trivalent Cr in saline-sodic soil that was artificially spiked with Cr, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, phenol, and kerosene. Overall desirability of 0.715 was attained at the following optimal conditions: voltage gradient 0.36 V/cm; polarity reversal rate 17.63 hr; soil pH 10.0. Under these conditions, the expected trivalent Cr remedial efficiency is 64.75 %.

  13. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>20081182 Chen Guoguang(China University of Geosciences,Wuhan 430074,China);Zhou Guohua Eco-Geochemical Assessment Based On Geosciences(Resources Survey & Environment,ISSN1671-4814,CN32-1640/N,28(2),2007,p.79-84,2 tables,6 refs.)Key words:regional geochemical

  14. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131784 An Guoying(China Aero Geophysical Survey and Remote Sensing Center for Land and Resources,Beijing 100083,China);Lei Yingping Geochemical Characteristics and Metallogenic Prospecting Areas in Yunkai Area,Guangxi(Geophysical and Geochemical Exploration,ISSN1000-8918,CN11-1906/P,36

  15. Can pH and electrical conductivity monitoring reveal spatial and temporal patterns in wetland geochemical processes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Gerla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonate reactions and equilibria play a dominant role in the biogeochemical function of many wetlands. The US Geological Survey PHREEQC computer code was used to model geochemical reactions that may be typical for wetlands with water budgets characterized by: (a input dominated by direct precipitation, (b interaction with groundwater, (c variable degrees of reaction with organic carbon, and (d different rates of evapotranspiration. Rainfall with a typical composition was progressively reacted with calcite and organic carbon at various rates and proportions using PHREEQC. Contrasting patterns of the results suggest that basic water quality data collected in the field can reveal differences in the geochemical processes in wetlands. Given a temporal record, these can signal subtle changes in surrounding land cover and use. To demonstrate this, temperature, pH, and electrical conductivity (EC were monitored for three years in five large wetlands comprising 48 sample sites in northwest Minnesota. EC and pH of samples ranged greatly – from 23 to 1300 μS cm−1 and 5.5 to 9. The largest range in pH was observed in small beach ridge wetlands, where two clusters are apparent: (1 low EC and a wide range of pH and (2 higher pH and EC. Large marshes within a glacial lake – till plain have a broad range of pH and EC, but depend on the specific wetland. Outlying data typically occurred in altered or disturbed areas. The inter-annual and intra-wetland consistency of the results suggests that each wetland system hosts characteristic geochemical conditions.

  16. Geochemical balance of lateritization processes and climatic signatures in weathering profiles overlain by ferricretes in Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Anicet

    1999-12-01

    A simple geochemical balance of lateritization processes governing the development of several tens of meters of weathering profiles overlain by ferricretes is estimated on the basis of detailed mineralogical and geochemical data. The lateritic weathering mantle of the "Haut-Mbomou" area in Central Africa is composed of different weathering layers described from the base to the top of vertical profiles as a saprolite, a mottled clay layer, a soft nodular layer, a soft ferricrete, and a ferricrete in which kaolinite, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite occur in various quantities. Incongruent dissolution of kaolinite leads to the formation of gibbsite in the upper saprolite, whereas the hematite does not clearly replace the kaolinite according to an epigene process in the upper ferruginous layers of the profiles. Instead, that kaolinite is also transformed into gibbsite according to an incongruent dissolution under hydrated and reducing conditions induced by a relatively humid climatic pattern. The respective relations of the silica, iron, and aluminum balances and the Al substitution rate of the hematite on the one hand, and of RHG [RHG = 100 (hematite/hematite + goethite)] and the kaolinite on the other hand, to the consumption or the release of protons H + permit differentiation of aggrading ferruginization and degradation processes operating in the different lateritic weathering profiles. The Al substitution rate of the Fe-oxyhydroxides varies according to the nature of lateritization processes, e.g., saprolitic weathering and aggrading ferruginization vs. degradation. The observations and results indicate that the ferruginization process of the weathering materials of parent rocks is not a simple ongoing process as often thought. This suggests that the actual lateritic weathering mantle of the Haut-Mbomou area may result from different stages of weathering and erosion during climatic changes.

  17. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, H. Henry [PI, The George Washington University; Xu, Huifang [Co-PI, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2013-07-17

    We have approached the long-standing geochemical question why anhydrous high-Mg carbonate minerals (i.e., magnesite and dolomite) cannot be formed at ambient conditions from a new perspective by exploring the formation of MgCO{sub 3} and Mg{sub x}Ca{sub (1-x)}CO{sub 3} in non-aqueous solutions. Data collected from our experiments in this funding period suggest that a fundamental barrier, other than cation hydration, exists that prevents Mg{sup 2+} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} ions from forming long-range ordered structures. We propose that this barrier mainly stems from the lattice limitation on the spatial configuration of CO{sub 3} groups in magnesite crystals. On the other hand, the measured higher distribution coefficients of Mg between magnesian calcites formed in the absence and presence of water give us a first direct proof to support and quantify the cation hydration effect.

  18. A comparative review of petrogenetic processes beneath the Cameroon Volcanic Line: Geochemical constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asobo N.E. Asaah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The origin and petrogenesis of the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL, composed of volcanoes that form on both the ocean floor and the continental crust, are difficult to understand because of the diversity, heterogeneity, and nature of available data. Major and trace elements, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data of volcanic rocks of the CVL spanning four decades have been compiled to reinterpret their origin and petrogenesis. Volcanic rocks range from nephelinite, basanite and alkali basalts to phonolite, trachyte and rhyolite with the presence of a compositional gap between SiO2 58–64 wt.%. Similarities in geochemical characteristics, modeled results for two component mixing, and the existence of mantle xenoliths in most mafic rocks argue against significant crustal contamination. Major and trace element evidences indicate that the melting of mantle rocks to generate the CVL magma occurred dominantly in the garnet lherzolite stability field. Melting models suggest small degree (<3% partial melting of mantle bearing (6–10% garnet for Mt. Etinde, the Ngaoundere Plateau and the Biu Plateau, and <5% of garnet for the oceanic sector of the CVL, Mt. Cameroon, Mt. Bambouto, Mt. Manengouba and the Oku Volcanic Group. The Sr-Nd-Pb isotope systematics suggest that mixing in various proportions of Depleted MORB Mantle (DMM with enriched mantle 1 and 2 (EM1 and EM2 could account for the complex isotopic characteristics of the CVL lavas. Low Mg number (Mg# = 100 × MgO/(MgO + FeO and Ni, Cr and Co contents of the CVL mafic lavas reveal their crystallization from fractionated melts. The absence of systematic variation in Nb/Ta and Zr/Hf ratios, and Sr-Nd isotope compositions between the mafic and felsic lavas indicates progressive evolution of magmas by fractional crystallization. Trace element ratios and their plots corroborate mantle heterogeneity and reveal distinct geochemical signatures for individual the CVL volcanoes.

  19. A comparative review of petrogenetic processes beneath the Cameroon Volcanic Line:Geochemical constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asobo N.E. Asaah; Tetsuya Yokoyama; Festus T. Aka; Tomohiro Usui; Mengnjo J. Wirmvem; Boris Chako Tchamabe; Takeshi Ohba; Gregory Tanyileke; J.V. Hell

    2015-01-01

    The origin and petrogenesis of the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL), composed of volcanoes that form on both the ocean floor and the continental crust, are difficult to understand because of the diversity, het-erogeneity, and nature of available data. Major and trace elements, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data of volcanic rocks of the CVL spanning four decades have been compiled to reinterpret their origin and petrogenesis. Volcanic rocks range from nephelinite, basanite and alkali basalts to phonolite, trachyte and rhyolite with the presence of a compositional gap between SiO2 58e64 wt.%. Similarities in geochemical characteristics, modeled results for two component mixing, and the existence of mantle xenoliths in most mafic rocks argue against significant crustal contamination. Major and trace element evidences indicate that the melting of mantle rocks to generate the CVL magma occurred dominantly in the garnet lherzolite stability field. Melting models suggest small degree (<3%) partial melting of mantle bearing (6e10%) garnet for Mt. Etinde, the Ngaoundere Plateau and the Biu Plateau, and<5%of garnet for the oceanic sector of the CVL, Mt. Cameroon, Mt. Bambouto, Mt. Manengouba and the Oku Volcanic Group. The Sr-Nd-Pb isotope sys-tematics suggest that mixing in various proportions of Depleted MORB Mantle (DMM) with enriched mantle 1 and 2 (EM1 and EM2) could account for the complex isotopic characteristics of the CVL lavas. Low Mg number (Mg# ¼ 100 ? MgO/(MgO þ FeO)) and Ni, Cr and Co contents of the CVL mafic lavas reveal their crystallization from fractionated melts. The absence of systematic variation in Nb/Ta and Zr/Hf ratios, and Sr-Nd isotope compositions between the mafic and felsic lavas indicates progressive evolution of magmas by fractional crystallization. Trace element ratios and their plots corroborate mantle het-erogeneity and reveal distinct geochemical signatures for individual the CVL volcanoes.

  20. Food Processing Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    When NASA started plarning for manned space travel in 1959, the myriad challenges of sustaining life in space included a seemingly mundane but vitally important problem: How and what do you feed an astronaut? There were two main concerns: preventing food crumbs from contaminating the spacecraft's atmosphere or floating into sensitive instruments, and ensuring complete freedom from potentially catastrophic disease-producing bacteria, viruses, and toxins. To solve these concerns, NASA enlisted the help of the Pillsbury Company. Pillsbury quickly solved the first problem by coating bite-size foods to prevent crumbling. They developed the hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) concept to ensure against bacterial contamination. Hazard analysis is a systematic study of product, its ingredients, processing conditions, handling, storage, packing, distribution, and directions for consumer use to identify sensitive areas that might prove hazardous. Hazard analysis provides a basis for blueprinting the Critical Control Points (CCPs) to be monitored. CCPs are points in the chain from raw materials to the finished product where loss of control could result in unacceptable food safety risks. In early 1970, Pillsbury plants were following HACCP in production of food for Earthbound consumers. Pillsbury's subsequent training courses for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) personnel led to the incorporation of HACCP in the FDA's Low Acid Canned Foods Regulations, set down in the mid-1970s to ensure the safety of all canned food products in the U.S.

  1. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20091835 Cheng Hangxin(School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering,Peking University,Beijing 100871,China);Zhuang Guangmin The Cd Geochemical Province in the Source Area of the Yangtze River and the Output Fluxes of Cd for Its Major Water Systems(Earth Science Frontiers,ISSN1005-2321,CN11-3370/P,15(5),2008,p.203-211,5 illus.,5 tables,25 refs.,with English abstract)Key words:cadmium,geochemical province,Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau20091836 Cheng Hangxin(School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering,Peking University,Beijing 100871,China);Yang Zhongfang A New Round of Global Geochemical

  2. Geochemical constraints on mixed source and hydrocarbon filling process in theYingjisu Sag, Tarim Basin, Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Lingyun; CHANG Xiangchun; WANG Mingzhen; YU Xinghe; MA Lixin; DUAN Yunge

    2009-01-01

    The Yingjisu Sag was petroliferous for normal oil, condensate oil, reservoir bitumen and natural gases. Geochemical studies showed that natural gases in the Yingjisu Sag were a gas mixture consisting mainly of Cambrian pyrolysis gas, Jurassic condensate oil in well Yingnan 2 and normal oil in well Tadong 2, reflecting the characteristics of marine-phase gases and oils, while crude oils in well Longkou 1 demonstrated the characteristics of both marine and terrestrial oils, which were derived from lower algae and higher plants. Jurassic oils from wells Longkou 1 and Huayingcan 1 and Cambrian crude oils from well Tadong 2 were derived mainly from Cambrian-Lower Ordovician source rocks. Jurassic and Silurian reservoir bitumens from well Yingnan 2 were biodegradated, suggesting they are of marine and terrestrial origins. The bitumens have similar geochemical characteristics, which are correlated well with Ordovician crude oils from well Tadong 2 and Jurassic condensate oil from well Yingnan 2. Based on the characteristics of tectonic evolution in this area and the analysis of hydrocarbon accumulation, the constraints on the mixed source and hydrocarbon filling process in the Yingjisu Sag were brought forward.

  3. Controlled processing during sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thothathiri, Malathi; Rattinger, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Longstanding evidence has identified a role for the frontal cortex in sequencing within both linguistic and non-linguistic domains. More recently, neuropsychological studies have suggested a specific role for the left premotor-prefrontal junction (BA 44/6) in selection between competing alternatives during sequencing. In this study, we used neuroimaging with healthy adults to confirm and extend knowledge about the neural correlates of sequencing. Participants reproduced visually presented sequences of syllables and words using manual button presses. Items in the sequence were presented either consecutively or concurrently. Concurrent presentation is known to trigger the planning of multiple responses, which might compete with one another. Therefore, we hypothesized that regions involved in controlled processing would show greater recruitment during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. Whole-brain analysis showed concurrent > consecutive activation in sensory, motor and somatosensory cortices and notably also in rostral-dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Region of interest analyses showed increased activation within left BA 44/6 and correlation between this region's activation and behavioral response times. Functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity between left BA 44/6 and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. These results corroborate recent evidence and demonstrate the involvement of BA 44/6 and other control regions when ordering co-activated representations.

  4. Controlled processing during sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malathi eThothathiri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Longstanding evidence has identified a role for the frontal cortex in sequencing within both linguistic and non-linguistic domains. More recently, neuropsychological studies have suggested a specific role for the left premotor-prefrontal junction (BA 44/6 in selection between competing alternatives during sequencing. In this study, we used neuroimaging with healthy adults to confirm and extend knowledge about the neural correlates of sequencing. Participants reproduced visually presented sequences of syllables and words using manual button presses. Items in the sequence were presented either consecutively or concurrently. Concurrent presentation is known to trigger the planning of multiple responses, which might compete with one another. Therefore, we hypothesized that regions involved in controlled processing would show greater recruitment during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. Whole-brain analysis showed concurrent > consecutive activation in sensory, motor and somatosensory cortices and notably also in rostral-dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. Region of interest analyses showed increased activation within left BA 44/6 and correlation between this region’s activation and behavioral response times. Functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity between left BA 44/6 and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. These results corroborate recent evidence and demonstrate the involvement of BA 44/6 and other control regions when ordering co-activated representations.

  5. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20152642 Baoyinwuliji(Inner Mongolia Institute of Geological Survey,Hohhot 010020,China);Zhao Wentao Geochemical Anomaly and Metallogenic Potential of the Naomugengsumu Lithium Mineralization Area in Inner Mongolia(Geology and Resources,ISSN1671

  6. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>20122626 Li Dongfeng ( Liaoning Institute of Mineral Resources Exploration,Shenyang 110032,China ) Application of Comprehensive Geophysical-Geochemical Method in Toudao-yingzi Gold Field ( Journal of Liaoning Technical University ( Natural Sciences ), ISSN1008-0562,CN21-1379 / N,30 ( 6 ), 2011,p.849-852,1illus.,2tables,10refs. ) Key words:gold ores,geophysical exploration,geochemical exploration,Liaoning Province

  7. Simulation of geochemical processes responsible for the formation of the Zhezqazghan deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhenko, B. N.; Cherkasova, E. V.

    2014-05-01

    Physicochemical computer simulation of water-rock systems at a temperature of 25-150°C and under a pressure of up to 600 bar has been carried out for quantitative description of the mineralization formation conditions at sandstone- and shale-hosted copper deposits. The simulation is based on geological and geochemical information concerning the Zhezqazghan deposit and considers (i) a source of ore matter, (ii) composition of the fluid that transfers ore matter to the ore formation zone, and (iii) factors of ore concentration. It has been shown that extraction of copper from minerals of rocks and its accumulation in aqueous solution are optimal at a high mass ratio of rock to water (R/W > 10), Eh of +200 to -100 mV, and an obligatory content of chloride ions in the aqueous phase. The averaged ore-bearing fluid Cl95SO44//Ca50(Na + K)30Mg19 (eq %), pH ˜ 4, mineralization of up to 400 g/L, is formed by the interaction of red sandstone beds with a sedimentogenic brine (a product of metamorphism of seawater in carbonate rocks enriched in organic matter). The ore concentration proceeds in the course of cooling from 150 to 50°C during filtration of ore-bearing fluid through red sandstone beds in the rock-water system thermodynamically opened with respect to the reductive components.

  8. Geochemical investigation of weathering processes in a forested headwater catchment: Mass-balance weathering fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.F.; Herman, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Geochemical research on natural weathering has often been directed towards explanations of the chemical composition of surface water and ground water resulting from subsurface water-rock interactions. These interactions are often defined as the incongruent dissolution of primary silicates, such as feldspar, producing secondary weathering products, such as clay minerals and oxyhydroxides, and solute fluxes (Meunier and Velde, 1979). The chemical composition of the clay-mineral product is often ignored. However, in earlier investigations, the saprolitic weathering profile at the South Fork Brokenback Run (SFBR) watershed, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, was characterized extensively in terms of its mineralogical and chemical composition (Piccoli, 1987; Pochatila et al., 2006; Jones et al., 2007) and its basic hydrology. O'Brien et al. (1997) attempted to determine the contribution of primary mineral weathering to observed stream chemistry at SFBR. Mass-balance model results, however, could provide only a rough estimate of the weathering reactions because idealized mineral compositions were utilized in the calculations. Making use of detailed information on the mineral occurrence in the regolith, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of compositional variation on mineral-solute mass-balance modelling and to generate plausible quantitative weathering reactions that support both the chemical evolution of the surface water and ground water in the catchment, as well as the mineralogical evolution of the weathering profile. ?? 2008 The Mineralogical Society.

  9. Geochemical processes regulating F-, as and NO3- content in the groundwater of a sector of the Pampean Region, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzi, Guido E; García, Leandro; Carol, Eleonora S

    2015-10-15

    The presence of F(-) and As in groundwater is common in volcanic aquifers. Excessive concentrations of these ions affect the quality of drinking water and can be harmful to health. When there is an anthropogenic source in phreatic aquifers, NO3(-) is incorporated to the groundwater components, deteriorating its quality. The objective of this work is to assess the geochemical processes that regulate the contents of F(-), As and NO3(-) of the groundwater in a sector of the Pampean Region in Argentina. This area is supplied with water by exploiting a multilayer aquifer, composed of a phreatic aquifer occurring in loess sediments and a fluvial semi-confined aquifer, separated by an aquitard. The results obtained show that the phreatic aquifer has a higher concentration of F(-), As and NO3(-) than the semi-confined aquifer. Fluoride derives from the dissolution of volcanic glass at a slightly alkaline pH and from anion exchange; however, it may also be absorbed by the reprecipitating carbonates. The As is released by desorption, with the main source being the glass and lithic fragments of the loess. The NO3(-) originates from the decomposition of organic matter, mainly in the septic tanks of the peri-urban areas. Meanwhile, the As and F(-) content in the semi-confined aquifer is lower and its origin is the result of water inflow by vertical downward infiltration from the phreatic aquifer through the aquitard. The Pampean Region is one of the areas with the largest volume of agricultural exports in the world and at present it is undergoing a strong social and economic growth. Understanding the geochemical processes that regulate the quality of drinking water is of vital importance to generate water management guidelines aiming at minimizing the deterioration of drinking water sources.

  10. Groundwater compartmentalisation: a water table height and geochemical analysis of the structural controls on the subdivision of a major aquifer, the Sherwood Sandstone, Merseyside, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Compartmentalisation, the subdivision of an aquifer into discrete and relatively isolated units, may be of critical importance for the protection of groundwater although it has been largely ignored in the groundwater literature. The Lower Triassic Sherwood Sandstone, in north west of England, UK, may be a good example of an aquifer that has been compartmentalised by numerous high angle faults with displacements of up to 300 m. The study was initiated to assess the local groundwater flow, the extent of seawater invasion and the controls on recharge in the aquifer and to try to understand whether the aquifer is broken into discrete compartments. Maps and schematic cross-sections of groundwater heads for the years 1993, and 2002 were prepared to trace any structural controls on the groundwater heads across the area. Studying the contour maps and cross sections revealed that: 1 there are substantial differences in groundwater head across some of the NNW-SSE trending faults implying that groundwater flow is strongly limited by faults, 2 an anticline in the east of the area acts as a groundwater divide and 3 the groundwater head seems to follow the topography in some places, although steep changes in groundwater head occur across faults showing that they locally control the groundwater head. The aquifer was thus provisionally subdivided into several hydrogeological sub-basins based on groundwater head patterns and the occurrence of major structural features (faults and a fold. Using groundwater geochemistry data, contour maps of chloride and sulphate concentration largely support the structural sub-division of the area into hydrogeological sub-basins. Scrutiny of groundwater geochemical data, averaged for each sub-basin, confirmed the degree of compartmentalisation and the occurrence of sealed faults. The variation of the geochemical composition of the groundwater not only relates to the different, localised geochemical processes and seawater

  11. Geochemical processes and the effects of natural organic solutes on the solubility of selenium in coal-mine backfill samples from the Powder River basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, R.B.; Reddy, K.J.; Vance, G.F.; Fadlelmawla, A.A.; Blaylock, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    Geochemical processes and the effects of natural organic solutes on the solubility of selenium in coal-mine backfill aquifers were investigated. Backfill and ground-water samples were collected at coal mines in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Backfill was generally dominated by aluminum (14,400 to 49,000 mg/kg (milligrams per kilogram)), iron (3,330 to 23,200 mg/kg), and potassium (7,950 to 18,000 mg/kg). Backfill saturated-paste selenium concentrations ranged from 1 to 156 mg/kg (microsiemens per kilogram). Ground-water total selenium concentrations ranged from 3 to 125 mg/L. Dissolved organic carbon in all ground-water samples was dominated by hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids (38 to 84 percent). Selenite sorption/desorption experiments were conducted using background solutions of distilled-deionized water, 0.1 molar calcium chloride, and isolated hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids. Selenite sorption was larger when 0.1 molar calcium chloride was used. The addition of hydrophilic acid decreased selenite sorption more than the addition of hydrophobic acids. Geochemical modelling was used to predict the solid phases controlling dissolved selenium concentrations and to evaluate the effects of dissolved organic carbon on selenium solubility. Results suggested that 55 to 90 percent of selenium in backfill precipitation/dissolution extracts was dominated by magnesium selenate ion pairs. Dissolved organic carbon had little effect on selenium speciation. A redox chamber was constructed to control Eh and pH in water and backfill-core sample suspensions. The response of selenite and selenate in water samples to redox conditions did not follow thermodynamic predictions. Reduction of selenate in water samples did not occur at any of the redox levels tested.

  12. Pilot studies for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project - Site selection, sampling protocols, analytical methods, and quality control protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.B.; Woodruff, L.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Cannon, W.F.; Garrett, R.G.; Kilburn, J.E.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of Canada sampled and chemically analyzed soils along two transects across Canada and the USA in preparation for a planned soil geochemical survey of North America. This effort was a pilot study to test and refine sampling protocols, analytical methods, quality control protocols, and field logistics for the continental survey. A total of 220 sample sites were selected at approximately 40-km intervals along the two transects. The ideal sampling protocol at each site called for a sample from a depth of 0-5 cm and a composite of each of the O, A, and C horizons. The acid digestion. A separate sample of 0-5-cm material was collected at each site for determination of organic compounds. A subset of 73 of these samples was analyzed for a suite of 19 organochlorine pesticides by gas chromatography. Only three of these samples had detectable pesticide concentrations. A separate sample of A-horizon soil was collected for microbial characterization by phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA), soil enzyme assays, and determination of selected human and agricultural pathogens. Collection, preservation and analysis of samples for both organic compounds and microbial characterization add a great degree of complication to the sampling and preservation protocols and a significant increase to the cost for a continental-scale survey. Both these issues must be considered carefully prior to adopting these parameters as part of the soil geochemical survey of North America.

  13. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20151884 An Guoying(China Aero Geophysical Survey and Remote Sensing Center for Land and Resources,Beijing100083,China)Regional Geochemistry of Sanjiang Region in Yunnan Province and Its Copper-Polymetallic Prospecting Significance(Geophysical and Geochemical Exploration,ISSN1000-8918,

  14. Geochemical processes at a fresh/seawater interface in a shallow sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Iversen, Vibeke Margrethe Nyvang; Postma, Diederik Jan

    2001-01-01

    Chemical processes in a natural fresh-/seawater mixing zone were studied in a shallow sandy aquifer. The dominant redox-processes are sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Methanogenesis produces CO2, which causes calcite dissolution. The produced calcium induces ion exchange with sodium. The final...

  15. Process control in biogas plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Efficient monitoring and control of anaerobic digestion (AD) processes are necessary in order to enhance biogas plant performance. The aim of monitoring and controlling the biological processes is to stabilise and optimise the production of biogas. The principles of process analytical technology...

  16. Sensors for Process Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschulena, G.

    1988-01-01

    Sensors are one of the key elements for the automation in the manufacturing and process technology. The sensor field is presently within a restructuring process, directed to a stronger utilization of solid state technologies. This restructuring is governed by the utilization of solid state physical effects, by the use of reproducible fabrication techniques, and by the market driving forces. The state of the art of sensors in modern fabrication techniques will be demonstrated in examples, namely for sensors in silicon technology, in thin film technology and in thick film/screen printing technology. Some important physical and technological problems to be solved for the development of new and advanced sensor families will be outlined. Sensor development is strongly directed to the minaturization of devices and to the integration of different sensors to multisensors, as well as the integration between sensors and microelectronics.

  17. Combustion Process Modelling and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Maduda

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with realization of combustion control system on programmable logic controllers. Control system design is based on analysis of the current state of combustion control systems in technological device of raw material processing area. Control system design is composed of two subsystems. First subsystem is represented by software system for measured data processing and for data processing from simulation of the combustion mathematical model. Outputs are parameters for setting of controller algorithms. Second subsystem consists from programme modules. The programme module is presented by specific control algorithm, for example proportional regulation, programmed proportional regulation, proportional regulation with correction on the oxygen in waste gas, and so on. According to the specific combustion control requirements it is possible built-up concrete control system by programme modules. The programme modules were programmed by Automation studio that is used for development, debugging and testing software for B&R controllers.

  18. Geotechnical/geochemical characterization of advanced coal process waste streams: Task 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretti, C.J.; Olson, E.S.

    1992-09-01

    Successful disposal practices for solid wastes produced from advanced coal combustion and coal conversion processes must provide for efficient management of relatively large volumes of wastes in a cost-effective and environmentally safe manner. At present, most coal-utilization solid wastes are disposed of using various types of land-based systems, and it is probable that this disposal mode will continue to be widely used in the future for advanced process wastes. Proper design and operation of land-based disposal systems for coal combustion wastes normally require appropriate waste transfer, storage, and conditioning subsystems at the plant to prepare the waste for transport to an ultimate disposal site. Further, the overall waste management plan should include a by-product marketing program to minimize the amount of waste that will require disposal. In order to properly design and operate waste management systems for advanced coal-utilization processes, a fundamental understanding of the physical properties, chemical and mineral compositions, and leaching behaviors of the wastes is required. In order to gain information about the wastes produced by advanced coal-utilization processes, 55 waste samples from 16 different coal gasification, fluidized-bed coal combustion (FBC), and advanced flue gas scrubbing processes were collected. Thirty-four of these wastes were analyzed for their bulk chemical and mineral compositions and tested for a detailed set of disposal-related physical properties. The results of these waste characterizations are presented in this report. In addition to the waste characterization data, this report contains a discussion of potentially useful waste management practices for advanced coal utilization processes.

  19. Geochemical Characteristics and Behaviors of Rare Earth Elements in Process of Vertisol Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄成敏; 王成善

    2004-01-01

    Vertisol developed on argillaceous rocks has its special pedogenic processes and properties, and formed some secondary nodules. In study area, contents of rare earth elements (REE) are significantly different in different sedimentary rocks due to varied contents of clay fraction and clay mineral composition, etc. Under the dry and hot climate, REEs were less differentiated than their parent sedimentary rocks. However, REEs in secondary nodules formed in pedogenic process display their specific behaviors. They are more concentrated in iron concretions, the content of heavy REEs increases relatively, and positive Ce-anomaly appeares. But, negative Ce-anomaly was found in calcium concretions, while normal Ce content in parent rocks and vertisol.

  20. Geomicrobial and Geochemical Redox Processes in a Landfill-Polluted Aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Liselotte; Heron, Gorm; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of different dominant microbial-mediated redox processes in a landfill leachate-polluted aquifer (Grindsted, Denmark) was investigated. The most probable number method was utilized for detecting bacteria able to use each of the electron acceptors, and unamended incubations were u...

  1. Influence of global temperature change on the geochemical processes in the Plitvice Lakes waters - a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironić, Andreja; Barešić, Jadranka; Horvatinčić, Nada; Brozinčević, Andrijana; Vurnek, Maja; Kapelj, Sanja

    2016-04-01

    One of the major reasons for the global air temperature increase, recorded as the highest in the last decade, is considered to be the increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, in calculation of the global carbon budget a certain unknown carbon sink is identified, and karst relief is considered to be an important candidate for it, as well as being a source of carbon. Aquatic systems on karst enable carbon exchange between karst and atmosphere, often through groundwater geochemical carbonate rock dissolution (carbon sink) and in form of secondary calcium carbonate precipitation (carbon source). Protected area of the Plitvice Lakes National Park, settled in the karst area of Croatia, was chosen as a case study of karst geochemical processes. The Lakes are also specific for its tufa precipitation in form of tufa barriers. Physical and chemical data of water collected on 8 locations (2 springs and 6 lakes) in the last 30 years were studied. The data records were not systematic for all 30 years, so first the seasonal periodicity of all data was assessed and temporal change was investigated in each calendar month, and then the change was studied by comparing two distinct periods: 1981-1986 and 2010-2014. On all selected locations we observed temporal increase of air and water temperature, Ca2+ and HCO3- concentrations, calcite saturation index (SIcalc) and of calcite dissolution ionic ratio (IRcalc,) and a decrease in Mg/Ca ratio, though the intensity of this changes differ locally. No statistically significant change was observed for pH and CO2(aq) and Mg2+ concentrations. Discharge rates did not show significant change in the last 30 years; however there is a change in their seasonal distribution and more extreme values were recorded in recent period. Comparison of mean monthly air and water temperature for two periods implies more influence of groundwater inflow at all locations in recent period, which is probably a result of seasonal change in water

  2. Geochemical and hydrodynamic controls on arsenic and trace metal cycling in a seasonally stratified US sub-tropical reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Herbert, Bruce; Tissot, Philippe

    2004-10-01

    The phase distribution of trace metals and oxyanions was investigated within a South Texas watershed hosting a high density of surface uranium mine pits and tailings. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the potential impact of these old uranium mining sites on the watershed with particular emphasis on spatial and temporal changes in water quality of a reservoir that serves as the major source of freshwater to a population of {approx} 350,000 people in the region. A livestock pond, bordered by uranium mine tailings, was used as a model case-study site to evaluate the cycling of uranium mine-derived oxyanions under changing redox conditions. Although the pond showed seasonal thermal and chemical stratification, geochemical cycling of metals was limited to Co and Pb, which seemed to be mostly associated with redox cycling of Mn mineral phases, and U, which suggested reductive precipitation in the ponds hypolimnion. Uranium levels, however, were too low to support strong inputs from th e tailings into the water column of the pond. The strong relations observed between particulate Cr, Cs, V and Fe suggest that these metals are associated with a stable particulate phase (probably allochthonous aluminosilicates) enriched in unreactive iron. This observation is supported by a parallel relationship in sediments collected across a broad range of sediment depositional processed (and histories) in the basin. Arsenic, though selectively enriched in the ponds water column, remained stable and mostly in solution throughout the depth of the profile and showed no sign of geochemical cycling or interaction with Fe-rich particles. We found no evidence of anthropogenic impacts of U mines beyond the purely local scale. Arsenic does decrease in concentration downstream of uranium mining sites but its presence within the Nueces drainage basin is related to interactions between surface and ground waters with uranium-rich geological formations rather than long-scale transport of

  3. Meso-Scale and Macro-Scale Analysis of the Geochemical and Physical Processes Responsible for Acid Rock Drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otwinowski, Matthew

    1997-08-01

    We have developed a computer model which describes the geochemical and physical processes responsible for acid drainage from waste rock piles. The model is in the form of coupled nonlinear PDEs which describe: the kinetics of the chemical reactions, the release of contaminants, the generation of energy due to the exothermic oxidation of sulphides, the diffusive and convective transport of oxygen and water, and the transport of energy by conduction and convection. The meso-scale and large-scale characterization of waste rock and waste rock piles is discussed. We show that long-term leaching rates are inversely proportional to the square of particle diameter and that the previously used models underestimate the particle size effect on long-term sulphide oxidation. Experimental data on rock fragmentation are used for a fractal statistical characterization of waste rock piles. The acid generation rates, oxygen consumption rates and temperature profiles have been determined for piles containing from fifty thousand to five hundred thousand tonnes of waste rock. The thermodynamic instabilities, which occur at certain critical values of pile height, are responsible for thermodynamic catastrophes which result in a rapid increase of acid generation rates. The critical height is determined by the values of sulphide concentration, particle size, pile porosity and other factors. The numerical code is based on the finite elements method with an adaptive grid generator. abstract.

  4. Geomicrobiology of sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake: geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Macur, Richard E; Clingenpeel, Scott; Tenney, Aaron; Lovalvo, David; Beam, Jacob P; Kozubal, Mark A; Shanks, W C; Morgan, Lisa A; Kan, Jinjun; Gorby, Yuri; Yooseph, Shibu; Nealson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) is a large high-altitude (2200 m), fresh-water lake, which straddles an extensive caldera and is the center of significant geothermal activity. The primary goal of this interdisciplinary study was to evaluate the microbial populations inhabiting thermal vent communities in Yellowstone Lake using 16S rRNA gene and random metagenome sequencing, and to determine how geochemical attributes of vent waters influence the distribution of specific microorganisms and their metabolic potential. Thermal vent waters and associated microbial biomass were sampled during two field seasons (2007-2008) using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Sublacustrine thermal vent waters (circa 50-90°C) contained elevated concentrations of numerous constituents associated with geothermal activity including dissolved hydrogen, sulfide, methane and carbon dioxide. Microorganisms associated with sulfur-rich filamentous "streamer" communities of Inflated Plain and West Thumb (pH range 5-6) were dominated by bacteria from the Aquificales, but also contained thermophilic archaea from the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Novel groups of methanogens and members of the Korarchaeota were observed in vents from West Thumb and Elliot's Crater (pH 5-6). Conversely, metagenome sequence from Mary Bay vent sediments did not yield large assemblies, and contained diverse thermophilic and nonthermophilic bacterial relatives. Analysis of functional genes associated with the major vent populations indicated a direct linkage to high concentrations of carbon dioxide, reduced sulfur (sulfide and/or elemental S), hydrogen and methane in the deep thermal ecosystems. Our observations show that sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake support novel thermophilic communities, which contain microorganisms with functional attributes not found to date in terrestrial geothermal systems of YNP.

  5. Geochemical signatures of thermochemical sulfate reduction in controlled hydrous pyrolysis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Ellis, G.S.; Walters, C.C.; Kelemen, S.R.; Wang, K.-s.; Tang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    A series of gold tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments was conducted in order to investigate the effect of thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) on gas generation, residual saturated hydrocarbon compositional alteration, and solid pyrobitumen formation. The intensity of TSR significantly depends on the H2O/MgSO4 mole ratio, the smaller the ratio, the stronger the oxidizing conditions. Under highly oxidizing conditions (MgSO4/hydrocarbon wt/wt 20/1 and hydrocarbon/H2O wt/wt 1/1), large amounts of H2S and CO2 are generated indicating that hydrocarbon oxidation coupled with sulfate reduction is the dominant reaction. Starting with a mixture of C21-C35 n-alkanes, these hydrocarbons are consumed totally at temperatures below the onset of hydrocarbon thermal cracking in the absence of TSR (400 ??C). Moreover, once the longer chain length hydrocarbons are oxidized, secondarily formed hydrocarbons, even methane, are oxidized to CO2. Using whole crude oils as the starting reactants, the TSR reaction dramatically lowers the stability of hydrocarbons leading to increases in gas dryness and gas/oil ratio. While their concentrations decrease, the relative distributions of n-alkanes do not change appreciably from the original composition, and consequently, are non-diagnostic for TSR. However, distinct molecular changes related to TSR are observed, Pr/n-C17 and Ph/n-C18 ratios decrease at a faster rate under TSR compared to thermal chemical alteration (TCA) alone. TSR promotes aromatization and the incorporation of sulfur and oxygen into hydrocarbons leading to a decrease in the saturate to aromatic ratio in the residual oil and in the generation of sulfur and oxygen rich pyrobitumen. These experimental findings could provide useful geochemical signatures to identify TSR in settings where TSR has occurred in natural systems. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Geomicrobiology of sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake: Geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Inskeep

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA is a large high-altitude (2200 m, fresh-water lake, which straddles an extensive caldera and is the center of significant geothermal activity. The primary goal of this interdisciplinary study was to evaluate the microbial populations inhabiting thermal vent communities in Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone Lake using 16S rRNA gene and random metagenome sequencing, and to determine how geochemical attributes of vent waters influence the distribution of specific microorganisms and their metabolic potential. Thermal vent waters and associated microbial biomass were sampled during two field seasons (2007 - 2008 using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV. Sublacustrine thermal vent waters (circa 50 - 90 oC contained elevated concentrations of numerous constituents associated with geothermal activity including dissolved hydrogen, sulfide, methane and carbon dioxide. Microorganisms associated with sulfur-rich filamentous ‘streamer’ communities of Inflated Plain and West Thumb (pH range 5 - 6 were dominated by bacteria from the Aquificales, but also contained thermophilic archaea from the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Novel groups of methanogens and members of the Korarchaeota were observed in vents from West Thumb and Elliot’s Crater (pH 5 - 6. Conversely, metagenome sequence from Mary Bay vent sediments did not yield large assemblies, and contained diverse thermophilic and nonthermophilic bacterial relatives. Analysis of functional genes associated with the major vent populations indicated a direct linkage to high concentrations of carbon dioxide, reduced sulfur (sulfide and/or elemental S, hydrogen and methane in the deep thermal ecosystems. Our observations show that sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake support novel thermophilic communities, which contain microorganisms with functional attributes not found to date in terrestrial geothermal systems of YNP.

  7. Robust control charts in statistical process control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazir, H.Z.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of outliers and contaminations in the output of the process highly affects the performance of the design structures of commonly used control charts and hence makes them of less practical use. One of the solutions to deal with this problem is to use control charts which are robust agains

  8. Process management: two control charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, L

    1993-09-01

    It is not at all surprising that many persons avoid involvement in statistical process control. The statistical procedures developed in industry to monitor production processes are somewhat different from those employed in biostatistics and social science applications. Many find it difficult to adjust to these procedures and to apply statistical process control techniques to situations in health care settings. Not everyone involved in a QI process, however, needs to become versed in statistical process control techniques. At the Indiana University Medical Center several persons from different hospital departments have volunteered to form a cadre of internal statistical process control consultants. The group has come to be known by some as the statistical process control "think tank." No doubt a small group of individuals who are interested in statistics, quality control, and computers can be found in most hospitals. While it is necessary that the large majority of managers and supervisors in any health care organization are knowledgeable about process management and control charts at the concept level of understanding, it takes a relatively few to understand and use such control charts. As internal consultants, these few persons can provide technical assistance when such aid is needed.

  9. Self-organizing maps in geothermal exploration-A new approach for understanding geochemical processes and fluid evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehme, Maren; Bauer, Klaus; Nukman, Mochamad; Regenspurg, Simona

    2017-04-01

    Understanding geochemical processes is an important part of geothermal exploration to get information about the source and evolution of geothermal fluids. However, in most cases knowledge of fluid properties is based on few parameters determined in samples from the shallow subsurface. This study presents a new approach that allows to conclude from the combination of a variety of these data on processes occurring at depth in a geothermal reservoir. The neural network clustering technique called ;self-organizing maps; (SOMs) successfully distinguished two different geothermal settings based on a hydrochemical database and disclosed the source, evolution and flow pathways of geothermal fluids. Scatter plots, as shown in this study, are appropriate presentations of element concentrations and the chemical interaction of water and rock at depth. One geological setting presented here is marked by fault dominated fluid pathways and minor influence of volcanic affected fluids with high concentrations of HCO3, Ca and Sr. The second is a magmatically dominated setting showing strong alteration features in volcanic rocks and accommodates acidic fluids with high SO4 and Si concentrations. Former studies, i.e., Giggenbach (1988), suggested Cl, HCO3 and SO4 to be generally the most important elements for understanding hydrochemical processes in geothermal reservoirs. Their relation has been widely used to classify different water types in geothermal fields. However, this study showed that non-standard elements are at least of same importance to reveal different fluid types in geothermal systems. Therefore, this study is an extended water classification approach using SOM for element correlations. SOM have been proven to be a successful method for analyzing even relatively small hydrochemical datasets in geothermal applications.

  10. Control structures for flow process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Dulău

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the industrial domain, a large number of applications is covered by slow processes, including the flow, the pressure, the temperature and the level control. Each control system must be treated in steady and dynamic states and from the point of view of the possible technical solutions. Based on mathematical models of the processes and design calculations, PC programs allow simulation and the determination of the control system performances.The paper presents a part of an industrial process with classical control loops of flow and temperature. The mathematical model of the flow control process was deducted, the control structure, based on experimental criterions, was designed and the version witch ensure the imposed performances was chosen. Using Matlab, the robustness performances were studied.

  11. Chicxulub Impact Melts: Geochemical Signatures of Target Lithology Mixing and Post-Impact Hydrothermal Fluid Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, David A.; Zurcher, Lukas; Horz, Freidrich; Mertzmann, Stanley A.

    2004-01-01

    Impact melts within complex impact craters are generally homogeneous, unless they differentiated, contain immiscible melt components, or were hydrothermally altered while cooling. The details of these processes, however, and their chemical consequences, are poorly understood. The best opportunity to unravel them may lie with the Chicxulub impact structure, because it is the world s most pristine (albeit buried) large impact crater. The Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Project recovered approx. 100 meters of impactites in a continuous core from the Yaxcopoil-1 (YAX-1) borehole. This dramatically increased the amount of melt available for analyses, which was previously limited to two small samples N17 and N19) recovered from the Yucatan-6 (Y-6) borehole and one sample (N10) recovered from the Chicxulub-1 (C-1) borehole. In this study, we describe the chemical compositions of six melt samples over an approx. 40 m section of the core and compare them to previous melt samples from the Y-6 and C-1 boreholes.

  12. Process Analysis Via Accuracy Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    0 1 4 3 NDARDS THE NATIONAL February 1982 Process Analysis Via Accuracy Control RESEARCH PROG RAM U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime...SUBTITLE Process Analysis Via Accuracy Control 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...examples are contained in Appendix C. Included, are examples of how “A/C” process - analysis leads to design improvement and how a change in sequence can

  13. Coupling of geochemical and multiphase flow processes for validation of the MUFITS reservoir simulator against TOUGHREACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kempka, Thomas; Afanasyev, Andrey; Melnik, Oleg; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Coupled reactive transport simulations, especially in heterogeneous settings considering multiphase flow, are extremely time consuming and suffer from significant numerical issues compared to purely hydrodynamic simulations. This represents a major hurdle in the assessment of geological subsurface utilization, since it constrains the practical application of reactive transport modelling to coarse spatial discretization or oversimplified geological settings. In order to overcome such limitations, De Lucia et al. [1] developed and validated a one-way coupling approach between geochemistry and hydrodynamics, which is particularly well suited for CO2 storage simulations, while being of general validity. In the present study, the models used for the validation of the one-way coupling approach introduced by De Lucia et al. (2015), and originally performed with the TOUGHREACT simulator, are transferred to and benchmarked against the multiphase reservoir simulator MUFITS [2]. The geological model is loosely inspired by an existing CO2 storage site. Its grid comprises 2,950 elements enclosed in a single layer, but reflecting a realistic three-dimensional anticline geometry. For the purpose of this comparison, homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios in terms of porosity and permeability were investigated. In both cases, the results of the MUFITS simulator are in excellent agreement with those produced with the fully-coupled TOUGHREACT simulator, while profiting from significantly higher computational performance. This study demonstrates how a computationally efficient simulator such as MUFITS can be successfully included in a coupled process simulation framework, and also suggests ameliorations and specific strategies for the coupling of chemical processes with hydrodynamics and heat transport, aiming at tackling geoscientific problems beyond the storage of CO2. References [1] De Lucia, M., Kempka, T., and Kühn, M. A coupling alternative to reactive transport simulations

  14. Geochemical fingerprints of waters in the Lake Baringo-Bogoria region, Kenya: Implications for hydrogeochemical processes and water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hover, V. C.; Ashley, G. M.; Renaut, R. W.

    2002-12-01

    Lake Baringo and Lake Bogoria lie within an asymmetric half-graben in the East African Rift, Central Kenya. Lake Baringo to the north is fresh because of subsurface outflow (~0.8 g/l TDS; pH=8.9) whereas to the south, Lake Bogoria, which is hydrologically closed, is saline/alkaline (mixolimnion: ~40 g/l TDS; pH=10.2). The climate is semi arid (Plakes is comprised of Pleistocene and Holocene alluvium and lake sediments >1 km thick. The primary sources of water in the area are rivers draining the highlands, and hot, warm and cool springs and seeps of different salinities associated with the faults. Freshwater wetlands and rivers traversing the Loboi Plain represent a limited resource in this semi-arid environment and are heavily utilized for drinking water by the resident population, livestock, and wildlife, and for crop irrigation. To better understand the hydrogeochemical processes affecting the freshwater sources in the southern Loboi Plain, water samples that were collected from lakes, rivers, springs, and one of the large wetlands (Loboi Swamp) were analyzed for a full suite of major and minor elements. The objective of the study was to determine the extent to which the composition of water from a variety of environments could be used as geochemical fingerprints for hydrogeochemical processes. Conservative mixing between the most dilute river-water endmember (~0.1g/l TDS) and the most concentrated Lake Bogoria surface water, is indicated by the covariation of Na^{+} with (Alk_{T}+Cl^{-}) and with F^{-} content for nearly all surface and spring waters in the region. This trend is consistent with an overall process of evapoconcentration of dilute meteoric water containing dominantly Na^{+}, HCO_{3}$-, and Cl- derived from weathering of intermediate (trachyphonolite) and basaltic volcanic rocks in the region. Spring waters feeding the Loboi Swamp are warm (~35°C), with pH~6.4-6.9, and compositions (~0.25 g/l TDS) consistent with interaction of relatively shallow

  15. Kinetics and Mechanism of Metal Retention/Release in Geochemical Processes in Soil - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Robert W.

    2000-12-29

    Effective, remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals requires a better understanding of the mechanisms by which the metals are retained/released in soils over a long period of time. Studies on reaction of Cr(VI) with iron-rich clays indicated that structural iron (II) in these surfaces is capable of reducing chromate to chromium (III). We found that iron (II) either found naturally or produced by treatment of clay with sodium dithionite, effectively reduced Cr (VI) to Cr (III). Thus, in situ remediation of chromium combines reduction of Cr (VI) to Cr (III) and immobilization of chromium on mineral surfaces. During this study, lead sorption on a kaolin surface was found to be a rapid and a pH dependant process in which lead sorption significantly increased with the amount of phosphate on the clay surface. This study verifies that methylmercury cation remains intact when it binds to humic acids, forming a monodentate complex with some sub-population of humic thiol ligands .

  16. Biological response to geochemical and hydrological processes in a shallow submarine cave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. RADOLOVIĆ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Croatian coastal karst abounds in submerged caves that host a variety of environmental conditions depending on the geomorphology, depth and submarine groundwater discharge. One example is the Y-Cave, a shallow, mostly submerged, horizontal cave on Dugi Otok Island, on the eastern Adriatic coast. This study was aimed at examining the temporal and spatial variability of the marine cave environment, including temperature, salinity, light intensity, cave morphology and hydrodynamism, along with the dissolutional effect caused by the mixing of sea and freshwater. The general distribution of organisms in the Y-Cave was positively correlated to the light gradient and reduced water circulation, thus the highest species diversity and abundance were recorded in the front part of the cave. The phylum Porifera was the most dominant group, and the poriferan species diversity in the cave ranks among the ten highest in the Mediterranean. The middle part of the cave, although completely dark, hosts an abundant population of the gastropod Homalopoma sanguineum and clusters of the gregarious brachiopod Novocrania anomala, whose presence could be connected to tidal hydrodynamics. The absence/scarcity of sessile marine organisms and pronounced corrosion marks at shallow depths inside the cave suggest a freshwater impact in the upper layers of the water column. A year long experiment with carbonate tablets revealed three different, independent ongoing processes affected by the position in the cave: bioaccumulation, dissolution and mechanical erosion. The results of long-term temperature readings also revealed water column stratification within the cave, which was not disturbed by either tidal or wave action. The shallow, partly submerged and relatively small Y-Cave is characterised by a suite of complex environmental conditions, which, together with the resulting distribution of organisms, are unique to this cave.

  17. Mineralogy and Geochemical Processes of Carbonate Mineral-rich Sulfide Mine Tailings, Zimapan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, R. J.; Deng, Y.; Loeppert, R.; Herbert, B. E.; Carrillo, R.; Gonzalez, C.

    2009-12-01

    Mining for silver, lead, zinc, and copper in Zimapan, Hidalgo State, Mexico has been ongoing since 1576. High concentrations of heavy metals have been found in several mine tailing heaps in the Zimapan area, with concentrations of arsenic observed as high as 28,690 mg/kg and levels of Pb as high as 2772 mg/kg. Unsecured tailings heaps and associated acid mine drainage has presented tremendous problems to revegetation, water quality, and dust emission control in the Zimapan area. Although acid mine drainage problems related to weathering of sulfide minerals have been extensively studied and are well known, the weathering products of sulfides in areas with a significant presence of carbonate minerals and their effect on the mobility of heavy metals warrant further study. Carbonate minerals are expected to neutralize sulfuric acid produced from weathering of sulfide minerals, however, in the Zimapan area localized areas of pH as low as 1.8 were observed within carbonate mineral-rich tailing heaps. The objectives of this study are to characterize (1) the heavy metal-containing sulfide minerals in the initial tailing materials, (2) the intermediate oxidation products of sulfide minerals within the carbonate-rich tailings, (3) chemical species of heavy metals within pH gradients between 1.8 and 8.2, the approximate natural pH of limestone, and (4) the mobility of soluble and colloidal heavy metals and arsenic within the carbonate-rich tailings. Representative mine tailings and their intermediate oxidation products have been sampled from the Zimapan area. Mineralogical characterization will be conducted with X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, electron microscopes and microprobes, and chemical methods. Chemical species will be extracted by selective dissolution methods. Preliminary results have identified calcite as the dominant mineral in the tailing heaps with a pH of 7, suggesting non-equilibrium with the acidic weathering products. Other minerals identified in

  18. The Genesis of tectonically and hydrothermally controlled industry mineral deposits: A geochemical and structural study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfler, Anke; Prochaska, Walter; Henjes-Kunst, Friedhelm; Fritz, Harald

    2010-05-01

    surfaces was proposed by Sandrone & Zucchetti, 1988. Magnesite and talc bearing shearzones in ultramafic hostrocks (Lahnaslampi & Horsmanaho, Finland): Both deposits are situated in the Proterozoic schist belt where the talc-magnesite rocks at Lahnaslampi are associated with minor serpentine breccias. The steatitization took place in two different stages: During prograde metamorphism with H2O-dominated solutions and at declining temperature and pressure in the presence of CO2-bearing fluids that resulted in the main steatitization along tectonic structures. A combined geological, petrological and geochronological is chosen to resolve mechanism of mineralisation within the different tectonic setting. Different phases of mineral formation are first distinguished by pertrological and structural field work and then dated by radiometric techniques. Fluid species and chemical environment during mineralisation is resolved by geochemical techniques and stable isotope studies. References Grillo, S., Prochaska, W. (2007): Fluid Chemistry and Stable Isotope Evidence of Shearzone related Talc and Chlorite Mineralizations in Central Sardinia-Italy, In: Conference Abstracts SGA-Meeting. Radvanec, M., Koděra, P., Prochaska, W. (2004): Mg replacement of the Gemerska Poloma talk-magnesite deposit, Western Carpathians, Slovakia. Acta Petrologica Sinica, 20, 773-790. Sandrone, Zucchetti (1988): Geology of the Italian high-quality cosmetic talc from the Pinerolo district (Western Alps). Zuffar' Days - Symposium held in Cagliari, 10-15

  19. Quantum Control of Molecular Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Written by two of the world's leading researchers in the field, this is a systematic introduction to the fundamental principles of coherent control, and to the underlying physics and chemistry.This fully updated second edition is enhanced by 80% and covers the latest techniques and applications, including nanostructures, attosecond processes, optical control of chirality, and weak and strong field quantum control. Developments and challenges in decoherence-sensitive condensed phase control as well as in bimolecular control are clearly described.Indispensable for atomic, molecular and chemical

  20. Optimal Control of Teaching Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Man; ZHANG Guo-zhi

    2002-01-01

    The authors first put forward quadratic form performance index as a criterion of measuringmerits and demerits of teaching process. On this base, we got a low of optimal control after the quantificationof the teacher's functions. It must play a leading role on how the teacher fully controls the whole teachingprocess.

  1. Process control using reliability based control charts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Jacob

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents the method to monitor the mean time between failures (MTBF and detect anychange in intensity parameter. Here, a control chart procedure is presented for process reliability monitoring.Control chart based on different distributions are also considered and were used in decision making. Results anddiscussions are presented based on the case study at different industries.Design/methodology/approach: The failure occurrence process can be modeled by different distributions likehomogeneous Poisson process, Weibull model etc. In each case the aim is to monitor the mean time betweenfailure (MTBF and detect any change in intensity parameter. When the process can be described by a Poissonprocess the time between failures will be exponential and can be used for reliability monitoring.Findings: In this paper, a new procedure based on the monitoring of time to observe r failures is also proposedand it can be more appropriate for reliability monitoring.Practical implications: This procedure is useful and more sensitive when compared with the λ-chart although itwill wait until r failures for a decision. These charts can be regarded as powerful tools for reliability monitoring.λr gives more accurate results than λ-chart.Originality/value: Adopting these measures to system of equipments can increase the reliability and availabilityof the system results in economic gain. A homogeneous Poisson process is usually used to model the failureoccurrence process with certain intensity.

  2. Hydrological and geochemical processes constraining groundwater salinity in wetland areas related to evaporitic (karst) systems. A case study from Southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Márquez, J. M.; Barberá, J. A.; Andreo, B.; Mudarra, M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic evolution of groundwater in an evaporite karst plateau (including wetland areas and saline to hyper-saline springs) located at S Spain was studied. Physicochemical parameters, major ions and stable isotopes were analyzed in rain, brine spring, wetland and leakage water samples, from which the most common mineral saturation indexes were computed and geochemical and isotopic modelling were performed. Results show an apparent relationship between the elevation of brine springs and their water mineralization, indicating that drainage at higher altitude may be associated to gravity-driven flows, since brackish groundwater is isotopically fractionated due to evaporation. On the other hand, the lower altitude springs could drain deeper flows with longer residence time, resulting in highly mineralized and warmer (briny) groundwater. The dissolution of halite and gypsum has proved to be the main geochemical processes, which are favored by the great ionic strength of groundwater. Calcite precipitation occurs in brackish waters draining wetlands, being boosted by common ion effect (when CaSO4 waters are present) and solute concentration caused by evaporation. Modelling results strongly support the hypothesis that most of the selected springs geochemically evolve in a common (S-N) flowpath. The methods used in this research contribute to a better understanding of the hydrogeological processes occurring in the studied evaporitic system, but also in equivalent hydrological environments worldwide.

  3. Geochemical processes in ground water resulting from surface mining of coal at the Big Sky and West Decker Mine areas, southeastern Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A potential hydrologic effect of surface mining of coal in southeastern Montana is a change in the quality of ground water. Dissolved-solids concen- trations in water in spoils aquifers generally are larger than concentrations in water in the coal aquifers they replaced; however, laboratory experiments have indicated that concentrations can decrease if ground water flows from coal-mine spoils to coal. This study was conducted to determine if decreases in concentrations occur onsite and, if so, which geochemical processes caused the decreases. Solid-phase core samples of spoils, unmined over- burden, and coal, and ground-water samples were collected from 16 observation wells at two mine areas. In the Big Sky Mine area, changes in ground- water chemistry along a flow path from an upgradient coal aquifer to a spoils aquifer probably were a result of dedolomitization. Dissolved-solids concentrations were unchanged as water flowed from a spoils aquifer to a downgradient coal aquifer. In the West Decker Mine area, dissolved-solids concentrations apparently decreased from about 4,100 to 2,100 milligrams per liter as water moved along an inferred flow path from a spoils aquifer to a downgradient coal aquifer. Geochemical models were used to analyze changes in water chemistry on the basis of results of solid-phase and aqueous geochemical characteristics. Geochemical processes postulated to result in the apparent decrease in dissolved-solids concentrations along this inferred flow path include bacterial reduction of sulfate, reverse cation exchange within the coal, and precipitation of carbonate and iron-sulfide minerals.

  4. Path modeling and process control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høskuldsson, Agnar; Rodionova, O.; Pomerantsev, A.

    2007-01-01

    and having three or more stages. The methods are applied to a process control of a multi-stage production process having 25 variables and one output variable. When moving along the process, variables change their roles. It is shown how the methods of path modeling can be applied to estimate variables...... of the next stage with the purpose of obtaining optimal or almost optimal quality of the output variable. An important aspect of the methods presented is the possibility of extensive graphic analysis of data that can provide the engineer with a detailed view of the multi-variate variation in data.......Many production processes are carried out in stages. At the end of each stage, the production engineer can analyze the intermediate results and correct process parameters (variables) of the next stage. Both analysis of the process and correction to process parameters at next stage should...

  5. Geochemical modeling of leaching from MSWI air-pollution control residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astrup, T.; Dijkstra, J.J.; Comans, R.N.J.; Sloot, van der H.A.; Christensen, T.H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an improved understanding of the leaching behavior of waste incineration air-pollution-control (APC) residues in a long-term perspective. Leaching was investigated by a series of batch experiments reflecting leaching conditions after initial washout of highly soluble salts from r

  6. Geochemical modeling of leaching from MSWI air-pollution control residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astrup, T.; Dijkstra, J.J.; Comans, R.N.J.; Sloot, van der H.A.; Christensen, T.H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an improved understanding of the leaching behavior of waste incineration air-pollution-control (APC) residues in a long-term perspective. Leaching was investigated by a series of batch experiments reflecting leaching conditions after initial washout of highly soluble salts from r

  7. Stratigraphic and geochemical controls on naturally occurring arsenic in groundwater, eastern Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, M. E.; Simo, J. A.; Freiberg, P. G.

    High arsenic concentrations (up to 12,000μg/L) have been measured in groundwater from a confined sandstone aquifer in eastern Wisconsin. The main arsenic source is a sulfide-bearing secondary cement horizon (SCH) that has variable thickness, morphology, and arsenic concentrations. Arsenic occurs in pyrite and marcasite as well as in iron oxyhydroxides but not as a separate arsenopyrite phase. Nearly identical sulfur isotopic signatures in pyrite and dissolved sulfate and the correlation between dissolved sulfate, iron, and arsenic concentrations suggest that sulfide oxidation is the dominant process controlling arsenic release to groundwater. However, arsenic-bearing oxyhydroxides can potentially provide another arsenic source if reducing conditions develop or if they are transported as colloids in the aquifer. Analysis of well data indicates that the intersection of the SCH with static water levels measured in residential wells is strongly correlated with high concentrations of arsenic in groundwater. Field and laboratory data suggest that the most severe arsenic contamination is caused by localized borehole interactions of air, water, and sulfides. Although arsenic contamination is caused by oxidation of naturally occurring sulfides, it is influenced by water-level fluctuations caused by municipal well pumping or climate changes, which can shift geographic areas in which contamination occurs. Résumé De fortes concentrations en arsenic, jusqu'à 12000μg/L, ont été mesurées dans l'eau souterraine d'un aquifère gréseux captif, dans l'est du Wisconsin. La principale source d'arsenic est un horizon à cimentation secondaire (SCH) comportant des sulfures, dont l'épaisseur, la morphologie et les concentrations en arsenic sont variables. L'arsenic est présent dans la pyrite et dans la marcassite, de même que dans des oxy-hydroxydes de fer, mais non pas dans une phase séparée d'arsénopyrite. Les signatures isotopiques du soufre presque identiques dans la

  8. Process control under safety aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, T. E-mail: theo.vollmer@hvt.fzk.de; Borcherding, K.; Hellriegel, G.; Penzhorn, R.-D

    2000-08-01

    The safety of people and the environment is increasingly important in the operation and, consequently, also in the project design of process equipment. Rules and regulations for safeguarding of industrial process plants (not-nuclear and nuclear) by means of process control engineering are either being developed or expanded. This includes the international harmonization of existing national codes. This article presents an introduction into the philosophy of ensuring plant safety by means of instrumentation and control protection systems. The methods of risk assessment are described, and various potential solutions are shown which are geared to achieving the necessary level of safety and, at the same time, allowing flexible operation to be maintained. Reference is made to the problems existing with respect to integrating people into this process, i.e. man-machine interaction, especially in view of possible interventions in emergencies.

  9. Fluid/Gas Process Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Sergio

    1989-01-01

    Fluid/gas controller, or "Super Burper", developed to obtain precise fill quantities of working fluid and noncondensable gas in heat pipe by incorporating detachable external reservoir into system during processing stage. Heat pipe filled with precise quantities of working fluid and noncondensable gas, and procedure controlled accurately. Application of device best suited for high-quality, high performance heat pipes. Device successfully implemented with various types of heat pipes, including vapor chambers, thermal diodes, large space radiators, and sideflows.

  10. Geochemical controls of elevated arsenic concentrations in groundwater, Ester Dome, Fairbanks district, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplanck, P.L.; Mueller, S.H.; Goldfarb, R.J.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Youcha, E.K.

    2008-01-01

    Ester Dome, an upland area near Fairbanks, Alaska, was chosen for a detailed hydrogeochemical study because of the previously reported elevated arsenic in groundwater, and the presence of a large set of wells amenable to detailed sampling. Ester Dome lies within the Fairbanks mining district, where gold-bearing quartz veins, typically containing 2-3??vol.% sulfide minerals (arsenopyrite, stibnite, and pyrite), have been mined both underground and in open cuts. Gold-bearing veins on Ester Dome occur in shear zones and the sulfide minerals in these veins have been crushed to fine-grained material by syn- or post-mineralization movement. Groundwater at Ester Dome is circumneutral, Ca-HCO3 to Ca-SO4 type, and ranges from dilute (specific conductance of 48????S/cm) to more concentrated (specific conductance as high as 2070????S/cm). In general, solute concentrations increase down hydrologic gradient. Redox species indicate that the groundwaters range from oxic to sub-oxic (low dissolved oxygen, Fe(III) reduction, no SO4 reduction). Waters with the highest Fe concentrations, as high as 10.7??mg/L, are the most anoxic. Dissolved As concentrations range from iron oxyhydroxides, control the arsenic chemistry. Furthermore, As concentrations do not covary with other constituents that form anions and oxyanions in solution (e.g., HCO3, Mo, F, or U) such that desorption of arsenic from clays or oxides also does not control arsenic mobility. Oxidation of arsenopyrite and dissolution of scorodite, in the near-surface environment appears to be the primary control of dissolved As in this upland area. More specifically, the elevated As concentrations are spatially associated with sulfidized shear zones and localities of gold-bearing quartz veins. Consistent with this interpretation, elevated dissolved Sb concentrations (as high as 59????g/L), also correlated with occurrences of hypogene sulfide minerals, were measured in samples with high dissolved As concentrations.

  11. EVALUATION OF GEOCHEMICAL QUALITY CONTROL IN DETERMINATION OF Mn IN SOILS USING A SEQUENTIAL CHEMICAL EXTRACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Sequential chemical extraction procedure has been widely used to partition particulate trace metals into various fractions and to describe the distribution and the statue of trace metals in geo-environment. One sequential chemical extraction procedure was employed here to partition various fractions of Mn in soils. The experiment was designed with quality controlling concept in order to show sampling and analytical error. Experimental results obtained on duplicate analysis of all soil samples demonstrated that the precision was less than 10% (at 95% confidence level). The accuracy was estimated by comparing the accepted total concentration of Mn in standard reference materials (SRMs) with the measured sum of the individual fractions. The recovery of Mn from SRM1 and SRM2 was 94.1% and 98.4% , respectively. The detection limit, accuracy and precision of the sequential chemical extraction procedure were discussed in detailed. All the results suggest that the trueness of the analytical method is satisfactory.

  12. Control of geochemical mobility of arsenic by liming in materials subjected to acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, R.P. de; Figueiredo, B.R. [Geoscience Inst., UNICAMP, SP (Brazil); Mello, J.W.V. de; Santos, J.C.Z.; Zandonadi, L.U. [Soil Dept., Federal Univ. of Vicosa, MG (Brazil)

    2008-04-15

    Background. Acid mine drainage (AMD) results from the exposure of sulfide materials to atmospheric water and oxygen. In addition to AMD, oxidation of arsenopyrite and other As-bearing sulfides can release arsenic (As) into the environment. In view of the risk to living organisms due to contamination of ground and surface water sources with As, this work was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of lime (CaCO{sub 3}) in controlling the dispersion of this metalloid in the environment. Methods. Partially oxidized samples of sulfide bearing materials from gold mines in Brazil were used to evaluate the arsenic mobilization by leaching tests. Columns containing ground samples, with and without liming treatments, were leached with distilled water every two weeks over a 156-day period. Results and discussion. The acid-base accounting (ABA) static tests classified the samples as potential acid forming materials. In the treatments without liming, As, Fe and S concentrations in the leachates were higher than after treatment with carbonate. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of liming and As mobilization were lower in the sample containing goethite. A high correlation between Fe and As concentrations in the leachates (r=0.749) suggests that iron (hydr)oxides retained arsenic in the solid phase. Oxidation rates of As bearing sulfides were increased at low pH (2.0-3.9), probably due to the enhanced activity of bacteria (Acidithiobacillus) and decreased rate of Fe precipitation, thus reinforcing generation of acid water, and consequently releasing As. Conclusions and perspectives. Our results corroborate the use of lime to control the dispersion of As in AMD-affected environments. However, the effectiveness of the liming treatment seems to be dependent on the presence of iron (hydr)oxides in the sample. These findings can be useful to remediate areas affected by acid mine drainage and arsenic mobilization in partially oxidized sulfide materials. (orig.)

  13. A Process Control Undergraduate Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, J. C.; Mumme', K. I.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a course sequence in process control in the chemical engineering department at the University of Maine. Various factors in teaching the sequence (which tends to be strongly applied in nature) are also discussed. These factors include texts, facilities, industrial response to the program, and others. (Author/JN)

  14. Interactive Control of Prototyping Process

    OpenAIRE

    Luqi; Lee, Yuh-jeng

    1989-01-01

    We present the use of CAPS (Computer-aided Prototyping System) for the interactive construction, execution, debugging, modification, and controlling of software prototypes. We discuss the current version of CAPS, explicate its user interface for monitoring and coordinating the prototype development process, and depict the functioning of each of the integrated software tools.

  15. Trace elements in tourmalines from massive sulfide deposits and tourmalinites: Geochemical controls and exploration applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, W.L.; Slack, J.F.; Ramsden, A.R.; Win, T.T.; Ryan, C.G.

    1996-01-01

    Trace element contents of tourmalines from massive sulfide deposits and tourmalinites have been determined in situ by proton microprobe; >390 analyses were acquired from 32 polished thin sections. Concentrations of trace elements in the tourmalines vary widely, from zones are relatively homogeneous, suggesting that these trace elements are contained within the crystal structure of the tourmaline, and are not present in inclusions. The highest base metal contents are in ore-related tourmaline samples from Kidd Creek (Ontario), Broken Hill (Australia), and Sazare (Japan). Tourmaline data from these and many other massive sulfide deposits cluster by sample and display broadly linear trends on Zn vs. Fe plots, suggesting chemical control by temperature and hydrothermal and/or metamorphic fluid-mineral equilibria. Significant Ni occurs only in samples from the Kidd Creek Cu-Zn-Pb-Ag deposit, which is associated with a large footwall ultramafic body. An overall antithetic relationship between Zn and Ni probably reflects fluid source controls. Mn is correlated with Fe in tourmalines from barren associations, and possibly in some tourmalines associated with sulfide vein deposits. Sn increases systematically with Fe content irrespective of association; the highest values are found in schorls from granites. Other trace elements are generally uncorrelated with major element concentrations (e.g., Sr-Ca). Base metal proportions in the tourmalines show systematic patterns on ternary Cu-Pb-Zn diagrams that correlate well with the major commodity metals in the associated massive sulfide deposits. For example, data for tourmalines from Cu-Zn deposits (e.g., Ming mine, Newfoundland) fall mainly on the Cu-Zn join, whereas those from Pb-Zn deposits (e.g., Broken Hill, Australia) plot on the Pb-Zn join; no data fall on the Cu-Pb join, consistent with the lack of this metal association in massive sulfide deposits. The systematic relationship between base metal proportions in the

  16. EVALUATION OF GEOCHEMICAL QUALITY CONTROL IN DETERMINATION OF Mn IN SOILS USING A SEQUENTIAL CHEMICAL EXTRACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONGDe-ming; FANGChun-sheng; 等

    2002-01-01

    Sequential chemical extraction procedure has been widely used to partition particulate trace metals into vari-ous fractions and to describe the distribution and the statue of trace metals in geo-environment.One sequential chemical extraction procedure was employed here to partition various fractions of Mn in soils.The experiment was designed with quality controlling concept in order to show sampling and analytical error.Experimental results obtained on duplicate analy-sis of all soil samples demonstrated that the precision was less than 10%(at 95% confidence level).The accuracy was estimated by comparing the accepted total concentration of Mn in standard reference materials (SRMs) with the measured sum of the individual fractions.The recovery of Mn from SRM1 and SRM2 was 94.1% and 98.4%,respectively.The detection limit,accuracy and precision of the sequential chemical extraction procedure were discussed in detailed.All the results suggest that the trueness of the analytical method is satisfactory.

  17. Subduction of Fracture Zones control mantle melting and geochemical signature above slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Leeman, William; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi

    2014-05-01

    The geochemistry of arc volcanics proximal to oceanic fracture zones (FZs) is consistent with higher than normal fluid inputs to arc magma sources. Here, enrichment of boron (B/Zr) in volcanic arc lavas is used to evaluate relative along-strike inputs of slab-derived fluids in the Aleutian, Andean, Cascades, and Trans-Mexican arcs. Significant B/Zr spikes coincide with subduction of prominent FZs in the relatively cool Aleutian and Andean subduction zones, but not in the relatively warm Cascadia and Mexican subduction zones, suggesting that FZ subduction locally enhances fluid introduction beneath volcanic arcs, and retention of fluids to sub-arc depths diminishes with subduction zone thermal gradient. Geodynamic treatments of lateral inhomogeneities in subducting plates have not previously considered how FZs may influence the melt and fluid distribution above the slab. Using high-resolution three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, concentrate in areas where fracture zones are subducted, resulting in along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes.

  18. Subduction of fracture zones controls mantle melting and geochemical signature above slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Vlad C; Leeman, William P; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi

    2014-10-24

    For some volcanic arcs, the geochemistry of volcanic rocks erupting above subducted oceanic fracture zones is consistent with higher than normal fluid inputs to arc magma sources. Here we use enrichment of boron (B/Zr) in volcanic arc lavas as a proxy to evaluate relative along-strike inputs of slab-derived fluids in the Aleutian, Andean, Cascades and Trans-Mexican arcs. Significant B/Zr spikes coincide with subduction of prominent fracture zones in the relatively cool Aleutian and Andean subduction zones where fracture zone subduction locally enhances fluid introduction beneath volcanic arcs. Geodynamic models of subduction have not previously considered how fracture zones may influence the melt and fluid distribution above slabs. Using high-resolution three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of subduction, we show that enhanced production of slab-derived fluids and mantle wedge melts concentrate in areas where fracture zones are subducted, resulting in significant along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes.

  19. Geochemical and geological control on filling history of Eocene reservoirs, Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, M.; Maguregui, J.; Toro, C.; Marquina, M. [Intevep S.A., Caracas (Venezuela)

    1996-08-01

    Crude oils of Eocene fluvio-deltaic reservoirs in {open_quotes}Bloque V{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Centro Lago{close_quotes} fields in the center of the Maracaibo Lake show many differences in composition, which are due to stratigraphically and structurally controlled reservoir geometry and a low rate of in-reservoir mixing of at least two successive petroleum charges. Oils produced from the top of structural highs contain 18(H) oleanane, higher Pr/Ph and C{sub 23-3}/C{sub 24-4} ratios, a lower proportion of DBT/P compounds, and clearly different fingerprint patterns in the C{sub 6}-C{sub 15} range, than those observed in oils produced from the lower parts of the structures. These compositional differences suggest that two source rocks, or two distinctive organic facies within the same Cretaceous La Luna Formation, generated and filled vertically poorly connected Eocene reservoirs. On the other hand, saturate-biomarkers ratios, triaromatics (C{sub 21}/C{sub 21}+C{sub 28}), n-paraffins (n-C{sub 20}/n-C{sub 29}) and n-heptane index suggest that oils in upper reservoirs are slightly less mature than oils in lower reservoirs and, consequently filled the structure first. Additional evidence from formation water analysis and tectonic basin evolution allow us to interpret at least two petroleum pulses from Cretaceous source rocks during Upper Miocene to present day kitchens located in the Andes foredeep at the southeast of the study area.

  20. Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation of Blind Geothermal Resources in Fault-Controlled Dilational Corners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, Daniel [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Geothermal plays in extensional and transtensional tectonic environments have long been a major target in the exploration of geothermal resources and the Dixie Valley area has served as a classic natural laboratory for this type of geothermal plays. In recent years, the interactions between normal faults and strike-slip faults, acting either as strain relay zones have attracted significant interest in geothermal exploration as they commonly result in fault-controlled dilational corners with enhanced fracture permeability and thus have the potential to host blind geothermal prospects. Structural ambiguity, complications in fault linkage, etc. often make the selection for geothermal exploration drilling targets complicated and risky. Though simplistic, the three main ingredients of a viable utility-grade geothermal resource are heat, fluids, and permeability. Our new geological mapping and fault kinematic analysis derived a structural model suggest a two-stage structural evolution with (a) middle Miocene N -S trending normal faults (faults cutting across the modern range), - and tiling Olio-Miocene volcanic and sedimentary sequences (similar in style to East Range and S Stillwater Range). NE-trending range-front normal faulting initiated during the Pliocene and are both truncating N-S trending normal faults and reactivating some former normal faults in a right-lateral fashion. Thus the two main fundamental differences to previous structural models are (1) N-S trending faults are pre-existing middle Miocene normal faults and (2) these faults are reactivated in a right-later fashion (NOT left-lateral) and kinematically linked to the younger NE-trending range-bounding normal faults (Pliocene in age). More importantly, this study provides the first constraints on transient fluid flow through the novel application of apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and 4He/3He thermochronometry in the geothermally active Dixie Valley area in Nevada.

  1. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20111167 Cao Zhonghuang(Wuhan Iron & Steel Group Minerals Company,Wuhan 430063,China);Luo Xianrong Comparative Study of Copper-Nickel Deposit Exploration by the Geoelectro-chemical Extraction Method in Different Overburden Areas(Geology and Prospecting,ISSN0495-5331,CN11-2043/P,46(3),2010,p.476-482,4 illus.,5 tables,20 refs.)Key words:geo-electrochemical methods,copper ores,nickel ores,Gansu Province,Jilin Province The authors have made a comparative study of quantitative and qualitative analysis and application of the geoelectro-chemical extraction method in different overburden areas in southward extension of Jinchuan in Gansu Province and Hongqiling in Jilin Province.The authors found that this method extracted very few ions in arid areas covered with debris,but the prospecting effect was almost the same as that in moist areas covered with thick overburden.And this method could show objectively differences of geochemical characters

  2. Reactive transport modeling of geochemical controls on secondary water quality impacts at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Gene-Hua Crystal.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Baedecker, Mary Jo; Bennett, Philip C.; Amos, Richard T.; Herkelrath, William N.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation of organic amendments and contaminants in aquifers can trigger secondary water quality impacts that impair groundwater resources. Reactive transport models help elucidate how diverse geochemical reactions control the spatiotemporal evolution of these impacts. Using extensive monitoring data from a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota (USA), we implemented a comprehensive model that simulates secondary plumes of depleted dissolved O2 and elevated concentrations of Mn2+, Fe2+, CH4, and Ca2+ over a two-dimensional cross section for 30 years following the spill. The model produces observed changes by representing multiple oil constituents and coupled carbonate and hydroxide chemistry. The model includes reactions with carbonates and Fe and Mn mineral phases, outgassing of CH4 and CO2 gas phases, and sorption of Fe, Mn, and H+. Model results demonstrate that most of the carbon loss from the oil (70%) occurs through direct outgassing from the oil source zone, greatly limiting the amount of CH4 cycled down-gradient. The vast majority of reduced Fe is strongly attenuated on sediments, with most (91%) in the sorbed form in the model. Ferrous carbonates constitute a small fraction of the reduced Fe in simulations, but may be important for furthering the reduction of ferric oxides. The combined effect of concomitant redox reactions, sorption, and dissolved CO2 inputs from source-zone degradation successfully reproduced observed pH. The model demonstrates that secondary water quality impacts may depend strongly on organic carbon properties, and impacts may decrease due to sorption and direct outgassing from the source zone.

  3. Diazotrophy in the Deep: An analysis of the distribution, magnitude, geochemical controls, and biological mediators of deep-sea benthic nitrogen fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekas, Anne Elizabeth

    Biological nitrogen fixation (the conversion of N2 to NH3) is a critical process in the oceans, counteracting the production of N2 gas by dissimilatory bacterial metabolisms and providing a source of bioavailable nitrogen to many nitrogen-limited ecosystems. One currently poorly studied and potentially underappreciated habitat for diazotrophic organisms is the sediments of the deep-sea. Although nitrogen fixation was once thought to be negligible in non-photosynthetically driven benthic ecosystems, the present study demonstrates the occurrence and expression of a diversity of nifH genes (those necessary for nitrogen fixation), as well as a widespread ability to fix nitrogen at high rates in these locations. The following research explores the distribution, magnitude, geochemical controls, and biological mediators of nitrogen fixation at several deep-sea sediment habitats, including active methane seeps (Mound 12, Costa Rica; Eel River Basin, CA, USA; Hydrate Ridge, OR, USA; and Monterey Canyon, CA, USA), whale-fall sites (Monterey Canyon, CA), and background deep-sea sediment (off-site Mound 12 Costa Rica, off-site Hydrate Ridge, OR, USA; and Monterey Canyon, CA, USA). The first of the five chapters describes the FISH-NanoSIMS method, which we optimized for the analysis of closely associated microbial symbionts in marine sediments. The second describes an investigation of methane seep sediment from the Eel River Basin, where we recovered nifH sequences from extracted DNA, and used FISH-NanoSIMS to identify methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2) as diazotrophs, when associated with functional sulfate-reducing bacterial symbionts. The third and fourth chapters focus on the distribution and diversity of active diazotrophs (respectively) in methane seep sediment from Mound 12, Costa Rica, using a combination of 15N-labeling experiments, FISH-NanoSIMS, and RNA and DNA analysis. The fifth chapter expands the scope of the investigation by targeting diverse samples from methane

  4. Geochemical characteristics of fault core and damage zones of the Hong-Che Fault Zone of the Junggar Basin (NW China) with implications for the fault sealing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Wu, Kongyou; Wang, Xi; Pei, Yangwen; Liu, Bo; Guo, Jianxun

    2017-08-01

    Faults may have a complex internal structure, including fault core and damage zone, and can act as major conduits for fluid migration. The migration of fluids along faults is generally associated with strong fluid-rock interaction, forming large amounts of cement that fill in the fractures. The cementation of the fault fractures is considered to be one of the important parameters of fault sealing. The different components of faults have diverse geochemical features because of varying physical characteristics. The investigation of the geochemical characteristics of the fault and damage zones could provide important information about the fault sealing process, which is very important in oil and gas exploration. To understand the fault-cemented sealing process, detailed geochemical studies were conducted on the fault and damage zones of the Hong-Che Fault of the northwestern Junggar Basin in China. The major and trace element data of our study suggest that the fault core is characterized by higher loss on ignition (LOI), potassium loss, Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA), and Plagioclase Index of Alteration (PIA) values and lower high field strength element (HFSE), large-ion lithosphile element (LILE), and rare earth element (REE) concentrations compared with the damage zone, implying more serious elemental loss and weathering of the fault core compared with the damage zone during faulting. The carbon and oxygen isotope data reveal that the cement of the Hong-Che Fault Zone formed due to multiple sources of fluids. The fault core was mainly affected by deep sources of hydrothermal fluids. In combination with previous studies, we suggest a potential fault-cemented sealing process during the period of fault movement. The fault core acts as the fluid conduit during faulting. After faulting, the fault core is cemented and the damage zone becomes the major conduit for fluid migration. The cementation firstly occurs on two sides of the damage zone in the upper part of the

  5. Geochemical Processes Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Zachara, John M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2007-09-28

    This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical process information available for the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tank farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility. Two companion reports to this one were recently published which discuss the geology of the farms (Reidel and Chamness 2007) and groundwater flow and contamination beneath the farms (Horton 2007).

  6. Supramolecular Photochemistry Controlling Photochemical Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ramamurthy, V

    2011-01-01

    This is the most updated, comprehensive collection of monographs on all aspects of photochemistry and photophysics related to natural and synthetic, inorganic, organic, and biological supramolecular systems. Supramolecular Photochemistry: Controlling Photochemical Processes addresses reactions in crystals, organized assemblies, monolayers, zeolites, clays, silica, micelles, polymers, dendrimers, organic hosts, supramolecular structures, organic glass, proteins and DNA, and applications of photosystems in confined media. This landmark publication describes the past, present, and future of this

  7. Geochemical evolution processes and water-quality observations based on results of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program in the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, 1996-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, MaryLynn; Fahlquist, Lynne; Houston, Natalie A.; Lindgren, Richard J.; Ging, Patricia B.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program, the U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed groundwater samples during 1996-2006 from the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer of central Texas, a productive karst aquifer developed in Cretaceous-age carbonate rocks. These National Water-Quality Assessment Program studies provide an extensive dataset of groundwater geochemistry and water quality, consisting of 249 groundwater samples collected from 136 sites (wells and springs), including (1) wells completed in the shallow, unconfined, and urbanized part of the aquifer in the vicinity of San Antonio (shallow/urban unconfined category), (2) wells completed in the unconfined (outcrop area) part of the regional aquifer (unconfined category), and (3) wells completed in and springs discharging from the confined part of the regional aquifer (confined category). This report evaluates these data to assess geochemical evolution processes, including local- and regional-scale processes controlling groundwater geochemistry, and to make water-quality observations pertaining to sources and distribution of natural constituents and anthropogenic contaminants, the relation between geochemistry and hydrologic conditions, and groundwater age tracers and travel time. Implications for monitoring water-quality trends in karst are also discussed. Geochemical and isotopic data are useful tracers of recharge, groundwater flow, fluid mixing, and water-rock interaction processes that affect water quality. Sources of dissolved constituents to Edwards aquifer groundwater include dissolution of and geochemical interaction with overlying soils and calcite and dolomite minerals that compose the aquifer. Geochemical tracers such as magnesium to calcium and strontium to calcium ratios and strontium isotope compositions are used to evaluate and constrain progressive fluid-evolution processes. Molar ratios of magnesium to calcium and strontium to calcium in groundwater typically

  8. Microstructural Control on Perlite Expansibility and Geochemical Balance with a Novel Application of Isocon Analysis: An Example from Milos Island Perlite (Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basilios Tsikouras

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Representative perlite bulk rock samples from two areas of Milos Island, Greece were collected and the expansion properties of their industrial product were investigated. Coarse crude perlite from Tsigrado exhibits better expansibility, which is assigned to the presence of coarser crystallites in its bulk parent rock. During thermal treatment, the finer crystallites of the coarse crude perlite from Trachilas are entrapped in the groundmass and lead to overheating, which inhibits expansion and eventually results in shrinkage. Geochemical modification of the expanded perlites relative to their crude precursors were investigated, using the isocon method. Volatilisation of crystalline water is the main factor controlling mass reduction of the expanded perlites. Other elements, during the adequate expansion of the Tsigrado perlite, can be classified into three categories. The elements that participate preferentially in crystals decrease in the expanded material at amounts higher than the total mass loss of the rock, due to their escape controlled mainly by the removal of the crystalline phases. The elements equally participating in crystals and the groundmass show losses equivalent to the total mass loss of the rocks, as they escaped in the crystalline phases and airborne particles from the groundmass during thermal treatment. Decrease of highly incompatible elements, which mostly participate in the groundmass, in the expanded products is less than the total mass loss, as they escaped mainly in the airborne particles. The inadequate expansion and burst of the Trachilas perlite did not allow for a similar categorisation, due to random and unpredictable escape of the elements. We propose the application of this method to an artificial system to predict unexpandable mineral phases in bulk perlite, as well as elements that are most likely to participate in the amorphous perlite phase, which cannot be determined from a regular industrial production line

  9. From Process Understanding to Process Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streefland, M.

    2010-01-01

    A licensed pharmaceutical process is required to be executed within the validated ranges throughout the lifetime of product manufacturing. Changes to the process usually require the manufacturer to demonstrate that the safety and efficacy of the product remains unchanged. Recent changes in the regul

  10. Modelling geochemical and microbial consumption of dissolved oxygen after backfilling a high level radiactive waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changbing; Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorge; Bonilla, Mercedes

    2007-08-15

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) left in the voids of buffer and backfill materials of a deep geological high level radioactive waste (HLW) repository could cause canister corrosion. Available data from laboratory and in situ experiments indicate that microbes play a substantial role in controlling redox conditions near a HLW repository. This paper presents the application of a coupled hydro-bio-geochemical model to evaluate geochemical and microbial consumption of DO in bentonite porewater after backfilling of a HLW repository designed according to the Swedish reference concept. In addition to geochemical reactions, the model accounts for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) respiration and methane oxidation. Parameters for microbial processes were derived from calibration of the REX in situ experiment carried out at the Aspö underground laboratory. The role of geochemical and microbial processes in consuming DO is evaluated for several scenarios. Numerical results show that both geochemical and microbial processes are relevant for DO consumption. However, the time needed to consume the DO trapped in the bentonite buffer decreases dramatically from several hundreds of years when only geochemical processes are considered to a few weeks when both geochemical reactions and microbially-mediated DOC respiration and methane oxidation are taken into account simultaneously.

  11. Melt extraction and enrichment processes in the New Caledonia lherzolites: Evidence from geochemical and Sr-Nd isotope data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchiari, Arianna; Montanini, Alessandra; Bosch, Delphine; Macera, Patrizia; Cluzel, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    The New Caledonia ophiolite (Peridotite Nappe) is dominated by mantle lithologies, composed of forearc-related refractory harzburgites and minor lherzolites in both the spinel and plagioclase facies. In this study, a comprehensive geochemical data set (major, trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes) is used to constrain the mantle evolution of the lherzolites and their relationships with the basalts from the Poya Terrane, which tectonically underlies the mantle rocks. The majority of the lherzolites are low-strain porphyroclastic tectonites. They likely record an asthenospheric origin followed by re-equilibration at lithospheric conditions, as supported by geothermometric estimates (T = 1100-940 °C and 920-890 °C for porphyroclastic and neoblastic spinel-facies assemblages, respectively). Olivine composition (Fo = 88.5-90.0 mol%), spinel Cr# ([molar 100 • Cr/(Cr + Al)] = 13-17) and relatively high amounts (7-8 vol%) of Al2O3- and Na2O-rich clinopyroxene (up to 0.5 and 6.5 wt.%, respectively) indicate a moderately depleted geochemical signature for the spinel lherzolites. Bulk rock and clinopyroxene rare earth elements (REE) patterns display a typical abyssal-type signature, i.e. steeply plunging LREE accompanied by nearly flat HREE to MREE. Clinopyroxene REE compositions of the spinel lherzolites may be reproduced by small amounts of fractional melting of a garnet lherzolite precursor (~ 4%), followed by 4%-5% melting in the spinel peridotite field. The plagioclase lherzolites show melt impregnation microstructures, Cr- and Ti-rich spinels and incompatible trace element enrichments (REE, Ti, Y, and Zr) in bulk rocks and clinopyroxenes. Impregnation modelling for these elements suggests that the plagioclase lherzolites originated from residual spinel lherzolites by entrapment of highly depleted (non-aggregated) MORB melt fractions in the shallow oceanic lithosphere. Nd isotope compositions of the investigated peridotites are consistent with derivation from an

  12. Geochemical controls of groundwaters upwelling in saline environments: Case study the discharge playa of Sidi El Hani (Sahel, Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagorti, Mohamed Ali; Essefi, Elhoucine; Touir, Jamel; Guellala, Rihab; Yaich, Chokri

    2013-10-01

    Within the discharge playa of Sidi El Hani, the surrounding aquifers converge due to uprising underground waters. The Principal Component Analysis proves that the fluid density is inversely influenced by the rainfall and has a reciprocal effect with evaporation. This parameter is governed by uprising groundwaters and the convergence of waters and inflow in the sabkha result in a geochemical exceptionality. The fluid density maintains high values during the year, the modeling of which shows a third sinusoidal distribution. This model remains stable along a span of time because the surrounding aquifer feeds the discharge playa by a continuous salty water flow. In general, waters in the majority of drills surrounding the discharge playa have the same facies which is mainly made up of water charged with Na+ and Cl-. A sample from the northeast of discharge playa shows a geochemical similarity with two wells located in its vicinity.

  13. Geochemical controls on fluoriferous groundwaters of the Pliocene and the more recent aquifers: The case of Aigion region, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanou, K.; Siavalas, G.; Lambrakis, N.

    2013-12-01

    High fluoride concentrations (> 8 mg/L) in the groundwater of the Plio-Pleistocene sediments are rare; however, this is the case around Aigion town, where teeth fluorosis has been detected since the 80s. Aiming to investigate the origin and the mobility mechanism of fluorine in groundwater and sediments a hydrogeological and geochemical research has been conducted. The hydrogeological research revealed that the Na-HCO3 water type of boreholes aligned along a fault and hosted in the confined aquifers display the higher fluoride content. The unconfined aquifer is mostly dominated by Na-Ca-Mg-HCO3-SO4 water, which displays much lower fluoride concentrations. The most permeable sectors of this aquifer host fresh water of Ca-HCO3 type. The geochemical research revealed significant amount of fluorine in the base of a lignite sequence hosted in the Plio-Pleistocene sediments.

  14. National Geochemical Database: Soil

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of soil samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are from the continental US...

  15. National Geochemical Database: Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of sediment samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are of stream sediment in...

  16. National Geochemical Database: Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of sediment samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are of stream sediment...

  17. Physical and Geochemical Controls on the Structure and Function of Microbial Mat Communities at El Tatio Geyser Field, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, K. D.; Omelon, C. R.; Bennett, P.

    2013-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are important primary producers that form the basis of most hot spring microbial mat communities in waters between 30-73°C. Primary producers shape microbial mat communities by fixing the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) pool to organic carbon and providing nutrients for diverse microorganisms that perform a broad range of biogeochemical transformations. This study compares the microbial community structure and net primary productivity of cyanobacterially-based and non-cyanobacterially based microbial mats collected from the El Tatio Geyser Field, a high elevation geyser complex in the Andes Mountains in Region II, Chile. In addition to extreme conditions imparted by high elevation and its location in the Atacama Desert, El Tatio has a suite of extreme geochemical stressors for life, including high arsenic as As(III) and As(V) (0.4-0.6 mM). El Tatio also has unusually low concentrations of DIC in some streams (0.1-0.3 mM), low enough to severely limit primary production in microbial mats. In contrast to other geothermal sites around the world where microbial diversity is controlled primarily by temperature, observations of unusual patterns in microbial mat composition in low-DIC streams at El Tatio suggest alternate controls their distribution. For instance, we observe less biomass in low-DIC streams compared to nearby high DIC streams, and less biomass in high temperature regions of low-DIC streams, compared to low-temperature locations that are dominated by cyanobacteria. To further investigate these patterns, a field assay was conducted to compare carbon assimilation, the relative importance of photo- and chemoautotrophy, and bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundance at two distinct sites along a low-DIC stream. Water temperature at the upstream site measured 60°C, is dominated by high As(III), and is composed of sparse, red-colored mat material, whereas the downstream site measured a water temperature of 40°C, is dominated by high As(V), and is

  18. Multivariate Statistical Process Control Process Monitoring Methods and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

      Given their key position in the process control industry, process monitoring techniques have been extensively investigated by industrial practitioners and academic control researchers. Multivariate statistical process control (MSPC) is one of the most popular data-based methods for process monitoring and is widely used in various industrial areas. Effective routines for process monitoring can help operators run industrial processes efficiently at the same time as maintaining high product quality. Multivariate Statistical Process Control reviews the developments and improvements that have been made to MSPC over the last decade, and goes on to propose a series of new MSPC-based approaches for complex process monitoring. These new methods are demonstrated in several case studies from the chemical, biological, and semiconductor industrial areas.   Control and process engineers, and academic researchers in the process monitoring, process control and fault detection and isolation (FDI) disciplines will be inter...

  19. Business Intelligence in Process Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopčeková, Alena; Kopček, Michal; Tanuška, Pavol

    2013-12-01

    The Business Intelligence technology, which represents a strong tool not only for decision making support, but also has a big potential in other fields of application, is discussed in this paper. Necessary fundamental definitions are offered and explained to better understand the basic principles and the role of this technology for company management. Article is logically divided into five main parts. In the first part, there is the definition of the technology and the list of main advantages. In the second part, an overview of the system architecture with the brief description of separate building blocks is presented. Also, the hierarchical nature of the system architecture is shown. The technology life cycle consisting of four steps, which are mutually interconnected into a ring, is described in the third part. In the fourth part, analytical methods incorporated in the online analytical processing and data mining used within the business intelligence as well as the related data mining methodologies are summarised. Also, some typical applications of the above-mentioned particular methods are introduced. In the final part, a proposal of the knowledge discovery system for hierarchical process control is outlined. The focus of this paper is to provide a comprehensive view and to familiarize the reader with the Business Intelligence technology and its utilisation.

  20. Geochemical engineering and materials program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) was designated as lead agency in discharging the overall legislative mandate for federal R&D to assist the private sector in developing appropriate technology for exploiting geothermal energy resources. The Geochemical Engineering and Materials (GEM) Program was conceived, as part of DOE'S overall strategy, to address specific and plant-wide problems and uncertainties in the use of materials and in geochemical engineering. This program assists industry in the conduct of long-term,high-risk R&D needed to overcome the significant technical and economic GEM-related obstacles faced by developers and potential developers of this alternative energy source. The program focuses on: (1) Increasing the knowledge about the properties of materials and their performance under geothermal energy system conditions; (2) Developing and utilizing more reliable and/or cost-effective materials than previously available; and (3) Developing a greater understanding of and control over geochemical processes during fluid production and transport, energy conversion, and waste management. As a stand-alone program and as support to other DOE geothermal technology development programs, the GEM Program contributes to the feasibility of designing and operating efficient, reliable, and safe fluid handling and energy conversion systems.

  1. Influence of geochemical processes on hydrochemistry and irrigation suitability of groundwater in part of semi-arid Deccan Plateau, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, Duraisamy; Singh, Surendra Kumar; Tiwary, Pramod; Sahu, Nisha; Ray, Sanjay Kumar; Butte, Pravin; Duraisami, Veppangadu Perumal

    2017-02-01

    Major ion geochemistry was used to characterise the chemical composition of groundwater in part of semi-arid Deccan plateau region to understand the geochemical evolution and to evaluate the groundwater quality for irrigation. The study area comprises peninsular gneissic complex of Archean age, younger granites and basaltic alluvium. Forty-nine georeferenced groundwater samples were collected and analysed for major ions. The ionic sequence based on relative proportions was Na+ > Mg2+ > Ca2+ > SO4 2- > HCO3 - > Cl- > CO3 2- > BO3 3- > K+. High Na+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ were generally associated with basaltic alluvial formation, whereas pH, electrical conductivity (EC) and total dissolved salts (TDS) were found to be higher in granitic formations. High standard deviation for EC, TDS, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ indicated the dispersion of ionic concentration throughout the study area. Four major hydrochemical facies identified were Na-Mg-HCO3 type; Mg-Na-HCO3 type; Na-Mg-Ca-SO4 and Mg-Na-Ca-SO4 type. The graphical plots indicated that the groundwater chemistry was influenced by rock-water interaction, silicate weathering and reverse ion exchange. Sodium-dominated waters might have impeded the hydraulic properties of soils as a result of long-term irrigation.

  2. Nanomineralogy as a new dimension in understanding elusive geochemical processes in soils: The case of low-solubility-index elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Michael; Hochella, Michael F.

    2016-05-20

    Nanomineralogy is a new dimension in understanding chemical processes in soils. These processes are revealed at the nanoscale within the structures and compositions of phases that heretofore were not even known to exist in the soils in which they are found. The discovery and understanding of soil chemistry in this way is best accessible via a combination of focused ion beam technology (for sample preparation) and high resolution, analytical transmission electron microscopy (for phase identification). We have used this scientific framework and these techniques to decipher past and present chemical processes in a soil in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada that has been impacted by both smelter contamination (acidification) and subsequent remediation within the past century. In this study, we use these methods to investigate mobilization and sequestration of the relatively immobile elements Al, Ti and Zr. In a micrometer-thick alteration layer on an albite grain, a first generation of clay minerals represents weathering of the underlying mineral prior to the acidification of the soils. Complex assemblages of Ti- and Zr-bearing nanophases occur on the surfaces of Fe-(hydr)oxide crystals and are the result of the dissolution of silicates and oxides and the mobilization of Ti- and Zr-bearing colloids under acidic conditions. These phases include anatase (TiO2), kleberite (Fe3+Ti6O11(OH)5) Ti4O7, baddelyite (ZrO2), a structural analogue to kelyshite (NaZr[Si2O6(OH)]) and authigenic zircon (ZrSiO4). Subsequent remediation of the acidic soils has resulted in the sequestration of Al and in the neoformation of the clay minerals kaolinite, smectite and illite. These complex mineral assemblages form a porous layer that controls the interaction of the underlying mineral with the environment.

  3. Petrological and geochemical Highlights in the floating fragments of the October 2011 submarine eruption offshore El Hierro (Canary Islands): Relevance of submarine hydrothermal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Losada, Jose A.; Eff-Darwich, Antonio; Hernandez, Luis E.; Viñas, Ronaldo; Pérez, Nemesio; Hernandez, Pedro; Melián, Gladys; Martinez-Frías, Jesús; Romero-Ruiz, M. Carmen; Coello-Bravo, Juan Jesús

    2015-02-01

    This paper describes the main physical, petrological and geochemical features of the floating fragments that were emitted in the initial stages of the 2011-2012 submarine eruption off the coast of the Canarian island of El Hierro, located 380 km from the Northwest African Coast. It attempts to assess the potential of radiometric analyses to discern the intriguing origin of the floating fragments and the differences between their constituent parts. In this regard, the material that conforms the core of the fragments contains the largest concentration of uranium (U) ever found in volcanic rocks of the Canary Islands. This enrichment in U is not found in the content of thorium (Th), hence the floating fragments have an unusual U/Th ratio, namely equal to or larger than 3. Although the origin of this material is under discussion, it is proposed that the enrichment in U is the result of hydrothermal processes.

  4. Petrographic, geochemical and isotopic evidence of crustal assimilation processes in the Ponte Nova alkaline mafic-ultramafic massif, SE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzone, Rogério Guitarrari; Montecinos Munoz, Patricio; Enrich, Gaston Eduardo Rojas; Alves, Adriana; Ruberti, Excelso; Gomes, Celsode Barros

    2016-09-01

    Crustal assimilation plus crystal fractionation processes of different basanite magma batches control the evolution of the Ponte Nova cretaceous alkaline mafic-ultramafic massif in SE Brazil. This massif is composed of several intrusions, the main ones with a cumulate character. Disequilibrium features in the early-crystallized phases (e.g., corrosion and sieve textures in cores of clinopyroxene crystals, spongy-cellular-textured plagioclase crystals, gulf corrosion texture in olivine crystals) and classical hybridization textures (e.g., blade biotite and acicular apatite crystals) provide strong evidence of open-system behavior. All samples are olivine- and nepheline-normative rocks with basic-ultrabasic and potassic characters and variable incompatible element enrichments. The wide ranges of whole-rock 87Sr/86Sri and 143Nd/144Ndi ratios (0.70432-0.70641 and 0.512216-0.512555, respectively) are indicative of crustal contribution from the Precambrian basement host rocks. Plagioclase and apatite 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70422-0.70927) obtained for the most primitive samples of each intrusion indicate disequilibrium conditions from early- to principal-crystallization stages. Isotope mixing-model curves between the least contaminated alkaline basic magma and heterogeneous local crustal components indicate that each intrusion of the massif is differentiated from the others by varied degrees of crustal contribution. The primary mechanisms of crustal contribution to the Ponte Nova massif involve the assimilation of host rock xenoliths during the development of the chamber environment and the assimilation of partial melts from the surrounding host rocks. Thermodynamic models using the melts algorithm indicate that parental alkaline basic magmas can be strongly affected by contamination processes subsequently to their initial stages of crystallization when there is sufficient energy to assimilate partial melts of crustal host rocks. The assimilation processes are considered to

  5. PLANTWIDE CONTROL OF ACETYLENE HYDROGENATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SALAM K. AL-DAWERY

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available As an application of Plantwide control, where few papers have been published about the integrated process design and control of complete plants, the acetylene hydrogenation process has been considered as the goal of this research. Firstly, all plant units were controlled separately using PID controllers, then, complete plant control was based on the 15 steps of Luyben’s plantwide control strategy. An acceptable overall plant control behavior was achieved in terms of settling times and overshoot. An improvement was also, noticed on the plantwide control application when cascaded controllers are used for the developed control system. The improvement was clearly on the temperature control.

  6. Biological and geochemical controls on diel dissolved inorganic carbon cycling in a low-order agricultural stream: Implications for reach scales and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, C.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    Movement of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) through the hydrologic cycle is an important component of global carbon budgets, but there is considerable uncertainty about the controls of DIC transmission from landscapes to streams, and through river networks to the oceans. In this study, diel measurements of DIC, ??13C-DIC, dissolved oxygen (O2), ??18O-O2, alkalinity, pH, and other parameters were used to assess the relative magnitudes of biological and geochemical controls on DIC cycling and flux in a nutrient-rich, net autotrophic stream. Rates of photosynthesis (P), respiration (R), groundwater discharge, air-water exchange of CO2, and carbonate precipitation/dissolution were quantified through a time-stepping chemical/isotope (12C and 13C, 16O and 18O) mass balance model. Groundwater was the major source of DIC to the stream. Primary production and carbonate precipitation were equally important sinks for DIC removed from the water column. The stream was always super-saturated with respect to carbonate minerals, but carbonate precipitation occurred mainly during the day when P increased pH. We estimated more than half (possibly 90%) of the carbonate precipitated during the day was retained in the reach under steady baseflow conditions. The amount of DIC removed from the overlying water through carbonate precipitation was similar to the amount of DIC generated from R. Air-water exchange of CO2 was always from the stream to the atmosphere, but was the smallest component of the DIC budget. Overall, the in-stream DIC reactions reduced the amount of CO2 evasion and the downstream flux of groundwater-derived DIC by about half relative to a hypothetical scenario with groundwater discharge only. Other streams with similar characteristics are widely distributed in the major river basins of North America. Data from USGS water quality monitoring networks from the 1960s to the 1990s indicated that 40% of 652 stream monitoring stations in the contiguous USA were at or above

  7. Arsenic in groundwater of the Red River floodplain, Vietnam: Controlling geochemical processes and reactive transport modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Larsen, Flemming; Hue, N.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    with redox zonation dominated by the reduction of Fe-oxides and methanogenesis. Enhanced PCO2 pressure causes carbonate dissolution to take place but mainly in the soil and unsaturated zone. The concentration of As increases over depth to a concentration of up to 550 mu g/L. Most As is present as As...... indicate most As to be related to the Fe-oxide fractions. The measured amount of sorbed As is low. In agreement, speciation calculations for a Fe-oxide surface suggest As(III) to constitute only 3% of the surface sites while the remainder is occupied by carbonate and silica species. The evolution in water...

  8. Geochemical modelling baseline compositions of groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Kjøller, Claus; Andersen, Martin Søgaard;

    2008-01-01

    and variations in water chemistry that are caused by large scale geochemical processes taking place at the timescale of thousands of years. The most important geochemical processes are ion exchange (Valreas and Aveiro) where freshwater solutes are displacing marine ions from the sediment surface, and carbonate...... dissolution (East Midlands, Valreas and Aveiro). Reactive transport models, employing the code PHREEQC, which included these geochemical processes and one-dimensional solute transport were able to duplicate the observed patterns in water quality. These models may provide a quantitative understanding...

  9. Clay mineralogical and geochemical constraints on late Pleistocene weathering processes of the Qaidam Basin, northern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, WeiLiang; Fan, QiShun; Wei, HaiCheng; Zhang, XiYing; Ma, HaiZhou

    2016-09-01

    At the Qarhan Salt Lake (QSL) on the central-eastern Qaidam Basin, northern Tibetan Plateau, Quaternary lacustrine sediments have a thickness of over 3000 m and mainly composed of organic-rich clay and silty clay with some silt halite and halite. In this study, a 102-m-long sediment core (ISL1A) was obtained from the QSL. Combining with AMS 14C and 230Th dating, clay minerals and major-element concentrations of ISL1A were used to reconstruct the weathering process and trend of the QSL since late Pleistocene. The results reveal that the clay mineral from rocks, gneisses and schists of Eastern Kunlun Mountains on the south of the QSL. The abundance of illite mineral displays an opposite fluctuation trending with that of smectite, chlorite and kaolinite mineral in ISL1A, which is significantly different from the monsoon-controlled regions. Moreover, higher values of illite, kaolinite/chlorite and illite/chlorite ratios, and lower values of smectite, chlorite and kaolinite minerals occurred in 83-72.5 ka, 68.8-54 ka, 32-24 ka, corresponding to late MIS 5, late MIS 4, early MIS 3 and late MIS 3, respectively. These three phases were almost similarly changed with oxygen isotopes of authigenic carbonates and pollen records in ISL1A, which implies that stronger chemical weathering corresponds to higher effective moisture periods of source region in the Qaidam Basin. Based on chemical weathering index and (Al2O3-(CaO + Na2O)-K2O) diagram, chemical weathering degree in this study area takes a varying process from low to intermediate on the whole.

  10. Assessing the hydrogeochemical processes affecting groundwater pollution in arid areas using an integration of geochemical equilibrium and multivariate statistical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Alfy, Mohamed; Lashin, Aref; Abdalla, Fathy; Al-Bassam, Abdulaziz

    2017-10-01

    Rapid economic expansion poses serious problems for groundwater resources in arid areas, which typically have high rates of groundwater depletion. In this study, integration of hydrochemical investigations involving chemical and statistical analyses are conducted to assess the factors controlling hydrochemistry and potential pollution in an arid region. Fifty-four groundwater samples were collected from the Dhurma aquifer in Saudi Arabia, and twenty-one physicochemical variables were examined for each sample. Spatial patterns of salinity and nitrate were mapped using fitted variograms. The nitrate spatial distribution shows that nitrate pollution is a persistent problem affecting a wide area of the aquifer. The hydrochemical investigations and cluster analysis reveal four significant clusters of groundwater zones. Five main factors were extracted, which explain >77% of the total data variance. These factors indicated that the chemical characteristics of the groundwater were influenced by rock-water interactions and anthropogenic factors. The identified clusters and factors were validated with hydrochemical investigations. The geogenic factors include the dissolution of various minerals (calcite, aragonite, gypsum, anhydrite, halite and fluorite) and ion exchange processes. The anthropogenic factors include the impact of irrigation return flows and the application of potassium, nitrate, and phosphate fertilizers. Over time, these anthropogenic factors will most likely contribute to further declines in groundwater quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. TAPIR--Finnish national geochemical baseline database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarva, Jaana; Tarvainen, Timo; Reinikainen, Jussi; Eklund, Mikael

    2010-09-15

    In Finland, a Government Decree on the Assessment of Soil Contamination and Remediation Needs has generated a need for reliable and readily accessible data on geochemical baseline concentrations in Finnish soils. According to the Decree, baseline concentrations, referring both to the natural geological background concentrations and the diffuse anthropogenic input of substances, shall be taken into account in the soil contamination assessment process. This baseline information is provided in a national geochemical baseline database, TAPIR, that is publicly available via the Internet. Geochemical provinces with elevated baseline concentrations were delineated to provide regional geochemical baseline values. The nationwide geochemical datasets were used to divide Finland into geochemical provinces. Several metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, V, and Zn) showed anomalous concentrations in seven regions that were defined as metal provinces. Arsenic did not follow a similar distribution to any other elements, and four arsenic provinces were separately determined. Nationwide geochemical datasets were not available for some other important elements such as Cd and Pb. Although these elements are included in the TAPIR system, their distribution does not necessarily follow the ones pre-defined for metal and arsenic provinces. Regional geochemical baseline values, presented as upper limit of geochemical variation within the region, can be used as trigger values to assess potential soil contamination. Baseline values have also been used to determine upper and lower guideline values that must be taken into account as a tool in basic risk assessment. If regional geochemical baseline values are available, the national guideline values prescribed in the Decree based on ecological risks can be modified accordingly. The national geochemical baseline database provides scientifically sound, easily accessible and generally accepted information on the baseline values, and it can be used in various

  12. Hand controller commonality evaluation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Mark A.; Bierschwale, John M.; Wilmington, Robert P.; Adam, Susan C.; Diaz, Manuel F.; Jensen, Dean G.

    1993-01-01

    Hand controller selection for NASA's Orbiter and Space Station Freedom is an important area of human-telerobot interface design and evaluation. These input devices will control remotely operated systems that include large crane-like manipulators (e.g., Remote Manipulator System or RMS), smaller, more dexterous manipulators (e.g., Flight Telerobotic Servicer or FTS), and free flyers (e.g., Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle or OMV). Candidate hand controller configurations for these systems vary in many ways: shape, size, number of degrees-of-freedom (DOF), operating modes, provision of force reflection, range of movement, and 'naturalness' of use. Unresolved design implementation issues remain, including such topics as how the current Orbiter RMS rotational and translational rate hand controllers compare with the proposed Space Station Freedom hand controllers, the advantages that position hand controllers offer for these applications, and whether separate hand controller configurations are required for each application. Since previous studies contain little empirical hand controller task performance data, a controlled study is needed that tests Space Station Freedom candidate hand controllers during representative tasks. This study also needs to include anthropometric and biomechanical considerations.

  13. To the bottom of carbon processing at the seafloor: towards integration of geological, geochemical and ecological concepts (Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelburg, Jack J.

    2017-04-01

    food. Here I present existing views on organic carbon processing at the seafloor, discuss where they agree and disagree and aim to arrive at an integrated view of carbon processing at the seafloor that is consistent with recent views within the organic geochemical, sediment geochemical, ecological and microbiological communities.

  14. Fuzzy Control in the Process Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jan; Verbruggen, Henk; Østergaard, Jens-Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    Control problems in the process industry are dominated by non-linear and time-varying behaviour, many inner loops, and much interaction between the control loops. Fuzzy controllers have in some cases nevertheless mimicked the control actions of a human operator. Simple fuzzy controllers can...

  15. Process Control for Nanoimprint Lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To tackle the demoulding and conglutinating problem with the resist and hard mold in the nanoimprint lithography process, a soft mould can be used to demould and reduce the macro or micro mismatch between mould bottom surface and wafer top surface. In nanoimprint lithography process, a mathematical equation is formulated to demonstrate the relation between the residual resist thickness and the pressing force during pressing the mould toward the resist-coated wafer.Based on these analytical studies, a new imprint process, which includes a pre-cure release of the pressing force, was proposed for the high-conformity transfer of nano-patterns from the mould to the wafer. The results of a series of imprint experiments showed that the proposed loading process could meet the requirements for the imprint of different patterns and feature sizes while maintaining a uniform residual resist and non-distorted transfer of nano-patterns from the mould to the resistcoated wafer.

  16. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  17. Stochastic MPC with applications to process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, I.; Millán, P.; Quevedo, D.; Rubio, F. R.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a model predictive control formulation for Networked Control Systems subject to independent and identically distributed delays and packet dropouts. The design takes into account the presence of a communication network in the control loop, resorting to a buffer at the actuator side to store and consistently apply delayed control sequences when fresh control inputs are not available. The proposed approach uses a statistical description of transmissions to optimise the expected future control performance conditioned upon the current system state, previously calculated control packets and transmission acknowledgements. Experimental studies using a quadruple tank process illustrate the applicability of the method to process control.

  18. Study On Machining Processing Technology Risk Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiqing

    2015-01-01

    In the industrial production process,only to ful y guarantee the machining production safety, it can been ensured that the smooth completion of machining process.Under this back ground,in the machining production process,the machinery processing safety would been ful y concerned,several factors, which may lead to the problem of mechanical processing and production process,were analyzed,and the relevant control strategies were researched.In view of this situation,this paper wil specifical y combined with the machining process characteristics to study the machining process manufacturability risk control.

  19. Robust CUSUM control charting for process dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazir, H.Z.; Riaz, M.; Does, R.J.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Process monitoring through control charts is a quite popular practice in statistical process control. From a statistical point of view, a superior control chart is one that has an efficient design structure, but having resistance against unusual situations is of more practical importance. To have a

  20. Third Dutch Process Security Control Event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiijf, H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    On June 4th, 2009, the third Dutch Process Control Security Event took place in Amsterdam. The event, organised by the Dutch National Infrastructure against Cybercrime (NICC), attracted both Dutch process control experts and members of the European SCADA and Control Systems Information Exchange (Eur

  1. Constraint control of distillation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roffel, B.; Fontein, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    There is a growing interest to design and operate chemical processes for reduced energy consumption. As an example a comparison is made between the distillation of binary mixtures in a conventional distillation column, a vapour recompression system and a two column heat integrated system. For all

  2. Novel imaging techniques, integrated with mineralogical, geochemical and microbiological characterizations to determine the biogeochemical controls on technetium mobility in FRC sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan R. Lloyd

    2009-02-03

    The objective of this research program was to take a highly multidisciplinary approach to define the biogeochemical factors that control technetium (Tc) mobility in FRC sediments. The aim was to use batch and column studies to probe the biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC. Background sediment samples from Area 2 (pH 6.5, low nitrate, low {sup 99}Tc) and Area 3 (pH 3.5, high nitrate, relatively high {sup 99}Tc) of the FRC were selected (http://www.esd.ornl.gov/nabirfrc). For the batch experiments, sediments were mixed with simulated groundwater, modeled on chemical constituents of FRC waters and supplemented with {sup 99}Tc(VII), both with and without added electron donor (acetate). The solubility of the Tc was monitored, alongside other biogeochemical markers (nitrate, nitrite, Fe(II), sulfate, acetate, pH, Eh) as the 'microcosms' aged. At key points, the microbial communities were also profiled using both cultivation-dependent and molecular techniques, and results correlated with the geochemical conditions in the sediments. The mineral phases present in the sediments were also characterized, and the solid phase associations of the Tc determined using sequential extraction and synchrotron techniques. In addition to the batch sediment experiments, where discrete microbial communities with the potential to reduce and precipitate {sup 99}Tc will be separated in time, we also developed column experiments where biogeochemical processes were spatially separated. Experiments were conducted both with and without amendments proposed to stimulate radionuclide immobilization (e.g. the addition of acetate as an electron donor for metal reduction), and were also planned with and without competing anions at high concentration (e.g. nitrate, with columns containing Area 3 sediments). When the columns had stabilized, as determined by chemical analysis of the effluents, we used a spike of the short-lived gamma emitter {sup 99m}Tc (50

  3. Integrated Process Design, Control and Analysis of Intensified Chemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil

    approach is to tackle process design and controllability issues simultaneously, in the early stages of process design. This simultaneous synthesis approach provides optimal/near optimal operation and more efficient control of conventional (non-reactive binary distillation columns) as well as complex...... chemical processes; for example, intensified processes such as reactive distillation. Most importantly, it identifies and eliminates potentially promising design alternatives that may have controllability problems later. To date, a number of methodologies have been proposed and applied on various problems...... design of the process as well as the controller structure. Through analytical, steady-state and closed-loop dynamic analysis it is verified that the control structure, disturbance rejection and energy requirement of the reactive distillation column is better than any other operation point...

  4. WRAP process area development control work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leist, K.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-27

    This work plan defines the manner in which the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module I Process Area will be maintained under development control status. This status permits resolution of identified design discrepancies, control system changes, as-building of equipment, and perform modifications to increase process operability and maintainability as parallel efforts. This work plan maintains configuration control as these efforts are undertaken. This task will end with system testing and reissue of field verified design drawings.

  5. Thermal processing of foods: control and automation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandeep, K. P

    2011-01-01

    .... In addition to validating new control systems, some food companies have started the more difficult task of validating legacy control systems that have been operating for a number of years on retorts or aseptic systems.Thermal Processing...

  6. Digitally Controlled Analog Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    Self-Tuned Filters,’ Proc. 26th Mid- west Symp. Ckts Systems, Puebla , Mexico, 1983. V in V C Fig. 6. (Compensated) OTA Integrator. DigWitly ControlDW...Proc. WS Mid- filters obtained by cascading the proposed second-order wat Symp. Circuits Sjdanwk INAOE, Puebla , Mex- block is presently under...REF IN and the instru- ment has warmed up at least 20 minutes at the ambient temperature. FREOUENCY: * Mesursmeet Buale 20 Hz to 40.1 MHz ODiplayed 114

  7. Physical Processes Controlling Earth's Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genio, Anthony Del

    2013-01-01

    As background for consideration of the climates of the other terrestrial planets in our solar system and the potential habitability of rocky exoplanets, we discuss the basic physics that controls the Earths present climate, with particular emphasis on the energy and water cycles. We define several dimensionless parameters relevant to characterizing a planets general circulation, climate and hydrological cycle. We also consider issues associated with the use of past climate variations as indicators of future anthropogenically forced climate change, and recent advances in understanding projections of future climate that might have implications for Earth-like exoplanets.

  8. Microprocessor systems for industrial process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesh, F. H.

    1980-01-01

    Six computers operate synchronously and are interconnected by three independent data buses. Processors control one subsystem. Some can control buses to transfer data at 1 megabit per second. Every 2.5 msec each processor examines list of things to do during next interval. This spacecraft control system could be adapted for controlling complex industrial processes.

  9. HMI conventions for process control graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikaar, Ruud N

    2012-01-01

    Process operators supervise and control complex processes. To enable the operator to do an adequate job, instrumentation and process control engineers need to address several related topics, such as console design, information design, navigation, and alarm management. In process control upgrade projects, usually a 1:1 conversion of existing graphics is proposed. This paper suggests another approach, efficiently leading to a reduced number of new powerful process graphics, supported by a permanent process overview displays. In addition a road map for structuring content (process information) and conventions for the presentation of objects, symbols, and so on, has been developed. The impact of the human factors engineering approach on process control upgrade projects is illustrated by several cases.

  10. Geochemical patterns in the soils of Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, David R; Rutherford, Neil F; Morisseau, Eleni; Zissimos, Andreas M

    2012-03-15

    The soil geochemical atlas of Cyprus is a recent addition to the series of national to continental-scale geochemical mapping programmes implemented over the last two decades for environmental and resource applications. The study has been conducted at the high sampling density of 1 site per 1km(2), with multi-element and multi-method analysis performed on samples of top soil (0-25cm) and sub soil (50-75cm) from a grid of over 5350 sites across a major portion of Cyprus. Major and most trace elements display sharp concentration changes across the main geological boundaries but a high degree of spatial continuity and consistency of values within those boundaries. Some elements display one to two orders of magnitude difference in median concentrations between the soils developed over ultramafic or mafic units and those developed over sedimentary rocks or alluvial units. The ratio of aqua regia-extractable to total metal contents provides an indication of the general mineralogical host for a number of trace elements. The majority of soils are near-neutral to alkaline with the small proportion of areas with soil pHgeochemical values. Where the concentrations of some elements (including Pb, Hg and Sn) are indicative of contamination, the values are typically higher in the top soil samples in these areas. Variations in the concentration of elements with strong redox controls on mobility are linked to changes in sedimentary environment between deep and shallow marine conditions. Some element patterns can be related to the effects of urbanisation and sulphide mining operations; however the dominant control on soil geochemistry is the parent geology and regolith forming processes. The atlas demonstrates the effectiveness of high-density sampling in mapping local to regional-scale features of the geochemical landscape.

  11. Low Activity Waste Feed Process Control Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-06-14

    The primary purpose of this document is to describe the overall process control strategy for monitoring and controlling the functions associated with the Phase 1B high-level waste feed delivery. This document provides the basis for process monitoring and control functions and requirements needed throughput the double-shell tank system during Phase 1 high-level waste feed delivery. This document is intended to be used by (1) the developers of the future Process Control Plan and (2) the developers of the monitoring and control system.

  12. Natural resources and control processes

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Mu-Hao; Hung, Yung-Tse; Shammas, Nazih

    2016-01-01

    This edited book has been designed to serve as a natural resources engineering reference book as well as a supplemental textbook. This volume is part of the Handbook of Environmental Engineering series, an incredible collection of methodologies that study the effects of pollution and waste in their three basic forms: gas, solid, and liquid. It complements two other books in the series including Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering and Integrated Natural Resources Management that serve as a basis for advanced study or specialized investigation of the theory and analysis of various natural resources systems. This book covers the management of many waste sources including those from agricultural livestock, deep-wells, industries manufacturing dyes, and municipal solid waste incinerators. The purpose of this book is to thoroughly prepare the reader for understanding the sources, treatment and control methods of toxic wastes shown to have harmful effects on the environment. Chapters provide information ...

  13. Quality Control in Production Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prístavka Miroslav

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The tools for quality management are used for quality improvement throughout the whole Europe and developed countries. Simple statistics are considered one of the most basic methods. The goal was to apply the simple statistical methods to practice and to solve problems by using them. Selected methods are used for processing the list of internal discrepancies within the organization, and for identification of the root cause of the problem and its appropriate solution. Seven basic quality tools are simple graphical tools, but very effective in solving problems related to quality. They are called essential because they are suitable for people with at least basic knowledge in statistics; therefore, they can be used to solve the vast majority of problems.

  14. Control of Thermal Meat Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, Carl L.; Osaili, Tareq M.

    The recent growth of the market for ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and poultry products has led to serious concern over foodborne illnesses due to the presence of pathogens, particularly Salmonella spp, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in meat and poultry products. Emphasis has been placed on thermal processing since heat treatment is still considered the primary means of eliminating foodborne pathogens from raw meat and poultry products (Juneja, Eblen, & Ransom, 2001). Inadequate time/temperature exposure during cooking is a contributing factor in food poisoning outbreaks. Optimal heat treatment is required not only to destroy pathogenic microorganisms in meat and poultry products but also to maintain desirable food quality and product yield.

  15. Fundamentals of semiconductor manufacturing and process control

    CERN Document Server

    May, Gary S

    2006-01-01

    A practical guide to semiconductor manufacturing from process control to yield modeling and experimental design Fundamentals of Semiconductor Manufacturing and Process Control covers all issues involved in manufacturing microelectronic devices and circuits, including fabrication sequences, process control, experimental design, process modeling, yield modeling, and CIM/CAM systems. Readers are introduced to both the theory and practice of all basic manufacturing concepts. Following an overview of manufacturing and technology, the text explores process monitoring methods, including those that focus on product wafers and those that focus on the equipment used to produce wafers. Next, the text sets forth some fundamentals of statistics and yield modeling, which set the foundation for a detailed discussion of how statistical process control is used to analyze quality and improve yields. The discussion of statistical experimental design offers readers a powerful approach for systematically varying controllable p...

  16. Assessment of quality and geochemical processes occurring in groundwaters near central air conditioning plant site in Trombay, Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirumalesh, K; Shivanna, K; Sriraman, A K; Tyagi, A K

    2010-04-01

    This paper summarizes the findings obtained in a monitoring study to understand the sources and processes affecting the quality of shallow and deep groundwater near central air conditioning plant site in Trombay region by making use of physicochemical and biological analyses. All the measured parameters of the groundwaters indicate that the groundwater quality is good and within permissible limits set by (Indian Bureau of Standards 1990). Shallow groundwater is dominantly of Na-HCO(3) type whereas deep groundwater is of Ca-Mg-HCO(3) type. The groundwater chemistry is mainly influenced by dissolution of minerals and base exchange processes. High total dissolved solids in shallow groundwater compared to deeper ones indicate faster circulation of groundwater in deep zone preferably through fissures and fractures whereas groundwater flow is sluggish in shallow zone. The characteristic ionic ratio values and absence of bromide point to the fact that seawater has no influence on groundwater system.

  17. Geochemical Tracers of Processes Affecting the Formation of Seafloor Hydrothermal Fluids and Deposits in the Manus Back-Arc Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    alteration process in hypogene environments by magmatic gas contamination of meteoric fluids. Economic Geology 78, 73–90. Chiba H., Uchiyama N., and Teagle...sulfur from active crater lakes. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 97(1–4), 287. Lackschewitz K. S., Devey C. W., Stoffers P., Botz R...reaction of sulfur dioxide in hydrothermal fluids: Implications for the δ34S variations of dissolved bisulfate and elemental sulfur from active crater

  18. Geochemical normalization of magnetic susceptibility - a simple tool for distinction the sediment provenance and post-depositional processes in floodplain sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famera, Martin; Matys Grygar, Tomas; Elznicova, Jitka

    2017-04-01

    ', where cFe is concentration of Fe. Background functions must be obtained empirically from collection of samples of stratum B that needs qualified sampling strategy and informed data evaluation. Local enrichment factor of MS is then defined as LEF MS = MS/MS_PRISTINE. LEF MS is useful for study of MS depth profiles in both strata A and C. Floodplain sediments in river systems with catchment with "mafic" rock outcrops have MSPRISTINE by up to two orders of magnitude larger in comparison to systems with "felsic" source rocks. The carriers of magnetic signal in the "mafic" rock-derived sediments are affected by soil-forming processes, which gradually decrease their original MS, in particular in strata B and C. Post-depositional processes including pedogenesis, in particular reductimorphic processes, may thus alter MS/Fe. The reductimorphic processes in floodplain sediments may be revealed by "erratic" variations or a permanent increase of the Fe/Ti ratio. The advantage of using geochemical normalization of MS is that chemical analyses are currently nearly routinely performed in geochemical and pollution mapping studies and thus Fe concentrations are thus available for data processing. The combination of the mentioned handy proxies (MS and element composition) would definitely deserve broader use in environmental geology and monitoring.

  19. Geochemical Controls on the Mobility of Cu and Fe in Hydrothermal Vent Fluids at Mid-Ocean Ridges: Experimental and Theoretical Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaen, A. T.; Tutolo, B. M.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2012-12-01

    It has long been recognized that MOR hydrothermal vent fluids are characterized by variably high concentrations of dissolved transition metals. These metalliferous fluids play a role in the formation of seafloor massive sulfide deposits, serving as analogues for similar deposits on land, while also contributing to the flux of metals to seawater, with biogeochemical implications. Owing to the evolution of magmatic and tectonic processes associated with crustal formation at both fast and slow spreading ridges, chemical and physical conditions can change in space and time with corresponding changes in the solubility of Cu and Fe. Indeed, time series observations of hydrothermal vent fluids at EPR 9o N have provided unambiguous evidence of both diking and eruptive events with important implications for temperature and pressure changes affecting phase equilibria controls on mineral solubility. At the same time, recent advances in theoretical data have resulted in more robust thermodynamic models that can be used to calculate the effect of temperature and pressure, redox variability and dissolved chloride on metal mobility. However, fluid speciation calculations employing currently accepted Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) parameters for aqueous species result in Cu and Fe solubilities that differ significantly from constraints imposed by published experimental data and sampled MOR vent fluids. Consequently, new thermodynamic data is retrieved in this study from recent high P, T experimental data for Cu and Fe complexes and validated against new experiments to ensure accurate fluid speciation and trace metal solubility calculations. The addition of new experimental data to the thermodynamic data retrieval process strengthens predictions of geochemical interactions not only at the P and T of the experiments, but also over the entire range of applicability of the HKF model. For example, theoretical modeling of seawater salinity fluids (550 mmol/kg Cl) at 400 oC show

  20. PROCESS VARIABILITY REDUCTION THROUGH STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL FOR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.P. Mahesh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Quality has become one of the most important customer decision factors in the selection among the competing product and services. Consequently, understanding and improving quality is a key factor leading to business success, growth and an enhanced competitive position. Hence quality improvement program should be an integral part of the overall business strategy. According to TQM, the effective way to improve the Quality of the product or service is to improve the process used to build the product. Hence, TQM focuses on process, rather than results as the results are driven by the processes. Many techniques are available for quality improvement. Statistical Process Control (SPC is one such TQM technique which is widely accepted for analyzing quality problems and improving the performance of the production process. This article illustrates the step by step procedure adopted at a soap manufacturing company to improve the Quality by reducing process variability using Statistical Process Control.

  1. Geochemical and isotopic profile of Pico de Orizaba (Citlaltépetl) volcano, Mexico: Insights for magma generation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Peter; Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo

    2010-11-01

    Pico de Orizaba or Citlaltépetl volcano is the easternmost and highest stratovolcano of the subduction-related Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) located > 400 km NNE of the Middle America Trench. This active volcano comprises four evolutionary stages, ranging in age from 0.65 Ma to the Holocene, and is surrounded by Quaternary monogenetic scoria cones and maar volcanoes. Magmatic products of the stratocone range from basaltic andesites to rhyolites and the cinder cones erupted basalts and basaltic andesites. All rock compositions form a continuous calc-alkaline suite. Petrogenetic processes involved in magma generation and evolution include fractional crystallization and mid-crustal assimilation. Trace element patterns with elevated Ba/Nb, positive Pb spikes, and Th enrichments indicate contributions from subducted sediment. Low Ba/Th ratios suggest melting of hydrous sediment without significant loss of fluid-mobile elements prior to melting. Sr-Nd isotopic ratios of Pico de Orizaba and cinder cones are nearly chondritic and are located on a mixing curve between Pacific MORB and Paleozoic crust of SE Mexico. However, vertical Nd distributions in an 87Sr/ 86Sr vs. ɛNd diagram cannot be explained by crustal assimilation and indicate contributions of a sedimentary component with unradiogenic Nd. In contrast to other eastern MVB volcanic centres, Pico de Orizaba magmas are derived almost exclusively from a depleted mantle source. Compared to other MVB stratocones, Pico de Orizaba shows the least radiogenic Nd isotope ratios at nearly identical 87Sr/ 86Sr. Steep trends in a 206Pb/ 204Pb vs. 207Pb/ 204Pb diagram favour the involvement of young, 207Pb-enriched oceanic sediments in magma generation processes of Pico de Orizaba volcano. The Pb isotope data do not support any assimilation of lower crustal Grenvillian basement.

  2. Model-Free Adaptive Heating Process Control

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana LUKÁČOVÁ; Piteľ, Ján

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the dynamic behaviour of a Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) heating process control. The MFA controller is designed as three layer neural network with proportional element. The method of backward propagation of errors was used for neural network training. Visualization and training of the artificial neural network was executed by Netlab in Matlab environment. Simulation of the MFA heating process control with outdoor temperature compensation has proved better resu...

  3. Memory-type control charts in statistical process control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, N.

    2012-01-01

    Control chart is the most important statistical tool to manage the business processes. It is a graph of measurements on a quality characteristic of the process on the vertical axis plotted against time on the horizontal axis. The graph is completed with control limits that cause variation mark. Once

  4. Optimization and control of metal forming processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, Gosse Tjipke

    2016-01-01

    Inevitable variations in process and material properties limit the accuracy of metal forming processes. Robust optimization methods or control systems can be used to improve the production accuracy. Robust optimization methods are used to design production processes with low sensitivity to the distu

  5. Investigating the Hydro-geochemical Impact of Fugitive Methane on Groundwater: The Borden Aquifer Controlled Release Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, A. G.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.; Mayer, K. U.; Mayer, B.; Ryan, C.

    2015-12-01

    Shale gas development by hydraulic fracturing is believed by many to have the potential to transform the world's energy economy. The propensity of this technique to cause significant environmental impact is strongly contested and lacks evidence. Fugitive methane (CH4), potentially mobilized during well drilling, the complex extraction process and/or leaking well seals over time is arguably the greatest concern. Advanced understanding of CH4 mobility and fate in the subsurface is needed in order to assess risks, design suitable monitoring systems and gain public trust. Currently knowledge on subsurface CH4 mobilization and migration at scales relevant to shale gas development is lacking. Consequently a shallow aquifer controlled CH4 release experiment is being conducted at the Borden aquifer research facility (an unconfined, unconsolidated silicate sand aquifer) in Ontario, Canada. During the experiment, 100 m3 of gas phase CH4 was injected into the saturated zone over approximately 60 days through 2 inclined sparging wells (4.5 and 9 m depth) at rates relevant to natural gas well casing vent flows. The gas mobility and fate is being comprehensively monitored temporally and spatially in both the saturated and unsaturated zones considering; aqueous chemistry (including stable isotopes), soil gas characterization, surface efflux, geophysics (GPR and ERT), real time sensors (total dissolved gas pressure, soil moisture content, CH4 and CO2), mineralogical and microbiological characterization before, during and after injection. An overview of this unique study will be given including experimental design, monitoring system configuration and preliminary results. This multidisciplinary study will provide important insights regarding the mechanisms and rates for shallow CH4 migration, attenuation and water quality impacts that will inform baseline groundwater monitoring programs and retrospective forensic studies.

  6. Influence of electron donors and copper concentration on geochemical and mineralogical processes under conditions of biological sulphate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolicka, Dorota; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Sulphidogenous microorganism communities were isolated from soil polluted by crude oil. The study was focused on determining the influence of 1) copper (II) concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and 2) the applied electron donor on the course and evolution of mineral-forming processes under conditions favouring growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The influence of copper concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and the type of mineral phases formed was determined during experiments in which copper (II) chloride at concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.7 g/L was added to SRB cultures. The experiments were performed in two variants: with ethanol (4 g/L) or lactate (4 g/L) as the sole carbon source. In order to determine the taxonomic composition of the selected microorganism communities, the 16S rRNA method was used. Results of this analysis confirmed the presence of Desulfovibrio, Desulfohalobium, Desulfotalea, Thermotoga, Solibacter, Gramella, Anaeromyxobacter and Myxococcus sp. in the stationary cultures. The post-culture sediments contained covelline (CuS) and digenite (Cu9S5 ). Based on the results, it can be stated that the type of carbon source applied during incubation plays a crucial role in determining the mineral composition of the post-culture sediments. Thus, regardless of the amount of copper ion introduced to a culture with lactate as the sole carbon source, no copper sulphide was observed in the post-culture sediments. Cultures with ethanol as the sole carbon source, on the other hand, yielded covelline or digenite in all post-culture sediments.

  7. ADVANCED PROCESS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT IN RESIDUA CATALYTIC CRACKER CONTROL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Process calculations and rigorous dynamic model with detailed coke combustion kine-tics for two-stage regeneration FCC process were developed and integrated into the advanced process control(APC) context. The package was implemented in 6 SINOPEC commercial RFCCUs.Typical 0.5%~0.8% improvement of target product yields was achieved. Significant energy consumption was saved with tighter control over coke burning.

  8. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca as novel geochemical proxies for understanding sediment transport processes within coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacutan, J.; Vila-Concejo, A.; Nothdurft, L. D.; Fellowes, T. E.; Cathey, H. E.; Opdyke, B. N.; Harris, D. L.; Hamylton, S.; Carvalho, R. C.; Byrne, M.; Webster, J. M.

    2017-10-01

    Sediment transport is a key driver of reef zonation and biodiversity, where an understanding of sediment dynamics gives insights into past reef processes and allows the prediction of geomorphic responses to changing environmental conditions. However, modal conditions within the back-reef seldom promote sediment transport, hence direct observation is inherently difficult. Large benthic foraminifera (LBF) have previously been employed as 'tracers' to infer sediment transport pathways on coral reefs, as their habitat is largely restricted to the algal flat and post-mortem, their calcium carbonate test is susceptible to sediment transport forces into the back-reef. Foraminiferal test abundance and post-depositional test alteration have been used as proxies for sediment transport, although the resolution of these measures becomes limited by low test abundance and the lack of variation within test alteration. Here we propose the novel use of elemental ratios as a proxy for sediment transport. Two species, Baculogypsina sphaerulata and Calcarina capricornia, were analysed using a taphonomic index within One Tree and Lady Musgrave reefs, Great Barrier Reef (Australia). Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca and these ratios were compared with taphonomic data. Decreases in test Mg/Ca accompany increases in Sr/Ca in specimens from algal-flat to lagoonal samples in both species, mirroring trends indicated by taphonomic values, therefore indicating a relationship with test alteration. To delineate mechanisms driving changes in elemental ratios, back-scattered electron (BSE) images, elemental mapping and in situ quantitative spot analyses by electron microprobe microanalysis (EPMA) using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometers (WDS) were performed on un-altered algal flat and heavily abraded tests for both species. EPMA analyses reveal heterogeneity in Mg/Ca between spines and the test wall, implying the loss of

  9. Geochemical processes underlying a sharp contrast in groundwater arsenic concentrations in a village on the Red River delta, Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiche, Elisabeth [Institute of Mineralogy and Geochemistry, Universitaet Karlsruhe - TH, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: elisabeth.eiche@img.uni-karlsruhe.de; Neumann, Thomas [Institute of Mineralogy and Geochemistry, Universitaet Karlsruhe - TH, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Berg, Michael [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Weinman, Beth [Earth and Environmental Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37240 (United States); Geen, Alexander van [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States); Norra, Stefan; Berner, Zsolt [Institute of Mineralogy and Geochemistry, Universitaet Karlsruhe - TH, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Pham Thi Kim Trang; Pham Hung Viet [Centre for Environmental Technology and Sustainable Development (CETASD), Hanoi University of Science, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Stueben, Doris [Institute of Mineralogy and Geochemistry, Universitaet Karlsruhe - TH, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    The spatial variability of As concentrations in aquifers of the Red River Delta, Vietnam, was studied in the vicinity of Hanoi. Two sites, only 700 m apart but with very different As concentrations in groundwater (site L: <10 {mu}g/L vs. site H: 170-600 {mu}g/L) in the 20-50 m depth range, were characterized with respect to sediment geochemistry and mineralogy as well as hydrochemistry. Sequential extractions of the sediment were carried out in order to understand why As is released to groundwater at one site and not the other. No major differences were observed in the bulk mineralogy and geochemistry of the sediment, with the exception of the redox state of Fe oxyhydroxides inferred from sediment colour and diffuse spectral reflectance. At site H most of the As in the sediment was adsorbed to grey sands of mixed Fe(II/III) valence whereas at site L As was more strongly bound to orange-brown Fe(III) oxides. Higher dissolved Fe and low dissolved S concentrations in groundwater at site H ({approx}14 mg Fe/L, <0.3 mg S/L) suggest more strongly reducing conditions compared to site L (1-2 mg Fe/L, <3.8 mg S/L). High concentrations of NH{sub 4}{sup +} ({approx}10 mg/L), HCO{sub 3}{sup -} (500 mg/L) and dissolved P (600 mg/L), in addition to elevated As at site H are consistent with a release coupled to microbially induced reductive dissolution of Fe oxyhydroxides. Other processes such as precipitation of siderite and vivianite, which are strongly supersaturated at site H, or the formation of amorphous Fe(II)/As(III) phases and Fe sulfides, may also influence the partitioning of As between groundwater and aquifer sands. The origin of the redox contrast between the two sites is presently unclear. Peat was observed at site L, but it was embedded within a thick clayey silt layer. At site H, instead, organic rich layers were only separated from the underlying aquifer by thin silt layers. Leaching of organic matter from this source could cause reducing conditions and therefore

  10. Discrete Control Processes, Dynamic Games and Multicriterion Control Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru Lozovanu

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The discrete control processes with state evaluation in time of dynamical system is considered. A general model of control problems with integral-time cost criterion by a trajectory is studied and a general scheme for solving such classes of problems is proposed. In addition the game-theoretical and multicriterion models for control problems are formulated and studied.

  11. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Adam L; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K; Maxwell, Reed M

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb(2+)) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb(2+) concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb(2+) concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb(2+) concentrations are the same for all

  12. Markov processes and controlled Markov chains

    CERN Document Server

    Filar, Jerzy; Chen, Anyue

    2002-01-01

    The general theory of stochastic processes and the more specialized theory of Markov processes evolved enormously in the second half of the last century. In parallel, the theory of controlled Markov chains (or Markov decision processes) was being pioneered by control engineers and operations researchers. Researchers in Markov processes and controlled Markov chains have been, for a long time, aware of the synergies between these two subject areas. However, this may be the first volume dedicated to highlighting these synergies and, almost certainly, it is the first volume that emphasizes the contributions of the vibrant and growing Chinese school of probability. The chapters that appear in this book reflect both the maturity and the vitality of modern day Markov processes and controlled Markov chains. They also will provide an opportunity to trace the connections that have emerged between the work done by members of the Chinese school of probability and the work done by the European, US, Central and South Ameri...

  13. Linearizing control of continuous anaerobic fermentation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babary, J.P. [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 31 - Toulouse (France). Laboratoire d`Analyse et d`Architecture des Systemes; Simeonov, I. [Institute of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria); Ljubenova, V. [Institute of Control and System Research, BAS (Country unknown/Code not available); Dochain, D. [Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    1997-09-01

    Biotechnological processes (BTP) involve living organisms. In the anaerobic fermentation (biogas production process) the organic matter is mineralized by microorganisms into biogas (methane and carbon dioxide) in the absence of oxygen. The biogas is an additional energy source. Generally this process is carried out as a continuous BTP. It has been widely used in life process and has been confirmed as a promising method of solving some energy and ecological problems in the agriculture and industry. Because of the very restrictive on-line information the control of this process in continuous mode is often reduced to control of the biogas production rate or the concentration of the polluting organic matter (de-pollution control) at a desired value in the presence of some perturbations. Investigations show that classical linear controllers have good performances only in the linear zone of the strongly non-linear input-output characteristics. More sophisticated robust and with variable structure (VSC) controllers are studied. Due to the strongly non-linear dynamics of the process the performances of the closed loop system may be degrading in this case. The aim of this paper is to investigate different linearizing algorithms for control of a continuous non-linear methane fermentation process using the dilution rate as a control action and taking into account some practical implementation aspects. (authors) 8 refs.

  14. Integrated Process Design and Control of Reactive Distillation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    2015-01-01

    In this work, integrated design and control of reactive distillation processes is presented. Simple graphical design methods that are similar in concept to non-reactive distillation processes are used, such as reactive McCabe-Thiele method and driving force approach. The methods are based...... of this approach, it is shown that designing the reactive distillation process at the maximum driving force results in an optimal design in terms of controllability and operability. It is verified that the reactive distillation design option is less sensitive to the disturbances in the feed at the highest driving...

  15. National Geochemical Database: Concentrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemistry of concentrates from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are from the continental US and...

  16. Internal Decoupling in Nonlinear Process Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens G. Balchen

    1988-07-01

    Full Text Available A simple method has been investigated for the total or partial removal of the effect of non-linear process phenomena in multi-variable feedback control systems. The method is based upon computing the control variables which will drive the process at desired rates. It is shown that the effect of model errors in the linearization of the process can be partly removed through the use of large feedback gains. In practice there will be limits on how large gains can he used. The sensitivity to parameter errors is less pronounced and the transient behaviour is superior to that of ordinary PI controllers.

  17. Geochemical behavior and dissolved species control in acid sand pit lakes, Sepetiba sedimentary basin, Rio de Janeiro, SE - Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Eduardo D.; Sella, Sílvia M.; Bidone, Edison D.; Silva-Filho, Emmanoel V.

    2010-12-01

    This work shows the influence of pluvial waters on dissolved components and mineral equilibrium of four sand pit lakes, located in the Sepetiba sedimentary basin, SE Brazil. The sand mining activities promote sediment oxidation, lowering pH and increasing SO 4 contents. The relatively high acidity of these waters, similar to ore pit lakes environment and associated acid mine drainage, increases weathering rate, especially of silicate minerals, which produces high Al concentrations, the limiting factor for fish aquaculture. During the dry season, basic cations (Ca, Mg, K and Na), SiO 2 and Al show their higher values due to evapoconcentration and pH are buffered. In the beginning of the wet season, the dilution factor by rainwater increases SO 4 and decreases pH values. The aluminum monomeric forms (Al(OH) 2+ and Al(OH) 2+), the most toxic species for aquatic organisms, occur during the dry season, while AlSO 4+ species predominate during the wet season. Gibbsite, allophane, alunite and jurbanite are the reactive mineral phases indicated by PHREEQC modeling. During the dry season, hydroxialuminosilicate allophane is the main phase in equilibrium with the solution, while the sulphate salts alunite and jurbanite predominate in the rainy season due to the increasing of SO 4 values. Gibbsite is also in equilibrium with sand pit lakes waters, pointing out that hydrolysis reaction is a constant process in the system. Comparing to SiO 2, sulphate is the main Al retriever in the pit waters because the most samples (alunite and jurbanite) are in equilibrium with the solution in both seasons. This Al hydrochemical control allied to some precaution, like pH correction and fertilization of these waters, allows the conditions for fishpond culture. Equilibrium of the majority samples with kaolinite (Ca, Mg, Na diagrams) and primary minerals (K diagram) points to moderate weathering rate in sand pit sediments, which cannot be considered for the whole basin due to the anomalous

  18. Soft Computing Techniques for Process Control Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Malhotra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Technological innovations in soft computing techniques have brought automation capabilities to new levelsof applications. Process control is an important application of any industry for controlling the complexsystem parameters, which can greatly benefit from such advancements. Conventional control theory isbased on mathematical models that describe the dynamic behaviour of process control systems. Due to lackin comprehensibility, conventional controllers are often inferior to the intelligent controllers. Softcomputing techniques provide an ability to make decisions and learning from the reliable data or expert’sexperience. Moreover, soft computing techniques can cope up with a variety of environmental and stabilityrelated uncertainties. This paper explores the different areas of soft computing techniques viz. Fuzzy logic,genetic algorithms and hybridization of two and abridged the results of different process control casestudies. It is inferred from the results that the soft computing controllers provide better control on errorsthan conventional controllers. Further, hybrid fuzzy genetic algorithm controllers have successfullyoptimized the errors than standalone soft computing and conventional techniques.

  19. The Physical, Geochemical and Microbial Conditions and Processes in the Hyporheic Zone of a Large Tidally Influenced River: The Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, M.; Roschinski, T.; Ross, K.; Leslie, S.; William, M.; Beckie, R.

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the physical, chemical and biological conditions and processes that occur in the hyporheic zone of the lower Fraser River, British Columbia. The large flows of between 2000 and 10000 cubic meters per second, the 10 15 m deep, 250 m wide channel, the 1 m tidal fluctuations, the localized scour and redeposition of sediments during freshet and the strong geochemical contrast between groundwater and surface water distinguish this investigation from studies on smaller channels and streams and required the development of novel characterization tools and strategies. The geochemistry of water samples collected with a push-in profiler, bulk electrical conductivity (EC) measurements collected with a push-in tool and hydraulic head measurements indicate that groundwater principally discharges into the river approximately 100 m offshore in a 10 m wide band. River water and groundwater mix to a maximum depth of between 0.75 and 1.5 m. While hydraulic heads show strong tidal reversals, bulk EC profiles show only moderate changes during the tidal cycle. It was hypothesized that high iron (10's mg/L of Fe(II)) in reduced groundwater would precipitate from solution as secondary iron-oxide phases in the zone where groundwater mixes with aerobic river water. Sediments were collected with a freeze-shoe corer and depth profiles through the hyporheic zone and into the underlying aquifer were analyzed by selective extractions. The 15-30 mg/g of total extractable iron in both the aquifer and hyporheic zone is relatively high. The lack of noticeable iron accumulation in the hyporheic zone may indicate that iron precipitates on shallow sediments that are subsequently scoured from the river bed during freshet. Microbial DNA from sediments was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and showed a relatively diverse community structure but an overall low biomass.

  20. Testing fundamentals: The chemical state of geochemical tracers in biominerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, O.; Redfern, S. A. T.; Read, E.; Elderfield, H.

    2015-12-01

    The use of many carbonate-derived geochemical proxies is underpinned by the assumption that tracer elements are incorporated 'ideally' as impurities the mineral lattice, following relatively straightforward kinetic and thermodynamic drives. This allows comparison to inorganic precipitation experiments, and provides a systematic starting point from which to translate geochemical tracers to environmental records. Biomineral carbonates are a prominent source of geochemical proxy material, and are far from an ideal inorganic system. They are structurally and compositionally heterogeneous mineral-organic composites, produced in tightly controlled biological environments, possibly via non-classical crystal growth mechanisms. Biominerals offer numerous opportunities for tracers to be incorporated in a 'non-ideal' state. For instance, tracers could be hosted within the organic component of the structure, in interstitial micro-domains of a separate mineral phase, or in localized high-impurity clusters. If a proxy element is hosted in a non-ideal state, our understanding of its incorporation and preservation is flawed, and the theoretical basis behind the proxies derived from it must be reevaluated. Thus far, the assumption of ideal tracer incorporation has remained largely untested, owing to the spatial resolution and sensitivity limits of available techniques. Developments in high-resolution, high-sensitivity X-ray spectroscopy at Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopes (STXMs) have allowed us to measure trace element coordination in foraminiferal calcite, at length-scales relevant to biomineralisation processes and tracer incorporation. This instrument has allowed us to test the fundamental assumptions behind several geochemical proxy elements. We present a summary of four STXM studies, assessing the chemical state and distribution of Mg (Branson et al, 2014), B (Branson et al, 2015), S and Na (unpub.), and highlight the implications of these data for the use of these

  1. Geochemical and Sr Nd Pb isotopic evidence for a combined assimilation and fractional crystallisation process for volcanic rocks from the Huichapan caldera, Hidalgo, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Surendra P.

    2001-03-01

    This study reports new geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data for Miocene to Quaternary basaltic to andesitic, dacitic, and rhyolitic volcanic rocks from the Huichapan caldera, located in the central part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB). The initial Sr and Nd isotopic ratios, except for one rhyolite, range as follows: 87Sr/ 86Sr 0.70357-0.70498 and 143Nd/ 144Nd 0.51265-0.51282. The Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios are generally similar to those for volcanic rocks from other areas of the central and eastern parts of the MVB. The isotopic ratios of one older pre-caldera rhyolite (HP30) from the Huichapan area, particularly its high 87Sr/ 86Sr, are significantly different from rhyolitic rocks from this and other areas of the MVB, but are isotopically similar to some felsic rocks from the neighbouring geological province of Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO), implying an origin as a partial melt of the underlying crust. The evolved andesitic to rhyolitic magmas could have originated from a basaltic magma through a combined assimilation and fractional crystallisation (AFC) process. Different compositions, representing lower crust (LC) and upper crust (UC) as well as a hypothetical crust similar to the source of high 87Sr/ 86Sr rhyolite HP30, were tested as plausible assimilants for the AFC process. The results show that the UC represented by granitic rocks from a nearby Los Humeros area or by Cretaceous limestone (L) rocks outcropping in the northern part of the study area, and the LC represented by granulitic xenoliths from a nearby San Luis Potosı´ (SLP) area are not possible assimilants for Huichapan magmas, whereas a hypothetical crust (HA) similar in isotopic compositions to rhyolite HP30 could be considered a possible assimilant for the AFC process. Chemical composition of assimilant HA, although not well constrained at present, was inferred under the assumption that HP30 type partial melts could be generated from its partial melting. These data were then used to evaluate

  2. First Dutch Process Control Security Event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiijf, H.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Many organisations do not manage the information security of their process control systems (PCS). As risk is increasing, there is an urgent need for publicprivate collaboration against potential cyber crime in this domain.

  3. CONTROL CHARTS FOR STATIONARY VECTOR ARMA PROCESSES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yadavalli, J; Claasen, S.J; Singh, N

    2012-01-01

    .... To the author's best knowledge, no concrete attempts have been made so far to construct the control charts for such situations, particularly when the data arise from vector autoregressive-moving average (VARMA) processes...

  4. Geochemical engineering reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, L.B.; Michels, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The following topics are included in this manual: physical and chemical properties of geothermal brine and steam, scale and solids control, processing spent brine for reinjection, control of noncondensable gas emissions, and goethermal mineral recovery. (MHR)

  5. STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL IN SERBIAN FOOD PACKAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djekic Ilija

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an overview of the food packaging process in seven food companies in the dairy and confectionery sector. A total of 23 production runs have been analyzed regarding the three packers' rules outlined in the Serbian legislation and process capability tests related to statistical process control. None of the companies had any type of statistical process control in place. Results confirmed that more companies show overweight packaging compared to underfilling. Production runs are more accurate than precise, although in some cases the productions are both inaccurate and imprecise. Education / training of the new generation of food industry workers (both on operational and managerial level with courses in the food area covering elements of quality assurance and statistical process control can help in implementing effective food packaging.

  6. Optimal control of induction heating processes

    CERN Document Server

    Rapoport, Edgar

    2006-01-01

    This book introduces new approaches to solving optimal control problems in induction heating process applications. Optimal Control of Induction Heating Processes demonstrates how to apply and use new optimization techniques for different types of induction heating installations. Focusing on practical methods for solving real engineering optimization problems, the text features a variety of specific optimization examples for induction heater modes and designs, particularly those used in industrial applications. The book describes basic physical phenomena in induction heating and induction

  7. Modern control of mineral wool production process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stankov Stanko P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the control of the plant for mineral wool production consisting of a number of the technological units of different sizes and complexity is considered. The application of modern equipment based on PLC (Programmable Logic Controller and SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition configuration provides optimal control of technological process. Described supervisory and control system is consisting of a number of units doing decentralized distributed control of technological entities where all possible situation are considered during work of machines and devices, which are installed in electric drive and are protected from technological and electrical accident. Transformer station and diesel engine, raw materials transport and dosage, processes in dome oven, centrifuges, polycondensation (PC chamber, burners, compressor station, binder preparation and dosage, wool cutting, completed panel packing and their transport to storehouse are controlled. Process variables and parameters like as level, flow, velocity, temperature, pressure, etc. are controlled. Control system is doing identification of process states changes, diagnostic and prediction of errors and provides prediction of behavior of control objects when input flows of materials and generates optimal values of control variables due to decreasing downtime and technic - economical requires connected to wool quality to be achieved. Supervisory and control system either eliminates unwanted changes in the production line or restricts them within the allowable limits according to the technology. In this way, the optimization of energy and raw materials consumption and appropriate products quality is achieved, where requirements are satisfied in accordance with process safety and environmental standards. SCADA provides a visual representation of controlled and uncontrolled parts of the technological process, processing alarms and events, monitoring of the changes of relevant

  8. Integrated Process Design and Control of Reactive Distillation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    2015-01-01

    In this work, integrated process design and control of reactive distillation processes is presented. Simple graphical design methods that are similar in concept to non-reactive distillation processes are used, such as reactive McCabe-Thiele method and driving force approach. The methods are based...... on the element concept, which is used to translate a system of compounds into elements. The operation of the reactive distillation column at the highest driving force and other candidate points is analyzed through analytical solution as well as rigorous open-loop and closed-loop simulations. By application...... of this approach, it is shown that designing the reactive distillation process at the maximum driving force results in an optimal design in terms of controllability and operability. It is verified that the reactive distillation design option is less sensitive to the disturbances in the feed at the highest driving...

  9. Process Control Minitoring by Stress Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.; Stahl, David A.

    2006-04-17

    Environmental contamination with a variety of pollutants hasprompted the development of effective bioremediation strategies. But howcan these processes be best monitored and controlled? One avenue underinvestigation is the development of stress response systems as tools foreffective and general process control. Although the microbial stressresponse has been the subject of intensive laboratory investigation, theenvironmental reflection of the laboratory response to specific stresseshas been little explored. However, it is only within an environmentalcontext, in which microorganisms are constantly exposed to multiplechanging environmental stresses, that there will be full understanding ofmicrobial adaptive resiliency. Knowledge of the stress response in theenvironment will facilitate the control of bioremediation and otherprocesses mediated by complex microbial communities.

  10. Fault Tolerant Control Using Gaussian Processes and Model Predictive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiaoke

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Essential ingredients for fault-tolerant control are the ability to represent system behaviour following the occurrence of a fault, and the ability to exploit this representation for deciding control actions. Gaussian processes seem to be very promising candidates for the first of these, and model predictive control has a proven capability for the second. We therefore propose to use the two together to obtain fault-tolerant control functionality. Our proposal is illustrated by several reasonably realistic examples drawn from flight control.

  11. Controlling Laboratory Processes From A Personal Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, H.; Mackin, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program provides natural-language process control from IBM PC or compatible computer. Sets up process-control system that either runs without operator or run by workers who have limited programming skills. Includes three smaller programs. Two of them, written in FORTRAN 77, record data and control research processes. Third program, written in Pascal, generates FORTRAN subroutines used by other two programs to identify user commands with device-driving routines written by user. Also includes set of input data allowing user to define user commands to be executed by computer. Requires personal computer operating under MS-DOS with suitable hardware interfaces to all controlled devices. Also requires FORTRAN 77 compiler and device drivers written by user.

  12. Novel strategies for control of fermentation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mears, Lisa

    There is increasing interest in applying more advanced control strategies to biological processes in order to optimise the operation of these complex systems. In the past years, the major increases in product titre have been achieved mainly by genetic engineering approaches, which has lead......? In order to develop control strategies a significant effort must be invested into developing process models and establishing process understanding. Both data-driven modelling and mechanistic modelling approaches are considered in this work. Firstly, multivariate analysis is applied to production scale data...... (2012). This model describes the fungal processes operated in the fermentation pilot plant at Novozymes A/S. This model is investigated using uncertainty analysis methods in order to as-sess the applicability to control applications. A mechanistic model approach is desirable, as it is a predictive...

  13. Intelligent Predictive Control of Nonlienar Processes Using

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Peter Magnus; Sørensen, Paul Haase; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    1996-01-01

    frequently been discussed in the neural network community. This paper proposes an approximate scheme, the approximate predictive control (APC), which facilitates the implementation and gives a substantial reduction in the required amount of computations. The method is based on a technique for extracting......This paper presents a novel approach to design of generalized predictive controllers (GPC) for nonlinear processes. A neural network is used for modelling the process and a gain-scheduling type of GPC is subsequently designed. The combination of neural network models and predictive control has...... linear models from a nonlinear neural network and using them in designing the control system. The performance of the controller is demonstrated in a simulation study of a pneumatic servo system...

  14. Originator usage control with business process slicing

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Ziyi

    2012-01-01

    Originator Control allows information providers to define the information re-dissemination condition. Combined with usage control policy, fine-grained 'downstream usage control' can be achieved, which specifies what attributes the downstream consumers should have and how data is used. This paper discusses originator usage control, paying particular attention to enterprise-level dynamic business federations. Rather than 'pre-defining' the information re-dissemination paths, our business process slicing method 'capture' the asset derivation pattern, allowing to maintain originators' policies during the full lifecycle of assets in a collaborative context. First, we propose Service Call Graph (SCG), based on extending the System Dependency Graph, to describe dependencies among partners. When SCG (and corresponding 'service call tuple' list) is built for a business process, it is analyzed to group partners into sub-contexts, according to their dependency relations. Originator usage control can be achieved focusing...

  15. PID controller tuning for integrating processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmad; Majhi, Somanath

    2010-01-01

    Minimizing the integral squared error (ISE) criterion to get the optimal controller parameters results in a PD controller for integrating processes. The PD controller gives good servo response but fails to reject the load disturbances. In this paper, it is shown that satisfactory closed loop performances for a class of integrating processes are obtained if the ISE criterion is minimized with the constraint that the slope of the Nyquist curve has a specified value at the gain crossover frequency. Guidelines are provided for selecting the gain crossover frequency and the slope of the Nyquist curve. The proposed method is compared with some of the existing methods to control integrating plant transfer functions and in the examples taken it always gave better results for the load disturbance rejection whilst maintaining satisfactory setpoint response. For ease of use, analytical expressions correlating the controller parameters to plant model parameters are also given.

  16. Novel strategies for control of fermentation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mears, Lisa

    to highly optimised industrial host strains. The focus of this project is instead on en-gineering of the process. The question to be answered in this thesis is, given a highly optimised industrial host strain, how can we operate the fermentation process in order to maximise the productivity of the system...... (2012). This model describes the fungal processes operated in the fermentation pilot plant at Novozymes A/S. This model is investigated using uncertainty analysis methods in order to as-sess the applicability to control applications. A mechanistic model approach is desirable, as it is a predictive....... This provides a prediction of the future trajectory of the process, so that it is possible to guide the system to the desired target mass. The control strategy is applied on-line at 550L scale in the Novozymes A/S fermentation pilot plant, and the method is challenged with four different sets of process...

  17. Multivariable adaptive control of bio process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, M.; Bahhou, B.; Roux, G. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France); Maher, M. [Faculte des Sciences, Rabat (Morocco). Lab. de Physique

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a multivariable adaptive control of a continuous-flow fermentation process for the alcohol production. The linear quadratic control strategy is used for the regulation of substrate and ethanol concentrations in the bioreactor. The control inputs are the dilution rate and the influent substrate concentration. A robust identification algorithm is used for the on-line estimation of linear MIMO model`s parameters. Experimental results of a pilot-plant fermenter application are reported and show the control performances. (authors) 8 refs.

  18. Application of artificial intelligence in process control

    CERN Document Server

    Krijgsman, A

    1993-01-01

    This book is the result of a united effort of six European universities to create an overall course on the appplication of artificial intelligence (AI) in process control. The book includes an introduction to key areas including; knowledge representation, expert, logic, fuzzy logic, neural network, and object oriented-based approaches in AI. Part two covers the application to control engineering, part three: Real-Time Issues, part four: CAD Systems and Expert Systems, part five: Intelligent Control and part six: Supervisory Control, Monitoring and Optimization.

  19. Microeconomics of process control in semiconductor manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Kevin M.

    2003-06-01

    Process window control enables accelerated design-rule shrinks for both logic and memory manufacturers, but simple microeconomic models that directly link the effects of process window control to maximum profitability are rare. In this work, we derive these links using a simplified model for the maximum rate of profit generated by the semiconductor manufacturing process. We show that the ability of process window control to achieve these economic objectives may be limited by variability in the larger manufacturing context, including measurement delays and process variation at the lot, wafer, x-wafer, x-field, and x-chip levels. We conclude that x-wafer and x-field CD control strategies will be critical enablers of density, performance and optimum profitability at the 90 and 65nm technology nodes. These analyses correlate well with actual factory data and often identify millions of dollars in potential incremental revenue and cost savings. As an example, we show that a scatterometry-based CD Process Window Monitor is an economically justified, enabling technology for the 65nm node.

  20. The monitoring and control of TRUEX processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regalbuto, M.C.; Misra, B.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1992-04-01

    The Generic TRUEX Model (GTM) was used to design a flowsheet for the TRUEX solvent extraction process that would be used to determine its instrumentation and control requirements. Sensitivity analyses of the key process variables, namely, the aqueous and organic flow rates, feed compositions, and the number of contactor stages, were carried out to assess their impact on the operation of the TRUEX process. Results of these analyses provide a basis for the selection of an instrument and control system and the eventual implementation of a control algorithm. Volume Two of this report is an evaluation of the instruments available for measuring many of the physical parameters. Equations that model the dynamic behavior of the TRUEX process have been generated. These equations can be used to describe the transient or dynamic behavior of the process for a given flowsheet in accordance with the TRUEX model. Further work will be done with the dynamic model to determine how and how quickly the system responds to various perturbations. The use of perturbation analysis early in the design stage will lead to a robust flowsheet, namely, one that will meet all process goals and allow for wide control bounds. The process time delay, that is, the speed with which the system reaches a new steady state, is an important parameter in monitoring and controlling a process. In the future, instrument selection and point-of-variable measurement, now done using the steady-state results reported here, will be reviewed and modified as necessary based on this dynamic method of analysis.

  1. Neural PID Control Strategy for Networked Process Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method with a two-layer hierarchy is presented based on a neural proportional-integral-derivative (PID iterative learning method over the communication network for the closed-loop automatic tuning of a PID controller. It can enhance the performance of the well-known simple PID feedback control loop in the local field when real networked process control applied to systems with uncertain factors, such as external disturbance or randomly delayed measurements. The proposed PID iterative learning method is implemented by backpropagation neural networks whose weights are updated via minimizing tracking error entropy of closed-loop systems. The convergence in the mean square sense is analysed for closed-loop networked control systems. To demonstrate the potential applications of the proposed strategies, a pressure-tank experiment is provided to show the usefulness and effectiveness of the proposed design method in network process control systems.

  2. A plasma process monitor/control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J.O.; Ward, P.P.; Smith, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Markle, R.J. [Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a system to monitor plasma processes for control of industrial applications. The system is designed to act as a fully automated, sand-alone process monitor during printed wiring board and semiconductor production runs. The monitor routinely performs data collection, analysis, process identification, and error detection/correction without the need for human intervention. The monitor can also be used in research mode to allow process engineers to gather additional information about plasma processes. The plasma monitor can perform real-time control of support systems known to influence plasma behavior. The monitor can also signal personnel to modify plasma parameters when the system is operating outside of desired specifications and requires human assistance. A notification protocol can be selected for conditions detected in the plasma process. The Plasma Process Monitor/Control System consists of a computer running software developed by Sandia National Laboratories, a commercially available spectrophotometer equipped with a charge-coupled device camera, an input/output device, and a fiber optic cable.

  3. Improving industrial process control systems security

    CERN Document Server

    Epting, U; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2004-01-01

    System providers are today creating process control systems based on remote connectivity using internet technology, effectively exposing these systems to the same threats as corporate computers. It is becoming increasingly difficult and costly to patch/maintain the technical infrastructure monitoring and control systems to remove these vulnerabilities. A strategy including risk assessment, security policy issues, service level agreements between the IT department and the controls engineering groups must be defined. In addition an increased awareness of IT security in the controls system engineering domain is needed. As consequence of these new factors the control system architectures have to take into account security requirements, that often have an impact on both operational aspects as well as on the project and maintenance cost. Manufacturers of industrial control system equipment do however also propose progressively security related solutions that can be used for our active projects. The paper discusses ...

  4. Process and control systems for composites manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiang, T. H.; Wanamaker, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A precise control of composite material processing would not only improve part quality, but it would also directly reduce the overall manufacturing cost. The development and incorporation of sensors will help to generate real-time information for material processing relationships and equipment characteristics. In the present work, the thermocouple, pressure transducer, and dielectrometer technologies were investigated. The monitoring sensors were integrated with the computerized control system in three non-autoclave fabrication techniques: hot-press, self contained tool (self heating and pressurizing), and pressure vessel). The sensors were implemented in the parts and tools.

  5. Ultrasonic techniques for process monitoring and control.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, H.-T.

    1999-03-24

    Ultrasonic techniques have been applied successfully to process monitoring and control for many industries, such as energy, medical, textile, oil, and material. It helps those industries in quality control, energy efficiency improving, waste reducing, and cost saving. This paper presents four ultrasonic systems, ultrasonic viscometer, on-loom, real-time ultrasonic imaging system, ultrasonic leak detection system, and ultrasonic solid concentration monitoring system, developed at Argonne National Laboratory in the past five years for various applications.

  6. Ventilation equations for improved exothermic process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKernan, John L; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2007-04-01

    Exothermic or heated processes create potentially unsafe work environments for an estimated 5-10 million American workers each year. Excessive heat and process contaminants have the potential to cause acute health effects such as heat stroke, and chronic effects such as manganism in welders. Although millions of workers are exposed to exothermic processes, insufficient attention has been given to continuously improving engineering technologies for these processes to provide effective and efficient control. Currently there is no specific occupational standard established by OSHA regarding exposure to heat from exothermic processes, therefore it is important to investigate techniques that can mitigate known and potential adverse occupational health effects. The current understanding of engineering controls for exothermic processes is primarily based on a book chapter written by W. C. L. Hemeon in 1955. Improvements in heat transfer and meteorological theory necessary to design improved process controls have occurred since this time. The research presented involved a review of the physical properties, heat transfer and meteorological theories governing buoyant air flow created by exothermic processes. These properties and theories were used to identify parameters and develop equations required for the determination of buoyant volumetric flow to assist in improving ventilation controls. Goals of this research were to develop and describe a new (i.e. proposed) flow equation, and compare it to currently accepted ones by Hemeon and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). Numerical assessments were conducted to compare solutions from the proposed equations for plume area, mean velocity and flow to those from the ACGIH and Hemeon. Parameters were varied for the dependent variables and solutions from the proposed, ACGIH, and Hemeon equations for plume area, mean velocity and flow were analyzed using a randomized complete block statistical

  7. Evaluation of control strategies in forming processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calmano Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Products of forming processes are subject to quality fluctuations due to uncertainty in semi-finished part properties as well as process conditions and environment. An approach to cope with these uncertainties is the implementation of a closed-loop control taking into account the actual product properties measured by sensors or estimated by a mathematical process model. Both methods of uncertainty control trade off with a financial effort. In case of sensor integration the effort is the cost of the sensor including signal processing as well as the design and manufacturing effort for integration. In case of an estimation model the effort is mainly determined by the time and knowledge needed to derive the model, identify the parameters and implement the model into the PLC. The risk of mismatch between model and reality as well as the risk of wrong parameter identification can be assumed as additional uncertainty (model uncertainty. This paper evaluates controlled and additional uncertainty by taking into account process boundary conditions like the degree of fluctuations in semi-finished part properties. The proposed evaluation is demonstrated by the analysis of exemplary processes.

  8. Geochemical control of microbial Fe(III) reduction potential in wetlands: Comparison of the rhizosphere to non-rhizosphere soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J.V.; Emerson, D.; Megonigal, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    We compared the reactivity and microbial reduction potential of Fe(III) minerals in the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soil to test the hypothesis that rapid Fe(III) reduction rates in wetland soils are explained by rhizosphere processes. The rhizosphere was defined as the area immediately adjacent to a root encrusted with Fe(III)-oxides or Fe plaque, and non-rhizosphere soil was 0.5 cm from the root surface. The rhizosphere had a significantly higher percentage of poorly crystalline Fe (66??7%) than non-rhizosphere soil (23??7%); conversely, non-rhizosphere soil had a significantly higher proportion of crystalline Fe (50??7%) than the rhizosphere (18??7%, Psoil Fe(III)-oxide pool. Similarly, microbial reduction consumed 75-80% of the rhizosphere pool in 10 days compared to 30-40% of the non-rhizosphere soil pool. Differences between the two pools persisted when samples were amended with an electron-shuttling compound (AQDS), an Fe(III)-reducing bacterium (Geobacter metallireducens), and organic carbon. Thus, Fe(III)-oxide mineralogy contributed strongly to differences in the Fe(III) reduction potential of the two pools. Higher amounts of poorly crystalline Fe(III) and possibly humic substances, and a higher Fe(III) reduction potential in the rhizosphere compared to the non-rhizosphere soil, suggested the rhizosphere is a site of unusually active microbial Fe cycling. The results were consistent with previous speculation that rapid Fe cycling in wetlands is due to the activity of wetland plant roots. ?? 2004 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel strategies for control of fermentation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mears, Lisa; Stocks, Stuart; Sin, Gürkan

    Bioprocesses are inherently sensitive to fluctuations in processing conditions and must be tightly regulated to maintain cellular productivity. Industrial fermentations are often difficult to replicate across production sites or between facilities as the small operating differences in the equipment...... of a fermentation. Industrial fermentation processes are typically operated in fed batch mode, which also poses specific challenges for process monitoring and control. This is due to many reasons including non-linear behaviour, and a relatively poor understanding of the system dynamics. It is therefore challenging...

  10. Optimal control of a CSTR process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Soukkou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Designing an effective criterion and learning algorithm for find the best structure is a major problem in the control design process. In this paper, the fuzzy optimal control methodology is applied to the design of the feedback loops of an Exothermic Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor system. The objective of design process is to find an optimal structure/gains of the Robust and Optimal Takagi Sugeno Fuzzy Controller (ROFLC. The control signal thus obtained will minimize a performance index, which is a function of the tracking/regulating errors, the quantity of the energy of the control signal applied to the system, and the number of fuzzy rules. The genetic learning is proposed for constructing the ROFLC. The chromosome genes are arranged into two parts, the binary-coded part contains the control genes and the real-coded part contains the genes parameters representing the fuzzy knowledge base. The effectiveness of this chromosome formulation enables the fuzzy sets and rules to be optimally reduced. The performances of the ROFLC are compared to these found by the traditional PD controller with Genetic Optimization (PD_GO. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed ROFLC and PD_GO has successfully met the design specifications.

  11. Environmental Process Control: Strategies and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgis Staniskis

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The structure and mathematical presentation of the optimal strategy for environmental process control is presented. This approach covers a wide variety of control systems, which have been constructed and analysed at the Institute of Environmental Engineering during the last fifteen years. Special attention is paid to the preventive environmental control and its tools: pollution prevention, life cycle assessment. The implementation results of preventive environmental control from more than 150 companies are presented in the paper.The investigations on water quality control issues are evaluated from the point of view of the interface between physico-ecological and socio-economical systems and decision support system based on river water quality model is suggested.

  12. ADVANCED CONTROL OF A COMPLEX CHEMICAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Both

    Full Text Available Abstract Three phase catalytic hydrogenation reactors are important reactors with complex behavior due to the interaction among gas, solid and liquid phases with the kinetic, mass and heat transfer mechanisms. A nonlinear distributed parameter model was developed based on mass and energy conservation principles. It consists of balance equations for the gas and liquid phases, so that a system of partial differential equations is generated. Because detailed nonlinear mathematical models are not suitable for use in controller design, a simple linear mathematical model of the process, which describes its most important properties, was determined. Both developed mathematical models were validated using plant data. The control strategies proposed in this paper are a multivariable Smith Predictor PID controller and multivariable Smith Predictor structure in which the primary controllers are derived based on Internal Model Control. Set-point tracking and disturbance rejection tests are presented for both methods based on scenarios implemented in Matlab/SIMULINK.

  13. Process control for sheet-metal stamping process modeling, controller design and shop-floor implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Yongseob; Ulsoy, A Galip

    2014-01-01

    Process Control for Sheet-Metal Stamping presents a comprehensive and structured approach to the design and implementation of controllers for the sheet metal stamping process. The use of process control for sheet-metal stamping greatly reduces defects in deep-drawn parts and can also yield large material savings from reduced scrap. Sheet-metal forming is a complex process and most often characterized by partial differential equations that are numerically solved using finite-element techniques. In this book, twenty years of academic research are reviewed and the resulting technology transitioned to the industrial environment. The sheet-metal stamping process is modeled in a manner suitable for multiple-input multiple-output control system design, with commercially available sensors and actuators. These models are then used to design adaptive controllers and real-time controller implementation is discussed. Finally, experimental results from actual shopfloor deployment are presented along with ideas for further...

  14. Accurate, reliable control of process gases by mass flow controllers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, J.; McKnight, T.

    1997-02-01

    The thermal mass flow controller, or MFC, has become an instrument of choice for the monitoring and controlling of process gas flow throughout the materials processing industry. These MFCs are used on CVD processes, etching tools, and furnaces and, within the semiconductor industry, are used on 70% of the processing tools. Reliability and accuracy are major concerns for the users of the MFCs. Calibration and characterization technologies for the development and implementation of mass flow devices are described. A test facility is available to industry and universities to test and develop gas floe sensors and controllers and evaluate their performance related to environmental effects, reliability, reproducibility, and accuracy. Additional work has been conducted in the area of accuracy. A gravimetric calibrator was invented that allows flow sensors to be calibrated in corrosive, reactive gases to an accuracy of 0.3% of reading, at least an order of magnitude better than previously possible. Although MFCs are typically specified with accuracies of 1% of full scale, MFCs may often be implemented with unwarranted confidence due to the conventional use of surrogate gas factors. Surrogate gas factors are corrections applied to process flow indications when an MFC has been calibrated on a laboratory-safe surrogate gas, but is actually used on a toxic, or corrosive process gas. Previous studies have indicated that the use of these factors may cause process flow errors of typically 10%, but possibly as great as 40% of full scale. This paper will present possible sources of error in MFC process gas flow monitoring and control, and will present an overview of corrective measures which may be implemented with MFC use to significantly reduce these sources of error.

  15. Fault Detection and Control of Process Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Trieu Minh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a stochastic hybrid model-based control system that can determine online the optimal control actions, detect faults quickly in the control process, and reconfigure the controller accordingly using interacting multiple-model (IMM estimator and generalized predictive control (GPC algorithm. A fault detection and control system consists of two main parts: the first is the fault detector and the second is the controller reconfiguration. This work deals with three main challenging issues: design of fault model set, estimation of stochastic hybrid multiple models, and stochastic model predictive control of hybrid multiple models. For the first issue, we propose a simple scheme for designing faults for discrete and continuous random variables. For the second issue, we consider and select a fast and reliable fault detection system applied to the stochastic hybrid system. Finally, we develop a stochastic GPC algorithm for hybrid multiple-models controller reconfiguration with soft switching signals based on weighted probabilities. Simulations for the proposed system are illustrated and analyzed.

  16. Process control systems: integrated for future process technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botros, Youssry; Hajj, Hazem M.

    2003-06-01

    Process Control Systems (PCS) are becoming more crucial to the success of Integrated Circuit makers due to their direct impact on product quality, cost, and Fab output. The primary objective of PCS is to minimize variability by detecting and correcting non optimal performance. Current PCS implementations are considered disparate, where each PCS application is designed, deployed and supported separately. Each implementation targets a specific area of control such as equipment performance, wafer manufacturing, and process health monitoring. With Intel entering the nanometer technology era, tighter process specifications are required for higher yields and lower cost. This requires areas of control to be tightly coupled and integrated to achieve the optimal performance. This requirement can be achieved via consistent design and deployment of the integrated PCS. PCS integration will result in several benefits such as leveraging commonalities, avoiding redundancy, and facilitating sharing between implementations. This paper will address PCS implementations and focus on benefits and requirements of the integrated PCS. Intel integrated PCS Architecture will be then presented and its components will be briefly discussed. Finally, industry direction and efforts to standardize PCS interfaces that enable PCS integration will be presented.

  17. Sensor fusion for intelligent process control.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connors, John J. (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Hill, Kevin (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Hanekamp, David (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Haley, William F. (PPG Industries, Inc., Wichita Falls, TX); Gallagher, Robert J.; Gowin, Craig (PPG Industries, Inc., Batavia, IL); Farrar, Arthur R. (PPG Industries, Inc., Wichita Falls, TX); Sheaffer, Donald A.; DeYoung, Mark A. (PPG Industries, Inc., Mt. Zion, IL); Bertram, Lee A.; Dodge, Craig (PPG Industries, Inc., Mt. Zion, IL); Binion, Bruce (PPG Industries, Inc., Mt. Zion, IL); Walsh, Peter M.; Houf, William G.; Desam, Padmabhushana R. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Tiwary, Rajiv (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Stokes, Michael R. (PPG Industries, Inc.); Miller, Alan J. (PPG Industries, Inc., Mt. Zion, IL); Michael, Richard W. (PPG Industries, Inc., Lincoln, AL); Mayer, Raymond M. (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Jiao, Yu (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Smith, Philip J. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Arbab, Mehran (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Hillaire, Robert G.

    2004-08-01

    An integrated system for the fusion of product and process sensors and controls for production of flat glass was envisioned, having as its objective the maximization of throughput and product quality subject to emission limits, furnace refractory wear, and other constraints. Although the project was prematurely terminated, stopping the work short of its goal, the tasks that were completed show the value of the approach and objectives. Though the demonstration was to have been done on a flat glass production line, the approach is applicable to control of production in the other sectors of the glass industry. Furthermore, the system architecture is also applicable in other industries utilizing processes in which product uniformity is determined by ability to control feed composition, mixing, heating and cooling, chemical reactions, and physical processes such as distillation, crystallization, drying, etc. The first phase of the project, with Visteon Automotive Systems as industrial partner, was focused on simulation and control of the glass annealing lehr. That work produced the analysis and computer code that provide the foundation for model-based control of annealing lehrs during steady state operation and through color and thickness changes. In the second phase of the work, with PPG Industries as the industrial partner, the emphasis was on control of temperature and combustion stoichiometry in the melting furnace, to provide a wider operating window, improve product yield, and increase energy efficiency. A program of experiments with the furnace, CFD modeling and simulation, flow measurements, and sensor fusion was undertaken to provide the experimental and theoretical basis for an integrated, model-based control system utilizing the new infrastructure installed at the demonstration site for the purpose. In spite of the fact that the project was terminated during the first year of the second phase of the work, the results of these first steps toward implementation

  18. Inhibition: Mental Control Process or Mental Resource?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im-Bolter, Nancie; Johnson, Janice; Ling, Daphne; Pascual-Leone, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The current study tested 2 models of inhibition in 45 children with language impairment and 45 children with normally developing language; children were aged 7 to 12 years. Of interest was whether a model of inhibition as a mental-control process (i.e., executive function) or as a mental resource would more accurately reflect the relations among…

  19. Processes mediating expertise in air traffic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Meeuwen, Ludo; Jarodzka, Halszka; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen; De Bock, Jeano; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Van Meeuwen, L. W., Jarodzka, H., Brand-Gruwel, S., Van Merriënboer, J. J. G., De Bock, J. J. P. R., & Kirschner, P. A. (2010, September). Processes mediating expertise in air traffic control. Poster presented at the European Association for Aviation Psychology Conference, Budapest.

  20. EWMA control charts in statistical process monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, I.M.

    2016-01-01

    In today’s world, the amount of available data is steadily increasing, and it is often of interest to detect changes in the data. Statistical process monitoring (SPM) provides tools to monitor data streams and to signal changes in the data. One of these tools is the control chart. The topic of this

  1. Geochemical Calculations Using Spreadsheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutch, Steven Ian

    1991-01-01

    Spreadsheets are well suited to many geochemical calculations, especially those that are highly repetitive. Some of the kinds of problems that can be conveniently solved with spreadsheets include elemental abundance calculations, equilibrium abundances in nuclear decay chains, and isochron calculations. (Author/PR)

  2. Geochemical impacts of groundwater heat pump systems in an urban alluvial aquifer with evaporitic bedrock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido Schneider, Eduardo A. [Geological Survey of Spain (IGME), C/ Manuel Lasala no. 44, 9B, 50006 Zaragoza (Spain); García-Gil, Alejandro, E-mail: agargil@unizar.es [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Zaragoza, C/ Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); GHS, Institute of Environmental Assessment & Water Research (IDAEA), CSIC, Jordi Girona 18–26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Vázquez-Suñè, Enric [GHS, Institute of Environmental Assessment & Water Research (IDAEA), CSIC, Jordi Girona 18–26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Sánchez-Navarro, José Á. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Zaragoza, C/ Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2016-02-15

    In the last decade, there has been an extensive use of shallow geothermal exploitations in urban environments. Although the thermal interference between exploitations has been recently studied, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the geochemical impacts of those systems on the aquifers where they are installed. Groundwater flow line scale and well-doublet scale research work has been conducted at city scale to quantify the geochemical interaction of shallow geothermal exploitations with the environment. A comprehensive analysis was conducted on data obtained from a monitoring network specifically designed to control and develop aquifer policies related to thermal management of the aquifer. The geochemical impacts were evaluated from a thermodynamic point of view by means of saturation index (SI) calculations with respect to the different mineral species considered in the system. The results obtained indicate limited geochemical interaction with the urban environment in most of the situations. However, there are some cases where the interaction of the groundwater heat pump installations with the evaporitic bedrock resulted in the total disablement of the exploitation system operation wells. The application of the tool proposed proved to be pragmatic in the evaluation of geochemical impacts. Injection of water into the aquifer can trigger an important bedrock gypsum and halite dissolution process that is partly responsible for scaling in well casing pipes and collapse of the terrain in the vicinity of injection wells. - Highlights: • We studied geochemical impacts of groundwater heat pump systems. • We have sampled a monitoring network in an energetically exploited urban aquifer. • A limited geochemical interaction has been found in most of the exploitations. • Reinjection into the aquifer produces an important bedrock gypsum dissolution. • Scaling in well casing pipes and collapse of the terrain have been observed.

  3. Regional Geochemical Division-A Tool for Delineating Geochemical Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Regional geochemical division is a mapping technique to divide an area into slices where the associations between geochemical elements are relatively simple and uniform. The result of division is expressed on a 2-D map. The scheme of regional geochemical division includes non-supervised pattern recognition, elementary statistics and factor analysis. A practical example in a gold prospecting area in Jilin, China, and the corresponding explanation are presented. Regional geochemical division is a basic approach to the delineation of the geochemical blocks as well.

  4. Geochemical impacts of groundwater heat pump systems in an urban alluvial aquifer with evaporitic bedrock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Schneider, Eduardo A; García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñè, Enric; Sánchez-Navarro, José Á

    2016-02-15

    In the last decade, there has been an extensive use of shallow geothermal exploitations in urban environments. Although the thermal interference between exploitations has been recently studied, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the geochemical impacts of those systems on the aquifers where they are installed. Groundwater flow line scale and well-doublet scale research work has been conducted at city scale to quantify the geochemical interaction of shallow geothermal exploitations with the environment. A comprehensive analysis was conducted on data obtained from a monitoring network specifically designed to control and develop aquifer policies related to thermal management of the aquifer. The geochemical impacts were evaluated from a thermodynamic point of view by means of saturation index (SI) calculations with respect to the different mineral species considered in the system. The results obtained indicate limited geochemical interaction with the urban environment in most of the situations. However, there are some cases where the interaction of the groundwater heat pump installations with the evaporitic bedrock resulted in the total disablement of the exploitation system operation wells. The application of the tool proposed proved to be pragmatic in the evaluation of geochemical impacts. Injection of water into the aquifer can trigger an important bedrock gypsum and halite dissolution process that is partly responsible for scaling in well casing pipes and collapse of the terrain in the vicinity of injection wells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Environmental control costs for oil shale processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-10-01

    The studies reported herein are intended to provide more certainty regarding estimates of the costs of controlling environmental residuals from oil shale technologies being readied for commercial application. The need for this study was evident from earlier work conducted by the Office of Environment for the Department of Energy Oil Shale Commercialization Planning, Environmental Readiness Assessment in mid-1978. At that time there was little reliable information on the costs for controlling residuals and for safe handling of wastes from oil shale processes. The uncertainties in estimating costs of complying with yet-to-be-defined environmental standards and regulations for oil shale facilities are a critical element that will affect the decision on proceeding with shale oil production. Until the regulatory requirements are fully clarified and processes and controls are investigated and tested in units of larger size, it will not be possible to provide definitive answers to the cost question. Thus, the objective of this work was to establish ranges of possible control costs per barrel of shale oil produced, reflecting various regulatory, technical, and financing assumptions. Two separate reports make up the bulk of this document. One report, prepared by the Denver Research Institute, is a relatively rigorous engineering treatment of the subject, based on regulatory assumptions and technical judgements as to best available control technologies and practices. The other report examines the incremental cost effect of more conservative technical and financing alternatives. An overview section is included that synthesizes the products of the separate studies and addresses two variations to the assumptions.

  6. The statistical process control methods - SPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floreková Ľubica

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Methods of statistical evaluation of quality – SPC (item 20 of the documentation system of quality control of ISO norm, series 900 of various processes, products and services belong amongst basic qualitative methods that enable us to analyse and compare data pertaining to various quantitative parameters. Also they enable, based on the latter, to propose suitable interventions with the aim of improving these processes, products and services. Theoretical basis and applicatibily of the principles of the: - diagnostics of a cause and effects, - Paret analysis and Lorentz curve, - number distribution and frequency curves of random variable distribution, - Shewhart regulation charts, are presented in the contribution.

  7. Microbial iron cycling in acidic geothermal springs of Yellowstone National Park: Integrating molecular surveys, geochemical processes and isolation of novel Fe-active microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Kozubal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical, molecular, and physiological analyses of microbial isolates were combined to study the geomicrobiology of acidic iron oxide mats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP. Nineteen sampling locations from 11 geothermal springs were studied ranging in temperature from 53 to 84 °C and pH 2.4 to 3.6. All iron-oxide mats exhibited high diversity of crenarchaeal sequences from the Sulfolobales, Thermoproteales, and Desulfurococcales. The predominant Sulfolobales sequences were highly similar to Metallosphaera yellowstonensis str. MK1, previously isolated from one of these sites. Other groups of archaea were consistently associated with different types of iron oxide mats, including undescribed members of the phyla Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Bacterial sequences were dominated by relatives of Hydrogenobaculum spp. above 65-70 °C, but increased in diversity below 60 °C. Cultivation of relevant iron-oxidizing and iron-reducing microbial isolates included Sulfolobus str. MK3, Sulfobacillus str. MK2, Acidicaldus str. MK6, and a new candidate genus in the Sulfolobales referred to as Sulfolobales str. MK5. Strains MK3 and MK5 are capable of oxidizing ferrous iron autotrophically, while strain MK2 oxidizes iron mixotrophically. Similar rates of iron oxidation were observed for M. yellowstonensis str. MK1 and Sulfolobales str. MK5 cultures, and these rates are close to those measured in situ. Biomineralized phases of ferric iron varied among cultures and field sites, and included ferric oxyhydroxides, K-jarosite, goethite, hematite, and scorodite depending on geochemical conditions. Strains MK5 and MK6 are capable of reducing ferric iron under anaerobic conditions with complex carbon sources. The combination of geochemical and molecular data as well as physiological observations of isolates suggests that the community structure of acidic Fe mats is linked with Fe cycling across temperatures ranging from 53 to 88 oC.

  8. Agents-based distributed processes control systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Gligor

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Large industrial distributed systems have revealed a remarkable development in recent years. We may note an increase of their structural and functional complexity, at the same time with those on requirements side. These are some reasons why there are involvednumerous researches, energy and resources to solve problems related to these types of systems. The paper addresses the issue of industrial distributed systems with special attention being given to the distributed industrial processes control systems. A solution for a distributed process control system based on mobile intelligent agents is presented.The main objective of the proposed system is to provide an optimal solution in terms of costs, maintenance, reliability and flexibility. The paper focuses on requirements, architecture, functionality and advantages brought by the proposed solution.

  9. Reputation-controlled business process workflows

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz, Benjamin; Hamilton, G

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a model solution for controlling the execution of BPEL business processes based on reputation constraints at the level of the services, the service providers and the BPEL workflow. The reputation constraints are expressed as part of a service level agreement and are then enforced at runtime by a reputation monitoring system. We use our model to demonstrate how trust requirements based on such reputation constraints can be upheld in a real world example of a distributed map...

  10. Modelling and control of a flotation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, L.; Gustafsson, T. [Control Engineering Group, Lulea Univ. of Technology, Lulea (Sweden)

    1999-07-01

    A general description of a flotation process is given. The dynamic model of a MIMO nonlinear subprocess in flotation, i. e. the pulp levels in five compartments in series is developed and the model is verified with real data from a production plant. In order to reject constant disturbances five extra states are introduced and the model is modified. An exact linearization has been made for the non-linear model and a linear quadratic gaussian controller is proposed based on the linearized model. The simulation result shows an improved performance of the pulp level control when the set points are changed or a disturbance occur. In future the controller will be tested in production. (author)

  11. Geochemical study of water-rock interaction processes on geothermal systems of alkaline water in granitic massif; Estudio geoquimico de los procesos de interaccion agua-roca sobre sistemas goetermales de aguas alcalinas en granitoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buil gutierrez, B.; Garcia Sanz, S.; Lago San Jose, M.; Arranz Uague, E.; Auque Sanz, L. [Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    The study of geothermal systems developed within granitic massifs (with alkaline waters and reducing ORP values) is a topic of increasing scientific interest. These systems are a perfect natural laboratory for studying the water-rock interaction processes as they are defined by three main features: 1) long residence time of water within the system, 2) temperature in the reservoir high enough to favour reaction kinetics and finally, 3) the comparison of the chemistry of the incoming and outgoing waters of the system allows for the evaluation of the processes that have modified the water chemistry and its signature, The four geothermal systems considered in this paper are developed within granitic massifs of the Spanish Central Pyrenes; these systems were studied from a geochemical point of view, defining the major, trace and REE chemistry of both waters and host rocks and then characterizing the composition and geochemical evolution of the different waters. Bicarbonate-chloride-sodic and bicarbonate-sodic compositions are the most representative of the water chemistry in the deep geothermal system, as they are not affected by secondary processes (mixing, conductive cooling, etc). (Author)

  12. Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB)-Geochemical data for rock, sediment, soil, mineral, and concentrate sample media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitto, Matthew; Bailey, Elizabeth A.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.; Labay, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) was created and designed to compile and integrate geochemical data from Alaska in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessments, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessments, and studies in medical geology. This Microsoft Access database serves as a data archive in support of present and future Alaskan geologic and geochemical projects, and contains data tables describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses. The analytical results were determined by 85 laboratory and field analytical methods on 264,095 rock, sediment, soil, mineral and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed in USGS laboratories or, under contracts, in commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various USGS programs and projects from 1962 to 2009. In addition, mineralogical data from 18,138 nonmagnetic heavy mineral concentrate samples are included in this database. The AGDB includes historical geochemical data originally archived in the USGS Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database, used from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s and the USGS PLUTO database used from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. All of these data are currently maintained in the Oracle-based National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB were used to generate most of the AGDB data set. These data were checked for accuracy regarding sample location, sample media type, and analytical methods used. This arduous process of reviewing, verifying and, where necessary, editing all USGS geochemical data resulted in a significantly improved Alaska geochemical dataset. USGS data that were not previously in the NGDB because the data predate the earliest USGS geochemical databases, or were once excluded for programmatic reasons

  13. Geochemical modeling: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenne, E.A.

    1981-06-01

    Two general families of geochemical models presently exist. The ion speciation-solubility group of geochemical models contain submodels to first calculate a distribution of aqueous species and to secondly test the hypothesis that the water is near equilibrium with particular solid phases. These models may or may not calculate the adsorption of dissolved constituents and simulate the dissolution and precipitation (mass transfer) of solid phases. Another family of geochemical models, the reaction path models, simulates the stepwise precipitation of solid phases as a result of reacting specified amounts of water and rock. Reaction path models first perform an aqueous speciation of the dissolved constituents of the water, test solubility hypotheses, then perform the reaction path modeling. Certain improvements in the present versions of these models would enhance their value and usefulness to applications in nuclear-waste isolation, etc. Mass-transfer calculations of limited extent are certainly within the capabilities of state-of-the-art models. However, the reaction path models require an expansion of their thermodynamic data bases and systematic validation before they are generally accepted.

  14. Investigations of the geochemical controls on anomalous arsenic enrichment in the Santiago Peak Volcanics of Southern California: implications for arsenic distribution in volcanic arc systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, E. C.; Pollock, M.; Cathcart, E. M.; AlBashaireh, A.; O'shea, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Santiago Peak Volcanics (SPV) of Southern CA and Northern Baja CA, Mexico are remnants of a Cretaceous subaerial volcanic arc system that underwent greenschist facies metamorphism contemporaneous with volcanism. Observed SPV exposed at the surface of Black Mountain Open Space Park (San Diego, CA) exhibit anomalous arsenic (As) enrichment (100 - 480,000 ppm) up to five orders of magnitude greater than average for igneous rocks (1.5 ppm). We hypothesize that these rocks underwent localized syn-volcanic hydrothermal alteration along a highly fractured zone that today trends between N10°W and N20°W, leading to anomalous As enrichment on the spatial scale of tens of meters. We suspect that such As has been further mobilized by modern water-rock interactions. Using standard geochemical techniques (e.g. XRD, XRF, EDX) and mass balance analyses, we aim to (1) summarize the extent of As enrichment in altered SPV, and (2) present an integrated view of the interactions between ancient hydrothermal volcanic arc processes, surficial weathering, and observed As anomalies. Alteration textures of samples range from partially altered phenocrysts (i.e. minimally altered) to massive hydrothermal replacement, in which virtually all primary phases are altered to new hydrothermal minerals such as epidote, Fe-rich chlorite, and sericite (i.e. highly altered). Highly altered rocks contain average As concentrations (mean = 37,680 +/- 15,396 ppm, n = 23) >10,000 times that of minimally altered SPV (mean = 26 +/- 6 ppm As, n = 19). In some rocks, As-rich iron oxide and gypsum containing up to 900 ppm As are present as surficial rinds, suggesting modern day remobilization of As from hydrothermal host minerals, like arsenopyrite. These findings indicate that such As is highly soluble and, therefore, may be further mobilized by physical and chemical weathering. No other trace metals (e.g. Pb, Cu, Ag, Au) are consistently enriched above upper-crustal averages, and As does not always occur

  15. 过程能力指数在化探样品分析质量评估中的应用%The Application of Process Capability Index in the Quality Assessment for Geochemical Samples Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王烨; 陈爱平

    2013-01-01

    The process capability index (CPK) is the value that measures the degree of process capability to meet the quality standard of products. In the process control, if the CPK is bigger, the product quality is better. Considering the economy of production and processing, the CPK is usually controlled at an acceptable level. In this paper, we firstly applied a process capability index from industry to the quality assessment of analysis in the geological laboratory. The comprehensive evaluation of the overall quality of the samples was obtained through calculating the process of 114 capability indexes of the standard sediments (GBW 07320, GBW 07325 and GBW 07328) with the geochemical samples selected from the two Tibet 1 : 200000 Luolamu map. The results show that all the CPK were more than the threshold levels of CPK. In all of the testing items, 63 items' CPK such as Na2O, MgO, A12O3 and SiO2 etc, were more than 1. 33 , 47 items' CPK such as Cu, Li, Be, W etc were more than 0. 67. However, the CPK of Th, Ag, Cr and Hg were less than 0. 67. As for the items with poor process capability, the tests for process capability were taken, appropriate standard materials were selected, equipment calibrated, chemical procedures standardized and the measurement methods optimized in order to improve accuracy and stability of the analytical data. The application of process capability index provided a convenient and scientific method for quality evaluation of geochemical sample analysis, which provided the scientific basis to choose analysis plans for different testing items and reduce the cost.%过程能力指数(CPK)是衡量工序能力满足产品质量标准要求程度的量值,CPK越大,产品质量越高,同时考虑到生产加工的经济性,通常将CPK控制在一个可以接受的水平.本研究首次将工业生产常用的过程能力指数方法运用于地矿实验室分析质量评估,通过计算西藏1:20万罗拉木等两个图幅化探样品中插入的西藏

  16. Monitoring and controlling the biogas process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahring, B.K.; Angelidaki, I. [The Technical Univ. of Denmark, Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1997-08-01

    Many modern large-scale biogas plants have been constructed recently, increasing the demand for proper monitoring and control of these large reactor systems. For monitoring the biogas process, an easy to measure and reliable indicator is required, which reflects the metabolic state and the activity of the bacterial populations in the reactor. In this paper, we discuss existing indicators as well as indicators under development which can potentially be used to monitor the state of the biogas process in a reactor. Furthermore, data are presented from two large scale thermophilic biogas plants, subjected to temperature changes and where the concentration of volatile fatty acids was monitored. The results clearly demonstrated that significant changes in the concentration of the individual VFA occurred although the biogas production was not significantly changed. Especially the concentrations of butyrate, isobutyrate and isovalerate showed significant changes. Future improvements of process control could therefore be based on monitoring of the concentration of specific VFA`s together with information about the bacterial populations in the reactor. The last information could be supplied by the use of modern molecular techniques. (au) 51 refs.

  17. Produced water re-injection in a non-fresh water aquifer with geochemical reaction, hydrodynamic molecular dispersion and adsorption kinetics controlling: model development and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obe, Ibidapo; Fashanu, T. A.; Idialu, Peter O.; Akintola, Tope O.; Abhulimen, Kingsley E.

    2017-06-01

    An improved produced water reinjection (PWRI) model that incorporates filtration, geochemical reaction, molecular transport, and mass adsorption kinetics was developed to predict cake deposition and injectivity performance in hydrocarbon aquifers in Nigeria oil fields. Thus, the improved PWRI model considered contributions of geochemical reaction, adsorption kinetics, and hydrodynamic molecular dispersion mechanism to alter the injectivity and deposition of suspended solids on aquifer wall resulting in cake formation in pores during PWRI and transport of active constituents in hydrocarbon reservoirs. The injectivity decline and cake deposition for specific case studies of hydrocarbon aquifers in Nigeria oil fields were characterized with respect to its well geometry, lithology, and calibrations data and simulated in COMSOL multiphysics software environment. The PWRI model was validated by comparisons to assessments of previous field studies based on data and results supplied by operator and regulator. The results of simulation showed that PWRI performance was altered because of temporal variations and declinations of permeability, injectivity, and cake precipitation, which were observed to be dependent on active adsorption and geochemical reaction kinetics coupled with filtration scheme and molecular dispersion. From the observed results and findings, transition time t r to cake nucleation and growth were dependent on aquifer constituents, well capacity, filtration coefficients, particle-to-grain size ratio, water quality, and more importantly, particle-to-grain adsorption kinetics. Thus, the results showed that injectivity decline and permeability damage were direct contributions of geochemical reaction, hydrodynamic molecular diffusion, and adsorption kinetics to the internal filtration mechanism, which are largely dependent on the initial conditions of concentration of active constituents of produced water and aquifer capacity.

  18. Produced water re-injection in a non-fresh water aquifer with geochemical reaction, hydrodynamic molecular dispersion and adsorption kinetics controlling: model development and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obe, Ibidapo; Fashanu, T. A.; Idialu, Peter O.; Akintola, Tope O.; Abhulimen, Kingsley E.

    2016-12-01

    An improved produced water reinjection (PWRI) model that incorporates filtration, geochemical reaction, molecular transport, and mass adsorption kinetics was developed to predict cake deposition and injectivity performance in hydrocarbon aquifers in Nigeria oil fields. Thus, the improved PWRI model considered contributions of geochemical reaction, adsorption kinetics, and hydrodynamic molecular dispersion mechanism to alter the injectivity and deposition of suspended solids on aquifer wall resulting in cake formation in pores during PWRI and transport of active constituents in hydrocarbon reservoirs. The injectivity decline and cake deposition for specific case studies of hydrocarbon aquifers in Nigeria oil fields were characterized with respect to its well geometry, lithology, and calibrations data and simulated in COMSOL multiphysics software environment. The PWRI model was validated by comparisons to assessments of previous field studies based on data and results supplied by operator and regulator. The results of simulation showed that PWRI performance was altered because of temporal variations and declinations of permeability, injectivity, and cake precipitation, which were observed to be dependent on active adsorption and geochemical reaction kinetics coupled with filtration scheme and molecular dispersion. From the observed results and findings, transition time t r to cake nucleation and growth were dependent on aquifer constituents, well capacity, filtration coefficients, particle-to-grain size ratio, water quality, and more importantly, particle-to-grain adsorption kinetics. Thus, the results showed that injectivity decline and permeability damage were direct contributions of geochemical reaction, hydrodynamic molecular diffusion, and adsorption kinetics to the internal filtration mechanism, which are largely dependent on the initial conditions of concentration of active constituents of produced water and aquifer capacity.

  19. Process window control using CDU master

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Tomoharu; Toki, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Daishi; Sato, Maki; Kosugi, Junichi; Tanaka, Rika; Sakasai, Naruo; Ohashi, Toshio; Nakasone, Ryoko; Tokui, Akira

    2012-03-01

    As double patterning techniques such as spacer double/quadruple patterning mature, ArF water immersion lithography is expected to be applied down to the 1x nm hp node or beyond. This will necessitate precise process control solutions to accommodate extremely small process windows. In the case of spacer double/quadruple patterning in particular, CD uniformity of the final feature is strongly related to the lithography performance of the initial pre-spacer feature. CD uniformity of the resist image is affected by many sources. In the case of the exposure tool, CD error on the reticle, as well as exposure dose and focus errors are the key factors. For the resist process, heterogeneity of the stacked resist film thickness, post exposure bake (PEB) plate temperature, and development all have an impact. Furthermore, the process wafer also has error sources that include under-layer non-uniformities or wafer flatness. Fortunately, the majorities of these non-uniformities are quite stable in a volume production process. To improve and maintain the CD uniformity, a technique to calculate exposure dose and focus correction values simultaneously using the measured resist image feature was reported previously [1]. Further, a demonstration of a correction loop using a neural network calculation model was reported in SPIE 2010 [2], and the corrected CD uniformity was less than 1.5 nm (3 sigma) within a wafer. For further improvement, a demonstration of precise dose and focus control using high order field-by-field correction was then reported at SPIE 2011[3]. In that work, the interand intra-field CD uniformities reported were less than 1 nm (3 sigma) respectively. A key aspect of this method is the simultaneous compensation of dose and focus offsets, which successfully maximizes the process margin of a target pattern. The Nikon CDU Master then derives the optimal control parameters for each compensation function in the scanner using the exposure dose and focus correction data

  20. Gesture Controlled Robot using Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Kumar Kaura

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Service robots directly interact with people, so finding a more natural and easy user interface is of fundamental importance. While earlier works have focused primarily on issues such as manipulation and navigation in the environment, few robotic systems are used with user friendly interfaces that possess the ability to control the robot by natural means. To facilitate a feasible solution to this requirement, we have implemented a system through which the user can give commands to a wireless robot using gestures. Through this method, the user can control or navigate the robot by using gestures of his/her palm, thereby interacting with the robotic system. The command signals are generated from these gestures using image processing. These signals are then passed to the robot to navigate it in the specified directions.

  1. High risk process control system assessment methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Venetia [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil); Zamberlan, Maria Cristina [National Institute of Tehnology (INT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Human Reliability and Ergonomics Research Group for the Oil, Gas and Energy Sector

    2009-07-01

    The evolution of ergonomics methodology has become necessary due to the dynamics imposed by the work environment, by the increase of the need of human cooperation and by the high interaction between various sections within a company. In the last 25 years, as of studies made in the high risk process control, we have developed a methodology to evaluate these situations that focus on the assessment of activities and human cooperation, the assessment of context, the assessment of the impact of work of other sectors in the final activity of the operator, as well as the modeling of existing risks. (author)

  2. Multivariate Process Control with Autocorrelated Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahci, Murat

    2011-01-01

    As sensor and computer technology continues to improve, it becomes a normal occurrence that we confront with high dimensional data sets. As in many areas of industrial statistics, this brings forth various challenges in statistical process control and monitoring. This new high dimensional data...... often exhibit not only cross-­‐correlation among the quality characteristics of interest but also serial dependence as a consequence of high sampling frequency and system dynamics. In practice, the most common method of monitoring multivariate data is through what is called the Hotelling’s T2 statistic...

  3. Control of fumonisin: effects of processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, D S; Meredith, F I; Voss, K A

    2001-05-01

    Of about 10 billion bushels of corn that are grown each year in the United States, less than 2% is processed directly into food products, and about 18% is processed into intermediates such as high-fructose corn syrup, ethanol, and cornstarch. The vast majority of the annual crop is used domestically for animal feed (60%), and about 16% is exported. Thus, any program for controlling residues of fumonisin (FB) in food must recognize that most of the crop is grown for something other than food. Studies on the effects of wet milling on FB residues found these residues nondetectable in cornstarch, the starting material for high-fructose corn syrup and most other wet-milled food ingredients. Similar effects are noted for the dry-milling process. FB residues were nondetectable or quite low in dry flaking grits and corn flour, higher in corn germ, and highest in corn bran. Extrusion of dry-milled products reduces FB concentrations by 30-90% for mixing-type extruders and 20-50% for nonmixing extruders. Cooking and canning generally have little effect on FB content. In the masa process measurable FB is reduced following the cooking, soaking, and washing steps, with little conversion of FB to the hydrolyzed form. Sheeting, baking, and frying at commercial times and temperatures generally have no effect. In summary, all available studies on the effects of processing corn into food and food ingredients consistently demonstrate substantial reductions in measurable FB. No studies have shown a concentration in FB residues in food products or ingredients.

  4. Automated control system for a mashing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teterin, E.; Rudnickiy, V.

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe a system for a mashing process, which is the first part of brewing beer. The mashing is a procedure where the fermentable (and some nonfermentable) sugars are extracted from malts. The program part based on LabVIEW, which is used to control NI CompactRIO. The main target of the project is to reach a predefined levels of the temperatures and maintain it during the pauses. When the necessary break time is ended the system is ready to go to the new value. The precise control of the temperatures during the breaks is one of the critical factors that define the texture and alcohol content of the beer. The system has two tanks with resistors PT'00 in both of them, heat exchanger (coil), heater and pump. The first tank has heating element in order to rise the temperature in the other one. This project has practical solution with all explanations and graphs which are proven working ability of this control system.

  5. Chlorine isotopes potential as geo-chemical tracers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Pradhan, U.K.; Banerjee, R.

    The potential of chlorine isotopes as tracers of geo-chemical processes of earth and the oceans is highlighted based on systematic studies carried out in understanding the chlorine isotope fractionation mechanism, its constancy in seawater and its...

  6. Test and inspection for process control of monolithic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, E.

    1967-01-01

    Report details the test and inspection procedures for the mass production of high reliability integrated circuits. It covers configuration control, basic fundamentals of quality control, control charts, wafer process evaluation, general process evaluation, evaluation score system, and diffusion evaluation.

  7. Modeling and Advanced Control for Sustainable Process Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter introduces a novel process systems engineering framework that integrates process control with sustainability assessment tools for the simultaneous evaluation and optimization of process operations. The implemented control strategy consists of a biologically-insp...

  8. Gamma radiation as a microbiological control process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, E.T.; Stein, M.H.

    1976-01-01

    Since the approval of the NDA for radiation sterilization of tetracycline ophthalmic ointment submitted by Lederle Laboratories, many other companies have initiated programs to obtain the necessary data for an NDA filling. This paper outlines the factors to be considered in such filling, i.e., choice of radiation exposure, microbiological efficacy, evaluation of possibility of chemical change, establishment of maximum exposure, effect of maximum ratio, etc. Using radiation to control the bacterial level of incoming raw material is also discussed both from the standpoint of reducing the challenge to the sterilization process and as an adjunct to GMP for maintaining the equivalent to aseptic handling cleanliness for those products which do not require sterility or high degrees of sterility assurance.

  9. Environmental Control Of A Genetic Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Chaitan; Bailey, James E.

    1991-01-01

    E. coli bacteria altered to contain DNA sequence encoding production of hemoglobin made to produce hemoglobin at rates decreasing with increases in concentration of oxygen in culture media. Represents amplification of part of method described in "Cloned Hemoglobin Genes Enhance Growth Of Cells" (NPO-17517). Manipulation of promoter/regulator DNA sequences opens promising new subfield of recombinant-DNA technology for environmental control of expression of selected DNA sequences. New recombinant-DNA fusion gene products, expression vectors, and nucleotide-base sequences will emerge. Likely applications include such aerobic processes as manufacture of cloned proteins and synthesis of metabolites, production of chemicals by fermentation, enzymatic degradation, treatment of wastes, brewing, and variety of oxidative chemical reactions.

  10. Neural Networks for Signal Processing and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselroth, Ted Daniel

    Neural networks are developed for controlling a robot-arm and camera system and for processing images. The networks are based upon computational schemes that may be found in the brain. In the first network, a neural map algorithm is employed to control a five-joint pneumatic robot arm and gripper through feedback from two video cameras. The pneumatically driven robot arm employed shares essential mechanical characteristics with skeletal muscle systems. To control the position of the arm, 200 neurons formed a network representing the three-dimensional workspace embedded in a four-dimensional system of coordinates from the two cameras, and learned a set of pressures corresponding to the end effector positions, as well as a set of Jacobian matrices for interpolating between these positions. Because of the properties of the rubber-tube actuators of the arm, the position as a function of supplied pressure is nonlinear, nonseparable, and exhibits hysteresis. Nevertheless, through the neural network learning algorithm the position could be controlled to an accuracy of about one pixel (~3 mm) after two hundred learning steps. Applications of repeated corrections in each step via the Jacobian matrices leads to a very robust control algorithm since the Jacobians learned by the network have to satisfy the weak requirement that they yield a reduction of the distance between gripper and target. The second network is proposed as a model for the mammalian vision system in which backward connections from the primary visual cortex (V1) to the lateral geniculate nucleus play a key role. The application of hebbian learning to the forward and backward connections causes the formation of receptive fields which are sensitive to edges, bars, and spatial frequencies of preferred orientations. The receptive fields are learned in such a way as to maximize the rate of transfer of information from the LGN to V1. Orientational preferences are organized into a feature map in the primary visual

  11. Mineralogical and geochemical controls on the release of trace elements from slag produced by base- and precious-metal smelting at abandoned mine sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, N.M.; Seal, R.R.; Hammarstrom, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    toxicity guideline. Geochemical modeling of the leachate chemistry suggests that leachates from the Vermont, Tennessee and Clayton slags are saturated with amorphous silica and Al hydroxide. Therefore, the dissolution of silicate and oxide phases, the oxidation of sulfide phases, as well as the precipitation of secondary phases may control the composition of leachate from slags. The presence of secondary minerals on slag deposits in the field is evidence that these materials are reactive. The petrographic data and results of leaching tests from this study indicate slag may be a source of potentially toxic metals at abandoned mine sites.

  12. Understanding Control Function and Failure From a Process Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heussen, Kai; Lind, Morten

    2012-01-01

    In control design, fault-identification and fault tolerant control, the controlled process is usually perceived as a dynamical process, captured in a mathematical model. The design of a control system for a complex process, however, begins typically long before these mathematical models become...... behaviour and its function. This paper presents a formal methodology for the qualitative representation of control functions in relation to their process context. Different types of relevant process and control abstractions are introduced and their application to formal analysis of control failure modes...... relevant and available. To consider the role of control functions in process design, a good qualitative understanding of the process as well as of control functions is required. As the purpose of a control function is closely tied to the process functions, its failure has a direct effects on the process...

  13. Bayesian nonparametric adaptive control using Gaussian processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Girish; Kingravi, Hassan A; How, Jonathan P; Vela, Patricio A

    2015-03-01

    Most current model reference adaptive control (MRAC) methods rely on parametric adaptive elements, in which the number of parameters of the adaptive element are fixed a priori, often through expert judgment. An example of such an adaptive element is radial basis function networks (RBFNs), with RBF centers preallocated based on the expected operating domain. If the system operates outside of the expected operating domain, this adaptive element can become noneffective in capturing and canceling the uncertainty, thus rendering the adaptive controller only semiglobal in nature. This paper investigates a Gaussian process-based Bayesian MRAC architecture (GP-MRAC), which leverages the power and flexibility of GP Bayesian nonparametric models of uncertainty. The GP-MRAC does not require the centers to be preallocated, can inherently handle measurement noise, and enables MRAC to handle a broader set of uncertainties, including those that are defined as distributions over functions. We use stochastic stability arguments to show that GP-MRAC guarantees good closed-loop performance with no prior domain knowledge of the uncertainty. Online implementable GP inference methods are compared in numerical simulations against RBFN-MRAC with preallocated centers and are shown to provide better tracking and improved long-term learning.

  14. Thermionic power system power processing and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Thermionic power systems are being considered for space-based miltary applications because of their survivability and high efficiency. Under the direction of the Air Force, conceptual designs were generated for two thermionic power systems to determine preliminary system performance data and direct future component development. This paper discusses the power processing and control (PP&C) subsystem that conditions the thermionic converter power and controls the operation of the reactor and thermionic converter subsystems. The baseline PP&C design and design options are discussed, mass and performance data are provided, and technology needs are identified. The impact on PP&C subsystem mass and efficiency of alternate power levels and boom lengths is also presented. The baseline PP&C subsystem is lightweight and reliable, and it uses proven design concepts to minimize development and testing time. However, the radiation dosages specified in the program research and development announcement (PRDA) are 10 to 100 times the capabilities of present semiconductor devices. While these levels are aggressive, they are considered to be achievable by 1995 if the Air Force and other government agencies continue to actively develop radiation resistant electronics devices for military applications.

  15. Late Triassic high-Mg andesite/dacite suites from northern Hohxil, North Tibet: Geochronology, geochemical characteristics, petrogenetic processes and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wyman, Derek A.; Sun, Ya-Li; Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Zhu, Yin-Tang; Qiu, Hua-Ning

    2011-09-01

    This study reports age, petrologic and geochemical data for andesites and dacites from the Late Triassic sedimentary strata of northern Hohxil, in the Hohxil-Songpan-Ganzi Block (northern Tibet), which constitutes the most voluminous Triassic strata on Earth. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb analysis of dacite (210.4 ± 1.9 Ma) and whole rock 40Ar- 39Ar analyses for both the andesites and dacites (211 ± 2 Ma and 210.9 ± 1.6 Ma) show that the rocks were almost contemporaneous. Both rock types are sodium-rich and calc-alkaline. The andesites, characterized by high MgO (up to 10 wt.%) or Mg # (~ 70), TiO 2, Al 2O 3, Cr, Ni, La/Yb and Th/La, but low Nb/Ta ratios, are geochemically similar to sanukitoids in southeastern Japan. The dacites are strongly peraluminous, and have high Al 2O 3 and La/Yb, low Y and Yb, coupled with negligible to positive Eu and Sr anomalies, comparable to slab-derived adakites in the circum Pacific arc system. Both rocks exhibit strongly fractionated platinum group element patterns, with Pt/Pt* (Pt anomaly), (Pt/Ir) N and Re/Os ratios higher than those of the primitive mantle. They have uniformly low ɛNd(t) values (- 7.57--9.59) and high ( 86Sr/ 87Sr) i ratios (0.7086-0.7106) that imply a continental rather than oceanic type magma source. We suggest that the northern Hohxil dacites were produced by partial melting of subducted sediments on the northward-subducting Songpan-Ganzi oceanic slab, and the high-Mg andesites were formed by subsequent interaction between the sediment-derived melts and mantle wedge peridotites. Taking into account the Triassic magmatic record from nearby regions, we suggest that the Late Triassic high-Mg andesite/dacite suites of northern Hohxil were generated in a forearc setting, and propose that double-sided subduction eventually closed the Songpan-Ganzi ocean during the Late Triassic.

  16. Hydrochemical and geochemical processes in superficial dump sediments in Zwenkau open brown coal mine; Hydro- und geochemische Prozesse in oberflaechennahen Kippensedimenten des Braunkohlentagebaus Zwenkau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, U.

    2002-07-01

    The present study was performed as part of a project titled ''Ground and air-based spectrometric studies for the differentiation of reactively altered brown coal open mining areas in Central Germany'' (Project 02 WB 9667/5) which was funded by the Federal Ministry for Education and Research. It was carried out as a cooperation between GeoForschungszentrum Potsdam (GFZ, Potsdam GeoResearch Centre), Deutsches Zentrum for Lust- und Raumfahrt (DLR, German Aerospace Centre), Gesellschaft fuer Angewandte Fernerkundung (GAF, Society for Applied Remote Sensing) and Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig/Halle GmbH (UFZ, Leipzig/Halle Environmental Research Centre). The idea of the project was to calibrate aerial data obtained by means of spectrometric remote sensing methods using conventional petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical analysis. This would provide the mining industry with a powerful method with low time and staff requirement for reliably classifying the vast dump areas produced by open pit mining, accurately assigning findings to location data and thus identifying suitable uses for different sites. The focus of the present study was on characterising hydrochemical and geochemical alterations in dump sediments of the Zwenkau brown coal open mining area south of Leipzig in Central Germany. The collection of these data plays a decisive role in plans for cultivating and assessing the potential hazard to the open mining landscape. [German] Die vorliegende Arbeit wurde im Rahmen des BMBF-gefoerderten Projektes 'Luft- und bodengestuetzte spektrometrische Untersuchungen zur Differenzierung reaktiv veraenderter Braunkohlentagebaugebiete in Mitteldeutschland' (Vorhaben 02 WB 9667/5) als Kooperation zwischen dem GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), dem Deutschen Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), der Gesellschaft fuer Angewandte Fernerkundung (GAF) und dem Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig/Halle GmbH (UFZ) angefertigt. Idee des Projektes war

  17. Geochemical Processes and compacted bentonite FEBEX with a thermohydraulic gradient with a thermohydraulic gradient; Procesos geoquimicos y modificaciones texturales en bentonita FEBEX compactada sometida a un gradiente termohidraulico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leguey Jimenez, S.; Cuevas Rodriguez, J.; Martin Barca, M.; Vigil de la Villa Mencia, R.; Ramirez Martin, S.; Garcia Gimenez, R. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    At present, the main source of High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) is the electrical energy production during all sep of developing. In almost all the countries with nuclear programs, the option for the final management of HLW is the Deep Geological Repository (DGR), based on the concept of multi barrier. According to this concept, the wastes is isolated from biosphere by the interposition of confinement barrier. In the context of an investigation of the near field for a repository of HLW, the FEBEX Project, a set of laboratory test has been designed to give a better understanding of the thermo-hydro-mechanical and geochemical behaviour of the compacted bentonite as a confinement barrier. The object of these work is to analyse the properties of the bentonite and its behaviour under conditions that will be found in a repository. The precipitation of mineral phases, due to local changes in the chemical equilibrium and the hydration itself, can produce changes in the salinity of the interstitial water and in the microstructural organisation of the clay particles. the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the bentonite can be modified by the special conditions of the barrier. (Author)

  18. 21 CFR 820.70 - Production and process controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Production and process controls. 820.70 Section...) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Production and Process Controls § 820.70 Production and process controls. (a) General. Each manufacturer shall develop, conduct, control, and monitor production...

  19. Security of legacy process control systems : Moving towards secure process control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterink, M.

    2012-01-01

    This white paper describes solutions which organisations may use to improve the security of their legacy process control systems. When we refer to a legacy system, we generally refer to old methodologies, technologies, computer systems or applications which are still in use, despite the fact that ne

  20. Security of legacy process control systems : Moving towards secure process control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterink, M.

    2012-01-01

    This white paper describes solutions which organisations may use to improve the security of their legacy process control systems. When we refer to a legacy system, we generally refer to old methodologies, technologies, computer systems or applications which are still in use, despite the fact that

  1. Statistical process control for IMRT dosimetric verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Stephen L; Moseley, Douglas J; Zhang, Beibei; Sharpe, Michael B

    2008-10-01

    Patient-specific measurements are typically used to validate the dosimetry of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). To evaluate the dosimetric performance over time of our IMRT process, we have used statistical process control (SPC) concepts to analyze the measurements from 330 head and neck (H&N) treatment plans. The objectives of the present work are to: (i) Review the dosimetric measurements of a large series of consecutive head and neck treatment plans to better understand appropriate dosimetric tolerances; (ii) analyze the results with SPC to develop action levels for measured discrepancies; (iii) develop estimates for the number of measurements that are required to describe IMRT dosimetry in the clinical setting; and (iv) evaluate with SPC a new beam model in our planning system. H&N IMRT cases were planned with the PINNACLE treatment planning system versions 6.2b or 7.6c (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) and treated on Varian (Palo Alto, CA) or Elekta (Crawley, UK) linacs. As part of regular quality assurance, plans were recalculated on a 20-cm-diam cylindrical phantom, and ion chamber measurements were made in high-dose volumes (the PTV with highest dose) and in low-dose volumes (spinal cord organ-at-risk, OR). Differences between the planned and measured doses were recorded as a percentage of the planned dose. Differences were stable over time. Measurements with PINNACLE3 6.2b and Varian linacs showed a mean difference of 0.6% for PTVs (n=149, range, -4.3% to 6.6%), while OR measurements showed a larger systematic discrepancy (mean 4.5%, range -4.5% to 16.3%) that was due to well-known limitations of the MLC model in the earlier version of the planning system. Measurements with PINNACLE3 7.6c and Varian linacs demonstrated a mean difference of 0.2% for PTVs (n=160, range, -3.0%, to 5.0%) and -1.0% for ORs (range -5.8% to 4.4%). The capability index (ratio of specification range to range of the data) was 1.3 for the PTV data, indicating that almost

  2. Automation and control of off-planet oxygen production processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marner, W. J.; Suitor, J. W.; Schooley, L. S.; Cellier, F. E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses several aspects of the automation and control of off-planet production processes. First, a general approach to process automation and control is discussed from the viewpoint of translating human process control procedures into automated procedures. Second, the control issues for the automation and control of off-planet oxygen processes are discussed. Sensors, instruments, and components are defined and discussed in the context of off-planet applications, and the need for 'smart' components is clearly established.

  3. An Introduction to Controller Performance Assessment in Process Control Class through Stiction in Control Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Ranganathan; Rengaswamy, Raghunathan; Harris, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a simple liquid level experiment that can be used to teach nonlinear phenomena in process control through stiction in control valves. This experiment can be used to introduce the undergraduate students to the area of Controller Performance Assessment (CPA). The experiment is very easy to set-up and demonstrate. While…

  4. A geochemical examination of humidity cell tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maest, Ann; Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2017-01-01

    Humidity cell tests (HCTs) are long-term (20 to >300 weeks) leach tests that are considered by some to be the among the most reliable geochemical characterization methods for estimating the leachate quality of mined materials. A number of modifications have been added to the original HCT method, but the interpretation of test results varies widely. We suggest that the HCTs represent an underutilized source of geochemical data, with a year-long test generating approximately 2500 individual chemical data points. The HCT concentration peaks and valleys can be thought of as a “chromatogram” of reactions that may occur in the field, whereby peaks in concentrations are associated with different geochemical processes, including sulfate salt dissolution, sulfide oxidation, and dissolution of rock-forming minerals, some of which can neutralize acid. Some of these reactions occur simultaneously, some do not, and geochemical modeling can be used to help distinguish the dominant processes. Our detailed examination, including speciation and inverse modeling, of HCTs from three projects with different geology and mineralization shows that rapid sulfide oxidation dominates over a limited period of time that starts between 40 and 200 weeks of testing. The applicability of laboratory tests results to predicting field leachate concentrations, loads, or rates of reaction has not been adequately demonstrated, although early flush releases and rapid sulfide oxidation rates in HCTs should have some relevance to field conditions. Knowledge of possible maximum solute concentrations is needed to design effective treatment and mitigation approaches. Early flush and maximum sulfide oxidation results from HCTs should be retained and used in environmental models. Factors that complicate the use of HCTs include: sample representation, time for microbial oxidizers to grow, sample storage before testing, geochemical reactions that add or remove constituents, and the HCT results chosen for use

  5. Geobiochemistry: Placing Biochemistry in Its Geochemical Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, E.; Boyer, G. M.; Canovas, P. A., III; Prasad, A.; Dick, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Goals of geobiochemistry include simultaneously evaluating the relative stabilities of microbial cells and minerals, and predicting how the composition of biomolecules can change in response to the progress of geochemical reactions. Recent developments in theoretical geochemistry make it possible to predict standard thermodynamic properties of proteins, nucleotides, lipids, and many metabolites including the constituents of the citric acid cycle, at all temperatures and pressures where life is known to occur, and beyond. Combining these predictions with constraints from geochemical data makes it possible to assess the relative stabilities of biomolecules. Resulting independent predictions of the environmental occurrence of homologous proteins and lipid side-chains can be compared with observations from metagenomic and metalipidomic data to quantify geochemical driving forces that shape the composition of biomolecules. In addition, the energetic costs of generating biomolecules from within a diverse range of habitable environments can be evaluated in terms of prevailing geochemical variables. Comparisons of geochemical bioenergetic calculations across habitats leads to the generalization that the availability of H2 determines the cost of autotrophic biosynthesis relative to the aquatic environment external to microbial cells, and that pH, temperature, pressure, and availability of C, N, P, and S are typically secondary. Increasingly reduced conditions, which are determined by reactions of water with mineral surfaces and mineral assemblages, allow many biosynthetic reactions to shift from costing energy to releasing energy. Protein and lipid synthesis, as well as the reverse citric acid cycle, become energy-releasing processes under these conditions. The resulting energy balances that determine habitability contrast dramatically with assumptions derived from oxic surface conditions, such as those where human biochemistry operates.

  6. Neuro-fuzzy Control of Integrating Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vasičkaninová

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Fuzzy technology is adaptive and easily applicable in different areas.Fuzzy logic provides powerful tools to capture the perceptionof natural phenomena. The paper deals with tuning of neuro-fuzzy controllers for integrating plant and for integrating plantswith time delay. The designed approach is verified on three examples by simulations and compared plants with classical PID control.Designed fuzzy controllers lead to better closed-loop control responses then classical PID controllers.

  7. Geochemical data requirements for performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, D.; Stenhouse, M.J.

    1997-08-15

    This report reviews the geochemical data requirements and their application to the assessment of the performance of a geologic repository for radioactive wastes. It is concluded that information must be acquired on pH, redox reactions, inorganic and organic ligands in groundwater and colloids and processes such as precipitation, adsorption and diffusion and palaeohydrogeologic information in order to predict present hydrogeologic properties of potential repository sites. (UK).

  8. Comparison Analysis of Model Predictive Controller with Classical PID Controller For pH Control Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Balaji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available pH control plays a important role in any chemical plant and process industries. For the past four decades the classical PID controller has been occupied by the industries. Due to the faster computing   technology in the industry demands a tighter advanced control strategy. To fulfill the needs and requirements Model Predictive Control (MPC is the best among all the advanced control algorithms available in the present scenario. The study and analysis has been done for First Order plus Delay Time (FOPDT model controlled by Proportional Integral Derivative (PID and MPC using the Matlab software. This paper explores the capability of the MPC strategy, analyze and compare the control effects with conventional control strategy in pH control. A comparison results between the PID and MPC is plotted using the software. The results clearly show that MPC provide better performance than the classical controller.

  9. Geochemical mapping of New Mexico, USA, using stream sediment data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumlot, Taisser; Goodell, Philip; Howari, Fares

    2009-10-01

    The spatial analysis of geochemical data has several environmental and geological applications. The present study investigated the regional distribution of Al, Ba, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sc, Th, Ti, U, V, and Zn elements in stream sediment samples from New Mexico State. These elements were studied in order to integrate them with geological and environmental characteristics of the area. Data are used from 27,798 samples that were originally collected during the national uranium resource evaluation (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance (HSSR) program in the 1970s. The original data are available as U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 97-492. The study used a variety of data processing and filtering techniques that included univariate, bivariate, factor analyses and spatial analyses to transform the data into a useable format. Principal component analysis and GIS techniques are applied to classify the elements and to identify geochemical signatures, either natural or anthropogenic. The study found that the distribution of the investigated elements is mainly controlled by the bed rock chemistry. For example, along the Rio Grande rift and Jemez lineament a strong association between Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Sc, Ti, V and Zn was observed and indicates that elements distribution in the area controlled by the mafic factor. The rare earth elements (REE) factor which is consists of Ce, La and U, also has strong, localized, clusters in the felsic centers in New Mexico.

  10. Geochemical Evidence of Microbially-Mediated Subglacial Mineral Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montross, S. N.; Skidmore, M. L.

    2006-12-01

    Interactions between dilute meltwater and fine-grained, freshly comminuted debris at the bed of temperate glaciers liberate significant solute. The proportions of solute produced in the subglacial environment via biotic and abiotic processes remains unknown, however, this work suggests the biotic contribution is substantial. Laboratory analyses of microbiological and geochemical properties of sediment and meltwater from the Haut Glacier d'Arolla (HGA) indicates that a metabolically active microbial community exists in water-saturated sediments at the ice-bedrock interface. Basal sediment slurries and meltwater were incubated in the laboratory for 100 days under near in situ subglacial conditions. Relative proportions of solute produced via abiotic v. biotic mineral weathering were analyzed by comparing the evolved aqueous chemistry of biologically active "live" sediment slurries with sterilized controls. Aqueous chemical analyses indicate an increase in solute produced from mineral weathering coupled with nitrate depletion in the biologically active slurries compared with the killed controls. These results infer that microbial activity at HGA is likely an important contributor to chemical weathering associated solute fluxes from the glaciated catchment. Due to the magnitude of past glaciations throughout geologic time (e.g., Neoproterozoic and Late-Pleistocene), and evidence that subglacial microbial activity impacts mineral weathering, greater consideration needs to be given to cold temperature biogeochemical weathering and its impact on global geochemical cycles.

  11. A geochemical transport model for redox-controlled movement of mineral fronts in groundwater flow systems: A case of nitrate removal by oxidation of pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engesgaard, Peter; Kipp, Kenneth L.

    1992-01-01

    A one-dimensional prototype geochemical transport model was developed in order to handle simultaneous precipitation-dissolution and oxidation-reduction reactions governed by chemical equilibria. Total aqueous component concentrations are the primary dependent variables, and a sequential iterative approach is used for the calculation. The model was verified by analytical and numerical comparisons and is able to simulate sharp mineral fronts. At a site in Denmark, denitrification has been observed by oxidation of pyrite. Simulation of nitrate movement at this site showed a redox front movement rate of 0.58 m yr−1, which agreed with calculations of others. It appears that the sequential iterative approach is the most practical for extension to multidimensional simulation and for handling large numbers of components and reactions. However, slow convergence may limit the size of redox systems that can be handled.

  12. Inorganic contaminants from diffuse pollution in shallow groundwater of the Campanian Plain (Southern Italy). Implications for geochemical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuoco, E; Darrah, T H; Buono, G; Verrengia, G; De Francesco, S; Eymold, W K; Tedesco, D

    2015-02-01

    The Campanian Plain (CP) shallow aquifer (Southern Italy) represents a natural laboratory to validate geochemical methods for differentiating diffuse anthropogenic pollution from natural water-rock interaction processes. The CP is an appropriate study area because of numerous potential anthropogenic pollution vectors including agriculture, animal husbandry, septic/drainage sewage systems, and industry. In order to evaluate the potential for geochemical methods to differentiate various contamination vectors, 538 groundwater wells from the shallow aquifer in Campanian Plain (CP) were sampled. The dataset includes both major and trace elements. Natural water-rock interactions, which primarily depend on local lithology, control the majority of geochemical parameters, including most of the major and trace elements. Using prospective statistical methods in combination with the traditional geochemical techniques, we determined the chemical variables that are enriched by anthropogenic contamination (i.e. NO3, SO4 and U) by using NO3 as the diagnostic variable for detecting polluted groundwater. Synthetic agricultural fertilizers are responsible for the majority of SO4 and U pollution throughout the CP area. Both SO4 and U are present in the groundmass of synthetic fertilizers; the uranium concentration is specifically applicable as a tracer for non-point source agricultural fertilizer contamination. The recognition of non-geological (anthropogenic) inputs of these elements has to be considered in the geochemical investigations of contaminated aquifers.

  13. Improving dryer energy efficiency and controllability simultaneously by process modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atuonwu, J.C.; Straten, G. van; Deventer, H.C. van; Boxtel, A.J.B. van

    2013-01-01

    This work establishes a relationship between dryer energy performance and controllability using energy balances and process resiliency analysis. It is shown that using the process gain matrix, the dryer energy efficiency can be reliably calculated with conditions for simultaneous controllability

  14. Geophysical Processes - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  15. A visual basic spreadsheet macro for geochemical background analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakić, Zoran; Posavec, Kristijan; Bacani, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    A Visual Basic macro entitled BACKGROUND calculates geochemical background values of chemical parameters and estimates threshold values separating background data from anomalies. The macro uses two statistical methods, the iterative 2-sigma technique and the calculated distribution function, and integrates these model-based objective methods into a widely accessible platform (i.e., MS Excel). The macro offers the possibility for automated processing of geochemical data and enables an automated generation of background range and threshold values for chemical parameters.

  16. Anticipated Activities in Maritime Work, Process Control, and Business Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2004-01-01

    Most activities are anticipated before they are executed. The paper presents methods for describing this anticipated state and the processes that may lead to a new state where the activities are executed. The method builds on linguistic case-theory.......Most activities are anticipated before they are executed. The paper presents methods for describing this anticipated state and the processes that may lead to a new state where the activities are executed. The method builds on linguistic case-theory....

  17. Practical Implementations of Advanced Process Control for Linear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jørgen K . H.; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2013-01-01

    Most advanced process control systems are based on Model Predictive Control (MPC). In this paper we discuss three critical issues for the practical implementation of linear MPC for process control applications. The rst issue is related to oset free control and disturbance models; the second issue...... implications for process control. If the control and evaluation intervals are chosen too short, the predicted behaviour of the controllers may have unstable characteristics. Depending of the degrees of freedom, oset-free control of a number of the controlled variables can be achieved by introduction of noise...... models and integration of the innovation errors. If the disturbances increases, oset-free control cannot be achieved without violation of process constraints. A target calculation function is used to calculate the optimal achievable target for the process. The use of soft constraints for process output...

  18. Hierarchical Process Control of Chemical Vapor Infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-05-31

    in these variables with reference to Figure 8. Conventional PID controllers are beneficially employed at this level in order to retain industry...to achieve minimum controlled-variable variations. PID controllers are beneficially employed at this level to retain industry standard functions useful

  19. Coliforms in processed mango: significance and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor-Shaw, R E; Guthrie, J A; Dunlop, K J; Roberts

    1995-03-01

    The aims of this investigation were to enumerate coliforms in fresh mangoes, puree, cheeks, and cheeks-in-puree in order to determine the source of these organisms in the processed products, to determine methods for their control, and to identify coliforms isolated from cheeks-in-puree to determine whether they have any public health significance. Product from four processors was tested on two occasions. The retail packs of cheeks-in-puree having the highest coliform counts were those in which raw puree was added to the cheeks. Coliform counts in these samples ranged between 1.4 x 10(3) and 5.4 x 10(4) cfu/g. Pasteurisation reduced the coliform count of raw puree to Klebsiella pneumoniae using the ATB 32E Identification System. Klebsiella strains were tested for growth at 10 degrees C, faecal coliform response, and fermentation of D-melizitose, to differentiate the three phenotypically similar strains, K. pneumoniae, K. terrigena and K planticola. Results indicated that 41% of K. pneumoniae isolates gave reactions typical of K. pneumoniae. A further 44% of strains gave an atypical reaction pattern for these tests and were designed 'psychrotrophic' K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumoniae counts of between 2.1 x 10(3) and 4.9 x 10(4) cfu/g were predicted to occur in the retail packs of mango cheeks-in-puree produced by the processors who constituted this product with raw puree. In view of the opportunistic pathogenic nature of K. pneumoniae, its presence in these products is considered undesirable and steps, such as pasteurisation of puree, should be taken in order to inactivate it.

  20. The Research and Application of Prediction Control in Multi-variable Control Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Shuangying

    2006-01-01

    The modern industrial control objects become more and more complicated, and higher control quality is required, so a series of new control strategies appear, applied, modified and develop quickly. This paper researches a new control strategy-prediction control-and its application in Multi-Variable Control Process. The research result is worthy for automatic control in process industry.

  1. Investigating In-Situ Mass Transfer Processes in a Groundwater U Plume Influenced by Groundwater-River Hydrologic and Geochemical Coupling (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachara, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site is a DOE/BER-supported experimental and monitoring facility focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes (hanfordifc@pnl.gov). It is located within the footprint of a historic uranium (U) waste disposal pond that overlies a contaminated vadose zone and a 1 km+ groundwater U plume. The plume is under a regulatory clean-up mandate. The site is in hydraulic connectivity with the Columbia River that is located approximately 300 m distant. Dramatic seasonal variations in Columbia River stage cause 2m+ variations in water table and associated changes in groundwater flow directions and composition that are believed to recharge contaminant U to the plume through lower vadose zone pumping. The 60 m triangular shaped facility contains 37 monitoring wells equipped with down-hole electrical resistance tomography electrode and thermistor arrays, pressure transducers for continual water level monitoring, and specific conductance electrodes. Well spacings allow cross-hole geophysical interrogation and dynamic plume monitoring. Various geophysical and hydrologic field characterizations were performed during and after well installation, and retrieved sediments are being subjected to a hierarchal laboratory characterization process to support geostatistical models of hydrologic properties, U(VI) distribution and speciation, and equilibrium and kinetic reaction parameters for robust but tractable field-scale reactive transport calculations. Three large scale (10,000 gal+), non-reactive tracer experiments have been performed to evaluate groundwater flowpaths and velocities, facies scale mass transfer, and subsurface heterogeneity effects under different hydrologic conditions (e.g., flow vectors toward or away from the river). A passive monitoring experiment was completed during spring and summer of 2009 that documents spatially variable U(VI) release and plume recharge from the contaminated lower vadose zone during

  2. Association between product quality control and process quality control of bulk milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, A.; Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of dairy-milk quality is based on product quality control (testing bulk-milk samples) and process quality control (auditing dairy farms). It is unknown whether process control improves product quality. To quantify possible association between product control and process control a statisti

  3. Global satisfactory control for nonlinear integrator processes with long delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiqun YANG; Guobo XIANG

    2007-01-01

    Integrator processes with long delay are difficult to control. Nonlinear characteristics of actuators make the control problem more challenging. A technique is proposed in this paper for global satisfactory control (GSC) of such processes with relay-type nonlinearity. An oscillatory control signal is injected into the nonlinear process; the amplitude and frequency of the oscillatory signal are designed to linearise the nonlinear process in the sense of harmonic analysis; and a state feedback controller is configured to implement GSC over the linearised process. An illustrative example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Plug-and-play process control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, K; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    An important issue in the area of reconfigurable systems is how to respond correctly if new components are added. We consider the problem of improving control performance for a system where a new set of sensors becomes available. It is assumed that a complete re-design of the control system is un...

  5. Overview of advanced process control in welding within ERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, R.E.

    1977-02-11

    The special kinds of demands placed on ERDA weapons and reactors require them to have very reliable welds. Process control is critical in achieving this reliability. ERDA has a number of advanced process control projects underway with much of the emphasis being on electron beam welding. These include projects on voltage measurement, beam-current control, beam focusing, beam spot tracking, spike suppression, and computer control. A general discussion of process control in welding is followed by specific examples of some of the advanced joining process control projects in ERDA.

  6. Construction Process Control of Large Extra Caissons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shaowei; WANG Hongxia; FAN Jiansheng

    2005-01-01

    The complexity of geotechnical engineering and variability in construction circumstances of large extra caissons make the problem of maintaining appropriate sink attitude quite difficult, especially in keeping sink uniformity and achieving the expected final sink depth. A new construction control method is presented using (H∞) theory, considering uncertainties in the mechanics model and external noise in the construction site parameters. The design method of an (H∞) controller has consequently been obtained for large extra caissons. Control results using only constructor experiences are compared with simulation results using the (H∞) controller for a practical engineering situation, which indicates that the (H∞) controller is successful in maintaining sink uniformity, avoiding sink as well as in achieving the expected final sink depth.

  7. Viscous Control of the Foam Glass Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    The production of foam glass as heat insulating material is an important industrial process because it enables low-cost recycling of glass waste from a variety of chemical compositions. Optimization of the foaming process of new glass waste compositions is time consuming, since many factors affect...... the foaming process such as temperature, particle size, type and concentration of foaming agent. The foaming temperature is one of the key factors, because even small temperature changes can affect the melt viscosity by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, it is important to establish the viscosity range...... in which the foaming process should take place, particularly when the type of recycled cullet is changed or several types of cullet are mixed in one batch. According to recent glass literature, the foaming process should occur at viscosity 103 to 105 Pa s. However, no systematic studies have hitherto been...

  8. THROTTLE CONTROL STRATEGIES IN THE PROCESS OF INTEGRATED POWERTRAIN CONTROL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Yulong; Gao Bingzhao; Tian Hua; Ge Anlin; Yan Su

    2005-01-01

    Combining with the development of automated manual transmission (AMT), the various throttle control demands are analyzed under different working conditions of AMT such as tracking acceleration pedal, start, shift and so on. Based on simulation, the responding throttle control strategies are proposed, and a simple but effective throttle control method is presented. The testing results have proved that the strategies are effective for improving the pedal tracking precision and the qualities of start and shift.

  9. Design and development of expert system for controlling sintering process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The general structure of expert system for controlling sintering process has been proposed. It includes knowledge base, inference engine, data acquisition system, learning system, knowledge base management system, explanation system and so on. The control functions consist of sintering chemical composition control centered on basicity and sintering process state control centered on permeability. The adaptive prediction of sintering chemical composition, the control strategy centered on basicity, the control strategy centered on permeability, the judgement of permeability and the prediction of burn through point were studied. The software of system, which includes about 1000 expert rules, was successfully applied in off-line control of sintering process in a sintering plant.

  10. Geochemical modelling of the weathering zone of the 'Mina Fe' U deposit (Spain): A natural analogue for nuclear spent fuel alteration and stability processes in radwaste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos, D. [AMPHOS XXI Consulting S.L., Passeig de Rubi, 29-31, 08197 Valldoreix, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: david.arcos@amphos21.com; Perez del Villar, L. [CIEMAT, Dpto.de Medio Ambiente, Avda, Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bruno, J.; Domenech, C. [AMPHOS XXI Consulting S.L., Passeig de Rubi, 29-31, 08197 Valldoreix, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-04-15

    The 'Mina Fe' U deposit (Salamanca, Spain) has been studied in the context of Enresa's programme for U-mine sites restoration and also as a natural analogue for processes in high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) geological disposal. The investigations encompassed an array of geoscience disciplines, such as structural geology, mineralogy, hydrogeology and elemental and isotopic geochemistry and hydrogeochemistry of the site. Based on the obtained results, a conceptual mineralogical and geochemical model was performed integrating the main geochemical processes occurring at the site: the interaction between oxidised and slightly acidic water with pyrite, pitchblende, calcite and dolomite, as essential minerals of the U fracture-filling mineralisation, and hydroxyapatite from the host rock, as the main source of P. This conceptual model has been tested in a systematic numerical model, which includes the main kinetic (pyrite and pitchblende dissolution) and equilibrium processes (carbonate mineral dissolution, and goethite, schoepite and autunite secondary precipitation). The results obtained from the reactive-transport model satisfactorily agree with the conceptual model previously established. The assumption of the precipitation of coffinite as a secondary mineral in the system cannot be correctly evaluated due to the lack of hydrochemical data from the reducing zone of the site and valid thermodynamic and kinetic data for this hydrated U(IV)-silicate. This precipitation can also be hampered by the probable existence of dissolved U(IV)-organic matter and/or uranyl carbonate complexes, which are thermodynamically stable under the alkaline and reducing conditions that prevail in the reducing zone of the system. Finally, the intense downwards oxic and acidic alteration in the upper part of the system is of no relevance for the performance assessment of a HLNW disposal. However, the acidic and oxidised conditions are quickly buffered to neutral-alkaline and

  11. Development of Expert Controller for Plasma Spraying Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIChun-xu; CHENKe-xuan; LIHe-qi; LIDe-wu

    2004-01-01

    Aiming at the plasma spraying process control, the control system model is developed on the basis of analyzing control parameters and coating properties and their correlation, and the corresponding control method and regulations are also given. With the developed expert controller for plasma spraying process, stable spraying can be realized using ordinary spraying powder and the coating of compaction, homogeneity and high bonding strength can be obtained.

  12. Ewmareg control chart applied in the monitoring of industrial processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Cuzzuol Pedrini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available If the process quality characteristics are dependent of control variables, and these vary during the process operation, the basic assumptions of control charts are violated. If the values of the control variables are known, it’s possible to apply the regression control chart. One of the most recent works in this area is the EWMAREG chart, which is the monitoring of the standardized residuals using exponentially weighted moving average control chart. In this paper, we present a systematic application of the EWMAREG control chart in monitoring a simulated process of chemical industry. The process characteristic monitored was the corrosion rate of steel pipe in function of four process control variables. The tool applied demonstrated high potential to detect change in surveillance of corrosion rate, ensuring stability process.

  13. Numerical Controlled Rolling Process of Thick Metal Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Thick metal plate rolling process has become more and more important in building a flat roof of drilling on the bottom at sea. This is because not only the product quality requirement higher and higher but also the marketing competition. To improve the process of thick metal plate rolling and to increase productivity a numerical controlled rolling process is developed, which include the process planning, the mathematical model establishment and the numerical control system development. The process is for ...

  14. Maximum process problems in optimal control theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Peskir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Given a standard Brownian motion (Btt≥0 and the equation of motion dXt=vtdt+2dBt, we set St=max0≤s≤tXs and consider the optimal control problem supvE(Sτ−Cτ, where c>0 and the supremum is taken over all admissible controls v satisfying vt∈[μ0,μ1] for all t up to τ=inf{t>0|Xt∉(ℓ0,ℓ1} with μ0g∗(St, where s↦g∗(s is a switching curve that is determined explicitly (as the unique solution to a nonlinear differential equation. The solution found demonstrates that the problem formulations based on a maximum functional can be successfully included in optimal control theory (calculus of variations in addition to the classic problem formulations due to Lagrange, Mayer, and Bolza.

  15. The application of mean control chart in managing industrial processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papić-Blagojević Nataša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the advent of mass production comes the problem of monitoring and maintaining the quality of the product, which stressed the need for the application of selected statistical and mathematical methods in the control process. The main objective of applying the methods of statistical control is continuous quality improvement through permanent monitoring of the process in order to discover the causes of errors. Shewart charts are the most popular method of statistical process control, which performs separation of controlled and uncontrolled variations along with detection of increased variations. This paper presents the example of Shewart mean control chart with application in managing industrial process.

  16. Operator's Influence on the Safety of the Controlled Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Nagy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of risks related to controlled process and related hazards identification is an important activity during the development of the safety related control system (SRCS. The mistake of the operational staff during the execution of the safety relevant operations related to controlled process can be the cause of hazard. Influence of the operator on controlled process safety depends on operation mode of the SRCS and on technical safety of the SRCS. This contribution deals with the issue of the safety assessment of the operator effect on the safety of the controlled process.

  17. Monitoring active volcanoes: The geochemical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ohba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The geochemical surveillance of an active volcano aims to recognize possible signals that are related to changes in volcanic activity. Indeed, as a consequence of the magma rising inside the volcanic "plumbing system" and/or the refilling with new batches of magma, the dissolved volatiles in the magma are progressively released as a function of their relative solubilities. When approaching the surface, these fluids that are discharged during magma degassing can interact with shallow aquifers and/or can be released along the main volcano-tectonic structures. Under these conditions, the following main degassing processes represent strategic sites to be monitored.

    The main purpose of this special volume is to collect papers that cover a wide range of topics in volcanic fluid geochemistry, which include geochemical characterization and geochemical monitoring of active volcanoes using different techniques and at different sites. Moreover, part of this volume has been dedicated to the new geochemistry tools.

  18. NONLINEAR MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF CHEMICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. SILVA

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available A new algorithm for model predictive control is presented. The algorithm utilizes a simultaneous solution and optimization strategy to solve the model's differential equations. The equations are discretized by equidistant collocation, and along with the algebraic model equations are included as constraints in a nonlinear programming (NLP problem. This algorithm is compared with the algorithm that uses orthogonal collocation on finite elements. The equidistant collocation algorithm results in simpler equations, providing a decrease in computation time for the control moves. Simulation results are presented and show a satisfactory performance of this algorithm.

  19. Practical Implementations of Advanced Process Control for Linear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jørgen K . H.; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    This paper describes some practical problems encountered, when implementing Advanced Process Control, APC, schemes on linear processes. The implemented APC controllers discussed will be LQR, Riccati MPC and Condensed MPC controllers illustrated by simulation of the Four Tank Process...... cannot be achieved without violation of process constraints. A target calculation function can be used to calculate the optimal achievable target for the process. The use of hard and soft constraints for process input constraints in the MPC controllers, ensures feasible solutions. The computational load...... as function of controllers type, Model dimension and constraint type will be discussed. Finally the special requirements set by processes including a pure integration dynamics will be illustrated by a linearised CSTR process. The simulated results presented, will later on be implemented on and demonstrated...

  20. Globally stable control systems for processes with input multiplicities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jietae [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Edgar, Thomas F. [University of Texas, Austin (United States)

    2016-02-15

    A nonlinear process with input multiplicity has two or more input values for a given output at the steady state, and the process steady state gain changes its sign as the operating point changes. A control system with integral action will be unstable when both signs of the process gain and the controller integral gain are different, and its stability region will be limited to the boundary where the process steady state gain is zero. Unlike processes with output multiplicities, feedback controllers cannot be used to correct the sign changes of process gain. To remove such stability limitation, a simple control system with parallel compensator is proposed. The parallel compensator can be easily designed based on the process steady state gain information and tuned in the field. Using the two time scale method, the stability of proposed control systems for processes with input multiplicities can be checked.

  1. Process plant equipment operation, control, and reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Holloway, Michael D; Onyewuenyi, Oliver A

    2012-01-01

    "Process Plant Equipment Book is another great publication from Wiley as a reference book for final year students as well as those who will work or are working in chemical production plants and refinery…" -Associate Prof. Dr. Ramli Mat, Deputy Dean (Academic), Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia "…give[s] readers access to both fundamental information on process plant equipment and to practical ideas, best practices and experiences of highly successful engineers from around the world… The book is illustrated throughout with numerous black & white p

  2. Signal sampling techniques for data acquisition in process control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, Marten Derk van der

    1995-01-01

    In computing sytems employed for data acquisition and process control, communication with the controlled processes is mainly taking place via analog signal lines. In this situation, the quality of data acquired by A/D-converters and the generation of analog control signals by D/A-converters is of

  3. The Myriad Strategies for Seeking Control in the Dying Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroepfer, Tracy A.; Noh, Hyunjin; Kavanaugh, Melinda

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the role control plays in the dying process of terminally ill elders by investigating the aspects of the dying process over which they seek to exercise control, the strategies they use, and whether they desire to exercise more control. Design and Methods: In-depth face-to-face interviews were conducted with 84…

  4. Signal sampling techniques for data acquisition in process control

    OpenAIRE

    Laan, Marten Derk van der

    1995-01-01

    In computing sytems employed for data acquisition and process control, communication with the controlled processes is mainly taking place via analog signal lines. In this situation, the quality of data acquired by A/D-converters and the generation of analog control signals by D/A-converters is of major importance for the overall performance of a system. ... Zie: Summary

  5. Signal sampling techniques for data acquisition in process control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, Marten Derk van der

    1995-01-01

    In computing sytems employed for data acquisition and process control, communication with the controlled processes is mainly taking place via analog signal lines. In this situation, the quality of data acquired by A/D-converters and the generation of analog control signals by D/A-converters is of ma

  6. Parallel femtosecond laser processing with vector-wave control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayasaki Yoshio

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Parallel femtosecond laser processing with a computer-generated hologram displayed on a spatial light modulator, has the advantages of high throughput and high energy-use efficiency. for further increase of the processing efficiency, we demonstrated parallel femtosecond laser processing with vector-wave control that is based on polarization control using a pair of spatial light modulators.

  7. Advanced Polymer Composite Molding Through Intelligent Process Analysis and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-30

    In this project. process analysis of Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) was carried out and adaptive process control models were developed. In addition, a...aforementioned work in three separate sections: (1) process analysis and adaptive control modeling, (2) manufacturing of non-invasive sensor, end (3) list of publications resulting from this project.

  8. Process for control of cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, C. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method of controlling mitosis of biological cells was developed, which involved inducing a change in the intracellular ionic hierarchy accompanying the cellular electrical transmembrane potential difference (Esubm) of the cells. The ionic hierarchy may be varied by imposing changes on the relative concentrations of Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-), or by directly imposing changes in the physical Esubm level across the cell surface.

  9. Modeling of Reaction Processes Controlled by Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Revelli, J

    2003-01-01

    Stochastic modeling is quite powerful in science and technology.The technics derived from this process have been used with great success in laser theory, biological systems and chemical reactions.Besides, they provide a theoretical framework for the analysis of experimental results on the field of particle's diffusion in ordered and disordered materials.In this work we analyze transport processes in one-dimensional fluctuating media, which are media that change their state in time.This fact induces changes in the movements of the particles giving rise to different phenomena and dynamics that will be described and analyzed in this work.We present some random walk models to describe these fluctuating media.These models include state transitions governed by different dynamical processes.We also analyze the trapping problem in a lattice by means of a simple model which predicts a resonance-like phenomenon.Also we study effective diffusion processes over surfaces due to random walks in the bulk.We consider differe...

  10. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1999-01-01

    , the nitriding result is determined largely by the kinetics of the process. The nitriding kinetics have been shown to be characterised by the occurring local near-equilibria and stationary states at surfaces and interfaces, and the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in the various phases, for which new data have...

  11. SeqControl: process control for DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Lauren C; Albuquerque, Marco A; Harding, Nicholas J; Caloian, Cristian; Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle; de Borja, Richard; Fraser, Michael; Denroche, Robert E; Beck, Timothy A; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Bristow, Robert G; McPherson, John D; Boutros, Paul C

    2014-10-01

    As high-throughput sequencing continues to increase in speed and throughput, routine clinical and industrial application draws closer. These 'production' settings will require enhanced quality monitoring and quality control to optimize output and reduce costs. We developed SeqControl, a framework for predicting sequencing quality and coverage using a set of 15 metrics describing overall coverage, coverage distribution, basewise coverage and basewise quality. Using whole-genome sequences of 27 prostate cancers and 26 normal references, we derived multivariate models that predict sequencing quality and depth. SeqControl robustly predicted how much sequencing was required to reach a given coverage depth (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.993), accurately classified clinically relevant formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples, and made predictions from as little as one-eighth of a sequencing lane (AUC = 0.967). These techniques can be immediately incorporated into existing sequencing pipelines to monitor data quality in real time. SeqControl is available at http://labs.oicr.on.ca/Boutros-lab/software/SeqControl/.

  12. Observed changes of the diffuse H_{2} emission at the summit cone of Teide volcano (Tenerife, Canary Islands): a geochemical evidence of processes operating deep in the magmatic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Melián, Gladys V.; Padrón, Eleazar; Asensio-Ramos, María; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Calvo, David; Barrancos, José; Hernández, Pedro A.

    2017-04-01

    cone of Teide volcano during the 2005-2009 period (Pérez et al., 2013) suggesting the ascent of deep-reservoir (CO2-H2-rich) gas bubbles. These geochemical observations seem to be clear evidences of changes of processes operating deep in the magmatic system of Tenerife. Chiodini and Marini 1998, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, Giggenbach1987. App. Geochem., DOI: 10.1016/0883-2927(87)90030-8 Pérez et al. 2013. J. Geol. Soc., DOI: 10.1144/jgs2012-125 Pérez and Schmincke 2016, Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 18, EGU2016-10379 .

  13. Ternary geochemical-tracing system in natural gas accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of geochemical-tracing system of gas generation and accumulation is helpful to re-elucidating the gas migration and accumulation in time and space. To deduce the complex process of gas accumulation, a ternary geochemical-tracing system is set up, according to stable isotope inheritance of source rocks, kinetic fractionation of stable isotopes, time-accumulating effect of noble gas isotopes, mantle-derived volatile inheritance, and organic molecule inheritance of light hydrocarbons and thermally kinetic fractionation in their generation, in combination with the previous achievements of gas geochemistry and geochemical parameters of gas-source correlation. There are tight interactions for the geochemical parameters with much information about parent inheritance and special biomarkers, in which they are confirmed each other, reciprocally associated and preferentially used for the requirement so that we can use these geochemical parameters to effectively demonstrate the sources of natural gas, sedimentary environments and thermal evolution of source rocks, migration and accumulation of natural gas, and rearrangement of natural gas reservoirs. It is necessary for the ternary geochemical-tracing system to predict the formation of high efficient gas reservoir and their distribution in time and space.

  14. Nonlinear Markov Control Processes and Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    further research we indicated possible extensions to state spaces with nontrivial geometry, to the controlled nonlinear quantum dynamic semigroups and...space nonlinear Markov semigroup is a one-parameter semigroup of (possibly nonlinear) transformations of the unit simplex in n-dimensional Euclidean...certain mixing property of nonlinear transition probabilities. In case of the semigroup parametrized by continuous time one defines its generator as the

  15. Multivariate Process Control with Autocorrelated Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahci, Murat

    2011-01-01

    . For high dimensional data with excessive amount of cross correlation, practitioners are often recommended to use latent structures methods such as Principal Component Analysis to summarize the data in only a few linear combinations of the original variables that capture most of the variation in the data....... In this paper, we discuss the effect of autocorrelation (when it is ignored) on multivariate control charts based on these methods and provide some practical suggestions and remedies to overcome this problem....

  16. Control and signal processing by transcriptional interference

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A transcriptional activator can suppress gene expression by interfering with transcription initiated by another activator. Transcriptional interference has been increasingly recognized as a regulatory mechanism of gene expression. The signals received by the two antagonistically acting activators are combined by the polymerase trafficking along the DNA. We have designed a dual-control genetic system in yeast to explore this antagonism systematically. Antagonism by an upstream activator bears ...

  17. Secure VM for Monitoring Industrial Process Controllers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Dipankar [ORNL; Ali, Mohammad Hassan [University of Memphis; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Schlicher, Bob G [ORNL; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL; Carvalho, Marco [Institute of Human and Machine Cognition

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the biological immune system as an autonomic system for self-protection, which has evolved over millions of years probably through extensive redesigning, testing, tuning and optimization process. The powerful information processing capabilities of the immune system, such as feature extraction, pattern recognition, learning, memory, and its distributive nature provide rich metaphors for its artificial counterpart. Our study focuses on building an autonomic defense system, using some immunological metaphors for information gathering, analyzing, decision making and launching threat and attack responses. In order to detection Stuxnet like malware, we propose to include a secure VM (or dedicated host) to the SCADA Network to monitor behavior and all software updates. This on-going research effort is not to mimic the nature but to explore and learn valuable lessons useful for self-adaptive cyber defense systems.

  18. Automatic/Control Processing and Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    experiments. American Scientist, 1969, 57, 421-457. (a) Sternberg, S. The discovery of processing stages: Extensions of Donder’s method . In W. G. Koster...Research Institute, Alexandria, VA H. O’Neil, Army Research Institute, Alexandria, VA R. Sasmor, Army Reseach Institute, Alexandria, VA J. Ward, U.S...DARPA, Arlington, VA P. Chapin, Linguistics Program, NSF, Washington, DC S. Chipman, National Institute of Education, Washington, DC W. McLaurin, Camp

  19. Design and Application of Economical Process Control Charts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S.N. Murthy

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistical quality control techniques are useful in monitoring the process behaviour. Attribute control charts are widely used in process control. The selection of sample size, sampling interval and control width of the control chart is important in minimising the quality costs. Control chart parameters, like 3delta controlimits and fixed fraction sampling at conveniently selected sampling intervals result in deplovable cost penalties in quality control. The best selection of these parameters depends on several process parameters,like frequency of occupancy of a shift in the process, cost of sampling, cost of investigation for finding assignable cause, probability of false alarms, penalty cost of defectives and process correction cost. A general model has been developed to determine the total quality cost as a function of these parameters. Probability of not identifying a process shift (Beeta-risk and probability of wrongly. concluding the process got shifted (alpha-risk are considered in developing the model. This cost equation is optimised to determine optimum values control chart parameters. Fibonacci search is used to quicken the analytical method or determining optimum sampling size and control width. The proposals made by Duncan, Montgomery, Gibra and Chiu for determining the optimum control chart parameters are critically examined and compared with the present model. Case studies were conducted in two foundries. Optimum control chart parameters in casting of cylinder liners and cast plates are determined. It has been found that quality costs are considerably reduced by using optimally designed control chart parameters with proposed method.

  20. Development of Cooling Process Control Technique in Hot Strip Mill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Bin; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong; SHE Guang-fu

    2005-01-01

    In order to ensure required mechanical properties of steel strip, various innovations in the cooling process control on the run-out table of a hot strip mill were actively promoted. The recent progress of process mathematical model and the new cooling strategy and equipment were discussed. The computer control system of high performance was introduced. The development trend in cooling process control was given.

  1. Control and systems concepts in the innovation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Allan Kjaer is an electrical engineer who arned master's and Ph.D.degrees in control nd system identification. He then began work n control, information, and production processes in the steel industry. Leading a team of evelopers at the Danish Steel Company, Dr. Kjaer applied systems thinking to the wider issues of process and information integration to achieve a tightly integrated production and business process. His article is important because it directly shows how control-systems

  2. Instrumentation and Control for Fossil-Energy Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Instrumentation and control requirements for fossil-energy processes discussed in working document. Published to foster advancement of instrumentation and control technology by making equipment suppliers and others aware of specifications, needs, and potential markets.

  3. Retrofitting automated process control systems at Ukrainian power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.E. Simkin; V.S. Naumchik; B.D. Kozitskii (and others) [OAO L' vovORGRES, Lviv (Ukraine)

    2008-04-15

    Approaches and principles for retrofitting automated process control systems at Ukrainian power stations are considered. The results obtained from retrofitting the monitoring and control system of Unit 9 at the Burshtyn thermal power station are described.

  4. Nanorack Compatible Standardized Data Processing, Communication, and Control Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I study will design and develop a NanoRacks Control Module (NCM) that provides communications, control functions and data processing in a NanoRacks...

  5. A mass balance approach to investigating geochemical controls on secondary water quality impacts at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Gene-Hua Crystal; Bekins, Barbara A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Baedecker, Mary Jo; Bennett, Philip C.; Amos, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    Secondary water quality impacts can result from a broad range of coupled reactions triggered by primary groundwater contaminants. Data from a crude-oil spill research site near Bemidji, MN provide an ideal test case for investigating the complex interactions controlling secondary impacts, including depleted dissolved oxygen and elevated organic carbon, inorganic carbon, CH4, Mn, Fe, and other dissolved ions. To better understand these secondary impacts, this study began with an extensive data compilation of various data types, comprising aqueous, sediment, gas, and oil phases, covering a 260 m cross-sectional domain over 30 years. Mass balance calculations are used to quantify pathways that control secondary components, by using the data to constrain the sources and sinks for the important redox processes. The results show that oil constituents other than BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-, m- and p-xylenes), including n-alkanes and other aromatic compounds, play significant roles in plume evolution and secondary water quality impacts. The analysis underscores previous results on the importance of non-aqueous phases. Over 99.9% of the Fe2+ plume is attenuated by immobilization on sediments as Fe(II) and 85–95% of the carbon biodegradation products are outgassed. Gaps identified in carbon and Fe mass balances and in pH buffering mechanisms are used to formulate a new conceptual model. This new model includes direct out-gassing of CH4 and CO2 from organic carbon biodegradation, dissolution of directly produced CO2, and sorption with H+ exchange to improve pH buffering. The identification of these mechanisms extends understanding of natural attenuation of potential secondary impacts at enhanced reductive dechlorination sites, particularly for reduced Fe plumes, produced CH4, and pH perturbations.

  6. Microeconomics of 300-mm process module control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Kevin M.; Chatterjee, Arun K.; Falessi, Georges; Levy, Ady; Stoller, Meryl D.

    2001-08-01

    Simple microeconomic models that directly link metrology, yield, and profitability are rare or non-existent. In this work, we validate and apply such a model. Using a small number of input parameters, we explain current yield management practices in 200 mm factories. The model is then used to extrapolate requirements for 300 mm factories, including the impact of simultaneous technology transitions to 130nm lithography and integrated metrology. To support our conclusions, we use examples relevant to factory-wide photo module control.

  7. Plug and Play Process Control of a District Heating System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangbaek, Klaus; Knudsen, Torben; Skovmose Kallesøe, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The main idea of plug and play process control is to initialise and reconfigure control systems automatically. In this paper these ideas are applied to a scaled laboratory model of a district heating pressure control system.  First of all this serves as a concrete example of plug and play control...

  8. Memory-type control charts for monitoring the process dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, N.; Riaz, M.; Does, R.J.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Control charts have been broadly used for monitoring the process mean and dispersion. Cumulative sum (CUSUM) and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts are memory control charts as they utilize the past information in setting up the control structure. This makes CUSUM and EWMA-t

  9. Memory-type control charts for monitoring the process dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, N.; Riaz, M.; Does, R.J.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Control charts have been broadly used for monitoring the process mean and dispersion. Cumulative sum (CUSUM) and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts are memory control charts as they utilize the past information in setting up the control structure. This makes CUSUM and EWMA-t

  10. Development of Chemical Process Design and Control for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    This contribution describes a novel process systems engineering framework that couples advanced control with sustainability evaluation and decision making for the optimization of process operations to minimize environmental impacts associated with products, materials, and energy....

  11. The controlled vitrification/crystallisation process applied

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero, M.

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The glass-ceramic process, as well as the usual processing of ceramic and vitreous materials, is being investigated as a promising way for isolation and recycling of both mineral wastes (debris and mineral residues, clearings in public works and inorganic industrial wastes (muds, slags, fly ashes. Synthetic materials with useful properties to be used as building materials have been prepared from inorganic wastes of different type (red muds from zinc hydrometalurgy, fly ashes from power thermal stations, slags and fly ashes from domiciliary incinerators as well as from mixtures of such wastes with other raw materials. The obtained results allow us to conclude that the ceramic and glass-ceramic processes are outlined as an useful alternative to solve the social and environmental problems associated to wastes production.

    El proceso vitrocerámico, así como el procesado habitual de materiales cerámicos y vítreos, está siendo actualmente investigado como una prometedora vía para el aislamiento, inertización e incluso el reciclado de residuos minerales (escombreras y estériles de minas, desmontes de Obras Públicas, etc... e industriales (lodos, fangos, escorias, cenizas, etc.... A partir de residuos inorgánicos de diferente naturaleza (lodos de la hidrometalurgia del zinc, cenizas de centrales térmicas, escorias y cenizas de plantas incineradoras así como de mezclas de los mismos con otras materias primas, se están obteniendo materiales sintéticos con amplias aplicaciones en la Construcción y en Obras Públicas. Los resultados que se están consiguiendo permiten concluir que los procesos cerámico y vitrocerámico se perfilan como una alternativa real y útil para resolver, al menos parcialmente, los problemas sociales y medioambientales asociados a la producción de dichos residuos.

  12. Predictive functional control of integrating process based on impulse response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin ZHANG; Ping LI; Weidong ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    The predictive model is built according to the characteristics of the impulse response of integrating process. In order to eliminate the permanent offset between the setpoint and the process output in the presence of the load disturbance, a novel error compensation method is proposed. Then predictive functional control of integrating process is designed. The method given generates a simple control structure, which can significantly reduce online computation. Furthermore, the tuning of the controller is fairly straightforward. Simulation results indicate that the designed control system is relatively robust to the parameters variation of the process.

  13. Cascaded process model based control: packed absorption column application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Anand; Jayaraman, Suresh Kumar; Sethuraman, Vijayalakshmi; Raul, Pramod R; Rhinehart, R Russell

    2014-03-01

    Nonlinear, adaptive, process-model based control is demonstrated in a cascaded single-input-single-output mode for pressure drop control in a pilot-scale packed absorption column. The process is shown to be nonlinear. Control is demonstrated in both servo and regulatory modes, for no wind-up in a constrained situation, and for bumpless transfer. Model adaptation is demonstrated and shown to provide process insight. The application procedure is revealed as a design guide to aid others in implementing process-model based control.

  14. A Controlled New Process of Pack Aluminization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhi-rong; MA Liu-bao; LI Pei-ning; XU Hong

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum diffusion coatings are often prepared by a pack aluminization technique, which is a specific variety of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The coating process takes place in a bed containing a mixed powder that serves as a source of the coatings forming element. The phase composition of the diffusion layer obtained depends on the activity of the Al during the pack aluminization processing. In this work, the proportion of Al to special additive powder in the pack and the treatment temperature are adjusted to achieve the desired surface composition of aluminized layer. The aluminized 20 plain carbon steel and HK40 austenitic steel were investigated by optical microscopy (OM) , X-ray diffraction (XRD)and microsclerometer. The results showed that the desired FeAl, Fe3Al and NiAl were respectively formed on the 20 plain carbon steel and HK40 austenitic steel, and the aluminides FeAl3, Fe2Al5 or Ni2Al3, NiAl3 could be inhibited.

  15. A Controlled New Process of Pack Aluminization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGZhi-rong; MALiu-bao; LIPei-ning; XUHong

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum diffusion coatings are often prepared by a pack aluminization technique, which is a specific variety of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The coating process takes place in a bed containing a mixed powder that serves as a source of the coatings forming element. The phase composition of the diffusion layer obtained depends on the activity of the Al during the pack aluminization processing. In this work, the proportion of Al to special additive powder in the pack and the treatment temperature are adjusted to achieve the desired surface composition of aluminized layer. The aluminized 20 plain carbon steel and HK40 austenitic steel were investigated by optical microscopy (OM) , X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microsclerometer. The results showed that the desired FeAl, Fe3Al and NiAl were respectively formed on the 20 plain carbon steel and HK40 austenitic steel, and the aluminides FeAl3, Fe2Al5 or Ni2Al3, NiAl3 could be inhibited.

  16. High Level Waste (HLW) Feed Process Control Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-06-14

    The primary purpose of this document is to describe the overall process control strategy for monitoring and controlling the functions associated with the Phase 1B high-level waste feed delivery. This document provides the basis for process monitoring and control functions and requirements needed throughput the double-shell tank system during Phase 1 high-level waste feed delivery. This document is intended to be used by (1) the developers of the future Process Control Plan and (2) the developers of the monitoring and control system.

  17. Robust control of lithographic process in semiconductor manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wei; Mao, John

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, a stability analysis is conducted for several feedback controllers of photolithography processes. We emphasize the stability of process controllers in the presence of model mismatch, and other uncertainties such as system drift and unknown noise. Real data of critical dimension (CD) in shallow trench isolation area from an Intel manufacturing fab is used for model analysis. The feedbacks studied in this paper include a controller based on an adaptive model, and several controllers based on existing estimation methods such as EWMA, extended EWMA, and d-EWMA. Both theoretical analysis and computer simulations are presented to show the stability of the controlled process under these feedbacks.

  18. Hydrogeochemical processes controlling the high fluoride concentration in groundwater: a case study at the Boden block area, Orissa, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, R K; Swain, S K; Mishra, Sulagna; Sharma, Prachi; Patnaik, Tanushree; Singh, V K; Dehury, B N; Jha, Usha; Patel, R K

    2012-05-01

    The present investigation reports the assessment of hydrochemical/geochemical processes controlling the concentration of fluoride in groundwater of a village in India (Boden block, Orissa). Boden block is one of the severely affected fluoride-contaminated areas in the state of Orissa (India). The sampling and subsequent analysis of water samples of the study area was carried out following standard prescribed methods. The results of the analysis indicate that 36.60% groundwater F(-) concentration exceeds the limit prescribed by the World Health Organization for drinking water. The rock interaction with groundwater containing high concentration of HCO(3)(-) and Na(+) at a higher pH value of the medium could be one of the important reasons for the release of F(-) from the aquatic matrix into groundwater. Geochemical classification of groundwater based on Chadha rectangular diagram shows that most of the groundwater samples having fluoride concentration more than 1.5 mg L(-1) belongs to the Na-K-HCO(3) type. The saturation index values evaluated for the groundwater of the study area indicated that it is oversaturated with respect to calcite, whereas the same is undersaturated with respect to fluorite content. The deficiency of calcium ion concentration in the groundwater from calcite precipitation favors fluorite dissolution leading to excess of fluoride concentration. The risk index was calculated as a function of fluoride level in drinking water and morbidity of fluorosis categorizes high risk for villages of Amera and Karlakote panchayat of Boden block.

  19. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1997-01-01

    As a prerequisite for the predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present, even the description of thermodynamic equilibrium...... of pure Fe-N phases has not been fully achieved. It is shown that taking into account the ordering of nitrogen in the epsilon and gamma' iron nitride phases leads to an improved understanding of the Fe-N phase diagram. Although consideration of thermodynamics indicates the state the system strives for...... of the International Federation for Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering held in Brighton, UK on 1-5 September 1996. (C) 1997 The Institute of Materials....

  20. Gravimetric control of active volcanic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltogianni, Vasso; Stiros, Stathis

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic activity includes phases of magma chamber inflation and deflation, produced by movement of magma and/or hydrothermal processes. Such effects usually leave their imprint as deformation of the ground surfaces which can be recorded by GNSS and other methods, on one hand, and on the other hand they can be modeled as elastic deformation processes, with deformation produced by volcanic masses of finite dimensions such as spheres, ellipsoids and parallelograms. Such volumes are modeled on the basis of inversion (non-linear, numerical solution) of systems of equations relating the unknown dimensions and location of magma sources with observations, currently mostly GNSS and INSAR data. Inversion techniques depend on the misfit between model predictions and observations, but because systems of equations are highly non-linear, and because adopted models for the geometry of magma sources is simple, non-unique solutions can be derived, constrained by local extrema. Assessment of derived magma models can be provided by independent observations and models, such as micro-seismicity distribution and changes in geophysical parameters. In the simplest case magmatic intrusions can be modeled as spheres with diameters of at least a few tens of meters at a depth of a few kilometers; hence they are expected to have a gravimetric signature in permanent recording stations on the ground surface, while larger intrusions may also have an imprint in sensors in orbit around the earth or along precisely defined air paths. Identification of such gravimetric signals and separation of the "true" signal from the measurement and ambient noise requires fine forward modeling of the wider areas based on realistic simulation of the ambient gravimetric field, and then modeling of its possible distortion because of magmatic anomalies. Such results are useful to remove ambiguities in inverse modeling of ground deformation, and also to detect magmatic anomalies offshore.

  1. Case Studies in Modelling, Control in Food Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassey, J; Barone, A; Montague, G A; Sabou, V

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses the importance of modelling and control in increasing food process efficiency and ensuring product quality. Various approaches to both modelling and control in food processing are set in the context of the specific challenges in this industrial sector and latest developments in each area are discussed. Three industrial case studies are used to demonstrate the benefits of advanced measurement, modelling and control in food processes. The first case study illustrates the use of knowledge elicitation from expert operators in the process for the manufacture of potato chips (French fries) and the consequent improvements in process control to increase the consistency of the resulting product. The second case study highlights the economic benefits of tighter control of an important process parameter, moisture content, in potato crisp (chips) manufacture. The final case study describes the use of NIR spectroscopy in ensuring effective mixing of dry multicomponent mixtures and pastes. Practical implementation tips and infrastructure requirements are also discussed.

  2. The Process Controller for the LHCb On-LIne Farm

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifazi, F; Carbone, A; Galli, D; Gregori, D; Marconi, U; Peco, G; Vagnoni, V

    2007-01-01

    The Process Controller is a tool of the LHCb FMC (Farm Monitoring and Control System) in charge of keeping a list of applications up and running on the farm nodes. It tipically runs on a few control PCs each one watching ~200 farm nodes and performs its task by maintaining the list of scheduled applications for each controlled farm node and by interacting with the Task Manager Servers running on the farm nodes to start processes, to obtain the notification of process termination, to re-spawn the terminated processes (if requested) and to stop processes. Processes can be added to or removed from the scheduled application list for one or more nodes by means of DIM commands, while DIM services provide the list of scheduled applications for each controlled farm node together with their properties, the number of re-spawns and the re-spawn times.

  3. STATISTICAL CONTROL OF PROCESSES AND PRODUCTS IN AGRICULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Horvat

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental concept of statistical process control is based on decision-making about the process on the basis of comparison of data collected from process with calculated control limits. Statistical process and quality control of agricultural products is used to provide agricultural products that will satisfy customer requirements in a view of quality pretension as well as costumer requirements in a cost price. In accordance with ISO 9000, quality standards for process and products are defined. There are many institutions in Croatia that work in accordance with these standards. Implementation of statistical process control and usage of a control charts can greatly help in convergence to the standards and in decreasing of production costs. To illustrate the above mentioned we tested a work quality of a nozzle at the eighteen meter clutch sprayer.

  4. Geochemical patterns and microbial contribution to iron plaque formation in the rice plant rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Markus; Murata, Chihiro; Unger, Julia; Kappler, Andreas; Schmidt, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Rice is the major food source for more than half of the world population and 80 percent of the worldwide rice cultivation is performed on water logged paddy soils. The establishment of reducing conditions in the soil and across the soil-water interface not only stimulates the microbial production and release of the greenhouse gas methane. These settings also create optimal conditions for microbial iron(III) reduction and therefore saturate the system with reduced ferrous iron. Through the reduction and dissolution of ferric minerals that are characterized by their high surface activity, sorbed nutrients and contaminants (e.g. arsenic) will be mobilized and are thus available for uptake by plants. Rice plants have evolved a strategy to release oxygen from their roots in order to prevent iron toxification in highly ferrous environments. The release of oxygen to the reduced paddy soil causes ferric iron plaque formation on the rice roots and finally increases the sorption capacity for toxic metals. To this date the geochemical and microbiological processes that control the formation of iron plaque are not deciphered. It has been hypothesized that iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria play a potential role in the iron(III) mineral formation along the roots. However, not much is known about the actual processes, mineral products, and geochemical gradients that establish within the rhizosphere. In the present study we have developed a growth set-up that allows the co-cultivation of rice plants and iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria, as well as the visual observation and in situ measurement of geochemical parameters. Oxygen and dissolved iron(II) gradients have been measured using microelectrodes and show geochemical hot spots that offer optimal growth conditions for microaerophilic iron(II) oxidizers. First mineral identification attempts of iron plaque have been performed using Mössbauer spectroscopy and microscopy. The obtained results on mineraology and crystallinity have been

  5. Control and signal processing by transcriptional interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; Ungricht, Rosemarie; Kelemen, János Z; Shetty, Chetak; Ratna, Prasuna; Becskei, Attila

    2009-01-01

    A transcriptional activator can suppress gene expression by interfering with transcription initiated by another activator. Transcriptional interference has been increasingly recognized as a regulatory mechanism of gene expression. The signals received by the two antagonistically acting activators are combined by the polymerase trafficking along the DNA. We have designed a dual-control genetic system in yeast to explore this antagonism systematically. Antagonism by an upstream activator bears the hallmarks of competitive inhibition, whereas a downstream activator inhibits gene expression non-competitively. When gene expression is induced weakly, the antagonistic activator can have a positive effect and can even trigger paradoxical activation. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium models of transcription shed light on the mechanism by which interference converts signals, and reveals that self-antagonism of activators imitates the behavior of feed-forward loops. Indeed, a synthetic circuit generates a bell-shaped response, so that the induction of expression is limited to a narrow range of the input signal. The identification of conserved regulatory principles of interference will help to predict the transcriptional response of genes in their genomic context. PMID:19690569

  6. Control of the aseptic processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieben, W R

    1983-11-01

    Methods used by industry with applications to hospital pharmacy for maintaining an aseptic environment in production of sterile pharmaceutical products are discussed. A major source of product contamination is airborne microorganisms. The laminar-airflow workbench with a high-efficiency particulate air filter provides an ultraclean environment for preparation of sterile products. However, the workbench does not guarantee sterility of products and is not effective if not properly installed and maintained or if the operator uses poor aseptic technique. The laminar-airflow workbench should be tested for leaks, airflow velocity, and airflow patterns when installed, and the workbench should be checked periodically thereafter. The workbench should be placed in a cleanroom where traffic and air disturbances that might affect the laminar airflow are eliminated. A major source of airborne microbial contamination in cleanrooms is people. Personnel movement through an area and presence of personnel without lint-free, nonshedding protective garments increase the levels of microbial contaminants in an area. The transport of nonsterile products (bottles, boxes, paper products) into a cleanroom should be minimized. The cleanroom itself should be sanitized and should be immaculate. Microbial or particulate monitoring should be conducted in the cleanroom using a quantitative method, and corrective-action limits should be set. Hospital pharmacists should examine industrial sterile-processing techniques and apply them to the preparation of sterile products.

  7. Association between product quality control and process quality control of bulk milk

    OpenAIRE

    Velthuis, A.; Asseldonk, van, M.M.L.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of dairy-milk quality is based on product quality control (testing bulk-milk samples) and process quality control (auditing dairy farms). It is unknown whether process control improves product quality. To quantify possible association between product control and process control a statistical analysis was conducted. The analysis comprised 64.373 audit results on 26,953 dairy farms and all conducted lab tests of bulk-milk samples two, six or 12 months before the audit. Lab results in...

  8. Identification of the hydrogeochemical processes and assessment of groundwater quality using classic integrated geochemical methods in the Southeastern part of Ordos basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingchun; Li, Zijun; Ma, Hongyun; Wang, Luchen; Martín, Jordi Delgado

    2016-11-01

    Insufficient understanding of the hydrogeochemistry of aquifers makes it necessary to conduct a preliminary water quality assessment in the southern region of Ordos Basin, an arid area in the world. In this paper, the major ions of groundwater have been studied aiming at evaluating the hydrogeochemical processes that probably affect the groundwater quality using 150 samples collected in 2015. The two prevalent hydrochemical facies, HCO3Mg·Na·Ca and HCO3Mg·Ca·Na type water, have been identified based on the hydrochemical analysis from Piper trilinear diagram. Compositional relations have been used to assess the origin of solutes and confirm the predominant hydrogeochemical processes responsible for the various ions in the groundwater. The results show that the ions are derived from leaching effect, evaporation and condensation, cation exchange, mixing effect and human activities. Finally groundwater quality was assessed with single factor and set pair methods, the results indicate that groundwater quality in the study region is generally poor in terms of standard of national groundwater quality. The results obtained in this study will be useful to understand the groundwater quality status for effective management and utilization of the groundwater resource. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Major, trace and REE geochemistry in contrasted chlorite schist weathering profiles from southern Cameroon: Influence of the Nyong and Dja Rivers water table fluctuations in geochemical evolution processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onana, Vincent Laurent; Ntouala, Roger Firmin Donald; Tang, Sylvie Noa; Effoudou, Estelle Ndome; Kamgang, Veronique Kabeyene; Ekodeck, Georges Emmanuel

    2016-12-01

    Three weathering profiles developed on chlorite schists, formations on which little studies have been conducted, were chosen to understand the weathering processes prevailing downslope in Southern Cameroon. The materials nearest to Nyong River at Ayos weather under the influence of the fluctuations of groundwater table and acid rain, while those from Bengbis and Mbalmayo weather under the influence of acid rain. The result is the thickening of materials and weathering profiles, without formation of a nodular ferruginous horizon at Ayos. The Ayos weathered materials (CIA ∼ 92) are the most altered and the least lateritised (IOL ∼ 32). The most stable systems are Hf - U - Nb - Ti - Zr - Mo - W (Bengbis), Yb - U - Nb - Ti - Zr - Hf - Mo - W - Th (Mbalmayo) and Th - Nb - Zr - Hf - Mo - Ta (Ayos). Molybdenum accumulations are important in the studied materials. Uranium accumulations are found only in Mbalmayo. Coarse saprolitic materials at Ayos are the most depleted and fractionated in REE ((La/Yb)N = 0.07, Ce/Ce* = 2.24), while superficial clayey materials are less fractionated. This process is reversed at Bengbis and Mbalmayo. By contrast, weathered materials at Ayos do not show any Eu anomalies (as in Bengbis and Mbalmayo). Weathered materials from Bengbis, nearest to the Dja River, have (La/Yb)N < 1 ratios, indicating the relative immobility of HREE relative to LREE due to xenotime abnormally rich in HREE (HREE-PO4). Weak Ce anomalies (1.05-2.24) are ubiquitous in all the studied materials.

  10. Organic geochemical constraints on paleoelevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polissar, P. J.; Rowley, D. B.; Currie, B. S.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    The elevation history of the land surface is an important factor in the interpretation of past tectonic, climate and ecological processes. However, quantitative estimates of paleoelevation are difficult to produce and new techniques are needed. Organic geochemical approaches to quantifying paleoelevations provide a new perspective on this difficult task. The hydrogen isotopic composition of organic biomarker molecules synthesized by plants and algae is systematically related to the water used for growth. Organic molecules in ancient sediments can provide values for the isotopic composition of this water and thus elevation, provided the relationship between elevation and isotopic values is known. Molecular hydrogen isotope ratios from Cenozoic lake sediments on the Tibetan Plateau demonstrate the utility of a biomarker approach. Terrestrial plant-wax D/H values on Neogene sediments from the Namling-Oiyug Basin provide new paleoelevation estimates that compare well with previous studies. Plant wax D/H ratios paired with lacustrine carbonate oxygen isotope values from the Lunpola and Hoh-Xil basins illustrate how paired isotope systems can unravel the isotopic composition of precipitation from evaporative enrichment of lake waters. A potentially fruitful avenue for future research is illustrated by D/H analyses on older sediments from the Namling-Oiyug Basin. These sediments—like many that could be useful for paleoaltimetry—have experienced significant burial and heating. As temperatures approach the oil window it becomes possible to exchange hydrogen in both the extractable organic molecules (bitumen) and the insoluble organic residue (kerogen). The extent to which this exchange alters the original isotopic composition will determine the usefulness of D/H analyses on thermally mature organic matter. The potential payoff and pitfalls of D/H analyses on heated sediments is illustrated with thermally immature and mature samples from the Namling-Oiyug Basin.

  11. State Space Reduction of Linear Processes Using Control Flow Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van de Jaco; Timmer, Mark; Liu, Z.; Ravn, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method for fighting the state space explosion of process algebraic specifications, by performing static analysis on an intermediate format: linear process equations (LPEs). Our method consists of two steps: (1) we reconstruct the LPE's control flow, detecting control flow parameters

  12. State Space Reduction of Linear Processes using Control Flow Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van de Jaco; Timmer, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method for fighting the state space explosion of process algebraic specifications, by performing static analysis on an intermediate format: linear process equations (LPEs). Our method consists of two steps: (1) we reconstruct the LPE's control flow, detecting control flow parameters

  13. On the design of chemical processes with improved controllability characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuse, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally, process design and control system design are carried out sequentially. The premise underlying this sequential approach is that the decisions made in the process design phase do not limit the control design. However, it is generally known that incongruent designs can occur quite

  14. Manufacturing Squares: An Integrative Statistical Process Control Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    In the exercise, students in a junior-level operations management class are asked to manufacture a simple product. Given product specifications, they must design a production process, create roles and design jobs for each team member, and develop a statistical process control plan that efficiently and effectively controls quality during…

  15. Using Statistical Process Control to Enhance Student Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Mark D.; Raichura, Nilesh; Bernardes, Ednilson

    2012-01-01

    Public interest in educational outcomes has markedly increased in the most recent decade; however, quality management and statistical process control have not deeply penetrated the management of academic institutions. This paper presents results of an attempt to use Statistical Process Control (SPC) to identify a key impediment to continuous…

  16. Integrated Modeling and Intelligent Control Methods of Grinding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-sheng Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The grinding process is a typical complex nonlinear multivariable process with strongly coupling and large time delays. Based on the data-driven modeling theory, the integrated modeling and intelligent control method of grinding process is carried out in the paper, which includes the soft-sensor model of economic and technique indexes, the optimized set-point model utilizing case-based reasoning, and the self-tuning PID decoupling controller. For forecasting the key technology indicators (grinding granularity and mill discharge rate of grinding process, an adaptive soft-sensor modeling method based on wavelet neural network optimized by the improved shuffled frog leaping algorithm (ISFLA is proposed. Then, a set point optimization control strategy of grinding process based on case-based reasoning (CBR method is adopted to obtain the optimized velocity set-point of ore feed and pump water feed in the grinding process controlled loops. Finally, a self-tuning PID decoupling controller optimized is used to control the grinding process. Simulation results and industrial application experiments clearly show the feasibility and effectiveness of control methods and satisfy the real-time control requirements of the grinding process.

  17. Improving dryer energy efficiency and controllability simultaneously by process modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atuonwu, J.C.; Straten, van G.; Deventer, van H.C.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2013-01-01

    This work establishes a relationship between dryer energy performance and controllability using energy balances and process resiliency analysis. It is shown that using the process gain matrix, the dryer energy efficiency can be reliably calculated with conditions for simultaneous controllability imp

  18. On the design of chemical processes with improved controllability characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuse, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally, process design and control system design are carried out sequentially. The premise underlying this sequential approach is that the decisions made in the process design phase do not limit the control design. However, it is generally known that incongruent designs can occur quite easily

  19. Hydrologic Regulation of Global Geochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, K.

    2015-12-01

    understand the processes controlling marine isotopic weathering processes, the need to integrate solute and solid transport into Earth system models, and the need to understand the role of extreme physical and temporal heterogeneities in moderating geochemical fluxes.

  20. Nitrate control strategies in an activated sludge wastewater treatment process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Wenhao; Tao, Erpan; Chen, Xiaoquan; Liu, Dawei [South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Hongbin [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    We studied nitrate control strategies in an activated sludge wastewater treatment process (WWTP) based on the activated sludge model. Two control strategies, back propagation for proportional-integral-derivative (BP-PID) and adaptive-network based fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS), are applied in the WWTP. The simulation results show that the simple local constant setpoint control has poor control effects on the nitrate concentration control. However, the ANFIS (4*1) controller, which considers not only the local constant setpoint control of the nitrate concentration, but also three important indices in the effluent--ammonia concentration, total suspended sludge concentration and total nitrogen concentration--demonstrates good control performance. The results also prove that ANFIS (4*1) controller has better control performance than that of the controllers PI, BP-PID and ANFIS (2*1), and that the ANFIS (4*1) controller is effective in improving the effluent quality and maintaining the stability of the effluent quality.

  1. Uranium-series radionuclides as tracers of geochemical processes in Long Island Sound. [Natural /sup 210/Pb tracer study of estuarine geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benninger, L.K.

    1976-05-01

    An estuary can be visualized as a membrane between land and the deep ocean, and the understanding of the estuarine processes which determine the permeability of this membrane to terrigenous materials is necessary for the estimation of fluxes of these materials to the oceans. Natural radionuclides are useful probes into estuarine geochemistry because of the time-dependent relationships among them and because, as analogs of stable elements, they are much less subject to contamination during sampling and analysis. In this study the flux of heavy metals through Long Island Sound is considered in light of the material balance for excess /sup 210/Pb, and analyses of concurrent seston and water samples from central Long Island Sound are used to probe the internal workings of the estuary.

  2. DESIGN OF AN EXPERT CONTROL SYSTEM FOR LEACHING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    One important step in zinc hydrometallurgy is the leaching process, which involves the dissolving of zinc-bearing material in dilute sulfuric acid to form zinc sulfate solution. The key problem in the process control is to determine the optimal pHs of the overflows of the continuous leaches and track them. An expert control system for the leaching process was designed to solve the key problem. A methodology is proposed for determining and tracking the optimal pHs with an expert control strategy based on a combination of steadystate mathematical models and rule models of the process.

  3. NOAA and MMS Marine Minerals Geochemical Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Minerals Geochemical Database was created by NGDC as a part of a project to construct a comprehensive computerized bibliography and geochemical database...

  4. On the design of chemical processes with improved controllability characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Meeuse, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally, process design and control system design are carried out sequentially. The premise underlying this sequential approach is that the decisions made in the process design phase do not limit the control design. However, it is generally known that incongruent designs can occur quite easily. In the literature two different classes of approaches are being described that consider the control performance of the design alternatives from the earliest design stages: (i) Anticipating sequen...

  5. Process Control System Cyber Security Standards - An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert P. Evans

    2006-05-01

    The use of cyber security standards can greatly assist in the protection of process control systems by providing guidelines and requirements for the implementation of computer-controlled systems. These standards are most effective when the engineers and operators, using the standards, understand what each standard addresses. This paper provides an overview of several standards that deal with the cyber security of process measurements and control systems.

  6. Evaluation of geochemical data acquired from regular grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezvoda, V.; Jelinkova, E.; Segeth, K.

    1986-11-01

    Geochemical data obtained during mineral exploration often are biased by systematic as well as random errors; these may result in failures when usual methods of evaluation are used. This is true particularly in soil surveys carried out in regions where a long history of prospecting and mining activity has occurred and/or where aerial chemical pollution is likely to have occurred. A satisfactory evaluation of geochemical data even in such an unfavorable case requires sampling on a relatively dense grid and utilization of all available knowledge of types of mineralization. The evaluation procedure proposed consists of five consecutive phases: (1) dividing the area of interest into subareas of a relatively homogeneous geological nature; (2) processing by multivariate methods (factor analysis, in particular) without consideration of geographic relations; (3) a preliminary interpretation and search for a geochemical explanation of factors; (4) processing of individual factors in two-dimensional geographic space by directional and frequency linear filtering methods; (5) final interpretation and construction of a geochemical model. The procedure is illustrated by an example from a geochemical exploration survey in the vicinity of Pribram (Middle Bohemia).

  7. Iterative Controller Tuning for Process with Fold Bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2007-01-01

    Processes involving fold bifurcation are notoriously difficult to control in the vicinity of the fold where most often optimal productivity is achieved . In cases with limited process insight a model based control synthesis is not possible. This paper uses a data driven approach with an improved...... version of iterative feedback tuning to optimizing a closed loop performance criterion, as a systematic tool for tuning process with fold bifurcations....

  8. Simulation research on control algorithm of differential pressure casting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chai Yan; Jie Wanqi; Yang Bo

    2009-01-01

    To improve the precision of the filling pressure curve of differential pressure casting controlled with PID controller,the model of differential pressure casting process is established and two pressure-difference control systems using PID algorithm and Dahlin algorithm are separately designed in MATLAB. The scheduled pressure curves controlled with PID algorithm and Dahlin algorithm,respectively,are comparatively simulated in MATLAB.The simulated pressure curves obtained show that the control precision with Dahlin algorithm is higher than that with PID algorithm in the differential pressure casting process,and it was further verified by production practice.

  9. Integrated quality control architecture for multistage machining processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Liu, Guixiong

    2010-12-01

    To solve problems concerning the process quality prediction control for the multistage machining processes, a integrated quality control architecture is proposed in this paper. First, a hierarchical multiple criteria decision model is established for the key process and the weight matrix method stratified is discussed. Predictive control of the manufacturing quality is not just for on-site monitoring and control layer, control layer in the enterprise, remote monitoring level of quality exists a variety of target predictive control demand, therefore, based on XML to achieve a unified description of manufacturing quality information, and in different source of quality information between agencies to achieve the transfer and sharing. This will predict complex global quality control, analysis and diagnosis data to lay a good foundation to achieve a more practical, open and standardized manufacturing quality with higher levels of information integration system.

  10. Model Based Monitoring and Control of Chemical and Biochemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    This presentation will give an overview of the work performed at the department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering related to process control. A research vision is formulated and related to a number of active projects at the department. In more detail a project describing model estimation...... and controller tuning in Model Predictive Control application is discussed....

  11. Genetic Algorithm Optimisation of PID Controllers for a Multivariable Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Alharbi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This project is about the design of PID controllers and the improvement of outputs in multivariable processes. The optimisation of PID controller for the Shell oil process is presented in this paper, using Genetic Algorithms (GAs. Genetic Algorithms (GAs are used to automatically tune PID controllers according to given specifications. They use an objective function, which is specially formulated and measures the performance of controller in terms of time-domain bounds on the responses of closed-loop process.A specific objective function is suggested that allows the designer for a single-input, single-output (SISO process to explicitly specify the process performance specifications associated with the given problem in terms of time-domain bounds, then experimentally evaluate the closed-loop responses. This is investigated using a simple two-term parametric PID controller tuning problem. The results are then analysed and compared with those obtained using a number of popular conventional controller tuning methods. The intention is to demonstrate that the proposed objective function is inherently capable of accurately quantifying complex performance specifications in the time domain. This is something that cannot normally be employed in conventional controller design or tuning methods.Finally, the recommended objective function will be used to examine the control problems of Multi-Input-Multi-Output (MIMO processes, and the results will be presented in order to determine the efficiency of the suggested control system.

  12. Situation awareness in process control; designing the human interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passenier, P.O.; Delft, J.H. van

    1999-01-01

    Through the introduction of process automation, the supervision of multiple functions becomes more and more the role of a single human operator, the 'process manager', assisted by a process information and control system. Consequently, the level of direct involvement of the human operator with the a

  13. Geochemical and microbiological processes contributing to the transformation of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in contaminated aquifer material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Man Jae; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A; Finneran, Kevin T

    2011-08-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a potential human carcinogen, and its contamination of subsurface environments is a significant threat to public health. This study investigated abiotic and biological degradation of RDX in contaminated aquifer material. Anoxic batch systems were started with and without pre-aeration of aquifer material to distinguish initial biological RDX reduction from abiotic RDX reduction. Aerating the sediment eliminated chemical reductants in the native aquifer sediment, primarily Fe(II) sorbed to mineral surfaces. RDX (50 μM) was completely reduced and transformed to ring cleavage products when excess concentrations (2mM) of acetate or lactate were provided as the electron donor for aerated sediment. RDX was reduced concurrently with Fe(III) when acetate was provided, while RDX, Fe(III), and sulfate were reduced simultaneously with lactate amendment. Betaproteobacteria were the dominant microorganisms associated with RDX and Fe(III)/sulfate reduction. In particular, Rhodoferax spp. increased from 21% to 35% and from 28% to 60% after biostimulation by acetate and lactate, respectively. Rarefaction analyses demonstrated that microbial diversity decreased in electron-donor-amended systems with active RDX degradation. Although significant amounts of Fe(III) and/or sulfate were reduced after biostimulation, solid-phase reactive minerals such as magnetite or ferrous sulfides were not observed, suggesting that RDX reduction in the aquifer sediment is due to Fe(II) adsorbed to solid surfaces as a result of Fe(III)-reducing microbial activity. These results suggest that both biotic and abiotic processes play an important role in RDX reduction under in situ conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluoride-contaminated groundwater of Birbhum district, West Bengal, India: Interpretation of drinking and irrigation suitability and major geochemical processes using principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batabyal, Asit Kumar; Gupta, Srimanta

    2017-08-01

    The present research work is confined to a rural tract located in the north-western part of Birbhum district, West Bengal, India. Chemical analysis of the groundwater shows the cations is in the order of Na(+) > Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) while for anions it is HCO3(─) > Cl(─) > SO4(2─) > NO3(─). The F(─) concentration was found to vary from 0.01 to 18 mg/L in the pre-monsoon and 0.023 to 19 mg/L in post-monsoon period. 86% of samples show low F(─) content (1.2 mg/L) mainly in the central and north-central parts of the study area at a depth of 46 to 98 m. The prime water type is CaHCO3 succeeded by F(─)-rich NaHCO3 and NaCl waters. The suitability analysis reveals that the water at about 81% of the sampling sites is unsuitable for drinking and at 16% of sites unsuitable for irrigation. The alkaline nature of the water and/or elevated concentration of Fe, Mn and F(─) make the water unsuitable for potable purposes while the high F(─) and Na(+) contents delimit the groundwater for irrigation uses. Multivariate statistical analysis suggests that chemical weathering along with ion exchange is the key process, responsible for mobilization of fluoride in groundwater of the study area.

  15. A Pore Fluid Study in the Transform Fault System of Western Haiti: Investigating Geochemical Processes and Hydrologic Pathways of the Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battani, A.; Monnin, C.; Ruffine, L.; Ellouz, N.; Leroy, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    The area of Western Haiti is located between the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault (EPGF) and Ciabao-Oriente Septentrional fault systems. It has been investigated during the Haiti-SIS cruise (November-December 2012) by heat flow measurements and coring. These two strike-slip fault systems accommodate the relative motion between the Caribbean and North American plates. An aftershock study of the MW= 7, 12 January 2010 earthquake indicated that this event originated along the EPGF fault, while the septentrional fault has not been ruptured for about a century. We focused coring operations on specific zones; faults, basin margins, ridge, deep basins delimated using structural/sedimentological surface data. The objective of the pore-fluid study was to determine both the pathways of the fluids and their origin in relation with the fault activity. A total of 14 Kullenberg cores were collected for fluid sampling and sedimentological analyses. Overall, 99 pore fluids were extracted, using Rhizon® samplers. Major and minor dissolved elements were analyzed. The resulting dataset allows us to identify several diagenetic processes occurring within the upper section of the sedimentary column. For the fault-crossing zones, the vertical chloride and sulphate profiles where the dissolved-element concentrations are close to that of normal seawater suggest seawater downward flow (infiltration). There the faults would then act as recharge zones for fluid circulation. On the opposite, for cores recovered in the basins, dissolved element profiles exhibit variable shapes with sulfate concentration decreasing with depth (indicating organic matter oxydation or anaerobic oxidation of methane) These results will be combined with those from the emerged segment of the EPGF (that can be observed on land in Haiti) in order to have a picture of the hydrologic regime of the fault system, its capacity to act as a recharge zone and conversely to supply deep-seated fluids to the surface (discharge

  16. Process and quality verification controls for solid propellant manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that in-process tests to verify quality and detect discrepant propellant which could compromise motor performance are essential elements of the solid composite propellant manufacturing process. The successful performance of the 260SL-1 and 260SL-2 motors aptly verified the controls used for manufacturing the propellant. The present investigation is concerned with the selected control parameters, and their relationships to composition and final propellant properties. Control performance is evaluated by comparison with processing data experienced in the manufacture of the propellant for the 260SL-1 motor. It is found that the in-process quality verification controls utilized in the propellant manufacturing process for the 260-in. diameter motor contributed significantly to the confidence of successful and predictable motor performance.

  17. Process and quality verification controls for solid propellant manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that in-process tests to verify quality and detect discrepant propellant which could compromise motor performance are essential elements of the solid composite propellant manufacturing process. The successful performance of the 260SL-1 and 260SL-2 motors aptly verified the controls used for manufacturing the propellant. The present investigation is concerned with the selected control parameters, and their relationships to composition and final propellant properties. Control performance is evaluated by comparison with processing data experienced in the manufacture of the propellant for the 260SL-1 motor. It is found that the in-process quality verification controls utilized in the propellant manufacturing process for the 260-in. diameter motor contributed significantly to the confidence of successful and predictable motor performance.

  18. Geochemical Origin of Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2013-04-01

    A model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules is presented. Rocks such as peridotites and basalts, which contain ferromagnesian minerals, evolve in the presence of water. Their hydrolysis is an exothermic reaction which generates heat and a release of H2 and of minerals with modified structures. The hydrogen reacts with the CO2 embedded inside the rock or with the CO2 of the environment to form CO in an hydrothermal process. With the N2 of the environment, and with an activation source arising from cosmic radiation, ferromagnesian rocks might evolve towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules, such as peptide like macromolecules which produce amino acids after acid hydrolysis. The reactions concerned are described. The production of hydrothermal CO is discussed in geological sites containing ferromagnesian silicate minerals and the low intensity of the Earth's magnetic field during Paleoarchaean Era is also discussed. It is concluded that excitation sources arising from cosmic radiation were much more abundant during Paleoarchaean Era and that macromolecular structures of biological relevance might consequently form during Archaean Eon, as a product of the chemical evolution of the rocks and of their mineral contents. This synthesis of abiotically formed biological molecules is consecutively discussed for meteorites and other planets such as Mars. This model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules has first been proposed in 2008 in the context of reactions involving catalysers such as kaolinite [Bassez 2008a] and then presented in conferences and articles [Bassez 2008b, 2009, 2012; Bassez et al. 2009a to 2012b]. BASSEZ M.P. 2008a Synthèse prébiotique dans les conditions hydrothermales, CNRIUT'08, Lyon 29-30/05/2008, Conf. and open access article:http://liris.cnrs.fr/~cnriut08/actes/ 29 mai 11h-12h40. BASSEZ M.P. 2008b Prebiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions, ISSOL'08, P2-6, Firenze-Italy, 24-29/08/2008. Poster at the

  19. Gemstone Grinding Process Improvement by using Impedance Force Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamprommarat Chumpol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chula Automatic Faceting Machine has been developed by The Advance Manufacturing Research Lab, Chulalongkorn University to support Thailand Gems-Industry. The machine has high precision motion control by using position and force control. A contact stiffness model is used to estimate grinding force. Although polished gems from the Faceting Machine have uniform size and acceptable shape, the force of the grinding and polishing process cannot be maintain constant and has some fluctuation due to indirect force control. Therefor this research work propose a new controller for this process based on an impedance direct force control to improve the gemstone grinding performance during polishing process. The grinding force can be measured through motor current. The results show that the polished gems by using impedance direct force control can maintain uniform size as well as good shape and high quality surface.

  20. The National Shipbuilding Research Program. Process Analysis Via Accuracy Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    Process Analysis Via Accuracy Control U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration in cooperation with Todd Pacific Shipyards...AUG 1985 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The National Shipbuilding Research Program Process Analysis Via...lighting, retraining work- ers, or other such approaches. This product of A/C is called process or method analysis. Process analysis involves a

  1. Kriging - a challenge in geochemical mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojdl, Jiri; Matys Grygar, Tomas; Elznicova, Jitka; Popelka, Jan; Vachova, Tatina; Hosek, Michal

    2017-04-01

    Geochemists can easily provide datasets for contamination mapping thanks to recent advances in geographical information systems (GIS) and portable chemical-analytical instrumentation. Kriging is commonly used to visualise the results of such mapping. It is understandable, as kriging is a well-established method of spatial interpolation. It was created in 1950's for geochemical data processing to estimate the most likely distribution of gold based on samples from a few boreholes. However, kriging is based on the assumption of continuous spatial distribution of numeric data that is not realistic in environmental geochemistry. The use of kriging is correct when the data density is sufficient with respect to heterogeneity of the spatial distribution of the geochemical parameters. However, if anomalous geochemical values are focused in hotspots of which boundaries are insufficiently densely sampled, kriging could provide misleading maps with the real contours of hotspots blurred by data smoothing and levelling out individual (isolated) but relevant anomalous values. The data smoothing can thus it results in underestimation of geochemical extremes, which may in fact be of the greatest importance in mapping projects. In our study we characterised hotspots of contamination by uranium and zinc in the floodplain of the Ploučnice River. The first objective of our study was to compare three methods of sampling: random (based on stochastic generation of sampling points), systematic (square grid) and judgemental sampling (based on judgement stemming from principles of fluvial deposition) as the basis for pollution maps. The first detected problem in production of the maps was the reduction of the smoothing effect of kriging using appropriate function of empirical semivariogram and setting the variation of at microscales smaller than the sampling distances to minimum (the "nugget" parameter of semivariogram). Exact interpolators such as Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) or Radial

  2. Process Control of Pink Guava Puree Pasteurization Process: Simulation and Validation by Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. F. Wan Mokhtar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, process control has been applied extensively in many food processes include pasteurization process. The purpose is to control and maintain the product temperature at desired value. In order to be able to control the process properly, the model of the process needs to be obtained. This research aims to obtain the empirical model and to determine the best control strategy in pasteurization process of pink guava puree. The PID controller tuned by different tuning methods was simulated using Simulink and closed loop responses were observed. Simulation results revealed that PID controller tuned by minimizing of integral absolute error (IAE method were satisfactory adaptable in this process in term of faster settling time, less overshoot, smallest values of IAE and ISE that less than 1. Then, experiment was performed using this method in order to validate simulation results. In general, a good agreement was achieved between experimental data and dynamic simulation result in control of pasteurization temperature process with  R2=0.83. As the conclusion, the results obtained can be used as the recommendation for a suitable control strategy for the pasteurization process of pink guava puree in the industry.

  3. Guidance on Design of Internet-based Process Control Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.H.YANG; L.YANG

    2005-01-01

    Internet-based process control is becoming new generations of control systems, in which the Internet is used as a platform for global remote monitoring and control. The obvious benefit is to enable global collaboration between operators from geographically dispersed locations, data sharing and data provision for remote monitoring and control. However, connection to an open network and the use of universal technology present new problems that did not exist with the conventional design and construction of control systems, such as time delay and data loss in Internet transmission and security. This paper reviews the latest research results and presents design guidance of Internet based monitoring and control systems.

  4. Dynamic control of crystallinity in polymer film casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thananchai Leephakpreeda

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach for dynamic control of crystallinity in polymer film casting process. As known, the transients of crystallization dictate the microstructures of semi-crystalline polymer during solidification. In turn, the properties of finished products can be determined by adjustable variables in polymer film casting process such as temperature of chill roll. In this work, an experimental model of the solidification in film casting process is derived by a system identification technique. This model is used to design a digital feedback controller including a state estimator. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed control technique on an extruded film.

  5. Monitoring Software Reliability using Statistical Process Control: An MMLE Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandla Sreenivasa Rao

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper consider an MMLE (Modified Maximum Likelihood Estimation based scheme to estimatesoftware reliability using exponential distribution. The MMLE is one of the generalized frameworks ofsoftware reliability models of Non Homogeneous Poisson Processes (NHPPs. The MMLE givesanalytical estimators rather than an iterative approximation to estimate the parameters. In this paper weproposed SPC (Statistical Process Control Charts mechanism to determine the software quality usinginter failure times data. The Control charts can be used to measure whether the software process isstatistically under control or not.

  6. Is formamide a geochemically plausible prebiotic solvent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bada, Jeffrey L; Chalmers, John H; Cleaves, H James

    2016-07-27

    From a geochemical perspective, significant amounts of pure formamide (HCONH2) would have likely been rare on the early Earth. There may have been mixed formamide-water solutions, but even in the presence of catalyst, solutions with >20 weight% water in formamide would not have produced significant amounts of prebiotic compounds. It might be feasible to produce relatively pure formamide by a rare occurrence of freezing formamide/water mixtures at temperatures lower than formamide's freezing point (2.55 °C) but greater than the freezing point of water. Because of the high density of formamide ice it would have sunk and accumulated at the bottom of the solution. If the remaining water froze on the surface of this ice, and was then removed by a sublimation-ablation process, a small amount of pure formamide ice might have been produced. In addition a recent report suggested that ∼85 weight% formamide could be prepared by a geochemical type of fractional distillation process, offering another possible route for prebiotic formamide production.

  7. A Coupled Model of Hydro- Transport- Thermal in Variable Saturated Porous Media Considering Geochemical Process%地球化学作用下饱和-非饱和介质水力-传质-传热耦合模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜利国; 梁冰

    2011-01-01

    Geochemical process is one of the fftost important factors influenced fluid movement, solute transport and heat transfer in porous media such as rock and soil. Based on the unsaturated soil theory established by Fredlund, in which the unsaturated soil porous media has been considered as a media which has four phases, assumed the effect of precipitation/dissolution to be an individual phase. With some hypotheses, the porosity and water content of porous media are modified by solute concentration, a new coupled relation between solute transport and hydraulic parameters has been built. The new relation updates the traditional coupled model in which the impact from solute field acts On seepage flow field by only density and viscosity. Here, a coupled model of multi-phases and multi components hydraulic-transport-thermal and geochemical processes in variable saturated porous media is established. Using a infiltrate experiment for reactive coal mine gangue in the laboratory, the coupled numerical model is tested. The results show that the water seepage velocity calculated from experiment matches well the outcome from numerical model which considered the precipitation/dissolution coupling variable. Thus the applicability of the numerical model is verified.%地球化学作用是影响岩土类多孔介质中流体流动、传质、传热的重要因素之一.基于Fredlund所提出的非饱和土四相理论,将地球化学作用所产生的溶解/沉淀视为一个独立相,在一定的假设基础上,利用溶质浓度对介质孔隙度、含水率进行修正,从而建立起传质过程与介质水力性质之间的关系,改进了传统模型中传质过程与流体密度、黏度之间单一的耦合关系;并以此为基础建立了考虑地球化学作用下饱和-非饱和介质中多组分、多相流体渗流场-浓度场-温度场耦合的数学模型.通过在实验室内对反应性煤矸石进行渗透实验的结果对笔者所建模型进行了验证,

  8. Adjustment of geochemical background by robust multivariate statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conventional analyses of exploration geochemical data assume that the background is a constant or slowly changing value, equivalent to a plane or a smoothly curved surface. However, it is better to regard the geochemical background as a rugged surface, varying with changes in geology and environment. This rugged surface can be estimated from observed geological, geochemical and environmental properties by using multivariate statistics. A method of background adjustment was developed and applied to groundwater and stream sediment reconnaissance data collected from the Hot Springs Quadrangle, South Dakota, as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Source-rock lithology appears to be a dominant factor controlling the chemical composition of groundwater or stream sediments. The most efficacious adjustment procedure is to regress uranium concentration on selected geochemical and environmental variables for each lithologic unit, and then to delineate anomalies by a common threshold set as a multiple of the standard deviation of the combined residuals. Robust versions of regression and RQ-mode principal components analysis techniques were used rather than ordinary techniques to guard against distortion caused by outliers Anomalies delineated by this background adjustment procedure correspond with uranium prospects much better than do anomalies delineated by conventional procedures. The procedure should be applicable to geochemical exploration at different scales for other metals. ?? 1985.

  9. Software control and system configuration management - A process that works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, K. L.; Flores, C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A comprehensive software control and system configuration management process for flight-crucial digital control systems of advanced aircraft has been developed and refined to insure efficient flight system development and safe flight operations. Because of the highly complex interactions among the hardware, software, and system elements of state-of-the-art digital flight control system designs, a systems-wide approach to configuration control and management has been used. Specific procedures are implemented to govern discrepancy reporting and reconciliation, software and hardware change control, systems verification and validation testing, and formal documentation requirements. An active and knowledgeable configuration control board reviews and approves all flight system configuration modifications and revalidation tests. This flexible process has proved effective during the development and flight testing of several research aircraft and remotely piloted research vehicles with digital flight control systems that ranged from relatively simple to highly complex, integrated mechanizations.

  10. Use of Hydrochemistry, Stable Isotope, Radiocarbon, 222Rn and Terrigenic 4He to Study the Geochemical Processes and the Mode of Vertical Leakage to the Gambier Basin Tertiary Confined Sand Aquifer, South Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Somaratne

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The mode of vertical recharge to aquifers is important to the application of appropriate recharge estimation methods. This study identifies the origin, geochemical evolution and mode of vertical leakage to the Gambier Basin confined aquifer, south east of South Australia. The recharge zone spans areas of the Glencoe-Nangwarry-Nagwarry (GNN. The Hundreds of Glencoe and Nangwarry are in South Australia, and the Parish of Nagwarry adjoins Nangwarry in western Victoria. The plot of stable isotopes of water molecules, δ2H versus δ18O, indicates that local rainfall with minor surface evaporation is the source of recharge. The results of hydrochemical analysis indicate that the sources of ions in the recharge zone groundwater are derived from carbonate and silicate weathering with cation exchange. The majority of water types (66% of samples within the South Australian part of the recharge zone show Ca-Na-HCO3-Cl due to carbonate dissolution processes, and about 83% of samples within the Victorian part of the recharge zone show Na-Ca-HCO3-Cl water types, indicating cation exchange or mixing with other waters. The influence of faults on vertical leakage was studied at eight sites located in the Nangwarry and Nagwarry area using electrical conductivity logging, measuring the concentration of radiocarbon activity, δ18O, 222Rn and terrigenic 4He in the vertical profiles. Results show that regardless of land use in the study area, the interconnection of the unconfined Tertiary limestone aquifer with the Tertiary confined sand aquifer occurs, via both diffuse and preferential flows. Thus, the application of conventional vertical leakage estimation methods using Darcy’s equation or the application of tracer techniques may be inappropriate unless the duality of the flow system is considered.

  11. Dynamics and control strategies for a butanol fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Adriano Pinto; Costa, Caliane Bastos Borba; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf; Maugeri Filho, Francisco; Atala, Daniel Ibraim Pires; de Angelis, Dejanira de Franceschi; Maciel Filho, Rubens

    2010-04-01

    In this work, mathematical modeling was employed to assess the dynamic behavior of the flash fermentation process for the production of butanol. This process consists of three interconnected units as follows: fermentor, cell retention system (tangential microfiltration), and vacuum flash vessel (responsible for the continuous recovery of butanol from the broth). Based on the study of the dynamics of the process, suitable feedback control strategies [single input/single output (SISO) and multiple input/multiple output (MIMO)] were elaborated to deal with disturbances related to the process. The regulatory control consisted of keeping sugar and/or butanol concentrations in the fermentor constant in the face of disturbances in the feed substrate concentration. Another objective was the maintenance of the proper operation of the flash tank (maintenance of the thermodynamic equilibrium of the liquid and vapor phases) considering that oscillations in the temperature in the tank are expected. The servo control consisted of changes in concentration set points. The performance of an advanced controller, the dynamic matrix control, and the classical proportional-integral controller was evaluated. Both controllers were able to regulate the operating conditions in order to accommodate the perturbations with the lowest possible alterations in the process outputs. However, the performance of the PI controller was superior because it showed quicker responses without oscillations.

  12. Mechanisms and Geochemical Models of Core Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rubie, David C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the Earth's core is a consequence of planetary accretion and processes in the Earth's interior. The mechanical process of planetary differentiation is likely to occur in large, if not global, magma oceans created by the collisions of planetary embryos. Metal-silicate segregation in magma oceans occurs rapidly and efficiently unlike grain scale percolation according to laboratory experiments and calculations. Geochemical models of the core formation process as planetary accretion proceeds are becoming increasingly realistic. Single stage and continuous core formation models have evolved into multi-stage models that are couple to the output of dynamical models of the giant impact phase of planet formation. The models that are most successful in matching the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle, based on experimentally-derived element partition coefficients, show that the temperature and pressure of metal-silicate equilibration must increase as a function of time and mass accreted and so m...

  13. Energy Efficient Pump Control for an Offshore Oil Processing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Soleiman, Kian; Løhndorf, Bo

    2012-01-01

    The energy efficient control of a pump system for an offshore oil processing system is investigated. The seawater is lifted up by a pump system which consists of three identical centrifugal pumps in parallel, and the lifted seawater is used to cool down the crude oil flowing out of a threephase...... separator on one of the Danish north-sea platform. A hierarchical pump-speed control strategy is developed for the considered system by minimizing the pump power consumption subject to keeping a satisfactory system performance. The proposed control strategy consists of online estimation of some system...... operating parameters, optimization of pump configurations, and a real-time feedback control. Comparing with the current control strategy at the considered system, where the pump system is on/off controlled, and the seawater flows are controlled by a number of control valves, the proposed control strategy...

  14. An Unified Approach for Process Quality Analysis and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof.Chandrakanth Biradar,Aruna Kawdi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract— The process in a company finally results in product of the company, which represents the company standard. Hence, during the process execution time quality of the process needs to be taken care before and after the work done. In this paper, an unified approach to quality analysis and control of a process development is presented. This approach gives an overview of what the task the company assigned to the employers. The process is defined as the set of action items to achieve the work completion. Quality means grade of excellence. Quality analysis of a process is an improvement of the process and making sure that all the standard procedures are followed. An unified approach designed in this paper is a combination of software cost estimation and a financial market forecasting with the support of historical data, statistical data mining technique and artificial neural networks, which helps the developers as well as investors in strategic planning and investment decision making. Therefore, the paper describes a recommended process to develop software (SW cost estimates for software managers, perform financial market forecasting to control quality of process development. As a result, the improvement and analysis of the process quality can be performed from basic level to the corporate level. By this work, we conclude that the process quality control can be made easier and efficient compared to the old graphical analytics technique.

  15. Optimal control of switched systems arising in fermentation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chongyang

    2014-01-01

    The book presents, in a systematic manner, the optimal controls under different mathematical models in fermentation processes. Variant mathematical models – i.e., those for multistage systems; switched autonomous systems; time-dependent and state-dependent switched systems; multistage time-delay systems and switched time-delay systems – for fed-batch fermentation processes are proposed and the theories and algorithms of their optimal control problems are studied and discussed. By putting forward novel methods and innovative tools, the book provides a state-of-the-art and comprehensive systematic treatment of optimal control problems arising in fermentation processes. It not only develops nonlinear dynamical system, optimal control theory and optimization algorithms, but can also help to increase productivity and provide valuable reference material on commercial fermentation processes.

  16. Digital signal processing in power electronics control circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Sozański, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses problems concerning the design and realization of digital control algorithms for power electronics circuits using digital signal processing (DSP) methods. It includes Matlab examples for illustration of considered problems.

  17. Controlling Contagion Processes in Time-Varying Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Suyu; Karsai, Marton; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of strategies aimed at controlling contagion processes on networks considers the connectivity pattern of the system as either quenched or annealed. However, in the real world many networks are highly dynamical and evolve in time concurrently to the contagion process. Here, we derive an analytical framework for the study of control strategies specifically devised for time-varying networks. We consider the removal/immunization of individual nodes according the their activity in the network and develop a block variable mean-field approach that allows the derivation of the equations describing the evolution of the contagion process concurrently to the network dynamic. We derive the critical immunization threshold and assess the effectiveness of the control strategies. Finally, we validate the theoretical picture by simulating numerically the information spreading process and control strategies in both synthetic networks and a large-scale, real-world mobile telephone call dataset

  18. Systematic Integrated Process Design and Control of Binary Element Reactive Distillation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    2016-01-01

    In this work, integrated process design and control of reactive distillation processes is considered through a computer-aided framework. First, a set of simple design methods for reactive distillation column that are similar in concept to non-reactive distillation design methods are extended....... It is shown that the same design-control principles that apply to a non-reacting binary system of compounds are also valid for a reactive binary system of elements for distillation columns. Application of this framework shows that designing the reactive distillation process at the maximum driving force...... results in a feasible and reliable design of the process as well as the controller structure....

  19. VPLS Based Quality and Cost Control for Tennessee Eastman Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋凯; 王海清; 李平

    2005-01-01

    Product quality and operation cost control obtain increasing emphases in modern chemical system engineering. To improve the fault detection power of the partial least square (PLS) method for quality control, a new QRPV statistic is proposed in terms of the VP (variable importance in projection) indices of monitored process variables, which is significantly advanced over and different from the conventional Q statistic. QRPV is calculated only by the residuals of the remarkable process variables (RPVs). Therefore, it is the dominant relation between quality and RPV not all process variables (as in the case of the conventional PLS) that is monitored by this new VP-PLS (VPLS) method. The combination of QRPV and T2 statistics is applied to the quality and cost control of the Tennessee Eastman (TE) process, and weak faults can be detected as quickly as possible. Consequently, the product quality of TE process is guaranteed and operation costs are reduced.

  20. Reach tracking reveals dissociable processes underlying cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Christopher D; Moher, Jeff; Sobel, David M; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    The current study uses reach tracking to investigate how cognitive control is implemented during online performance of the Stroop task (Experiment 1) and the Eriksen flanker task (Experiment 2). We demonstrate that two of the measures afforded by reach tracking, initiation time and reach curvature, capture distinct patterns of effects that have been linked to dissociable processes underlying cognitive control in electrophysiology and functional neuroimaging research. Our results suggest that initiation time reflects a response threshold adjustment process involving the inhibition of motor output, while reach curvature reflects the degree of co-activation between response alternatives registered by a monitoring process over the course of a trial. In addition to shedding new light on fundamental questions concerning how these processes contribute to the cognitive control of behavior, these results present a framework for future research to investigate how these processes function across different tasks, develop across the lifespan, and differ among individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Process control and optimization with simple interval calculation method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomerantsev, A.; Rodionova, O.; Høskuldsson, Agnar

    2006-01-01

    the series of expanding PLS/SIC models in order to support the on-line process improvements. This method helps to predict the effect of planned actions on the product quality and thus enables passive quality control. We have also considered an optimization approach that proposes the correcting actions......Methods of process control and optimization are presented and illustrated with a real world example. The optimization methods are based on the PLS block modeling as well as on the simple interval calculation methods of interval prediction and object status classification. It is proposed to employ...... for the quality improvement in the course of production. The latter is an active quality optimization, which takes into account the actual history of the process. The advocate approach is allied to the conventional method of multivariate statistical process control (MSPC) as it also employs the historical process...

  2. Instrumentation and control for fossil-energy processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    The 1982 symposium on instrumentation and control for fossil energy processes was held June 7 through 9, 1982, at Adam's Mark Hotel, Houston, Texas. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy; Argonne National Laboratory; and the Society for Control and Instrumentation of Energy Processes. Fifty-two papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; eleven papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  3. Thermomechanically-controlled Processing for Producing Ship-building Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Basu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermomechanically-controlled processing of a newly developed high-strength lowalloy steel has been designed in such a way that the problems, normally faced in producing thequench and tempered steels, have been mitigated and the final product (steel plates are available in as rolled condition rather than quench and tempered steels.A low-carbon, low-alloy steel having nickel, chromium, copper, niobium, boron, has been designed for ease of welding, improved weldability over the conventional steels, and responsiveto the thermomechanically-controlled processing. A number of laboratory-scale batches of the alloy were made with different combinations of thermomechanically-controlled processingparameters. The different thermomechanically-controlled processing parameters studied include (i slab-reheating temperature,~ (ii. def.orm ation above recrvstallisation temperature, (iiideformation below recrystallisation temperature, and (iv finish-rolling temperature. The thermomechanically-processed steel plates, under certain combinations of  thermomechanically-controlled ~rocessi-ne.o arameters. showed excellent combination of imvact and tensile n.r on. erties. In this paper, the microstructure-property correlation has been made to throw light on the type of microstructure required to obtain such superior package of mechanical properties. Further, the optimised laboratory-scale thermomechanically-controlled processing parameters, which were used to process newer hatches of the steel made through industrial route, have delivered encouraging results.

  4. Particle electrophoresis for quality assurance and process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, G V; Knox, R J

    2001-02-01

    Process control is an increasingly important issue as life science companies world-wide strive for recognition of their manufacturing and product development quality measures according to International Standards Organization (ISO) or good manufacturing practices (GMP) standards. Analytical particle electrophoresis (APE) has the potential for significant contributions, not just to basic research, but also in process development and control in manufacturing environments. An important feature of colloidal (small) particles, which controls their behavior, is their surface charge. Optimization of life science products and process conditions involving small particles (>100 nm) may be approached by a variety of strategies based upon direct measurements of the charge properties of process particles or "reporter" particles. The availability of increasingly powerful instruments and control particle preparations (National Institute of Standards and Technology ((NIST) and others) for validation of instrument operation make the method more attractive than ever. We summarize highly flexible electrophoretic strategies for assessing process consistency both from the perspective of particles being processed as well as the processing environment and describe principles for the use of polymer microspheres both as control particles for validation of instrument operation as well as for probes of the assay medium.

  5. Development of Chemical Process Design and Control for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyun Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This contribution describes a novel process systems engineering framework that couples advanced control with sustainability evaluation for the optimization of process operations to minimize environmental impacts associated with products, materials and energy. The implemented control strategy combines a biologically-inspired method with optimal control concepts for finding more sustainable operating trajectories. The sustainability assessment of process operating points is carried out by using the U.S. EPA’s Gauging Reaction Effectiveness for the ENvironmental Sustainability of Chemistries with a multi-Objective Process Evaluator (GREENSCOPE tool that provides scores for the selected indicators in the economic, material efficiency, environmental and energy areas. The indicator scores describe process performance on a sustainability measurement scale, effectively determining which operating point is more sustainable if there are more than several steady states for one specific product manufacturing. Through comparisons between a representative benchmark and the optimal steady states obtained through the implementation of the proposed controller, a systematic decision can be made in terms of whether the implementation of the controller is moving the process towards a more sustainable operation. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is illustrated through a case study of a continuous fermentation process for fuel production, whose material and energy time variation models are characterized by multiple steady states and oscillatory conditions.

  6. The process matters: cyber security in industrial control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadžiosmanović, Dina

    2014-01-01

    An industrial control system (ICS) is a computer system that controls industrial processes such as power plants, water and gas distribution, food production, etc. Since cyber-attacks on an ICS may have devastating consequences on human lives and safety in general, the security of ICS is important. I

  7. Stabilizing control for a class of delay unstable processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, See Chek; Wang, Qing-Guo; Nguyen, Le Binh

    2010-07-01

    The stabilization of unstable first-order plus time-delay processes with a zero by means of simple controllers is investigated in detail. Explicit stabilizability conditions are established. And the computational methods for determining stabilizing controller parameters are also presented with illustrative examples.

  8. Dynamic modelling and process control of ZnS precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    König, J.; Keesman, K.J.; Veeken, A.H.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the dynamic modelling and design of a control strategy for the ZnS precipitation process. During lab¿scale experiments, the sulfide concentration in a precipitator was controlled at a prespecified pS value by manipulating the flow from a buffer vessel. Batch tests showed that the

  9. The process matters: cyber security in industrial control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadziosmanovic, D.

    2014-01-01

    An industrial control system (ICS) is a computer system that controls industrial processes such as power plants, water and gas distribution, food production, etc. Since cyber-attacks on an ICS may have devastating consequences on human lives and safety in general, the security of ICS is important. I

  10. Anaerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. Areas addressed include: (1) anaerobic sludge digestion (considering the nature of raw sludge, purposes of anaerobic digestion, the results of digestion, types of equipment, and other topics); (2) digester process control (considering feeding…

  11. Advantages of Laser Polarimetry Applied to Tequila Industrial Process Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajer, V.; Rodriguez, C.; Flores, R.; Naranjo, S.; Cossio, G.; Lopez, J.

    2002-03-01

    The development of a polarimetric method for crude and cooked agave juice quality control not only by direct polarimetric measurement also by means of laser polarimeter LASERPOL 101M used as a liquid chromatographic detector is presented. The viability and advantage of this method for raw material quality control and during Tequila industrial process is shown.

  12. Identification & Control of Special Processes in Civil Engineering Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张怡

    2009-01-01

    @@ A lot ot special processes exist in operation of construction enterprises. Construction enterprises are categorized as of high risks in certification under the quality management system. Taking civil engineering construction of building projects as an example, the writer analyzes how construction enterprises shall identify and control the special processes.

  13. The role of analytical chemistry in process quality control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, W.E.; de Niet, G.; Bos, M.

    1989-01-01

    The growing need for quality supervision and control in production processes is briefly outlined. After a summary of available process analytical devices, and a short discussion of their possibilities and limitations, an alternative approach is discussed. This approach is based on the development of

  14. The Possibilities of WWW Utilization for Process Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roškanin Martin

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the possibilities of www technology utilization in real time process control and describes the representation of this information on client site in the www page form. The communication between client and process over web server and socket connection is discussed. The application of one of this method is illustrated.

  15. Closing the Gap Between Process Control Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Carlos; Cardona-Martinez, Nelson; Velazquez, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    The pressure on world-wide manufacturing industries to meet tougher demands and regulations has forced companies to focus on improving manufacturing using tools like process automation. This focus requires better-prepared students. The process control course of the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez has…

  16. Statistical Process Control for Evaluating Contract Service at Army Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 12a. DISTRIBUTION/ AVAILABILTY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for...requirements. In addition to their usage in fault diagnosis and process improvement, process control methods are recommended for supporting acceptance

  17. Closing the Gap Between Process Control Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Carlos; Cardona-Martinez, Nelson; Velazquez, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    The pressure on world-wide manufacturing industries to meet tougher demands and regulations has forced companies to focus on improving manufacturing using tools like process automation. This focus requires better-prepared students. The process control course of the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez has…

  18. The Geochemical Society(GS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seth M.Davis

    2007-01-01

    @@ Mission The Geochemical Society is an international nonprofit organization for scientists involved in the practice,study and teaching of geochemistry.0ur principal roles are to understand and meet the needs of our members so as to provide them with programs and services that will help them be better geochemists;to empower geochemists through information,education,relationships and resources that will enrich their professional development and careers;and to advance the thought and application of geochemistry.

  19. Arsenic: geochemical distribution and health risk in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzolo, Daniela; Cicchella, Domenico; Albanese, Stefano; Catani, Vittorio; Dinelli, Enrico; Lima, Annamaria; Valera, Paolo; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2017-04-01

    Characterization of risks to human health is determinant for risk management and population surveillance. This study represent the first work at national scale for Italy about arsenic occurrence, distribution and health impact. We analyzed the As geochemical distribution in different environmental matrices on the whole Italian territory, and assessed both carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks for different exposure routes and age groups. The results demonstrate that, in Italy, arsenic is present in significant concentrations both in water (up to 27.2 µg/L) and soils (up to 70 mg/kg). Its presence is mainly controlled by geological processes and locally reflects the industrial history of the Country. The population of the Central Italy, where high content of arsenic in the analyzed samples is due to the presence of alkaline volcanics, are the most exposed to the health risk. Based on the results of our work, it is clear that the consumption of tap water for potable use is the most impactful route for As daily exposure and play an important role in governing potential cancer and non-cancer risks for the considered population. It is interesting to observe that the Incremental Life Cancer Risk through water ingestion show that almost 80% of data falls above the internationally accepted benchmark value of 1 x 10-5. Moreover it was demonstrated that childhood is the most susceptible age stage to As exposure. Geochemical mapping provided a useful tool to spatially analyze and represent data and to highlight the most critic areas and the most exposed population to arsenic at national scale. In conclusion, this study improve knowledge about As occurrence for an entire Country, recognizing an health emerging problem. It might be a good starting point to support the urgently needed policy actions, in order to prevent and reduce the health risk. Moreover, the performed method in this case study research is potentially generalizable and applicable in other countries.

  20. Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D

    2006-02-28

    The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling

  1. Dynamic control of crystallinity in polymer film casting process

    OpenAIRE

    Thananchai Leephakpreeda

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for dynamic control of crystallinity in polymer film casting process. As known, the transients of crystallization dictate the microstructures of semi-crystalline polymer during solidification. In turn, the properties of finished products can be determined by adjustable variables in polymer film casting process such as temperature of chill roll. In this work, an experimental model of the solidification in film casting process is derived by a system identificatio...

  2. Control and Systems Concepts in the Innovation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The idea for this article and the associated feature articles in this special section come from two sources. The first is the opinion, shared by many control experts, that, while our subject has achieved much in its short history, it is now time to seek new directions and a new identity. The second source is my experience over the past 30 years with multidisciplinary R&D; I have seen that control systems methods can contribute to the development of new products and processes in a broader sense than the traditional design of feedback control loops.In some specific incidents, key innovative steps were made by taking a generalized control systems view. Interestingly, in most cases the control analyst, rather than making the key inventive steps, acted as a scientific facilitator by linking the skills of team members via the common languages of control systems, including modeling, simulation, and dynamic analysis. These experiences led me to reflect on searches for new directions in control and to question whether control systems analysts and educators should reposition control as a general systems science that can assist innovation in our industries, much in the same way that Wiener placed control at the heart of his cybernetic vision. This idea led to a further questioning of the sense in which innovation itself is a systematic process and therefore susceptible to control systems analysis.

  3. Variation Analysis and Stability Control for Measurement Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Feng-yu; MA Yi-zhong; Bo Bergman; XU Ji-chao

    2002-01-01

    Based on a two-section measuring method, a data collection sheet is formed. According to the data collected, the variation sources of a measurement process are analyzed and general guidelines for variation diagnosis are suggested. In our previous study, a method is presented to control the deviation of measurement system, but it is not sensitive to mean value variation and mean value drift. In this paper, a simplified data collection scheme via two-section measuring method is introduced to control both variation and center drift of measurement process. Based on this scheme, traditional SPC charts for variation control and EWMA chart for mean value drift are given.

  4. Intelligent Transportation Control based on Proactive Complex Event Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yongheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex Event Processing (CEP has become the key part of Internet of Things (IoT. Proactive CEP can predict future system states and execute some actions to avoid unwanted states which brings new hope to intelligent transportation control. In this paper, we propose a proactive CEP architecture and method for intelligent transportation control. Based on basic CEP technology and predictive analytic technology, a networked distributed Markov decision processes model with predicting states is proposed as sequential decision model. A Q-learning method is proposed for this model. The experimental evaluations show that this method works well when used to control congestion in in intelligent transportation systems.

  5. Digital signal processing in power system protection and control

    CERN Document Server

    Rebizant, Waldemar; Wiszniewski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Digital Signal Processing in Power System Protection and Control bridges the gap between the theory of protection and control and the practical applications of protection equipment. Understanding how protection functions is crucial not only for equipment developers and manufacturers, but also for their users who need to install, set and operate the protection devices in an appropriate manner. After introductory chapters related to protection technology and functions, Digital Signal Processing in Power System Protection and Control presents the digital algorithms for signal filtering, followed

  6. Platform for 3D inline process control in additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Marc; Zhang, Chen; Rosenberger, Maik; Notni, Gunther

    2017-06-01

    3D - Inline - Process - Control is getting more attention in any fields of manufacturing processes to increase productivity and quality. Sensor systems are necessary to capture the currently process status and are basement for Inline-Process- Control. The presented work is a possibility to get inline information's about the additive manufacturing process Fused Filament Fabrication. The requirement is the ability to manipulate the machine code to get free field of view to the topside of the object after every manufactured layer. The adaptable platform layout makes possible to create different approaches for inline process control. One approach is the single camera layout from bird view to get 2,5D information's about the manufactured object and the other one is the active stereoscopic camera layout with pattern projection. Both approaches are showing a possibility to get information's of the manufactured object in process. Additional this cases allow a view inside the manufactured object and defects can be located. Deviations in the manufacturing process can be corrected and relevant parameters can be adapted during slicing process to increase the manufacturing quality.

  7. A systematic framework for design of process monitoring and control (PAT) systems for crystallization processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Samad, Noor Asma Fazli Bin; Sin, Gürkan; Gernaey, Krist

    2013-01-01

    for generation of the supersaturation set-point for supersaturation control, as well as a tool for design of a process monitoring and control system (also called Process Analytical Technology (PAT) system). This systematic design allows one to generate the necessary problem-chemical system specific model......A generic computer-aided framework for systematic design of a process monitoring and control system for crystallization processes has been developed to study various aspects of crystallization operations.The systematic design framework contains a generic crystallizer modelling toolbox, a tool......, the necessary supersaturation set-point as well as a PAT system design including implementation of monitoring tools and control strategies in order to produce the desired target product properties notably crystal size distribution (CSD) and shape for a wide range of crystallization processes. Application...

  8. COMPUTATIONALLY INTELLIGENT MODELLING AND CONTROL OF FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan T Ćirić

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper modelling and control approaches for fluidized bed combustion process have been considered, that are based on the use of computational intelligence. Proposed adaptive neuro-fuzzy-genetic modelling and intelligent control strategies provide for efficient combining of available expert knowledge with experimental data. Firstly, based on the qualitative information on the desulphurization process, models of the SO2 emission in fluidized bed combustion have been developed, which provides for economical and efficient reduction of SO2 in FBC by estimation of optimal process parameters and by design of intelligent control systems based on defined emission models. Also, efficient fuzzy nonlinear FBC process modelling strategy by combining several linearized combustion models has been presented. Finally, fuzzy and conventional process control systems for fuel flow and primary air flow regulation based on developed models and optimized by genetic algorithms have also been developed. Obtained results indicate that computationally intelligent approach can be successfully applied for modelling and control of complex fluidized bed combustion process.

  9. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 2: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Geochemical Influences on the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Subsurface at the INEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul L. Wichlacz; Robert C. Starr; Brennon Orr

    2003-09-01

    . The documents that appeared to be the most pertinent were selected from further review. These documents are tabulated in the citation list. This report summarizes existing geochemical conceptual models, but does not attempt to generate a new conceptual model or select the ''right'' model. This document is organized as follows. Geochemical models are described in general in Section 2. Geochemical processes that control the transport and fate of contaminants introduced into groundwater are described in Section 3. The natural geochemistry of the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) is described in Section 4. The effect of waste disposal on the INEEL subsurface is described in Section 5. The geochemical behavior of the major contaminants is described in Section 6. Section 7 describes the site-specific geochemical models developed for various INEEL facilities.

  10. Geochemical Investigations of Groundwater Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, Adrian [Intellisci Ltd., Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    The report describes geochemical parameters and methods that provide information about the hydrodynamic stability of groundwaters in low permeability fractured rocks that are potential hosts for radioactive waste repositories. Hydrodynamic stability describes the propensity for changes in groundwater flows over long timescales, in terms of flow rates and flow directions. Hydrodynamic changes may also cause changes in water compositions, but the related issue of geochemical stability of a potential repository host rock system is outside the scope of this report. The main approaches to assessing groundwater stability are numerical modelling, measurement and interpretation of geochemical indicators in groundwater compositions, and analyses and interpretations of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions in these minerals. This report covers the latter two topics, with emphasis on geochemical indicators. The extent to which palaeohydrogeology and geochemical stability indicators have been used in past safety cases is reviewed. It has been very variable, both in terms of the scenarios considered, the stability indicators considered and the extent to which the information was explicitly or implicitly used in assessing FEPs and scenarios in the safety cases. Geochemical indicators of hydrodynamic stability provide various categories of information that are of hydrogeological relevance. Information about groundwater mixing, flows and water sources is potentially provided by the total salinity of groundwaters, their contents of specific non-reactive solutes (principally chloride) and possibly of other solutes, the stable isotopic ratio of water, and certain characteristics of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions. Information pertaining directly to groundwater ages and the timing of water and solute movements is provided by isotopic systems including tritium, carbon-14, chlorine-36, stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, uranium isotopes and dissolved mobile gases in

  11. Adaptive control method for nonlinear time-delay processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Two complex properties,varying time-delay and block-oriented nonlinearity,are very common in chemical engineering processes and not easy to be controlled by routine control methods.Aimed at these two complex properties,a novel adaptive control algorithm the basis of nonlinear OFS(orthonormal functional series) model is proposed.First,the hybrid model which combines OFS and Volterra series is introduced.Then,a stable state feedback strategy is used to construct a nonlinear adaptive control algorithm that can guarantee the closed-loop stability and can track the set point curve without steady-state errors.Finally,control simulations and experiments on a nonlinear process with varying time-delay are presented.A number of experimental results validate the efficiency and superiority of this algorithm.

  12. Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Hahn; Thomas Anderson

    2005-04-01

    Traditionally, the primary focus of the chemical industry has been safety and productivity. However, recent threats to our nation’s critical infrastructure have prompted a tightening of security measures across many different industry sectors. Reducing vulnerabilities of control systems against physical and cyber attack is necessary to ensure the safety, security and effective functioning of these systems. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has developed a strategy to secure these vulnerabilities. Crucial to this strategy is the Control Systems Security and Test Center (CSSTC) established to test and analyze control systems equipment. In addition, the CSSTC promotes a proactive, collaborative approach to increase industry's awareness of standards, products and processes that can enhance the security of control systems. This paper outlines measures that can be taken to enhance the cybersecurity of process control systems in the chemical sector.

  13. Cognitive control modulates preferential sensory processing of affective stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Marco; Flaisch, Tobias; Meinzer, Marcus; Schupp, Harald T

    2016-10-01

    Adaptive human behavior crucially relies on the ability of the brain to allocate resources automatically to emotionally significant stimuli. This ability has consistently been demonstrated by studies showing preferential processing of affective stimuli in sensory cortical areas. It is still unclear, however, whether this putatively automatic mechanism can be modulated by cognitive control processes. Here, we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether preferential processing of an affective face distractor is suppressed when an affective distractor has previously elicited a response conflict in a word-face Stroop task. We analyzed this for three consecutive stages in the ventral stream of visual processing for which preferential processing of affective stimuli has previously been demonstrated: the striate area (BA 17), category-unspecific extrastriate areas (BA 18/19), and the fusiform face area (FFA). We found that response conflict led to a selective suppression of affective face processing in category-unspecific extrastriate areas and the FFA, and this effect was accompanied by changes in functional connectivity between these areas and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex. In contrast, preferential processing of affective face distractors was unaffected in the striate area. Our results indicate that cognitive control processes adaptively suppress preferential processing of affective stimuli under conditions where affective processing is detrimental because it elicits response conflict.

  14. Digital signal processing in power electronics control circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Sozanski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Many digital control circuits in current literature are described using analog transmittance. This may not always be acceptable, especially if the sampling frequency and power transistor switching frequencies are close to the band of interest. Therefore, a digital circuit is considered as a digital controller rather than an analog circuit. This helps to avoid errors and instability in high frequency components. Digital Signal Processing in Power Electronics Control Circuits covers problems concerning the design and realization of digital control algorithms for power electronics circuits using

  15. Adaptive Clutch Engaging Process Control for Automatic Mechanical Transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hai-ou; CHEN Hui-yan; DING Hua-rong; HE Zhong-bo

    2005-01-01

    Based on detail analysis of clutch engaging process control targets and adaptive demands, a control strategy which is based on speed signal, different from that of based on main clutch displacement signal, is put forward. It considers both jerk and slipping work which are the most commonly used quality evaluating indexes of vehicle starting phase. The adaptive control system and its reference model are discussed profoundly.Taking the adaptability to different starting gears and different road conditions as examples, some proving field test records are shown to illustrate the main clutch adaptive control strategy at starting phase. Proving field test gives acceptable results.

  16. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoek; Pim , Aristidou; Aristos , Rush; Brian

    2007-06-19

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  17. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoek, Pim; Aristidou, Aristos; Rush, Brian J.

    2016-08-30

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  18. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoek, Pim; Aristidou, Aristos; Rush, Brian

    2014-09-09

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  19. Flow manipulation and control methodologies for vacuum infusion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alms, Justin B.

    Vacuum Infusion Processes (VIPs) are very attractive composite manufacturing processes since large structures such as fuselages and wind blades can be fabricated in a cost effective manner. In VIPs, the fabric layers are placed on a one sided mold which is closed by enveloping the entire mold with a thin plastic film and evacuating the air out. The vacuum compresses the fabric and when a resin inlet is opened, resin flows into the mold. The resin is allowed to cure before demolding the structure. However, VIPs causes non-repeatable and problematic resin filling patterns due to the heterogeneous nature of the material, nesting between various layers, and the hand labor utilized for laying up the fabric. The design of the manufacturing process routinely involves a trial and error model which make manufacturing costs and development time difficult to estimate. The clear solution to improving the reliability and robustness of VIPs is to implement a system capable of on-line flow control. While on-line flow control has been studied and developed for other composite manufacturing processes, the VIPs have been largely ignored as there are few process parameters that lend themselves to effective flow control. In this work, two new processes were discovered with the goal of on-line control of VIPs in mind. These two processes referred to as Flow Flooding Chamber (FFC) and Vacuum Induced Preform Relaxation (VIPR) will be discussed. They both employ an external vacuum chamber to influence the permeability of the fabric temporarily which allows one to redirect the resin flow to resin starved regions of the mold. The VIPR process in addition uses a low and regulated vacuum pressure in the external chamber to increase the permeability of the fabric in a controllable manner. The objective is to understand how the VIPR process affects the resin flow in order to implement it into a complete flow control and automated environment which will reduce or eliminate the variability

  20. New Robust Nonlinear Controller Design Based on Predictive Control for Industrial Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Esfroghy

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new sliding mode controller based on predictive control is used for the first order system, which is a good model for the industrial process. In this method a developed predictive control is used to optimize the sliding mode control including sliding surface and switching function coefficient at every moment. A new smooth function is used to reduce the chattering problems. Simulation results show the high effectiveness of the proposed controller.