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Sample records for controlling flowering time

  1. Chemical control of flowering time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ionescu, Irina Alexandra; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Sánchez Pérez, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    the transition to flowering as well as flower opening. Increased emphasis on research within this area has the potential to counteract the negative effects of global warming on flowering time, especially in perennial crop plants. Perennial crops have a requirement for winter chill, but winters become...... increasingly warm in temperate regions. This has dramatic effects on crop yield. Different strategies are therefore being developed to engineer flowering time to match local growing conditions. The majority of these efforts are within plant breeding, which benefits from a substantial amount of knowledge...... on the genetic aspects of flowering time regulation in annuals, but less so in perennials. An alternative to plant breeding approaches is to engineer flowering time chemically via the external application of flower-inducing compounds. This review discusses a variety of exogenously applied compounds used in fruit...

  2. Gene control of flowering time in higher plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Flowering involves a transition process from vegetative growth to reproductive development, in which a series of routine changes take place in the shoot apical meristems from metabolic pathway to external phenotype. Expression of the genes related to flowering is the foundation for achieving the transition. Environmental factors (such as vernalization and photoperiod) and the growth status of cell itself induce the expression of the specific genes. A lot of achievements have been made recently in gene control for the determination of flowering time. The article reviews some new advances of such researches related to our work and the interesting field.

  3. Arabidopsis MSI1 functions in photoperiodic flowering time control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Yvonne; Hennig, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate timing of flowering is crucial for crop yield and the reproductive success of plants. Flowering can be induced by a number of molecular pathways that respond to internal and external signals such as photoperiod, vernalization or light quality, ambient temperature and biotic as well as abiotic stresses. The key florigenic signal FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) is regulated by several flowering activators, such as CONSTANS (CO), and repressors, such as FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Chromatin modifications are essential for regulated gene expression, which often involves the well conserved MULTICOPY SUPRESSOR OF IRA 1 (MSI1)-like protein family. MSI1-like proteins are ubiquitous partners of various complexes, such as POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX2 or CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTOR 1. In Arabidopsis, one of the functions of MSI1 is to control the switch to flowering. Arabidopsis MSI1 is needed for the correct expression of the floral integrator gene SUPPRESSOR OF CO 1 (SOC1). Here, we show that the histone-binding protein MSI1 acts in the photoperiod pathway to regulate normal expression of CO in long day (LD) photoperiods. Reduced expression of CO in msi1-mutants leads to failure of FT and SOC1 activation and to delayed flowering. MSI1 is needed for normal sensitivity of Arabidopsis to photoperiod, because msi1-mutants responded less than wild type to an intermittent LD treatment of plants grown in short days. Finally, genetic analysis demonstrated that MSI1 acts upstream of the CO-FT pathway to enable an efficient photoperiodic response and to induce flowering.

  4. Genetic control of flowering time in rice: integration of Mendelian genetics and genomics.

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    Hori, Kiyosumi; Matsubara, Kazuki; Yano, Masahiro

    2016-12-01

    Integration of previous Mendelian genetic analyses and recent molecular genomics approaches, such as linkage mapping and QTL cloning, dramatically strengthened our current understanding of genetic control of rice flowering time. Flowering time is one of the most important agronomic traits for seed production in rice (Oryza sativa L.). It is controlled mainly by genes associated with photoperiod sensitivity, particularly in short-day plants such as rice. Since the early twentieth century, rice breeders and researchers have been interested in elucidating the genetic basis of flowering time because its modification is important for regional adaptation and yield optimization. Although flowering time is a complex trait controlled by many quantitative trait loci (QTLs), classical genetic studies have shown that many associated genes are inherited in accordance with Mendelian laws. Decoding the rice genome sequence opened a new era in understanding the genetic control of flowering time on the basis of genome-wide mapping and gene cloning. Heading date 1 (Hd1) was the first flowering time QTL to be isolated using natural variation in rice. Recent accumulation of information on rice genome has facilitated the cloning of other QTLs, including those with minor effects on flowering time. This information has allowed us to rediscover some of the flowering genes that were identified by classical Mendelian genetics. The genes characterized so far, including Hd1, have been assigned to specific photoperiod pathways. In this review, we provide an overview of the studies that led to an in-depth understanding of the genetic control of flowering time in rice, and of the current state of improving and fine-tuning this trait for rice breeding.

  5. Micro-climatic controls and warming effects on flowering time in alpine snowbeds.

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    Carbognani, Michele; Bernareggi, Giulietta; Perucco, Francesco; Tomaselli, Marcello; Petraglia, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Alpine snowbed communities are among the habitats most threatened by climate change. The warmer temperature predicted, coupled with advanced snowmelt time, will influence flowering phenology, which is a key process in species adaptation to changing environmental conditions and plant population dynamics. However, we know little about the effects of changing micro-climate on flowering time in snowbeds and the mechanisms underlying such phenological responses. The flowering phenology of species inhabiting alpine snowbeds was assessed with weekly observations over five growing seasons. We analysed flowering time in relation to micro-climatic variation in snowmelt date, soil and air temperature, and experimental warming during the snow-free period. This approach allowed us to test hypotheses concerning the processes driving flowering phenology. The plants were finely tuned with inter-annual and intra-seasonal variations of their micro-climate, but species did not track the same micro-climatic feature to flower. At the growing-season time-scale, the air surrounding the plants was the most common trigger of the blooming period. However, at the annual time-scale, the snowmelt date was the main controlling factor for flowering time, even in warmer climate. Moreover, spatial patterns of the snowmelt influenced the developmental rate of the species because in later snowmelt sites the plants needed a lower level of heat accumulation to enter anthesis. Phenological responses to experimental warming differed among species, were proportional to the pre-flowering time-span of plants, and did not show consistent trends of change over time. Finally, warmer temperature produced an overall increase of flowering synchrony both within and among plant species.

  6. Enabling photoperiodic control of flowering by timely chromatin silencing of the florigen gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuehui

    2015-01-01

    Many plants synchronize their flowering times with changing seasons to maximize reproductive success. A key seasonal cue is the change in day length (photoperiod), that induces the production of a systemic flowering signaling molecule called florigen. A major florigen component is FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) or its orthologs. In the long-day plant Arabidopsis thaliana, FT expression is well known to be activated by the photoperiod pathway output specifically near dusk in long days; however, underappreciated is the importance of FT silencing at other times of the day, in enabling Arabidopsis to respond only to long days in flowering. We have recently reported that a plant-specific chromatin-silencing complex called EMF1c represses FT expression at times other than around dusk in long days to prevent its temporal ectopic expression from "spoiling" the long-day floral induction in Arabidopsis. Here I further discuss in other day-length sensitive plants the potential involvement of a chromatin mechanism similar to the Arabidopsis EMF1c-mediated silencing, in repressing the expression of FT orthologs to enable diverse photoperiodic control of flowering.

  7. Mediator subunit18 controls flowering time and floral organ identity in Arabidopsis.

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    Zhengui Zheng

    Full Text Available Mediator is a conserved multi-protein complex that plays an important role in regulating transcription by mediating interactions between transcriptional activator proteins and RNA polymerase II. Much evidence exists that Mediator plays a constitutive role in the transcription of all genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. However, evidence is mounting that specific Mediator subunits may control the developmental regulation of specific subsets of RNA polymerase II-dependent genes. Although the Mediator complex has been extensively studied in yeast and mammals, only a few reports on Mediator function in flowering time control of plants, little is known about Mediator function in floral organ identity. Here we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, MEDIATOR SUBUNIT 18 (MED18 affects flowering time and floral organ formation through FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC and AGAMOUS (AG. A MED18 loss-of-function mutant showed a remarkable syndrome of later flowering and altered floral organ number. We show that FLC and AG mRNA levels and AG expression patterns are altered in the mutant. Our results support parallels between the regulation of FLC and AG and demonstrate a developmental role for Mediator in plants.

  8. Flowering time: from photoperiodism to florigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H

    1998-09-24

    An Arabidopsis blue-light receptor, Cry2, has been found to play a critical role in the photoperiodic control of flowering time; and genes have been identified that may control the production of a transmissible flower-inducing signal, which may turn out to be the long-elusive putative flowering hormone 'florigen'.

  9. Interconnection between flowering time control and activation of systemic acquired resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Zeeshan Z; Nandi, Ashis K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to avoid or neutralize pathogens is inherent to all higher organisms including plants. Plants recognize pathogens through receptors, and mount resistance against the intruders, with the help of well-elaborated defense arsenal. In response to some localinfections, plants develop systemic acquired resistance (SAR), which provides heightened resistance during subsequent infections. Infected tissues generate mobile signaling molecules that travel to the systemic tissues, where they epigenetically modify expression o a set of genes to initiate the manifestation of SAR in distant tissues. Immune responses are largely regulated at transcriptional level. Flowering is a developmental transition that occurs as a result of the coordinated action of large numbers of transcription factors that respond to intrinsic signals and environmental conditions. The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) which is required for SAR activation positively regulates flowering. Certain components of chromatin remodeling complexes that are recruited for suppression of precocious flowering are also involved in suppression of SAR in healthy plants. FLOWERING LOCUS D, a putative histone demethylase positively regulates SAR manifestation and flowering transition in Arabidopsis. Similarly, incorporation of histone variant H2A.Z in nucleosomes mediated by PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING 1, an ortholog of yeast chromatin remodeling complex SWR1, concomitantly influences SAR and flowering time. SUMO conjugation and deconjugation mechanisms also similarly affect SAR and flowering in an SA-dependent manner. The evidences suggest a common underlying regulatory mechanism for activation of SAR and flowering in plants.

  10. Separate elements of the TERMINAL FLOWER 1 cis-regulatory region integrate pathways to control flowering time and shoot meristem identity.

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    Serrano-Mislata, Antonio; Fernández-Nohales, Pedro; Doménech, María J; Hanzawa, Yoshie; Bradley, Desmond; Madueño, Francisco

    2016-09-15

    TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1) is a key regulator of Arabidopsis plant architecture that responds to developmental and environmental signals to control flowering time and the fate of shoot meristems. TFL1 expression is dynamic, being found in all shoot meristems, but not in floral meristems, with the level and distribution changing throughout development. Using a variety of experimental approaches we have analysed the TFL1 promoter to elucidate its functional structure. TFL1 expression is based on distinct cis-regulatory regions, the most important being located 3' of the coding sequence. Our results indicate that TFL1 expression in the shoot apical versus lateral inflorescence meristems is controlled through distinct cis-regulatory elements, suggesting that different signals control expression in these meristem types. Moreover, we identified a cis-regulatory region necessary for TFL1 expression in the vegetative shoot and required for a wild-type flowering time, supporting that TFL1 expression in the vegetative meristem controls flowering time. Our study provides a model for the functional organisation of TFL1 cis-regulatory regions, contributing to our understanding of how developmental pathways are integrated at the genomic level of a key regulator to control plant architecture. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Association mapping of loci controlling genetic and environmental interaction of soybean flowering time under various photo-thermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Tingting; Li, Jinyu; Wen, Zixiang; Wu, Tingting; Wu, Cunxiang; Sun, Shi; Jiang, Bingjun; Hou, Wensheng; Li, Wenbin; Song, Qijian; Wang, Dechun; Han, Tianfu

    2017-05-26

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is a short day plant. Its flowering and maturity time are controlled by genetic and environmental factors, as well the interaction between the two factors. Previous studies have shown that both genetic and environmental factors, mainly photoperiod and temperature, control flowering time of soybean. Additionally, these studies have reported gene × gene and gene × environment interactions on flowering time. However, the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTL) in response to photoperiod and temperature have not been well evaluated. The objectives of the current study were to identify the effects of loci associated with flowering time under different photo-thermal conditions and to understand the effects of interaction between loci and environment on soybean flowering. Different photoperiod and temperature combinations were obtained by adjusting sowing dates (spring sowing and summer sowing) or day-length (12 h, 16 h). Association mapping was performed on 91 soybean cultivars from different maturity groups (MG000-VIII) using 172 SSR markers and 5107 SNPs from the Illumina SoySNP6K iSelectBeadChip. The effects of the interaction between QTL and environments on flowering time were also analysed using the QTXNetwork. Large-effect loci were detected on Gm 11, Gm 16 and Gm 20 as in previous reports. Most loci associated with flowering time are sensitive to photo-thermal conditions. Number of loci associated with flowering time was more under the long day (LD) than under the short day (SD) condition. The variation of flowering time among the soybean cultivars mostly resulted from the epistasis × environment and additive × environment interactions. Among the three candidate loci, i.e. Gm04_4497001 (near GmCOL3a), Gm16_30766209 (near GmFT2a and GmFT2b) and Gm19_47514601 (E3 or GmPhyA3), the Gm04_4497001 may be the key locus interacting with other loci for controlling soybean flowering time. The effects of loci associated

  12. Identification of Soybean Genes Involved in Circadian Clock Mechanism and Photoperiodic Control of Flowering Time by In Silico Analyses Flowering Time by In Silico Analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Glycine max is a photoperiodic short-day plant and the practical consequence of the response is latitude and sowing period limitations to commercial crops.Genetic and physiological studies using the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa)have uncovered several genes and genetic pathways controlling the process,however information about the corresponding pathways in legumes is scarce.Data mining prediction methodologies,Including multiple sequence alignment,phylogenetic analysis,bioinformatics expression and sequence motif pattern identification were used to identify soybean genes involved In day length perception and photoperiodic flowering induction.We have investigated approximately 330 000 sequences from open-access databases and have identified all bona fide central oscillator genes and circadian photoreceptors from A.thaliana in soybean sequence databases.We propose e working model for the photoperiodic control of flowering time in G.max,based on the identified key components.These results demonstrate the power of comparative genomics between model systems and crop species to elucidate the several aspects of plant physiology and metabolism.

  13. Poppy APETALA1/FRUITFULL orthologs control flowering time, branching, perianth identity, and fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabón-Mora, Natalia; Ambrose, Barbara A; Litt, Amy

    2012-04-01

    Several MADS box gene lineages involved in flower development have undergone duplications that correlate with the diversification of large groups of flowering plants. In the APETALA1 gene lineage, a major duplication coincides with the origin of the core eudicots, resulting in the euFUL and the euAP1 clades. Arabidopsis FRUITFULL (FUL) and APETALA1 (AP1) function redundantly in specifying floral meristem identity but function independently in sepal and petal identity (AP1) and in proper fruit development and determinacy (FUL). Many of these functions are largely conserved in other core eudicot euAP1 and euFUL genes, but notably, the role of APETALA1 as an "A-function" (sepal and petal identity) gene is thought to be Brassicaceae specific. Understanding how functional divergence of the core eudicot duplicates occurred requires a careful examination of the function of preduplication (FUL-like) genes. Using virus-induced gene silencing, we show that FUL-like genes in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and California poppy (Eschscholzia californica) function in axillary meristem growth and in floral meristem and sepal identity and that they also play a key role in fruit development. Interestingly, in opium poppy, these genes also control flowering time and petal identity, suggesting that AP1/FUL homologs might have been independently recruited in petal identity. Because the FUL-like gene functional repertoire encompasses all roles previously described for the core eudicot euAP1 and euFUL genes, we postulate subfunctionalization as the functional outcome after the major AP1/FUL gene lineage duplication event.

  14. Flower Development and Photoperiodic Control of Flowering in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Chao; QU Li-jun; GAO Yong-ming; SHI Ying-yao

    2013-01-01

    Floral transition,which is referred to as a plant's transition from vegetative stage to reproductive stage,is considered to be a critical developmental switch in higher plants,for a timely flowering is a major factor of reproductive success.Endogenous and environmental cues,such as photoperiod,light quality,plant hormones concentrations and temperature,provide information to the plants whether the environment is favorable for flowering.These cues promote,or prevent,flowering through a complex genetic network,mediated by a careful orchestration of temporal and spatial gene expression.One of such cues is photoperiod.Rice (Oryza sativa L.) serves as a powerful model species for the understanding of flowering in higher plants,including flower development and photoperiodic control of flowering.In this review,we overviewed and discussed the flower development and its model.We also overviewed the photoperiodic pathways in rice flowering control,and summarized the pathways at molecular level.

  15. Genetic analyses of interactions among gibberellin, abscisic acid, and brassinosteroids in the control of flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata A Domagalska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic interactions between phytohormones in the control of flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana have not been extensively studied. Three phytohormones have been individually connected to the floral-timing program. The inductive function of gibberellins (GAs is the most documented. Abscisic acid (ABA has been demonstrated to delay flowering. Finally, the promotive role of brassinosteroids (BRs has been established. It has been reported that for many physiological processes, hormone pathways interact to ensure an appropriate biological response. METHODOLOGY: We tested possible genetic interactions between GA-, ABA-, and BR-dependent pathways in the control of the transition to flowering. For this, single and double mutants deficient in the biosynthesis of GAs, ABA, and BRs were used to assess the effect of hormone deficiency on the timing of floral transition. Also, plants that over-express genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes in each biosynthetic pathway were generated and the flowering time of these lines was investigated. CONCLUSIONS: Loss-of-function studies revealed a complex relationship between GAs and ABA, and between ABA and BRs, and suggested a cross-regulatory relation between GAs to BRs. Gain-of-function studies revealed that GAs were clearly limiting in their sufficiency of action, whereas increases in BRs and ABA led to a more modest phenotypic effect on floral timing. We conclude from our genetic tests that the effects of GA, ABA, and BR on timing of floral induction are only in partially coordinated action.

  16. The MADS-domain protein MPF1 of Physalis floridana controls plant architecture, seed development and flowering time.

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    He, Chaoying; Tian, Ying; Saedler, Rainer; Efremova, Nadia; Riss, Simone; Khan, Muhammad Ramzan; Yephremov, Alexander; Saedler, Heinz

    2010-02-01

    Floral and vegetative development of plants is dependent on the combinatorial action of MADS-domain transcription factors. Members of the STMADS11 subclade, such as MPF1 of Physalis, are abundantly expressed in leaves as well as in floral organs, but their function is not yet clear. Our studies with transgenic Arabidopsis that over-express MPF1 suggest that MPF1 interacts with SOC1 to determine flowering time. However, MPF1 RNAi-mediated knockdown Physalis plants revealed a complex phenotype with changes in flowering time, plant architecture and seed size. Flowering of these plants was delayed by about 20% as compared to wild type. Expression of PFLFY is upregulated in the MPF1 RNAi lines, while PFFT and MPF3 genes are strongly repressed. MPF1 interacts with a subset of MADS-domain factors, namely with PFSOC1 in planta, and with PFSEP3 and PFFUL in yeast, supporting a regulatory role for this protein in flowering. The average size of seeds produced by the transgenic MPF1 RNAi plants is increased almost twofold. The height of these plants is also increased about twofold, but most axillary buds are stunted when compared to controls. Taken together, this suggests that members of the STMADS11 subclade act as positive regulators of flowering but have diverse functions in plant growth.

  17. Characterization of a new mutant allele of the Arabidopsis Flowering Locus D (FLD) gene that controls the flowering time by repressing FLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ruiqiang; ZHANG Suzhi; SUN Shulan; CHANG Jianhong; ZUO Jianru

    2005-01-01

    Flowering in higher plants is controlled by both the internal and environmental cues. In Arabidopsis, several major genetic loci have been defined as the key switches to control flowering. The Flowering Locus C (FLC) gene has been shown in the autonomous pathway to inhibit the vegetative-to-reproductive transition. FLC appears to be repressed by Flowering Locus D (FLD), which encodes a component of the histone deacetylase complex. Here we report the identification and characterization of a new mutant allele fld-5. Genetic analysis indicates that fld-5 (in the Wassilewskija background) is allelic to the previously characterized fld-3 and fld-4 (in the Colombia-0 background). Genetic and molecular analyses reveal that fld-5 carries a frame-shift mutation, resulting in a premature termination of the FLD open reading frame. The FLC expression is remarkably increased in fld-5, which presumably attributes to the extremely delayed flowering phenotype of the mutant.

  18. Identification of successive flowering phases highlights a new genetic control of the flowering pattern in strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotte, Justine; Guédon, Yann; Gaston, Amèlia; Denoyes, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    The genetic control of the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering has been deciphered in various perennial species. However, little is known about the genetic control of the dynamics of perpetual flowering, which changes abruptly at well-defined time instants during the growing season. Here, we characterize the perpetual flowering pattern and identify new genetic controls of this pattern in the cultivated strawberry. Twenty-one perpetual flowering strawberry genotypes were phenotyped at the macroscopic scale for their course of emergence of inflorescences and stolons during the growing season. A longitudinal analysis based on the segmentation of flowering rate profiles using multiple change-point models was conducted. The flowering pattern of perpetual flowering genotypes takes the form of three or four successive phases: an autumn-initiated flowering phase, a flowering pause, and a single stationary perpetual flowering phase or two perpetual flowering phases, the second one being more intense. The genetic control of flowering was analysed by quantitative trait locus mapping of flowering traits based on these flowering phases. We showed that the occurrence of a fourth phase of intense flowering is controlled by a newly identified locus, different from the locus FaPFRU, controlling the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering behaviour. The role of this locus was validated by the analysis of data obtained previously during six consecutive years. PMID:27664957

  19. Identification of successive flowering phases highlights a new genetic control of the flowering pattern in strawberry.

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    Perrotte, Justine; Guédon, Yann; Gaston, Amèlia; Denoyes, Béatrice

    2016-10-01

    The genetic control of the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering has been deciphered in various perennial species. However, little is known about the genetic control of the dynamics of perpetual flowering, which changes abruptly at well-defined time instants during the growing season. Here, we characterize the perpetual flowering pattern and identify new genetic controls of this pattern in the cultivated strawberry. Twenty-one perpetual flowering strawberry genotypes were phenotyped at the macroscopic scale for their course of emergence of inflorescences and stolons during the growing season. A longitudinal analysis based on the segmentation of flowering rate profiles using multiple change-point models was conducted. The flowering pattern of perpetual flowering genotypes takes the form of three or four successive phases: an autumn-initiated flowering phase, a flowering pause, and a single stationary perpetual flowering phase or two perpetual flowering phases, the second one being more intense. The genetic control of flowering was analysed by quantitative trait locus mapping of flowering traits based on these flowering phases. We showed that the occurrence of a fourth phase of intense flowering is controlled by a newly identified locus, different from the locus FaPFRU, controlling the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering behaviour. The role of this locus was validated by the analysis of data obtained previously during six consecutive years.

  20. Hd18, Encoding Histone Acetylase Related to Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS D, is Involved in the Control of Flowering Time in Rice.

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    Shibaya, Taeko; Hori, Kiyosumi; Ogiso-Tanaka, Eri; Yamanouchi, Utako; Shu, Koka; Kitazawa, Noriyuki; Shomura, Ayahiko; Ando, Tsuyu; Ebana, Kaworu; Wu, Jianzhong; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Yano, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    Flowering time is one of the most important agronomic traits in rice (Oryza sativa L.), because it defines harvest seasons and cultivation areas, and affects yields. We used a map-based strategy to clone Heading date 18 (Hd18). The difference in flowering time between the Japanese rice cultivars Koshihikari and Hayamasari was due to a single nucleotide polymorphism within the Hd18 gene, which encodes an amine oxidase domain-containing protein and is homologous to Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS D (FLD). The Hayamasari Hd18 allele and knockdown of Hd18 gene expression delayed the flowering time of rice plants regardless of the day-length condition. Structural modeling of the Hd18 protein suggested that the non-synonymous substitution changed protein stability and function due to differences in interdomain hydrogen bond formation. Compared with those in Koshihikari, the expression levels of the flowering-time genes Early heading date 1 (Ehd1), Heading date 3a (Hd3a) and Rice flowering locus T1 (RFT1) were lower in a near-isogenic line with the Hayamasari Hd18 allele in a Koshihikari genetic background. We revealed that Hd18 acts as an accelerator in the rice flowering pathway under both short- and long-day conditions by elevating transcription levels of Ehd1 Gene expression analysis also suggested the involvement of MADS-box genes such as OsMADS50, OsMADS51 and OsMADS56 in the Hd18-associated regulation of Ehd1 These results suggest that, like FLD, its rice homolog accelerates flowering time but is involved in rice flowering pathways that differ from the autonomous pathways in Arabidopsis.

  1. "Missing" G x E Variation Controls Flowering Time in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Sasaki, Eriko; Zhang, Pei; Atwell, Susanna; Meng, Dazhe; Nordborg, Magnus

    2015-10-01

    Understanding how genetic variation interacts with the environment is essential for understanding adaptation. In particular, the life cycle of plants is tightly coordinated with local environmental signals through complex interactions with the genetic variation (G x E). The mechanistic basis for G x E is almost completely unknown. We collected flowering time data for 173 natural inbred lines of Arabidopsis thaliana from Sweden under two growth temperatures (10°C and 16°C), and observed massive G x E variation. To identify the genetic polymorphisms underlying this variation, we conducted genome-wide scans using both SNPs and local variance components. The SNP-based scan identified several variants that had common effects in both environments, but found no trace of G x E effects, whereas the scan using local variance components found both. Furthermore, the G x E effects appears to be concentrated in a small fraction of the genome (0.5%). Our conclusion is that G x E effects in this study are mostly due to large numbers of allele or haplotypes at a small number of loci, many of which correspond to previously identified flowering time genes.

  2. Maternal temperature history activates Flowering Locus T in fruits to control progeny dormancy according to time of year.

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    Chen, Min; MacGregor, Dana R; Dave, Anuja; Florance, Hannah; Moore, Karen; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Graham, Ian A; Penfield, Steven

    2014-12-30

    Seasonal behavior is important for fitness in temperate environments but it is unclear how progeny gain their initial seasonal entrainment. Plants use temperature signals to measure time of year, and changes to life histories are therefore an important consequence of climate change. Here we show that in Arabidopsis the current and prior temperature experience of the mother plant is used to control germination of progeny seeds, via the activation of the florigen Flowering Locus T (FT) in fruit tissues. We demonstrate that maternal past and current temperature experience are transduced to the FT locus in silique phloem. In turn, FT controls seed dormancy through inhibition of proanthocyanidin synthesis in fruits, resulting in altered seed coat tannin content. Our data reveal that maternal temperature history is integrated through FT in the fruit to generate a metabolic signal that entrains the behavior of progeny seeds according to time of year.

  3. The Arabidopsis CstF64-Like RSR1/ESP1 Protein Participates in Glucose Signaling and Flowering Time Control

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    Funck, Dietmar; Clauß, Karen; Frommer, Wolf B.; Hellmann, Hanjo A.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms for sensing and regulating metabolic processes at the cellular level are critical for the general physiology and development of living organisms. In higher plants, sugar signaling is crucial for adequate regulation of carbon and energy metabolism and affects virtually every aspect of development. Although many genes are regulated by sugar levels, little is known on how sugar levels are measured by plants. Several components of the sugar signaling network have been unraveled and demonstrated to have extensive overlap with hormone signaling networks. Here we describe the reduced sugar response1-1 (rsr1-1) mutant as a new early flowering mutant that displays decreased sensitivity to abscisic acid. Both hexokinase1 (HXK1)-dependent and glucose phosphorylation-independent signaling is reduced in rsr1-1. Map-based identification of the affected locus demonstrated that rsr1-1 carries a premature stop codon in the gene for a CstF64-like putative RNA processing factor, ESP1, which is involved in mRNA 3′-end formation. The identification of RSR1/ESP1 as a nuclear protein with a potential threonine phosphorylation site may explain the impact of protein phosphorylation cascades on sugar-dependent signal transduction. Additionally, RSR1/ESP1 may be a crucial factor in linking sugar signaling to the control of flowering time. PMID:22629280

  4. The Arabidopsis CstF64-like RSR1/ESP1 protein participates in glucose signaling and flowering time control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar eFunck

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms for sensing and regulating metabolic processes at the cellular level are critical for the general physiology and development of living organisms. In higher plants, sugar signaling is crucial for adequate regulation of carbon and energy metabolism and affects virtually every aspect of development. Although many genes are regulated by sugar levels, little is known on how sugar levels are measured by plants. Several components of the sugar signaling network have been unraveled and demonstrated to have extensive overlap with hormone signaling networks. Here we describe the reduced sugar response1-1 (rsr1-1 mutant as a new early flowering mutant that displays decreased sensitivity to abscisic acid. Both Hexokinase1 (HXK1-dependent and glucose phosphorylation-independent signaling is reduced in rsr1-1. Map-based identification of the affected locus demonstrated that rsr1-1 carries a premature stop codon in the gene for a CstF64-like putative RNA processing factor, ESP1, which is involved in mRNA 3’-end formation. The identification of RSR1/ESP1 as a nuclear phosphoprotein may explain the impact of protein phosphorylation cascades on sugar-dependent signal transduction. Additionally, RSR1/ESP1 may be a crucial factor in linking sugar signaling to the control of flowering time.

  5. VASCULAR PLANT ONE-ZINC FINGER1 and VOZ2 repress the FLOWERING LOCUS C clade members to control flowering time in Arabidopsis.

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    Yasui, Yukiko; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Floral transition is regulated by environmental and endogenous signals. Previously, we identified VASCULAR PLANT ONE-ZINC FINGER1 (VOZ1) and VOZ2 as phytochrome B-interacting factors. VOZ1 and VOZ2 redundantly promote flowering and have pivotal roles in the downregulation of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a central repressor of flowering in Arabidopsis. Here, we showed that the late-flowering phenotypes of the voz1 voz2 mutant were suppressed by vernalization in the Columbia and FRIGIDA (FRI)-containing accessions, which indicates that the late-flowering phenotype of voz1 voz2 mutants was caused by upregulation of FLC. We also showed that the other FLC clade members, MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING (MAF) genes, were also a downstream target of VOZ1 and VOZ2 as their expression levels were also increased in the voz1 voz2 mutant. Our results suggest that the FLC clade genes integrate signals from VOZ1/VOZ2 and vernalization to regulate flowering.

  6. Control of the first flowering in forest trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalupka, W. [Inst. od Dendrology, Kornik (Poland); Cecich, R.A. [U.S.D.A.-Forest Service, Columbia, MO (United States). North Central Forest Experiment Station

    1997-04-01

    Precocious flowering provides opportunities to shorten a breeding cycle. A tree may flower for the first time when sufficient crown development has occurred and there are enough meristems to support both vegetative and reproductive buds. Precocious flowering can be promoted through the use of cultural techniques, such as photoperiod, accelerated growth, gibberellins and water stress. The length of the juvenile phase is dependent on genetic and environmental variables that affect achievement of a minimum size, and is positively correlated with the height of the plants within a family. Selection pressure can be applied successfully to the precocious flowering character, and crossed or inbred lines of precocious flowering progeny can be developed. Various levels and amounts of genetic control have been implicated in the control of precocious flowering. 90 refs, 1 tab

  7. CmFTL2 is involved in the photoperiod- and sucrose-mediated control of flowering time in chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Wang, Heng; Ren, Liping; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi; Jiang, Jiafu

    2017-01-01

    The chrysanthemum genome harbors three FT-like genes: CmFTL1 and CmFTL3 are thought to act as regulators of floral induction under long-day (LD) and short-day (SD) conditions, respectively, whereas the function of CmFTL2 is currently unclear. The objective of the present research was to explore the function of CmFTL2 in the determination of flowering time of the photo-insensitive chrysanthemum cultivar 'Floral Yuuka', both in response to variation in the photoperiod and to the exogenous provision of sucrose. Spraying leaves of 'Floral Yuuka' plants with 50 mM sucrose accelerated flowering and increased the level of CmFTL2 transcription in the leaf more strongly than either CmFTL1 or FTL3 under both long and SD conditions. Transcription profiling indicated that all three CmFTL genes were upregulated during floral induction. The relationship of the CmFTL2 sequence with that of other members of the PEBP family suggested that its product contributes to the florigen rather than to the anti-florigen complex. The heterologous expression of CmFTL2 in the Arabidopsis thaliana ft-10 mutant rescued the mutant phenotype, showing that CmFTL2 could compensate for the absence of FT. These results suggest that CmFTL2 acts as a regulator of floral transition and responds to both the photoperiod and sucrose.

  8. A major gene for time of flowering in chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J; van Rheenen, H A

    2000-01-01

    A major gene for the number of days from sowing to appearance of the first flower (time of flowering) was identified in a cross between an extrashort duration chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) variety, ICCV 2, and a medium duration variety, JG 62. The F2 population was advanced through the single-seed-descent method to develop random recombinant inbred lines (RILs). Time of flowering was recorded for the parents and 66 F(6) RILs from this cross that were grown in a Vertisol field in the post-rainy season of 1996-1997. Similarly the parents, F(1) and F(10) RILs were evaluated in 1997-1998. The F(1) flowered along with JG 62. The time of flowering for the two sets of RILs showed bimodal distributions with nearly equal peaks. One peak corresponded with ICCV 2 and the other with JG 62. This suggests that a single gene controls the difference for the time of flowering between ICCV 2 and JG 62 and the allele carried by the latter parent is dominant. To our knowledge no gene has been identified for the time of flowering in chickpea. Therefore the allele carried by JG 62 is designated as Efl-1 and that by ICCV 2 as efl-1. The proposed genotype for ICCV 2 is efl-1 efl-1 and for JG 62 is Efl-1 Efl-1. The genotype efl-1 efl-1 reduces the time of flowering at ICRISAT by nearly 3 weeks. The significance of this gene for breeding for early maturity and genome mapping has been discussed.

  9. Timing of Photoperiodic Flowering:Light Perception and Circadian Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Zhou; Xiao-Dong Sun; Min Ni

    2007-01-01

    Flowering symbolizes the transition of a plant from vegetative phase to reproductive phase and is controlled by fairly complex and highly coordinated regulatory pathways. Over the last decade, genetic studies in Arabidopsis have aided the discovery of many signaling components involved in these pathways. In this review, we discuss how the timing of flowering is regulated by photoperiod and the involvement of light perception and the circadian clock in this process. The specific regulatory mechanisms on CONSTANS expression and CONSTANS stability by the circadian clock and photoreceptors are described in detail. In addition, the roles of CONSTANS, FLOWERING LOCUS T, and several other light signaling and circadiandependent components in photoperiodic flowering are also highlighted.

  10. Genetic architecture of flowering time variation in Brachypodium distachyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transition to reproductive development is a crucial step of a plant’s life cycle, and the timing of this transition is an important factor in crop yields. Here, we report new insights into the genetic control of natural variation in flowering time in Brachypodium distachyon, a non-domesticated c...

  11. Genome-wide analyses of the transcriptomes of salicylic acid-deficient versus wild-type plants uncover Pathogen and Circadian Controlled 1 (PCC1) as a regulator of flowering time in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, Silvia; Mir, Ricardo; Martínez, Cristina; León, José

    2010-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been characterized as an activator of pathogen-triggered resistance of plants. SA also regulates developmental processes such as thermogenesis in floral organs and stress-induced flowering. To deepen our knowledge of the mechanism underlying SA regulation of flowering time in Arabidopsis, we compared the transcriptomes of SA-deficient late flowering genotypes with wild-type plants. Down- or up-regulated genes in SA-deficient plants were screened for responsiveness to ultraviolet (UV)-C light, which accelerates flowering in Arabidopsis. Among them, only Pathogen and Circadian Controlled 1 (PCC1) was up-regulated by UV-C light through a SA-dependent process. Moreover, UV-C light-activated expression of PCC1 was also dependent on the flowering activator CONSTANS (CO). PCC1 gene has a circadian-regulated developmental pattern of expression with low transcript levels after germination that increased abruptly by day 10. RNAi plants with very low expression of PCC1 gene were late flowering, defective in UV-C light acceleration of flowering and contained FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) transcript levels below 5% of that detected in wild-type plants. Although PCC1 seems to function between CO and FT in the photoperiod-dependent flowering pathway, transgenic plants overexpressing a Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR)-fused version of CO strongly activated FT but not PCC1 after dexamethasone treatment.

  12. Photoperiodic flowering: time measurement mechanisms in leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Hun; Shim, Jae Sung; Kinmonth-Schultz, Hannah A; Imaizumi, Takato

    2015-01-01

    Many plants use information about changing day length (photoperiod) to align their flowering time with seasonal changes to increase reproductive success. A mechanism for photoperiodic time measurement is present in leaves, and the day-length-specific induction of the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene, which encodes florigen, is a major final output of the pathway. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which photoperiodic information is perceived in order to trigger FT expression in Arabidopsis as well as in the primary cereals wheat, barley, and rice. In these plants, the differences in photoperiod are measured by interactions between circadian-clock-regulated components, such as CONSTANS (CO), and light signaling. The interactions happen under certain day-length conditions, as previously predicted by the external coincidence model. In these plants, the coincidence mechanisms are governed by multilayered regulation with numerous conserved as well as unique regulatory components, highlighting the breadth of photoperiodic regulation across plant species.

  13. Candidate Gene Identification of Flowering Time Genes in Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrinne E. Grover

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Flowering time control is critically important to all sexually reproducing angiosperms in both natural ecological and agronomic settings. Accordingly, there is much interest in defining the genes involved in the complex flowering-time network and how these respond to natural and artificial selection, the latter often entailing transitions in day-length responses. Here we describe a candidate gene analysis in the cotton genus , which uses homologs from the well-described flowering network to bioinformatically and phylogenetically identify orthologs in the published genome sequence from Ulbr., one of the two model diploid progenitors of the commercially important allopolyploid cottons, L. and L. Presence and patterns of expression were evaluated from 13 aboveground tissues related to flowering for each of the candidate genes using allopolyploid as a model. Furthermore, we use a comparative context to determine copy number variability of each key gene family across 10 published angiosperm genomes. Data suggest a pattern of repeated loss of duplicates following ancient whole-genome doubling events in diverse lineages. The data presented here provide a foundation for understanding both the parallel evolution of day-length neutrality in domesticated cottons and the flowering-time network, in general, in this important crop plant.

  14. Photoperiod and cold night temperature in control of flowering in Kalanchoë

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes Coelho, Lívia; Kuligowska, Katarzyna; Lütken, Henrik Vlk

    2015-01-01

    Kalanchoë species and cultivars are produced as ornamental plants in many places in the world. The genus contains around 140 species comprising significant morphological variation, however, the number of species used for breeding is limited due to lack of knowledge of e.g., flower inducing factors....... Having both parental plants flowering at the same time is vital for croßpollination; therefore, it is of significant importance to be able to control flowering time of the species of interest. The objective of this study was to control flower induction in K. marmorata and K. longiflora. K. prittwitzii...... was used as control species to validate treatments that consisted of combining short day photoperiod (8 h) and different night temperature (18, 12 and 6C). While K. prittwitzii had 100% flowering for all treatments, K. marmorata only flowered at 12C (33% plants flowering) and 6C (25% plants flowering...

  15. Time to flower: interplay between photoperiod and the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Mikael; Staiger, Dorothee

    2015-02-01

    Plants precisely time the onset of flowering to ensure reproductive success. A major factor in seasonal control of flowering time is the photoperiod. The length of the daily light period is measured by the circadian clock in leaves, and a signal is conveyed to the shoot apex to initiate floral transition accordingly. In the last two decades, the molecular players in the photoperiodic pathway have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, the intricate connections between the circadian clockwork and components of the photoperiodic pathway have been unravelled. In particular, the molecular basis of time-of-day-dependent sensitivity to floral stimuli, as predicted by Bünning and Pittendrigh, has been elucidated. This review covers recent insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying clock regulation of photoperiodic responses and the integration of the photoperiodic pathway into the flowering time network in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, examples of conservation and divergence in photoperiodic flower induction in other plant species are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Control of the Transition to Flowering by Chromatin Modifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuehui He

    2009-01-01

    The timing of floral transition is critical to reproductive success in angiosperms and is genetically controlled by a network of flowering genes.In Arabidopsis,expression of certain flowering genes is regulated by various chromatin modifications,among which are two central regulators of flowering,namely FLOWERING LOCUS C(FLC) and FLOWERING LOCUS T(FT).Recent studies have revealed that a number of chromatin-modifying components are involved in activation or repression of FLC expression.Activation of FLC expression is associated with various 'active' chromatin modifications including acetylation of core histone tails,histone H3 lysine-4 (H3K4) methylation,H2B monoubiquitination,H3 lysine-36 (H3K36) di- and tri-methylation and deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z,whereas various 'repressive' histone modifications are associated with FLC repression,including histone deacetylation,H3K4 demethylation,histone H3 lysine-9(H3Kg) and H3 lysine-27 (H3K27) methylation,and histone arginine methylation.In addition,recent studies have revealed that Polycomb group gene-mediated transcriptional-silencing mechanism not only represses FLC expression,but also directly represses FT expression.Regulation of FLC expression provides a paradigm for control of the expression of other developmental genes in plants through chromatin mechanisms.

  17. Transcription factor PIF4 controls the thermosensory activation of flowering

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S. Vinod

    2012-03-21

    Plant growth and development are strongly affected by small differences in temperature. Current climate change has already altered global plant phenology and distribution, and projected increases in temperature pose a significant challenge to agriculture. Despite the important role of temperature on plant development, the underlying pathways are unknown. It has previously been shown that thermal acceleration of flowering is dependent on the florigen, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). How this occurs is, however, not understood, because the major pathway known to upregulate FT, the photoperiod pathway, is not required for thermal acceleration of flowering. Here we demonstrate a direct mechanism by which increasing temperature causes the bHLH transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) to activate FT. Our findings provide a new understanding of how plants control their timing of reproduction in response to temperature. Flowering time is an important trait in crops as well as affecting the life cycles of pollinator species. A molecular understanding of how temperature affects flowering will be important for mitigating the effects of climate change. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthetic control of flowering in rice independent of the cultivation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ryo; Nemoto, Yasue; Endo-Higashi, Naokuni; Izawa, Takeshi

    2017-03-27

    For genetically homogeneous crops, the timing of flowering is determined largely by the cultivation environment and is strongly associated with the yield and quality of the harvest(1). Flowering time and other agronomical traits are often tightly correlated, which can lead to difficulty excluding the effects of flowering time when evaluating the characteristics of different genetic varieties(2). Here, we describe the development of transgenic rice plants whose flowering time can be controlled by specific agrochemicals. We first developed non-flowering rice plants by overexpressing a floral repressor gene, Grain number, plant height and heading date 7 (Ghd7)(3,4), to inhibit any environmentally induced spontaneous flowering. We then co-transformed plants with a rice florigen gene, Heading date 3a (Hd3a)(5), which is induced by the application of specific agrochemicals. This permitted the flowering time to be experimentally controlled regardless of the cultivation environment: some transgenic plants flowered only after agrochemical treatment. Furthermore, plant size and yield-related traits could, in some cases, be increased owing to both a longer duration of vegetative growth and an increased panicle size. This ability to control flowering time experimentally, independently of environmental variables, may lead to production of crops suitable for growth in different climates and facilitate breeding for various agronomical traits.

  19. Impact of light intensity on flowering time and plant quality of Antirrhinum majus L.cultivar Chimes White

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MUNIR Muhammad; JAMIL Muhammad; BALOCH Jalal-ud-din; KHATTAK Khalid Rehman

    2004-01-01

    Shades of different light intensities (29%, 43%, 54%, 60% or 68%) along with control (no shade) were studied to observe their effects on the flowering time and plant quality. A hyperbolic relationship was observed between different light intensities under shade, and time to flowering. The total number of flower buds showed a curvilinear relationship with light intensities. Growth parameters related to the plant characteristics such as plant height, leaf area and plant fresh weight were improved under shading treatments at the expense of flowering time and number of flower buds. However, both linear and polynomial models applied assumed that cultivar Chimes White was equally sensitive to light intensity throughout development.

  20. Isolation and functional analysis of CONSTANS-LIKE genes suggests that a central role for CONSTANS in flowering time control is not evolutionarily conserved in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert eWong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The zinc finger transcription factor CONSTANS has a well-established central role in the mechanism for photoperiod sensing in Arabidopsis, integrating light and circadian clock signals to upregulate the florigen gene FT under long-day but not short-day conditions. Although CONSTANS-like (COL genes in other species have also been shown to regulate flowering time, it is not clear how widely this central role in photoperiod sensing is conserved.Legumes are a major plant group and various legume species show significant natural variation for photoperiod responsive flowering. Orthologs of several Arabidopsis genes have been shown to participate in photoperiodic flowering in legumes, but the possible function of COL genes as integrators of the photoperiod response has not yet been examined in detail. Here we characterize the COL family in the temperate long-day legume Medicago truncatula, using expression analyses, reverse genetics, transient activation assays and Arabidopsis transformation. Our results provide several lines of evidence suggesting that COL genes are unlikely to have a central role in the photoperiod response mechanism in this species.

  1. Association mapping of flowering time QTLs and insight into their contributions to rapeseed growth habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nian eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plants have developed sophisticated systems to adapt to local conditions during evolution, domestication and natural or artificial selection. The selective pressures of these different growing conditions have caused significant genomic divergence within species. The flowering time trait is the most crucial factor because it helps plants to maintain sustainable development. Controlling flowering at appropriate times can also prevent plants from suffering from adverse growth conditions, such as drought, winter hardness, and disease. Hence, discovering the genome-wide genetic mechanisms that influence flowering time variations and understanding their contributions to adaptation should be a central goal of plant genetics and genomics. A global core collection panel with 448 inbred rapeseed lines was first planted in four independent environments, and their flowering time traits were evaluated. We then performed a genome-wide association mapping of flowering times with a 60 K SNP array for this core collection. With quality control and filtration, 20,342 SNP markers were ultimately used for further analyses. In total, 312 SNPs showed marker-trait associations in all four environments, and they were based on a threshold p value of 4.06x10-4; the 40 QTLs showed significant association with flowering time variations. To explore flowering time QTLs and genes related to growth habits in rapeseed, selection signals related to divergent habits were screened at the genome-wide level and 117 genomic regions were found. Comparing locations of flowering time QTLs and genes with these selection regions revealed that 20 flowering time QTLs and 224 flowering time genes overlapped with 24 and 81 selected regions, respectively. Based on this study, a number of marker-trait associations and candidate genes for flowering time variations in rapeseed were revealed. Moreover, we also showed that both flowering time QTLs and genes play important roles in rapeseed growth

  2. Research progress of photoperiod regulated genes on flowering time in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyan, Kong; Shoujun, Chen; Liguo, Zhou; Huan, Gao; Lijun, Luo; Zaochang, Liu

    2016-06-20

    Rice flowering regulation is an extremely complex process, which is controlled by genetic factors and external environment. Photoperiodic regulatory pathway is pivotal to control flowering in rice, in which florigen genes Hd3a and RTF1 are at the core and they are regulated by upstream Hd1-dependent, Ehd1-dependent, as well as both Hd1- and Ehd1-independent pathways. The three pathways bring a variety of light signal information together to Hd3a and RTF1 for further integration, and then transmit the signals in the form of florigen to the downstream flowering related genes. In this review, we summarize the research progress of photoperiod regulated genes on flowering time in rice, including the photoreceptors and circadian rhythm genes, the florigens, its upstream, downstream and interacting genes. We hope to provide a reference for in-depth study of rice flowering regulation.

  3. Ectopic expression of a WRKY homolog from Glycine soja alters flowering time in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao; Sun, Xiaoli; Liu, Baohui; Zhu, Dan; Bai, Xi; Cai, Hua; Ji, Wei; Cao, Lei; Wu, Jing; Wang, Mingchao; Ding, Xiaodong; Zhu, Yanming

    2013-01-01

    Flowering is a critical event in the life cycle of plants; the WRKY-type transcription factors are reported to be involved in many developmental processes sunch as trichome development and epicuticular wax loading, but whether they are involved in flowering time regulation is still unknown. Within this study, we provide clear evidence that GsWRKY20, a member of WRKY gene family from wild soybean, is involved in controlling plant flowering time. Expression of GsWRKY20 was abundant in the shoot tips and inflorescence meristems of wild soybean. Phenotypic analysis showed that GsWRKY20 over-expression lines flowered earlier than the wild-type plants under all conditions: long-day and short-day photoperiods, vernalization, or exogenous GA3 application, indicating that GsWRKY20 may mainly be involved in an autonomous flowering pathway. Further analyses by qRT-PCR and microarray suggests that GsWRKY20 accelerating plant flowering might primarily be through the regulation of flowering-related genes (i.e., FLC, FT, SOC1 and CO) and floral meristem identity genes (i.e., AP1, SEP3, AP3, PI and AG). Our results provide the evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of manipulating GsWRKY20 for altering plant flowering time.

  4. Ectopic expression of a WRKY homolog from Glycine soja alters flowering time in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Luo

    Full Text Available Flowering is a critical event in the life cycle of plants; the WRKY-type transcription factors are reported to be involved in many developmental processes sunch as trichome development and epicuticular wax loading, but whether they are involved in flowering time regulation is still unknown. Within this study, we provide clear evidence that GsWRKY20, a member of WRKY gene family from wild soybean, is involved in controlling plant flowering time. Expression of GsWRKY20 was abundant in the shoot tips and inflorescence meristems of wild soybean. Phenotypic analysis showed that GsWRKY20 over-expression lines flowered earlier than the wild-type plants under all conditions: long-day and short-day photoperiods, vernalization, or exogenous GA3 application, indicating that GsWRKY20 may mainly be involved in an autonomous flowering pathway. Further analyses by qRT-PCR and microarray suggests that GsWRKY20 accelerating plant flowering might primarily be through the regulation of flowering-related genes (i.e., FLC, FT, SOC1 and CO and floral meristem identity genes (i.e., AP1, SEP3, AP3, PI and AG. Our results provide the evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of manipulating GsWRKY20 for altering plant flowering time.

  5. Natural variation of the RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T 1 contributes to flowering time divergence in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Ogiso-Tanaka

    Full Text Available In rice (Oryza sativa L., there is a diversity in flowering time that is strictly genetically regulated. Some indica cultivars show extremely late flowering under long-day conditions, but little is known about the gene(s involved. Here, we demonstrate that functional defects in the florigen gene RFT1 are the main cause of late flowering in an indica cultivar, Nona Bokra. Mapping and complementation studies revealed that sequence polymorphisms in the RFT1 regulatory and coding regions are likely to cause late flowering under long-day conditions. We detected polymorphisms in the promoter region that lead to reduced expression levels of RFT1. We also identified an amino acid substitution (E105K that leads to a functional defect in Nona Bokra RFT1. Sequencing of the RFT1 region in rice accessions from a global collection showed that the E105K mutation is found only in indica, and indicated a strong association between the RFT1 haplotype and extremely late flowering in a functional Hd1 background. Furthermore, SNPs in the regulatory region of RFT1 and the E105K substitution in 1,397 accessions show strong linkage disequilibrium with a flowering time-associated SNP. Although the defective E105K allele of RFT1 (but not of another florigen gene, Hd3a is found in many cultivars, relative rate tests revealed no evidence for differential rate of evolution of these genes. The ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions suggest that the E105K mutation resulting in the defect in RFT1 occurred relatively recently. These findings indicate that natural mutations in RFT1 provide flowering time divergence under long-day conditions.

  6. Climate change and the optimal flowering time of annual plants in seasonal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jacob; Bolmgren, Kjell; Jonzén, Niclas

    2013-01-01

    Long-term phenology monitoring has documented numerous examples of changing flowering dates during the last century. A pivotal question is whether these phenological responses are adaptive or not under directionally changing climatic conditions. We use a classic dynamic growth model for annual plants, based on optimal control theory, to find the fitness-maximizing flowering time, defined as the switching time from vegetative to reproductive growth. In a typical scenario of global warming, with advanced growing season and increased productivity, optimal flowering time advances less than the start of the growing season. Interestingly, increased temporal spread in production over the season may either advance or delay the optimal flowering time depending on overall productivity or season length. We identify situations where large phenological changes are necessary for flowering time to remain optimal. Such changes also indicate changed selection pressures. In other situations, the model predicts advanced phenology on a calendar scale, but no selection for early flowering in relation to the start of the season. We also show that the optimum is more sensitive to increased productivity when productivity is low than when productivity is high. All our results are derived using a general, graphical method to calculate the optimal flowering time applicable for a large range of shapes of the seasonal production curve. The model can thus explain apparent maladaptation in phenological responses in a multitude of scenarios of climate change. We conclude that taking energy allocation trade-offs and appropriate time scales into account is critical when interpreting phenological patterns.

  7. Genetic regulation of flowering time in annual and perennial plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Rehman Gul; Ai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Flowering time plays a significant role in the reproductive success of plants. So far, five major pathways to flowering have been characterized in Arabidopsis, including environmental induction through photoperiod, vernalization, and gibberellins and autonomous floral iation, and aging by sequentially operating miRNAs (typically miR156 and miR172) responding to endogenous cues. The balance of signals from these pathways is integrated by a common set of genes (FLOWERING LOCUS C, FLOWERING LOCUS T, LEAFY, and SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1) that determine the flowering time. Recent studies have indicated that epigenetic modification, alternative splicing, antisense RNA and chromatin silencing regulatory mechanisms play an important role in this process by regulating related flowering gene expression. In this review, we discuss the current understanding in genetic regulation of the phase transition from vegetative to reproductive growth by using Arabidopsis as a model. We also describe how this knowledge has been successfully applied for identifying homologous genes from perennial crops. Furthermore, detailed analysis of the similarities and differences between annual and perennial plants flowering will help elucidate the mechanisms of perennial plant maturation and regulation of floral initiation.

  8. Linkage and association mapping of Arabidopsis thaliana flowering time in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Brachi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Flowering time is a key life-history trait in the plant life cycle. Most studies to unravel the genetics of flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana have been performed under greenhouse conditions. Here, we describe a study about the genetics of flowering time that differs from previous studies in two important ways: first, we measure flowering time in a more complex and ecologically realistic environment; and, second, we combine the advantages of genome-wide association (GWA and traditional linkage (QTL mapping. Our experiments involved phenotyping nearly 20,000 plants over 2 winters under field conditions, including 184 worldwide natural accessions genotyped for 216,509 SNPs and 4,366 RILs derived from 13 independent crosses chosen to maximize genetic and phenotypic diversity. Based on a photothermal time model, the flowering time variation scored in our field experiment was poorly correlated with the flowering time variation previously obtained under greenhouse conditions, reinforcing previous demonstrations of the importance of genotype by environment interactions in A. thaliana and the need to study adaptive variation under natural conditions. The use of 4,366 RILs provides great power for dissecting the genetic architecture of flowering time in A. thaliana under our specific field conditions. We describe more than 60 additive QTLs, all with relatively small to medium effects and organized in 5 major clusters. We show that QTL mapping increases our power to distinguish true from false associations in GWA mapping. QTL mapping also permits the identification of false negatives, that is, causative SNPs that are lost when applying GWA methods that control for population structure. Major genes underpinning flowering time in the greenhouse were not associated with flowering time in this study. Instead, we found a prevalence of genes involved in the regulation of the plant circadian clock. Furthermore, we identified new genomic regions lacking

  9. Nonfunctional alleles of long-day suppressor genes independently regulate flowering time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ming Zheng; Li Feng; Junrui Wang; Weihua Qiao; Lifang Zhang; Yunlian Cheng; Qingwen Yang

    2016-01-01

    Due to the remarkable adaptability to various environments, rice varieties with diverse flowering times have been domesticated or improved from Oryza rufipogon. Detailed knowledge of the genetic factors controlling flower-ing time will facilitate understanding the adaptation mecha-nism in cultivated rice and enable breeders to design appropriate genotypes for distinct preferences. In this study, four genes (Hd1, DTH8, Ghd7 and OsPRR37) in a rice long-day suppression pathway were collected and sequenced in 154, 74, 69 and 62 varieties of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) respectively. Under long-day conditions, varieties with non-functional alleles flowered significantly earlier than those with functional alleles. However, the four genes have different genetic effects in the regulation of flowering time: Hd1 and OsPRR37 are major genes that generally regulate rice flowering time for all varieties, while DTH8 and Ghd7 only regulate regional rice varieties. Geographic analysis and network studies suggested that the nonfunctional alleles of these suppression loci with regional adaptability were derived recently and independently. Alleles with regional adaptability should be taken into consideration for genetic improvement. The rich genetic variations in these four genes, which adapt rice to different environments, provide the flexi-bility needed for breeding rice varieties with diverse flowering times.

  10. Root microbiota dynamics of perennial Arabis alpina are dependent on soil residence time but independent of flowering time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Nina; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Agler, Matthew T; Hacquard, Stéphane; Kemen, Eric; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Wunder, Jörg; Coupland, George; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recent field and laboratory experiments with perennial Boechera stricta and annual Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that the root microbiota influences flowering time. Here we examined in long-term time-course experiments the bacterial root microbiota of the arctic-alpine perennial Arabis alpina in natural and controlled environments by 16S rRNA gene profiling. We identified soil type and residence time of plants in soil as major determinants explaining up to 15% of root microbiota variation, whereas environmental conditions and host genotype explain maximally 11% of variation. When grown in the same soil, the root microbiota composition of perennial A. alpina is largely similar to those of its annual relatives A. thaliana and Cardamine hirsuta. Non-flowering wild-type A. alpina and flowering pep1 mutant plants assemble an essentially indistinguishable root microbiota, thereby uncoupling flowering time from plant residence time-dependent microbiota changes. This reveals the robustness of the root microbiota against the onset and perpetual flowering of A. alpina. Together with previous studies, this implies a model in which parts of the root microbiota modulate flowering time, whereas, after microbiota acquisition during vegetative growth, the established root-associated bacterial assemblage is structurally robust to perturbations caused by flowering and drastic changes in plant stature.

  11. Effects of Passion Flower Extract, as an Add-On Treatment to Sertraline, on Reaction Time in Patients ‎with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojoumi, Mandana; Ghaeli, Padideh; Salimi, Samrand; Sharifi, Ali; Raisi, Firoozeh

    2016-07-01

    Objective: Because of functional impairment caused by generalized anxiety disorder and due to cognitive side ‎effects of many anti-anxiety agents, in this study we aimed to evaluate the influence of Passion ‎flower standardized extract on reaction time in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.‎ Method: Thirty patients aged 18 to 50 years of age, who were diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder and ‎fulfilled the study criteria, entered this double-blind placebo-controlled study. Reaction time was ‎measured at baseline and after one month of treatment using computerized software. Correct ‎responses, omission and substitution errors and the mean time of correct responses (reaction time) in ‎both visual and auditory tests were collected. The analysis was performed between the two groups ‎and within each group utilizing SPSS PASW- statics, Version 18. P-value less than 0.05 was ‎considered statistically significant.‎ Results: All the participants were initiated on Sertraline 50 mg/day, and the dosage was increased to 100 ‎mg / day after two weeks. Fourteen patients received Pasipy (Passion Flower) 15 drops three times ‎daily and 16 received placebo concurrently. Inter-group comparison proved no significant difference ‎in any of the test items between assortments while a significant decline was observed in auditory ‎omission errors in passion flower group after on month of treatment using intra-group analysis.‎‎ Conclusion: This study noted that passion flower might be suitable as an add-on in the treatment of generalized ‎anxiety disorder with low side effects. Further studies with longer duration are recommended to ‎confirm the results of this study.‎.

  12. Effects of Passion Flower Extract, as an Add-on Treatment to Sertraline, on Reaction Time in Patients ‎with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: a Double-blind Placebo-Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Nojoumi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Because of functional impairment caused by generalized anxiety disorder and due to cognitive side ‎effects of many anti-anxiety agents, in this study we aimed to evaluate the influence of Passion ‎flower standardized extract on reaction time in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.‎Method: Thirty patients aged 18 to 50 years of age, who were diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder and ‎fulfilled the study criteria, entered this double-blind placebo-controlled study. Reaction time was ‎measured at baseline and after one month of treatment using computerized software. Correct ‎responses, omission and substitution errors and the mean time of correct responses (reaction time in ‎both visual and auditory tests were collected. The analysis was performed between the two groups ‎and within each group utilizing SPSS PASW- statics, Version 18. P-value less than 0.05 was ‎considered statistically significant.‎Results: All the participants were initiated on Sertraline 50 mg/day, and the dosage was increased to 100 ‎mg / day after two weeks. Fourteen patients received Pasipy (Passion Flower 15 drops three times ‎daily and 16 received placebo concurrently. Inter-group comparison proved no significant difference ‎in any of the test items between assortments while a significant decline was observed in auditory ‎omission errors in passion flower group after on month of treatment using intra-group analysis.‎‎Conclusion: This study noted that passion flower might be suitable as an add-on in the treatment of generalized ‎anxiety disorder with low side effects. Further studies with longer duration are recommended to ‎confirm the results of this study.‎

  13. Natural soil microbes alter flowering phenology and the intensity of selection on flowering time in a wild Arabidopsis relative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Maggie R; Lundberg, Derek S; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Tringe, Susannah G; Dangl, Jeffery L; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Plant phenology is known to depend on many different environmental variables, but soil microbial communities have rarely been acknowledged as possible drivers of flowering time. Here, we tested separately the effects of four naturally occurring soil microbiomes and their constituent soil chemistries on flowering phenology and reproductive fitness of Boechera stricta, a wild relative of Arabidopsis. Flowering time was sensitive to both microbes and the abiotic properties of different soils; varying soil microbiota also altered patterns of selection on flowering time. Thus, soil microbes potentially contribute to phenotypic plasticity of flowering time and to differential selection observed between habitats. We also describe a method to dissect the microbiome into single axes of variation that can help identify candidate organisms whose abundance in soil correlates with flowering time. This approach is broadly applicable to search for microbial community members that alter biological characteristics of interest.

  14. Time after time: flowering phenology and biotic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzinga, J.A.; Atlan, A.; Biere, A.; Gigord, L.; Weis, A.E.; Bernasconi, G.

    2007-01-01

    The role of biotic interactions in shaping plant flowering phenology has long been controversial; plastic responses to the abiotic environment, limited precision of biological clocks and inconsistency of selection pressures have generally been emphasized to explain phenological variation. However, p

  15. Flowering time regulation: photoperiod- and temperature-sensing in leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Hun; Ito, Shogo; Imaizumi, Takato

    2013-10-01

    Plants monitor changes in photoperiod and temperature to synchronize their flowering with seasonal changes to maximize fitness. In the Arabidopsis photoperiodic flowering pathway, the circadian clock-regulated components, such as FLAVIN-BINDING, KELCH REPEAT, F-BOX 1 and CONSTANS, both of which have light-controlled functions, are crucial to induce the day-length specific expression of the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene in leaves. Recent advances indicate that FT transcriptional regulation is central for integrating the information derived from other important internal and external factors, such as developmental age, amount of gibberellic acid, and the ambient temperature. In this review, we describe how these factors interactively regulate the expression of FT, the main component of florigen, in leaves.

  16. Environmental stress and flowering time: the photoperiodic connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboni, Matteo; Robustelli Test, Alice; Galbiati, Massimo; Tonelli, Chiara; Conti, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Plants maximize their chances to survive adversities by reprogramming their development according to environmental conditions. Adaptive variations in the timing to flowering reflect the need for plants to set seeds under the most favorable conditions. A complex network of genetic pathways allows plants to detect and integrate external (e.g., photoperiod and temperature) and/or internal (e.g., age) information to initiate the floral transition. Furthermore different types of environmental stresses play an important role in the floral transition. The emerging picture is that stress conditions often affect flowering through modulation of the photoperiodic pathway. In this review we will discuss different modes of cross talk between stress signaling and photoperiodic flowering, highlighting the central role of the florigen genes in this process.

  17. Characterising genes associated with flowering time in carrot (Daucus carota L.) using transcriptome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, C-G; Mao, J-H; Liu, L-J; Li, C-J; Ren, H-F; Zhao, Z-W; Zhuang, F-Y

    2017-03-01

    Carrot is generally regarded as a biennial plant with an obligatory vernalization requirement. Early spring cultivation makes plants vulnerable to premature bolting, which results in a loss of commercial value. However, our knowledge of flowering time genes and flowering mechanisms in carrot remain limited. Bolting behavior of D. carota ssp. carota 'Songzi', a wild species sensitive to flower induction by vernalization and photoperiod, and orange cultivar 'Amsterdam forcing', and their offspring were investigated in different growing conditions. We performed RNA-seq to identify the flowering time genes, and digital gene expression (DGE) analysis to examine their expression levels. The circadian patterns of related genes were identified by qPCR. The results showed bolting behavior of carrot was influenced by low temperature, illumination intensity and photoperiod. A total of 45 flowering time-related unigenes were identified, which were classified into five categories including photoperiod, vernalization, autonomous and gibberellin pathway, and floral integrators. Homologs of LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and CONSTANS-LIKE 2 (COL2) were more highly expressed under short day condition than under long day condition. Homologs of COL2, CONSTANS-LIKE 5 (COL5), SUPPRESSION OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1), FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and GIBBERELLIC ACID INSENSITIVE (GAI) were differentially expressed between 'Songzi' and 'Amsterdam forcing'. The homolog of COL2 (Dct43207) was repressed by light, but that of COL5 (Dct20940) was induced. A preliminary model of genetic network controlling flowering time was constructed by associating the results of DGE analysis with correlation coefficients between genes. This study provides useful information for further investigating the genetic mechanism of flowering in carrot.

  18. Functional Characterization of a Putative Glycine max ELF4 in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Its Role during Flowering Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre L. Nepomuceno

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Flowering is an important trait in major crops like soybean due to its direct relation to grain production. The circadian clock mediates the perception of seasonal changes in day length and temperature to modulate flowering time. The circadian clock gene EARLY FLOWERING 4 (ELF4 was identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and is believed to play a key role in the integration of photoperiod, circadian regulation, and flowering. The molecular circuitry that comprises the circadian clock and flowering control in soybeans is just beginning to be understood. To date, insufficient information regarding the soybean negative flowering regulators exist, and the biological function of the soybean ELF4 (GmELF4 remains unknown. Here, we investigate the ELF4 family members in soybean and functionally characterize a GmELF4 homologous gene. The constitutive overexpression of GmELF4 delayed flowering in Arabidopsis, showing the ELF4 functional conservation among plants as part of the flowering control machinery. We also show that GmELF4 alters the expression of Arabidopsis key flowering time genes (AtCO and AtFT, and this down-regulation is the likely cause of flowering delay phenotypes. Furthermore, we identified the GmELF4 network genes to infer the participation of GmELF4 in soybeans. The data generated in this study provide original insights for comprehending the role of the soybean circadian clock ELF4 gene as a negative flowering controller.

  19. Method for production of sorghum hybrids with selected flowering times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullet, John E.; Rooney, William L.

    2016-08-30

    Methods and composition for the production of sorghum hybrids with selected and different flowering times are provided. In accordance with the invention, a substantially continual and high-yield harvest of sorghum is provided. Improved methods of seed production are also provided.

  20. Method for production of sorghum hybrids with selected flowering times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, John E.; Rooney, William L.

    2016-08-30

    Methods and composition for the production of sorghum hybrids with selected and different flowering times are provided. In accordance with the invention, a substantially continual and high-yield harvest of sorghum is provided. Improved methods of seed production are also provided.

  1. Natural variation in flowering time among populations of the annual crucifer Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammad, I.; Van Tienderen, P.H.

    1997-01-01

    Genetic variation in flowering time was studied in four natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana, using greenhouse experiments. Two populations from ruderal sites flowered early, two others from river dykes late. However, the late flowering plants flowered almost as early as the others after cold

  2. Flower power? Potential benefits and pitfalls of using (flowering) vegetation for conservation biological control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wackers, F.L.; Rijn, van P.C.J.; Winkler, K.; Olson, D.

    2006-01-01

    Whereas nectar and pollen provision to predators and parasitoids is a main objective in pursuing agricultural biodiversity, we often know little about whether the flowering plant species involved are actually suitable as insect food sources or about their ultimate impact on biological pest control.

  3. GmmiR156b overexpression delays flowering time in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dong; Li, Ying; Wang, Jialin; Nan, Haiyang; Wang, Youning; Lu, Sijia; Jiang, Qiong; Li, Xiaoming; Shi, Danning; Fang, Chao; Yuan, Xiaohui; Zhao, Xiaohui; Li, Xia; Liu, Baohui; Kong, Fanjiang

    2015-11-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is an important crop used for human consumption, animal feed and biodiesel fuel. Wering time and maturity significantly affect soybean grain yield. In Arabidopsis thaliana, miR156 has been proposed to regulate the transition from the juvenile to the adult phase of shoot development, which is accompanied by changes in vegetative morphology and an increase in reproductive potential. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying miR156 function in soybean flowering remain unknown. Here, we report that the overexpression of GmmiR156b delays flowering time in soybean. GmmiR156b may target SPL orthologs and negatively regulate GmSPLs, thereby delaying flowering in soybean under LD and natural conditions. GmmiR156b down-regulates several known flowering time regulators in soybean, such as GmAP1 (a, b, c), GmLFY2, GmLFY2, GmFULs, GmSOC1s, GmFT5a, and GmmiR172. These data show that a similar miR156-SPL regulatory module was conserved in the soybean flowering pathway. However, GmFULs, GmSOC1a and GmSOC1b were significantly suppressed under LD conditions but not under SD conditions, which is different in Arabidopsis that these genes were down-regulated irrespective of photoperiod. In addition, GmmiR156b was up-regulated by E1, E2 (GmGI), E3 and E4, which control flowering time and maturity in soybean, and suppressed E1 (E1-Like) and E2 (E2-Like) genes under LD conditions. These data indicated that the miR156-SPL regulatory module was also with some degree of divergent in soybean flowering pathway.

  4. Impact of light intensity on flowering time and plant quality of Antirrhinum majus L. cultivar Chimes White

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MUNIRMuhammad; JAMILMuhammad[; BALOCHJalal-ud-din; KHATTAKKhalidRehman

    2004-01-01

    Shades of different light intensities (29%, 43%, 54%,60% or 68%) along with control (no shade) were studied to observe their effects on the flowering time and plant quality. A hyperbolic relationship was observed between different light intensities under shade,and time to flowering.The total number of flower buds showed a curvilinear relationship with light intensities. Growth parameters related to the plant characteristics such as plant height,leaf area and plant fresh weight were improved under shading treatments at the expense of flowering time and number of flower buds.However,both linear and polynomial models applied assumed that cultivar Chimes White was equally sensitive to light intensity throughout development.

  5. Pleiotropic effects of flowering time genes in the annual crucifer Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tienderen, P.H.; Hammad, I.; Zwaal, F.C.

    1996-01-01

    Variation in flowering time of Arabidopsis thaliana was studied in an experiment with mutant lines. The pleiotropic effects of flowering time genes on morphology and reproductive yield were assessed under three levels of nutrient supply. At all nutrient levels flowering time and number of rosette le

  6. Altered expression of polyamine transporters reveals a role for spermidine in the timing of flowering and other developmental response pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sheaza; Ariyaratne, Menaka; Patel, Jigar; Howard, Alexander E; Kalinoski, Andrea; Phuntumart, Vipaporn; Morris, Paul F

    2017-05-01

    Changes in the levels of polyamines are correlated with the activation or repression of developmental response pathways, but the role of polyamine transporters in the regulation of polyamine homeostasis and thus indirectly gene expression, has not been previously addressed. Here we show that the A. thaliana and rice transporters AtPUT5 and OsPUT1 were localized to the ER, while the AtPUT2, AtPUT3, and OsPUT3 were localized to the chloroplast by transient expression in N. benthamiana. A. thaliana plants that were transformed with OsPUT1 under the control the PUT5 promoter were delayed in flowering by 16days. In contrast, put5 mutants flowered four days earlier than WT plants. The delay of flowering was associated with significantly higher levels of spermidine and spermidine conjugates in the leaves prior to flowering. A similar delay in flowering was also noted in transgenic lines with constitutive expression of either OsPUT1 or OsPUT3. All three transgenic lines had larger rosette leaves, thicker flowering stems, and produced more siliques than wild type plants. In contrast, put5 plants had smaller leaves, thinner flowering stems, and produced fewer siliques. Constitutive expression of PUTs was also associated with an extreme delay in both plant senescence and maturation rate of siliques. These experiments provide the first genetic evidence of polyamine transport in the timing of flowering, and indicate the importance of polyamine transporters in the regulation of flowering and senescence pathways.

  7. Molecular Control of Flowering in Response to Day Length in Rice (F)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vittoria Brambilla; Fabio Fornara

    2013-01-01

    Flowering at the most appropriate times of the year requires careful monitoring of environmental conditions and correct integration of such information with an endogenous molecular network.Rice (Oryza sativa) is a facultative short day plant,and flowers quickly under short day lengths,as opposed to Arabidopsis thaliana whose flowering is accelerated by longer days.Despite these physiological differences,several genes controlling flowering in response to day length (or photoperiod) are conserved between rice and Arabidopsis,and the molecular mechanisms involved are similar.Inductive day lengths trigger expression of florigenic proteins in leaves that can move to the shoot apical meristem to induce reproductive development.As compared to Arabidopsis,rice also possesses unique factors that regulate expression of florigenic genes.Here,we discuss recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in day length perception,production of florigenic signals,and molecular responses of the shoot apical meristem to florigenic proteins.

  8. Implications of High Temperature and Elevated CO2 on Flowering Time in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadish, S V Krishna; Bahuguna, Rajeev N; Djanaguiraman, Maduraimuthu; Gamuyao, Rico; Prasad, P V Vara; Craufurd, Peter Q

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a crucial determinant for plant reproductive success and seed-set. Increasing temperature and elevated carbon-dioxide (e[CO2]) are key climate change factors that could affect plant fitness and flowering related events. Addressing the effect of these environmental factors on flowering events such as time of day of anthesis (TOA) and flowering time (duration from germination till flowering) is critical to understand the adaptation of plants/crops to changing climate and is the major aim of this review. Increasing ambient temperature is the major climatic factor that advances flowering time in crops and other plants, with a modest effect of e[CO2].Integrated environmental stimuli such as photoperiod, temperature and e[CO2] regulating flowering time is discussed. The critical role of plant tissue temperature influencing TOA is highlighted and crop models need to substitute ambient air temperature with canopy or floral tissue temperature to improve predictions. A complex signaling network of flowering regulation with change in ambient temperature involving different transcription factors (PIF4, PIF5), flowering suppressors (HvODDSOC2, SVP, FLC) and autonomous pathway (FCA, FVE) genes, mainly from Arabidopsis, provides a promising avenue to improve our understanding of the dynamics of flowering time under changing climate. Elevated CO2 mediated changes in tissue sugar status and a direct [CO2]-driven regulatory pathway involving a key flowering gene, MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (MFT), are emerging evidence for the role of e[CO2] in flowering time regulation.

  9. Photoperiodic regulation of flowering time through periodic histone deacetylation of the florigen gene FT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Gu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The developmental transition from a vegetative to a reproductive phase (i.e., flowering is timed by the seasonal cue day length or photoperiod in many plant species. Through the photoperiod pathway, inductive day lengths trigger the production of a systemic flowering signal, florigen, to provoke the floral transition. FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT, widely conserved in angiosperms, is a major component of the mobile florigen. In the long-day plant Arabidopsis, FT expression is rhythmically activated by the output of the photoperiod pathway CONSTANS (CO, specifically at the end of long days. How FT expression is modulated at an adequate level in response to the long-day cue to set a proper flowering time remains unknown. Here, we report a periodic histone deacetylation mechanism for the photoperiodic modulation of FT expression. We have identified a plant-unique core structural component of an Arabidopsis histone deacetylase (HDAC complex. In long days, this component accumulates at dusk, and is recruited by a MADS-domain transcription factor to the FT locus specifically at the end of the day, leading to periodic histone deacetylation of FT chromatin at dusk. Furthermore, we found that at the end of long days CO activity not only activates FT expression but also enables HDAC-activity recruitment to FT chromatin to dampen the level of FT expression, and so prevent precocious flowering in response to the inductive long-day cue. These results collectively reveal a periodic histone deacetylation mechanism for the day-length control of flowering time in higher plants.

  10. Photoperiodic regulation of flowering time through periodic histone deacetylation of the florigen gene FT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yizhong; He, Yuehui

    2013-09-01

    The developmental transition from a vegetative to a reproductive phase (i.e., flowering) is timed by the seasonal cue day length or photoperiod in many plant species. Through the photoperiod pathway, inductive day lengths trigger the production of a systemic flowering signal, florigen, to provoke the floral transition. FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), widely conserved in angiosperms, is a major component of the mobile florigen. In the long-day plant Arabidopsis, FT expression is rhythmically activated by the output of the photoperiod pathway CONSTANS (CO), specifically at the end of long days. How FT expression is modulated at an adequate level in response to the long-day cue to set a proper flowering time remains unknown. Here, we report a periodic histone deacetylation mechanism for the photoperiodic modulation of FT expression. We have identified a plant-unique core structural component of an Arabidopsis histone deacetylase (HDAC) complex. In long days, this component accumulates at dusk, and is recruited by a MADS-domain transcription factor to the FT locus specifically at the end of the day, leading to periodic histone deacetylation of FT chromatin at dusk. Furthermore, we found that at the end of long days CO activity not only activates FT expression but also enables HDAC-activity recruitment to FT chromatin to dampen the level of FT expression, and so prevent precocious flowering in response to the inductive long-day cue. These results collectively reveal a periodic histone deacetylation mechanism for the day-length control of flowering time in higher plants.

  11. Investigating the Association between Flowering Time and Defense in the Arabidopsis thaliana-Fusarium oxysporum Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Rebecca; Rusu, Anca; Stiller, Jiri; Powell, Jonathan; Manners, John M; Kazan, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to pathogens either by investing more resources into immunity which is costly to development, or by accelerating reproductive processes such as flowering time to ensure reproduction occurs before the plant succumbs to disease. In this study we explored the link between flowering time and pathogen defense using the interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana and the root infecting fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. We report that F. oxysporum infection accelerates flowering time and regulates transcription of a number of floral integrator genes, including FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and GIGANTEA (GI). Furthermore, we observed a positive correlation between late flowering and resistance to F. oxysporum in A. thaliana natural ecotypes. Late-flowering gi and autonomous pathway mutants also exhibited enhanced resistance to F. oxysporum, supporting the association between flowering time and defense. However, epistasis analysis showed that accelerating flowering time by deletion of FLC in fve-3 or fpa-7 mutants did not alter disease resistance, suggesting that the effect of autonomous pathway on disease resistance occurs independently from flowering time. Indeed, RNA-seq analyses suggest that fve-3 mediated resistance to F. oxysporum is most likely a result of altered defense-associated gene transcription. Together, our results indicate that the association between flowering time and pathogen defense is complex and can involve both pleiotropic and direct effects.

  12. The Oryza sativa Regulator HDR1 Associates with the Kinase OsK4 to Control Photoperiodic Flowering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehui Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rice is a facultative short-day plant (SDP, and the regulatory pathways for flowering time are conserved, but functionally modified, in Arabidopsis and rice. Heading date 1 (Hd1, an ortholog of Arabidopsis CONSTANS (CO, is a key regulator that suppresses flowering under long-day conditions (LDs, but promotes flowering under short-day conditions (SDs by influencing the expression of the florigen gene Heading date 3a (Hd3a. Another key regulator, Early heading date 1 (Ehd1, is an evolutionarily unique gene with no orthologs in Arabidopsis, which acts as a flowering activator under both SD and LD by promoting the rice florigen genes Hd3a and RICE FLOWERING LOCUST 1 (RFT1. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the flowering regulator Heading Date Repressor1 (HDR1 in rice. The hdr1 mutant exhibits an early flowering phenotype under natural LD in a paddy field in Beijing, China (39°54'N, 116°23'E, as well as under LD but not SD in a growth chamber, indicating that HDR1 may functionally regulate flowering time via the photoperiod-dependent pathway. HDR1 encodes a nuclear protein that is most active in leaves and floral organs and exhibits a typical diurnal expression pattern. We determined that HDR1 is a novel suppressor of flowering that upregulates Hd1 and downregulates Ehd1, leading to the downregulation of Hd3a and RFT1 under LDs. We have further identified an HDR1-interacting kinase, OsK4, another suppressor of rice flowering under LDs. OsK4 acts similarly to HDR1, suppressing flowering by upregulating Hd1 and downregulating Ehd1 under LDs, and OsK4 can phosphorylate HD1 with HDR1 presents. These results collectively reveal the transcriptional regulators of Hd1 for the day-length-dependent control of flowering time in rice.

  13. The Oryza sativa Regulator HDR1 Associates with the Kinase OsK4 to Control Photoperiodic Flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuehui; Zhang, Zhiguo; Wu, Jinxia; Cui, Xuean; Feng, Dan; Wang, Kai; Xu, Ming; Zhou, Li; Han, Xiao; Gu, Xiaofeng; Lu, Tiegang

    2016-03-01

    Rice is a facultative short-day plant (SDP), and the regulatory pathways for flowering time are conserved, but functionally modified, in Arabidopsis and rice. Heading date 1 (Hd1), an ortholog of Arabidopsis CONSTANS (CO), is a key regulator that suppresses flowering under long-day conditions (LDs), but promotes flowering under short-day conditions (SDs) by influencing the expression of the florigen gene Heading date 3a (Hd3a). Another key regulator, Early heading date 1 (Ehd1), is an evolutionarily unique gene with no orthologs in Arabidopsis, which acts as a flowering activator under both SD and LD by promoting the rice florigen genes Hd3a and RICE FLOWERING LOCUST 1 (RFT1). Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the flowering regulator Heading Date Repressor1 (HDR1) in rice. The hdr1 mutant exhibits an early flowering phenotype under natural LD in a paddy field in Beijing, China (39°54'N, 116°23'E), as well as under LD but not SD in a growth chamber, indicating that HDR1 may functionally regulate flowering time via the photoperiod-dependent pathway. HDR1 encodes a nuclear protein that is most active in leaves and floral organs and exhibits a typical diurnal expression pattern. We determined that HDR1 is a novel suppressor of flowering that upregulates Hd1 and downregulates Ehd1, leading to the downregulation of Hd3a and RFT1 under LDs. We have further identified an HDR1-interacting kinase, OsK4, another suppressor of rice flowering under LDs. OsK4 acts similarly to HDR1, suppressing flowering by upregulating Hd1 and downregulating Ehd1 under LDs, and OsK4 can phosphorylate HD1 with HDR1 presents. These results collectively reveal the transcriptional regulators of Hd1 for the day-length-dependent control of flowering time in rice.

  14. Allelic Variation in the Perennial Ryegrass FLOWERING LOCUS T Gene is Associated with Changes in Flowering Time across a Range of Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøt, Leif; Sanderson, Ruth; Thomas, Ann

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene and its orthologs in other plant species (e.g. rice [Oryza sativa] OsFTL2/Hd3a) have an established role in the photoperiodic induction of flowering response. The genomic and phenotypic variations associated with the perennial...... ryegrass (Lolium perenne) ortholog of FT, designated LpFT3, was assessed in a diverse collection of nine European germplasm populations, which together constituted an association panel of 864 plants. Sequencing and genotyping of a series of amplicons derived from the nine populations, containing...... or structured association with further correction using genomic control indicated significant associations between LpFT3 and variation in flowering time. These associations were corroborated in a validation population segregating for the same major alleles. The most "diagnostic" region of genomic variation...

  15. The Genetic Architecture of Flowering Time and Photoperiod Sensitivity in Maize as Revealed by QTL Review and Meta Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Xu; Tingzhao Rong; Yaxi Liu; Jian Liu; Moju Cao; Jing Wang; Hai Lan; Yunbi Xu; Yanli Lu; Guangtang Pan

    2012-01-01

    The control of flowering is not only important for reproduction,but also plays a key role in the processes of domestication and adaptation.To reveal the genetic architecture for flowering time and photoperiod sensitivity,a comprehensive evaluation of the relevant literature was performed and followed by meta analysis.A total of 25 synthetic consensus quantitative trait loci (QTL) and four hot-spot genomic regions were identified for photoperiod sensitivity including 11 genes related to photoperiod response or flower morphogenesis and development.Besides,a comparative analysis of the QTL for flowering time and photoperiod sensitivity highlighted the regions containing shared and unique QTL for the two traits.Candidate genes associated with maize flowering were identified through integrated analysis of the homologous genes for flowering time in plants and the consensus QTL regions for photoperiod sensitivity in maize (Zea mays L.).Our results suggest that the combination of literature review,meta-analysis and homologous blast is an efficient approach to identify new candidate genes and create a global view of the genetic architecture for maize photoperiodic flowering.Sequences of candidate genes can be used to develop molecular markers for various models of marker-assisted selection,such as marker-assisted recurrent selection and genomic selection that can contribute significantly to crop environmental adaptation.

  16. The U-Box/ARM E3 ligase PUB13 regulates cell death, defense, and flowering time in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Ahn, Il-Pyung; Ning, Yuese; Park, Chan-Ho; Zeng, Lirong; Whitehill, Justin G A; Lu, Haibin; Zhao, Qingzhen; Ding, Bo; Xie, Qi; Zhou, Jian-Min; Dai, Liangying; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2012-05-01

    The components in plant signal transduction pathways are intertwined and affect each other to coordinate plant growth, development, and defenses to stresses. The role of ubiquitination in connecting these pathways, particularly plant innate immunity and flowering, is largely unknown. Here, we report the dual roles for the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Plant U-box protein13 (PUB13) in defense and flowering time control. In vitro ubiquitination assays indicated that PUB13 is an active E3 ubiquitin ligase and that the intact U-box domain is required for the E3 ligase activity. Disruption of the PUB13 gene by T-DNA insertion results in spontaneous cell death, the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and salicylic acid (SA), and elevated resistance to biotrophic pathogens but increased susceptibility to necrotrophic pathogens. The cell death, hydrogen peroxide accumulation, and resistance to necrotrophic pathogens in pub13 are enhanced when plants are pretreated with high humidity. Importantly, pub13 also shows early flowering under middle- and long-day conditions, in which the expression of SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 and FLOWERING LOCUS T is induced while FLOWERING LOCUS C expression is suppressed. Finally, we found that two components involved in the SA-mediated signaling pathway, SID2 and PAD4, are required for the defense and flowering-time phenotypes caused by the loss of function of PUB13. Taken together, our data demonstrate that PUB13 acts as an important node connecting SA-dependent defense signaling and flowering time regulation in Arabidopsis.

  17. Capturing sequence variation among flowering-time regulatory gene homologues in the allopolyploid crop species Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eSchiessl

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Flowering, the transition from the vegetative to the generative phase, is a decisive time point in the lifecycle of a plant. Flowering is controlled by a complex network of transcription factors, photoreceptors, enzymes and miRNAs. In recent years, several studies gave rise to the hypothesis that this network is also strongly involved in the regulation of other important lifecycle processes ranging from germination and seed development through to fundamental developmental and yield-related traits. In the allopolyploid crop species Brassica napus, (genome AACC, homoeologous copies of flowering time regulatory genes are implicated in major phenological variation within the species, however the extent and control of intraspecific and intergenomic variation among flowering-time regulators is still unclear. To investigate differences among B. napus morphotypes in relation to flowering-time gene variation, we performed targeted deep sequencing of 29 regulatory flowering-time genes in four genetically and phenologically diverse B. napus accessions. The genotype panel included a winter-type oilseed rape, a winter fodder rape, a spring-type oilseed rape (all B. napus ssp. napus and a swede (B. napus ssp. napobrassica, which show extreme differences in winter-hardiness, vernalization requirement and flowering behaviour. A broad range of genetic variation was detected in the targeted genes for the different morphotypes, including non-synonymous SNPs, copy number variation and presence-absence variation. The results suggest that this broad variation in vernalisation, clock and signaling genes could be a key driver of morphological differentiation for flowering-related traits in this recent allopolyploid crop species.

  18. Is 'peak N' key to understanding the timing of flowering in annual plants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbaud, Camille S E; Dalchau, Neil; Purves, Drew W; Turnbull, Lindsay A

    2015-01-01

    Flowering time in annual plants has large fitness consequences and has been the focus of theoretical and empirical study. Previous theory has concluded that flowering time has evolved over evolutionary time to maximize fitness over a particular season length. We introduce a new model where flowering is cued by a growth-rate rule (peak nitrogen (N)). Flowering is therefore sensitive to physiological parameters and to current environmental conditions, including N availability and the presence of competitors. The model predicts that, when overall conditions are suitable for flowering, plants should never flower after 'peak N', the point during development when the whole-plant N uptake rate reaches its maximum. Our model further predicts correlations between flowering time and vegetative growth rates, and that the response to increased N depends heavily on how this extra N is made available. We compare our predictions to observations in the literature. We suggest that annual plants may have evolved to use growth-rate rules as part of the cue for flowering, allowing them to smoothly and optimally adjust their flowering time to a wide range of local conditions. If so, there are widespread implications for the study of the molecular biology behind flowering pathways.

  19. Altitudinal and climatic associations of seed dormancy and flowering traits evidence adaptation of annual life cycle timing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza Vidigal, de Deborah; Correia Silva Santana Marques, Alexandre; Willems, Leo A.J.; Buijs, Gonda; Méndez-Vigo, Belén; Hilhorst, Henk W.M.; Bentsink, Leónie; Picó, F.X.; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The temporal control or timing of the life cycle of annual plants is presumed to provide adaptive strategies to escape harsh environments for survival and reproduction. This is mainly determined by the timing of germination, which is controlled by the level of seed dormancy, and of flowering init

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana VOZ (Vascular plant One-Zinc finger) transcription factors are required for proper regulation of flowering time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celesnik, Helena; Ali, Gul S; Robison, Faith M; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2013-04-15

    Transition to flowering in plants is tightly controlled by environmental cues, which regulate the photoperiod and vernalization pathways, and endogenous signals, which mediate the autonomous and gibberellin pathways. In this work, we investigated the role of two Zn(2+)-finger transcription factors, the paralogues AtVOZ1 and AtVOZ2, in Arabidopsis thaliana flowering. Single atvoz1-1 and atvoz2-1 mutants showed no significant phenotypes as compared to wild type. However, atvoz1-1 atvoz2-1 double mutant plants exhibited several phenotypes characteristic of flowering-time mutants. The double mutant displayed a severe delay in flowering, together with additional pleiotropic phenotypes. Late flowering correlated with elevated expression of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), which encodes a potent floral repressor, and decreased expression of its target, the floral promoter FD. Vernalization rescued delayed flowering of atvoz1-1 atvoz2-1 and reversed elevated FLC levels. Accumulation of FLC transcripts in atvoz1-1 atvoz2-1 correlated with increased expression of several FLC activators, including components of the PAF1 and SWR1 chromatin-modifying complexes. Additionally, AtVOZs were shown to bind the promoter of MOS3/SAR3 and directly regulate expression of this nuclear pore protein, which is known to participate in the regulation of flowering time, suggesting that AtVOZs exert at least some of their flowering regulation by influencing the nuclear pore function. Complementation of atvoz1-1 atvoz2-1 with AtVOZ2 reversed all double mutant phenotypes, confirming that the observed morphological and molecular changes arise from the absence of functional AtVOZ proteins, and validating the functional redundancy between AtVOZ1 and AtVOZ2.

  1. Changes in time of sowing, flowering and maturity of cereals in Europe under climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jørgen E; Børgesen, Christen Duus; Elsgaard, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The phenological development of cereal crops from emergence through flowering to maturity is largely controlled by temperature, but also affected by day length and potential physiological stresses. Responses may vary between species and varieties. Climate change will affect the timing of cereal...... crop development, but exact changes will also depend on changes in varieties as affected by plant breeding and variety choices. This study aimed to assess changes in timing of major phenological stages of cereal crops in Northern and Central Europe under climate change. Records on dates of sowing......, flowering, and maturity of wheat, oats and maize were collected from field experiments conducted during the period 1985–2009. Data for spring wheat and spring oats covered latitudes from 46 to 64°N, winter wheat from 46 to 61°N, and maize from 47 to 58°N. The number of observations (site...

  2. Putative sugarcane FT/TFL1 genes delay flowering time and alter reproductive architecture in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Carla P; Minow, Mark A A; Chalfun-Júnior, Antonio; Colasanti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Agriculturally important grasses such as rice, maize, and sugarcane are evolutionarily distant from Arabidopsis, yet some components of the floral induction process are highly conserved. Flowering in sugarcane is an important factor that negatively affects cane yield and reduces sugar/ethanol production from this important perennial bioenergy crop. Comparative studies have facilitated the identification and characterization of putative orthologs of key flowering time genes in sugarcane, a complex polyploid plant whose genome has yet to be sequenced completely. Using this approach we identified phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) gene family members in sugarcane that are similar to the archetypical FT and TFL1 genes of Arabidopsis that play an essential role in controlling the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. Expression analysis of ScTFL1, which falls into the TFL1-clade of floral repressors, showed transcripts in developing leaves surrounding the shoot apex but not at the apex itself. ScFT1 was detected in immature leaves and apical regions of vegetatively growing plants and, after the floral transition, expression also occurred in mature leaves. Ectopic over-expression of ScTFL1 in Arabidopsis caused delayed flowering in Arabidopsis, as might be expected for a gene related to TFL1. In addition, lines with the latest flowering phenotype exhibited aerial rosette formation. Unexpectedly, over-expression of ScFT1, which has greatest similarity to the florigen-encoding FT, also caused a delay in flowering. This preliminary analysis of divergent sugarcane FT and TFL1 gene family members from Saccharum spp. suggests that their expression patterns and roles in the floral transition has diverged from the predicted role of similar PEBP family members.

  3. Putative sugarcane FT/TFL1 genes delay flowering time and alter reproductive architecture in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla P. Coelho

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Agriculturally important grasses such as rice, maize and sugarcane are evolutionarily distant from Arabidopsis, yet some components of the floral induction process are highly conserved. Flowering in sugarcane is an important factor that negatively affects cane yield and reduces sugar/ethanol production from this important perennial bioenergy crop. Comparative studies have facilitated the identification and characterization of putative orthologs of key flowering time genes in sugarcane, a complex polyploid plant whose genome has yet to be sequenced completely. Using this approach we identified phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP gene family members in sugarcane that are similar to the archetypical FT and TFL1 genes of Arabidopsis that play an essential role in controlling the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. Expression analysis of ScTFL1, which falls into the TFL1-clade of floral repressors, showed transcripts in developing leaves surrounding the shoot apex but not at the apex itself. ScFT1 was detected in immature leaves and apical regions of vegetatively growing plants and, after the floral transition, expression also occurred in mature leaves. Ectopic over-expression of ScTFL1 in Arabidopsis caused delayed flowering in Arabidopsis, as might be expected for a gene related to TFL1. In addition, lines with the latest flowering phenotype exhibited aerial rosette formation. Unexpectedly, over-expression of ScFT1, which has greatest similarity to the florigen-encoding FT, also caused a delay in flowering. This preliminary analysis of divergent sugarcane FT and TFL1 gene family members from Saccharum spp. suggests that their expression patterns and roles in the floral transition has diverged from the predicted role of similar PEBP family members.

  4. Putative sugarcane FT/TFL1 genes delay flowering time and alter reproductive architecture in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Carla P.; Minow, Mark A. A.; Chalfun-Júnior, Antonio; Colasanti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Agriculturally important grasses such as rice, maize, and sugarcane are evolutionarily distant from Arabidopsis, yet some components of the floral induction process are highly conserved. Flowering in sugarcane is an important factor that negatively affects cane yield and reduces sugar/ethanol production from this important perennial bioenergy crop. Comparative studies have facilitated the identification and characterization of putative orthologs of key flowering time genes in sugarcane, a complex polyploid plant whose genome has yet to be sequenced completely. Using this approach we identified phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) gene family members in sugarcane that are similar to the archetypical FT and TFL1 genes of Arabidopsis that play an essential role in controlling the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. Expression analysis of ScTFL1, which falls into the TFL1-clade of floral repressors, showed transcripts in developing leaves surrounding the shoot apex but not at the apex itself. ScFT1 was detected in immature leaves and apical regions of vegetatively growing plants and, after the floral transition, expression also occurred in mature leaves. Ectopic over-expression of ScTFL1 in Arabidopsis caused delayed flowering in Arabidopsis, as might be expected for a gene related to TFL1. In addition, lines with the latest flowering phenotype exhibited aerial rosette formation. Unexpectedly, over-expression of ScFT1, which has greatest similarity to the florigen-encoding FT, also caused a delay in flowering. This preliminary analysis of divergent sugarcane FT and TFL1 gene family members from Saccharum spp. suggests that their expression patterns and roles in the floral transition has diverged from the predicted role of similar PEBP family members. PMID:24904616

  5. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium of nine genes with putative effects on flowering time in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiil, Alice; Lenk, Ingo; Petersen, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Optimization of flowering is an important breeding goal in forage and turf grasses, such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). Nine floral control genes including Lolium perenne CONSTANS (LpCO), SISTER OF FLOWERING LOCUS T (LpSFT), TERMINAL FLOWER1 (LpTFL1), VERNALIZATION1 (LpVRN1, identical......, one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was present per 127 bp between two randomly sampled sequences for the nine genes (π = 0.00790). Two MADS-box genes, LpMADS1 and LpMADS10, involved in timing of flowering showed high nucleotide diversity and rapid LD decay, whereas MADS-box genes involved...

  6. Beyond flowering time: pleiotropic function of the maize flowering hormone florigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilevskaya, Olga N; Meng, Xin; McGonigle, Brian; Muszynski, Michael G

    2011-09-01

    The transition from vegetative to reproductive development is a critical turning point in a plant’s life cycle. It is now widely accepted that a leaf-borne signal, florigen, moves via the phloem from leaves to the shoot apical meristem to trigger its reprogramming to produce flowers. In part, the florigenic signal comprises a protein that belongs to the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) family that is present in all living organisms but displays diverse functions. The founding floral-promoting PEBP gene in Arabidopsis is FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) whose functional homologs have been indentified in many flowering plants. We recently accumulated sufficient evidence to demonstrate the maize FT homolog ZCN8 has florigenic function. This task was particularly challenging due to the large number of FT-homologous genes in the maize genome. Here we show that ZCN8 function is more complex than simply regulating the floral transition. ZCN8 appears to play a pleiotropic role in the regulation of generalized growth of vegetative and reproductive tissues.

  7. A genetic framework for flowering-time pathways in Citrus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Carnier Dornelas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Floral transition is one the most drastic changes occurring during the life cycle of a plant. The shoot apical meristem switches from the production of leaves with associated secondary shoot meristems to the production of flower meristems. This transition is abrupt and generally irreversible, suggesting it is regulated by a robust gene regulatory network capable of driving sharp transitions. The moment at which this transition occurs is precisely determined by environmental and endogenous signals. A large number of genes acting within these pathways have been cloned in model herbaceous plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. In this paper, we report the results of our search in the Citrus expressed sequence tag (CitEST database for expressed sequence tags (ESTs showing sequence homology with known elements of flowering-time pathways. We have searched all sequence clusters in the CitEST database and identified more than one hundred Citrus spp sequences that codify putative conserved elements of the autonomous, vernalization, photoperiod response and gibberelic acid-controlled flowering-time pathways. Additionally, we have characterized in silico putative members of the Citrus spp homologs to the Arabidopsis CONSTANS family of transcription factors.

  8. EMF1, a novel protein involved in the control of shoot architecture and flowering in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubert, D.; Chen, L.; Moon, Y.-H.

    2001-01-01

    Shoot architecture and flowering time in angiosperms depend on the balanced expression of a large number of flowering time and flower meristem identity genes. Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis EMBRYONIC FLOWER (EMF) genes cause Arabidopsis to eliminate rosette shoot growth and transform...... the apical meristem from indeterminate to determinate growth by producing a single terminal flower on all nodes. We have identified the EMF1 gene by positional cloning. The deduced polypeptide has no homology with any protein of known function except a putative protein in the rice genome with which EMF1...

  9. Ozone pollution affects flower numbers and timing in a simulated BAP priority calcareous grassland community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Felicity; Williamson, Jennifer; Mills, Gina

    2012-04-01

    Mesocosms representing the BAP Priority habitat 'Calcareous Grassland' were exposed to eight ozone profiles for twelve-weeks in two consecutive years. Half of the mesocosms received a reduced watering regime during the exposure periods. Numbers and timing of flowering in the second exposure period were related to ozone concentration and phytotoxic ozone dose (accumulated stomatal flux). For Lotus corniculatus, ozone accelerated the timing of the maximum number of flowers. An increase in mean ozone concentration from 30ppb to 70ppb corresponded with an advance in the timing of maximum flowering by six days. A significant reduction in flower numbers with increasing ozone was found for Campanula rotundifolia and Scabiosa columbaria and the relationship with ozone was stronger for those that were well-watered than for those with reduced watering. These changes in flowering timing and numbers could have large ecological impacts, affecting plant pollination and the food supply of nectar feeding insects.

  10. Association analysis of photoperiodic flowering time genes in west and central African sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhosale Sankalp U

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photoperiod-sensitive flowering is a key adaptive trait for sorghum (Sorghum bicolor in West and Central Africa. In this study we performed an association analysis to investigate the effect of polymorphisms within the genes putatively related to variation in flowering time on photoperiod-sensitive flowering in sorghum. For this purpose a genetically characterized panel of 219 sorghum accessions from West and Central Africa was evaluated for their photoperiod response index (PRI based on two sowing dates under field conditions. Results Sorghum accessions used in our study were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in six genes putatively involved in the photoperiodic control of flowering time. Applying a mixed model approach and previously-determined population structure parameters to these candidate genes, we found significant associations between several SNPs with PRI for the genes CRYPTOCHROME 1 (CRY1-b1 and GIGANTEA (GI. Conclusions The negative values of Tajima's D, found for the genes of our study, suggested that purifying selection has acted on genes involved in photoperiodic control of flowering time in sorghum. The SNP markers of our study that showed significant associations with PRI can be used to create functional markers to serve as important tools for marker-assisted selection of photoperiod-sensitive cultivars in sorghum.

  11. A Multiple QTL-Seq Strategy Delineates Potential Genomic Loci Governing Flowering Time in Chickpea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rishi; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Kumar, Rajendra; Daware, Anurag; Basu, Udita; Shimray, Philanim W.; Tripathi, Shailesh; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2017-01-01

    Identification of functionally relevant potential genomic loci using an economical, simpler and user-friendly genomics-assisted breeding strategy is vital for rapid genetic dissection of complex flowering time quantitative trait in chickpea. A high-throughput multiple QTL-seq strategy was employed in two inter (Cicer arietinum desi accession ICC 4958 × C reticulatum wild accession ICC 17160)- and intra (ICC 4958 × C. arietinum kabuli accession ICC 8261)-specific RIL mapping populations to identify the major QTL genomic regions governing flowering time in chickpea. The whole genome resequencing discovered 1635117 and 592486 SNPs exhibiting differentiation between early- and late-flowering mapping parents and bulks, constituted by pooling the homozygous individuals of extreme flowering time phenotypic trait from each of two aforesaid RIL populations. The multiple QTL-seq analysis using these mined SNPs in two RIL mapping populations narrowed-down two longer (907.1 kb and 1.99 Mb) major flowering time QTL genomic regions into the high-resolution shorter (757.7 kb and 1.39 Mb) QTL intervals on chickpea chromosome 4. This essentially identified regulatory as well as coding (non-synonymous/synonymous) novel SNP allelic variants from two efl1 (early flowering 1) and GI (GIGANTEA) genes regulating flowering time in chickpea. Interestingly, strong natural allelic diversity reduction (88–91%) of two known flowering genes especially mapped at major QTL intervals as compared to that of background genomic regions (where no flowering time QTLs were mapped; 61.8%) in cultivated vis-à-vis wild Cicer gene pools was evident inferring the significant impact of evolutionary bottlenecks on these loci during chickpea domestication. Higher association potential of coding non-synonymous and regulatory SNP alleles mined from efl1 (36–49%) and GI (33–42%) flowering genes for early and late flowering time differentiation among chickpea accessions was evident. The robustness and

  12. Quantifying the Effects of Photoperiod, Temperature and Daily Irradiance on Flowering Time of Soybean Isolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elroy R. Cober

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Soybean isolines with different combinations of photoperiod sensitivity alleles were planted in a greenhouse at different times during the year resulting in natural variation in daily incident irradiance and duration. The time from planting to first flower were observed. Mathematical models, using additive and multiplicative modes, were developed to quantify the effect of photoperiod, temperature, photoperiod-temperature interactions, rate of photoperiod change, and daily solar irradiance on flowering time. Observed flowering times correlated with predicted times (R2 = 0.92, Standard Error of the Estimate (SSE = 2.84 d, multiplicative mode; R2 = 0.91, SSE = 2.88 d, additive mode. The addition of a rate of photoperiod change function and an irradiance function to the temperature and photoperiod functions improved the accuracy of flowering time prediction. The addition of a modified photoperiod function, which allowed for photoperiod sensitivity at shorter photoperiods, improved prediction of flowering time. Both increasing and decreasing rate of photoperiod change, as well as low levels of daily irradiance delayed flowering in soybean. The complete model, which included terms for the rate of photoperiod change, photoperiod, temperature and irradiance, predicted time to first flower in soybean across a range of environmental conditions with an SEE of 3.6 days when tested with independent data.

  13. Molecular mechanisms regulating flowering time in sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ionescu, Irina Alexandra

    The timing of flowering is a well-researched but at the same time incredibly complex process in angiosperms. Although we are in possession of detailed knowledge on the genetic level of flowering time regulation in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, it is often difficult to transfer this knowle...... and its amide coincided with flowering time in both species. Taken together, these results contribute to elucidating parts of the complex network regulating flowering time in perennial plants.......The timing of flowering is a well-researched but at the same time incredibly complex process in angiosperms. Although we are in possession of detailed knowledge on the genetic level of flowering time regulation in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, it is often difficult to transfer...... this knowledge to other plants, like perennial woody plants growing in temperate regions. The main reason for this is a process called bud dormancy, which enables these plants to survive the harsh environmental conditions of winter. Accordingly a certain amount of cold is required for them to flower properly...

  14. Flowering time and incompatibility groups: Cultivar combination in commercial sweet cherry (Prunus avium L. orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radičević Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of eight-year study (1999-2006 of flowering phenophase in 21 introduced sweet cherry cultivars grown under the agro-environmental conditions of West Serbia. Flowering time, as well as progress and abundance of flowering were studied, and classification of the studied cultivars according to flowering time was derived. On the basis of mean several-year overlap in phenophase of full flowering and on the grounds of so far known data on classification of these cultivars among incompatibility groups, we have offered a recommendation for their cultivation in orchards whereby the most effective pollination and fertilization can be ensured as well as good fruit-set and satisfactory fruit yields.

  15. Transcriptome Analysis of Flowering Time Genes under Drought Stress in Maize Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kitae; Kim, Hyo Chul; Shin, Seungho; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Moon, Jun-Cheol; Kim, Jae Yoon; Lee, Byung-Moo

    2017-01-01

    Flowering time is an important factor determining yield and seed quality in maize. A change in flowering time is a strategy used to survive abiotic stresses. Among abiotic stresses, drought can increase anthesis-silking intervals (ASI), resulting in negative effects on maize yield. We have analyzed the correlation between flowering time and drought stress using RNA-seq and bioinformatics tools. Our results identified a total of 619 genes and 126 transcripts whose expression was altered by drought stress in the maize B73 leaves under short-day condition. Among drought responsive genes, we also identified 20 genes involved in flowering times. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis was used to predict the functions of the drought-responsive genes and transcripts. GO categories related to flowering time included reproduction, flower development, pollen–pistil interaction, and post-embryonic development. Transcript levels of several genes that have previously been shown to affect flowering time, such as PRR37, transcription factor HY5, and CONSTANS, were significantly altered by drought conditions. Furthermore, we also identified several drought-responsive transcripts containing C2H2 zinc finger, CCCH, and NAC domains, which are frequently involved in transcriptional regulation and may thus have potential to alter gene expression programs to change maize flowering time. Overall, our results provide a genome-wide analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs), novel transcripts, and isoform variants expressed during the reproductive stage of maize plants subjected to drought stress and short-day condition. Further characterization of the drought-responsive transcripts identified in this study has the potential to advance our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate flowering time under drought stress.

  16. Identification of genetic variants associated with maize flowering time using an extremely large multi-genetic background population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowering time is one of the major adaptive traits in domestication of maize and an important selection criterion in breeding. To detect more maize flowering time variants we evaluated flowering time traits using an extremely large multi- genetic background population that contained more than 8000 l...

  17. Flower power? Potential benefits and pitfalls of using (flowering) vegetation for conservation biological control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wackers, F.L.; Rijn, van P.C.J.; Winkler, K.; Olson, D.

    2007-01-01

    Whereas nectar and pollen provision to predators and parasitoids is often a main objective in pursuing agricultural biodiversity, we generally know little about whether the flowering plant species involved are actually suitable as insect food sources or what their ultimate impact is on biological pe

  18. Variation in highbush blueberry floral volatile profiles as a function of pollination status, cultivar, time of day and flower part: implications for flower visitation by bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Parra, Leonardo; Quiroz, Andrés; Isaacs, Rufus

    2011-06-01

    Studies of the effects of pollination on floral scent and bee visitation remain rare, particularly in agricultural crops. To fill this gap, the hypothesis that bee visitation to flowers decreases after pollination through reduced floral volatile emissions in highbush blueberries, Vaccinium corymbosum, was tested. Other sources of variation in floral emissions and the role of floral volatiles in bee attraction were also examined. Pollinator visitation to blueberry flowers was manipulated by bagging all flowers within a bush (pollinator excluded) or leaving them unbagged (open pollinated), and then the effect on floral volatile emissions and future bee visitation were measured. Floral volatiles were also measured from different blueberry cultivars, times of the day and flower parts, and a study was conducted to test the attraction of bees to floral volatiles. Open-pollinated blueberry flowers had 32 % lower volatile emissions than pollinator-excluded flowers. In particular, cinnamyl alcohol, a major component of the floral blend that is emitted exclusively from petals, was emitted in lower quantities from open-pollinated flowers. Although, no differences in cinnamyl alcohol emissions were detected among three blueberry cultivars or at different times of day, some components of the blueberry floral blend were emitted in higher amounts from certain cultivars and at mid-day. Field observations showed that more bees visited bushes with pollinator-excluded flowers. Also, more honey bees were caught in traps baited with a synthetic blueberry floral blend than in unbaited traps. Greater volatile emissions may help guide bees to unpollinated flowers, and thus increase plant fitness and bee energetic return when foraging in blueberries. Furthermore, the variation in volatile emissions from blueberry flowers depending on pollination status, plant cultivar and time of day suggests an adaptive role of floral signals in increasing pollination of flowers.

  19. Variation in highbush blueberry floral volatile profiles as a function of pollination status, cultivar, time of day and flower part: implications for flower visitation by bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Parra, Leonardo; Quiroz, Andrés; Isaacs, Rufus

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Studies of the effects of pollination on floral scent and bee visitation remain rare, particularly in agricultural crops. To fill this gap, the hypothesis that bee visitation to flowers decreases after pollination through reduced floral volatile emissions in highbush blueberries, Vaccinium corymbosum, was tested. Other sources of variation in floral emissions and the role of floral volatiles in bee attraction were also examined. Methods Pollinator visitation to blueberry flowers was manipulated by bagging all flowers within a bush (pollinator excluded) or leaving them unbagged (open pollinated), and then the effect on floral volatile emissions and future bee visitation were measured. Floral volatiles were also measured from different blueberry cultivars, times of the day and flower parts, and a study was conducted to test the attraction of bees to floral volatiles. Key Results Open-pollinated blueberry flowers had 32 % lower volatile emissions than pollinator-excluded flowers. In particular, cinnamyl alcohol, a major component of the floral blend that is emitted exclusively from petals, was emitted in lower quantities from open-pollinated flowers. Although, no differences in cinnamyl alcohol emissions were detected among three blueberry cultivars or at different times of day, some components of the blueberry floral blend were emitted in higher amounts from certain cultivars and at mid-day. Field observations showed that more bees visited bushes with pollinator-excluded flowers. Also, more honey bees were caught in traps baited with a synthetic blueberry floral blend than in unbaited traps. Conclusions Greater volatile emissions may help guide bees to unpollinated flowers, and thus increase plant fitness and bee energetic return when foraging in blueberries. Furthermore, the variation in volatile emissions from blueberry flowers depending on pollination status, plant cultivar and time of day suggests an adaptive role of floral signals in

  20. Models to Predict Flowering Time in the Main Saffron Production Regions of Khorasan Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behdani, M. A.; Koocheki, A.; Nassiri, M.; Rezvani, P.

    The objective of this study was to develop a thermal model that can be used for prediction of saffron flowering time. For this purpose, existing data on saffron flower emergence time were collected in a wide range of temperature regimes over the saffron production regions of Khorasan province, Iran. Linear second-order polynomial and 5-parameter beta models were used and statistically compared for their ability in predicting saffron flowering time as a function of temperature. The results showed a significant delay in flowering date across the temperature gradient. While beta model had a better statistical performance but the simple linear model also showed a good predicting ability and therefore, can be used as a reliable model.

  1. Genome dynamics explain the evolution of flowering time CCT domain gene families in the Poaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Cockram

    Full Text Available Numerous CCT domain genes are known to control flowering in plants. They belong to the CONSTANS-like (COL and PREUDORESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR gene families, which in addition to a CCT domain possess B-box or response-regulator domains, respectively. Ghd7 is the most recently identified COL gene to have a proven role in the control of flowering time in the Poaceae. However, as it lacks B-box domains, its inclusion within the COL gene family, technically, is incorrect. Here, we show Ghd7 belongs to a larger family of previously uncharacterized Poaceae genes which possess just a single CCT domain, termed here CCT MOTIF FAMILY (CMF genes. We molecularly describe the CMF (and related COL and PRR gene families in four sequenced Poaceae species, as well as in the draft genome assembly of barley (Hordeum vulgare. Genetic mapping of the ten barley CMF genes identified, as well as twelve previously unmapped HvCOL and HvPRR genes, finds the majority map to colinear positions relative to their Poaceae orthologues. Combined inter-/intra-species comparative and phylogenetic analysis of CMF, COL and PRR gene families indicates they evolved prior to the monocot/dicot divergence ∼200 mya, with Poaceae CMF evolution described as the interplay between whole genome duplication in the ancestral cereal, and subsequent clade-specific mutation, deletion and duplication events. Given the proven role of CMF genes in the modulation of cereals flowering, the molecular, phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the Poaceae CMF, COL and PRR gene families presented here provides the foundation from which functional investigation can be undertaken.

  2. Genome dynamics explain the evolution of flowering time CCT domain gene families in the Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockram, James; Thiel, Thomas; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Stein, Nils; Taudien, Stefan; Bailey, Paul C; O'Sullivan, Donal M

    2012-01-01

    Numerous CCT domain genes are known to control flowering in plants. They belong to the CONSTANS-like (COL) and PREUDORESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) gene families, which in addition to a CCT domain possess B-box or response-regulator domains, respectively. Ghd7 is the most recently identified COL gene to have a proven role in the control of flowering time in the Poaceae. However, as it lacks B-box domains, its inclusion within the COL gene family, technically, is incorrect. Here, we show Ghd7 belongs to a larger family of previously uncharacterized Poaceae genes which possess just a single CCT domain, termed here CCT MOTIF FAMILY (CMF) genes. We molecularly describe the CMF (and related COL and PRR) gene families in four sequenced Poaceae species, as well as in the draft genome assembly of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Genetic mapping of the ten barley CMF genes identified, as well as twelve previously unmapped HvCOL and HvPRR genes, finds the majority map to colinear positions relative to their Poaceae orthologues. Combined inter-/intra-species comparative and phylogenetic analysis of CMF, COL and PRR gene families indicates they evolved prior to the monocot/dicot divergence ∼200 mya, with Poaceae CMF evolution described as the interplay between whole genome duplication in the ancestral cereal, and subsequent clade-specific mutation, deletion and duplication events. Given the proven role of CMF genes in the modulation of cereals flowering, the molecular, phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the Poaceae CMF, COL and PRR gene families presented here provides the foundation from which functional investigation can be undertaken.

  3. The B2 flowering time locus of beet encodes a zinc finger transcription factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dally, Nadine; Xiao, Ke; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Jung, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) is a biennial root crop that grows vegetatively in the first year and starts shoot elongation (bolting) and flowering after exposure to cold temperatures over winter. Early bolting before winter is controlled by the dominant allele of the B locus. Recently, the BOLTING TIME CONTROL 1 (BTC1) gene has been cloned from this locus. BTC1 promotes early bolting through repression of the downstream bolting repressor B. vulgaris FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (BvFT1) and activation of the downstream floral activator BvFT2. We have identified a new bolting locus B2 acting epistatically to B. B2 houses a transcription factor which is diurnally regulated and acts like BTC1 upstream of BvFT1 and BvFT2. It was termed BvBBX19 according to its closest homolog from Arabidopsis thaliana. The encoded protein has two conserved domains with homology to zinc finger B-boxes. Ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutations within the second B-box caused up-regulation of BvFT1 and complete down-regulation of BvFT2. In Arabidopsis, the expression of FT is promoted by the B-box containing protein CONSTANS (CO). We performed a phylogenetic analysis with B-box genes from beet and A. thaliana but only BvCOL1 clustered with CO. However, BvCOL1 had been excluded as a CO ortholog by previous studies. Therefore, a new model for flowering induction in beet is proposed in which BTC1 and BvBBX19 complement each other and thus acquire a CO function to regulate their downstream targets BvFT1 and BvFT2. PMID:24965366

  4. Arabidopsis SUMO protease ASP1 positively regulates flowering time partially through regulating FLC stability 

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, Xiangxiong

    2016-12-07

    The initiation of flowering is tightly regulated by the endogenous and environment signals, which is crucial for the reproductive success of flowering plants. It is well known that autonomous and vernalization pathways repress transcription of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a focal floral repressor, but how its protein stability is regulated remains largely unknown. Here, we found that mutations in a novel Arabidopsis SUMO protease 1 (ASP1) resulted in a strong late-flowering phenotype under long-days, but to a lesser extent under short-days. ASP1 localizes in the nucleus and exhibited a SUMO protease activity in vitro and in vivo. The conserved Cys-577 in ASP1 is critical for its enzymatic activity, as well as its physiological function in the regulation of flowering time. Genetic and gene expression analyses demonstrated that ASP1 promotes transcription of positive regulators of flowering, such as FT, SOC1 and FD, and may function in both CO-dependent photoperiod pathway and FLC-dependent pathways. Although the transcription level of FLC was not affected in the loss-of-function asp1 mutant, the protein stability of FLC was increased in the asp1 mutant. Taken together, this study identified a novel bona fide SUMO protease, ASP1, which positively regulates transition to flowering at least partly by repressing FLC protein stability.

  5. Controllable preparation of flower-like brookite TiO{sub 2} nanostructures via one-step hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Yunling [School of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); College of Science, Civil Aviation University of China, Tianjin 300300 (China); Tan, Xin [School of Science, Tibet University, Lhasa 850000 (China); Yu, Tao, E-mail: yutao@tju.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li, Yan; Li, Yimei; Wang, Ru; Xue, Lingqian [College of Science, Civil Aviation University of China, Tianjin 300300 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Flower-like brookite TiO{sub 2} structures were prepared by hydrothermal method. • PVP not only acted as a dispersant but also stabilized the layered structure. • The resulted brookite TiO{sub 2} showed high photocatalytic activity under UV irradiation. - Abstract: Flower-like brookite TiO{sub 2} nanostructures were controllable prepared by a one-step hydrothermal method by changing experimental conditions, such as hydrothermal temperature, reaction time and the amount of polyvinylpyrrolidone. The photocatalytic activities of the samples were investigated by degradation of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution under UV light irradiation. It was found that the formation of brookite TiO{sub 2} nanostructures with various morphologies could be well controlled by the adjustment of hydrothermal temperature, reaction time and the amount of surfactant, and the morphology of the products changed from spindle-like structures to flower-like structures with the increase of hydrothermal temperature, reaction time and the amount of surfactant. The photocatalytic tests indicate that the flower-like brookite TiO{sub 2} nanostructures shows high photocatalytic activity in degradation of methylene blue (MB) under UV light irradiation. The formation mechanism of flower-like brookite TiO{sub 2} nanostructures was also discussed in detail based on the above investigations.

  6. Combined linkage and association mapping of flowering time in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadic, Elena; Coque, Marie; Vear, Felicity; Grezes-Besset, Bruno; Pauquet, Jerôme; Piquemal, Joël; Lippi, Yannick; Blanchard, Philippe; Romestant, Michel; Pouilly, Nicolas; Rengel, David; Gouzy, Jerôme; Langlade, Nicolas; Mangin, Brigitte; Vincourt, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    Association mapping and linkage mapping were used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) and/or causative mutations involved in the control of flowering time in cultivated sunflower Helianthus annuus. A panel of 384 inbred lines was phenotyped through testcrosses with two tester inbred lines across 15 location × year combinations. A recombinant inbred line (RIL) population comprising 273 lines was phenotyped both per se and through testcrosses with one or two testers in 16 location × year combinations. In the association mapping approach, kinship estimation using 5,923 single nucleotide polymorphisms was found to be the best covariate to correct for effects of panel structure. Linkage disequilibrium decay ranged from 0.08 to 0.26 cM for a threshold of 0.20, after correcting for structure effects, depending on the linkage group (LG) and the ancestry of inbred lines. A possible hitchhiking effect is hypothesized for LG10 and LG08. A total of 11 regions across 10 LGs were found to be associated with flowering time, and QTLs were mapped on 11 LGs in the RIL population. Whereas eight regions were demonstrated to be common between the two approaches, the linkage disequilibrium approach did not detect a documented QTL that was confirmed using the linkage mapping approach.

  7. The B-box family gene STO (BBX24) in Arabidopsis thaliana regulates flowering time in different pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Sun, Jinjing; Wang, Donghui; Bai, Shunong; Clarke, Adrian K; Holm, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Flowering at the appropriate time is crucial for reproductive success and is strongly influenced by various pathways such as photoperiod, circadian clock, FRIGIDA and vernalization. Although each separate pathway has been extensively studied, much less is known about the interactions between them. In this study we have investigated the relationship between the photoperiod/circadian clock gene and FRIGIDA/FLC by characterizing the function of the B-box STO gene family. STO has two B-box Zn-finger domains but lacks the CCT domain. Its expression is controlled by circadian rhythm and is affected by environmental factors and phytohormones. Loss and gain of function mutants show diversiform phenotypes from seed germination to flowering. The sto-1 mutant flowers later than the wild type (WT) under short day growth conditions, while over-expression of STO causes early flowering both in long and short days. STO over-expression not only reduces FLC expression level but it also activates FT and SOC1 expression. It also does not rely on the other B-box gene CO or change the circadian clock system to activate FT and SOC1. Furthermore, the STO activation of FT and SOC1 expression is independent of the repression of FLC; rather STO and FLC compete with each other to regulate downstream genes. Our results indicate that photoperiod and the circadian clock pathway gene STO can affect the key flowering time genes FLC and FT/SOC1 separately, and reveals a novel perspective to the mechanism of flowering regulation.

  8. Linked circadian outputs control elongation growth and flowering in response to photoperiod and temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seaton, D.D.; Smith, R.W.; Young Hun Song,; MacGregor, D.R.; Stewart, K.; Steel, G.; Foreman, J.; Penfield, S.; Imaizumi, T.; Miller, A.J.; Halliday, K.J.

    2015-01-01

    Clock-regulated pathways coordinate the response of many developmental processes to changes in photoperiod and temperature. We model two of the best-understood clock output pathways in Arabidopsis, which control key regulators of flowering and elongation growth. In flowering, the model predicted reg

  9. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castède, Sophie; Campoy, José Antonio; Le Dantec, Loïck; Quero-García, José; Barreneche, Teresa; Wenden, Bénédicte; Dirlewanger, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies 'Regina' × 'Garnet' and 'Regina' × 'Lapins', and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions.

  10. Upland cotton gene GhFPF1 confers promotion of flowering time and shade-avoidance responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Xiaoyan Wang

    Full Text Available Extensive studies on floral transition in model species have revealed a network of regulatory interactions between proteins that transduce and integrate developmental and environmental signals to promote or inhibit the transition to flowering. Previous studies indicated FLOWERING PROMOTING FACTOR 1 (FPF1 gene was involved in the promotion of flowering, but the molecular mechanism was still unclear. Here, FPF1 homologous sequences were screened from diploid Gossypium raimondii L. (D-genome, n = 13 and Gossypium arboreum L. genome (A-genome, n = 13 databases. Orthologous genes from the two species were compared, suggesting that distinctions at nucleic acid and amino acid levels were not equivalent because of codon degeneracy. Six FPF1 homologous genes were identified from the cultivated allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L. (AD-genome, n = 26. Analysis of relative transcripts of the six genes in different tissues revealed that this gene family displayed strong tissue-specific expression. GhFPF1, encoding a 12.0-kDa protein (Accession No: KC832319 exerted more transcripts in floral apices of short-season cotton, hinting that it could be involved in floral regulation. Significantly activated APETALA 1 and suppressed FLOWERING LOCUS C expression were induced by over-expression of GhFPF1 in the Arabidopsis Columbia-0 ecotype. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis displayed a constitutive shade-avoiding phenotype that is characterized by long hypocotyls and petioles, reduced chlorophyll content, and early flowering. We propose that GhFPF1 may be involved in flowering time control and shade-avoidance responses.

  11. Genetics of flowering time in bread wheat Triticum aestivum: complementary interaction between vernalization-insensitive and photoperiod-insensitive mutations imparts very early flowering habit to spring wheat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushil Kumar; Vishakha Sharma; Swati Chaudhary; Anshika Tyagi; Poonam Mishra; Anupama Priyadarshini; Anupam Singh

    2011-04-01

    Time to flowering in the winter growth habit bread wheat is dependent on vernalization (exposure to cold conditions) and exposure to long days (photoperiod). Dominant Vrn-1 (Vrn-A1, Vrn-B1 and Vrn-D1) alleles are associated with vernalization-independent spring growth habit. The semidominant Ppd-D1a mutation confers photoperiod-insensitivity or rapid flowering in wheat under short day and long day conditions. The objective of this study was to reveal the nature of interaction between Vrn-1 and Ppd-D1a mutations (active alleles of the respective genes vrn-1 and Ppd-D1b). Twelve Indian spring wheat cultivars and the spring wheat landrace Chinese Spring were characterized for their flowering times by seeding them every month for five years under natural field conditions in New Delhi. Near isogenic Vrn-1 Ppd-D1 and Vrn-1 Ppd-D1a lines constructed in two genetic backgrounds were also phenotyped for flowering time by seeding in two different seasons. The wheat lines of Vrn-A1a Vrn-B1 Vrn-D1 Ppd-D1a, Vrn-A1a Vrn-B1 Ppd-D1a and Vrn-A1a Vrn-D1 Ppd-D1a (or Vrn-1 Ppd-D1a) genotypes flowered several weeks earlier than that of Vrn-A1a Vrn-B1 Vrn-D1 Ppd-D1b, Vrn-A1b Ppd-D1b and Vrn-D1 Ppd-D1b (or Vrn-1 Ppd-D1b) genotypes. The flowering time phenotypes of the isogenic vernalization-insensitive lines confirmed that Ppd-D1a hastened flowering by several weeks. It was concluded that complementary interaction between Vrn-1 and Ppd-D1a active alleles imparted super/very-early flowering habit to spring wheats. The early and late flowering wheat varieties showed differences in flowering time between short day and long day conditions. The flowering time in Vrn-1 Ppd-D1a genotypes was hastened by higher temperatures under long day conditions. The ambient air temperature and photoperiod parameters for flowering in spring wheat were estimated at 25°C and 12 h, respectively.

  12. Flowering-Related RING Protein 1 (FRRP1) Regulates Flowering Time and Yield Potential by Affecting Histone H2B Monoubiquitination in Rice (Oryza Sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yiwei; He, Wei; Deng, Changwang; Chen, Xi; Gou, Lanming; Zhu, Fugui; Guo, Wei; Zhang, Jianfu; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Flowering time is a critical trait for crops cultivated under various temperature/photoperiod conditions around the world. To understand better the flowering time of rice, we used the vector pTCK303 to produce several lines of RNAi knockdown transgenic rice and investigated their flowering times and other agronomic traits. Among them, the heading date of FRRP1-RNAi knockdown transgenic rice was 23-26 days earlier than that of wild-type plants. FRRP1 is a novel rice gene that encodes a C3HC4-type Really Interesting Novel Gene (RING) finger domain protein. In addition to the early flowering time, FRRP1-RNAi knockdown transgenic rice caused changes on an array of agronomic traits, including plant height, panicle length and grain length. We analyzed the expression of some key genes associated with the flowering time and other agronomic traits in the FRRP1-RNAi knockdown lines and compared with that in wild-type lines. The expression of Hd3a increased significantly, which was the key factor in the early flowering time. Further experiments showed that the level of histone H2B monoubiquitination (H2Bub1) was noticeably reduced in the FRRP1-RNAi knockdown transgenic rice lines compared with wild-type plants and MBP-FRRP1-F1 was capable of self-ubiquitination. The results indicate that Flowering Related RING Protein 1 (FRRP1) is involved in histone H2B monoubiquitination and suggest that FRRP1 functions as an E3 ligase in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, FRRP1 probably regulates flowering time and yield potential in rice by affecting histone H2B monoubiquitination, which leads to changes in gene expression in multiple processes.

  13. Flowering time diversification and dispersal in central Eurasian wild wheat Aegilops tauschii Coss.: genealogical and ecological framework.

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    Yoshihiro Matsuoka

    Full Text Available Timing of flowering is a reproductive trait that has significant impact on fitness in plants. In contrast to recent advances in understanding the molecular basis of floral transition, few empirical studies have addressed questions concerning population processes of flowering time diversification within species. We analyzed chloroplast DNA genealogical structure of flowering time variation in central Eurasian wild wheat Aegilops tauschii Coss. using 200 accessions that represent the entire species range. Flowering time measured as days from germination to flowering varied from 144.0 to 190.0 days (average 161.3 days among accessions in a common garden/greenhouse experiment. Subsequent genealogical and statistical analyses showed that (1 there exist significant longitudinal and latitudinal clines in flowering time at the species level, (2 the early-flowering phenotype evolved in two intraspecific lineages, (3 in Asia, winter temperature was an environmental factor that affected the longitudinal clinal pattern of flowering time variation, and (4 in Transcaucasus-Middle East, some latitudinal factors affected the geographic pattern of flowering time variation. On the basis of palaeoclimatic, biogeographic, and genetic evidence, the northern part of current species' range [which was within the temperate desert vegetation (TDV zone at the Last Glacial Maximum] is hypothesized to have harbored species refugia. Postglacial southward dispersal from the TDV zone seems to have been driven by lineages that evolved short-flowering-time phenotypes through different genetic mechanisms in Transcaucasus-Middle East and Asia.

  14. A survey of flowering genes reveals the role of gibberellins in floral control in rose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remay, Arnaud; Lalanne, David; Thouroude, Tatiana; Le Couviour, Fabien; Hibrand-Saint Oyant, Laurence; Foucher, Fabrice

    2009-09-01

    Exhaustive studies on flowering control in annual plants have provided a framework for exploring this process in other plant species, especially in perennials for which little molecular data are currently available. Rose is a woody perennial plant with a particular flowering strategy--recurrent blooming, which is controlled by a recessive locus (RB). Gibberellins (GA) inhibit flowering only in non-recurrent roses. Moreover, the GA content varies during the flowering process and between recurrent and non-recurrent rose. Only a few rose genes potentially involved in flowering have been described, i.e. homologues of ABC model genes and floral genes from EST screening. In this study, we gained new information on the molecular basis of rose flowering: date of flowering and recurrent blooming. Based on a candidate gene strategy, we isolated genes that have similarities with genes known to be involved in floral control in Arabidopsis (GA pathway, floral repressors and integrators). Candidate genes were mapped on a segregating population, gene expression was studied in different organs and transcript abundance was monitored in growing shoot apices. Twenty-five genes were studied. RoFT, RoAP1 and RoLFY are proposed to be good floral markers. RoSPY and RB co-localized in our segregating population. GA metabolism genes were found to be regulated during floral transition. Furthermore, GA signalling genes were differentially regulated between a non-recurrent rose and its recurrent mutant. We propose that flowering gene networks are conserved between Arabidopsis and rose. The GA pathway appears to be a key regulator of flowering in rose. We postulate that GA metabolism is involved in floral initiation and GA signalling might be responsible for the recurrent flowering character.

  15. Quantitative trait loci analysis of flowering time related traits identified in recombinant inbred lines of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andargie, Mebeasealassie; Pasquet, Remy S; Muluvi, Geoffrey M; Timko, Michael P

    2013-05-01

    Flowering time is a major adaptive trait in plants and an important selection criterion in the breeding for genetic improvement of crop species. QTLs for the time of flower opening and days to flower were identified in a cross between a short duration domesticated cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) variety, 524B, and a relatively long duration wild accession, 219-01. A set of 159 F7 lines was grown under greenhouse conditions and scored for the flowering time associated phenotypes of time of flower opening and days to flower. Using a LOD threshold of 2.0, putative QTLs were identified and placed on a linkage map consisting of 202 SSR markers and four morphological loci. A total of five QTLs related to the time of flower opening were identified, accounting for 8.8%-29.8% of the phenotypic variation. Three QTLs for days to flower were detected, accounting for 5.7%-18.5% of the phenotypic variation. The major QTL of days to flower and time of flower opening were both mapped on linkage group 1. The QTLs identified in this study provide a strong foundation for further validation and fine mapping for developing an efficient way to restrain the gene flow between the cultivated and wild plants.

  16. FT and florigen long-distance flowering control in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putterill, Joanna; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika

    2016-10-01

    The great hunt for florigen, the universal, long distance flowering regulator proposed by Chailakhan in the 1930s, resulted in the discovery a decade ago that FT-like proteins fulfilled the predictions for florigen. They are small (∼175 amino acids), globular, phosphatidylethanolamine-binding (PEBP) proteins, phloem-expressed, graft-transmissible and able to move to the shoot apex to act as potent stimulators of flowering in many plants. Genes that regulate Arabidopsis FT protein movement and some features of Arabidopsis FT protein that make it an effective florigen have recently been identified. Although floral promotion via graft transmission of FT has not been demonstrated in trees, FT-like genes have been successfully applied to reducing the long juvenile (pre-flowering) phase of many trees enabling fast track breeding.

  17. MISSING FLOWERS gene controls axillary meristems initiation in sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fambrini, Marco; Cionini, Giuliano; Bertini, Daniele; Michelotti, Vania; Conti, Alessio; Pugliesi, Claudio

    2003-05-01

    The initiation and growth of axillary meristems are fundamental components of plant architecture. Here, we describe the mutant missing flowers (mf) of Helianthus annuus characterized by the lack of axillary shoots. Decapitation experiments and histological analysis indicate that this phenotype is the result of a defect in axillary meristem initiation. In addition to shoot branching, mutation affects floral differentiation. The indeterminate inflorescence of sunflower (capitulum) is formed of a large flat meristem which produces floret primordia in multiple spirals. In wildtype plants a bisecting crease divides each primordium in two distinct bumps that adopt different fate. The peripheral (abaxial) part of the primordium becomes a small leaf-like bract and the adaxial part becomes a flower. In the mf mutant, the formation of flowers at the axil of bracts is precluded. Histological analyses show that in floret primordia of the mutant a clear subdivision in dyads is not established. The primordia progressively bend inside and only large involucral floral bracts are developed. The results suggest that the MISSING FLOWERS gene is essential to provide or perceive an appropriate signal to the initiation of axillary meristems during both vegetative and reproductive phases.

  18. Influence of EARLI1-like genes on flowering time and lignin synthesis of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y; Zhang, X; Xu, Z-Y; Li, L; Zhang, C; Schläppi, M; Xu, Z-Q

    2011-09-01

    EARLI1 encodes a 14.7 kDa protein in the cell wall, is a member of the PRP (proline-rich protein) family and has multiple functions, including resistance to low temperature and fungal infection. RNA gel blot analyses in the present work indicated that expression of EARLI1-like genes, EARLI1, At4G12470 and At4G12490, was down-regulated in Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants derived from transformation with Agrobacterium strain ABI, which contains a construct encoding a double-strand RNA targeting 8CM of EARLI1. Phenotype analyses revealed that Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants of EARLI1 flowered earlier than Col-FRI-Sf2 wild-type plants. The average bolting time of Col-FRI-Sf2 and Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants was 39.7 and 19.4 days, respectively, under a long-day photoperiod. In addition, there were significant differences in main stem length, internode number and rosette leaf number between Col-FRI-Sf2 and Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants. RT-PCR showed that EARLI1-like genes might delay flowering time through the autonomous and long-day photoperiod pathways by maintaining the abundance of FLC transcripts. In Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants, transcription of FLC was repressed, while expression of SOC1 and FT was activated. Microscopy observations showed that EARLI1-like genes were also associated with morphogenesis of leaf cells in Arabidopsis. Using histochemical staining, EARLI1-like genes were found to be involved in regulation of lignin synthesis in inflorescence stems, and Col-FRI-Sf2 and Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants had 9.67% and 8.76% dry weight lignin, respectively. Expression analysis revealed that cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, a key enzyme in lignin synthesis, was influenced by EARLI1-like genes. These data all suggest that EARLI1-like genes could control the flowering process and lignin synthesis in Arabidopsis.

  19. Conserved CO-FT regulons contribute to the photoperiod flowering control in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chengming; Hu, Ruibo; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Qingzhe; Ma, Jinhua; Fu, Yong-Fu

    2014-01-07

    FTL1 to 6 showed flower-promoting activities in Arabidopsis. After three recent rounds of whole genome duplications in the soybean, the paralogous genes of CO-FT regulons showed subfunctionalization through expression divergence. Then, only GmCOL5/13 kept flowering-promoting activities, while GmFTL1 to 6 contributed to flowering control. Additionally, GmCOL5/13 and GmFT1/2/3/4/5/6 showed similar circadian expression profiles. Therefore, our results suggested that GmCOL5/13 and GmFT1/2/3/4/5/6 formed the complicate CO-FT regulons in the photoperiod regulation of flowering time in soybean.

  20. The Effect of Citrus Aurantium Flowers Aqueous Extract on Sleeping Time and the Level of Anxiety in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Sadat Abbasnia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: In Iranian traditional medicine Citrus Aurantium flower extract is used to treat some neural diseases. Tendency to use medicinal herbs is increasing. The present  study was done to determine the effect of Citrus Aurantium flowers on sleeping time and the level of anxiety in mice. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 80 male albino mice (25-30 g were  randomly divided into 8 equal groups. In order to measure . the sleeping time of the subjects . Angel’s method  was applied and the animals were divided into three experimental.groups (200, 400 and 600 mg/kg and one control group. To evaluate their anxiety levels. they were randomly divided into three experimental and one  control group;and for their evaluation plus maze (EPM model was used. The evaluation of anxiety indices included number and percent of time spent in open arm. Different doses of the aqueous extract of Citrus Aurantium flowers (200, 400, 600 mg/kg IP; respectively were intraperitoneally injected into the treated groups.  But, the controls received 10 ml/kg/BW normal saline intraperitoneally in both of the methods. The obtained data was analyzed by means of SPSS . software (V:17 using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test(α=0.05. Results: The extract of  Citrus aurantium flowers (200, 400 and 600 mg/kg significantly increased  sleeping time (12/2±0/53, (14/4±037, (15/5±1/22, time-spent of open arm entries (64/4±4/01, (75±3/01, (78±2/01 and arm entries into open arms(5/9±021, (6/6±0/41, (6/8±72 compared to the control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: The current study showed that the aqueous extract of Citrus Aurantium flowers incerases the sleeping time and decreases level of anxity in mice.

  1. EFFECTS OF PLANTING SPACE AND HARVEST TIME ON THE NUMBER, WEIGHT AND DIAMETER OF MARIGOLD (CALENDULA OFFICINALIS L. FLOWERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Parađiković

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted during 2010 in marigold (Calendula officinalis L. to determine the effects of three plant densities (plant density A - 65 cm x 35 cm; plant density B - 65 cm x 25 cm; plant density C – 55 cm x 25 cm and harvest time on the number, weight and diameter of marigold flowers. The results showed that the plant density significantly influenced the number of flowers per plant and flower weight. The largest number of flowers per plant was recorded in the plant density B (13.2 and the lowest (9.87 in the plant density C. The lowest flower weight was recorded in the plant density C (1.31 g and was statistically lower than the flower weight in the plant densities A (1.42 g and B (1.38 g. The plant density significantly influenced the number of flowers on side branches, being the highest in the plant density B. The diameter of the marigold flower was not significantly influenced by the plant density. During the experiment, a total of 13 harvests were achieved. The greatest number of flowers per plant was harvested in the eighth, ninth and tenth harvest, while the largest flower weight was measured in the fifth and twelfth harvest. On the average, the number of flowers per plant / harvest was 11.63 and the weight of flowers was 1.38 g. Diameter of marigold flowers ranged from 2.89 cm to 3.59 cm in the thirteenth and the third harvest, respectively. The number of flowers on side branches per plant / harvest was 11.61.

  2. Controlled synthesis and characterization of hollow flower-like silver nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eid KAM

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Kamel AM Eid, Hassan ME AzzazyNovel Diagnostics and Therapeutics Group, Yousef Jameel Science and Technology Research Center, School of Sciences and Engineering, The American University in Cairo, New Cairo, EgyptBackground: The synthesis of anisotropic silver nanoparticles is a time-consuming process and involves the use of expensive toxic chemicals and specialized laboratory equipment. The presence of toxic chemicals in the prepared anisotropic silver nanostructures hindered their medical application. The authors have developed a fast and inexpensive method for the synthesis of three-dimensional hollow flower-like silver nanostructures without the use of toxic chemicals.Methods: In this method, silver nitrate was reduced using dextrose in presence of trisodium citrate as a capping agent. Sodium hydroxide was added to enhance reduction efficacy of dextrose and reduce time of synthesis. The effects of all four agents on the shape and size of silver nanostructures were investigated.Results: Robust hollow flower-like silver nanostructures were successfully synthesized and ranged in size from 0.2 µm to 5.0 µm with surface area between 25–240 m2/g. Changing the concentration of silver nitrate, dextrose, sodium hydroxide, and trisodium citrate affected the size and shape of the synthesized structures, while changing temperature had no effect.Conclusion: The proposed method is simple, safe, and allows controlled synthesis of anisotropic silver nanostructures, which may represent promising tools as effective antimicrobial agents and for in vitro diagnostics. The synthesized hollow nanostructures may be used for enhanced drug encapsulation and sustained release.Keywords: silver nanoparticles, 3D hollow, flower-like, green synthesis

  3. Functional characterization of a putative glycine max ELF4 transgenic aradopsis and its role during flowering control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowering is an important trait in major crops like soybean due to its direct relation to grain production. The circadian clock mediates the perception of seasonal changes in day length and temperature to modulate flowering time. The circadian clock gene EARLY FLOWERING 4 (ELF4) was identified in Ar...

  4. Snow cover and extreme winter warming events control flower abundance of some, but not all species in high arctic Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semenchuk, Philipp R.; Elberling, Bo; Cooper, Elisabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    frequent extreme winter warming events. Flower production of many Arctic plants is dependent on melt out timing, since season length determines resource availability for flower preformation. We erected snow fences to increase snow depth and shorten growing season, and counted flowers of six species over 5...

  5. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Castède

    Full Text Available The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies 'Regina' × 'Garnet' and 'Regina' × 'Lapins', and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions.

  6. Quantitative trait loci for flowering time and morphological traits in multiple populations of Brassica rapa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, P.; Jianjun Zhao, Jianjun; Kim, J.S.; Shen, Shuxing; Pino del Carpio, D.; Song, Xiaofei; Jin, M.; Vreugdenhil, D.; Wang, Xiaowu; Koornneef, M.; Bonnema, A.B.

    2007-01-01

    Wide variation for morphological traits exists in Brassica rapa and the genetic basis of this morphological variation is largely unknown. Here is a report on quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of flowering time, seed and pod traits, growth-related traits, leaf morphology, and turnip formation in

  7. Quantitative trait loci for flowering time and morphological traits in multiple populations of Brassica rapa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, P.; Jianjun Zhao, Jianjun; Kim, J.S.; Shen, Shuxing; Pino del Carpio, D.; Song, Xiaofei; Jin, M.; Vreugdenhil, D.; Wang, Xiaowu; Koornneef, M.; Bonnema, A.B.

    2007-01-01

    Wide variation for morphological traits exists in Brassica rapa and the genetic basis of this morphological variation is largely unknown. Here is a report on quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of flowering time, seed and pod traits, growth-related traits, leaf morphology, and turnip formation in

  8. Flowering and Fruiting Times on Four Species of Annona (Annonaceae in Purwodadi Botanic Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Ayu Lestari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Annona is a genus belongs to Annonaceae family, consisting of numerous species that produce edible fruit. Four species namely A. glabra, A. montana, A. muricata and A. squamosa collections of Purwodadi Botanic Garden were recorded for its flowering and fruiting times, since November 2010 to April 2013. The data were scored and complemented with climate data (temperature, rainfall intensity, humidity then analyzed using multiple linear regression analysis. The result showed that humidity was the most affected climate factors on the flowering and fruiting times of those species. Specifically, rainfall intensity (0-550 mm affected to Annona muricata, temperature (25,56-28,33°C and humidity (66,83-85,02% to Annona squamosa, and humidity to A. glabra (71,62-85,02% and A. montana (71,62 to 82,94 % as well. Flowering time of A. glabra occurs three times a year in wet and dry, and fruiting occurs twice a year in the same month. Annona muricata is flowering throughout the year and fruiting twice a year in wet. A. montana and A. squamosa recorded one a year during the wet month.

  9. Forecasting of the flowering time for wild species observed at Guidonia, central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, C. A.; Ceschia, M.

    It is well known that forecasting the flowering time of wild vegetation is useful for various sectors of human activity, particularly for all agricultural practices. Therefore, continuing previous work by Cenci et al., we will present here three new phenoclimatic models of the flowering time for a set of wild species, based on an original data sample of flowering dates for more than 500 species, observed at Guidonia (42° N in central Italy) by Montelucci in the period 1960-1982. However, on applying the bootstrap technique to each species sample to check its basic statistical parameters, we found only about 200 to have data samples with an approximately Gaussian distribution. Eventually only 57 species (subdivided into eight monthly subsets from February to September) were used to formulate the models satisfactorily. The flowering date (represented by the z variable), is expressed in terms of two variables x and y by a nonlinear equation of the form z=αxβ+γy. The x variable represents either the degree-day sum (in model 1), or the daily-maximum-temperature sum (in model 2), or the daily-global-insolation sum (in model 3), while y for all three models corresponds to the rainy-day sum. Note that all summations involved in the computation of the variables x and y take place over a certain period of time (preceding the flowering phase), which is a parameter to be determined by the fitting procedure. This parameter, together with the threshold temperature (needed to compute the degree-days in model 1), represents the two implicit parameters of the process, thus the total number of parameters (including these last two) becomes respectively, five for model 1, and four for the other two models. The preliminary results of this work were reported at the XVI International Botanical Congress (1-7 August 1999, St. Louis, Missouri USA).

  10. Major Contribution of Flowering Time and Vegetative Growth to Plant Production in Common Bean As Deduced from a Comparative Genetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ana M.; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J.; Saburido, Soledad; Bretones, Sandra; De Ron, Antonio M.; Lozano, Rafael; Santalla, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Determinacy growth habit and accelerated flowering traits were selected during or after domestication in common bean. Both processes affect several presumed adaptive traits such as the rate of plant production. There is a close association between flowering initiation and vegetative growth; however, interactions among these two crucial developmental processes and their genetic bases remain unexplored. In this study, with the aim to establish the genetic relationships between these complex processes, a multi-environment quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping approach was performed in two recombinant inbred line populations derived from inter-gene pool crosses between determinate and indeterminate genotypes. Additive and epistatic QTLs were found to regulate flowering time, vegetative growth, and rate of plant production. Moreover, the pleiotropic patterns of the identified QTLs evidenced that regions controlling time to flowering traits, directly or indirectly, are also involved in the regulation of plant production traits. Further QTL analysis highlighted one QTL, on the lower arm of the linkage group Pv01, harboring the Phvul.001G189200 gene, homologous to the Arabidopsis thaliana TERMINAL FLOWER1 (TFL1) gene, which explained up to 32% of phenotypic variation for time to flowering, 66% for vegetative growth, and 19% for rate of plant production. This finding was consistent with previous results, which have also suggested Phvul.001G189200 (PvTFL1y) as a candidate gene for determinacy locus. The information here reported can also be applied in breeding programs seeking to optimize key agronomic traits, such as time to flowering, plant height and an improved reproductive biomass, pods, and seed size, as well as yield. PMID:28082996

  11. Genome-wide association mapping in Arabidopsis identifies previously known flowering time and pathogen resistance genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Aranzana

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There is currently tremendous interest in the possibility of using genome-wide association mapping to identify genes responsible for natural variation, particularly for human disease susceptibility. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is in many ways an ideal candidate for such studies, because it is a highly selfing hermaphrodite. As a result, the species largely exists as a collection of naturally occurring inbred lines, or accessions, which can be genotyped once and phenotyped repeatedly. Furthermore, linkage disequilibrium in such a species will be much more extensive than in a comparable outcrossing species. We tested the feasibility of genome-wide association mapping in A. thaliana by searching for associations with flowering time and pathogen resistance in a sample of 95 accessions for which genome-wide polymorphism data were available. In spite of an extremely high rate of false positives due to population structure, we were able to identify known major genes for all phenotypes tested, thus demonstrating the potential of genome-wide association mapping in A. thaliana and other species with similar patterns of variation. The rate of false positives differed strongly between traits, with more clinal traits showing the highest rate. However, the false positive rates were always substantial regardless of the trait, highlighting the necessity of an appropriate genomic control in association studies.

  12. Anthropogenic edges, isolation and the flowering time and fruit set of Anadenanthera peregrina, a cerrado savanna tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athayde, Eduardo Anversa; Morellato, Leonor Patrícia Cerdeira

    2014-05-01

    Fragmentation exposes plants to extreme environmental conditions with implications for species phenology and reproduction.We investigated whether isolation and edge effects influence size, flowering time, fruit set, and seedling establishment of Anadenanthera peregrina var. falcata. We compared trees in the interior (n =85), and on the edge (n =74) of a cerrado savanna fragment as well as in a pasture (n =26) with respect to size, flowering phenology, flower and fruit production, fruit and seed set, predispersal seed predation, and seedling establishment. Trees in the pasture were larger and produced a higher number of flowers and fruits than trees on the edge and interior, yet seed set did not differ across environments. The plant size structure explained the flower and fruit production, and the self-compatibility breeding system caused a similar seed set regardless of the environment. First flowering was later and fruit set higher in the interior. We argue that time of first flower influenced the fruit set of Anadenathera. Edge and isolated trees started to flower earlier as a response to microclimatic conditions--mainly temperature--reducing the fruit set. Predispersal seed predation was lower among pasture trees. Conversely, we found seedlings only on the edge and in the interior of cerrado, suggesting that the pasture was of poor quality habitat for Anadenanthera recruitment. Isolation affected the plant size structure and reproduction of Anadenanthera trees. Studies comparing plant phenology under contrasting environmental conditions may offer clues on how global change may affect plant reproduction in the tropics.

  13. Anthropogenic edges, isolation and the flowering time and fruit set of Anadenanthera peregrina, a cerrado savanna tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athayde, Eduardo Anversa; Morellato, Leonor Patrícia Cerdeira

    2014-05-01

    Fragmentation exposes plants to extreme environmental conditions with implications for species phenology and reproduction. We investigated whether isolation and edge effects influence size, flowering time, fruit set, and seedling establishment of Anadenanthera peregrina var. falcata. We compared trees in the interior ( n = 85), and on the edge ( n = 74) of a cerrado savanna fragment as well as in a pasture ( n = 26) with respect to size, flowering phenology, flower and fruit production, fruit and seed set, predispersal seed predation, and seedling establishment. Trees in the pasture were larger and produced a higher number of flowers and fruits than trees on the edge and interior, yet seed set did not differ across environments. The plant size structure explained the flower and fruit production, and the self-compatibility breeding system caused a similar seed set regardless of the environment. First flowering was later and fruit set higher in the interior. We argue that time of first flower influenced the fruit set of Anadenathera. Edge and isolated trees started to flower earlier as a response to microclimatic conditions—mainly temperature—reducing the fruit set. Predispersal seed predation was lower among pasture trees. Conversely, we found seedlings only on the edge and in the interior of cerrado, suggesting that the pasture was of poor quality habitat for Anadenanthera recruitment. Isolation affected the plant size structure and reproduction of Anadenanthera trees. Studies comparing plant phenology under contrasting environmental conditions may offer clues on how global change may affect plant reproduction in the tropics.

  14. Whole genome duplication affects evolvability of flowering time in an autotetraploid plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L Martin

    Full Text Available Whole genome duplications have occurred recurrently throughout the evolutionary history of eukaryotes. The resulting genetic and phenotypic changes can influence physiological and ecological responses to the environment; however, the impact of genome copy number on evolvability has rarely been examined experimentally. Here, we evaluate the effect of genome duplication on the ability to respond to selection for early flowering time in lines drawn from naturally occurring diploid and autotetraploid populations of the plant Chamerion angustifolium (fireweed. We contrast this with the result of four generations of selection on synthesized neoautotetraploids, whose genic variability is similar to diploids but genome copy number is similar to autotetraploids. In addition, we examine correlated responses to selection in all three groups. Diploid and both extant tetraploid and neoautotetraploid lines responded to selection with significant reductions in time to flowering. Evolvability, measured as realized heritability, was significantly lower in extant tetraploids (^b(T =  0.31 than diploids (^b(T =  0.40. Neotetraploids exhibited the highest evolutionary response (^b(T  =  0.55. The rapid shift in flowering time in neotetraploids was associated with an increase in phenotypic variability across generations, but not with change in genome size or phenotypic correlations among traits. Our results suggest that whole genome duplications, without hybridization, may initially alter evolutionary rate, and that the dynamic nature of neoautopolyploids may contribute to the prevalence of polyploidy throughout eukaryotes.

  15. Characterization of new allele influencing flowering time in bread wheat introgressed from Triticum militinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaničová, Zuzana; Jakobson, Irena; Reis, Diana; Šafář, Jan; Milec, Zbyněk; Abrouk, Michael; Doležel, Jaroslav; Järve, Kadri; Valárik, Miroslav

    2016-09-25

    Flowering time variation was identified within a mapping population of doubled haploid lines developed from a cross between the introgressive line 8.1 and spring bread wheat cv. Tähti. The line 8.1 carried introgressions from tetraploid Triticum militinae in the cv. Tähti genetic background on chromosomes 1A, 2A, 4A, 5A, 7A, 1B and 5B. The most significant QTL for the flowering time variation was identified within the introgressed region on chromosome 5A and its largest effect was associated with the VRN-A1 locus, accounting for up to 70% of phenotypic variance. The allele of T. militinae origin was designated as VRN-A1f-like. The effect of the VRN-A1f-like allele was verified in two other mapping populations. QTL analysis identified that in cv. Tähti and cv. Mooni genetic background, VRN-A1f-like allele incurred a delay of 1.9-18.6 days in flowering time, depending on growing conditions. Sequence comparison of the VRN-A1f-like and VRN-A1a alleles from the parental lines of the mapping populations revealed major mutations in the promoter region as well as in the first intron, including insertion of a MITE element and a large deletion. The sequence variation allowed construction of specific diagnostic PCR markers for VRN-A1f-like allele determination. Identification and quantification of the effect of the VRN-A1f-like allele offers a useful tool for wheat breeding and for studying fine-scale regulation of flowering pathways in wheat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A large scale joint analysis of flowering time reveals independent temperate adaptations in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modulating days to flowering is a key mechanism in plants for adapting to new environments, and variation in days to flowering drives population structure by limiting mating. To elucidate the genetic architecture of flowering across maize, a quantitative trait, we mapped flowering in five global pop...

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene regulating flowering time from Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiejun; Chao, Yuehui; Kang, Junmei; Ding, Wang; Yang, Qingchuan

    2013-07-01

    Genes that regulate flowering time play crucial roles in plant development and biomass formation. Based on the cDNA sequence of Medicago truncatula (accession no. AY690425), the LFY gene of alfalfa was cloned. Sequence similarity analysis revealed high homology with FLO/LFY family genes of other plants. When fused to the green fluorescent protein, MsLFY protein was localized in the nucleus of onion (Allium cepa L.) epidermal cells. The RT-qPCR analysis of MsLFY expression patterns showed that the expression of MsLFY gene was at a low level in roots, stems, leaves and pods, and the expression level in floral buds was the highest. The expression of MsLFY was induced by GA3 and long photoperiod. Plant expression vector was constructed and transformed into Arabidopsis by the agrobacterium-mediated methods. PCR amplification with the transgenic Arabidopsis genome DNA indicated that MsLFY gene had integrated in Arabidopsis genome. Overexpression of MsLFY specifically caused early flowering under long day conditions compared with non-transgenic plants. These results indicated MsLFY played roles in promoting flowering time.

  18. Relationship between time to flowering and stalk and ear damage by second generation corn borers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordas, B; Alvarez, A; Revilla, P; Butron, A; Malvar, R A

    2013-06-01

    In the Mediterranean area, the main corn borer species are Sesamia nonagrioides Lefebvre (Mediterranean corn borer) and Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner (European corn borer). In the overall context of integrated pest control, it is possible to reduce the effect of a pest without having a negative effect on the environment by varying the sowing date. Benefits are possible if the most susceptible stages of the crop no longer coincide with the peak of the pest. We used different cycles of selection (0, 6, 8, 10, and 12) of two populations (Purdue A and Purdue B) of maize selected for early flowering to get a more precise estimation of the relationship between maturity of plant tissues and corn borer damage. We found a relationship between the damage produced by corn borers and the number of days from flowering to infestation. We conclude that, after flowering, a later stage of plant development at the moment of the infestation by corn borers reduces the damage caused by the larvae. Based on our results, we recommend to plant as early as possible so the tissues would be as mature as possible at the moment of insect attack.

  19. Nectar accessibility determines fitness, flower choice and abundance of hoverflies that provide natural pest control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Paul C. J.; Wäckers, Felix L.

    2016-01-01

    In modern agricultural landscapes, many organisms providing ecosystem services such as pollination and natural pest control are likely constrained by shortage of nectar and/or pollen required for adult nutrition. More and more flower-rich field margin strips and other habitats are created to elimina

  20. Nectar accessibility determines fitness, flower choice and abundance of hoverflies that provide natural pest control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, P.C.J.; Wäckers, F.L.

    2016-01-01

    1. In modern agricultural landscapes, many organisms providing ecosystem services such as pollination and natural pest control are likely constrained by shortage of nectar and/or pollen required for adult nutrition. More and more flower-rich field margin strips and other habitats are created to elim

  1. Noncrop flowering plants restore top-down herbivore control in agricultural fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Oliver; Pfiffner, Lukas; Schied, Johannes; Willareth, Martin; Leimgruber, Andrea; Luka, Henryk; Traugott, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Herbivore populations are regulated by bottom-up control through food availability and quality and by top-down control through natural enemies. Intensive agricultural monocultures provide abundant food to specialized herbivores and at the same time negatively impact natural enemies because monocultures are depauperate in carbohydrate food sources required by many natural enemies. As a consequence, herbivores are released from both types of control. Diversifying intensive cropping systems with flowering plants that provide nutritional resources to natural enemies may enhance top-down control and contribute to natural herbivore regulation. We analyzed how noncrop flowering plants planted as "companion plants" inside cabbage (Brassica oleracea) fields and as margins along the fields affect the plant-herbivore-parasitoid-predator food web. We combined molecular analyses quantifying parasitism of herbivore eggs and larvae with molecular predator gut content analysis and a comprehensive predator community assessment. Planting cornflowers (Centaurea cynanus), which have been shown to attract and selectively benefit Microplitis mediator, a larval parasitoid of the cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae, between the cabbage heads shifted the balance between trophic levels. Companion plants significantly increased parasitism of herbivores by larval parasitoids and predation on herbivore eggs. They furthermore significantly affected predator species richness. These effects were present despite the different treatments being close relative to the parasitoids' mobility. These findings demonstrate that habitat manipulation can restore top-down herbivore control in intensive crops if the right resources are added. This is important because increased natural control reduces the need for pesticide input in intensive agricultural settings, with cascading positive effects on general biodiversity and the environment. Companion plants thus increase biodiversity both directly, by introducing

  2. Interaction of Polycomb-group proteins controlling flowering in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanvivattana, Yindee; Bishopp, Anthony; Schubert, Daniel; Stock, Christine; Moon, Yong-Hwan; Sung, Z Renee; Goodrich, Justin

    2004-11-01

    In Arabidopsis, the EMBYRONIC FLOWER2 (EMF2), VERNALISATION2 (VRN2) and FERTILISATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM2 (FIS2) genes encode related Polycomb-group (Pc-G) proteins. Their homologues in animals act together with other Pc-G proteins as part of a multimeric complex, Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2), which functions as a histone methyltransferase. Despite similarities between the fis2 mutant phenotype and those of some other plant Pc-G members, it has remained unclear how the FIS2/EMF2/VRN2 class Pc-G genes interact with the others. We have identified a weak emf2 allele that reveals a novel phenotype with striking similarity to that of severe mutations in another Pc-G gene, CURLY LEAF (CLF), suggesting that the two genes may act in a common pathway. Consistent with this, we demonstrate that EMF2 and CLF interact genetically and that this reflects interaction of their protein products through two conserved motifs, the VEFS domain and the C5 domain. We show that the full function of CLF is masked by partial redundancy with a closely related gene, SWINGER (SWN), so that null clf mutants have a much less severe phenotype than emf2 mutants. Analysis in yeast further indicates a potential for the CLF and SWN proteins to interact with the other VEFS domain proteins VRN2 and FIS2. The functions of individual Pc-G members may therefore be broader than single mutant phenotypes reveal. We suggest that plants have Pc-G protein complexes similar to the Polycomb Repressive Complex2 (PRC2) of animals, but the duplication and subsequent diversification of components has given rise to different complexes with partially discrete functions.

  3. PUB13, a U-box/ARM E3 ligase, regulates plant defense, cell death, and flowering time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Dai, Liangying; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2012-08-01

    The ubiquitination pathway is involved in a variety of cellular processes in plant growth, development, and immune responses. However, the function of this pathway in connecting plant development and innate immunity is still largely unknown. Recently, we characterized the U-box/ARM E3 ubiquitin ligase PUB13, which regulates both immune responses and flowering time in Arabidopsis. Here, we show that the rice Spl11 gene can complement the cell death and flowering functions of PUB13 in the pub13 mutant. In addition, HFR1, which functions mainly in photomorphogenesis, was identified as one of the PUB13-interacting proteins through yeast two-hybrid screening and pull-down assays. Because the flowering phenotype of pub13 depends on photoperiod, we propose that PUB13 may regulate HFR1 to fine-tune photomorphogenesis and flowering time in Arabidopsis.

  4. Effect of Flowering Time of Spikelets Within a Rice Panicle on Endosperm Deve lopment and Its Physiological Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jianchang; Liu Lijun; Wang Zhiqin; Lang Youzhong; Zhu Qingsen

    2000-01-01

    The flowering duration of spikelets within a panicle of the rice cultivars of Wuyujing 3 (Japonica), Yangdao 4 (Indica), Shanyou 63 (Indica hybrid rice) and PC311/Zaoxiandang 18 (Indica/japonica hybrid rice) was 5d, 7d, 7d and 8d, respectively. The spikelets flowered on the 2nd day produced the highest endosperm weight (EW) and the most endosperm cells (ECs), and followed by the spikelets flowered on the 1st day. ECs decreased with the delay of flowering of the spikelets flowered from the 3rd day. Within a variety or a hybrid combination, the difference in endosperm cell weight (ECW) was not significant among the grains flowered on different dates. EW and grain-filled percentage (G-FP) were very significantly correlated with ECs, but not with ECW. The earlier the spikelets flowered (except those flowered on the 1st day), the greater the initial proliferation power (R°), the higher the maximum proliferation rate (Vmax) and the higher the mean proliferation rate (V) of ECs, and the shorter the time reaching Vmax, and vice versa. R°, Vmax,V and ECs were significantly correlated with the physiological activities (ATPase activity and the content of spermidine and spermine) of the grains at early grain filling stage. The physiological activities of the grains, R°,Vmax,V, ECs and EW significantly increased after removing 1/2 plants at booting stage and spraying 6-BA 〔N6(benzyl) adenine〕 at early heading stage, and the results were reversed after cutting 1/2 leaves at booting stage. These results suggest that the difference in ECs results in the difference in the grain weight, while the low physiological activities of late-flowered grains are the important reasons for their poor endosperm development.

  5. Large-scale climate variability and its effects on mean temperature and flowering time of Prunus and Betula in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormsen, A. K.; Hense, A.; Toldam-Andersen, T. B.; Braun, P.

    2005-08-01

    Large-scale climate variability largely affects average climatic conditions and therefore is likely to influence the phenology of plants. In NW-Europe, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) particularly influences winter climate and, through climate interactions on plants, flowering time of all tree species. In Denmark, like in many other NW-European countries, flowering of most tree species has become earlier since the end of the 1980’s. To quantify a possible relation between NAO and flowering time of tree species, two sources of phenological information from the Copenhagen area (Denmark) were analysed, i.e. pollen counts of the genus Betula and observed first bloom dates of Prunus avium. The Winter NAO explained 29 and 37% of the variation of monthly mean temperature for February and March, respectively. The influence of temperature on flowering time was up to 56% to 60% for the February April mean. A direct correlation of Winter NAO-index and flowering time also revealed a clear relation but the time of influence was earlier (December to February). This was shown to be the likely result of a combination of direct and time-lagged effects of the NAO on air and sea surface temperature. The NAO signal is apparently stored in the North Sea and then influences temperature east up to the Baltic States. It is shown that Denmark is right in the centre of direct and time-lagged effects of the NAO. This offers the possibility of using the NAO-index for predicting flowering time of Prunus avium. The beginning of pollen flow appears to be influenced too much by short-term perturbations of the climate system decreasing the value of the NAO-index for prediction. However, it indicates a close relationship between natural climate variability, measured by the NAO index, and flowering time of tree species for Denmark.

  6. Development, anatomy, and genetic control of some teratological phenotypes of Ranunculaceae flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Jabbour

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Teratological organisms originate from developmental anomalies, and exhibit structures and a body organization that deviate from the species standard. These monsters give essential clues about the formation and evolutionary significance of the wild-type groundplan. We focus on flower terata, which can be affected in their sterile and/or fertile organs, with special emphasis on the Ranunculaceae. The diversity of perianth shapes and organizations in flowers of this family is huge, and is even increased when anomalies occur during organo- and/or morphogenesis. To begin with, we synthesize the observations and research conducted on the Ranunculacean floral terata, following the most recent phylogenetic framework published in 2016 by our team. Then, we report results regarding the morphology of developing meristems, the anatomy of buds, and the genetic control of selected teratological phenotypes of Ranunculaceae flowers. We focus on species and horticultural varieties belonging to the genera Aquilegia, Delphinium, and Nigella. Wildtype flowers of these species are actinomorphic (Aquilegia, Nigella or zygomorphic (Delphinium, spurred (Aquilegia, Delphinium or with pocket-like petals (Nigella. Last, we discuss the evolutionary potential of such teratological phenotypes when they occur in the wild.

  7. Flowering time of butterfly nectar food plants is more sensitive to temperature than the timing of butterfly adult flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharouba, Heather M; Vellend, Mark

    2015-09-01

    1. Variation among species in their phenological responses to temperature change suggests that shifts in the relative timing of key life cycle events between interacting species are likely to occur under climate warming. However, it remains difficult to predict the prevalence and magnitude of these shifts given that there have been few comparisons of phenological sensitivities to temperature across interacting species. 2. Here, we used a broad-scale approach utilizing collection records to compare the temperature sensitivity of the timing of adult flight in butterflies vs. flowering of their potential nectar food plants (days per °C) across space and time in British Columbia, Canada. 3. On average, the phenology of both butterflies and plants advanced in response to warmer temperatures. However, the two taxa were differentially sensitive to temperature across space vs. across time, indicating the additional importance of nontemperature cues and/or local adaptation for many species. 4. Across butterfly-plant associations, flowering time was significantly more sensitive to temperature than the timing of butterfly flight and these sensitivities were not correlated. 5. Our results indicate that warming-driven shifts in the relative timing of life cycle events between butterflies and plants are likely to be prevalent, but that predicting the magnitude and direction of such changes in particular cases is going to require detailed, fine-scale data.

  8. Controlled Fabrication of Flower-like Nickel Oxide Hierarchical Structures and Their Application in Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxia Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flower-like NiO hierarchical structures with 2–5 μm diameter assembled from nanosheet building blocks have been successfully fabricated via a wet-chemical method combined with thermodecomposition technology. The template-free method is facile and effective in preparing flower-like NiO superstructures in high yield. The intermediate product and final hierarchical structures are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform IR (FTIR, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The effects of growth temperature and reaction time on the morphologies of the as-prepared structures were investigated by SEM characterization and a possible mechanism for the formation of flower-like NiO is proposed. Based on the nitrogen adsorption and desorption measurements, the BET surface area of the as-obtained sample is 55.7 m2/g and the pore-size distribution plot indicates a bimodal mesopore distribution, with pore sizes of ca. 2.6 nm and 7.4 nm, respectively. In comparison with sphere-like and rod-like structures, the flower-like NiO hierarchical structures show an excellent ability to rapidly remove various pollutants when used as adsorbent and photocatalyst in waste-water treatment, which may be attributed to its unique hierarchical and porous surface structures.

  9. Quantitative trait loci mapping of pubescence density and flowering time of insect-resistant soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiko Komatsu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of antibiosis resistance to common cutworm (Spodoptera litura Fabricius in soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr. has progressed significantly, but the immediate cause remains unknown. We performed quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis of pubescence density and plant development stage because these factors are assumed to be the immediate cause of resistance to cutworm. The QTLs for pubescence appeared to be identical to the previously detected the Pd1 and Ps loci controlling pubescence density. We found no candidate loci for flowering time QTLs, although one could be identical to the gene governing the long-juvenile trait or to the E6 loci controlling maturity. None of the QTLs overlapped with the QTLs for antibiosis resistance.

  10. Oxygenated Phosphine Fumigation for Control of Light Brown Apple Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Eggs on Cut-Flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Samuel S; Liu, Yong-Biao; Simmons, Gregory S

    2015-08-01

    Light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker), eggs were subjected to oxygenated phosphine fumigation treatments under 70% oxygen on cut flowers to determine efficacy and safety. Five cut flower species: roses, lilies, tulips, gerbera daisy, and pompon chrysanthemums, were fumigated in separate groups with 2,500 ppm phosphine for 72 h at 5°C. Egg mortality and postharvest quality of cut flowers were determined after fumigation. Egg mortalities of 99.7-100% were achieved among the cut flower species. The treatment was safe to all cut flowers except gerbera daisy. A 96-h fumigation treatment with 2,200 ppm phosphine of eggs on chrysanthemums cut flowers also did not achieve complete control of light brown apple moth eggs. A simulation of fumigation in hermetically sealed fumigation chambers with gerbera daisy showed significant accumulations of carbon dioxide and ethylene by the end of 72-h sealing. However, oxygenated phosphine fumigations with carbon dioxide and ethylene absorbents did not reduce the injury to gerbera daisy, indicating that it is likely that phosphine may directly cause the injury to gerbera daisy cut flowers. The study demonstrated that oxygenated phosphine fumigation is effective against light brown apple moth eggs. However, it may not be able to achieve the probit9 quarantine level of control and the treatment was safe to most of the cut flower species.

  11. Efficiency in pollen foraging by honey bees: Time, motion and pollen depletion on flowers of Sisyrinchium palmifolium Linnaeus (Asparagales: Iridaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno M. Freitas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Honey bees depend on flower resources (nectar and pollen to supply individual and colony needs. Although behavioural studies already assessed optimum foraging patterns of bumblebees, honey bees foraging behavioural patterns have been poorly assessed. We used Sysirinchium palmifolium L. (Iridaceae, a low-growing, abundant and anthophilous grassland flower to test the hypotheses that Apis mellifera workers would i spend more time, ii visit a greater number of flowers, and iii travel greater distances within patches of S. palmifolium which were newly opened or not been visited by other pollinators when compared to foraging on patches that were available to pollinators during its whole blooming period (only one day. In two different sunny days, we measured bee activities in an area opened for visitation during the whole anthesis (OP plot treatment and another opened for visitation only half of anthesis (CL plot treatment. We observed bees spending more time, visiting more flowers and travelling more in S. palmifolium CL treatment than the OP plot treatment. Previous studies already showed bees alter their foraging behaviour in the lack of resources. Honey bees are able to remember the period of the day when resources are usually the higher, they probably detect the most promising period to gather resources on S. palmifolium flowers. Since A. mellifera is a pollinator with a wide-distribution and is considered an important cause of changes on native pollinator communities, we support additional studies evaluating its foraging behaviours to better understand how it explores flower resources.

  12. DELAYED FLOWERING, an Arabidopsis Gene That Acts in the Autonomous Flowering Promotion Pathway and Is Required for Normal Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Jie Chen; Zheng Yuan; Hai Huang

    2006-01-01

    The control of flowering time in higher plants is one of the most important physiological processes and is critical for their reproductive success. To investigate the mechanisms controlling flowering time, we screened for Arabidopsis mutants with late-flowering phenotypes. One mutant, designated delayed flowering (dfr) in the Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotype, was identified with delayed flowering time. Genetic analysis revealed that dfr is a single gene recessive nuclear mutant and the mutation was mapped to a locus tightly linked to UFO on chromosome 1. To our knowledge, no gene regulating flowering time has been reported yet in this region. The dfr mutant plant showed a delayed flowering time under the different growth conditions examined,including long- and short-day photoperiods and gibberellic acid GA3 treatments, suggesting that DFR is a gene involved in the autonomous flowering promotion pathway. The Arabidopsis gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) plays a central role in repressing flowering and its transcripts are undetectable in wild-type Ler.However, FLCexpression was upregulated in the dfrmutant, suggesting that DFR is a negative regulator of FLC. In addition, the dfr mutant plant displayed altered valve shapes of the silique and the number of trichomes and branches of each trichome were both reduced, indicating that the DRFgene is also required for normal plant development. Moreover, dfr leafy-5 (Ify-5) double mutant plants showed a much later flowering time than either dfr or Ify-5 single mutants, indicating that DFR and LFYact synergistically to promote flowering in Arabidopsis.

  13. Exploration for the Biological Control of Flowering Rush, Butomus umbellatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    aggressive invader of freshwater systems especially in the midwestern and western states of the USA and western Canada. Since no effective control...ovipositing females had been transferred. We are currently trying different methods in order to further improve rearing success. Nevertheless we were able...ten test plant species offered, none was accepted for egg laying by female weevils, confirming the narrow host range of B. nodulosus. We will continue

  14. Heading date gene, dth3 controlled late flowering in O. Glaberrima Steud. by down-regulating Ehd1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, X F; Liu, X; Zhao, Z G; Jiang, L; Gao, H; Zhang, Y H; Zheng, M; Chen, L M; Liu, S J; Zhai, H Q; Wan, J M

    2011-12-01

    Heading date in rice is an important agronomic trait controlled by several genes. In this study, flowering time of variety Dianjingyou 1 (DJY1) was earlier than a near-isogenic line (named NIL) carried chromosome segment from African rice on chromosome 3S, when grown in both long-day (LD) and short-day (SD) conditions. By analyzing a large F2 population from NIL × DJY1, the locus DTH3 (QTL for days to heading on chromosome 3) controlling early heading date in DJY1 was fine mapped to a 64-kb segment which contained only one annotated gene, a MIKC-type MADS-box protein. We detected a 6-bp deletion and a single base substitution in the C-domain by sequencing DTH3 in DJY1 compared with dth3 in NIL, and overexpression of DTH3 caused early flowering in callus. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the transcript level of dth3 in NIL was lower than that DTH3 in DJY1 in both LD and SD conditions. The Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) which promotes the RFT1, was up-regulated by DTH3 in both LD and SD conditions. Based on Indel and dCAPs marker analysis, the dth3 allele was only present in African rice accessions. A phylogenetic analysis based on microsatellite genotyping suggested that African rice had a close genetic relationship to O. rufipogon and O. latifolia, and was similar to japonica cultivars. DTH3 affected flowering time and had no significant effect on the main agronomic traits.

  15. Genetic control of the number of days to flowering in common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Pedroso Mendes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic control of early flowering in common bean. Crosses weremade between the parents Pérola and BRS Radiante and between ESAL 506 and Preto 60 dias. The segregating generations,F3, F2BC11 and F2BC12 of each cross were evaluated in experiments with two replications. F3 plants of both crosses wererandomly taken, and F3:4 progenies evaluated for the trait number of days to flowering. There was good adjustment to theadditive-dominant model of both crosses. The dominance effect was lower than the additive effect in the trait control and, whenpresent, it reduced the number of days to flowering. The value of realized heritability (h2R was similar in both crosses andlower than the h2 estimated for selection among F3:4 progenies. There were indications that aside from the environmental effecton the trait expression, the genotype-environment interaction was also significant.

  16. Control of flower development and phyllotaxy by meristem identity genes in antirrhinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, R; Copsey, L; Vincent, C; Doyle, S; Magrath, R; Coen, E

    1995-01-01

    The flower meristem identity genes floricaula (flo) and squamosa (squa) promote a change in phyllotaxy from spiral to whorled in Antirrhinum. To determine how this might be achieved, we have performed a combination of morphological, genetic, and expression analyses. Comparison of the phenotypes and RNA expression patterns of single and double mutants with the wild type showed that flo and squa act together to promote flower development but that flo is epistatic to squa with respect to early effects on phyllotaxy. We propose that a common process underlies the phyllotaxy of wildtype, flo, and squa meristem development but that the relative timing of primordium initiation or growth is altered. This process depends on two separable events: setting aside zones for potential primordium initiation and partitioning these zones into discrete primordia. Failure of the second event can lead to the formation of continuous double spirals, which are occasionally seen in flo mutants. PMID:8718618

  17. Changing the spatial pattern of TFL1 expression reveals its key role in the shoot meristem in controlling Arabidopsis flowering architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Kim; Venail, Julien; Berbel, Ana; Domenech, Maria Jose; Money, Tracy; Conti, Lucio; Hanzawa, Yoshie; Madueno, Francisco; Bradley, Desmond

    2015-08-01

    Models for the control of above-ground plant architectures show how meristems can be programmed to be either shoots or flowers. Molecular, genetic, transgenic, and mathematical studies have greatly refined these models, suggesting that the phase of the shoot reflects different genes contributing to its repression of flowering, its vegetativeness ('veg'), before activators promote flower development. Key elements of how the repressor of flowering and shoot meristem gene TFL1 acts have now been tested, by changing its spatiotemporal pattern. It is shown that TFL1 can act outside of its normal expression domain in leaf primordia or floral meristems to repress flower identity. These data show how the timing and spatial pattern of TFL1 expression affect overall plant architecture. This reveals that the underlying pattern of TFL1 interactors is complex and that they may be spatially more widespread than TFL1 itself, which is confined to shoots. However, the data show that while TFL1 and floral genes can both act and compete in the same meristem, it appears that the main shoot meristem is more sensitive to TFL1 rather than floral genes. This spatial analysis therefore reveals how a difference in response helps maintain the 'veg' state of the shoot meristem. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. Estimating selection through male fitness: three complementary methods illuminate the nature and causes of selection on flowering time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austen, Emily J; Weis, Arthur E

    2016-02-24

    Our understanding of selection through male fitness is limited by the resource demands and indirect nature of the best available genetic techniques. Applying complementary, independent approaches to this problem can help clarify evolution through male function. We applied three methods to estimate selection on flowering time through male fitness in experimental populations of the annual plant Brassica rapa: (i) an analysis of mating opportunity based on flower production schedules, (ii) genetic paternity analysis, and (iii) a novel approach based on principles of experimental evolution. Selection differentials estimated by the first method disagreed with those estimated by the other two, indicating that mating opportunity was not the principal driver of selection on flowering time. The genetic and experimental evolution methods exhibited striking agreement overall, but a slight discrepancy between the two suggested that negative environmental covariance between age at flowering and male fitness may have contributed to phenotypic selection. Together, the three methods enriched our understanding of selection on flowering time, from mating opportunity to phenotypic selection to evolutionary response. The novel experimental evolution method may provide a means of examining selection through male fitness when genetic paternity analysis is not possible.

  19. Snow cover and extreme winter warming events control flower abundance of some, but not all species in high arctic Svalbard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenchuk, Philipp R; Elberling, Bo; Cooper, Elisabeth J

    2013-08-01

    The High Arctic winter is expected to be altered through ongoing and future climate change. Winter precipitation and snow depth are projected to increase and melt out dates change accordingly. Also, snow cover and depth will play an important role in protecting plant canopy from increasingly more frequent extreme winter warming events. Flower production of many Arctic plants is dependent on melt out timing, since season length determines resource availability for flower preformation. We erected snow fences to increase snow depth and shorten growing season, and counted flowers of six species over 5 years, during which we experienced two extreme winter warming events. Most species were resistant to snow cover increase, but two species reduced flower abundance due to shortened growing seasons. Cassiope tetragona responded strongly with fewer flowers in deep snow regimes during years without extreme events, while Stellaria crassipes responded partly. Snow pack thickness determined whether winter warming events had an effect on flower abundance of some species. Warming events clearly reduced flower abundance in shallow but not in deep snow regimes of Cassiope tetragona, but only marginally for Dryas octopetala. However, the affected species were resilient and individuals did not experience any long term effects. In the case of short or cold summers, a subset of species suffered reduced reproductive success, which may affect future plant composition through possible cascading competition effects. Extreme winter warming events were shown to expose the canopy to cold winter air. The following summer most of the overwintering flower buds could not produce flowers. Thus reproductive success is reduced if this occurs in subsequent years. We conclude that snow depth influences flower abundance by altering season length and by protecting or exposing flower buds to cold winter air, but most species studied are resistant to changes. Winter warming events, often occurring

  20. A high proportion of blue light increases the photosynthesis capacity and leaf formation rate of Rosa × hybrida but does not affect time to flower opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terfa, Meseret Tesema; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Gislerød, Hans Ragnar; Olsen, Jorunn Elisabeth; Torre, Sissel

    2013-05-01

    Alterations in light quality affect plant morphogenesis and photosynthetic responses but the effects vary significantly between species. Roses exhibit an irradiance-dependent flowering control but knowledge on light quality responses is scarce. In this study we analyzed, the responses in morphology, photosynthesis and flowering of Rosa × hybrida to different blue (B) light proportions provided by light-emitting diodes (LED, high B 20%) and high pressure sodium (HPS, low B 5%) lamps. There was a strong morphological and growth effect of the light sources but no significant difference in total dry matter production and flowering. HPS-grown plants had significantly higher leaf area and plant height, yet a higher dry weight proportion was allocated to leaves than stems under LED. LED plants showed 20% higher photosynthetic capacity (Amax ) and higher levels of soluble carbohydrates. The increase in Amax correlated with an increase in leaf mass per unit leaf area, higher stomata conductance and CO2 exchange, total chlorophyll (Chl) content per area and Chl a/b ratio. LED-grown leaves also displayed a more sun-type leaf anatomy with more and longer palisade cells and a higher stomata frequency. Although floral initiation occurred at a higher leaf number in LED, the time to open flowers was the same under both light conditions. Thereby the study shows that a higher portion of B light is efficient in increasing photosynthesis performance per unit leaf area, enhancing growth and morphological changes in roses but does not affect the total Dry Matter (DM) production or time to open flower.

  1. Evaluation of native plant flower characteristics for conservation biological control of Prays oleae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, A; Gonçalves, F; Crespí, A L; Campos, M; Torres, L

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have shown that manipulating flowering weeds within an agroecosystem can have an important role in pest control by natural enemies, by providing them nectar and pollen, which are significant sources of nutrition for adults. The aim of this study was to assess if the olive moth, Prays oleae (Bernard, 1788) (Lepidoptera: Praydidae), and five of its main natural enemies, the parasitoid species Chelonus elaeaphilus Silvestri (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Apanteles xanthostigma (Haliday) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Ageniaspis fuscicollis (Dalman) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) and Elasmus flabellatus (Fonscolombe) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), as well as the predator Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), can theoretically access the nectar from 21 flowering weeds that naturally occur in olive groves. Thus, the architecture of the flowers as well as the mouthpart structure and/or the head and thorax width of the pest and its enemies were analyzed. The results suggested that all beneficial insects were able to reach nectar of the plant species from Apiaceae family, i.e. Conopodium majus (Gouan) Loret, Daucus carota L. and Foeniculum vulgare Mill., as well as Asparagus acutifolius L., Echium plantagineum L., Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik., Raphanus raphanistrum L., Lonicera hispanica Boiss. et Reut., Silene gallica L., Spergula arvensis L., Hypericum perforatum L., Calamintha baetica Boiss. et Reut, Malva neglecta Wallr. and Linaria saxatilis (L.) Chaz. P. oleae was not able to access nectar from five plant species, namely: Andryala integrifolia L., Chondrilla juncea L., Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter, Sonchus asper (L.) Hill and Lavandula stoechas L.

  2. Flower-like superstructures of AIE-active tetraphenylethylene through solvophobic controlled self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimimarand, Mina; La, Duong Duc; Kobaisi, Mohammad Al; Bhosale, Sheshanath V.

    2017-02-01

    The development of well-organized structures with high luminescent properties in the solid and aggregated states is of both scientific and technological interest due to their applications in nanotechnology. In this paper we described the synthesis of amphiphilic and dumbbell shaped AIE-active tetraphenylethylene (TPE) derivatives and studied their self-assembly with solvophobic control. Interestingly, both TPE derivatives form a 3D flower-shape supramolecular structure from THF/water solutions at varying water fractions. SEM microscopy was used to visualise step-wise growth of flower-shape assembly. TPE derivatives also show good mechanochromic properties which can be observed in the process of grinding, fuming and heating. These TPE derivative self-assemblies are formed due to two main important properties: (i) the TPE-core along with alkyl chains, optimizing the dispersive interactions within a construct, and (ii) amide-linkage through molecular recognition. We believe such arrangements prevent crystallization and favour the directional growth of flower-shape nanostructures in a 3D fashion.

  3. Detecting QTLs and putative candidate genes involved in budbreak and flowering time in an apple multiparental population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allard, Alix; Bink, Marco C.A.M.; Martinez, Sebastien; Kelner, Jean Jacques; Legave, Jean Michel; Guardo, Di Mario; Pierro, Di Erica A.; Laurens, François; De Weg, Van Eric W.; Costes, Evelyne

    2016-01-01

    In temperate trees, growth resumption in spring time results from chilling and heat requirements, and is an adaptive trait under global warming. Here, the genetic determinism of budbreak and flowering time was deciphered using five related full-sib apple families. Both traits were observed over 3

  4. DELAY OF GERMINATION1 (DOG1) regulates both seed dormancy and flowering time through microRNA pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Heqiang; Wei, Shouhui; Bradford, Kent J.

    2016-01-01

    Seed germination and flowering, two critical developmental transitions in plant life cycles, are coordinately regulated by genetic and environmental factors to match plant establishment and reproduction to seasonal cues. The DELAY OF GERMINATION1 (DOG1) gene is involved in regulating seed dormancy in response to temperature and has also been associated genetically with pleiotropic flowering phenotypes across diverse Arabidopsis thaliana accessions and locations. Here we show that DOG1 can regulate seed dormancy and flowering times in lettuce (Lactuca sativa, Ls) and Arabidopsis through an influence on levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) miR156 and miR172. In lettuce, suppression of LsDOG1 expression enabled seed germination at high temperature and promoted early flowering in association with reduced miR156 and increased miR172 levels. In Arabidopsis, higher miR156 levels resulting from overexpression of the MIR156 gene enhanced seed dormancy and delayed flowering. These phenotypic effects, as well as conversion of MIR156 transcripts to miR156, were compromised in DOG1 loss-of-function mutant plants, especially in seeds. Overexpression of MIR172 reduced seed dormancy and promoted early flowering in Arabidopsis, and the effect on flowering required functional DOG1. Transcript levels of several genes associated with miRNA processing were consistently lower in dry seeds of Arabidopsis and lettuce when DOG1 was mutated or its expression was reduced; in contrast, transcript levels of these genes were elevated in a DOG1 gain-of-function mutant. Our results reveal a previously unknown linkage between two critical developmental phase transitions in the plant life cycle through a DOG1–miR156–miR172 interaction. PMID:27035986

  5. DELAY OF GERMINATION1 (DOG1) regulates both seed dormancy and flowering time through microRNA pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Heqiang; Wei, Shouhui; Bradford, Kent J

    2016-04-12

    Seed germination and flowering, two critical developmental transitions in plant life cycles, are coordinately regulated by genetic and environmental factors to match plant establishment and reproduction to seasonal cues. The DELAY OF GERMINATION1 (DOG1) gene is involved in regulating seed dormancy in response to temperature and has also been associated genetically with pleiotropic flowering phenotypes across diverse Arabidopsis thaliana accessions and locations. Here we show that DOG1 can regulate seed dormancy and flowering times in lettuce (Lactuca sativa, Ls) and Arabidopsis through an influence on levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) miR156 and miR172. In lettuce, suppression of LsDOG1 expression enabled seed germination at high temperature and promoted early flowering in association with reduced miR156 and increased miR172 levels. In Arabidopsis, higher miR156 levels resulting from overexpression of the MIR156 gene enhanced seed dormancy and delayed flowering. These phenotypic effects, as well as conversion of MIR156 transcripts to miR156, were compromised in DOG1 loss-of-function mutant plants, especially in seeds. Overexpression of MIR172 reduced seed dormancy and promoted early flowering in Arabidopsis, and the effect on flowering required functional DOG1 Transcript levels of several genes associated with miRNA processing were consistently lower in dry seeds of Arabidopsis and lettuce when DOG1 was mutated or its expression was reduced; in contrast, transcript levels of these genes were elevated in a DOG1 gain-of-function mutant. Our results reveal a previously unknown linkage between two critical developmental phase transitions in the plant life cycle through a DOG1-miR156-miR172 interaction.

  6. Quantitative trait loci mapping for flowering time in a switchgrass pseudo-F2 population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowering is an important developmental event in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) because the onset of flowering causes the cessation of vegetative growth and biomass accumulation. The objective of this study was to generate a linkage map using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to identify ...

  7. Variation in Time of Flowering and Seed Dispersal of Eastern Cottonwood In the Lower Mississippi Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Farmer

    1966-01-01

    Flowering of Populus deItoides Bartr. occurred from early March to early April; differences between trees within stands accounted for 98 percent of the significant variation in dates. High correlation (r = .91 to .96) between 1963 and 1964 dates of individual trees indicated that trees within stands flower in a predictable sequence. Seed dispersal...

  8. Key Impact of Vgt1 on Flowering Time Adaptation in Maize: Evidence From Association Mapping and Ecogeographical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrocq, Sébastien; Madur, Delphine; Veyrieras, Jean-Baptiste; Camus-Kulandaivelu, Létizia; Kloiber-Maitz, Monika; Presterl, Thomas; Ouzunova, Milena; Manicacci, Domenica; Charcosset, Alain

    2008-01-01

    An association study conducted on 375 maize inbred lines indicates a strong relationship between Vgt1 polymorphisms and flowering time, extending former quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping results. Analysis of allele frequencies in a landrace collection supports a key role of Vgt1 in maize altilatitudinal adaptation. PMID:18430961

  9. The Maintenance and Exploitation of ex situ Genebank Collections – Association Mapping for Flowering Time in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Börner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that world-wide existing germplasm collections contain about 7.4 million accessions of plant genetic resources. Wheat (Triticum and Aegilops represents the biggest group with about 900,000 accessions. One of the largest ex situ genebanks worldwide is located at the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research in Gatersleben, Germany. This collection comprises wild and primitive forms, landraces as well as old and more recent cultivars of mainly cereals but also other crops. As on the global scale wheat is the largest group having almost 30,000 accessions. Beside the long term storage and frequent regeneration of the material phenotypic characterisation and evaluation data are collected as a prerequisite for gene identification and mapping. We report the outcome of an association-based mapping study to elucidate the genetic basis of flowering time in winter wheat. A core collection of 96 cultivars was subjected to a genome-wide scan using diversity array technology markers. The same set of accessions had been earlier evaluated for flowering time over six consecutive seasons. Some of the resulting marker-trait associations (MTAs mapped to chromosomal locations in which known major genes affecting flowering time are known to reside. However, most of the MTAs identified genomic locations where no such genes are known to map, so providing new opportunities to exploit genetic variation for flowering time in wheat breeding programmes.

  10. The Maintenance and Exploitation of ex situ Genebank Collections – Association Mapping for Flowering Time in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Börner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that world-wide existing germplasm collections contain about 7.4 million accessions of plant genetic resources. Wheat (Triticum and Aegilops represents the biggest group with about 900,000 accessions. One of the largest ex situ genebanks worldwide is located at the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research in Gatersleben, Germany. This collection comprises wild and primitive forms, landraces as well as old and more recent cultivars of mainly cereals but also other crops. As on the global scale wheat is the largest group having almost 30,000 accessions. Beside the long term storage and frequent regeneration of the material phenotypic characterisation and evaluation data are collected as a prerequisite for gene identification and mapping. We report the outcome of an association-based mapping study to elucidate the genetic basis of flowering time in winter wheat. A core collection of 96 cultivars was subjected to a genome-wide scan using diversity array technology markers. The same set of accessions had been earlier evaluated for flowering time over six consecutive seasons. Some of the resulting marker-trait associations (MTAs mapped to chromosomal locations in which known major genes affecting flowering time are known to reside. However, most of the MTAs identified genomic locations where no such genes are known to map, so providing new opportunities to exploit genetic variation for flowering time in wheat breeding programmes.

  11. Genetic markers for flowering in perennial ryegrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paina, Cristiana; Byrne, Stephen; Andersen, Jeppe Reitan

    2011-01-01

    genes will be converted to molecular markers and mapped in an existing mapping population previously characterized for flowering time and vernalization response. References: Amasino, R.M., Michaels S.D. (2010). The Timing of Flowering. Plant Physiology 154: 516–520 Greenup, A., W. Peacock, W.J., Dennis...... E.S., Trevaskis, B. (2009). The molecular biology of seasonal flowering-responses in Arabidopsis and the cereals. Annals of Botany 103: 1165–1172 Distelfeld, A.,Li, C., Dubcovsky J. (2009). Regulation of flowering in temperate cereals. Current Opinion in Plant Biology 12:178–184 Jung, C., Müller, A.......E. (2009). Flowering time control and applications in plant breeding. Trends in Plant Science 14 /10: 563-573 Andersen, J.L., Jensen, L.B., Asp, T., Lübberstedt, T. (2006). Vernalization response in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) involves orthologues of diploid wheat (Triticum monococcum) VRN1...

  12. Flower-like NiO structures: Controlled hydrothermal synthesis and electrochemical characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Hui; Chen, Xuan [Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Material and Technology, Ministry of education, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046, Xinjiang (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Institute of Applied Chemistry, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046, Xinjiang (China); Jia, Dianzeng, E-mail: jdz0991@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Material and Technology, Ministry of education, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046, Xinjiang (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Institute of Applied Chemistry, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046, Xinjiang (China); Bao, Shujuan [Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Material and Technology, Ministry of education, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046, Xinjiang (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Institute of Applied Chemistry, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046, Xinjiang (China); Zhou, Wanyong [Chemistry and Chemical Engineering of Xinjiang University, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046, Xinjiang (China)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Flower-like porous NiO was obtained via thermal decomposition of the precursor prepared by a hydrothermal process using hexamethylenetetramine and polyethylene glycol as hydrolysis-controlling agent and surfactant, respectively. The morphology and microstructure of as-synthesized NiO were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results of electrochemical measurements demonstrated that the flower-like porous NiO has high capacity (340 F g{sup −1}) with excellent cycling performance as electrode materials of electrochemical capacitors (ECs), which may be attributed to the unique microstrcture of NiO. Data analyses indicated that NiO with novel porous structure attractive for practical and large-scale applications in electrochemical capacitors. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Synthesis and characterization of NiO with novel porous structure is presented in this work. ► The electrochemical performance of product was examined. ► NiO with excellent performance as electrode materials may be due to the unique microstrcture. ► NiO with novel porous structure attractive for practical with high capacity (340 F g{sup −1}). -- Abstract: Flower-like porous NiO was obtained by thermal decomposition of the precursor prepared by a hydrothermal process with hexamethylenetetramine and polyethylene glycol as hydrolysis-controlling agent and surfactant, respectively. The morphology and microstructure of as-synthesized NiO were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The resulting structures of NiO exhibited porous like petal building blocks. The electrochemical measurements’ results demonstrated that flower-like porous NiO has high capacity (340 F g{sup −1}) with excellent cycling performance as electrode materials for

  13. Molecular evolution and phylogenetic analysis of eight COL superfamily genes in group I related to photoperiodic regulation of flowering time in wild and domesticated cotton (Gossypium) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Ding, Jian; Liu, Chunxiao; Cai, Caiping; Zhou, Baoliang; Zhang, Tianzhen; Guo, Wangzhen

    2015-01-01

    Flowering time is an important ecological trait that determines the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. Flowering time in cotton is controlled by short-day photoperiods, with strict photoperiod sensitivity. As the CO-FT (CONSTANS-FLOWER LOCUS T) module regulates photoperiodic flowering in several plants, we selected eight CONSTANS genes (COL) in group I to detect their expression patterns in long-day and short-day conditions. Further, we individually cloned and sequenced their homologs from 25 different cotton accessions and one outgroup. Finally, we studied their structures, phylogenetic relationship, and molecular evolution in both coding region and three characteristic domains. All the eight COLs in group I show diurnal expression. In the orthologous and homeologous loci, each gene structure in different cotton species is highly conserved, while length variation has occurred due to insertions/deletions in intron and/or exon regions. Six genes, COL2 to COL5, COL7 and COL8, exhibit higher nucleotide diversity in the D-subgenome than in the A-subgenome. The Ks values of 98.37% in all allotetraploid cotton species examined were higher in the A-D and At-Dt comparison than in the A-At and D-Dt comparisons, and the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) of Ks between A vs. D and At vs. Dt also showed positive, high correlations, with a correlation coefficient of at least 0.797. The nucleotide polymorphism in wild species is significantly higher compared to G. hirsutum and G. barbadense, indicating a genetic bottleneck associated with the domesticated cotton species. Three characteristic domains in eight COLs exhibit different evolutionary rates, with the CCT domain highly conserved, while the B-box and Var domain much more variable in allotetraploid species. Taken together, COL1, COL2 and COL8 endured greater selective pressures during the domestication process. The study improves our understanding of the domestication-related genes/traits during cotton

  14. The influence of flower morphology and nectar quality on the longevity of a parasitoid biological control agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vattala, H.D.; Wratten, S.D.; Phillips, C.B.; Wäckers, F.L.

    2006-01-01

    Conservation biological control aims to enhance the efficacy of arthropod biological control agents, such as parasitoids, partly by providing them with access to floral nectar. However, the suitability of a flower species for providing nectar to a parasitoid is dependent on the morphologies of the p

  15. Rapid phase-controlled microwave synthesis of nanostructured hierarchical tetragonal and cubic β-In 2S 3 dandelion flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, S. D.; Jagadale, T. C.; Apte, S. K.; Sonawane, R. S.; Kulkarni, M. V.; Patil, S. I.; Ogale, S. B.; Kale, B. B.

    2008-02-01

    Phase controlled synthesis of hierarchical nanostructured β-In 2S 3 dandelion flowers is realized by a rapid microwave solvothermal process using indium metal, nitric acid and thiourea as precursors. The tetragonal and cubic phases of the compound have been successfully and separately stabilized in the same type of dandelion morphology by using aqueous-mediated and methanol-mediated synthesis, respectively. The possible mechanism responsible for phase control is discussed. Optical properties of the flowers as well as their hydrogen generation capability by photodecomposition of H 2S under visible light are also reported.

  16. Synthesis of Circular Array Antenna for Sidelobe Level and Aperture Size Control Using Flower Pollination Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. S. S. Chakravarthy Vedula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sidelobe level suppression is a major problem in circular array antenna (CAA synthesis. Many conventional numerical techniques are proposed to achieve this which are time consuming and often fail to handle multimodal problems. In this paper, a method of circular array synthesis using nature inspired flower pollination algorithm (FPA is proposed. The synthesis technique considered here adapts one and two degrees of freedom, namely, amplitude only and amplitude spacing. The effectiveness of the FPA is studied by comparing the results with genetic algorithm (GA and uniform circular array antenna (UCAA with uniform spacing. Also the effect of additional degree of freedom on the aperture size and the computational time is analyzed. A relative side lobe level (SLL of −25 dB is achieved using the algorithm under both no beam scanning (0° and beam scanning (15° conditions for 20 and 40 elements of CAA.

  17. Identification of Flowering-Related Genes Responsible for Differences in Bolting Time between Two Radish Inbred Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Won Yong; Park, Hyun Ji; Lee, Areum; Lee, Sang Sook; Kim, Youn-Sung; Cho, Hye Sun

    2016-01-01

    Late bolting after cold exposure is an economically important characteristic of radish (Raphanus sativus L.), an important Brassicaceae root vegetable crop. However, little information is available regarding the genes and pathways that govern flowering time in this species. We performed high-throughput RNA sequencing analysis to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that determine the differences in flowering times between two radish lines, NH-JS1 (late bolting) and NH-JS2 (early bolting). In total, 71,188 unigenes were identified by reference-guided assembly, of which 309, 788, and 980 genes were differentially expressed between the two inbred lines after 0, 15, and 35 days of vernalization, respectively. Among these genes, 218 homologs of Arabidopsis flowering-time (Ft) genes were identified in the radish, and 49 of these genes were differentially expressed between the two radish lines in the presence or absence of vernalization treatment. Most of the Ft genes up-regulated in NH-JS1 vs. NH-JS2 were repressors of flowering, such as RsFLC, consistent with the late-bolting phenotype of NH-JS1. Although, the functions of genes down-regulated in NH-JS1 were less consistent with late-bolting characteristics than the up-regulated Ft genes, several Ft enhancer genes, including RsSOC1, a key floral integrator, showed an appropriate expression to the late-bolting phenotype. In addition, the patterns of gene expression related to the vernalization pathway closely corresponded with the different bolting times of the two inbred lines. These results suggest that the vernalization pathway is conserved between radish and Arabidopsis. PMID:28018383

  18. Identification of flowering-related genes responsible for differences in bolting time between two radish inbred lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Sun Cho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Late bolting after cold exposure is an economically important characteristic of radish (Raphanus sativus L., an important Brassicaceae root vegetable crop. However, little information is available regarding the genes and pathways that govern flowering time in this species. We performed high-throughput RNA sequencing analysis to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that determine the differences in flowering times between two radish lines, NH-JS1 (late bolting and NH-JS2 (early bolting. In total, 71,188 unigenes were identified by reference-guided assembly, of which 309, 788, and 980 genes were differentially expressed between the two inbred lines after 0, 15, and 35 days of vernalization, respectively. Among these genes, 218 homologs of Arabidopsis flowering-time (Ft genes were identified in the radish, and 49 of these genes were differentially expressed between the two radish lines in the presence or absence of vernalization treatment. Most of the Ft genes up-regulated in NH-JS1 vs NH-JS2 were repressors of flowering, such as RsFLC, consistent with the late-bolting phenotype of NH-JS1. Although the functions of genes down-regulated in NH-JS1 were less consistent with late-bolting characteristics than the up-regulated Ft genes, several Ft enhancer genes, including RsSOC1, a key floral integrator, showed an appropriate expression to the late-bolting phenotype. In addition, the patterns of gene expression related to the vernalization pathway closely corresponded with the different bolting times of the two inbred lines. These results suggest that the vernalization pathway is conserved between radish and Arabidopsis.

  19. Flower Development

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R; Benítez, Mariana; Corvera-Poiré, Adriana; Chaos Cador, Álvaro; de Folter, Stefan; Gamboa de Buen, Alicia; Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; García-Ponce, Berenice; Jaimes-Miranda, Fabiola; Pérez-Ruiz, Rigoberto V.; Piñeyro-Nelson, Alma; Sánchez-Corrales, Yara E.

    2010-01-01

    Flowers are the most complex structures of plants. Studies of Arabidopsis thaliana, which has typical eudicot flowers, have been fundamental in advancing the structural and molecular understanding of flower development. The main processes and stages of Arabidopsis flower development are summarized to provide a framework in which to interpret the detailed molecular genetic studies of genes assigned functions during flower development and is extended to recent genomics studies uncovering the ke...

  20. The hot, the cold and the tulip : the regulation of flowering time and dormancy release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeggangers, Hendrika A.C.F.

    2017-01-01

    The ornamental geophyte Tulipa gesneriana is the most cultivated bulbous species in the Netherlands. It is widely grown in the field for vegetative propagation purposes and in greenhouses for the production of high quality cut flowers. Over the last decade, the tulip bulb industry is affected by the

  1. Time management and nectar flow: flower handling and suction feeding in long-proboscid flies (Nemestrinidae: Prosoeca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolyi, Florian; Morawetz, Linde; Colville, Jonathan F.; Handschuh, Stephan; Metscher, Brian D.; Krenn, Harald W.

    2013-11-01

    A well-developed suction pump in the head represents an important adaptation for nectar-feeding insects, such as Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera. This pumping organ creates a pressure gradient along the proboscis, which is responsible for nectar uptake. The extremely elongated proboscis of the genus Prosoeca (Nemestrinidae) evolved as an adaptation to feeding from long, tubular flowers. According to the functional constraint hypothesis, nectar uptake through a disproportionately elongated, straw-like proboscis increases flower handling time and consequently lowers the energy intake rate. Due to the conspicuous length variation of the proboscis of Prosoeca, individuals with longer proboscides are hypothesised to have longer handling times. To test this hypothesis, we used field video analyses of flower-visiting behaviour, detailed examinations of the suction pump morphology and correlations of proboscis length with body length and suction pump dimensions. Using a biomechanical framework described for nectar-feeding Lepidoptera in relation to proboscis length and suction pump musculature, we describe and contrast the system in long-proboscid flies. Flies with longer proboscides spent significantly more time drinking from flowers. In addition, proboscis length and body length showed a positive allometric relationship. Furthermore, adaptations of the suction pump included an allometric relationship between proboscis length and suction pump muscle volume and a combination of two pumping organs. Overall, the study gives detailed insight into the adaptations required for long-proboscid nectar feeding, and comparisons with other nectar-sucking insects allow further considerations of the evolution of the suction pump in insects with sucking mouthparts.

  2. Production of Correa 'Mannii' as a potted plant - propagation, nutrition management, and controlled flowering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian natives, Correa ‘Mannii’ and C. reflexa (Rutaceae), are considered suitable as a flowering pot plant. However, comprehensive information on the most effective propagation method and nutrition management and their impact on propagation and flowering is unavailable. The influence of temper...

  3. Quantifying temporal isolation: a modelling approach assessing the effect of flowering time differences on crop-to-weed pollen flow in sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumet, Marie; Cayre, Adeline; Latreille, Muriel; Muller, Marie-Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Flowering time divergence can be a crucial component of reproductive isolation between sympatric populations, but few studies have quantified its actual contribution to the reduction of gene flow. In this study, we aimed at estimating pollen-mediated gene flow between cultivated sunflower and a weedy conspecific sunflower population growing in the same field and at quantifying, how it is affected by the weeds' flowering time. For that purpose, we extended an existing mating model by including a temporal distance (i.e. flowering time difference between potential parents) effect on mating probabilities. Using phenological and genotypic data gathered on the crop and on a sample of the weedy population and its offspring, we estimated an average hybridization rate of approximately 10%. This rate varied strongly from 30% on average for weeds flowering at the crop flowering peak to 0% when the crop finished flowering and was affected by the local density of weeds. Our result also suggested the occurrence of other factors limiting crop-to-weed gene flow. This level of gene flow and its dependence on flowering time might influence the evolutionary fate of weedy sunflower populations sympatric to their crop relative.

  4. Controlled synthesis of Ce(OH)CO3 flowers by a hydrothermal method and their thermal conversion to CeO2 flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongen Zhang; Feng Li; Jian Gu; Qing Xie; Shanzhong Li; Xiaobo Zhang; Guiquan Han; Ailing Ying; Zhiwei Tong

    2012-01-01

    Highly uniform Ce(OH)CO3 flowers were successfully prepared in large quantities using a facile hydrothermal approach from the reaction of Ce(NH4)(NO3)4 with CO(NH2)2 at 160 ℃ in a water-N2H4 complex,The influences of the N2H4 content and temperature on flower formation were discussed.CeO2 flowers were prepared by thermal conversion of Ce(OH)CO3 flowers at 500 ℃ in air.Both Ce(OH)CO3 and CeO2 flowers were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD),and scanning electron microscopy (SEM),The UV-vis adsorption spectrum of the CeO2 flowers showed that the band gap energy (Eg) is 2.66 eV,which is lower than that of bulk ceria.

  5. Micrometeorological and thermal control of frost flower growth on young sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galley, R.J.; Else, B.G.T.; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier;

    2015-01-01

    Frost flowers are transient crystal structures that form on new and young sea ice surfaces. They have been implicated in a variety of biological, chemical and physical processes and interactions with the atmosphere at the sea ice surface. We describe the atmospheric and radiative conditions...... and the physical and thermal properties of the sea ice and atmosphere that form, decay and destroy frost flowers on young sea ice. Frost flower formation occurred during a high-pressure system that caused air temperatures to drop to -30°C, with relative humidity of 70% (an under saturated atmosphere), and very......-wave radiation balance at the surface. The observed crystal habits of the frost flowers were long needles, betraying their origin from the vapour phase at temperatures between -20°C and -30°C. After a night of growth, frost flowers decayed associated with increased solar radiation, a net surface radiation...

  6. Function of protein ubiquitination and SUMOylation in regulating flowering time of plants:A Function of protein ubiquitination and SUMOylation in regulating flowering time of plants:A review%蛋白泛素化和类泛素化修饰在植物开花时间调控中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张孝廉; 张吉顺; 邹颉; 赵杰宏; 任学良

    2015-01-01

    Summary Flowering is an important process in the life cycle of plants to complete the transition from vegetative growth to reproductive growth and to ensure the yield and production of next generation . Therefore , flowering time is a considerable agronomic trait in plants . There are many factors influencing flowering time , including internal factors , such as hormone and carbohydrate , and environmental factors , such as light and temperature . Different plant species have evolved complicated networks to modulate the flowering time accurately in response to environmental cues and endogenous signals . Studies in A rabidopsis have led to the identification of the major flowering pathways: the photoperiod pathway , the vernalization pathway , the ambient temperature pathway , the autonomous pathway , the gibberellic acid (GA) pathway and the age pathway . Multiple flowering regulatory pathways converge to control the activation of floral integrator genes , such as FT and SOC1 . The flowering time genes and their regulation pathways are highly conserved in A rabidopsis , rice and other higher plants . The key regulators of floral transition have been studied extensively in plants . As aspects of protein post‐translational modifications , the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway and SUMOylation play key roles in almost every aspect of growth and development for plants ,including the regulation of plant flowering time . Protein stability , degradation , location , and interaction with other proteins were also regulated under these pathways . The ubiquitination pathway usually contains three steps . First , the E1 ( ubiquitin activating enzyme) forms a thioester bond with the C terminus of the 76‐amino acid ubiquitin protein . Second , the activated ubiquitin is transferred to an E2 ( ubiquitin conjugating enzyme) . Third , with the help of the E3 ligase , ubiquitin is transferred to the substrate by E2 , and at last forms a ubiquitinated substrate protein . These

  7. Functional conservation of rice OsNF-YB/YC and Arabidopsis AtNF-YB/YC proteins in the regulation of flowering time

    KAUST Repository

    Hwang, Yoon-Hyung

    2016-01-11

    Plant NUCLEAR FACTOR Y (NF-Y) transcription factors play important roles in plant development and abiotic stress. In Arabidopsis thaliana, two NF-YB (AtNF-YB2 and AtNF-YB3) and five NF-YC (AtNF-YC1, AtNF-YC2, AtNF-YC3, AtNF-YC4, and AtNF-YC9) genes regulate photoperiodic flowering by interacting with other AtNF-Y subunit proteins. Three rice NF-YB (OsNF-YB8, OsNF-YB10, and OsNF-YB11) and five rice OsNF-YC (OsNF-YC1, OsNF-YC2, OsNF-YC4, OsNF-YC6, and OsNF-YC7) genes are clustered with two AtNF-YB and five AtNF-YC genes, respectively. To investigate the functional conservation of these NF-YB and NF-YC genes in rice and Arabidopsis, we analyzed the flowering phenotypes of transgenic plants overexpressing the respective OsNF-YB and OsNF-YC genes in Arabidopsis mutants. Overexpression of OsNF-YB8/10/11 and OsNF-YC2 complemented the late flowering phenotype of Arabidopsis nf-yb2 nf-yb3 and nf-yc3 nf-yc4 nf-yc9 mutants, respectively. The rescued phenotype of 35S::OsNF-YC2 nf-yc3 nf-yc4 nf-yc9 plants was attributed to the upregulation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1). In vitro and in planta protein–protein analyses revealed that OsNF-YB8/10/11 and OsNF-YC1/2/4/6/7 interact with AtNF-YC3/4/9 and AtNF-YB2/3, respectively. Our data indicate that some OsNF-YB and OsNF-YC genes are functional equivalents of AtNF-YB2/3 and AtNF-YC3/4/9 genes, respectively, and suggest functional conservation of Arabidopsis and rice NF-Y genes in the control of flowering time.

  8. Research progress ofphotoperiod regulatedgeneson flowering time in rice%水稻开花光周期调控相关基因研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔德艳; 陈守俊; 周立国; 高欢; 罗利军; 刘灶长

    2016-01-01

    Rice flowering regulation is an extremely complex process, which is controlled by genetic factors and external environment. Photoperiodic regulatory pathway ispivotal tocontrol flowering in rice, in which florigen genesHd3aandRTF1are at the core andthey are regulated byupstreamHd1-dependent,Ehd1-dependent,as well as bothHd1-andEhd1-independent pathways. The three pathways bring a variety of light signal information together toHd3aandRTF1for further integration,and then transmit the signals inthe form of florigen to the downstream flowering related genes.In thisreview, wesummarizethe research progress of photoperiod regulated geneson flowering time in rice,includingthe photoreceptors and circadian rhythm genes,the florigens,itsupstream, down-streamandinteracting genes.We hopeto provide a reference for in-depth study of rice flowering regulation.%水稻开花调控是一个极其复杂的生命过程,由自身遗传因素和外界环境共同决定。光周期途径是调控水稻开花的关键途径,在这个途径中成花素基因Hd3a和RTF1处于核心地位,其上游调控途径主要包括Hd1依赖途径、Ehd1依赖途径及不依赖于Hd1和Ehd1的途径。这3条途径在汇集了光信号的各种信息后,将信号在Hd3a 和 RTF1处整合,并通过成花素形式将信息传递给下游开花基因,调控水稻开花。本文从成花素、光信号感受基因和昼夜节律基因、成花素上游调控基因、互作蛋白和下游调控基因等几方面阐述水稻开花光周期调控相关基因的研究现状,为水稻开花调控的深入研究提供参考。

  9. Timing and abundance of flowering and fruiting of woody plants in the Hørsholm Arboretum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leverenz, Jerry

    The Arboretum in Hørsholm has an extensive collection of woody plant species of known origin. There are approximately 2200 woody plant taxa in the collection, representing 295 genera and 101 plant families. This collection is used to study how plants from different parts of the world thrive...... in response to the Danish environment. In this study of the area within 2 km in all directions from the Arboretum, we found no plant species that were definitely escaping from the Arboretum collection. This was a surprising result, but it became clear that we needed to know if the plants were producing...... flowers (pollen) and fruit (seed) in order to have a clearer understanding of the negative results. As a first step we have begun to record if, and when, the taxa in the collection produce flowers (and thus pollen), and fruits (and thereby seed). In this Working Paper we present and analyse the results...

  10. Polyglutamine variation in a flowering time protein correlates with island age in a Hawaiian plant radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laakkonen Liisa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A controversial topic in evolutionary developmental biology is whether morphological diversification in natural populations can be driven by expansions and contractions of amino acid repeats in proteins. To promote adaptation, selection on protein length variation must overcome deleterious effects of multiple correlated traits (pleiotropy. Thus far, systems that demonstrate this capacity include only ancient or artificial morphological diversifications. The Hawaiian Islands, with their linear geological sequence, present a unique environment to study recent, natural radiations. We have focused our research on the Hawaiian endemic mints (Lamiaceae, a large and diverse lineage with paradoxically low genetic variation, in order to test whether a direct relationship between coding-sequence repeat diversity and morphological change can be observed in an actively evolving system. Results Here we show that in the Hawaiian mints, extensive polyglutamine (CAG codon repeat polymorphism within a homolog of the pleiotropic flowering time protein and abscisic acid receptor FCA tracks the natural environmental cline of the island chain, consequent with island age, across a period of 5 million years. CAG expansions, perhaps following their natural tendency to elongate, are more frequent in colonists of recently-formed, nutrient-rich islands than in their forebears on older, nutrient-poor islands. Values for several quantitative morphological variables related to reproductive investment, known from Arabidopsis fca mutant studies, weakly though positively correlate with increasing glutamine tract length. Together with protein modeling of FCA, which indicates that longer polyglutamine tracts could induce suboptimally mobile functional domains, we suggest that CAG expansions may form slightly deleterious alleles (with respect to protein function that become fixed in founder populations. Conclusion In the Hawaiian mint FCA system, we infer that

  11. Understanding the genetic and epigenetic architecture in complex network of rice flowering pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Changhui; Chen, Dan; Fang, Jun; Wang, Pingrong; Deng, Xiaojian; Chu, Chengcai

    2014-12-01

    Although the molecular basis of flowering time control is well dissected in the long day (LD) plant Arabidopsis, it is still largely unknown in the short day (SD) plant rice. Rice flowering time (heading date) is an important agronomic trait for season adaption and grain yield, which is affected by both genetic and environmental factors. During the last decade, as the nature of florigen was identified, notable progress has been made on exploration how florigen gene expression is genetically controlled. In Arabidopsis expression of certain key flowering integrators such as FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) are also epigenetically regulated by various chromatin modifications, however, very little is known in rice on this aspect until very recently. This review summarized the advances of both genetic networks and chromatin modifications in rice flowering time control, attempting to give a complete view of the genetic and epigenetic architecture in complex network of rice flowering pathways.

  12. The Myths behind Flower Names

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白杰

    2014-01-01

    The Greek term for flower is Chloris. It is derived from the name of the Chloris, the goddess of vegetation, in Greek mythology, reasonably so, if we consider the great number of mythological tales linked to flowers of the Greek flowers. The use of flowers was widespread in Greece from time immemorial, since flowers are so important to us from the moment we are born. Flowers play an important role in mythology. As they morph from bud to bloom to faded and wilted petals, they assume various meanings linked to youth, life and death. They are associated with goddesses and legends, and are often attributed with certain powers and symbolism.

  13. Overexpression of PvPin1, a Bamboo Homolog of PIN1-Type Parvulin 1, Delays Flowering Time in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of the long and unpredictable flowering period in bamboo, the molecular mechanism of bamboo flowering is unclear. Recent study showed that Arabidopsis PIN1-type parvulin 1 (Pin1At is an important floral activator and regulates floral transition by facilitating the cis/trans isomerization of the phosphorylated Ser/Thr residues preceding proline motifs in suppressor of overexpression of CO 1 (SOC1 and agamous-like 24 (AGL24. Whether bamboo has a Pin1 homolog and whether it works in bamboo flowering are still unknown. In this study, we cloned PvPin1, a homolog of Pin1At, from Phyllostachys violascens (Bambusoideae. Bioinformatics analysis showed that PvPin1 is closely related to Pin1-like proteins in monocots. PvPin1 was widely expressed in all tested bamboo tissues, with the highest expression in young leaf and lowest in floral bud. Moreover, PvPin1 expression was high in leaves before bamboo flowering then declined during flower development. Overexpression of PvPin1 significantly delayed flowering time by downregulating SOC1 and AGL24 expression in Arabidopsis under greenhouse conditions and conferred a significantly late flowering phenotype by upregulating OsMADS56 in rice under field conditions. PvPin1 showed subcellular localization in both the nucleus and cytolemma. The 1500-bp sequence of the PvPin1 promoter was cloned, and cis-acting element prediction showed that ABRE and TGACG-motif elements, which responded to abscisic acid (ABA and methyl jasmonate (MeJA, respectively, were characteristic of P. violascens in comparison with Arabidopsis. On promoter activity analysis, exogenous ABA and MeJA could significantly inhibit PvPin1 expression. These findings suggested that PvPin1 may be a repressor in flowering, and its delay of flowering time could be regulated by ABA and MeJA in bamboo.

  14. Genetic control of chalcone isomerase activity in flowers of Dianthus caryophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkmann, G; Dangelmayr, B

    1980-06-01

    In flowers of Dianthus caryophyllus (carnation), the gene I is concerned with a discrete step in flavonoid biosynthesis, Genotypes with recessive (ii) alleles produce yellow flowers, which contain the chalcone isosalipurposide (naringenin-chalcone-2'-glucoside) as the major petal pigment, but in genotypes with wild-type alleles flavonols and anthocyanins can be formed and the flowers are white or red. Enzymatic measurements on petal extracts of four strains with different flower coloration revealed a clear correlation between accumulation of chalcone in recessive genotypes and deficiency of chalcone isomerase (E.C. 5.5.1.6) activity. From the chemogenetic and enzymological evidence it can be concluded that naringenin-chalcone is the first product of the synthesis of the flavonoid skeleton and that only the conversion of naringenin-chalcone to naringenin furnishes the substrate for the further reactions to flavonol and anthocyanin.

  15. Functional Diversity of CYCLOIDEA-like TCP Genes in the Control of Zygomorphic Flower Development in Lotus japonicus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shilei Xu; Yonghai Luo; Zhigang Cai; Xiangling Cao; Xiaohe Hu; Jun Yang; and Da Luo

    2013-01-01

    CYCLOIDEA (CYC)-Iike TCP genes play key roles in dorsoventral differentiation of zygomorphic flowers in Papilionoideae legumes.In this study,we analyzed the kew mutants whose flowers lost lateral identity,and investigated the diverse functions of three LjCYC genes during zygomorphic flower development in the model legume Lotusjaponicus.We showed that kew1 and kew3 are allelic mutants of LjCYC3,a CYC-like TCP gene.Through transgenic experiments,it was shown that LjCYC1 possesses dorsal activity similar to LjCYC2,and that LjCYC3 alone is sufficient to confer lateral activity,and an epistatic effect between dorsal and lateral activities was identified.Sequence analysis revealed a striking alteration at the 3' end of the LjCYC3 open reading frame (ORF) in comparison with those of LjCYC1 and LjCYC2 ORFs.Furthermore,it was found that LjCYC proteins could interact with each other and possess different activities by means of a transcriptional activity assay.Our data demonstrate that the sequence variation and the subsequent alteration of protein property play important roles in the functional diversity of different LjCYC genes in controlling zygomorphic flower development in Lotusjaponicus.

  16. Pollination increases ethylene production in Lilium hybrida cv. Brindisi flowers but does not affect the time to tepal senescence or tepal abscission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Silvia; Prisa, Domenico; Burchi, Gianluca; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2015-01-15

    In many species, pollination induces a rapid increase in ethylene production, which induces early petal senescence, petal abscission, or flower closure. Cross-pollination in Lilium hybrida cv. Brindisi resulted in a small increase in flower ethylene production. In intact plants and in isolated flowers, pollination had no effect on the time to tepal senescence or tepal abscission. When applied to closed buds of unpollinated flowers, exogenous ethylene slightly hastened the time to tepal senescence and abscission. However, exogenous ethylene had no effect when the flowers had just opened, i.e. at the time of pollination. Experiments with silver thiosulphate, which blocks the ethylene receptor, indicated that endogenous ethylene had a slight effect on the regulation of tepal senescence and tepal abscission, although only at the time the tepals were still inside buds and not in open flowers. Low ethylene-sensitivity after anthesis therefore explains why pollination had no effect on the processes studied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. The influence of population structure on gene expression and flowering time variation in the ubiquitous weed Capsella bursa-pastoris (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryvokhyzha, Dmytro; Holm, Karl; Chen, Jun; Cornille, Amandine; Glémin, Sylvain; Wright, Stephen I; Lagercrantz, Ulf; Lascoux, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Population structure is a potential problem when testing for adaptive phenotypic differences among populations. The observed phenotypic differences among populations can simply be due to genetic drift, and if the genetic distance between them is not considered, the differentiation may be falsely interpreted as adaptive. Conversely, adaptive and demographic processes might have been tightly associated and correcting for the population structure may lead to false negatives. Here, we evaluated this problem in the cosmopolitan weed Capsella bursa-pastoris. We used RNA-Seq to analyse gene expression differences among 24 accessions, which belonged to a much larger group that had been previously characterized for flowering time and circadian rhythm and were genotyped using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) technique. We found that clustering of accessions for gene expression retrieved the same three clusters that were obtained with GBS data previously, namely Europe, the Middle East and Asia. Moreover, the three groups were also differentiated for both flowering time and circadian rhythm variation. Correction for population genetic structure when analysing differential gene expression analysis removed all differences among the three groups. This may suggest that most differences are neutral and simply reflect population history. However, geographical variation in flowering time and circadian rhythm indicated that the distribution of adaptive traits might be confounded by population structure. To bypass this confounding effect, we compared gene expression differentiation between flowering ecotypes within the genetic groups. Among the differentially expressed genes, FLOWERING LOCUS C was the strongest candidate for local adaptation in regulation of flowering time.

  18. Endogenous growth regulators in embryonic shoots of Scots pine at the time of male and female flower primordia initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kopcewicz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The initiation of Scots pine male flower primordia is connected with a high content of gibberellins and a low level of auxins, whereas the initiation of female flower primordia is correlated with a high content of auxins and a low level of gibberellins. There is lack of direct correlation between the content of cytokinins or abscisic acid and flower sex differentation.

  19. OsCOL10, a CONSTANS-Like Gene, Functions as a Flowering Time Repressor Downstream of Ghd7 in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Junjie; Jin, Mingna; Wang, Jiachang; Wu, Fuqing; Sheng, Peike; Cheng, Zhijun; Wang, Jiulin; Zheng, Xiaoming; Chen, Liping; Wang, Min; Zhu, Shanshan; Guo, Xiuping; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Xuanming; Wang, Chunming; Wang, Haiyang; Wu, Chuanyin; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-04-01

    Flowering time, or heading date, is a critical agronomic trait that determines the cropping season and regional adaptability, and ultimately grain yield in rice. A number of genes involved in photoperiodic flowering have been cloned and their roles in modulating expression of the flowering genes have been characterized to a certain extent. However, much less is known about the pathway in transmitting the day length response signal(s) to induce transition to reproductive growth. Here, we report a constitutive flowering repressor OsCOL10, which encodes a member of the CONSTANS-like (COL) family. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing OsCOL10 (driven by a strong promoter or by fusing it to the activation domain of VP64) showed delayed flowering time under both short and long days.OsCOL10 is affected by the circadian clock and is preferentially expressed in leaf mesophyll cells; it is localized to the nucleus and has transcriptional activation activity. Further studies show that OsCOL10 represses the expression of theFT-like genes RFT1 and Hd3a through Ehd1. Transcripts of OsCOL10 are more abundant in plants carrying a functional Ghd7 allele or overexpressing Ghd7 than in Ghd7-deficient plants, thus placing OsCOL10 downstream of Ghd7.Taking these findings together, we conclude that OsCOL10 functions as a flowering time repressor that links Ghd7 and Ehd1 in rice.

  20. Molecular evolution and phylogenetic analysis of eight COL superfamily genes in group I related to photoperiodic regulation of flowering time in wild and domesticated cotton (Gossypium species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    Full Text Available Flowering time is an important ecological trait that determines the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. Flowering time in cotton is controlled by short-day photoperiods, with strict photoperiod sensitivity. As the CO-FT (CONSTANS-FLOWER LOCUS T module regulates photoperiodic flowering in several plants, we selected eight CONSTANS genes (COL in group I to detect their expression patterns in long-day and short-day conditions. Further, we individually cloned and sequenced their homologs from 25 different cotton accessions and one outgroup. Finally, we studied their structures, phylogenetic relationship, and molecular evolution in both coding region and three characteristic domains. All the eight COLs in group I show diurnal expression. In the orthologous and homeologous loci, each gene structure in different cotton species is highly conserved, while length variation has occurred due to insertions/deletions in intron and/or exon regions. Six genes, COL2 to COL5, COL7 and COL8, exhibit higher nucleotide diversity in the D-subgenome than in the A-subgenome. The Ks values of 98.37% in all allotetraploid cotton species examined were higher in the A-D and At-Dt comparison than in the A-At and D-Dt comparisons, and the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r of Ks between A vs. D and At vs. Dt also showed positive, high correlations, with a correlation coefficient of at least 0.797. The nucleotide polymorphism in wild species is significantly higher compared to G. hirsutum and G. barbadense, indicating a genetic bottleneck associated with the domesticated cotton species. Three characteristic domains in eight COLs exhibit different evolutionary rates, with the CCT domain highly conserved, while the B-box and Var domain much more variable in allotetraploid species. Taken together, COL1, COL2 and COL8 endured greater selective pressures during the domestication process. The study improves our understanding of the domestication-related genes

  1. Low temperature phosphine fumigation for postharvest control of western flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on lettuce, broccoli, asparagus, and strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Biao

    2008-12-01

    U.S. exported lettuce, broccoli, asparagus, and strawberries often harbor western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), a quarantined pest in Taiwan, and therefore require quarantine treatment. Fumigation with diluted pure phosphine at a low temperature of 2 degrees C was studied to control western flower thrips and to determine effects on the quality of the treated products. Total thrips control was achieved in > or = 18-h fumigation treatments with > or = 250 ppm phosphine. One day fumigation treatment with 1,000 ppm phosphine was tested on lettuce and broccoli. One-day fumigation treatments with 500 ppm and 1,000 ppm phosphine were tested on asparagus and strawberry. Visual quality of lettuce, broccoli, and asparagus was evaluated after 2-wk posttreatment storage. Strawberry quality was evaluated immediately after fumigation and after 1-wk posttreatment storage. For all the products, there were no significant differences between the treatments and the controls in postharvest quality, and there were no injuries caused by the fumigation treatments. Therefore, phosphine fumigation at low temperature was promising for postharvest control of western flower thrips on lettuce, broccoli, asparagus, and strawberry.

  2. Preventive use of Bach flower Rescue Remedy in the control of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Margarida Maria de Carvalho; Costa, Francisco Eduardo de Carvalho; Gardona, Rodrigo Galvão Bueno; Araújo, Rochilan Godinho; Mundim, Fiorita Gonzales Lopes; Costa, Maria José de Carvalho

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of Bach flower Rescue Remedy on the control of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in rats. A randomized longitudinal experimental study. Eighteen Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups of six animals each and orogastrically dosed with either 200 μl of water (group A, control), or 100 μl of water and 100 μl of Bach flower remedy (group B), or 200 μl of Bach flower remedy (group C) every 2 days, for 20 days. All animals were fed standard rat chow and water ad libitum. Urine volume, body weight, feces weight, and food intake were measured every 2 days. On day 20, tests of glycemia, hyperuricemia, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and total cholesterol were performed, and the anatomy and histopathology of the heart, liver and kidneys were evaluated. Data were analyzed using Tukey's test at a significance level of 5%. No significant differences were found in food intake, feces weight, urine volume and uric acid levels between groups. Group C had a significantly lower body weight gain than group A and lower glycemia compared with groups A and B. Groups B and C had significantly higher HDL-cholesterol and lower triglycerides than controls. Animals had mild hepatic steatosis, but no cardiac or renal damage was observed in the three groups. Bach flower Rescue Remedy was effective in controlling glycemia, triglycerides, and HDL-cholesterol and may serve as a strategy for reducing risk factors for cardiovascular disease in rats. This study provides some preliminary "proof of concept" data that Bach Rescue Remedy may exert some biological effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Análise do lead time nos processos logísticos de uma rede varejista de flores/Analysis of the lead time in the logistics processes of a retail flower network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luciana Torres Correia de Mello; Hugo Carlos Mansano Dornfeld; Givaldo Guilherme dos Santos; Débora Passos; Rafael Ribeiro; Moacir Godinho Filho

    2016-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to analyze the lead time of logistics processes of a flower retailer network with headquarters in Campinas/SP using the tool Manufacturing Critical-path Time of the Quick...

  4. Molecular mechanism of TFL1 on the regulation of flowering time in Rosaceae%TFL1调控蔷薇科植物开花时间的分子机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高用顺; 汪以; 朱云美; 林顺权

    2016-01-01

    and they flowered immediately.To sum up,TFL1 is a key gene regulating flower bud differentiation,and it can keep the inflorescences in an indeterminate growth state,however,the understanding of the regulation mechanism of perennial plant flowering is still limited.In this paper,we reviewed the advances of the molecular mechanism of TFL1 homologous genes on the regulation of rosaceous plants flowering time and the effect of TFL1 on the transformation from the juvenile to mature period.We summarize the expression pattern and genetic function of TFL1 homologues in the processes of flowering transition and from the juvenile stage to adult stage in various rosaceous species.This work provides important information for further study of the molecular mechanism of TFL1 on the regulation of rosaceous plants flowering time and juvenile phase variation.In the future,more studies should be focused on the basic research of the floral transition of the rosaceous species,not only onthe expression level of the target genes but also on the genetic functions.Moreover,further research will help to identify more key genes in the control of flowering time in horticultural plants besides TFL1 homologs,in order to provide effective service for the modification of the production traits of horticultural plants.%蔷薇科包含很多具有重要经济价值的园艺植物,它们的开花模式多样,而不同的开花模式又直接影响了开花观赏期和果树产期,在园艺生产上非常重要.以拟南芥为代表的模式植物中,TERMINAL FLOWER1(TFL1)基因调控开花的分子机制已被深入研究,它是调控植物花芽分化的关键基因,可以维持花序的无限生长状态,延迟拟南芥的开花时间.然而,人们对蔷薇科植物开花调控机制的了解还比较有限.在本文,我们回顾了TFL1同源基因在蔷薇科植物开花时间调控分子机制方面的研究进展,并着重阐述了TFL1同源基因在各种蔷薇科植物开花转型以及童期

  5. Low temperature phosphine fumigation of pre-chilled iceberg lettuce under insulation cover for postharvest control of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumigation of chilled iceberg lettuce under an insulation cover was studied to develop economical alternatives to conduct low temperature phosphine fumigation for control of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), on exported lettuce. Vacuum cooled commercial iceberg lettuce o...

  6. FILAMENTOUS FLOWER controls lateral organ development by acting as both an activator and a repressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonaccorso Oliver

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The YABBY (YAB family of transcription factors participate in a diverse range of processes that include leaf and floral patterning, organ growth, and the control of shoot apical meristem organisation and activity. How these disparate functions are regulated is not clear, but based on interactions with the LEUNIG-class of co-repressors, it has been proposed that YABs act as transcriptional repressors. In the light of recent work showing that DNA-binding proteins associated with the yeast co-repressor TUP1 can also function as activators, we have examined the transcriptional activity of the YABs. Results Of the four Arabidopsis YABs tested in yeast, only FILAMENTOUS FLOWER (FIL activated reporter gene expression. Similar analysis with Antirrhinum YABs identified the FIL ortholog GRAMINIFOLIA as an activator. Plant-based transactivation assays not only confirmed the potential of FIL to activate transcription, but also extended this property to the FIL paralog YABBY3 (YAB3. Subsequent transcriptomic analysis of lines expressing a steroid-inducible FIL protein revealed groups of genes that responded either positively or negatively to YAB induction. Included in the positively regulated group of genes were the polarity regulators KANADI1 (KAN1, AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 4 (ARF4 and ASYMMETRIC LEAVES1 (AS1. We also show that modifying FIL to function as an obligate repressor causes strong yab loss-of-function phenotypes. Conclusions Collectively these data show that FIL functions as a transcriptional activator in plants and that this activity is involved in leaf patterning. Interestingly, our study also supports the idea that FIL can act as a repressor, as transcriptomic analysis identified negatively regulated FIL-response genes. To reconcile these observations, we propose that YABs are bifunctional transcription factors that participate in both positive and negative regulation. These findings fit a model of leaf development in which

  7. Control of flowering and cell fate by LIF2, an RNA binding partner of the polycomb complex component LHP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Latrasse

    Full Text Available Polycomb Repressive Complexes (PRC modulate the epigenetic status of key cell fate and developmental regulators in eukaryotes. The chromo domain protein like heterochromatin protein1 (LHP1 is a subunit of a plant PRC1-like complex in Arabidopsis thaliana and recognizes histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, a silencing epigenetic mark deposited by the PRC2 complex. We have identified and studied an LHP1-Interacting Factor2 (LIF2. LIF2 protein has RNA recognition motifs and belongs to the large hnRNP protein family, which is involved in RNA processing. LIF2 interacts in vivo, in the cell nucleus, with the LHP1 chromo shadow domain. Expression of LIF2 was detected predominantly in vascular and meristematic tissues. Loss-of-function of LIF2 modifies flowering time, floral developmental homeostasis and gynoecium growth determination. lif2 ovaries have indeterminate growth and produce ectopic inflorescences with severely affected flowers showing proliferation of ectopic stigmatic papillae and ovules in short-day conditions. To look at how LIF2 acts relative to LHP1, we conducted transcriptome analyses in lif2 and lhp1 and identified a common set of deregulated genes, which showed significant enrichment in stress-response genes. By comparing expression of LHP1 targets in lif2, lhp1 and lif2 lhp1 mutants we showed that LIF2 can either antagonize or act with LHP1. Interestingly, repression of the FLC floral transcriptional regulator in lif2 mutant is accompanied by an increase in H3K27 trimethylation at the locus, without any change in LHP1 binding, suggesting that LHP1 is targeted independently from LIF2 and that LHP1 binding does not strictly correlate with gene expression. LIF2, involved in cell identity and cell fate decision, may modulate the activity of LHP1 at specific loci, during specific developmental windows or in response to environmental cues that control cell fate determination. These results highlight a novel link between plant RNA

  8. EVALUATION OF STEAM FOR NEMATODE AND WEED CONTROL IN CUT FLOWER PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field trial was established on a commercial flower production farm in Palm City, FL. Treatments included MB check under Canslit® metalized film, solarization alone, steam treatment after solarization using 3 inch perforated tile, and steam treatment following solarization using custom-drilled drai...

  9. Mapping QTL associated with photoperiod sensitivity and assessing the importance of QTL×environment interaction for flowering time in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuiling Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An understanding of the genetic determinism of photoperiod response of flowering is a prerequisite for the successful exchange of germplasm across different latitudes. In order to contribute to resolve the genetic basis of photoperiod sensitivity in maize, a set of 201 recombinant inbred lines (RIL, derived from a temperate and tropical inbred line cross were evaluated in 5 field trials spread in short- and long-day environments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Firstly, QTL analyses for flowering time and photoperiod sensitivity in maize were conducted in individual photoperiod environments separately, and then, the total genetic effect was partitioned into additive effect (A and additive-by-environment interaction effect (AE by using a mixed-model-based composite interval mapping (MCIM method. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Seven putative QTL were found associated with DPS thermal time based on the data estimated in individual environments. Nine putative QTL were found associated with DPS thermal time across environments and six of them showed significant QTL×enviroment (QE interactions. Three QTL for photoperiod sensitivity were identified on chromosome 4, 9 and 10, which had the similar position to QTL for DPS thermal time in the two long-day environment. The major photoperiod sensitive loci qDPS10 responded to both short and long-day photoperiod environments and had opposite effects in different photoperiod environment. The QTL qDPS3, which had the greatest additive effect exclusively in the short-day environment, were photoperiod independent and should be classified in autonomous promotion pathway.

  10. Heading date 1 (Hd1), an ortholog of Arabidopsis CONSTANS, is a possible target of human selection during domestication to diversify flowering times of cultivated rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Shimamoto, Ko

    2011-01-01

    During the domestication of rice (Oryza sativa L.), diversification of flowering time was important in expanding the areas of cultivation. Rice is a facultative short day (SD) plant and requires certain periods of dark to induce flowering. Heading date 1 (Hd1), a regulator of the florigen gene Hd3a, is one of the main factors used to generate diversity in flowering. Loss-of-function alleles of Hd1 are common in cultivated rice and cause the diversity of flowering time. However, it is unclear how these functional nucleotide polymorphisms of Hd1 accumulated in the course of evolution. Nucleotide polymorphisms within Hd1 and Hd3a were analyzed in 38 accessions of ancestral wild rice Oryza rufipogon and compared with those of cultivated rice. In contrast to cultivated rice, no nucleotide changes affecting Hd1 function were found in 38 accessions of wild rice ancestors. No functional changes were found in Hd3a in either cultivated or ancestral rice. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that evolution of the Hd1 alleles may have occurred independently in cultivars descended from various accessions of ancestral rice. The non-functional Hd1 alleles found in cultivated rice may be selected during domestication, because they were not found or very rare in wild ancestral rice. In contrast with Hd3a, which has been highly conserved, Hd1 may have undergone human selection to diversify the flowering times of rice during domestication or the early stage of the cultivation period.

  11. Novel flower-shaped albumin particles as controlled-release carriers for drugs to penetrate the round-window membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Z

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhan Yu,1,* Min Yu,2,* Zhimin Zhou,3 Zhibao Zhang,3 Bo Du,3 Qingqing Xiong3 1Second Artillery General Hospital, Beijing, 2Department of Cell Biology, Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Ministry of Public Health, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang, 3Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Material of Tianjin, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equallyto this work Abstract: Controlled-release carriers for local drug delivery have attracted increasing attention for inner-ear treatment recently. In this paper, flower-shaped bovine serum albumin (FBSA particles were prepared by a modified desolvation method followed by glutaraldehyde or heat denaturation. The size of the FBSA particles varied from 10 µm to 100 µm, and most were 50–80 µm. Heat-denatured FBSA particles have good cytocompatibility with a prolonged survival time for L929 cells. The FBSA particles were utilized as carriers to investigate the release behaviors of the model drug – rhodamine B. Rhodamine B showed a sustained-release effect and penetrated the round-window membrane of guinea pigs. We also confirmed the attachment of FBSA particles onto the round-window membrane by microscopy. The FBSA particles, with good biocompatibility, drug-loading capacity, adhesive capability, and biodegradability, may have potential applications in the field of local drug delivery for inner-ear disease treatment. Keywords: bovine serum albumin (BSA, controlled release, local delivery, round-window membrane

  12. Lotus Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    The lotus flower is a traditional subject for Chinese painters. Men of letters and painters depict it because although it grows from mud its blossoms are clean and charming, hence it has always been used to euphemize a man who keeps his noble mind even in unfavorable situations Young painter Xing Xiaolin features the lotus flowers again and

  13. Allele-specific interactions between CAST AWAY and NEVERSHED control abscission in Arabidopsis flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Groner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An advantage of analyzing abscission in genetically tractable model plants is the ability to make use of classic genetic tools such as suppression analysis. We have investigated the regulation of organ abscission by carrying out suppression analysis in Arabidopsis flowers. Plants carrying mutations in the NEVERSHED (NEV gene, which encodes an ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein, retain their outer floral organs after fertilization. Mutant alleles of CAST AWAY (CST, which encodes a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, were found to restore organ abscission in nev flowers in an allele-specific manner. To further explore the basis of the interactions between CST and NEV, we tested whether the site of a nev mutation is predictive of its ability to be suppressed. Our results suggest instead that the strength of a nev allele influences whether organ abscission can be rescued by a specific allele of CST.

  14. A naturally occurring splicing site mutation in the Brassica rapa FLC1 gene is associated with variation in flowering time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Y.X.; Wu, J.; Sun, R.F.; Zhang, X.W.; Xu, D.H.; Bonnema, A.B.; Wang, X.W.

    2009-01-01

    FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), encoding a MADS-domain transcription factor in Arabidopsis, is a repressor of flowering involved in the vernalization pathway. This provides a good reference for Brassica species. Genomes of Brassica species contain several FLC homologues and several of these colocalize with

  15. Identification of bolting-related microRNAs and their targets reveals complex miRNA-mediated flowering-time regulatory networks in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shanshan; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Huang, Danqiong; Muleke, Everlyne M; Sun, Xiaochuan; Wang, Ronghua; Xie, Yang; Gong, Yiqin; Liu, Liwang

    2015-09-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital regulatory roles in plant growth and development. The phase transition from vegetative growth to flowering is crucial in the life cycle of plants. To date, miRNA-mediated flowering regulatory networks remain largely unexplored in radish. In this study, two small RNA libraries from radish leaves at vegetative and reproductive stages were constructed and sequenced by Solexa sequencing. A total of 94 known miRNAs representing 21 conserved and 13 non-conserved miRNA families, and 44 potential novel miRNAs, were identified from the two libraries. In addition, 42 known and 17 novel miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed and identified as bolting-related miRNAs. RT-qPCR analysis revealed that some miRNAs exhibited tissue- or developmental stage-specific expression patterns. Moreover, 154 target transcripts were identified for 50 bolting-related miRNAs, which were predominately involved in plant development, signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. Based on the characterization of bolting-related miRNAs and their target genes, a putative schematic model of miRNA-mediated bolting and flowering regulatory network was proposed. These results could provide insights into bolting and flowering regulatory networks in radish, and facilitate dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying bolting and flowering time regulation in vegetable crops.

  16. Effects of elevated CO[sub 2] on time of flowering in four short-day and four long-day species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reekie, J.Y.C.; Hicklenton, P.R. (Agriculture Canada Research Station, Kentiville, NS (Canada)); Reekie, E.G. (Acadia Univ., Wolfville, NS (Canada))

    1994-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine if the effect of elevated CO[sub 2] on flowering phenology is a function of the photoperiodic response of the species involved. Four long-day plants, Achillea millefolium, Callistephus chinensis, Campanula isophylla, and Trachelium caeruleum, and four short-day plants, Dendranthema grandiflora, Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, Pharbitis nil, and Xanthium pensylvanicum, were grown under inductive photoperiods (9 h for short day and 17 h for long day) at either 350 or 1000 [mu]l/l CO[sub 2]. Time of visible flower bud formation, flower opening, and final plant biomass were assessed. Elevated CO[sub 2] advanced flower opening in all four long-day species and delayed flowering in all four short-day species. In the long-day species, the effect of CO[sub 2] was primarily on bud initiation; all four species formed buds earlier at high CO[sub 2]. Bud development, the difference in time between flower opening and bud initiation, was advanced in only one long-day species, Callistephus chinensis. Mixed results were obtained for the short-day species. Elevated CO[sub 2] exerted no effects on bud initiation but delayed bud development in Dendranthema and Kalanchoe. In Xanthium, bud initiation rather than bud development was delayed. Data on bud initiation and development were not obtained for Pharbitis. The negative effect of CO[sub 2] upon phenology in the short-day species was not associated with negative effects on growth. Elevated CO[sub 2] increased plant size in both long-day and short-day species. 26 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Flowers & Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the topics and teaching strategies employed in an Issues in Biology course. Discusses flowers, plant breeding, potatoes and tomatoes, the chocolate tree, weeds, Arabidopis, gene transfers, and plant genes/human genes. Contains 22 references. (JRH)

  18. Flowers & Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the topics and teaching strategies employed in an Issues in Biology course. Discusses flowers, plant breeding, potatoes and tomatoes, the chocolate tree, weeds, Arabidopis, gene transfers, and plant genes/human genes. Contains 22 references. (JRH)

  19. Temporal pattern of floral color change and time retention of post-change flowers in Weigela japonica var.sinica (Caprifoliaceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Wen ZHANG; Xing-Nan ZHAO; Sheng-Jun HUANG; Li-Hui ZHANG; Ji-Min ZHAO

    2012-01-01

    Floral color changes are common in Weigela and the retention of post-change flowers has been interpreted as a mechanism to increase attractiveness from a long distance and shorten pollinators' lingering time on the inflorescence(s) of individual plants.In the present study,we investigated the temporal pattern of floral color change and time required for pollen tube growth in the shrub Weigela japonica var.sinica.Over the 4-day anthesis,the color of the corolla in this species changes from white to red and the color cue changes from yellow to purple.The duration of both the white phase and the intermediate phase is approximately 1 day and the duration of the red phase is approximately 2 days.Our studies showed that color change in Weigela japonica var.sinica is age-dependent but independent of pollinator visits and flower pollination.Post-change flowers lost most of both the male and female residual reproductive ability and retained no rewards for pollinators.It took at least 3 days for a pollen tube to grow to the ovules and achieve fertilization.Thus,retention of post-change flowers is necessary for the completion of pollen tube growth.Our results indicate that the temporal pattern of color change and time requirement for pollen tube growth are most likely related events.

  20. Cyanogenic Glucosides and Derivatives in Almond and Sweet Cherry Flower Buds from Dormancy to Flowering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cueto, Jorge; Ionescu, Irina A.; Pičmanová, Martina; Gericke, Oliver; Motawia, Mohammed S.; Olsen, Carl E.; Campoy, José A.; Dicenta, Federico; Møller, Birger L.; Sánchez-Pérez, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Almond and sweet cherry are two economically important species of the Prunus genus. They both produce the cyanogenic glucosides prunasin and amygdalin. As part of a two-component defense system, prunasin and amygdalin release toxic hydrogen cyanide upon cell disruption. In this study, we investigated the potential role within prunasin and amygdalin and some of its derivatives in endodormancy release of these two Prunus species. The content of prunasin and of endogenous prunasin turnover products in the course of flower development was examined in five almond cultivars – differing from very early to extra-late in flowering time – and in one sweet early cherry cultivar. In all cultivars, prunasin began to accumulate in the flower buds shortly after dormancy release and the levels dropped again just before flowering time. In almond and sweet cherry, the turnover of prunasin coincided with increased levels of prunasin amide whereas prunasin anitrile pentoside and β-D-glucose-1-benzoate were abundant in almond and cherry flower buds at certain developmental stages. These findings indicate a role for the turnover of cyanogenic glucosides in controlling flower development in Prunus species. PMID:28579996

  1. Cyanogenic Glucosides and Derivatives in Almond and Sweet Cherry Flower Buds from Dormancy to Flowering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Del Cueto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Almond and sweet cherry are two economically important species of the Prunus genus. They both produce the cyanogenic glucosides prunasin and amygdalin. As part of a two-component defense system, prunasin and amygdalin release toxic hydrogen cyanide upon cell disruption. In this study, we investigated the potential role within prunasin and amygdalin and some of its derivatives in endodormancy release of these two Prunus species. The content of prunasin and of endogenous prunasin turnover products in the course of flower development was examined in five almond cultivars – differing from very early to extra-late in flowering time – and in one sweet early cherry cultivar. In all cultivars, prunasin began to accumulate in the flower buds shortly after dormancy release and the levels dropped again just before flowering time. In almond and sweet cherry, the turnover of prunasin coincided with increased levels of prunasin amide whereas prunasin anitrile pentoside and β-D-glucose-1-benzoate were abundant in almond and cherry flower buds at certain developmental stages. These findings indicate a role for the turnover of cyanogenic glucosides in controlling flower development in Prunus species.

  2. Evidence for an evolutionarily conserved interaction between cell wall biosynthesis and flowering in maize and sorghum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Karen J

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors that affect flowering vary among different plant species, and in the grasses in particular the exact mechanism behind this transition is not fully understood. The brown midrib (bm mutants of maize (Zea mays L., which have altered cell wall composition, have different flowering dynamics compared to their wild-type counterparts. This is indicative of a link between cell wall biogenesis and flowering. In order to test whether this relationship also exists in other grasses, the flowering dynamics in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench were investigated. Sorghum is evolutionarily closely related to maize, and a set of brown midrib (bmr mutants similar to the maize bm mutants is available, making sorghum a suitable choice for study in this context. Results We compared the flowering time (time to half-bloom of several different bmr sorghum lines and their wild-type counterparts. This revealed that the relationship between cell wall composition and flowering was conserved in sorghum. Specifically, the mutant bmr7 flowered significantly earlier than the corresponding wild-type control, whereas the mutants bmr2, bmr4, bmr6, bmr12, and bmr19 flowered later than their wild-type controls. Conclusion The change in flowering dynamics in several of the brown midrib sorghum lines provides evidence for an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that links cell wall biosynthesis to flowering dynamics. The availability of the sorghum bmr mutants expands the germplasm available to investigate this relationship in further detail.

  3. On being a discontinuous person: Ontological insecurity, the wounded storyteller and time in Daniel Keyes’s Flowers for Algernon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Ullyatt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explores ontological security and insecurity in Daniel Keyes’s novel, Flowers for Algernon. It opens with a very brief overview of the 1960s counter-culture to contextualise not only Keyes’s novel but also Laing’s theories of ontological (insecurity. After a discussion of Laing’s concept of ontological security and insecurity, the focus shifts to Arthur W. Frank’s notions of the wounded storyteller and how Charlie Gordon’s entry into the medical world constitutes a colonisation of the body that brings with it a deepening sense of ontological insecurity. In entering the world of medical research, Charlie becomes the wounded storyteller, offering a first-person account of his experiences during the experiment and its aftermath. As the initial success of the surgery deteriorates steadily into failure, with the protagonist’s intelligence returning steadily to its pre-operation level, the question of time and how he can make the best use of it to record the experiment becomes paramount. The final section of the article centres on the growing link between the surgery’s failure and how it increases the protagonist’s ontological insecurity. He uses the diminishing amount of time available to him in search of understanding the fuller implications of the experiment. Eventually, he reverts to his initial rudimentary ontological security when he finds himself with the same intellectual level, as prior to the experiment.

  4. Identification of flowering genes in strawberry, a perennial SD plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rantanen Marja

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We are studying the regulation of flowering in perennial plants by using diploid wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca L. as a model. Wild strawberry is a facultative short-day plant with an obligatory short-day requirement at temperatures above 15°C. At lower temperatures, however, flowering induction occurs irrespective of photoperiod. In addition to short-day genotypes, everbearing forms of wild strawberry are known. In 'Baron Solemacher' recessive alleles of an unknown repressor, SEASONAL FLOWERING LOCUS (SFL, are responsible for continuous flowering habit. Although flower induction has a central effect on the cropping potential, the molecular control of flowering in strawberries has not been studied and the genetic flowering pathways are still poorly understood. The comparison of everbearing and short-day genotypes of wild strawberry could facilitate our understanding of fundamental molecular mechanisms regulating perennial growth cycle in plants. Results We have searched homologs for 118 Arabidopsis flowering time genes from Fragaria by EST sequencing and bioinformatics analysis and identified 66 gene homologs that by sequence similarity, putatively correspond to genes of all known genetic flowering pathways. The expression analysis of 25 selected genes representing various flowering pathways did not reveal large differences between the everbearing and the short-day genotypes. However, putative floral identity and floral integrator genes AP1 and LFY were co-regulated during early floral development. AP1 mRNA was specifically accumulating in the shoot apices of the everbearing genotype, indicating its usability as a marker for floral initiation. Moreover, we showed that flowering induction in everbearing 'Baron Solemacher' and 'Hawaii-4' was inhibited by short-day and low temperature, in contrast to short-day genotypes. Conclusion We have shown that many central genetic components of the flowering pathways in Arabidopsis can

  5. Modulation of Ambient Temperature-Dependent Flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana by Natural Variation of FLOWERING LOCUS M.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Lutz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants integrate seasonal cues such as temperature and day length to optimally adjust their flowering time to the environment. Compared to the control of flowering before and after winter by the vernalization and day length pathways, mechanisms that delay or promote flowering during a transient cool or warm period, especially during spring, are less well understood. Due to global warming, understanding this ambient temperature pathway has gained increasing importance. In Arabidopsis thaliana, FLOWERING LOCUS M (FLM is a critical flowering regulator of the ambient temperature pathway. FLM is alternatively spliced in a temperature-dependent manner and the two predominant splice variants, FLM-ß and FLM-δ, can repress and activate flowering in the genetic background of the A. thaliana reference accession Columbia-0. The relevance of this regulatory mechanism for the environmental adaptation across the entire range of the species is, however, unknown. Here, we identify insertion polymorphisms in the first intron of FLM as causative for accelerated flowering in many natural A. thaliana accessions, especially in cool (15°C temperatures. We present evidence for a potential adaptive role of this structural variation and link it specifically to changes in the abundance of FLM-ß. Our results may allow predicting flowering in response to ambient temperatures in the Brassicaceae.

  6. Facile morphology-controlled hydrothermal synthesis of flower-like self-organized ZnO architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rongxian; Zhang, Qi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Du; Qin, Jieling; Lu, Chunyu; Ding, Heyi; Yan, Xuehua; Tang, Hua; Wang, Mingsong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Flower-like self-organized crystalline ZnO architectures were obtained through a facile and controlled hydrothermal process. As-synthesized products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron diffraction and UV-Vis spectroscopy. XRD and electron diffraction results confirmed the obtained materials are pure wurtzite ZnO. The effects of different ratios of starting materials and solvent on the morphologies of ZnO hydrothermal products were also evaluated by SEM observations. It is suggested that the use of water, rather than ethanol as the solvent, as well as employing a precursor of Zn(Ac){sub 2} and 2NaOH (v/v) in hydrothermal reactions are responsible for the generation of specific flower-like self-assembled ZnO structures. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Effect of Time and Level of Pruning on Vegetative Growth, Flowering, Yield, and Quality of Guava

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, Shiva; Kandel, Tanka Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Poor quality fruit production in the rainy season and failure to manipulate production periods are common problems for guava production in India and Nepal. As a possible management to overcome these problems, a field experiment was conducted to understand the effect of time and level of pruning o...

  8. Effects of Interplanting Flowering Plants on the Biological Control of Corn Earworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in Sweet Corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manandhar, Roshan; Wright, Mark G

    2016-02-01

    Natural enemy exploitation of food resources and alternative hosts in noncrop vegetation has been shown to be an effective means of enhancing natural enemy populations in diversified agro-ecosystem. Field trials were conducted in Hawaii to examine effects of interplanting flowering plants on 1) parasitism of corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) eggs by Trichogramma spp., and 2) abundance of Orius spp. in relation to prey (H. zea eggs and thrips [primarily, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) and Frankliniella williamsi Hood]). Sweet corn (maize), Zea mays L., was interplanted with three flowering plants, buckwheat, Fagopyrum esculentum Moench, cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.), and sunn hemp, Crotolaria juncea L., at 2:1 and 4:1 (corn: flowering plant) ratios in 2009 and 2010, respectively. In 2009, the abundance of Orius spp. was significantly greater in the buckwheat-interplanted treatment compared to the monocrop control at similar levels of prey availability, indicating buckwheat flowers might have provided both prey and nectar resources. In 2010, cowpea and sunn hemp flowering plants provided a source of an alternate host insect's eggs for Trichogramma spp. oviposition, resulting in significantly higher parasitism of H. zea eggs in the cowpea- and sunn hemp-interplanted treatments compared to the monocrop control. Despite of differences in pest and natural enemy interactions in two field trials, our findings suggested that provisioning of an alternate host insect's eggs through flowering plants is an effective means for enhancing Trichogramma spp. and provisioning of both nectar and prey resources through flowering plants is important for enhancing predation by Orius spp.

  9. The Staunch Beauty of Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    MANY women like to collect dried flowers. Unable to bear the sight of beautiful blossoms withering, they press them between the leaves of books. As time passes, the original fresh flowers turn into thin pale-colored specimens, but a careful viewer will notice that they have taken on a new grace—just like Ren Jie herself; though no longer young, she has managed to create beauty out of her later life. Ren Jie’s love of flowers dates back to her childhood, when she started to collect flower specimens. As she grew up, she learned how to paint; later, she

  10. Refuges, flower strips, biodiversity and agronomic interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Grégory; Wateau, Karine; Legrand, Mickaël; Oste, Sandrine

    2008-01-01

    Several arthropods are natural predators of pests, and they are able to reduce and control their population development. FREDON Nord Pas-de-Calais (Federation Regionate de Defense contre les Organismes Nuisibles = Regional Federation for Pest Control) has begun for a long time to form farmers to the recognition of beneficial arthropods and to show them their usefulness. These beneficial insects or arachnids are present everywhere, in orchards and even in fields which are areas relatively poor in biodiversity. Adults feed in the flower strips instead larvae and some adults feed on preys such as aphids or caterpillars. Most of the time, beneficial insects can regulate pest but sometimes, in agricultural area, they can't make it early enough and efficiently. Their action begin too late and there biodiversity and number are too low. It's possible to enhance their action by manipulating the ecological infrastructures, like sewing flower strips or installing refuges. Flower strips increase the density of natural enemies and make them be present earlier in the field in order to control pests. Refuges permit beneficial's to spend winter on the spot. So they're able to be active and to grow in number earlier. From 2004 to 2007, on the one hand, FREDON Nord Pas-de-Calais has developed a research program. Its purpose was to inventory practices and also tools and means available and to judge the advisability of using such or such beneficial refuge in orchards. On the second hand, it studied the impact in orchard of refuges on population of beneficial's and the difference there were between manufactured refuges and homemade refuges. Interesting prospects were obtained with some of them. Otherwise, since 2003, FREDON has studied flower strips influence on beneficial population and their impact on pest control. In cabbage fields, results of trials have shown that flower strips lead to a reduction of aphid number under acceptable economic level, up to 50 meters from flower strips

  11. Dominus for cut flower production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumigation with methyl bromide was the principal method of soilborne pest control in cut flower production. Many cut flower growers in Florida have ceased production, but those that remain are restricted in the fumigants that they are able to utilize due to proximity to potable water sources and oc...

  12. Flowering phenology, growth forms, and pollination syndromes in tropical dry forest species: Influence of phylogeny and abiotic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Flores, Jorge; Hernández-Esquivel, Karen Beatriz; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Ibarra-Manríquez, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Analyses of the influence of temporal variation in abiotic factors on flowering phenology of tropical dry forest species have not considered the possible response of species with different growth forms and pollination syndromes, while controlling for phylogenetic relationships among species. Here, we investigated the relationship between flowering phenology, abiotic factors, and plant functional attributes, while controlling for phylogenetic relationship among species, in a dry forest community in Mexico. We characterized flowering phenology (time and duration) and pollination syndromes of 55 tree species, 49 herbs, 24 shrubs, 15 lianas, and 11 vines. We tested the influence of pollination syndrome, growth form, and abiotic factors on flowering phenology using phylogenetic generalized least squares. We found a relationship between flowering duration and time. Growth form was related to flowering time, and the pollination syndrome had a more significant relationship with flowering duration. Flowering time variation in the community was explained mainly by abiotic variables, without an important phylogenetic effect. Flowering time in lianas and trees was negatively and positively correlated with daylength, respectively. Functional attributes, environmental cues, and phylogeny interact with each other to shape the diversity of flowering patterns. Phenological differentiation among species groups revealed multiples strategies associated with growth form and pollination syndromes that can be important for understanding species coexistence in this highly diverse plant community. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  13. Phytohormones level in the leaves of Hyoscyamus niger L. during variable photoperiods at the time of flower initiation and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kopcewicz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The investigations concern changes in the content of endogenous phytohormones in the leaves of the long-day plant Hyoscyamus niger L. during variable photoperiods applied before and after flower initiation. The results show that alternation of inductive photoperiods with short days leads to quantitative changes in the content of phytohormones. The changeable photoperiod leads to a general decrease in the contents of gibberellins, cytokinins and auxins during the short noninductive days both before and after flower initiation. Alternation of the inductive photoperiod with short days does not influence the content of abscisic acid-like substances before flower initiation and causes an increase of the amount of inhibitors in the postinductive period. The content of hormonal substances is subjected to rhytmical changes related to the periods of light and darkness in the twenty-four hours' cycle.

  14. Parallels between UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS and FIMBRIATA, genes controlling flower development in Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, G C; Goodrich, J; Wilkinson, M D; Simon, R; Haughn, G W; Coen, E S

    1995-09-01

    The unusual floral organs (ufo) mutant of Arabidopsis has flowers with variable homeotic organ transformations and inflorescence-like characteristics. To determine the relationship between UFO and previously characterized meristem and organ identity genes, we cloned UFO and determined its expression pattern. The UFO gene shows extensive homology with FIMBRIATA (FIM), a gene mediating between meristem and organ identity genes in Antirrhinum. All three UFO mutant alleles that we sequenced are predicted to produce truncated proteins. UFO transcripts were first detected in early floral meristems, before organ identity genes had been activated. At later developmental stages, UFO expression is restricted to the junction between sepal and petal primordia. Phenotypic, genetic, and expression pattern comparisons between UFO and FIM suggest that they are cognate homologs and play a similar role in mediating between meristem and organ identity genes. However, some differences in the functions and genetic interactions of UFO and FIM were apparent, indicating that changes in partially redundant pathways have occurred during the evolutionary divergence of Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum.

  15. Potential of a strain of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae) as a biological control agent against western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five Beauveria bassiana strains were evaluated for control of western flower thrips. Strain RSB was the most virulent, causing 69-96% mortality at concentrations of 1×104 – 1×107 conidia mL-1, 10 days after inoculation of first instars. In greenhouse trials, RSB applied to broccoli foliage signifi...

  16. Effect and Functional Mechanism of the Action of Exogenous Gibberellin on Flowering of Peach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Li-jun; JIN Liang; YANG Chun-qin; LI Tian-hong

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the effect of gibberellin and its possible mechanism of action on peach flower formation. At flower induction, 100 mg L-1 of gibberellic acid 3 (GA3) was sprayed on the leaves of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch.] cv. Bayuecui. Using anatomy, immunohistochemistry, and semi-quantitation, the in situ distribution of GAs and the expression of the key genes involved in peach flower formation in the apical meristem were studied during flowering differentiation. The results showed that induction of flowering in the Bayuecui peach occurred prior to 10 July in Beijing, China. Flower induction and further differentiation of the peach flower organs were significantly inhibited by leaf-spraying of GA3 at a concentration of 100 mg L-1 during the induction stage. The flowering rate was only 11.67% after treatment. The distribution of GA1 in the apical meristem varied during the process of flower bud differentiation. From 13 June to 25 July, the GA1 signal from control plants was detected mainly in the vascular bundles at the base of the flower buds. No GA1 signal was detected in the apical meristem. After treatment with GA3, the distribution was similar to that of the control from 13 June to 3 July. On 13 July, a GA1 signal was detected in the apical meristem accompanied by an increase in the GA1 signal in the vascular bundles at the base of the flower buds. The GAI signal weakened significantly in both the vascular bundles and the apical meristem on 25 July. The expression of the genes PpLEAFY and MADS6 in flower buds could be detected only on 10 October in the GA3-treated plants. The critical period for flower induction of Bayuecui peach in Beijing was in early July, during which time, leaf-spraying with 100 mg L-1 GA3 could effectively inhibit flower induction and further differentiation of the flower buds. GA1 in the gibberellin family was the suppressor for flower induction in peach. Its action was affected by the stage of flower bud

  17. Oxygenated phosphine fumigation for control of light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), eggs on cut-flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana, eggs were subjected to oxygenated phosphine fumigation treatments on cut flowers to determine efficacy and safety. Five cut flower species: roses, lilies, tulips, gerbera daisy, and pompon chrysanthemums, were fumigated in separate groups with 2500 ppm ...

  18. Epidemiology and effective control of Altenaria altenata, causal agent of dead (dormant) flower bud disease of pear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenneker, M.; Joosten, N.N.; Anbergen, R.H.N.; Vink, P.; Bruggen, van A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Dead flower buds are a common phenomenon in pear culture in The Netherlands, Belgium and Mediterranean countries. Disease cases are also reported from South America. The disease is characterized by a partial or complete necrosis of flower buds during tree dormancy. The disease progresses during wint

  19. Nitric oxide participates in plant flowering repression by ascorbate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Kumar, Rajendran; Shen, Chin-Hui; Wu, Pei-Yin; Suresh Kumar, Subbiah; Hua, Moda Sang; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2016-01-01

    In Oncidium, redox homeostasis involved in flowering is mainly due to ascorbic acid (AsA). Here, we discovered that Oncidium floral repression is caused by an increase in AsA-mediated NO levels, which is directed by the enzymatic activities of nitrate reductase (NaR) and nitrite reducatase (NiR). Through Solexa transcriptomic analysis of two libraries, ‘pseudobulb with inflorescent bud’ (PIB) and ‘pseudobulb with axillary bud’ (PAB), we identified differentially expressed genes related to NO metabolism. Subsequently, we showed a significant reduction of NaR enzymatic activities and NO levels during bolting and blooming stage, suggesting that NO controlled the phase transition and flowering process. Applying AsA to Oncidium PLB (protocorm-like bodies) significantly elevated the NO content and enzyme activities. Application of sodium nitroprusside (-NO donor) on Arabidopsis vtc1 mutant caused late flowering and expression level of flowering-associated genes (CO, FT and LFY) were reduced, suggesting NO signaling is vital for flowering repression. Conversely, the flowering time of noa1, an Arabidopsis NO-deficient mutant, was not altered after treatment with L-galacturonate, a precursor of AsA, suggesting AsA is required for NO-biosynthesis involved in the NO-mediated flowering-repression pathway. Altogether, Oncidium bolting is tightly regulated by AsA-mediated NO level and downregulation of transcriptional levels of NO metabolism genes. PMID:27731387

  20. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping of Maize Yield and Its Components Under Different Water Treatments at Flowering Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-He Lu; Yi-Rong Zhang; Jing-Rui Dai; Ji-Hua Tang; Jian-Bing Yan; Xi-Qing Ma; Jian-Sheng Li; Shao-Jiang Chen; Jian-Cang Ma; Zhan-Xian Liu; Li-Zhu E

    2006-01-01

    Drought or water stress is a serious agronomic problem resulting in maize (Zea mays L.) yield loss throughout the world. Breeding hybrids with drought tolerance is one important approach for solving this problem. However, lower efficiency and a longer period of breeding hybrids are disadvantages of traditional breeding programs. It is generally recognized that applying molecular marker techniques to traditional breeding programs could improve the efficiency of the breeding of drought-tolerant maize. To provide useful information for use in studies of maize drought tolerance,the mapping and tagging of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for yield and its components were performed in the present study on the basis of the principle of a mixed linear model. Two hundred and twenty-one recombinant inbred lines (RIL) of Yuyu 22 were grown under both well-watered and water-stressed conditions. In the former treatment group, plants were well irrigated, whereas those in the latter treatment group were stressed at flowering time.Ten plants of each genotype were grown in a row that was 3.00 m×0.67 m (length×width). The results show that a few of the QTL were the same (one additive QTL for ear length, two additive QTL and one pair of epistatic QTL for kernel number per row, one additive QTL for kernel weight per plant), whereas most of other QTL were different between the two different water treatment groups. It may be that genetic expression differs under the two different water conditions. Furthermore, differences in the additive and epistatic QTL among the traits under water-stressed conditions indicate that genetic expression also differs from trait to trait.Major and minor QTL were detected for the traits,except for kernel number per row, under water-stressed conditions. Thus, the genetic mechanism of drought tolerance in maize is complex because the additive and epistatic QTL exist at the same time and the major and minor QTL all contribute to phenotype under water

  1. Arctic mustard flower color polymorphism controlled by petal-specific downregulation at the threshold of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Cynthia A; Buenrostro, Jason; Butler, Timothy; Carlson, Matthew L; Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Whittall, Justen B

    2011-04-07

    Intra- and interspecific variation in flower color is a hallmark of angiosperm diversity. The evolutionary forces underlying the variety of flower colors can be nearly as diverse as the colors themselves. In addition to pollinator preferences, non-pollinator agents of selection can have a major influence on the evolution of flower color polymorphisms, especially when the pigments in question are also expressed in vegetative tissues. In such cases, identifying the target(s) of selection starts with determining the biochemical and molecular basis for the flower color variation and examining any pleiotropic effects manifested in vegetative tissues. Herein, we describe a widespread purple-white flower color polymorphism in the mustard Parrya nudicaulis spanning Alaska. The frequency of white-flowered individuals increases with increasing growing-season temperature, consistent with the role of anthocyanin pigments in stress tolerance. White petals fail to produce the stress responsive flavonoid intermediates in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway (ABP), suggesting an early pathway blockage. Petal cDNA sequences did not reveal blockages in any of the eight enzyme-coding genes in white-flowered individuals, nor any color differentiating SNPs. A qRT-PCR analysis of white petals identified a 24-fold reduction in chalcone synthase (CHS) at the threshold of the ABP, but no change in CHS expression in leaves and sepals. This arctic species has avoided the deleterious effects associated with the loss of flavonoid intermediates in vegetative tissues by decoupling CHS expression in petals and leaves, yet the correlation of flower color and climate suggests that the loss of flavonoids in the petals alone may affect the tolerance of white-flowered individuals to colder environments.

  2. Arctic mustard flower color polymorphism controlled by petal-specific downregulation at the threshold of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia A Dick

    Full Text Available Intra- and interspecific variation in flower color is a hallmark of angiosperm diversity. The evolutionary forces underlying the variety of flower colors can be nearly as diverse as the colors themselves. In addition to pollinator preferences, non-pollinator agents of selection can have a major influence on the evolution of flower color polymorphisms, especially when the pigments in question are also expressed in vegetative tissues. In such cases, identifying the target(s of selection starts with determining the biochemical and molecular basis for the flower color variation and examining any pleiotropic effects manifested in vegetative tissues. Herein, we describe a widespread purple-white flower color polymorphism in the mustard Parrya nudicaulis spanning Alaska. The frequency of white-flowered individuals increases with increasing growing-season temperature, consistent with the role of anthocyanin pigments in stress tolerance. White petals fail to produce the stress responsive flavonoid intermediates in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway (ABP, suggesting an early pathway blockage. Petal cDNA sequences did not reveal blockages in any of the eight enzyme-coding genes in white-flowered individuals, nor any color differentiating SNPs. A qRT-PCR analysis of white petals identified a 24-fold reduction in chalcone synthase (CHS at the threshold of the ABP, but no change in CHS expression in leaves and sepals. This arctic species has avoided the deleterious effects associated with the loss of flavonoid intermediates in vegetative tissues by decoupling CHS expression in petals and leaves, yet the correlation of flower color and climate suggests that the loss of flavonoids in the petals alone may affect the tolerance of white-flowered individuals to colder environments.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis of GmFT2a delays flowering time in soya bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yupeng; Chen, Li; Liu, Xiujie; Guo, Chen; Sun, Shi; Wu, Cunxiang; Jiang, Bingjun; Han, Tianfu; Hou, Wensheng

    2017-05-16

    Flowering is an indication of the transition from vegetative growth to reproductive growth and has considerable effects on the life cycle of soya bean (Glycine max). In this study, we employed the CRISPR/Cas9 system to specifically induce targeted mutagenesis of GmFT2a, an integrator in the photoperiod flowering pathway in soya bean. The soya bean cultivar Jack was transformed with three sgRNA/Cas9 vectors targeting different sites of endogenous GmFT2a via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Site-directed mutations were observed at all targeted sites by DNA sequencing analysis. T1-generation soya bean plants homozygous for null alleles of GmFT2a frameshift mutated by a 1-bp insertion or short deletion exhibited late flowering under natural conditions (summer) in Beijing, China (N39°58', E116°20'). We also found that the targeted mutagenesis was stably heritable in the following T2 generation, and the homozygous GmFT2a mutants exhibited late flowering under both long-day and short-day conditions. We identified some 'transgene-clean' soya bean plants that were homozygous for null alleles of endogenous GmFT2a and without any transgenic element from the T1 and T2 generations. These 'transgene-clean' mutants of GmFT2a may provide materials for more in-depth research of GmFT2a functions and the molecular mechanism of photoperiod responses in soya bean. They will also contribute to soya bean breeding and regional introduction. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Efikasi Chitosan untuk Memperpanjang Flower Longevity Bunga Anggrek Dendrobium Hibrida dalam Pot (Potted Flower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I MADE SUKEWIJAYA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Effication of Chitosan on Lengthening The Flower Longevity of Potted Orchid ofDendrobium Hybrid. The aim of the current research is to investigate general effects of Chitosantreatment on the flowering of Dendrobium orchid and to find out the optimum concentration of Chitosanin lengthening flower longevity of potted orchid of Dendrobium hybrid. Results of the research showedthat Chitosan application significantly affected variables of the number of flower per-plant, the length ofindividual flower, period of time to get full blooming, and the flower longevity. The best results for thoseof variables was achieved with Chitosan concentration of 0.15%.

  5. Compatibility assessment between four ethanolic plant extracts with a bug predator Orius horvathi (Reuter (Heteroptera: Anthocoridae used for controlling the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razavi Nooshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande attacks a large number of crop plants. The current insecticides have caused resistance in insects and have caused outbreaks of thrips. In many instances, alternative methods of insect management and natural products, offer adequate pest control and pose fewer hazards. Several species of minute pirate bugs of the genus Orius play a significant role in the biological control of a large number of thrips species, such as F. occidentalis. In this study, the insecticidal activity of four ethanolic plant extracts (Cercis siliquastrum L., Calendula officinalis L., Peganum harmala L., Melia azedarach L. in integration with Orius horvathi (Reuter were evaluated for controlling F. occidentalis. The present research aimed to find plant extracts with a good impact on F. occidentalis but which have fewer side effects on O. horvathi. The results showed that P. harmala extract can be considered compatible with the natural enemy for controlling thrips. When the predatory bugs O. horvathi, were released three days after P. harmala extract spraying, the integration was more effective. While the P. harmala plant extract plays an important role in thrips control, it is necessary to consider the specified time interval between the application of the P. harmala plant extract and the release of the O. horvathi predatory bugs. The ethanolic extract of M. azedarach caused a balance between the pest population and the natural enemy. This result is very important in an Integrated Pest Management (IPM program because this ethanolic extract of M. azedarach had lower side effects on the natural enemy. This means that an integration of plant derived chemicals and the natural enemy, O. horvathi, can effectively control thrips.

  6. DELLA proteins interact with FLC to repress flowering transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei Guo

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a highly orchestrated and extremely critical process in a plant’s life cycle. Previous study has demonstrated that SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) integrate the gibberellic acid (GA) signaling pathway and vernalization pathway in regulating flowering time, but detailed molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. In GA signaling pathway, DELLA proteins are a group of master transcriptional regulators, while in vernalization pathway FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is a core transcriptional repressor that down-regulates the expression of SOC1 and FT. Here, we report that DELLA proteins interact with FLC in vitro and in vivo, and the LHRI domains of DELLAs and the C-terminus of MADS domain of FLC are required for these interactions. Phenotypic and gene expression analysis showed that mutation of FLC reduces while over-expression of FLC enhances the GA response in the flowering process. Further, DELLA-FLC interactions promote the repression ability of FLC on its target genes. In summary, these findings report that the interaction between MADS box transcription factor FLC and GRAS domain regulator DELLAs may integrate various signaling inputs in flowering time control, and shed new light on the regulatory mechanism both for FLC and DELLAs in regulating gene expression.

  7. Flowering schedule in a perennial plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrlén, Johan; Raabova, Jana; Dahlgren, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Optimal timing of reproduction within a season may be influenced by several abiotic and biotic factors. These factors sometimes affect different components of fitness, making assessments of net selection difficult. We used estimates of offspring fitness to examine how pre-dispersal seed predation...... influences selection on flowering schedule in an herb with a bimodal flowering pattern, Actaea spicata. Within individuals, seeds from flowers on early terminal inflorescences had a higher germination rate and produced larger seedlings than seeds from flowers on late basal inflorescences. Reproductive value......, estimated using demographic integral projection models and accounting for size-dependent differences in future performance, was two times higher for intact seeds from early flowers than for seeds from late flowers. Fruits from late flowers were, however, much more likely to escape seed predation than fruits...

  8. Regulation of flowering in rice: two florigen genes, a complex gene network, and natural variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Taoka, Ken-ichiro; Shimamoto, Ko

    2011-02-01

    Photoperiodic control of flowering time consists of a complicated network that converges into the generation of a mobile flowering signal called florigen. Recent advances identifying the protein FT/Hd3a as the molecular nature responsible for florigen activity have focused current research on florigen genes as the important output of this complex signaling network. Rice is a model system for short-day plants and recent progress in elucidating the flowering network from rice and Arabidopsis, a long-day plant, provides an evolutionarily comparative view of the photoperiodic flowering pathway. This review summarizes photoperiodic flowering control in rice, including the interaction of complex layers of gene networks contributed from evolutionarily unique factors and the regulatory adaptation of conserved factors.

  9. A few aspects of the physiology of flowering in photoperiodic sensitive plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Groenewald

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Three aspects of the physiology of flowering in photoperiodic sensitive plants are discussed. These are the florigen hypothesis, phytochrome and the time measurement mechanism of flowering and genetic-molecular studies involved in flowering. There is evidence that the hypothetical compound, florigen, occurs in plants, but it has never been characterised. There is a family of phytochromes discovered in plants and some of them are involved with the circadian clock and thus with the time measurement mechanism of flowering. The molecular networks that interact to control flowering are being elucidated, by means of genetic-molecular techniques although at an early stage. It has not yet been possible to pinpoint florigen by these methods, but the future looks promising.

  10. A general G1/S-phase cell-cycle control module in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin'Ai Zhao

    Full Text Available The decision to replicate its DNA is of crucial importance for every cell and, in many organisms, is decisive for the progression through the entire cell cycle. A comparison of animals versus yeast has shown that, although most of the involved cell-cycle regulators are divergent in both clades, they fulfill a similar role and the overall network topology of G1/S regulation is highly conserved. Using germline development as a model system, we identified a regulatory cascade controlling entry into S phase in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which, as a member of the Plantae supergroup, is phylogenetically only distantly related to Opisthokonts such as yeast and animals. This module comprises the Arabidopsis homologs of the animal transcription factor E2F, the plant homolog of the animal transcriptional repressor Retinoblastoma (Rb-related 1 (RBR1, the plant-specific F-box protein F-BOX-LIKE 17 (FBL17, the plant specific cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitors KRPs, as well as CDKA;1, the plant homolog of the yeast and animal Cdc2⁺/Cdk1 kinases. Our data show that the principle of a double negative wiring of Rb proteins is highly conserved, likely representing a universal mechanism in eukaryotic cell-cycle control. However, this negative feedback of Rb proteins is differently implemented in plants as it is brought about through a quadruple negative regulation centered around the F-box protein FBL17 that mediates the degradation of CDK inhibitors but is itself directly repressed by Rb. Biomathematical simulations and subsequent experimental confirmation of computational predictions revealed that this regulatory circuit can give rise to hysteresis highlighting the here identified dosage sensitivity of CDK inhibitors in this network.

  11. Expression conservation within the circadian clock of a monocot: natural variation at barley Ppd-H1 affects circadian expression of flowering time genes, but not clock orthologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campoli Chiara

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The circadian clock is an endogenous mechanism that coordinates biological processes with daily changes in the environment. In plants, circadian rhythms contribute to both agricultural productivity and evolutionary fitness. In barley, the photoperiod response regulator and flowering-time gene Ppd-H1 is orthologous to the Arabidopsis core-clock gene PRR7. However, relatively little is known about the role of Ppd-H1 and other components of the circadian clock in temperate crop species. In this study, we identified barley clock orthologs and tested the effects of natural genetic variation at Ppd-H1 on diurnal and circadian expression of clock and output genes from the photoperiod-response pathway. Results Barley clock orthologs HvCCA1, HvGI, HvPRR1, HvPRR37 (Ppd-H1, HvPRR73, HvPRR59 and HvPRR95 showed a high level of sequence similarity and conservation of diurnal and circadian expression patterns, when compared to Arabidopsis. The natural mutation at Ppd-H1 did not affect diurnal or circadian cycling of barley clock genes. However, the Ppd-H1 mutant was found to be arrhythmic under free-running conditions for the photoperiod-response genes HvCO1, HvCO2, and the MADS-box transcription factor and vernalization responsive gene Vrn-H1. Conclusion We suggest that the described eudicot clock is largely conserved in the monocot barley. However, genetic differentiation within gene families and differences in the function of Ppd-H1 suggest evolutionary modification in the angiosperm clock. Our data indicates that natural variation at Ppd-H1 does not affect the expression level of clock genes, but controls photoperiodic output genes. Circadian control of Vrn-H1 in barley suggests that this vernalization responsive gene is also controlled by the photoperiod-response pathway. Structural and functional characterization of the barley circadian clock will set the basis for future studies of the adaptive significance of the circadian clock in

  12. Expression conservation within the circadian clock of a monocot: natural variation at barley Ppd-H1 affects circadian expression of flowering time genes, but not clock orthologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoli, Chiara; Shtaya, Munqez; Davis, Seth J; von Korff, Maria

    2012-06-21

    The circadian clock is an endogenous mechanism that coordinates biological processes with daily changes in the environment. In plants, circadian rhythms contribute to both agricultural productivity and evolutionary fitness. In barley, the photoperiod response regulator and flowering-time gene Ppd-H1 is orthologous to the Arabidopsis core-clock gene PRR7. However, relatively little is known about the role of Ppd-H1 and other components of the circadian clock in temperate crop species. In this study, we identified barley clock orthologs and tested the effects of natural genetic variation at Ppd-H1 on diurnal and circadian expression of clock and output genes from the photoperiod-response pathway. Barley clock orthologs HvCCA1, HvGI, HvPRR1, HvPRR37 (Ppd-H1), HvPRR73, HvPRR59 and HvPRR95 showed a high level of sequence similarity and conservation of diurnal and circadian expression patterns, when compared to Arabidopsis. The natural mutation at Ppd-H1 did not affect diurnal or circadian cycling of barley clock genes. However, the Ppd-H1 mutant was found to be arrhythmic under free-running conditions for the photoperiod-response genes HvCO1, HvCO2, and the MADS-box transcription factor and vernalization responsive gene Vrn-H1. We suggest that the described eudicot clock is largely conserved in the monocot barley. However, genetic differentiation within gene families and differences in the function of Ppd-H1 suggest evolutionary modification in the angiosperm clock. Our data indicates that natural variation at Ppd-H1 does not affect the expression level of clock genes, but controls photoperiodic output genes. Circadian control of Vrn-H1 in barley suggests that this vernalization responsive gene is also controlled by the photoperiod-response pathway. Structural and functional characterization of the barley circadian clock will set the basis for future studies of the adaptive significance of the circadian clock in Triticeae species.

  13. Sugars, the clock and transition to flowering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza eBolouri Moghaddam

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sugars do not only act as source of energy, but they also act as signals in plants. This mini review summarizes the emerging links between sucrose-mediated signaling and the cellular networks involved in flowering time control and defense. Cross-talks with gibberellin (GA and jasmonate (JA signaling pathways are highlighted. The circadian clock fulfills a crucial role at the heart of cellular networks and the bilateral relation between sugar signaling and the clock is discussed. It is proposed that important factors controlling plant growth (DELLAs, PIFs, invertases and trehalose- 6-phosphate or T6P might fulfill central roles in the transition to flowering as well. The emerging concept of ‘sweet immunity’, modulated by the clock, might at least partly rely on a sucrose-specific signaling pathway that needs further exploration.

  14. A low-cost, computer-controlled robotic flower system for behavioral experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusela, Erno; Lämsä, Juho

    2016-04-01

    Human observations during behavioral studies are expensive, time-consuming, and error prone. For this reason, automatization of experiments is highly desirable, as it reduces the risk of human errors and workload. The robotic system we developed is simple and cheap to build and handles feeding and data collection automatically. The system was built using mostly off-the-shelf components and has a novel feeding mechanism that uses servos to perform refill operations. We used the robotic system in two separate behavioral studies with bumblebees (Bombus terrestris): The system was used both for training of the bees and for the experimental data collection. The robotic system was reliable, with no flight in our studies failing due to a technical malfunction. The data recorded were easy to apply for further analysis. The software and the hardware design are open source. The development of cheap open-source prototyping platforms during the recent years has opened up many possibilities in designing of experiments. Automatization not only reduces workload, but also potentially allows experimental designs never done before, such as dynamic experiments, where the system responds to, for example, learning of the animal. We present a complete system with hardware and software, and it can be used as such in various experiments requiring feeders and collection of visitation data. Use of the system is not limited to any particular experimental setup or even species.

  15. The First Genetic and Comparative Map of White Lupin (Lupinus albus L.): Identification of QTLs for Anthracnose Resistance and Flowering Time, and a Locus for Alkaloid Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Huyen T. T.; Ellwood, Simon R.; Adhikari, Kedar; Nelson, Matthew N.; Oliver, Richard P.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract We report the first genetic linkage map of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.). An F8 recombinant inbred line population developed from Kiev mutant × P27174 was mapped with 220 amplified fragment length polymorphism and 105 gene-based markers. The genetic map consists of 28 main linkage groups (LGs) that varied in length from 22.7 cM to 246.5 cM and spanned a total length of 2951 cM. There were seven additional pairs and 15 unlinked markers, and 12.8% of markers showed segregation distortion at P anthracnose resistance, flowering time, and alkaloid content allowed loci governing these traits to be defined. Two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with significant effects were identified for anthracnose resistance on LG4 and LG17, and two QTLs were detected for flowering time on the top of LG1 and LG3. Alkaloid content was mapped as a Mendelian trait to LG11. PMID:17526914

  16. ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE 4 negatively regulates flowering through directly promoting Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Kai; Chen, Qian; Wu, Yaorong; Liu, Ruijun; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Shengfu; Tang, Sanyuan; Yang, Wenyu; Xie, Qi

    2016-01-01

    During the life cycle of a plant, one of the major biological processes is the transition from the vegetative to the reproductive stage. In Arabidopsis, flowering time is precisely controlled by extensive environmental and internal cues. Gibberellins (GAs) promote flowering, while abscisic acid (ABA) is considered as a flowering suppressor. However, the detailed mechanism through which ABA inhibits the floral transition is poorly understood. Here, we report that ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4), a key component in the ABA signalling pathway, negatively regulates floral transition by directly promoting FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) transcription. The abi4 mutant showed the early flowering phenotype whereas ABI4-overexpressing (OE-ABI4) plants had delayed floral transition. Consistently, quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) assay revealed that the FLC transcription level was down-regulated in abi4, but up-regulated in OE-ABI4. The change in FT level was consistent with the pattern of FLC expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-qPCR (ChIP-qPCR), electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), and tobacco transient expression analysis showed that ABI4 promotes FLC expression by directly binding to its promoter. Genetic analysis demonstrated that OE-ABI4::flc-3 could not alter the flc-3 phenotype. OE-FLC::abi4 showed a markedly delayed flowering phenotype, which mimicked OE-FLC::WT, and suggested that ABI4 acts upstream of FLC in the same genetic pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that ABA inhibits the floral transition by activating FLC transcription through ABI4. PMID:26507894

  17. Assessment of the internal quality of stored flower bulbs using magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, Maria Gerarda van

    2002-01-01

    Many flower bulbs have a life cycle of a year or more, flowering either in spring or in summer. Nevertheless, year-round production of cut flowers has become common practice in horticulture. To control flowering, which is necessary for the year-round production of flowers, bulbs are exposed to

  18. Finite Time and Exact Time Controllability on Compact Manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Jouan, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    It is first shown that a smooth controllable system on a compact manifold is finite time controllable. The technique of proof is close to the one of Sussmann's orbit theorem, and no rank condition is required. This technique is also used to give a new and elementary proof of the equivalence between controllability for essentially bounded inputs and for piecewise constant ones. Two sufficient conditions for controllability at exact time on a compact manifold are then stated. Some applications,...

  19. Pure phosphine fumigation treatment at low temperature for postharvest control of western flower thrips on lettuce, broccoli, asparagus, and strawberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. exported lettuce, broccoli, asparagus, and strawberries often harbor western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis), a quarantined pest in Taiwan, and therefore require quarantine treatment. Pure phosphine fumigation at a low temperature of 2°C was studied as an alternative fumigant to meth...

  20. Meta-analysis of phenotypic selection on flowering phenology suggests that early flowering plants are favoured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguía-Rosas, Miguel A; Ollerton, Jeff; Parra-Tabla, Victor; De-Nova, J Arturo

    2011-05-01

    Flowering times of plants are important life-history components and it has previously been hypothesized that flowering phenologies may be currently subject to natural selection or be selectively neutral. In this study we reviewed the evidence for phenotypic selection acting on flowering phenology using ordinary and phylogenetic meta-analysis. Phenotypic selection exists when a phenotypic trait co-varies with fitness; therefore, we looked for studies reporting an association between two components of flowering phenology (flowering time or flowering synchrony) with fitness. Data sets comprising 87 and 18 plant species were then used to assess the incidence and strength of phenotypic selection on flowering time and flowering synchrony, respectively. The influence of dependence on pollinators, the duration of the reproductive event, latitude and plant longevity as moderators of selection were also explored. Our results suggest that selection favours early flowering plants, but the strength of selection is influenced by latitude, with selection being stronger in temperate environments. However, there is no consistent pattern of selection on flowering synchrony. Our study demonstrates that phenotypic selection on flowering time is consistent and relatively strong, in contrast to previous hypotheses of selective neutrality, and has implications for the evolution of temperate floras under global climate change. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Flower Volatiles from Nine Citrus at Three Blooming Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Azam

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatiles from flowers at three blooming stages of nine citrus cultivars were analyzed by headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME-GC-MS. Up to 110 volatiles were detected, with 42 tentatively identified from citrus flowers for the first time. Highest amounts of volatiles were present in fully opened flowers of most citrus, except for pomelos. All cultivars were characterized by a high percentage of either oxygenated monoterpenes or monoterpene hydrocarbons, and the presence of a high percentage of nitrogen containing compounds was also observed. Flower volatiles varied qualitatively and quantitatively among citrus types during blooming. Limonene was the most abundant flower volatile only in citrons; α-citral and β-citral ranked 2nd and 3rd only for Bergamot, and unopened flowers of Ponkan had a higher amount of linalool and β-pinene while much lower amount of γ-terpinene and p-cymene than Satsuma. Taking the average of all cultivars, linalool and limonene were the top two volatiles for all blooming stages; β-pinene ranked 3rd in unopened flowers, while indole ranked 3rd for half opened and fully opened flower volatiles. As flowers bloomed, methyl anthranilate increased while 2-hexenal and p-cymene decreased. In some cases, a volatile could be high in both unopened and fully opened flowers but low in half opened ones. Through multivariate analysis, the nine citrus cultivars were clustered into three groups, consistent with the three true citrus types. Furthermore, an influence of blooming stages on clustering was observed, especially with hybrids Satsuma and Huyou. Altogether, it was suggested that flower volatiles can be suitable markers for revealing the genetic relationships between citrus cultivars but the same blooming stage needs to be strictly controlled.

  2. Latitudinal variation in sensitivity of flower bud formation to high temperature in Japanese Taraxacum officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshie, Fumio

    2014-05-01

    Control of flowering time plays a key role in the successful range expansion of plants. Taraxacum officinale has expanded throughout Japan during the 110 years after it was introduced into a cool temperate region. The present study tested a hypothesis that there is a genetic difference in the bud formation time in relation to temperature along latitudinal gradient of T. officinale populations. In Experiment 1, plants from three populations at different latitudes (26, 36, and 43°N) were grown at three temperatures. Time to flower bud appearance did not significantly differ among the three populations when plants were grown at 14 °C, whereas it increased with increasing latitude when grown at 19 and 24 °C. Rosette diameter was not different among the populations, indicating that the variation in bud formation time reflected a difference in genetic control rather than size variation. The latitudinal variation in bud appearance time was confirmed by Experiment 2 in which plants from 17 population were used. In Experiment 3, the size of plants that exhibited late-flowering was studied to test a hypothesis that the variation in flowering time reflects dormancy of vegetative growth, but the late-flowering plants were found to continue growth, indicating that vegetative dormancy was not the cause of the variation. The results clearly indicate that the degree of suppression of flower bud formation at high temperature decreases with latitude from north to south, which is under genetic control.

  3. [Pathways of flowering regulation in plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongping; Yang, Jing; Yang, Mingfeng

    2015-11-01

    Flowering, the floral transition from vegetative growth to reproductive growth, is induced by diverse endogenous and exogenous cues, such as photoperiod, temperature, hormones and age. Precise flowering time is critical to plant growth and evolution of species. The numerous renewal molecular and genetic results have revealed five flowering time pathways, including classical photoperiod pathway, vernalization pathway, autonomous pathway, gibberellins (GA) pathway and newly identified age pathway. These pathways take on relatively independent role, and involve extensive crosstalks and feedback loops. This review describes the complicated regulatory network of this floral transition to understand the molecular mechanism of flowering and provide references for further research in more plants.

  4. A Quasi Time Optimal Receding Horizon Control

    OpenAIRE

    Bania, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a quasi time optimal receding horizon control algorithm. The proposed algorithm generates near time optimal control when the state of the system is far from the target. When the state attains a certain neighbourhood of the aim, it begins the adaptation of the cost function. The purpose of this adaptation is to move from the time optimal control to the stabilizing control. Sufficient conditions for the stability of the closed loop system and the manner of the adaptation of ...

  5. Trees as huge flowers and flowers as oversized floral guides: the role of floral color change and retention of old flowers in Tibouchina pulchra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Lourenço Garcia Brito

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Floral color changes and retention of old flowers are frequently combined phenomena restricted to the floral guide or single flowers in few-flowered inflorescences. They are thought to increase the attractiveness over long distances and to direct nearby pollinators towards the rewarding flowers. In Tibouchina pulchra, a massively flowering tree, the whole flower changes its color during anthesis. On the first day, the flowers are white and on the next three days, they change to pink. This creates a new large-scale color pattern in which the white pre-changed flowers contrast against the pink post-changed ones over the entire tree. We describe the spectral characteristics of floral colors of T. pulchra and test bumblebees´ response to this color pattern when viewed at different angles (simulating long and short distances. The results indicated the role of different color components in bumblebee attraction and the possible scenario in which this flower color pattern has evolved. We tested bumblebees´ preference for simulated trees with 75% pink and 25% white flowers resembling the color patterns of T. pulchra, and trees with green leaves and pink flowers (control in long-distance approach. We also compared an artificial setting with three pink flowers and one white flower (T. pulchra model against four pink flowers with white floral guides (control in short-distance approach. Bumblebees spontaneously preferred the simulated T. pulchra patterns in both approaches despite similar rewards. Moreover, in short distances, pollinator visits to peripheral, non-rewarding flowers occurred only half as frequently in the simulated T. pulchra when compared to the control. Thefore, this exceptional floral color change and the retention of old flowers in T. pulchra favors the attraction of pollinators over long distances in a deception process while it honestly directs them towards the rewarding flowers at short distances possibly exploring their innate color

  6. On Discrete Time Control of Continuous Time Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    of Denmark. The focus in this paper is control of a continuous time system by means of a digital control. In this context the control signal can only change at sample instants and is constant between samples. The cost function do include the variations of output between samples....

  7. Selection of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real-time PCR during Flower Development in Tree Peony (Paeonia suffruticosa Andr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian eLi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa is a perennial plant indigenous to China known for its elegant and vibrantly colorful flowers. A few genes involved in petal pigmentation have been cloned in tree peony. However, to date, there have been few studies on the comparison and selection of stable reference genes for gene expression analysis by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR in this species. In this study, 10 candidate reference genes were evaluated for the normalization of qRT-PCR in three tree peony cultivars. GAPDH and UBC were identified as the top two most stable reference genes in ‘Feng Dan’ and ‘Xi Shi’, and EF-1α/UBC was recommended to be the best combination for ‘Que Hao’. The expression stability of various reference genes differed across cultivars, suggesting that selection and validation of reliable reference genes for quantitative gene expression analysis was necessary not only for different species but also for different cultivars. The results provided a list of reference genes for further study on gene expression in P. suffruticosa. However, in any case, a preliminary check on the accuracy of the best performing reference genes is requested for each qRT-PCR experiment.

  8. Selection of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real-Time PCR during Flower Development in Tree Peony (Paeonia suffruticosa Andr.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Han, Jigang; Hu, Yonghong; Yang, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa) is a perennial plant indigenous to China known for its elegant and vibrantly colorful flowers. A few genes involved in petal pigmentation have been cloned in tree peony. However, to date, there have been few studies on the comparison and selection of stable reference genes for gene expression analysis by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) in this species. In this study, 10 candidate reference genes were evaluated for the normalization of qRT-PCR in three tree peony cultivars. GAPDH and UBC were identified as the top two most stable reference genes in ‘Feng Dan’ and ‘Xi Shi,’ and EF-1α/UBC was recommended to be the best combination for ‘Que Hao.’ The expression stability of various reference genes differed across cultivars, suggesting that selection and validation of reliable reference genes for quantitative gene expression analysis was necessary not only for different species but also for different cultivars. The results provided a list of reference genes for further study on gene expression in P. suffruticosa. However, in any case, a preliminary check on the accuracy of the best performing reference genes is requested for each qRT-PCR experiment. PMID:27148337

  9. Validation of reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR during leaf and flower development in Petunia hybrida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hause Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of genes with invariant levels of gene expression is a prerequisite for validating transcriptomic changes accompanying development. Ideally expression of these genes should be independent of the morphogenetic process or environmental condition tested as well as the methods used for RNA purification and analysis. Results In an effort to identify endogenous genes meeting these criteria nine reference genes (RG were tested in two Petunia lines (Mitchell and V30. Growth conditions differed in Mitchell and V30, and different methods were used for RNA isolation and analysis. Four different software tools were employed to analyze the data. We merged the four outputs by means of a non-weighted unsupervised rank aggregation method. The genes identified as optimal for transcriptomic analysis of Mitchell and V30 were EF1α in Mitchell and CYP in V30, whereas the least suitable gene was GAPDH in both lines. Conclusions The least adequate gene turned out to be GAPDH indicating that it should be rejected as reference gene in Petunia. The absence of correspondence of the best-suited genes suggests that assessing reference gene stability is needed when performing normalization of data from transcriptomic analysis of flower and leaf development.

  10. Supervisory Control of Extended Timed Event Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-bing Zhuo; Wen-de Chen

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the dynamic behavior of extended timed event graphs related to place delay in the dioid framework. By Cofer and Garg's supervisory control theory[3], we address control problems of extended timed event graphs. Supervisory control of extended timed event graphs (a class of discrete event dynamic systems) is studied in the dioid framework, a necessary and sufficient condition for the ideals of the set of firing time sequences of transitions to be controllable is presented. We prove all the strongly controllable subsets can form a complete lattice.

  11. Solar rhythm in the regulation of photoperiodic flowering of long-day and short-day plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeang, Hoong-Yeet

    2013-07-01

    In photoperiodic flowering, long-day (LD) plants are induced to flower seasonally when the daylight hours are long, whereas flowering in short-day (SD) plants is promoted under short photoperiods. According to the widely accepted external coincidence model, flowering occurs in LD Arabidopsis when the circadian rhythm of the gene CONSTANS (CO) peaks in the afternoon, when it is light during long days but dark when the days are short. Nevertheless, extending this explanation to SD flowering in rice, Oriza sativa, requires LD and SD plants to have 'opposite light requirements' as the CO orthologue in rice, HEADING-DATE1 (Hd1), promotes flowering only under short photoperiods. This report proposes a role of the plant's solar rhythm in promoting seasonal flowering. The interaction between rhythmic genes entrained to the solar clock and those entrained to the circadian clock form the basis of an internal coincidence model that explains both LD and SD flowering equally well. The model invokes no presumption of opposite light requirements between LD and SD plants, and further argues against any specific requirement of either light or darkness for SD flowering. Internal coincidence predicts the inhibition of SD flowering of the rice plant by a night break (a brief interruption of light), while it also provides a plausible explanation for how a judiciously timed night break promotes Arabidopsis flowering even on short days. It is the timing of the light transitions (sunrise and sunset) rather than the duration of light or darkness per se that regulates photoperiod-controlled flowering.

  12. Snow cover and extreme winter warming events control flower abundance of some, but not all species in high arctic Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semenchuk, Philipp R.; Elberling, Bo; Cooper, Elisabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    The High Arctic winter is expected to be altered through ongoing and future climate change. Winter precipitation and snow depth are projected to increase and melt out dates change accordingly. Also, snow cover and depth will play an important role in protecting plant canopy from increasingly more...... season length and by protecting or exposing flower buds to cold winter air, but most species studied are resistant to changes....

  13. Discrete-time nonlinear sliding mode controller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    : Discrete-time delay system, Sliding mode control, nonlinear sliding ... The concept of the sliding mode control in recent years has drawn the ...... His area of interest is dc-dc converters, electrical vehicle and distributed generation application.

  14. Controllable synthesis of flower- and rod-like ZnO nanostructures by simply tuning the ratio of sodium hydroxide to zinc acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunyan; Mu, Jin

    2007-02-01

    A controlled synthesis of flower- and rod-like ZnO nanostructures in a hydrothermal phase has been realized in the absence of an additional template. The well-defined morphologies are obtained by simply tuning the ratio of sodium hydroxide to zinc acetate in a narrow range. The products are characterized by powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The growth mechanism is suggested to be that the supersaturation of the precursor Zn(OH)42- results in various nucleation habits, which induce the ZnO nanostructures with different morphologies.

  15. Identification and mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling cold-tolerance of Chinese common wild rice (O. rufipogon Griff.) at booting to flowering stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fengxia; SUN Chuanqing; TAN Lubin; FU Yongcai; LI Dejun; WANG Xiangkun

    2003-01-01

    An advanced backcross population of rice was used to identify the quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling the cold-tolerance at booting to flowering stages. The recipient, Guichao 2 (GC2), was a commercial Indica rice; the donor Dongxiang common wild rice, was an accession of common wild rice (DXCWR, Oryza rufipogon Griff.). Three QTLs for cold-tolerance were detected on chromosomes 1, 6and 11. Two of them coming from DXCWR could enhance the cold-tolerance of the backcross progenies. Moreover, one sterility QTL that could reduce the seed set rate of the backcross progenies by 78% was mapped on chromosome 5.

  16. Flowering phenology in subalpine meadows: does climate variation influence community co-flowering patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Jessica; Inouye, David W; Thomson, James D

    2010-02-01

    Climate change is expected to alter patterns of species co-occurrence, in both space and time. Species-specific shifts in reproductive phenology may alter the assemblages of plant species in flower at any given time during the growing season. Temporal overlap in the flowering periods (co-flowering) of animal-pollinated species may influence reproductive success if competitive or facilitative interactions between plant species affect pollinator services. We used a 33-year data set on flowering phenology in subalpine meadows in Colorado, USA, to determine whether interannual variation in snowmelt date, which marks the start of the growing season, affected co-flowering patterns. For two of four species considered, we found a significant relationship between snowmelt timing and composition of the assemblage of co-flowering plants. In years of early snowmelt, Lathyrus lanszwertii var. leucanthus (Fabaceae), the species we investigated in most detail, tended to overlap with earlier-flowering species and with fewer species overall. In particular, overlap with the flowering period of Lupinus polyphyllus var. prunophilus, with which Lathyrus leucanthus shares pollinators, was significantly reduced in early-snowmelt years. The observed association between timing of snowmelt and patterns of flowering overlap could not have been predicted simply by examining temporal trends in the dates of peak flowering of the dominant species in the community, as peak flowering dates have largely shifted in parallel with respect to snowmelt date. However, subtle interspecific differences in responsiveness of flowering time, duration, and intensity to interannual climate variation have likely contributed to the observed relationship. Although much of the year-to-year variation in flowering overlap remains unexplained by snowmelt date, our finding of a measurable signal of climate variation suggests that future climate change may lead to altered competitive environments for these wildflower

  17. Isolation of a CENTRORADIALIS/TERMINAL FLOWER1 homolog in saffron (Crocus sativus L.): characterization and expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Pasentsis, Konstantinos; Kalivas, Apostolos; Michailidou, Sofia; Madesis, Panagiotis; Argiriou, Anagnostis

    2012-08-01

    Genes in the phosphatidyl-ethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) family are instrumental in regulating the fate of meristems and flowering time. To investigate the role of these genes in the monocotyledonous plant Crocus (Crocus sativus L), an industrially important crop cultivated for its nutritional and medicinal properties, we have cloned and characterized a CENTRORADIALIS/TERMINAL FLOWER1 (CEN/TFL1) like gene, named CsatCEN/TFL1-like, the first reported CEN/TFL1 gene characterized from such a perennial geophyte. Sequence analysis revealed that CsatCEN/TFL1 shows high similarity to its homologous PEBP family genes CEN/TFL1, FT and MFT from a variety of plant species and maintains the same exon/intron organization. Phylogenetic analysis of the CsatCEN/TFL1 amino acid sequence confirmed that the isolated sequences belong to the CEN/TFL1 clade of the PEBP family. CsatCEN/TFL1 transcripts could be detected in corms, flower and flower organs but not in leaves. An alternative spliced transcript was also detected in the flower. Comparison of expression levels of CsatCEN/TFL1 and its alternative spliced transcript in wild type flower and a double flower mutant showed no significant differences. Overexpression of CsatCEN/TFL1 transcript in Arabidopsis tfl1 plants reversed the phenotype of early flowering and terminal flowering of the tfl1 plants to a normal one. Computational analysis of the obtained promoter sequences revealed, next to common binding motifs in CEN/TFL1-like genes as well as other flowering gene promoters, the presence of two CArG binding sites indicative of control of CEN/TFL1 by MADS-box transcription factors involved in crocus flowering and flower organ formation.

  18. Ectopic expression of Jatropha curcas APETALA1 (JcAP1 caused early flowering in Arabidopsis, but not in Jatropha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyong Tang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas is a promising feedstock for biofuel production because Jatropha oil is highly suitable for the production of biodiesel and bio-jet fuels. However, Jatropha exhibits a low seed yield as a result of unreliable and poor flowering. APETALA1 (AP1 is a floral meristem and organ identity gene in higher plants. The flower meristem identity genes of Jatropha have not yet been identified or characterized. To better understand the genetic control of flowering in Jatropha, an AP1 homolog (JcAP1 was isolated from Jatropha. An amino acid sequence analysis of JcAP1 revealed a high similarity to the AP1 proteins of other perennial plants. JcAP1 was expressed in inflorescence buds, flower buds, sepals and petals. The highest expression level was observed during the early developmental stage of the flower buds. The overexpression of JcAP1 using the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV 35S promoter resulted in extremely early flowering and abnormal flowers in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Several flowering genes downstream of AP1 were up-regulated in the JcAP1-overexpressing transgenic plant lines. Furthermore, JcAP1 overexpression rescued the phenotype caused by the Arabidopsis AP1 loss-of-function mutant ap1-11. Therefore, JcAP1 is an ortholog of AtAP1, which plays a similar role in the regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis. However, the overexpression of JcAP1 in Jatropha using the same promoter resulted in little variation in the flowering time and floral organs, indicating that JcAP1 may be insufficient to regulate flowering by itself in Jatropha. This study helps to elucidate the function of JcAP1 and contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of flower development in Jatropha.

  19. Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P.T.K.

    1980-03-18

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  20. Controlled Fabrication of Silk Protein Sericin Mediated Hierarchical Hybrid Flowers and Their Excellent Adsorption Capability of Heavy Metal Ions of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koley, Pradyot; Sakurai, Makoto; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-01-27

    Fabrication of protein-inorganic hybrid materials of innumerable hierarchical patterns plays a major role in the development of multifunctional advanced materials with their improved features in synergistic way. However, effective fabrication and applications of the hybrid structures is limited due to the difficulty in control and production cost. Here, we report the controlled fabrication of complex hybrid flowers with hierarchical porosity through a green and facile coprecipitation method by using industrial waste natural silk protein sericin. The large surface areas and porosity of the microsize hybrid flowers enable water purification through adsorption of different heavy metal ions. The high adsorption capacity depends on their morphology, which is changed largely by sericin concentration in their fabrication. Superior adsorption and greater selectivity of the Pb(II) ions have been confirmed by the characteristic growth of needle-shaped nanowires on the hierarchical surface of the hybrid flowers. These hybrid flowers show excellent thermal stability even after complete evaporation of the protein molecules, significantly increasing the porosity of the flower petals. A simple, cost-effective and environmental friendly fabrication method of the porous flowers will lead to a new solution to water pollution required in the modern industrial society.

  1. Time management training and perceived control of time at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Alexander; Stock, Armin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of time management training, which was based on psychological theory and research, on perceived control of time, perceived stress, and performance at work. The authors randomly assigned 71 employees to a training group (n = 35) or a waiting-list control group (n = 36). As hypothesized, time management training led to an increase in perceived control of time and a decrease in perceived stress. Time management training had no impact on different performance indicators. In particular, the authors explored the use and the perceived usefulness of the techniques taught. Participants judged the taught techniques as useful, but there were large differences concerning the actual use of the various techniques.

  2. Official Zhang Flower

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Tucked away at the highest elevation of any city in the world, Lhasa is filled with flowers bathed in warm sunlight. Whether in Barkor Street or in snaking alleys, one finds flowers in full bloom. They include the famous Gal-sang flower, azaleas, to be found in the mountains, Rho-diola which is used as a medicinal herb, and a kind of flower known as High Commissioner Zhang.

  3. The maize INDETERMINATE1 flowering time regulator defines a highly conserved zinc finger protein family in higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colasanti Joseph

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maize INDETERMINATE1 gene, ID1, is a key regulator of the transition to flowering and the founding member of a transcription factor gene family that encodes a protein with a distinct arrangement of zinc finger motifs. The zinc fingers and surrounding sequence make up the signature ID domain (IDD, which appears to be found in all higher plant genomes. The presence of zinc finger domains and previous biochemical studies showing that ID1 binds to DNA suggests that members of this gene family are involved in transcriptional regulation. Results Comparison of IDD genes identified in Arabidopsis and rice genomes, and all IDD genes discovered in maize EST and genomic databases, suggest that ID1 is a unique member of this gene family. High levels of sequence similarity amongst all IDD genes from maize, rice and Arabidopsis suggest that they are derived from a common ancestor. Several unique features of ID1 suggest that it is a divergent member of the maize IDD family. Although no clear ID1 ortholog was identified in the Arabidopsis genome, highly similar genes that encode proteins with identity extending beyond the ID domain were isolated from rice and sorghum. Phylogenetic comparisons show that these putative orthologs, along with maize ID1, form a group separate from other IDD genes. In contrast to ID1 mRNA, which is detected exclusively in immature leaves, several maize IDD genes showed a broad range of expression in various tissues. Further, Western analysis with an antibody that cross-reacts with ID1 protein and potential orthologs from rice and sorghum shows that all three proteins are detected in immature leaves only. Conclusion Comparative genomic analysis shows that the IDD zinc finger family is highly conserved among both monocots and dicots. The leaf-specific ID1 expression pattern distinguishes it from other maize IDD genes examined. A similar leaf-specific localization pattern was observed for the putative ID1 protein

  4. Three Medicago MtFUL genes have distinct and overlapping expression patterns during vegetative and reproductive development and 35S:MtFULb accelerates flowering and causes a terminal flower phenotype in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauren eJaudal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The timing of the transition to flowering is carefully controlled by plants in order to optimise sexual reproduction and the ensuing production of seeds, grains and fruits. The genetic networks that regulate floral induction are best characterised in the temperate eudicot Arabidopsis in which the florigen gene FT plays a major role in promoting the transition to flowering. Legumes are an important plant group, but less is known about the regulation of their flowering time. In the model legume Medicago truncatula (Medicago, a temperate annual plant like Arabidopsis, flowering is induced by prolonged cold (vernalisation followed by long day lengths (LD. Recent molecular-genetic experiments have revealed that a FT-like gene, MtFTa1, is a central regulator of flowering time in Medicago. Here, we characterize the three Medicago FRUITFULL (FUL MADS transcription factors, MtFULa, MtFULb and MtFULc using phylogenetic analyses, gene expression profiling through developmental time courses, and functional analyses in transgenic plants. MtFULa and MtFULb have similarity in sequence and expression profiles under inductive environmental conditions during both vegetative and reproductive development while MtFULc is only up regulated in the apex after flowering in LD conditions. Sustained up regulation of MtFULs requires functional MtFTa1 but their transcript levels are not affected during cold treatment. Overexpression of MtFULa and MtFULb promotes flowering in transgenic Arabidopsis plants with an additional terminal flower phenotype on some 35S:MtFULb plants. An increase in transcript levels of the MtFULs was also observed in Medicago plants overexpressing MtFTa1. Our results suggest that the MtFULs are targets of MtFTa1. Overall, this work highlights the conserved functions of FUL-like genes in promoting flowering and other roles in plant development and thus contributes to our understanding of the genetic control of the flowering process in Medicago.

  5. Minimal Time Problem with Impulsive Controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunisch, Karl, E-mail: karl.kunisch@uni-graz.at [University of Graz, Institute for Mathematics and Scientific Computing (Austria); Rao, Zhiping, E-mail: zhiping.rao@ricam.oeaw.ac.at [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Radon Institute of Computational and Applied Mathematics (Austria)

    2017-02-15

    Time optimal control problems for systems with impulsive controls are investigated. Sufficient conditions for the existence of time optimal controls are given. A dynamical programming principle is derived and Lipschitz continuity of an appropriately defined value functional is established. The value functional satisfies a Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman equation in the viscosity sense. A numerical example for a rider-swing system is presented and it is shown that the reachable set is enlargered by allowing for impulsive controls, when compared to nonimpulsive controls.

  6. Entomofauna visitante de Belamcanda chinensis (L. DC (Iridaceae durante o período de floração Flowering entomofauna Belamcanda chinensis (L. DC. (Iridaceae during flowering time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Jesus Vitali

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of the reproductive biology of B. chinensis (L. DC. (Iridaceae was realized comprising floral biology and breeding systems. The floral biology studies included analyses of nectar production, occurence of osmophores, corolla pigments, ultraviolet reflexion and absortion patterns, viability of pollen, pollinators and flower visitors. The breeding systems were studied taking into account the results of manual pollinators tests. B. chinensis is self-compatible bul cross-pollination is more frequent. The effective pollinators are Plebeia droryana (Friese, 1906 (45,7%, Trigona spinipes (Fabricius, 1793 (27,3%, Tetragonisca angustula (Latreille, 1811 (9,3%. Others insects visitors are considered nectar and pollen thieves. The flowering begins generally in January and February. The complete reproductive cicle, as here considered, begining with floral bud production ending with development of mature fruits, lasts January to June. Seed dispersion is ornitocoric.

  7. PHYTOCHROME C is an essential light receptor for photoperiodic flowering in the temperate grass, Brachypodium distachyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Daniel P; Ream, Thomas S; Minevich, Gregory; Hobert, Oliver; Amasino, Richard M

    2014-09-01

    We show that in the temperate grass, Brachypodium distachyon, PHYTOCHROME C (PHYC), is necessary for photoperiodic flowering. In loss-of-function phyC mutants, flowering is extremely delayed in inductive photoperiods. PHYC was identified as the causative locus by utilizing a mapping by sequencing pipeline (Cloudmap) optimized for identification of induced mutations in Brachypodium. In phyC mutants the expression of Brachypodium homologs of key flowering time genes in the photoperiod pathway such as GIGANTEA (GI), PHOTOPERIOD 1 (PPD1/PRR37), CONSTANS (CO), and florigen/FT are greatly attenuated. PHYC also controls the day-length dependence of leaf size as the effect of day length on leaf size is abolished in phyC mutants. The control of genes upstream of florigen production by PHYC was likely to have been a key feature of the evolution of a long-day flowering response in temperate pooid grasses.

  8. 姊妹花开新世纪二梅香飘天下春%Sister-Flowers Are Blooming Widely in the New Century, Mei Flower & Wintersweets Fragrance Will Spread Over Spring-time of the World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈俊愉

    2001-01-01

    Mei flower and Wintersweet are two very famous traditional flowers of China. The Seventh China Exhibition of Mei Flower & Wintersweet will be held during Feb.17 to March 15,2001 in Wuxi of Jiangsu province, a famous landscape City in China. This exhibition is sponsored by the Chinese Mei flower & Wintersweet Association and Wuxi Municipality, and is opening to the public mainly at Mei Garden of Wuxi. The exhibition is well prepaid and to be held in a large scale. The Mei Garden is standing with picturesque surrounding and has thousands of Mei trees grown there among some lovely and well arranged garden buildings. Furthermore, two international activities will be carried out there on Feb.18th, 2001: (1) International Symposium on Mei & Wintersweet Culture , (2) The second Annual Meeting of International Registration for Mei ( Prunus mume) cultivars . Specialists and representatives from China and abroad as well the International Registration Authority will be present there.%梅与蜡梅是我国的传统名花,由中国花卉协会梅花蜡梅分会和无锡市人民政府主办的第七届全国二梅展及无锡市首届梅花节,将以很大的规模于 2001年 2月 17日至 3月 15日在风景秀丽的无锡梅园举办。其间还将于 2月 18~ 21日召开国际梅与蜡梅文化研讨会和国际梅品种登录第二届年会。届时将会有国内外专家学者以及国际梅品种登录权威人士参加会议。

  9. Effectiveness of imidacloprid (ProAgro 100 SL) in the control of glasshouse whitefly (Trialeurodes vaporariorum) and western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) on tomato under cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkiewicz Jodki, J; Nawrocka, B; Swietosławski, J

    2004-01-01

    In 2002 a glasshouse experiments were carried out on the effectiveness of ProAgro 100 SL in the control of glasshouse whitefly and western flower thrips on tomato cv. Perkoz. Strict observation of the basic prophylactic rules such as introducing in to glasshouse only healthy seedlings, uninfected by whitefly and thrips as well as isolation of tomato plants, especially the seedlings from ornamental plants are important to the limit of the pest population. During the vegetation period the population of whitefly and thrips may be limited by the insecticide application. The glasshouse experiments on the performance of ProAgro 100 SL in the control of mentioned above pest species were carried out at the Research Institute of Vegetable Crops in Skierniewice. The ProAgro 100 SL was applied in the concentration of 0,1%. The standard treatment was Juventox 040 SL (acetamiprid) in the concentration of 0.05%. The obtained results allow to find that ProAgro 100 SL in the rates of 0.1% performed well in the limiting population of whitefly and western flower thrips on glasshouse tomato.

  10. Mutation in TERMINAL FLOWER1 reverses the photoperiodic requirement for flowering in the wild strawberry Fragaria vesca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Elli A; Mouhu, Katriina; Albani, Maria C; Kurokura, Takeshi; Rantanen, Marja; Sargent, Daniel J; Battey, Nicholas H; Coupland, George; Elomaa, Paula; Hytönen, Timo

    2012-07-01

    Photoperiodic flowering has been extensively studied in the annual short-day and long-day plants rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), whereas less is known about the control of flowering in perennials. In the perennial wild strawberry, Fragaria vesca (Rosaceae), short-day and perpetual flowering long-day accessions occur. Genetic analyses showed that differences in their flowering responses are caused by a single gene, SEASONAL FLOWERING LOCUS, which may encode the F. vesca homolog of TERMINAL FLOWER1 (FvTFL1). We show through high-resolution mapping and transgenic approaches that FvTFL1 is the basis of this change in flowering behavior and demonstrate that FvTFL1 acts as a photoperiodically regulated repressor. In short-day F. vesca, long photoperiods activate FvTFL1 mRNA expression and short days suppress it, promoting flower induction. These seasonal cycles in FvTFL1 mRNA level confer seasonal cycling of vegetative and reproductive development. Mutations in FvTFL1 prevent long-day suppression of flowering, and the early flowering that then occurs under long days is dependent on the F. vesca homolog of FLOWERING LOCUS T. This photoperiodic response mechanism differs from those described in model annual plants. We suggest that this mechanism controls flowering within the perennial growth cycle in F. vesca and demonstrate that a change in a single gene reverses the photoperiodic requirements for flowering.

  11. Work Time Control and Sleep Disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salo, Paula; Ala-Mursula, Leena; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Employee control over work times has been associated with favorable psychosocial and health-related outcomes, but the evidence regarding sleep quality remains inconclusive. We examined cross-sectional and prospective associations between work time control and sleep disturbances...... in a large working population, taking into account total hours worked. METHODS: The data were from a full-panel longitudinal cohort study of Finnish public sector employees who responded to questions on work time control and sleep disturbances in years 2000-2001, 2004-2005, 2008-2009, and 2012. The analysis....... RESULTS: Consistently in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models, less control over work time was associated with greater sleep disturbances in the total population and among those working normal 40-hour weeks. Among participants working more than 40 hours a week, work time that was both very high...

  12. Flower Power at the Dutch Flower Auctions? Application of an Inverse Almost Ideal Demand System

    OpenAIRE

    Steen, Marie

    2006-01-01

    Information on price-quantity relationships will enable flower producers to reduce risk and raise profits through better timing of rotations as well as better utilization of limited greenhouse space. The present paper presents econometric evidence on such price-quantity relationships for major species of cut flowers at the Dutch flower auctions. Specifically, an inverse linear approximate almost ideal demand model with seasonal adjustments is applied. This paper is introducing trigonometric f...

  13. The ALMA Real Time Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jeffrey S.; Juerges, Thomas A.; Marson, Ralph G.

    2009-01-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is a revolutionary millimeter and submillimeter array being developed on the Atacama plateau of northern Chile. An international partnership lead by NRAO, ESO, and NAOJ this powerful and flexible telescope will provide unprecedented observations of this relatively unexplored frequency range. The control subsystem for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array must coordinate the monitor and control of at least sixty six antennas (in four different styles), two correlators, and all of the ancillary equipment (samplers, local oscillators, front ends, etc.). This equipment will be spread over tens of kilometers and operated remotely. Operation of the array requires a robust, scalable, and maintainable real time control system. The real time control system is responsible for monitoring and control of any devices where there are fixed deadlines. Examples in the ALMA context are antenna pointing and fringe tracking. Traditionally the real time portion of a large software system is an intricate and error prone portion of the software. As a result the real time portion is very expensive in terms of effort expended both during construction and during maintenance phases of a project. The ALMA real time control system uses a Linux based real time operating system to interact with the hardware and the CORBA based ALMA Common Software to communicate in the distributed computing environment. Mixing the requirements of real time computing and the non-deterministic CORBA middleware has produced an interesting design. We discuss the architecture, design, and implementation of the ALMA real time control system. Highlight some lessons learned along the way, and justify our assertion that this should be the last large scale real time control system in radio astronomy.

  14. Durham adaptive optics real-time controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basden, Alastair; Geng, Deli; Myers, Richard; Younger, Eddy

    2010-11-10

    The Durham adaptive optics (AO) real-time controller was initially a proof of concept design for a generic AO control system. It has since been developed into a modern and powerful central-processing-unit-based real-time control system, capable of using hardware acceleration (including field programmable gate arrays and graphical processing units), based primarily around commercial off-the-shelf hardware. It is powerful enough to be used as the real-time controller for all currently planned 8 m class telescope AO systems. Here we give details of this controller and the concepts behind it, and report on performance, including latency and jitter, which is less than 10 μs for small AO systems.

  15. Timing and motor control in drumming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sofia; Grossbach, Michael; Altenmüller, Eckart

    the stick movement becomes increasingly difficult, sometimes resulting in irregularities in timing and/or striking force. Timing irregularities can also be a revealing sign of motor control problems, such as focal dystonia (Jabusch, Vauth & Altenmüller, 2004). The "breakdown" in motor control can therefore......The ability to keep a steady tempo is influenced by individual prerequisites as well as the playing conditions at hand. Percussionists have to acquire playing techniques that allow them to perform at the required tempi and dynamic levels. For more extreme tempi and dynamic levels controlling......) and dynamic levels (p, mf, f) were recorded. The motion data was analyzed with respect to general movement pattern, variability in timing and striking force. Preliminary results confirm deterioration in movement patterns for the faster tempi, typically displaying stiffened joints and lack of timing control...

  16. Influence of Riparian Tree Phenology on Lower Colorado River Spring-Migrating Birds: Implications of Flower Cueing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Laura J.; van Riper, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Neotropical migrant birds make choices about which habitats are most likely to provide successful foraging locations during migration, but little is known about how these birds recognize and process environmental clues that indicate the presence of prey species. Aspects of tree phenology, notably flowering of trees along the lower Colorado River corridor, coincide with the migratory stopovers of leaf-gleaning insectivorous songbirds and may be an important indicator of arthropod prey species availability. Shifting tree flowering and leaf flush during the spring migration period presents avian insectivores with an assortment of foraging opportunities. During two field seasons at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge in southwestern Arizona, we examined riparian tree species to test whether leaf-gleaning insectivorous birds are attracted to the flowering condition of trees in choosing foraging sites. We predicted that flowering trees would host more insect prey resources, would thus show increased visit rates, length of stays and attack ratios of migrant avian insectivores, and that those arthropods would be found in the stomach contents of the birds. Paired trees of honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), displaying heavy and light degrees of flowering were observed to test these predictions. To test whether birds are tracking arthropods directly or are using flowers as a proximate cue, we removed flowers from selected trees and paired these treated trees with neighboring high flowering trees, which served as controls. Avian foraging behavior, avian diets, arthropods, and phenology data were collected at the same time to control for temporal differences in insect availability, plant phenology, and differences in stopover arrivals of birds. We documented five patterns from this study: 1) Higher abundance and richness of arthropods were found on honey mesquite trees with greater numbers of flowers. 2) Arthropod abundance and richness increased as flowering

  17. Conditions for time-controllability of behaviours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasane, A; Cotroneo, T

    2002-01-01

    This paper develops a behavioural framework to study controllability of systems whose dynamics are described by systems of linear, constant coefficient partial differential equations. Questions about the notion of controllability are addressed with special importance given to the time-evolution. Alg

  18. Controlling hopf bifurcations: Discrete-time systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanrong Chen

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Bifurcation control has attracted increasing attention in recent years. A simple and unified state-feedback methodology is developed in this paper for Hopf bifurcation control for discrete-time systems. The control task can be either shifting an existing Hopf bifurcation or creating a new Hopf bifurcation. Some computer simulations are included to illustrate the methodology and to verify the theoretical results.

  19. Transgenic hybrid aspen trees with increased gibberellin (GA) concentrations suggest that GA acts in parallel with FLOWERING LOCUS T2 to control shoot elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Maria E; Hoffman, Daniel; Kaduk, Mateusz; Mauriat, Mélanie; Moritz, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Bioactive gibberellins (GAs) have been implicated in short day (SD)-induced growth cessation in Populus, because exogenous applications of bioactive GAs to hybrid aspens (Populus tremula × tremuloides) under SD conditions delay growth cessation. However, this effect diminishes with time, suggesting that plants may cease growth following exposure to SDs due to a reduction in sensitivity to GAs. In order to validate and further explore the role of GAs in growth cessation, we perturbed GA biosynthesis or signalling in hybrid aspen plants by overexpressing AtGA20ox1, AtGA2ox2 and PttGID1.3 (encoding GA biosynthesis enzymes and a GA receptor). We found trees with elevated concentrations of bioactive GA, due to overexpression of AtGA20ox1, continued to grow in SD conditions and were insensitive to the level of FLOWERING LOCUS T2 (FT2) expression. As transgenic plants overexpressing the PttGID1.3 GA receptor responded in a wild-type (WT) manner to SD conditions, this insensitivity did not result from limited receptor availability. As high concentrations of bioactive GA during SD conditions were sufficient to sustain shoot elongation growth in hybrid aspen trees, independent of FT2 expression levels, we conclude elongation growth in trees is regulated by both GA- and long day-responsive pathways, similar to the regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  20. Timing control by redundant inhibitory neuronal circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristan, I.; Rulkov, N. F.; Huerta, R.; Rabinovich, M.

    2014-03-01

    Rhythms and timing control of sequential activity in the brain is fundamental to cognition and behavior. Although experimental and theoretical studies support the understanding that neuronal circuits are intrinsically capable of generating different time intervals, the dynamical origin of the phenomenon of functionally dependent timing control is still unclear. Here, we consider a new mechanism that is related to the multi-neuronal cooperative dynamics in inhibitory brain motifs consisting of a few clusters. It is shown that redundancy and diversity of neurons within each cluster enhances the sensitivity of the timing control with the level of neuronal excitation of the whole network. The generality of the mechanism is shown to work on two different neuronal models: a conductance-based model and a map-based model.

  1. Timing system control software in the SLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, K.; Phinney, N.

    1985-04-01

    A new timing system that allows precision (approx.1 to 2 ns) control of the trigger times of klystrons, beam position monitors, and other devices on a pulse-to-pulse basis at up to 360 Hz is in operation in the first third of the SLAC linear accelerator. The control software is divided between a central host VAX and local Intel 8086-based microprocessor clusters. Facilities exist to set up and adjust the timing of devices or groups of devices independently for beam pulses having different destinations and purposes, which are run in an interlaced fashion during normal machine operation. Upgrading of the system is currently underway, using a new version of the Programmable Delay Unit CAMAC module to allow pipelining of timing information for three machine pulses. An overview of the current state of the system is presented in this paper, with an emphasis on software control.

  2. Finite-time stability and control

    CERN Document Server

    Amato, Francesco; Ariola, Marco; Cosentino, Carlo; De Tommasi, Gianmaria

    2014-01-01

    Finite-time stability (FTS) is a more practical concept than classical Lyapunov stability, useful for checking whether the state trajectories of a system remain within pre-specified bounds over a finite time interval. In a linear systems framework, FTS problems can be cast as convex optimization problems and solved by the use of effective off-the-shelf computational tools such as LMI solvers. Finite-time Stability and Control exploits this benefit to present the practical applications of FTS and finite-time control-theoretical results to various engineering fields. The text is divided into two parts: ·         linear systems; and ·         hybrid systems. The building of practical motivating examples helps the reader to understand the methods presented. Finite-time Stability and Control is addressed to academic researchers and to engineers working in the field of robust process control. Instructors teaching graduate courses in advanced control will also find parts of this book useful for the...

  3. Graft-transmissible action of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS T protein to promote flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaguchi, Michitaka; Daimon, Yasufumi; Abe, Mitsutomo; Araki, Takashi

    2009-02-01

    Day length perceived by a leaf is a major environmental factor that controls the timing of flowering. It has been believed that a mobile, long-distance signal called florigen is produced in the leaf, and is transported to the shoot apex where it triggers floral morphogenesis. Grafting experiments have shown that florigen is transmissible from a donor plant that has been subjected to inductive day length to an un-induced recipient plant. However, the nature of florigen has long remained elusive. Recent studies have provided evidence that the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) protein in Arabidopsis and corresponding proteins in other species are an important part of florigen. Our work showed that the FT activity, either from overexpressing or inducible transgenes or from the endogenous gene, to promote flowering is transmissible through a graft junction, and that an FT protein with a T7 tag (FT-T7) is transported from a donor scion to the apical region of recipient stock plants and becomes detectable within a short period of 24-48 h. That the FT-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein (FT:GFP) retains limited ability for graft-transmissible action was confirmed.

  4. Structural Characterization of Ginsenosides from Flower Buds of Panax ginseng by RRLC-Q-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Lu, Ziyan; Teng, Yaran; Guo, Yingying; Liu, Shuying

    2016-02-01

    Ginseng flower bud as a part of Panax ginseng has received much attention as a valuable functional food with medicinal potential. A few studies focused on systematic and comprehensive studies on its major ingredients. This study aims to rapidly characterize ginsenosides in ginseng flower buds and provide scientific basis for developing functional food, exploiting pharmaceutical effects and making full use of ginseng resources. A rapid resolution liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (RRLC-Q-TOF-MS) method was developed for rapid qualitative and quantitative analysis of ginsenosides in ginseng flower buds. The compounds were identified by comparing retention time of the reference standards, accurate mass measurement and the fragment ions obtained from RRLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS analyses. A total of 14 kinds of ginsenosides were identified and 5 kinds of malonyl-ginsenosides were first tentatively identified in ginseng flower buds. Ten kinds of main ginsenosides were quantitatively analyzed. The developed RRLC-Q-TOF-MS method was demonstrated as an effective analytical means for rapid characterization of the ginsenosides in flower buds of P. ginseng. The research result is valuable for quality control, assessment of authenticity and stability evaluation of ginseng flower buds. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Capsella rubella TGA4, a bZIP transcription factor, causes delayed flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Maofu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flowering time is usually regulated by many environmental factors and endogenous signals. TGA family members are bZIP transcription factors that bind to the octopine synthase element, which has been closely linked to defense/stress responses. Most TGA factors interact with non-expressor of PR1 (NPR1 and plant defense responses are strengthened by this interaction. TGA1and TGA4factors bind to NPR1 only in salicylic acid (SA-induced leaves, suggesting that TGA4 has another function during plant development. Here, we isolated a bZIP transcription factor gene, TGA4, from Capsella rubella. TGA4transcripts were detected in most tissues, with high expression in leaves, low expression in stems and flowering buds, and undetectable in siliques. CruTGA4was over expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana wild typeCol-0 plants. Flowering time and total leaf number in the transgenic plants showed that overexpression of CruTGA4could delay flowering in A. thaliana. Our findings suggest that TGA4 may act as flowering regulator that controls plant flowering.

  6. More flowers or new cladodes? Environmental correlates and biological consequences of sexual reproduction in a Sonoran Desert prickly pear cactus, Opuntia engelmannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Janice E.

    1996-01-01

    Should a platyopuntia expend all aerolar meristems in flower production, now new cladodes could be produced, and further reproductive effort and vegetative growth would cease. To investigate the trade-off between flower and cladode production, the numbers of flowers, fruits, and cladodes were monitored for 4 years on 30 Opuntia engelmannii Salm-Dyek, plants on Tumamoc Hill, Tucson, Arizona. Plant size controlled the number of flowers initiated each spring. The proportion of flowers that developed (i.e., did not abort) was perhaps determined by December-February rainfall in the months before bloom, with more being developed in the wettest years. Models based on different ratios of initiated cladodes to initiated flowers demonstrated that continued high investment in flowers and fruits would eventually terminate reproduction altogether; therefore periods of high sexual reproduction should alternate with periods of high vegetative growth. In the first 3 years of this study, the ratio of new cladodes to initiated flowers was low, showing a high investment in sexual reproduction. As suggested by the model, the population recouped this investment in the fourth year, when the number of new cladodes was nearly 3 times the 1992-1994 mean, and the number of initiated flowers was only 73% of the 3-year mean.

  7. Chosen aspects of flowering of Ranunculaceae representatives in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Denisow

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The family Ranunculaceae consists of numerous widespread species occuring from lowlands to subalpine or alpine zones. In Poland, the species grow in different types of habitats, including xerothermic swards (Adonido-Brachypodietum, Brachypodio- Teucrietum, Thalictro-Salvietum, Seslerio- Scorzoneretum and decidous forests (Tilio- Carpinetum. Many species are popular ornamentals cultivated fro their esthetic value. Ranunculaceans vary remarkably in the phenology of blooming. Among them, there are early spring blooming species like Eranthis hyemalis, Ficaria verna, Isopyrum thalictroides, Anemone nemorosa, A. ranunculoides, and those that start to bloom in autumn, e.g. Aconitum carmichaelli. The overall flowering duration may differ significantly between years – for example, in Anemone sylvestris the disparities reached more than three weeks. The occurrence and the length of each blooming phase may vary considerably between sites, e.g. in Adonis vernalis 10-15-day dissimilarities in the occurrence of blooming stages were recorded. Additionally, the duration of the full blooming stage varied from 10 to 30 days. The diurnal pattern of blooming among Ranunculaceae members was proved to be highly species-specific. Flowers of Aquilegia vulgaris started opening at approx. 5.00 (GMT+2, which was 2-3 hours earlier than those of Adonis vernalis. Significant differences in the diurnal flowering dynamics can be found even in the same genus: flowers of Aconitum lycoctonum began opening at 5.00 (with the peak between 6.00-9.00, while flowers of Aconitum carmichaelii started opening at 8.00 and peaked between 11.00-13.00. The flowering abundance may differ among populations of the same species. The management type was found to have an impact on the individuals’ density of Adonis vernalis occurring in xerothermic grasslands. The control of shrub encashment has already been designated as the factor determining the flowering abundance of Adonis vernalis in

  8. Real Time & Power Efficient Adaptive - Robust Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioan Gliga, Lavinius; Constantin Mihai, Cosmin; Lupu, Ciprian; Popescu, Dumitru

    2017-01-01

    A design procedure for a control system suited for dynamic variable processes is presented in this paper. The proposed adaptive - robust control strategy considers both adaptive control advantages and robust control benefits. It estimates the degradation of the system’s performances due to the dynamic variation in the process and it then utilizes it to determine when the system must be adapted with a redesign of the robust controller. A single integral criterion is used for the identification of the process, and for the design of the control algorithm, which is expressed in direct form, through a cost function defined in the space of the parameters of both the process and the controller. For the minimization of this nonlinear function, an adequate mathematical programming minimization method is used. The theoretical approach presented in this paper was validated for a closed loop control system, simulated in an application developed in C. Because of the reduced number of operations, this method is suitable for implementation on fast processes. Due to its effectiveness, it increases the idle time of the CPU, thereby saving electrical energy.

  9. Discrete time learning control in nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longman, Richard W.; Chang, Chi-Kuang; Phan, Minh

    1992-01-01

    In this paper digital learning control methods are developed primarily for use in single-input, single-output nonlinear dynamic systems. Conditions for convergence of the basic form of learning control based on integral control concepts are given, and shown to be satisfied by a large class of nonlinear problems. It is shown that it is not the gross nonlinearities of the differential equations that matter in the convergence, but rather the much smaller nonlinearities that can manifest themselves during the short time interval of one sample time. New algorithms are developed that eliminate restrictions on the size of the learning gain, and on knowledge of the appropriate sign of the learning gain, for convergence to zero error in tracking a feasible desired output trajectory. It is shown that one of the new algorithms can give guaranteed convergence in the presence of actuator saturation constraints, and indicate when the requested trajectory is beyond the actuator capabilities.

  10. A 1235711 Petalled Flower

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-01

    This article contains very simple mathematics and a lot ofcreativity. Here, we will sketch a 3-dimensional flower-likestructure, not using complicated equations but geometric ideasinstead. The speciality of 1235711 will be mentioned. At firstwe will study a general situation in 3-dimensional space $\\mathbb{R}^{3}$ and then we will take up the flower as an example of the generalcase.

  11. Delayed Flowering in Bamboo: Evidence from Fargesia qinlingensis in the Qinling Mountains of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eWang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gregarious flowering of bamboo species impacts ecosystem properties and conservation, but documentation of these periodic events is difficult. Here, we compare the characteristics of flowering sites and un-flowered patches of an arrow bamboo (Fargesia qinlingensis in the Qinling Mountains, China, over a five-year period (2003-2007 after a mast flowering event (2003. We examined flowering culm and seedling characteristics in relation to questions regarding the evolution of delayed flowering. Density of live culms decreased over the five years in both flowering sites and un-flowered patches. New shoots regenerated only in un-flowered patches. Chemical constituent allocation varied among culm parts (stems, branches, and leaves. Crude protein and extract ether in branches and leaves were less in flowering culms than in un-flowered culms. Seedling density was lower than expected based on floret counts, suggesting predation of seeds. Seedling density was significantly greater in flowering sites than in un-flowered patches and decreased over time. Seedlings performed better in flowering sites than in un-flowered patches based on their height, leaf number per seedling, and average leaf length, while fertilization on flowering sites had no significant effect on seedling growth, suggesting a saturation of resources. This study suggested that the characteristics of bamboos and bamboo stands were dramatically altered during this flowering event, enhancing seedling establishment and growth, and supporting mostly the habitat modification hypothesis of delayed reproduction.

  12. Flower litters of alpine plants affect soil nitrogen and phosphorus rapidly in the eastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinniu; Xu, Bo; Wu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Shi, Fusun

    2016-10-01

    Litters of reproductive organs have rarely been studied despite their role in allocating nutrients for offspring reproduction. This study determines the mechanism through which flower litters efficiently increase the available soil nutrient pool. Field experiments were conducted to collect plant litters and calculate biomass production in an alpine meadow of the eastern Tibetan Plateau. C, N, P, lignin, cellulose content, and their relevant ratios of litters were analyzed to identify their decomposition features. A pot experiment was performed to determine the effects of litter addition on the soil nutrition pool by comparing the treated and control samples. The litter-bag method was used to verify decomposition rates. The flower litters of phanerophyte plants were comparable with non-flower litters. Biomass partitioning of other herbaceous species accounted for 10-40 % of the aboveground biomass. Flower litter possessed significantly higher N and P levels but less C / N, N / P, lignin / N, and lignin and cellulose concentrations than leaf litter. The litter-bag experiment confirmed that the flower litters of Rhododendron przewalskii and Meconopsis integrifolia decompose approximately 3 times faster than mixed litters within 50 days. Pot experiment findings indicated that flower litter addition significantly increased the available nutrient pool and soil microbial productivity. The time of litter fall significantly influenced soil available N and P, and soil microbial biomass. Flower litters fed the soil nutrition pool and influenced nutrition cycling in alpine ecosystems more efficiently because of their non-ignorable production, faster decomposition rate, and higher nutrient contents compared with non-flower litters. The underlying mechanism can enrich nutrients, which return to the soil, and non-structural carbohydrates, which feed and enhance the transitions of soil microorganisms.

  13. RECONFIGURABLE CONTROL SYSTEM WITH DISCRETE-TIME CONTROLLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Strizhnev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a synthesis problem for automatic control systems, which operate in various modes, for example, tracking step-wise effects and slowly changing input signals. Generally, one controller cannot ensure the required qualitative characteristics in all operational modes. One of the methods to solve this problem is to create a reconfigurable control system. The authors propose a reconfigurable control system with two discrete-time controllers. The first one is placed in series with the forward path and the second one is connected in parallel with the reverse path having additional gain and unity feedback. Such system structure is characterized by its simplicity and qualitative operational ability to track step-wise and sinusoidal inputs with different amplitudes.The paper presents a developed block diagram of the reconfigurable system and describes its operational principle. Three various plants have been chosen with the purpose to check the operation of the system. Digital controllers have been selected and their parameters have been determined in accordance with the requirements to qualitative operational characteristics of the system. Mathematical modeling has been executed in order to check the operation of the proposed system with various plants and digital controllers. The modeling confirms good –speed performance of the automatic control system while tracking stepwise signals, provision of minimum dynamic error for the given controllers and time delay while tracking harmonic signals with various amplitudes. The obtained results have been successfully tested and can be used for development of automatic control systems that contain other plants and digital controllers, if there are various and occasionally contradictory requirements to their operational quality. 

  14. Developing a method for customized induction of flowering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macknight Richard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to induce flowering on demand is of significant biotechnological interest. FT protein has been recently identified as an important component of the mobile flowering hormone, florigen, whose function is conserved across the plant kingdom. We therefore focused on manipulation of both endogenous and heterologous FT genes to develop a floral induction system where flowering would be inhibited until it was induced on demand. The concept was tested in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis. Results Our starting point was plants with strongly delayed flowering due to silencing of FT with an artificial microRNA directed at FT (amiR-FT 1. First, we showed that constitutive expression of a heterologous FT gene (FTa1, from the model legume Medicago truncatula, (Medicago was able to rescue the amiR-FT late-flowering phenotype. In order to induce flowering in a controlled way, the FTa1 gene was then expressed under the control of an alcohol-inducible promoter in the late flowering amiR-FT plants. Upon exposure to ethanol, FTa1 was rapidly up regulated and this resulted in the synchronous induction of flowering. Conclusions We have thus demonstrated a controlled-inducible flowering system using a novel combination of endogenous and heterologous FT genes. The universal florigenic nature of FT suggests that this type of system should be applicable to crops of economic value where flowering control is desirable.

  15. PEP-II injection timing and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Browne, M.; Crane, M.; Gromme, T.; Himel, T.; Ross, M.; Stanek, M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ronan, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Hardware has been built and software written and incorporated in the existing SLC accelerator control system to control injection of beam pulses from the accelerator into the PEP-II storage rings currently under construction. Hardware includes a CAMAC module to delay the machine timing fiducial in order that a beam pulse extracted from a damping ring will be injected into a selected group of four 476 MHz buckets in a PEP-II ring. Further timing control is accomplished by shifting the phase of the bunches stored in the damping rings before extraction while leaving the phase of the PEP-II stored beam unchanged. The software which drives timing devices on a pulse-to-pulse basis relies on a dedicated communication link on which one scheduling microprocessor broadcasts a 128-bit message to all distributed control microprocessors at 360 Hz. PEP-II injection will be driven by the scheduling microprocessor according to lists specifying bucket numbers in arbitrary order, and according to scheduling constraints maximizing the useful beam delivered to the SLC collider currently in operation. These lists will be generated by a microprocessor monitoring the current stored per bucket in each of the PEP-II rings.

  16. Strawberry homologue of terminal flower1 integrates photoperiod and temperature signals to inhibit flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Marja; Kurokura, Takeshi; Jiang, Panpan; Mouhu, Katriina; Hytönen, Timo

    2015-04-01

    Photoperiod and temperature are major environmental signals affecting flowering in plants. Although molecular pathways mediating these signals have been well characterized in the annual model plant Arabidopsis, much less information is known in perennials. Many perennials including the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.) are induced to flower in response to decreasing photoperiod and temperature in autumn and they flower following spring. We showed earlier that, in contrast with Arabidopsis, the photoperiodic induction of flowering in strawberry occurs in short days (SD) when the decrease in FvFT1 (flowering locus T) and FvSOC1 (suppressor of the overexpression of constans1) expression leads to lower mRNA levels of the floral repressor, FvTFL1 (terminal flower1). By using transgenic lines and gene expression analyses, we show evidence that the temperature-mediated changes in the FvTFL1 mRNA expression set critical temperature limits for the photoperiodic flowering in strawberry. At temperatures below 13 °C, low expression level of FvTFL1 in both SD and long days (LD) allows flower induction to occur independently of the photoperiod. Rising temperature gradually increases FvTFL1 mRNA levels under LD, and at temperatures above 13 °C, SD is required for the flower induction that depends on the deactivation of FvSOC1 and FvTFL1. However, an unknown transcriptional activator, which functions independently of FvSOC1, enhances the expression of FvTFL1 at 23 °C preventing photoperiodic flowering. We suggest that the observed effect of the photoperiod × temperature interaction on FvTFL1 mRNA expression may allow strawberry to induce flowers in correct time in different climates.

  17. Developmental morphology of branching flowers in Nymphaea prolifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Valentin; Moline, Philip; Pfeifer, Evelin; Novelo, Alejandro R; Rutishauser, Rolf

    2006-11-01

    Nymphaea and Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae) share an extra-axillary mode of floral inception in the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Some leaf sites along the ontogenetic spiral are occupied by floral primordia lacking a subtending bract. This pattern of flower initiation in leaf sites is repeated inside branching flowers of Nymphaea prolifera (Central and South America). Instead of fertile flowers this species usually produces sterile tuberiferous flowers that act as vegetative propagules. N. prolifera changes the meristem identity from reproductive to vegetative or vice versa repeatedly. Each branching flower first produces some perianth-like leaves, then it switches back to the vegetative meristem identity of the SAM with the formation of foliage leaves and another set of branching flowers. This process is repeated up to three times giving rise to more than 100 vegetative propagules. The developmental morphology of the branching flowers of N. prolifera is described using both microtome sections and scanning electron microscopy.

  18. Molecular mapping and characterization of genes governing time to flowering, seed weight, and plant height in an intraspecific genetic linkage map of chickpea (Cicer arietinum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalabadi, Javad Ghorbani; Saidi, Abbas; Karami, Ezzat; Kharkesh, Mehrab; Talebi, Reza

    2013-06-01

    Drought is the major constraint to chickpea productivity worldwide. Utilizing early flowering genotypes and larger seed size have been suggested as strategies for breeding in drought zones. Therefore, this study aimed to identify potential markers linked to days-to-flowering, 100-seed weight, and plant height in a chickpea intraspecific F(2:3) population derived from the cross ILC3279 × ICCV2. A closely linked marker (TA117) on linkage group LG3 was identified for the days-to-flowering trait, explaining 33% of the variation. In relation to plant height, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) was located in LG3, close to the Ts5 marker, that explained 29% of phenotypic variation. A QTL for 100-seed weight located in LG4, close to TA176, explained 51% of variation. The identification of a locus linked both to high 100-seed weight and days-to-flowering may account for the correlation observed between these traits in this and other breeding attempts.

  19. The CMS Timing Control and Distribution System

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075794; Andre, Jean-marc Olivier; Behrens, Ulf; Branson, James; Chaze, Olivier; Cittolin, Sergio; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Deldicque, Christian; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dobson, Marc; Erhan, Samim; Fulcher, Jonathan Richard; Gigi, Dominique; Glege, Frank; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Hansen, Magnus; Holzner, Andre Georg; Jimenez Estupinan, Raul; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Franciscus; Meschi, Emilio; Mommsen, Remigius; Morovic, Srecko; O'Dell, Vivian; Orsini, Luciano; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Pieri, Marco; Racz, Attila; Sakulin, Hannes; Schwick, Christoph; Simelevicius, Dainius; Troska, Jan; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Zejdl, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment operating at the CERN (European Laboratory for Nuclear Physics) Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is in the process of upgrading several of its detector systems. Adding more individual detector components brings the need to test and commission those components separately from existing ones so as not to compromise physics data-taking. The CMS Trigger, Timing and Control (TTC) system had reached its limits in terms of the number of separate elements (partitions) that could be supported. A new Timing and Control Distribution System (TCDS) has been designed, built and commissioned in order to overcome this limit. It also brings additional functionality to facilitate parallel commissioning of new detector elements. We describe the new TCDS system and its components and show results from the first operational experience with the TCDS system in CMS.

  20. Development and characterization of local anti-inflammatory implantation for the controlled release of the hexane extract of the flower-heads of Euryops pectinatus L. (Cass.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesseem, D I; Michel, C G

    2011-04-01

    A hexane extract of the flower-heads of Euryops pectinatus L. (Cass.) was formulated into local anti-inflammatory implantation patches with controlled release. Cross-linked sodium hyaluronate patches (F1-F3) and chitosan patches (F4-F6) were prepared by a casting/solvent evaporation technique. Morphological and mechanical characterizations including the components ratio, surfactant and the loaded amount of the hexane extract (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg b.wt.) were investigated. Release studies were performed during 24 h using a diffusion cell. Films with optimum in vitro release rate have been investigated for testing the anti-inflammatory activity and the sustaining effect of the formulations. The sustained anti-inflammatory effect of the hexane extract of E. pectinatus flower-heads from the selected films was studied by inducing paw edema in rats with 1% (w/v) carrageenan solution. The results indicated the compatibility of hexane extract with both sodium hyaluronate and chitosan patches forming yellowish transparent films. Based on variations in drug release profiles throughout the 24-h among the formulations (F1-F6) studies, F3 and F6 were selected for further investigation. When the films were applied 1 h before the subplantar injection of carrageenan in the hind paw of male Albino rats, formulation (F3) provided its maximum inhibition of paw edema in rats (91.3%) 4 h after edema induction whereas, formulation (F6) showed less inhibition after 4 h (70.6%). The previous two formulations (F3 and F6) produced potent results (95.3 and 89.5%, respectively) after 24 h when compared with a local market preparation containing 25% β-sitosterol used as positive control. Histophathological investigation was conducted for 1, 4, and 12 weeks to study the tissue response for the two formulations (F3 and F6) at the implantation site. Chemical investigation of the hexane extract was achieved for both unsaponifiable matter (USM) and fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) using gas

  1. Effects of Planting Date, Time and Methods of Weed Control on Weed Density and Biomass in Cumin Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ghorbani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two field experiments were carried out in order to evaluate the effect of planting date, method and date of weed control on weed density and biomass in the experimental research field, Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, during 2006 and 2007. Treatments included planting date (30 December, 20 January and 30 February, weeding date (first true leaf, start of branching and beginning of flowering stages and weed control methods (hand weeding, fire treatment and control. The results showed that there were significant differences in the number of weeds between different sowing dates, weeding dates and control methods. The highest mean density and biomass of weeds were obtained on the planting date, 30 February, and when weed was controlled at the first leaf appearance stage with fire treatment. The most appropriate time for weed control was at the beginning of cumin flowering. Fire treatment reduced weed growth in the first half of growing season. However, hand weeding significantly reduced weed density and biomass in the second half of cumin growing season. The first planting date caused the lowest mean weed biomass and the highest cumin yield compared to later planting dates. Hand weeding treatment contained lower mean weed density and biomass compared to fire treatment, however, cumin yield was lower in hand weeding plots than fire treatment. Keywords: Cultural control, Cuminum cyminum, Fire, Hand weeding, Control time

  2. Field experiments of Anopheles gambiae attraction to local fruits/seedpods and flowering plants in Mali to optimize strategies for malaria vector control in Africa using attractive toxic sugar bait methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bah Sekou

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on recent studies in Israel demonstrating that attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB methods can be used to decimate local anopheline and culicine mosquito populations, an important consideration is whether the same methods can be adapted and improved to attract and kill malaria vectors in Africa. The ATSB approach uses fruit or flower scent as an attractant, sugar solution as a feeding stimulant, and an oral toxin. The ATSB solutions are either sprayed on vegetation or suspended in simple bait stations, and the mosquitoes ingesting the toxic solutions are killed. As such, this approach targets sugar-feeding female and male mosquitoes. This study examines the attractiveness of African malaria vectors to local fruits/seedpods and flowering plants, key biological elements of the ATSB approach for mosquito control. Methods Three field experiments were conducted at sites in Mali. The attraction of Anopheles gambiae s.l. to 26 different local fruits and seedpods was determined at a site in the semi-arid Bandiagara District of Mali. Wire mesh glue traps with fruits/seedpods suspended on skewers inside were set along a seasonal lagoon. Seven replicates of each fruit/seedpod species were tested, with a water-soaked sponge and a sugar-soaked sponge as controls. The attraction of An. gambiae s.l. to 26 different types of flowering plants was determined at a site near Mopti in Mali. The flowering plants held in a water-filled buried container were tested using the same glue traps, with controls including water only and sugar solution. Six replicates of each selected plant type were tested on transects between rice paddies. Additional studies using CDC light traps were done to determine the relative densities and periodicity of An. gambiae s.l. attraction to branches of the most highly attractive flowering plant, branches without flowers, human odor, and candescent light. Results Of the 26 fruits and seedpods tested, 6 were attractive

  3. Field experiments of Anopheles gambiae attraction to local fruits/seedpods and flowering plants in Mali to optimize strategies for malaria vector control in Africa using attractive toxic sugar bait methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Günter C; Beier, John C; Traore, Sekou F; Toure, Mahamoudou B; Traore, Mohamed M; Bah, Sekou; Doumbia, Seydou; Schlein, Yosef

    2010-09-20

    Based on recent studies in Israel demonstrating that attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) methods can be used to decimate local anopheline and culicine mosquito populations, an important consideration is whether the same methods can be adapted and improved to attract and kill malaria vectors in Africa. The ATSB approach uses fruit or flower scent as an attractant, sugar solution as a feeding stimulant, and an oral toxin. The ATSB solutions are either sprayed on vegetation or suspended in simple bait stations, and the mosquitoes ingesting the toxic solutions are killed. As such, this approach targets sugar-feeding female and male mosquitoes. This study examines the attractiveness of African malaria vectors to local fruits/seedpods and flowering plants, key biological elements of the ATSB approach for mosquito control. Three field experiments were conducted at sites in Mali. The attraction of Anopheles gambiae s.l. to 26 different local fruits and seedpods was determined at a site in the semi-arid Bandiagara District of Mali. Wire mesh glue traps with fruits/seedpods suspended on skewers inside were set along a seasonal lagoon. Seven replicates of each fruit/seedpod species were tested, with a water-soaked sponge and a sugar-soaked sponge as controls. The attraction of An. gambiae s.l. to 26 different types of flowering plants was determined at a site near Mopti in Mali. The flowering plants held in a water-filled buried container were tested using the same glue traps, with controls including water only and sugar solution. Six replicates of each selected plant type were tested on transects between rice paddies. Additional studies using CDC light traps were done to determine the relative densities and periodicity of An. gambiae s.l. attraction to branches of the most highly attractive flowering plant, branches without flowers, human odor, and candescent light. Of the 26 fruits and seedpods tested, 6 were attractive to An. gambiae s.l. females and males, respectively

  4. Changes of flowering phenology and flower size in rosaceous plants from a biodiversity hotspot in the past century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Jia, Dong-Rui; Tian, Bin; Yang, Yong-Ping; Duan, Yuan-Wen

    2016-06-17

    Responses of plant traits to climate changes are complex, which could be mirrored by the investigations of herbarium specimens. By examining specimens of Rosa and Cotoneaster species collected since 1920s in Hengduan Mountains, we analyzed the changes of flowering phenology and flower size in the past century when climate changes were considered to be intensified. We found that flowering phenology of Rosa showed no significant change, but flowering phenology of Cotoneaster was delayed in recent years. Flower size of Rosa species showed a marginally significant decrease over the past century. The results suggested that responses of flowering time to global changes and pollinator mediated selection on floral traits might be more complex than what were expected. Our results indicated that future researches based on investigations of herbarium specimens should be carried out on multiple plant species with different flower structures and life histories to better understand the effects of climate changes on plant traits.

  5. Kaempferol glycosides in the flowers of carnation and their contribution to the creamy white flower color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashina, Tsukasa; Yamaguchi, Masa-atsu; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Onozaki, Takashi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kawanobu, Shuji; Onoe, Hiroshi; Okamura, Masachika

    2010-12-01

    Three flavonol glycosides were isolated from the flowers of carnation cultivars 'White Wink' and 'Honey Moon'. They were identified from their UV, MS, 1H and 13C NMR spectra as kaempferol 3-O-neohesperidoside, kaempferol 3-O-sophoroside and kaempferol 3-O-glucosyl-(1 --> 2)-[rhamnosyl-(1 --> 6)-glucoside]. Referring to previous reports, flavonols occurring in carnation flowers are characterized as kaempferol 3-O-glucosides with additional sugars binding at the 2 and/or 6-positions of the glucose. The kaempferol glycoside contents of a nearly pure white flower and some creamy white flower lines were compared. Although the major glycoside was different in each line, the total kaempferol contents of the creamy white lines were from 5.9 to 20.9 times higher than the pure white line. Thus, in carnations, kaempferol glycosides surely contribute to the creamy tone of white flowers.

  6. What flowers do we like? The influence of shape and color on the rating of flower beauty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hůla, Martin; Flegr, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    There is no doubt that people find flowers beautiful. Surprisingly, we know very little about the actual properties which make flowers so appealing to humans. Although the evolutionary aesthetics provides some theories concerning generally preferred flower traits, empirical evidence is largely missing. In this study, we used an online survey in which residents of the Czech Republic (n = 2006) rated the perceived beauty of 52 flower stimuli of diverse shapes and colors. Colored flowers were preferred over their uncolored versions. When controlling for flower shape, we found an unequal preference for different flower colors, blue being the most and yellow the least preferred. In the overall assessment of beauty, shape was more important than color. Prototypical flowers, i.e., radially symmetrical flowers with low complexity, were rated as the most beautiful. We also found a positive effect of sharp flower contours and blue color on the overall rating of flower beauty. The results may serve as a basis for further studies in some areas of the people-plant interaction research.

  7. What flowers do we like? The influence of shape and color on the rating of flower beauty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hůla

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that people find flowers beautiful. Surprisingly, we know very little about the actual properties which make flowers so appealing to humans. Although the evolutionary aesthetics provides some theories concerning generally preferred flower traits, empirical evidence is largely missing. In this study, we used an online survey in which residents of the Czech Republic (n = 2006 rated the perceived beauty of 52 flower stimuli of diverse shapes and colors. Colored flowers were preferred over their uncolored versions. When controlling for flower shape, we found an unequal preference for different flower colors, blue being the most and yellow the least preferred. In the overall assessment of beauty, shape was more important than color. Prototypical flowers, i.e., radially symmetrical flowers with low complexity, were rated as the most beautiful. We also found a positive effect of sharp flower contours and blue color on the overall rating of flower beauty. The results may serve as a basis for further studies in some areas of the people-plant interaction research.

  8. THE USE OF A FLOWERING STABILITY INDEX FOR BIOCUMATIC RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. BASSI

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Finlay and Wilkinson analysis was used to study the stability, over 21 years. of the beginning of flowering of 53 species. This approach allows to study the behaviour of a siegle species in respect to the average behaviour of all species. Twenty-one out of 25 docile species are sensitive, while the remaining 4 are docile (their beginning of flowering time was relatively constant. The 28 recalcitrant species are characterized by unpredictability in Lbe beginning of flowering time.

  9. Quantitative Trait Loci for Salinity Tolerance Identified under Drained and Waterlogged Conditions and Their Association with Flowering Time in Barley (Hordeum vulgare. L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Ma

    Full Text Available Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting crop production via adverse effects of osmotic stress, specific ion toxicity, and stress-related nutritional disorders. Detrimental effects of salinity are also often exacerbated by low oxygen availability when plants are grown under waterlogged conditions. Developing salinity-tolerant varieties is critical to overcome these problems, and molecular marker assisted selection can make breeding programs more effective.In this study, a double haploid (DH population consisting of 175 lines, derived from a cross between a Chinese barley variety Yangsimai 1 (YSM1 and an Australian malting barley variety Gairdner, was used to construct a high density molecular map which contained more than 8,000 Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT markers and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers. Salinity tolerance of parental and DH lines was evaluated under drained (SalinityD and waterlogged (SalinityW conditions at two different sowing times.Three quantitative trait loci (QTL located on chromosome 1H, single QTL located on chromosomes 1H, 2H, 4H, 5H and 7H, were identified to be responsible for salinity tolerance under different environments. Waterlogging stress, daylight length and temperature showed significant effects on barley salinity tolerance. The QTL for salinity tolerance mapped on chromosomes 4H and 7H, QSlwd.YG.4H, QSlwd.YG.7H and QSlww.YG.7H were only identified in winter trials, while the QTL on chromosome 2H QSlsd.YG.2H and QSlsw.YG.2H were only detected in summer trials. Genes associated with flowering time were found to pose significant effects on the salinity QTL mapped on chromosomes 2H and 5H in summer trials. Given the fact that the QTL for salinity tolerance QSlsd.YG.1H and QSlww.YG.1H-1 reported here have never been considered in the literature, this warrants further investigation and evaluation for suitability to be used in breeding programs.

  10. Exercising for metabolic control: is timing important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhi, Jonida; Scotto di Palumbo, Alessandro; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus are leading causes of mortality in the world and both disorders are closely related to the postprandial phenomena. Regular exercise is being strongly advocated as a precious tool in easing the global burden of chronic disease. Although exercise intensity, duration and frequency are well established in current guidelines for healthy and diabetic individuals, there is still no consensus on the optimal timing of exercise in relation to the last meal. The present paper reviews the existing literature on the 'when?' of aerobic exercise for metabolic control in healthy and diabetic individuals. Effective control of postprandial phenomena might prove to be a useful tool in the prevention of chronic disease. Exercise appears to influence glycemic and triglyceridemic responses differently depending on the meal composition and time lapse from meals. In healthy individuals, fasted-state exercise favors postprandial triglyceridemic control and the insulin sensitivity related to it. However, there is a lack of data on this matter in diabetic patients. On the other hand, when postprandial glycemia is of concern, aerobic exercise works better when performed after a meal, both in healthy and in diabetic patients.

  11. Effect of Various Management Methods of Apical Flower Bud on Cut Flower Quality in Three Cultivars of Greenhouse Roses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mansour matloobi

    2017-02-01

    , it was determined in Rosa hybrida ‘Fire and Ice’ that the rate of increase in stem length was about two times more than that in ‘Kardinal’ cultivar when both compared to control cultivar. These differences may have genetic and/or environmental origins. Methods of stem treatment significantly affected some shoot characteristics such as bud burst time, number and weight of growing shoots on bent stems and flower diameter, but no significant effect was observed on most important marketable traits. However, this factor interacted significantly with cultivar in some characteristics such as time of bud burst and the number of growing shoots on bent stems, showing that similar stem treatments can cause different results in different cultivars. Methods of stem treatment unexpectedly did not change the stem marketable qualities such as stem length and diameter, while it significantly altered time of bud burst, flower diameter and weight of shoot sprouts on bent stems. The most interesting result was that time of bud burst decreased from about 10 days in the immediate stem bending with intact bud to about 5 days in the treatment containing bending practice two weeks after the flower bud removal. This feature can be valuable, since it can decrease time of shoot growth and harvest time, thereby increasing stem production per time scale. The highest weight of shoot sprouts on bent stems obtained when bud removal performed at bending time, indicating that this phenomenon occurs as a consequence of apical dominance removal. Growers can adjust leaf area per plant by controlling the rate of bud growth with or without the number of bud sprouts on the bent stems through implementing different flower shoot management systems. It was reported in many studies that altering stem position, removing flower bud, defoliating and practicing similar activities can change hormone and carbohydrate balance inside the plant, which, in turn, may lead to new shape of plant canopy with

  12. The evolutionary root of flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goremykin, Vadim V; Nikiforova, Svetlana V; Biggs, Patrick J; Zhong, Bojian; Delange, Peter; Martin, William; Woetzel, Stefan; Atherton, Robin A; McLenachan, Patricia A; Lockhart, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Correct rooting of the angiosperm radiation is both challenging and necessary for understanding the origins and evolution of physiological and phenotypic traits in flowering plants. The problem is known to be difficult due to the large genetic distance separating flowering plants from other seed plants and the sparse taxon sampling among basal angiosperms. Here, we provide further evidence for concern over substitution model misspecification in analyses of chloroplast DNA sequences. We show that support for Amborella as the sole representative of the most basal angiosperm lineage is founded on sequence site patterns poorly described by time-reversible substitution models. Improving the fit between sequence data and substitution model identifies Trithuria, Nymphaeaceae, and Amborella as surviving relatives of the most basal lineage of flowering plants. This finding indicates that aquatic and herbaceous species dominate the earliest extant lineage of flowering plants. [; ; ; ; ; .].

  13. Hibiscus and Wild Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    Woodcut artist Zheng Shuang convinces the audience through her display of poetic emotion Benefiting from training in watercoior paintings early in life, strict literary sketch training as well, as 10 years study at the Central Academy of Fine Aris, Zheng has mare than 30 years teaching experience at the Ouangzhou Academy of Fine Aris "I"m a roadside grass, a wild flower," Zheng Shuang describes herself She said she often talks to nature-the mountains, the trees, the flowers and the

  14. Stars and Flowers, Flowers and Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minti, Hari

    2012-12-01

    The author, a graduated from the Bucharest University (1964), actually living and working in Israel, concerns his book to variable stars and flowers, two domains of his interest. The analogies includes double stars, eclipsing double stars, eclipses, Big Bang. The book contains 34 chapters, each of which concerns various relations between astronomy and other sciences and pseudosciences such as Psychology, Religion, Geology, Computers and Astrology (to which the author is not an adherent). A special part of the book is dedicated to archeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, as well as to history of astronomy. Between the main points of interest of these parts: ancient sanctuaries in Sarmizegetusa (Dacia), Stone Henge(UK) and other. The last chapter of the book is dedicated to flowers. The book is richly illustrated. It is designed for a wide circle of readers.

  15. Towards real time speckle controlled retinal photocoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliedtner, Katharina; Seifert, Eric; Stockmann, Leoni; Effe, Lisa; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Photocoagulation is a laser treatment widely used for the therapy of several retinal diseases. Intra- and inter-individual variations of the ocular transmission, light scattering and the retinal absorption makes it impossible to achieve a uniform effective exposure and hence a uniform damage throughout the therapy. A real-time monitoring and control of the induced damage is highly requested. Here, an approach to realize a real time optical feedback using dynamic speckle analysis is presented. A 532 nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser is used for coagulation. During coagulation, speckle dynamics are monitored by a coherent object illumination using a 633nm HeNe laser and analyzed by a CMOS camera with a frame rate up to 1 kHz. It is obvious that a control system needs to determine whether the desired damage is achieved to shut down the system in a fraction of the exposure time. Here we use a fast and simple adaption of the generalized difference algorithm to analyze the speckle movements. This algorithm runs on a FPGA and is able to calculate a feedback value which is correlated to the thermal and coagulation induced tissue motion and thus the achieved damage. For different spot sizes (50-200 μm) and different exposure times (50-500 ms) the algorithm shows the ability to discriminate between different categories of retinal pigment epithelial damage ex-vivo in enucleated porcine eyes. Furthermore in-vivo experiments in rabbits show the ability of the system to determine tissue changes in living tissue during coagulation.

  16. Bamboo Flowering from the Perspective of Comparative Genomics and Transcriptomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Prasun; Chakraborty, Sukanya; Dutta, Smritikana; Pal, Amita; Das, Malay

    2016-01-01

    Bamboos are an important member of the subfamily Bambusoideae, family Poaceae. The plant group exhibits wide variation with respect to the timing (1-120 years) and nature (sporadic vs. gregarious) of flowering among species. Usually flowering in woody bamboos is synchronous across culms growing over a large area, known as gregarious flowering. In many monocarpic bamboos this is followed by mass death and seed setting. While in sporadic flowering an isolated wild clump may flower, set little or no seed and remain alive. Such wide variation in flowering time and extent means that the plant group serves as repositories for genes and expression patterns that are unique to bamboo. Due to the dearth of available genomic and transcriptomic resources, limited studies have been undertaken to identify the potential molecular players in bamboo flowering. The public release of the first bamboo genome sequence Phyllostachys heterocycla, availability of related genomes Brachypodium distachyon and Oryza sativa provide us the opportunity to study this long-standing biological problem in a comparative and functional genomics framework. We identified bamboo genes homologous to those of Oryza and Brachypodium that are involved in established pathways such as vernalization, photoperiod, autonomous, and hormonal regulation of flowering. Additionally, we investigated triggers like stress (drought), physiological maturity and micro RNAs that may play crucial roles in flowering. We also analyzed available transcriptome datasets of different bamboo species to identify genes and their involvement in bamboo flowering. Finally, we summarize potential research hurdles that need to be addressed in future research.

  17. Flowering as a condition for xylem expansion in Arabidopsis hypocotyl and root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibout, Richard; Plantegenet, Stéphanie; Hardtke, Christian S

    2008-03-25

    In dicotyledons, biomass predominantly represents cell-wall material of xylem, which is formed during the genetically poorly characterized secondary growth of the vasculature. In Arabidopsis hypocotyls, initially proportional secondary growth of all tissues is followed by a phase of xylem expansion and fiber differentiation. The factors that control this transition are unknown. We observed natural variation in Arabidopsis hypocotyl secondary growth and its coordination with root secondary growth. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population demonstrated separate genetic control of developmentally synchronized secondary-growth parameters. However, major QTL for xylem expansion and fiber differentiation correlated tightly and coincided with major flowering time QTL. Correlation between xylem expansion and flowering was confirmed in another RIL population and also found across Arabidopsis accessions. Gene-expression analyses suggest that xylem expansion is initiated after flowering induction but before inflorescence emergence. Consistent with this idea, transient activation of an inducer of flowering at the rosette stage promoted xylem expansion. Although the shoot was needed to trigger xylem expansion and can control it in a graft-transmissible fashion, the inflorescence stem was not required to sustain it. Collectively, our results suggest that flowering induction is the condition for xylem expansion in hypocotyl and root secondary growth.

  18. The Study of Controlling the Bacterial Growth in the Cut Stem Rose (Rosa Hybrida L.‘Dolce Vita’ Flowers with Preservative Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Oraee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the economic importance of longevity of cut flowers, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of nano-silver, silver thiosulfate, hydroxyl quinoline and a natural compound, thymol, on vase life and number of bacteria in cut stem ends of Rose flowers cv. Dolce vita. Cut flowers were transferred to laboratory at 22 ± 1ºC temperature and 60 ± 5% relative humidity. Cut flowers were pulse-treated with 2.5, 5 and 10 mg L-1 nano-silver, 0.5,1 and 2 mM silver thiosulfate, 50, 100 and 200 mg L-1 hydroxy quinoline and 50, 100, 200 mg L-1 thymol with 5% sucrose. Experiment was conducted in a completely randomized design with 8 replications and one flower in each experimental unit. Based on the results, all of the treatments showed positive effects on the vase life of flowers and number of bacteria in cut stem ends during the vase period, and no bacteria were found in 5 and 10 mg L-1 SNP treatments. The nano-silver (5 and 10 mg L-1 treatments showed the greatest mean longevity (19 days. Considering the results and economical and functional aspects of the tested materials, nano-silver treatment can be used for increasing the vase life of ‘Dolce vita’rose.

  19. Identification of regulatory genes implicated in continuous flowering of longan (Dimocarpus longan L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianqi Jia

    Full Text Available Longan (Dimocarpus longan L. is a tropical/subtropical fruit tree of significant economic importance in Southeast Asia. However, a lack of transcriptomic and genomic information hinders research on longan traits, such as the control of flowering. In this study, high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq was used to investigate differentially expressed genes between a unique longan cultivar 'Sijimi'(S which flowers throughout the year and a more typical cultivar 'Lidongben'(L which flowers only once in the season, with the aim of identifying candidate genes associated with continuous flowering. 36,527 and 40,982 unigenes were obtained by de novo assembly of the clean reads from cDNA libraries of L and S cultivars. Additionally 40,513 unigenes were assembled from combined reads of these libraries. A total of 32,475 unigenes were annotated by BLAST search to NCBI non-redundant protein (NR, Swiss-Prot, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG databases. Of these, almost fifteen thousand unigenes were identified as significantly differentially expressed genes (DEGs by using Reads Per kb per Million reads (RPKM method. A total of 6,415 DEGs were mapped to 128 KEGG pathways, and 8,743 DEGs were assigned to 54 Gene Ontology categories. After blasting the DEGs to public sequence databases, 539 potential flowering-related DEGs were identified. In addition, 107 flowering-time genes were identified in longan, their expression levels between two longan samples were compared by RPKM method, of which the expression levels of 15 were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Our results suggest longan homologues of SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP, GIGANTEA (GI, F-BOX 1 (FKF1 and EARLY FLOWERING 4 (ELF4 may be involved this flowering trait and ELF4 may be a key gene. The identification of candidate genes related to continuous flowering will provide new insight into the molecular process of regulating flowering time in woody

  20. Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    2005-09-27

    Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the

  1. Goethe and the ABC model of flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coen, E

    2001-06-01

    About 10 years ago, the ABC model for the genetic control of flower development was proposed. This model was initially based on the analysis of mutant flowers but has subsequently been confirmed by molecular analysis. This paper describes the 200-year history behind this model, from the late 18th century when Goethe arrived at his idea of plant metamorphosis, to the genetic studies on flower mutants carried out on Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum in the late 20th century.

  2. My favourite flowering image: the role of cytokinin as a flowering signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Georges

    2013-12-01

    My favourite flowering image shows a section in a shoot apical meristem of Sinapis alba undertaking the very first step of its transition to flowering. This step is the activation of the SaSOC1 gene, the Sinapis orthologue of Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO1 (SOC1), in a few central cells of the meristem. Hidden behind this picture is my long quest of physiological signals controlling flowering. Milestones of this story are briefly recounted here and this gives me an opportunity to raise a number of questions about the nature and function of florigen.

  3. Effect of Flower Removal on Senescence and Metabolism of Faba Bean (Vicia Faba L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaMingzhong

    1999-01-01

    In pot experiments of Xichang,China,during 1989-1994,visual scnescence symptoms and associated changes in constituent contents and activities of leaves of faba bean(Vicia faba L.)were compared in respones to flower removal.the leaves from upper, middle and lower positions were sampled six times during reproductive development phase.At 70 DAP flower removal had caused 37%-189% and 82%-197% increase of green leaf area and green leaf dry weight per plant respectively.Flower removal led to a significant increase in the chlorophyll,soluble surar and protein contents and the catalase activity.The leaf cell relative electroconductivity of those plants was maintained at a lower level,relative to the control,during the late growing stage.These results certainly implied that the leaves of flower removal plants were still fully functional at a very late growing stage,consequently the plants increased many new branches per plant.

  4. Interarticulator timing control during inspiratory phonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Manwa L; Chen, Yang; Wong, Stephen; Xue, Steve

    2011-05-01

    The ability of Cantonese speakers in producing aspirated and unaspirated stops and stops at different places of articulation using expiratory phonation (EP) and inspiratory phonation (IP) was compared. Interarticulator timing during stop production using EP and IP was examined. Voice onset time (VOT) associated with EP and IP stops was compared with stop identification scores by naïve listeners. Aspirated and unaspirated voiceless stops (/p(h), t(h), k(h), p, t, k/) followed by the vowel /a/ were produced by 15 male and 15 female Cantonese speakers using EP and IP. VOT values were measured and isolated speech samples of stop productions were identified by 10 naïve listeners. Percent correct identification of stops was obtained from the 10 listeners. Perceptual data showed that production of IP stops were associated with reduced accuracy in stop identification, with predominant errors in aspiration perception. Acoustic analysis showed that IP stops were generally produced with significantly shorter VOT than their EP counterparts. In addition, effect of place of articulation on VOT was also found for both IP and EP stops, notably with velar stops being associated with significantly longer VOT values than bilabial and alveolar stops. The findings that IP stops were produced with shorter VOT as compared with EP stops imply that the articulatory-phonatory coordination during IP was not the same as that during EP, causing a discrepancy in the timing control between articulators. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Insecticide Resistance in the Western Flower Thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sten Erik

    The western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) is a serious pest on a wide range of crops throughout the world. In Denmark F. occidentalis is a pest in greenhouses. F. occidentalis is difficult to control with insecticides because of its thigmokinetic behaviour and resistance...... to insecticides. Since F. occidentulis spread to become a worldwide pest in 1980’es, resistance to a number of different insecticides has been shown in many populations of F. occidentalis. This flower thrips has the potential of fast development of resistance owing to the short generation time, high fecundity......, and a haplodiploid breeding system. Although resistance in F. occidentalis is a common problem, the underlying mechanisms conferring resistance have only been studied on a few populations. A purpose of this study was to gain more knowledge about possible resistance mechanisms in F. occidentulis and, furthermore...

  6. MAF2 Is Regulated by Temperature-Dependent Splicing and Represses Flowering at Low Temperatures in Parallel with FLM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara A Airoldi

    Full Text Available Plants enter their reproductive phase when the environmental conditions are favourable for the successful production of progeny. The transition from vegetative to reproductive phase is influenced by several environmental factors including ambient temperature. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP is critical for this pathway; svp mutants cannot modify their flowering time in response to ambient temperature. SVP encodes a MADS-box transcription factor that directly represses genes that promote flowering. SVP binds DNA in complexes with other MADS-box transcription factors, including FLOWERING LOCUS M (FLM, which acts with SVP to repress the floral transition at low temperatures. Small temperature changes post-transcriptionally regulate FLM through temperature-dependent alternative splicing (TD-AS. As ambient temperature increases, the predominant FLM splice isoform shifts to encode a protein incapable of exerting a repressive effect on flowering. Here we characterize a closely related MADS-box transcription factor, MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING2 (MAF2, which has independently evolved TD-AS. At low temperatures the most abundant MAF2 splice variant encodes a protein that interacts with SVP to repress flowering. At increased temperature the relative abundance of splice isoforms shifts in favour of an intron-retaining variant that introduces a premature termination codon. We show that this isoform encodes a protein that cannot interact with SVP or repress flowering. At lower temperatures MAF2 and SVP repress flowering in parallel with FLM and SVP, providing an additional input to sense ambient temperature for the control of flowering.

  7. Controle genético da exigência térmica para o início do florescimento em milho Genetic control of the thermal demand for flowering initiation in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Lima

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo estudar o controle genético da exigência térmica para o início do florescimento em milho. Foram utilizadas duas linhagens contrastantes para o caráter em questão. A partir dessas duas linhagens, foram obtidas as gerações F1, F2, RC1 e RC2. Os dados referentes aos valores de graus-dia compreendidos entre a semeadura e o início do florescimento, foram obtidos por planta. Estimaram-se os componentes de média e de variância por meio do método dos quadrados mínimos ponderados. Constatou-se que em todos os modelos dos componentes de média avaliados os valores de R² foram próximos de 100%. Dessa forma, considerou-se o modelo simplificado, denominado aditivo-dominante. Pelos componentes de variância, o modelo envolvendo a variância aditiva, variância de dominância e variância ambiental foi suficiente para explicar o controle genético do florescimento em milho, evidenciando que a soma térmica como medida da precocidade em milho é oligogênica, com a presença de dominância. O alto valor da estimativa do coeficiente de herdabilidade permite inferir a possibilidade de sucesso com a seleção massal para o caráter.The objective of this work was to study the genetic control of thermal demand for maize flowering initiation. Two contrasting lines were crossed and used with the F1, F2 RC1 and RC2 derived populations. The trait day-degrees between sown and flowering per plant were evaluated to obtain the estimates of components of variance and means. All models of mean components had R² values near 100%, and then the simple additive-dominant model was considered. Considering the components of variance the model with additive, dominant and environment variance explained the genetic control of maize flowering. The results of the estimated components allowed to conclude that genetic control of earlyness in maize is oligogenic with presence of dominance. Moreover, high values of estimate heritability

  8. Flowering phenology: An example of relaxation of natural selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollerton, J; Lack, A J

    1992-08-01

    Flowering phenology has normally been viewed as fundamental to a plant species' reproductive ecology. Researchers in the field have emphasized the adaptive importance of flowering at a particular time relative to other individuals in the population, or other species in the community. An alternative view, however, is that flowering phenology is a trait that may not be under strong selection, and this may have allowed some variation to appear in populations by chance. Copyright © 1992. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. OsHAL3, a Blue Light-Responsive Protein, Interacts with the Floral Regulator Hd1 to Activate Flowering in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lei; Shan, Jun-Xiang; Gao, Ji-Ping; Lin, Hong-Xuan

    2016-02-01

    In flowering plants, photoperiodic flowering is controlled by a complicated network. Light is one of the most important environmental stimuli that control the timing of the transition from vegetative growth to reproductive development. Several photoreceptors, including PHYA, PHYB, CRY2, and FKF1 in Arabidopsis and their homologs (OsPHYA, OsPHYB, OsPHYC, and OsCRY2) in rice, have been identified to be related to flowering. Our previous study suggests that OsHAL3, a flavin mononucleotide-binding protein, may function as a blue-light sensor. Here, we report the identification of OsHAL3 as a positive regulator of flowering in rice. OsHAL3 overexpression lines exhibited an early flowering phenotype, whereas downregulation of OsHAL3 expression by RNA interference delayed flowering under an inductive photoperiod (short-day conditions). The change in flowering time was not accompanied by altered Hd1 expression but rather by reduced accumulation of Hd3a and MADS14 transcripts. OsHAL3 and Hd1 colocalized in the nucleus and physically interacted in vivo under the dark, whereas their interaction was inhibited by white or blue light. Moreover, OsHAL3 directly bound to the promoter of Hd3a, especially before dawn. We conclude that OsHAL3, a novel light-responsive protein, plays an essential role in photoperiodic control of flowering time in rice, which is probably mediated by forming a complex with Hd1. Our findings open up new perspectives on the photoperiodic flowering pathway.

  10. Identification and functional analysis of flowering related microRNAs in common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongxiang Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs is a class of non-coding RNAs involved in post- transcriptional control of gene expression, via degradation and/or translational inhibition. Six-hundred sixty-one rice miRNAs are known that are important in plant development. However, flowering-related miRNAs have not been characterized in Oryza rufipogon Griff. It was approved by supervision department of Guangdong wild rice protection. We analyzed flowering-related miRNAs in O. rufipogon using high-throughput sequencing (deep sequencing to understand the changes that occurred during rice domestication, and to elucidate their functions in flowering. RESULTS: Three O. rufipogon sRNA libraries, two vegetative stage (CWR-V1 and CWR-V2 and one flowering stage (CWR-F2 were sequenced using Illumina deep sequencing. A total of 20,156,098, 21,531,511 and 20,995,942 high quality sRNA reads were obtained from CWR-V1, CWR-V2 and CWR-F2, respectively, of which 3,448,185, 4,265,048 and 2,833,527 reads matched known miRNAs. We identified 512 known rice miRNAs in 214 miRNA families and predicted 290 new miRNAs. Targeted functional annotation, GO and KEGG pathway analyses predicted that 187 miRNAs regulate expression of flowering-related genes. Differential expression analysis of flowering-related miRNAs showed that: expression of 95 miRNAs varied significantly between the libraries, 66 are flowering-related miRNAs, such as oru-miR97, oru-miR117, oru-miR135, oru-miR137, et al. 17 are early-flowering -related miRNAs, including osa-miR160f, osa-miR164d, osa-miR167d, osa-miR169a, osa-miR172b, oru-miR4, et al., induced during the floral transition. Real-time PCR revealed the same expression patterns as deep sequencing. miRNAs targets were confirmed for cleavage by 5'-RACE in vivo, and were negatively regulated by miRNAs. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first investigation of flowering miRNAs in wild rice. The result indicates that variation in miRNAs occurred during rice domestication and

  11. A petunia homeodomain-leucine zipper protein, PhHD-Zip, plays an important role in flower senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower senescence is mediated in part by changes of plant hormones, such as ethylene, cytokinin and abscisic acid (ABA). Ethylene is known to control flower senescence in many species, especially ethylene sensitive flowers, like petunia, carnation and rose. During flower senescence in petunia and ot...

  12. PEP1 of Arabis alpina is encoded by two overlapping genes that contribute to natural genetic variation in perennial flowering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C Albani

    Full Text Available Higher plants exhibit a variety of different life histories. Annual plants live for less than a year and after flowering produce seeds and senesce. By contrast perennials live for many years, dividing their life cycle into episodes of vegetative growth and flowering. Environmental cues control key check points in both life histories. Genes controlling responses to these cues exhibit natural genetic variation that has been studied most in short-lived annuals. We characterize natural genetic variation conferring differences in the perennial life cycle of Arabis alpina. Previously the accession Pajares was shown to flower after prolonged exposure to cold (vernalization and only for a limited period before returning to vegetative growth. We describe five accessions of A. alpina that do not require vernalization to flower and flower continuously. Genetic complementation showed that these accessions carry mutant alleles at PERPETUAL FLOWERING 1 (PEP1, which encodes a MADS box transcription factor orthologous to FLOWERING LOCUS C in the annual Arabidopsis thaliana. Each accession carries a different mutation at PEP1, suggesting that such variation has arisen independently many times. Characterization of these alleles demonstrated that in most accessions, including Pajares, the PEP1 locus contains a tandem arrangement of a full length and a partial PEP1 copy, which give rise to two full-length transcripts that are differentially expressed. This complexity contrasts with the single gene present in A. thaliana and might contribute to the more complex expression pattern of PEP1 that is associated with the perennial life-cycle. Our work demonstrates that natural accessions of A. alpina exhibit distinct life histories conferred by differences in PEP1 activity, and that continuous flowering forms have arisen multiple times by inactivation of the floral repressor PEP1. Similar phenotypic variation is found in other herbaceous perennial species, and our results

  13. Temporal dynamics of gene expression and histone marks at the Arabidopsis shoot meristem during flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yuan; Sawikowska, Aneta; Neumann, Manuela; Posé, David; Capovilla, Giovanna; Langenecker, Tobias; Neher, Richard A; Krajewski, Paweł; Schmid, Markus

    2017-05-17

    Plants can produce organs throughout their entire life from pluripotent stem cells located at their growing tip, the shoot apical meristem (SAM). At the time of flowering, the SAM of Arabidopsis thaliana switches fate and starts producing flowers instead of leaves. Correct timing of flowering in part determines reproductive success, and is therefore under environmental and endogenous control. How epigenetic regulation contributes to the floral transition has eluded analysis so far, mostly because of the poor accessibility of the SAM. Here we report the temporal dynamics of the chromatin modifications H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 and their correlation with transcriptional changes at the SAM in response to photoperiod-induced flowering. Emphasizing the importance of tissue-specific epigenomic analyses we detect enrichments of chromatin states in the SAM that were not apparent in whole seedlings. Furthermore, our results suggest that regulation of translation might be involved in adjusting meristem function during the induction of flowering.

  14. Real time control engineering systems and automation

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Tian Seng

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the two broad areas of the electronics and electrical aspects of control applications, highlighting the many different types of control systems of relevance to real-life control system design. The control techniques presented are state-of-the-art. In the electronics section, readers will find essential information on microprocessor, microcontroller, mechatronics and electronics control. The low-level assembly programming language performs basic input/output control techniques as well as controlling the stepper motor and PWM dc motor. In the electrical section, the book addresses the complete elevator PLC system design, neural network plant control, load flow analysis, and process control, as well as machine vision topics. Illustrative diagrams, circuits and programming examples and algorithms help to explain the details of the system function design. Readers will find a wealth of computer control and industrial automation practices and applications for modern industries, as well as the educat...

  15. Timing and host plant associations in the evolution of the weevil tribe Apionini (Apioninae, Brentidae, Curculionoidea, Coleoptera) indicate an ancient co-diversification pattern of beetles and flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Sven; Friedman, Ariel L L; Astrin, Jonas J; Gottsberger, Brigitte; Letsch, Harald

    2017-02-01

    Host plant shifts of insects can lead to a burst of diversification driven by their arrival in a new adaptive zone. In this context, our study aims to explore timing and patterns in the evolution of the weevil tribe Apionini (Brentidae, Curculionoidea, Coleoptera), particularly in relation to affiliations with their host plants. The classification of Apionini is difficult because of their relatively uniform appearance. Most taxa live mono- or oligophagously on members of Asteraceae or Fabaceae, but many are associated with other plant families, like Lamiaceae, Malvaceae and Polygonaceae. However, a comprehensive hypothesis of the phylogenetic relationships within the tribe Apionini is still missing. In the present study, we reconstructed trees and estimated divergence times among tribes. These results were further used to reconstruct the ancestral host plant use in Apionini weevils and to infer if the divergence timing of putative subtribes corresponds with the occurrence and radiation of their specific host plant groups. Phylogenetic analyses confirm the monophyly of most subtribes, with the exceptions of Oxystomatina, Kalcapiina and Aspidapiina. The subribe Aplemonina is inferred to be sister to all remaining Apionini. Divergence time estimates indicate the first occurrence of Apionini in the Upper Cretaceous and a simultaneous occurrence of several families of flowering plants and the occupation by Apionini weevil herbivores. These conspicuous coincidences support either an ancient co-diversification scenario or an escalating diversification in weevils induced by the radiation of flowering plants.

  16. Divergence of flowering genes in soybean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moon Young Kim; Jin Hee Shin; Yang Jae Kang; Sang Rea Shim; Suk-Ha Lee

    2012-11-01

    Soybean genome sequences were blasted with Arabidopsis thaliana regulatory genes involved in photoperiod-dependent flowering. This approach enabled the identification of 118 genes involved in the flowering pathway. Two genome sequences of cultivated (Williams 82) and wild (IT182932) soybeans were employed to survey functional DNA variations in the flowering-related homologs. Forty genes exhibiting nonsynonymous substitutions between G. max and G. soja were catalogued. In addition, 22 genes were found to co-localize with QTLs for six traits including flowering time, first flower, pod maturity, beginning of pod, reproductive period, and seed filling period. Among the genes overlapping the QTL regions, two LHY/CCA1 genes, GI and SFR6 contained amino acid changes. The recently duplicated sequence regions of the soybean genome were used as additional criteria for the speculation of the putative function of the homologs. Two duplicated regions showed redundancy of both flowering-related genes and QTLs. ID 12398025, which contains the homeologous regions between chr 7 and chr 16, was redundant for the LHY/CCA1 and SPA1 homologs and the QTLs. Retaining of the CRY1 gene and the pod maturity QTLs were observed in the duplicated region of ID 23546507 on chr 4 and chr 6. Functional DNA variation of the LHY/CCA1 gene (Glyma07g05410) was present in a counterpart of the duplicated region on chr 7, while the gene (Glyma16g01980) present in the other portion of the duplicated region on chr 16 did not show a functional sequence change. The gene list catalogued in this study provides primary insight for understanding the regulation of flowering time and maturity in soybean.

  17. Control of Aedes albopictus larvae using time-release larvicide formulations in Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasci, R S; Wright, G B; Willis, F S

    1994-03-01

    The ability of time-release formulations of larvicides and insect growth regulators (IGRs) to provide long-term control of Aedes albopictus was investigated in the field. Larvicides used in the study were Bactimos pellets (Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis, active ingredient) and Abate pellets (temephos, active ingredient). The IGR Altosid (methoprene, active ingredient) was used in pellet and sand formulations. Application rates were higher than label recommendations. In a preliminary test, clay flower bowls were treated with 2 g of material. Bactimos pellets failed to provide control after 60 days. Abate pellets and the Altosid formulations provided essentially 100% control for 150 days. After 360 days in the field, the Abate pellets produced 100% larval mortality, and significant levels of control were provided by the Altosid formulations and the Bactimos pellets. In a small-scale operational trial of this technique, 1 g of Altosid pellets was applied to every container that could be located in 2 urban residential neighborhoods in Lake Charles, LA. Aedes albopictus biting populations were monitored weekly in the treated areas and in an untreated control area. Biting population densities declined significantly in treated areas compared with the control area. Results suggested that long-term control of Ae. albopictus populations can be achieved economically with one application of Altosid pellets or Abate pellets in containers.

  18. Long-distance, graft-transmissible action of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS T protein to promote flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaguchi, Michitaka; Abe, Mitsutomo; Kimura, Takahiro; Daimon, Yasufumi; Kobayashi, Toshinori; Yamaguchi, Ayako; Tomita, Yuki; Dohi, Koji; Mori, Masashi; Araki, Takashi

    2008-11-01

    Day length perceived by a leaf is a major environmental factor that controls the timing of flowering. It has been believed that a mobile, long-distance signal called florigen is produced in the leaf under inductive day length conditions, and is transported to the shoot apex where it triggers floral morphogenesis. Grafting experiments have shown that florigen is transmissible from a donor plant that has been subjected to inductive day length to an uninduced recipient plant. However, the nature of florigen has long remained elusive. Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) is expressed in cotyledons and leaves in response to inductive long days (LDs). FT protein, with a basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor FD, acts in the shoot apex to induce target meristem identity genes such as APETALA1 (AP1) and initiates floral morphogenesis. Recent studies have provided evidence that the FT protein in Arabidopsis and corresponding proteins in other species are an important part of florigen. Our work shows that the FT activity, either from overexpressing or inducible transgenes or from the endogenous gene, to promote flowering is transmissible through a graft junction, and that an FT protein with a T7 tag is transported from a donor scion to the apical region of recipient stock plants and becomes detectable within a day or two. The sequence and structure of mRNA are not of critical importance for the long-distance action of the FT gene. These observations led to the conclusion that the FT protein, but not mRNA, is the essential component of florigen.

  19. Association of the circadian rhythmic expression of GmCRY1a with a latitudinal cline in photoperiodic flowering of soybean

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Photoperiodic control of flowering time is believed to affect latitudinal distribution of plants. The blue light receptor CRY2 regulates photoperiodic flowering in the experimental model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it is unclear whether genetic variations affecting cryptochrome activity or expression is broadly associated with latitudinal distribution of plants. We report here an investigation of the function and expression of two cryptochromes in soybean, GmCRY1a and GmCRY2a. Soybea...

  20. Daffodil flower delay senescence in cut Iris flowers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Sinz, A.; Tomassen, M.M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Visible symptoms of tepal senescence in cut Iris x hollandica (cv. Blue Magic) flowers were delayed by placing one cut daffodil flower (Narcissus pseudonarcissus, cv. Carlton) in the same vase. Addition of mucilage, exuded by daffodil stems, to the vase water had the same effect as the flowering daf

  1. Discrete-Time Controllability for Feedback Quantum Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Albertini, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Controllability properties for discrete-time, Markovian quantum dynamics are investigated. We find that, while in general the controlled system is not finite-time controllable, feedback control allows for arbitrary asymptotic state-to-state transitions. Under further assumption on the form of the measurement, we show that finite-time controllability can be achieved in a time that scales linearly with the dimension of the system, and we provide an iterative procedure to design the unitary control actions.

  2. Orchid flowers: evolution and molecular development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Frederiksen, Signe Elisabeth

    2002-01-01

    MADS-box genes, ABS model, Orchid flower evolution, Gene expression in orchid flowers, in situ PCR......MADS-box genes, ABS model, Orchid flower evolution, Gene expression in orchid flowers, in situ PCR...

  3. Effects of fire season on flowering of forbs and shrubs in longleaf pine forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, William J; Evans, Gregory W; Davis, Mary M

    1988-08-01

    Effects of variation in fire season on flowering of forbs and shrubs were studied experimentally in two longleaf pine forest habitats in northern Florida, USA. Large, replicated plots were burned at different times of the year, and flowering on each plot was measured over the twelve months following fire. While fire season had little effect on the number of species flowering during the year following fire, fires during the growing season decreased average flowering duration per species and increased synchronization of peak flowering times within species relative to fires between growing seasons. Fires during the growing season also increased the dominance of fall flowering forbs and delayed peak fall flowering. Differences in flowering resulting from variation in fire season were related to seasonal changes in the morphology of clonal forbs, especially fall-flowering composites. Community level differences in flowering phenologies indicated that timing of fire relative to environmental cues that induced flowering was important in determining flowering synchrony among species within the ground cover of longleaf pine forests. Differences in fire season produced qualitatively similar effects on flowering phenologies in both habitats, indicating plant responses to variation in the timing of fires were not habitat specific.

  4. Flower volatiles, crop varieties and bee responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn K Klatt

    Full Text Available Pollination contributes to an estimated one third of global food production, through both the improvement of the yield and the quality of crops. Volatile compounds emitted by crop flowers mediate plant-pollinator interactions, but differences between crop varieties are still little explored. We investigated whether the visitation of crop flowers is determined by variety-specific flower volatiles using strawberry varieties (Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne and how this affects the pollination services of the wild bee Osmia bicornis L. Flower volatile compounds of three strawberry varieties were measured via headspace collection. Gas chromatography showed that the three strawberry varieties produced the same volatile compounds but with quantitative differences of the total amount of volatiles and between distinct compounds. Electroantennographic recordings showed that inexperienced females of Osmia bicornis had higher antennal responses to all volatile compounds than to controls of air and paraffin oil, however responses differed between compounds. The variety Sonata was found to emit a total higher level of volatiles and also higher levels of most of the compounds that evoked antennal responses compared with the other varieties Honeoye and Darselect. Sonata also received more flower visits from Osmia bicornis females under field conditions, compared with Honeoye. Our results suggest that differences in the emission of flower volatile compounds among strawberry varieties mediate their attractiveness to females of Osmia bicornis. Since quality and quantity of marketable fruits depend on optimal pollination, a better understanding of the role of flower volatiles in crop production is required and should be considered more closely in crop-variety breeding.

  5. Shifts in flowering phenology reshape a subalpine plant community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CaraDonna, Paul J; Iler, Amy M; Inouye, David W

    2014-04-01

    Phenology--the timing of biological events--is highly sensitive to climate change. However, our general understanding of how phenology responds to climate change is based almost solely on incomplete assessments of phenology (such as first date of flowering) rather than on entire phenological distributions. Using a uniquely comprehensive 39-y flowering phenology dataset from the Colorado Rocky Mountains that contains more than 2 million flower counts, we reveal a diversity of species-level phenological shifts that bring into question the accuracy of previous estimates of long-term phenological change. For 60 species, we show that first, peak, and last flowering rarely shift uniformly and instead usually shift independently of one another, resulting in a diversity of phenological changes through time. Shifts in the timing of first flowering on average overestimate the magnitude of shifts in the timing of peak flowering, fail to predict shifts in the timing of last flowering, and underrepresent the number of species changing phenology in this plant community. Ultimately, this diversity of species-level phenological shifts contributes to altered coflowering patterns within the community, a redistribution of floral abundance across the season, and an expansion of the flowering season by more than I mo during the course of our study period. These results demonstrate the substantial reshaping of ecological communities that can be attributed to shifts in phenology.

  6. 'Who's who' in two different flower types of Calluna vulgaris (Ericaceae: morphological and molecular analyses of flower organ identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krüger Katja

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ornamental crop Calluna vulgaris is of increasing importance to the horticultural industry in the northern hemisphere due to a flower organ mutation: the flowers of the 'bud-flowering' phenotype remain closed i.e. as buds throughout the total flowering period and thereby maintain more colorful flowers for a longer period of time than the wild-type. This feature is accompanied and presumably caused by the complete lack of stamens. Descriptions of this botanical particularity are inconsistent and partially conflicting. In order to clarify basic questions of flower organ identity in general and stamen loss in detail, a study of the wild-type and the 'bud-flowering' flower type of C. vulgaris was initiated. Results Flowers were examined by macro- and microscopic techniques. Organ development was investigated comparatively in both the wild-type and the 'bud-flowering' type by histological analyses. Analysis of epidermal cell surface structure of vegetative tissues and perianth organs using scanning electron microscopy revealed that in wild-type flowers the outer whorls of colored organs may be identified as sepals, while the inner ones may be identified as petals. In the 'bud-flowering' type, two whorls of sepals are directly followed by the gynoecium. Both, petals and stamens, are completely missing in this flower type. The uppermost whorl of green leaves represents bracts in both flower types. In addition, two MADS-box genes (homologs of AP3/DEF and SEP1/2 were identified in C. vulgaris using RACE-PCR. Expression analysis by qRT-PCR was conducted for both genes in leaves, bracts, sepals and petals. These experiments revealed an expression pattern supporting the organ classification based on morphological characteristics. Conclusions Organ identity in both wild-type and 'bud-flowering' C. vulgaris was clarified using a combination of microscopic and molecular methods. Our results for bract, sepal and petal organ identity are

  7. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production of Flower-like Cadmium Sulfide Decorated by Histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qizhao; Lian, Juhong; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rongfang; Huang, Haohao; Su, Bitao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-09-01

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdS can significantly enhance the efficiency of its photocatalytic hydrogen production. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) flower-like CdS is synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal process using Cd(NO3)2•4H2O and thiourea as precursors and L-Histidine as a chelating agent. The morphology, crystal phase, and photoelectrochemical performance of the flower-like CdS and pure CdS nanocrystals are carefully investigated via various characterizations. Superior photocatalytic activity relative to that of pure CdS is observed on the flower-like CdS photocatalyst under visible light irradiation, which is nearly 13 times of pure CdS. On the basis of the results from SEM studies and our analysis, a growth mechanism of flower-like CdS is proposed by capturing the shape evolution. The imidazole ring of L-Histidine captures the Cd ions from the solution, and prevents the growth of the CdS nanoparticles. Furthermore, the photocatalytic contrast experiments illustrate that the as-synthesized flower-like CdS with L-Histidine is more stable than CdS without L-Histidine in the hydrogen generation.

  8. Transcriptomic analysis of flower development in wintersweet (Chimonanthus praecox.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daofeng Liu

    Full Text Available Wintersweet (Chimonanthus praecox is familiar as a garden plant and woody ornamental flower. On account of its unique flowering time and strong fragrance, it has a high ornamental and economic value. Despite a long history of human cultivation, our understanding of wintersweet genetics and molecular biology remains scant, reflecting a lack of basic genomic and transcriptomic data. In this study, we assembled three cDNA libraries, from three successive stages in flower development, designated as the flower bud with displayed petal, open flower and senescing flower stages. Using the Illumina RNA-Seq method, we obtained 21,412,928, 26,950,404, 24,912,954 qualified Illumina reads, respectively, for the three successive stages. The pooled reads from all three libraries were then assembled into 106,995 transcripts, 51,793 of which were annotated in the NCBI non-redundant protein database. Of these annotated sequences, 32,649 and 21,893 transcripts were assigned to gene ontology categories and clusters of orthologous groups, respectively. We could map 15,587 transcripts onto 312 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database. Based on these transcriptomic data, we obtained a large number of candidate genes that were differentially expressed at the open flower and senescing flower stages. An analysis of differentially expressed genes involved in plant hormone signal transduction pathways indicated that although flower opening and senescence may be independent of the ethylene signaling pathway in wintersweet, salicylic acid may be involved in the regulation of flower senescence. We also succeeded in isolating key genes of floral scent biosynthesis and proposed a biosynthetic pathway for monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in wintersweet flowers, based on the annotated sequences. This comprehensive transcriptomic analysis presents fundamental information on the genes and pathways which are involved in flower development in

  9. Selecting Landscape Plants: Flowering Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Relf, Diane; Appleton, Bonnie Lee, 1948-2012

    2009-01-01

    This publication helps the reader to select wisely among the many species and varieties of flowering trees available. The following are considerations that should be taken into account when choosing flowering trees for the home landscape: selections factors, environmental responses, availability and adaptability, and flowering tree descriptions.

  10. Coincidence of flowering time and the productivity and quality of cauliflower hybrid seeds Coincidência de florescimento entre linhagens de couve-flor na produtividade e qualidade de sementes híbridas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Fontanetti Verdial

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The missing of flowering synchronization between the self-incompatible lines in a crop field of cauliflower hybrid seeds besides making the seed production smaller can compromise the genetic purity of them. The coincidence of the flowering time between two cauliflower lines was examined to study its effect on the productivity and quality of hybrid seeds. The treatments consisted of six different sowing dates, every fifteen days, using a self-incompatible tropical line pollinated by a winter line which does not present self-incompatibility. The following characteristics were evaluated: leaf average area and number of flowers per plant, number of siliques per plant, number and weight of seeds per plant, weight of thousand seeds and average number of seeds per silique. The germination standard test and genetic seed purity were determined for each treatment. The coincident flowering season between cauliflower lines affects directly the productivity and the genetic quality of the produced hybrid seeds. The closer the flowering time coincidence between the lines, the greater the number of seeds per silique and the smaller the percentage of non-hybrid seedlings. However, the coincidence of the flowering season between lines was found to influence physiological seed quality.A falta de sincronismo de florescimento entre as linhagens auto incompatíveis em um campo de produção de sementes híbridas de couve flor pode além de reduzir a produção de sementes comprometer a pureza genética das mesmas. Com o objetivo de estudar o efeito da coincidência de florescimento entre linhagens de couve-flor na produtividade e qualidade de sementes híbridas, foi realizado o presente experimento. Os tratamentos consistiram em seis diferentes épocas de semeadura, espaçadas a cada quinze dias, de uma linhagem de verão auto-incompatível que foi polinizada por uma linhagem de inverno que não apresenta auto-incompatibilidade. Observou-se a coincidência do

  11. Flowering of Areca catechu in Bogor Botanic Gardens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Yudaputra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Areca catechu is a species of palms that widely distributed in Indonesia. This palm has unique characteristics and important roles of a tropical forest ecosystem. Indonesian local tribes used seed of this palm for traditionaly medicinal purposes. Information regarding of flowering of A.catechu is valuabe to support a genetic improvement program. Currently, the flowering information about this palm is still lack, thereby study that related with flowering of A. catechu is important to be conducted. This study aimed to provide information about the flowering of A.catechu species. The observation was started with randomly selection of three individuals A. catechu from the Moluccas island. There were 3 main observations which done in this study, included the observation of flowering phases period, morphological changes of each phases, and the micro-climate factors. Flowering A. catechu was categorized into 4 phases, including initiation, bud towards anthesis, anthesis and young fruit to maturity. Each of flowering phases have a different time. The flowering phases were not directly influenced by micro-climate factors. Trigona laeviceps was the most dominant insect visitor and wind was an abiotic factors that influenced the flowering of A. catechu.

  12. The Effect of Organic Fertilizers and Flowering Plants on Sheet-Web and Wolf Spider Populations (Araneae: Lycosidae and Linyphiidae) and Its Importance for Pest Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nabawy, El-Said M; Tsuda, Katsuo; Sakamaki, Yositaka; Oda, Asahi; Ushijima, Yurie

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to identify the treatment that increases the populations of spiders, which are effective predators in agroecosystems. In 2013 and 2014 the experimental eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) field was two different treatments, organic fertilizers and chemical fertilizer treatment, and in 2014 we surrounded organic fertilizer plots with the flowering plants mealy cup sage (Salvia farinacea Benth.), spearmint (Mentha spicata L.), and basil (Ocimum basilicum L.). Analysis using repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant influences of fertilizer type on the numbers of linyphiid spiders and Collembola in 2013. In 2014, the numbers of Collembola, thrips, and lycosid and linyphiid spider were higher in organic fertilizer with flowering plants treatment comparing with the chemical fertilizer treatment. Moreover, the numbers of Henosepilachna vigintioctopunctata (F.) were significantly lower in the organic fertilizer with flowering plants treatment than in chemical fertilizers treatment. Finally, we expect that Thysanoptera and Collembola were important alternative prey for linyphiid and lycosid spiders and the use of organic fertilizer and flowering plants enhanced the density of these spiders, and may increase their effectiveness in suppressing the populations of H. vigintioctopunctata (F.).

  13. Arabidopsis COP1 and SPA genes are essential for plant elongation but not for acceleration of flowering time in response to a low red light to far-red light ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolauffs, Sebastian; Fackendahl, Petra; Sahm, Jan; Fiene, Gabriele; Hoecker, Ute

    2012-12-01

    Plants sense vegetative shade as a reduction in the ratio of red light to far-red light (R:FR). Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) responds to a reduced R:FR with increased elongation of the hypocotyl and the leaf petioles as well as with an acceleration of flowering time. The repressor of light signaling, CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1), has been shown previously to be essential for the shade-avoidance response in seedlings. Here, we have investigated the roles of COP1 and the COP1-interacting SUPPRESSOR OF PHYA-105 (SPA) proteins in seedling and adult facets of the shade-avoidance response. We show that COP1 and the four SPA genes are essential for hypocotyl and leaf petiole elongation in response to low R:FR, in a fashion that involves the COP1/SPA ubiquitination target LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FR LIGHT1 but not ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5. In contrast, the acceleration of flowering in response to a low R:FR was normal in cop1 and spa mutants, thus demonstrating that the COP1/SPA complex is only required for elongation responses to vegetative shade and not for shade-induced early flowering. We further show that spa mutant seedlings fail to exhibit an increase in the transcript levels of the auxin biosynthesis genes YUCCA2 (YUC2), YUC8, and YUC9 in response to low R:FR, suggesting that an increase in auxin biosynthesis in vegetative shade requires SPA function. Consistent with this finding, expression of the auxin-response marker gene DR5::GUS did not increase in spa mutant seedlings exposed to low R:FR. We propose that COP1/SPA activity, via LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FR LIGHT1, is required for shade-induced modulation of the auxin biosynthesis pathway and thereby enhances cell elongation in low R:FR.

  14. Arabidopsis COP1 and SPA Genes Are Essential for Plant Elongation But Not for Acceleration of Flowering Time in Response to a Low Red Light to Far-Red Light Ratio1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolauffs, Sebastian; Fackendahl, Petra; Sahm, Jan; Fiene, Gabriele; Hoecker, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Plants sense vegetative shade as a reduction in the ratio of red light to far-red light (R:FR). Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) responds to a reduced R:FR with increased elongation of the hypocotyl and the leaf petioles as well as with an acceleration of flowering time. The repressor of light signaling, CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1), has been shown previously to be essential for the shade-avoidance response in seedlings. Here, we have investigated the roles of COP1 and the COP1-interacting SUPPRESSOR OF PHYA-105 (SPA) proteins in seedling and adult facets of the shade-avoidance response. We show that COP1 and the four SPA genes are essential for hypocotyl and leaf petiole elongation in response to low R:FR, in a fashion that involves the COP1/SPA ubiquitination target LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FR LIGHT1 but not ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5. In contrast, the acceleration of flowering in response to a low R:FR was normal in cop1 and spa mutants, thus demonstrating that the COP1/SPA complex is only required for elongation responses to vegetative shade and not for shade-induced early flowering. We further show that spa mutant seedlings fail to exhibit an increase in the transcript levels of the auxin biosynthesis genes YUCCA2 (YUC2), YUC8, and YUC9 in response to low R:FR, suggesting that an increase in auxin biosynthesis in vegetative shade requires SPA function. Consistent with this finding, expression of the auxin-response marker gene DR5::GUS did not increase in spa mutant seedlings exposed to low R:FR. We propose that COP1/SPA activity, via LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FR LIGHT1, is required for shade-induced modulation of the auxin biosynthesis pathway and thereby enhances cell elongation in low R:FR. PMID:23093358

  15. Controlling generate & test in any time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coulon, C.; Harmelen, van F.A.H.; Karbach, W.; Voss, A.

    1993-01-01

    Most problem solvers have a one-dimensional stop criterion: compute the correct and complete solution. Incremental algorithms can be interrupted at any time, returning a result that is more accurate the more time has been available. They allow the introduction of time as a new dimension into stop

  16. Sex determination in flowering plants: papaya as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Rishi; Ming, Ray

    2014-03-01

    Unisexuality in flowering plants evolved from a hermaphrodite ancestor. Transition from hermaphrodite to unisexual flowers has occurred multiple times across the different lineages of the angiosperms. Sexuality in plants is regulated by genetic, epigenetic and physiological mechanisms. The most specialized mechanism of sex determination is sex chromosomes. The sex chromosomes ensure the stable segregation of sexual phenotypes by preventing the recombination of sex determining genes. Despite continuous efforts, sex determining genes of dioecious plants have not yet been cloned. Concerted efforts with various model systems are necessary to understand the complex mechanism of sex determination in plants. Papaya (Carica papaya L.) is a tropical fruit tree with three sex forms, male, hermaphrodite, and female. Sexuality in papaya is determined by an XY chromosome system that is in an early evolutionary stage. The male and hermaphrodite of papaya are controlled by two different types of Y chromosomes: Y and Y(h). Large amounts of information in the area of genetics, genomics, and epigenetics of papaya have been accumulated over the last few decades. Relatively short lifecycle, small genome size, and readily available genetic and genomic resources render papaya an excellent model system to study sex determination and sex chromosomes in flowering plants.

  17. ABA-dependent control of GIGANTEA signalling enables drought escape via up-regulation of FLOWERING LOCUS T in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboni, Matteo; Robustelli Test, Alice; Galbiati, Massimo; Tonelli, Chiara; Conti, Lucio

    2016-12-01

    One strategy deployed by plants to endure water scarcity is to accelerate the transition to flowering adaptively via the drought escape (DE) response. In Arabidopsis thaliana, activation of the DE response requires the photoperiodic response gene GIGANTEA (GI) and the florigen genes FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF). The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is also required for the DE response, by promoting the transcriptional up-regulation of the florigen genes. The mode of interaction between ABA and the photoperiodic genes remains obscure. In this work we use a genetic approach to demonstrate that ABA modulates GI signalling and consequently its ability to activate the florigen genes. We also reveal that the ABA-dependent activation of FT, but not TSF, requires CONSTANS (CO) and that impairing ABA signalling dramatically reduces the expression of florigen genes with little effect on the CO transcript profile. ABA signalling thus has an impact on the core genes of photoperiodic signalling GI and CO by modulating their downstream function and/or activities rather than their transcript accumulation. In addition, we show that as well as promoting flowering, ABA simultaneously represses flowering, independent of the florigen genes. Genetic analysis indicates that the target of the repressive function of ABA is the flowering-promoting gene SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1), a transcription factor integrating floral cues in the shoot meristem. Our study suggests that variations in ABA signalling provide different developmental information that allows plants to co-ordinate the onset of the reproductive phase according to the available water resources.

  18. The regulation of seasonal flowering in the Rosaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokura, Takeshi; Mimida, Naozumi; Battey, Nicholas H; Hytönen, Timo

    2013-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms regulating the flowering process have been extensively studied in model annual plants; in perennials, however, understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling flowering has just started to emerge. Here we review the current state of flowering research in perennial plants of the rose family (Rosaceae), which is one of the most economically important families of horticultural plants. Strawberry (Fragaria spp.), raspberry (Rubus spp.), rose (Rosa spp.), and apple (Malus spp.) are used to illustrate how photoperiod and temperature control seasonal flowering in rosaceous crops. We highlight recent molecular studies which have revealed homologues of terminal flower1 (TFL1) to be major regulators of both the juvenile to adult, and the vegetative to reproductive transitions in various rosaceous species. Additionally, recent advances in understanding of the regulation of TFL1 are discussed.

  19. The strength of assortative mating for flowering date and its basis in individual variation in flowering schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, A E; Nardone, E; Fox, G A

    2014-10-01

    Although it has been widely asserted that plants mate assortatively by flowering time, there is virtually no published information on the strength or causes of phenological assortment in natural populations. When strong, assortative mating can accelerate the evolution of plant reproductive phenology through its inflationary effect on genetic variance. We estimated potential assortative mating for flowering date in 31 old-field species in Ontario, Canada. For each species, we constructed a matrix of pairwise mating probabilities from the individual flowering schedules, that is the number of flower deployed on successive dates. The matrix was used to estimate the phenotypic correlation between mates, ρ, for flowering date. We also developed a measure of flowering synchrony within species, S, based upon the eigenstructure of the mating matrix. The mean correlation between pollen recipients and potential donors for flowering date was ρ=0.31 (range: 0.05-0.63). A strong potential for assortative mating was found among species with high variance in flowering date, flowering schedules of short duration and skew towards early flower deployment. Flowering synchrony, S, was negatively correlated with potential assortment (r= -0.49), but we go on to show that although low synchrony is a necessary condition for phenological assortative mating, it may not be sufficient to induce assortment for a given phenological trait. The potential correlation between mates showed no seasonal trend; thus, as climate change imposes selection on phenology through longer growing seasons, spring-flowering species are no more likely to experience an accelerated evolutionary response than summer species.

  20. Real time digital control and controlled structures experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Michael J.; Knowles, Gareth J.; Rauch, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs covering the following topics are given: controlled structures technology at Grumman Corporate Research Center, active and passive control technology, experiment plans, and vacuum chamber test experiment objectives and setup.

  1. Plastic Responses Contribute to Explaining Altitudinal and Temporal Variation in Potential Flower Longevity in High Andean Rhodolirion montanum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavieres, Lohengrin A.

    2016-01-01

    The tendency for flower longevity to increase with altitude is believed by many alpine ecologists to play an important role in compensating for low pollination rates at high altitudes due to cold and variable weather conditions. However, current studies documenting an altitudinal increase in flower longevity in the alpine habitat derive principally from studies on open-pollinated flowers where lower pollinator visitation rates at higher altitudes will tend to lead to flower senescence later in the life-span of a flower in comparison with lower altitudes, and thus could confound the real altitudinal pattern in a species´ potential flower longevity. In a two-year study we tested the hypothesis that a plastic effect of temperature on flower longevity could contribute to an altitudinal increase in potential flower longevity measured in pollinator-excluded flowers in high Andean Rhodolirium montanum Phil. (Amaryllidaceae). Using supplemental warming we investigated whether temperature around flowers plastically affects potential flower longevity. We determined tightly temperature-controlled potential flower longevity and flower height for natural populations on three alpine sites spread over an altitudinal transect from 2350 and 3075 m a.s.l. An experimental increase of 3.1°C around flowers significantly decreased flower longevity indicating a plastic response of flowers to temperature. Flower height in natural populations decreased significantly with altitude. Although temperature negatively affects flower longevity under experimental conditions, we found no evidence that temperature around flowers explains site variation in flower longevity over the altitudinal gradient. In a wetter year, despite a 3.5°C temperature difference around flowers at the extremes of the altitudinal range, flower longevity showed no increase with altitude. However, in a drier year, flower longevity increased significantly with altitude. The emerging picture suggests an increase in flower

  2. Structural Controllability of Discrete-Time Linear Control Systems with Time-Delay: A Delay Node Inserting Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ailing Qi; Xuewei Ju; Qing Zhang; Zengqiang Chen

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the structural controllability analysis for discrete-time linear control systems with time-delay. By adding virtual delay nodes, the linear systems with time-delay are transformed into corresponding linear systems without time-delay, and the structural controllability of them is equivalent. That is to say, the time-delay does not affect or change the controllability of the systems. Several examples are also presented to illustrate the theoretical results.

  3. Time Series Analysis Forecasting and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Box, George E P; Reinsel, Gregory C

    2011-01-01

    A modernized new edition of one of the most trusted books on time series analysis. Since publication of the first edition in 1970, Time Series Analysis has served as one of the most influential and prominent works on the subject. This new edition maintains its balanced presentation of the tools for modeling and analyzing time series and also introduces the latest developments that have occurred n the field over the past decade through applications from areas such as business, finance, and engineering. The Fourth Edition provides a clearly written exploration of the key methods for building, cl

  4. FLOWERING LOCUS C -dependent and -independent regulation of the circadian clock by the autonomous and vernalization pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn James R

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The circadian system drives pervasive biological rhythms in plants. Circadian clocks integrate endogenous timing information with environmental signals, in order to match rhythmic outputs to the local day/night cycle. Multiple signaling pathways affect the circadian system, in ways that are likely to be adaptively significant. Our previous studies of natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions implicated FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC as a circadian-clock regulator. The MADS-box transcription factor FLC is best known as a regulator of flowering time. Its activity is regulated by many regulatory genes in the "autonomous" and vernalization-dependent flowering pathways. We tested whether these same pathways affect the circadian system. Results Genes in the autonomous flowering pathway, including FLC, were found to regulate circadian period in Arabidopsis. The mechanisms involved are similar, but not identical, to the control of flowering time. By mutant analyses, we demonstrate a graded effect of FLC expression upon circadian period. Related MADS-box genes had less effect on clock function. We also reveal an unexpected vernalization-dependent alteration of periodicity. Conclusion This study has aided in the understanding of FLC's role in the clock, as it reveals that the network affecting circadian timing is partially overlapping with the floral-regulatory network. We also show a link between vernalization and circadian period. This finding may be of ecological relevance for developmental programing in other plant species.

  5. Current trends and future directions in flower development research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutt, Charlie P; Vandenbussche, Michiel

    2014-11-01

    Flowers, the reproductive structures of the approximately 400 000 extant species of flowering plants, exist in a tremendous range of forms and sizes, mainly due to developmental differences involving the number, arrangement, size and form of the floral organs of which they consist. However, this tremendous diversity is underpinned by a surprisingly robust basic floral structure in which a central group of carpels forms on an axis of determinate growth, almost invariably surrounded by two successive zones containing stamens and perianth organs, respectively. Over the last 25 years, remarkable progress has been achieved in describing the molecular mechanisms that control almost all aspects of flower development, from the phase change that initiates flowering to the final production of fruits and seeds. However, this work has been performed almost exclusively in a small number of eudicot model species, chief among which is Arabidopsis thaliana. Studies of flower development must now be extended to a much wider phylogenetic range of flowering plants and, indeed, to their closest living relatives, the gymnosperms. Studies of further, more wide-ranging models should provide insights that, for various reasons, cannot be obtained by studying the major existing models alone. The use of further models should also help to explain how the first flowering plants evolved from an unknown, although presumably gymnosperm-like ancestor, and rapidly diversified to become the largest major plant group and to dominate the terrestrial flora. The benefits for society of a thorough understanding of flower development are self-evident, as human life depends to a large extent on flowering plants and on the fruits and seeds they produce. In this preface to the Special Issue, we introduce eleven articles on flower development, representing work in both established and further models, including gymnosperms. We also present some of our own views on current trends and future directions of the

  6. Increasing Hermaphrodite Flowers using Plant Growth Regulators in Andromonoecious Jatropha curcas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DASUMIATI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas (JC is a crop with potential for use in biodiesel. Production of biodiesel requires plant seed as raw material, so the viability of JC for use in biodiesel will dependent greatly on the plant’s production of flowers. Generally, this plant is monoecious, meaning it has both male and female flowers. However, very rarely JC plants may be andromonoecious. Andromonoecious specimens of JC produce hermaphrodite and male flowers in the same plant. The number of hermaphrodite flowers per inflorescence is generally low compared to the number of male flowers. The aim of this study was to increase the proportion of hermaphrodite flowers by using plant growth regu- lators (PGRs in andromonoecious JC. Our experiment was conducted in Randomized Block Design (RBD with 9 treatments, namely kinetin, GA3, and IAA with concentrations of 0 ppm as a control, 50 and 100 ppm of each PGRs. The treatments were applied to stem cuttings from each plant and repeated 4 times. PGRs were applied by spraying the leaves within the buds of each plant. Applications took place weekly beginning when the plants entered flower initiating phase, until inflorescence produced. Observations were conducted during the treatment period (10 weeks. Results showed that plants treated with IAA, GA3, and kinetin at 50 and 100 ppm produced increased inflorescence per plant. The increases measured were 155.4 and 92.9% of (IAA, 120.4 and 151% (GA3, 96.6 and 51.7% (kinetin respectively. In addition, we found that application and GA3 at concentrations of 50 and 100 ppm, and kinetin at 50 ppm, increased the number of hermaphrodite flowers per inflorescence by 50%, and increased the number of hermaphrodite flowers per plant by 275.6 and 183.1% (IAA, 219.5 and 254.1% (GA3, 162.9 and 103.1% (kinetin respectively. As would be expected, the number of fruit per plant increased in those specimens treated with IAA, GA3, and kinetin at 50 and 100 ppm. The increases measured were 301.7 and 167

  7. Implicit and explicit timing in oculomotor control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhame Ameqrane

    Full Text Available The passage of time can be estimated either explicitly, e.g. before leaving home in the morning, or implicitly, e.g. when catching a flying ball. In the present study, the latency of saccadic eye movements was used to evaluate differences between implicit and explicit timing. Humans were required to make a saccade between a central and a peripheral position on a computer screen. The delay between the extinction of a central target and the appearance of an eccentric target was the independent variable that could take one out of four different values (400, 900, 1400 or 1900 ms. In target trials, the delay period lasted for one of the four durations randomly. At the end of the delay, a saccade was initiated by the appearance of an eccentric target. Cue&target trials were similar to target trials but the duration of the delay was visually cued. In probe trials, the duration of the upcoming delay was cued, but there was no eccentric target and subjects had to internally generate a saccade at the estimated end of the delay. In target and cue&target trials, the mean and variance of latency distributions decreased as delay duration increased. In cue&target trials latencies were shorter. In probe trials, the variance increased with increasing delay duration and scalar variability was observed. The major differences in saccadic latency distributions were observed between visually-guided (target and cue&target trials and internally-generated saccades (probe trials. In target and cue&target trials the timing of the response was implicit. In probe trials, the timing of the response was internally-generated and explicitly based on the duration of the visual cue. Scalar timing was observed only during probe trials. This study supports the hypothesis that there is no ubiquitous timing system in the brain but independent timing processes active depending on task demands.

  8. Flower consumption lures investment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShiSesheng

    2003-01-01

    In the Netherlands the annual fresh flower consumption is 150 items per person, in France it is 80, in the US it is 30, in Japan the money involved amounts to US$11 billion, but in urban China, this is less than I0. Globally when per capita GDP in a country or region goes up to US$6,000, flower consumption will go up too. As per capita GDP in Shanghai isgoing from US$5,000 to US$7,500, the municipal government should include the construction of floral markets as part of its infrastructural development, just as the construction of urban forests, urban parks, urban greenery, and urban environmental investment. The fostering of local floral markets also require joint efforts from the society at large in terms of finance.

  9. Butterfly Longing for Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    "BUTTERFLY Longs for Flowers" (Die Lian Hua)was the name of a melody famous in the TangDynasty (618-907). It was later used as the nameof tunes to which poems were composed. As thename suggests, butteffies and flowers attract anddepend on each other; a natural occurrence andyet full of worldly beauty. The Yu couple havebeen researching customs and dance for a longtime, over the course of which they have collectedcountless materials that have allowed theaficionados to appreciate and conclude on theiruse. Based on their findings they create folkdances and perform them on stage. Their love,pursuit and understanding of the art displays timeand again the beauty of a butterfly longing forflowers.

  10. How flowers catch raindrops

    CERN Document Server

    Amador, Guillermo; Hu, David

    2011-01-01

    Several species of plants have raindrop-sized flowers that catch raindrops opportunistically in order to spread their 0.3-mm seeds distances of over 1 m. In the following fluid dynamics video, we show examples of these plants and some of the high speed videography used to visualize the splash dynamics responsible for raindrop-driven seed dispersal. Experiments were conducted on shape mimics of the plants' fruit bodies, fabricated using a 3D printer. Particular attention was paid to optimizing flower geometries and drop impact parameters to propel seeds the farthest distance. We find off-center impacts are the most effective for dispersing seeds. Such impacts amplify the raindrop's speed, encapsulate seeds within drops, and direct the seed trajectory at angles optimal for long-distance dispersal.

  11. Let the flowers grow…

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The Environmental part of CERN Safety policy is represented by a flower whose petals are the various domains of its application. The Environment Services section within the Occupational Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Unit is in charge of monitoring the impact of the Laboratory on the environment. You are called on to make every effort to reduce this impact as much as reasonably achievable. Read why and how…   A physics Laboratory occupying a territory of the size of a small village, with sites scattered across an even larger area, has a considerable potential impact on the environment. Energy and water consumption, waste management... these are all aspects of the same problem or, in the representation, petals of the same flower. Each one should be carefully studied and dealt with. The nine members of the Environment Services section deal with matters that concern these and other aspects of the CERN's policy for the protection of the environment. “...

  12. Phenological mismatch with abiotic conditions implications for flowering in Arctic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Helen C; Høye, Toke T; Schmidt, Niels Martin; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Forchhammer, Mads C

    2015-03-01

    Although many studies have examined the phenological mismatches between interacting organisms, few have addressed the potential for mismatches between phenology and seasonal weather conditions. In the Arctic, rapid phenological changes in many taxa are occurring in association with earlier snowmelt. The timing of snowmelt is jointly affected by the size of the late winter snowpack and the temperature during the spring thaw. Increased winter snowpack results in delayed snowmelt, whereas higher air temperatures and faster snowmelt advance the timing of snowmelt. Where interannual variation in snowpack is substantial, changes in the timing of snowmelt can be largely uncoupled from changes in air temperature. Using detailed, long-term data on the flowering phenology of four arctic plant species from Zackenberg, Greenland, we investigate whether there is a phenological component to the temperature conditions experienced prior to and during flowering. In particular, we assess the role of timing of flowering in determining pre-flowering exposure to freezing temperatures and to the temperatures-experienced prior to flowering. We then examine the implications of flowering phenology for flower abundance. Earlier snowmelt resulted in greater exposure to freezing conditions, suggesting an increased potential for a mismatch between the timing of flowering and seasonal weather conditions and an increased potential for negative consequences, such as freezing 'damage. We also found a parabolic relationship between the timing of flowering and the temperature experienced during flowering after taking interannual temperature effects into account. If timing of flowering advances to a cooler period of the growing season, this may moderate the effects of a general warming trend across years. Flower abundance was quadratically associated with the timing of flowering, such that both early and late flowering led to lower flower abundance than did intermediate flowering. Our results

  13. The flowering pattern of Arnica montana L. and A. chamissonis Less. under field cultivation conditions with successive flower head collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Sugier

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The research on the flowering of Arnica montana L. and A. chamissonis Less. was carried out in the years 2005-2006 on two- and three-year plantations on grey-brown podsolic soil with the granulometric composition of heavy clay sand. The aim of the work was to determine the pattern and length of flowering of two- and three-year-old plants under field cultivation conditions with successive flower head collection. The flowering of Arnica montana in both years of study lasted 26 days (from the 28th of May to the 22nd of June. In this period, eight collections of flower heads were made. When analyzing the number of inflorescences gathered during particular collections, it was concluded that at the initial stage of flowering it was not great, but it successively increased with the passage of time up to the seventh collection. The pattern of flowering of the two- and three-year-old Arnica montana plants was similar. The inflorescences of Arnica chamissonis were collected six times, and the most abundant flowering was found in the middle period of this stage, which lasted 20 days.

  14. Motor control by precisely timed spike patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Kyle H; Holmes, Caroline M; Vellema, Michiel

    2017-01-01

    A fundamental problem in neuroscience is understanding how sequences of action potentials ("spikes") encode information about sensory signals and motor outputs. Although traditional theories assume that this information is conveyed by the total number of spikes fired within a specified time...

  15. Arabidopsis florigen FT binds to diurnally oscillating phospholipids that accelerate flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Andrés, Fernando; Kanehara, Kazue; Liu, Yu-chi; Dörmann, Peter; Coupland, George

    2014-04-04

    Arabidopsis FT protein is a component of florigen, which transmits photoperiodic flowering signals from leaf companion cells to the shoot apex. Here, we show that FT specifically binds phosphatidylcholine (PC) in vitro. A transgenic approach to increase PC levels in vivo in the shoot meristem accelerates flowering whereas reduced PC levels delay flowering, demonstrating that PC levels are correlated with flowering time. The early flowering is related to FT activity, because expression of FT-effector genes is increased in these plants. Simultaneous increase of FT and PC in the shoot apical meristem further stimulates flowering, whereas a loss of FT function leads to an attenuation of the effect of increased PC. Specific molecular species of PC oscillate diurnally, and night-dominant species are not the preferred ligands of FT. Elevating night-dominant species during the day delays flowering. We suggest that FT binds to diurnally changing molecular species of PC to promote flowering.

  16. Increased seed set in down slope-facing flowers of Lilium duchartrei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Guo SUN; Chi-Yuan YAO

    2013-01-01

    Flower orientation has been considered one aspect of floral attraction.Plants growing on slopes should orientate their flowers facing down slope towards greater open space to enhance reproduction by attracting more pollinators.Flower angle and floral symmetry may affect this pattern; for example,this trend would be overshadowed in vertical/pendent flowers with radial symmetry because the flowers can attract pollinators and provide landing platforms from many directions.We investigated this hypothesis in Lilium duchartrei,a herb with pendent and actinomorphic flowers,in the Hengduan Mountains region of China by measuring flower direction for individuals growing on fiat ground and on slopes.We also changed flower direction from facing down to up slope to test the effects on pollinator visitation frequency and subsequent plant reproduction.Plants growing on flat ground orientate their flowers equally towards the four geomagnetic directions,whereas the flowers on individuals growing on slopes preferentially face down slope.This pattern was more pronounced for individuals growing on steeper slopes.There was a positive correlation between slope angle and the seed set of flowers facing down slope (control),but a negative correlation between seed set and flowers facing up slope.The visitation frequency also tended to be higher for control flowers on steeper slopes and lower for those flowers changed to face up slope.Unexpectedly,floral direction was not affected by flower angle or floral symmetry.The results suggest that a down slope orientation of flowers could function to improve pollination in heterogeneous pollination environments.

  17. Comparison of time optimal control for two level quantum systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Cong; Jie Wen; Xubo Zou

    2014-01-01

    The time optimal problem for a two level quantum sys-tem is studied. We compare two different control strategies of bang-bang control and the geometric control, respectively, es-pecial y in the case of minimizing the time of steering the state from North Pole to South Pole on the Bloch sphere with bounded control. The time performances are compared for different param-eters by the individual numerical simulation experiments, and the experimental results are analyzed. The results show that the ge-ometric control spends less time than the bang-bang control does.

  18. Controlling flow time delays in flexible manufacturing cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slomp, J.; Caprihan, R.; Bokhorst, J. A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Flow time delays in Flexible Manufacturing Cells (FMCs) are caused by transport and clamping/reclamping activities. This paper shows how dynamic scheduling parameters may control the flow times of jobs and the available task windows for flow time delays.

  19. The flavonoid pathway regulates the petal colors of cotton flower.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafu Tan

    Full Text Available Although biochemists and geneticists have studied the cotton flower for more than one century, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the dramatic color change that occurs during its short developmental life following blooming. Through the analysis of world cotton germplasms, we found that all of the flowers underwent color changes post-anthesis, but there is a diverse array of petal colors among cotton species, with cream, yellow and red colors dominating the color scheme. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicated that both the original cream and red colors and the color changes post-anthesis were related to flavonoid content. The anthocyanin content and the expression of biosynthesis genes were both increased from blooming to one day post-anthesis (DPA when the flower was withering and undergoing abscission. Our results indicated that the color changes and flavonoid biosynthesis of cotton flowers were precisely controlled and genetically regulated. In addition, flavonol synthase (FLS genes involved in flavonol biosynthesis showed specific expression at 11 am when the flowers were fully opened. The anthocyanidin reductase (ANR genes, which are responsible for proanthocyanidins biosynthesis, showed the highest expression at 6 pm on 0 DPA, when the flowers were withered. Light showed primary, moderate and little effects on flavonol, anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthesis, respectively. Flavonol biosynthesis was in response to light exposure, while anthocyanin biosynthesis was involved in flower color changes. Further expression analysis of flavonoid genes in flowers of wild type and a flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H silenced line showed that the development of cotton flower color was controlled by a complex interaction between genes and light. These results present novel information regarding flavonoids metabolism and flower development.

  20. Time-delayed autosynchronous swarm control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, James D; Bennet, Derek J; Dadzie, S Kokou

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a general Morse potential model of self-propelling particles is considered in the presence of a time-delayed term and a spring potential. It is shown that the emergent swarm behavior is dependent on the delay term and weights of the time-delayed function, which can be set to induce a stationary swarm, a rotating swarm with uniform translation, and a rotating swarm with a stationary center of mass. An analysis of the mean field equations shows that without a spring potential the motion of the center of mass is determined explicitly by a multivalued function. For a nonzero spring potential the swarm converges to a vortex formation about a stationary center of mass, except at discrete bifurcation points where the center of mass will periodically trace an ellipse. The analytical results defining the behavior of the center of mass are shown to correspond with the numerical swarm simulations.

  1. Finite-time Control of One-link Mechanical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoba, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Nami; Nakamura, Hisakazu; Akiba, Hideyuki

    This paper considers finite-time position control of an one-link mechanical system. The system is modeled by discontinuous differential equations. In this paper, we prove that the Nakamura's local homogeneous controller based on a control Lyapunov function is valid to the position control of the robot manipulators, and show the effectiveness of the controller by experiments.

  2. Mechanism of supercooling in flower bud of Camellia oleifea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏维埃; 潘良文

    1995-01-01

    It is the first time for MRI to be used in the research of flower buds supercooling. Directobservation on freezing course of living flower buds of Camellia yuhsienensis by MRI and tissue browning test showed that freezing order of the flower organs is bud axis, scale, petal, pistil and stamen. It is coincident with the direction of ice development from bud axes to flower organs upwards. The corresponding results from MRI and freezing-fixation showed that the water translocation from flower organs to axes and scales is carried on in the course of bud freezing. ’H spectral measurement of NMR was used to follow the decrease of unfrozen water in the buds during the cooling.

  3. An Efficient Secure Real-Time Concurrency Control Protocol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yingyuan; LIU Yunsheng; CHEN Xiangyang

    2006-01-01

    Secure real-time databases must simultaneously satisfy two requirements in guaranteeing data security and minimizing the missing deadlines ratio of transactions. However, these two requirements can conflict with each other and achieve one requirement is to sacrifice the other. This paper presents a secure real-time concurrency control protocol based on optimistic method. The concurrency control protocol incorporates security constraints in a real-time optimistic concurrency control protocol and makes a suitable tradeoff between security and real-time requirements by introducing secure influence factor and real-time influence factor. The experimental results show the concurrency control protocol achieves data security without degrading real-time performance significantly.

  4. Time domain passivity controller for 4-channel time-delay bilateral teleoperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Joao; Schiele, Andre

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an extension of the time-domain passivity control approach to a four-channel bilateral controller under the effects of time delays. Time-domain passivity control has been used successfully to stabilize teleoperation systems with position-force and position-position controllers; however, the performance with such control architectures is sub-optimal both with and without time delays. This work extends the network representation of the time-domain passivity controller to the four-channel architecture, which provides perfect transparency to the user without time delay. The proposed architecture is based on modelling the controllers as dependent voltage sources and using only series passivity controllers. The obtained results are shown on a one degree-of-freedom setup and illustrate the stabilization behaviour of the proposed controller when time delay is present in the communication channel.

  5. Influence of gibberellic acid on the growth and flowering initiation of two types of peas (Pisum sativum L. differing in photoperiod response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Łukasik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It was found that GA3 (0.03 mg per one plant caused significant delay of the flowering of two different genotypes of peas under conditions of an increasing natural day length (March - May. It was expressed both in a greater number of vegetative nodes and in a greater number of days to the first flower. Under conditions of a decreasing day length (August - November most of G type plants treated with GA3 reacted with complete inhibition of the flowering. In K type pea, GA3 treatment in the discussed conditions affected only the number of days from the sowing time to the appearence of the first flower. This stage was greater in treated plants in comparison with the control ones.

  6. APPROXIMATION LAWS OF DISCRETE-TIME VARIABLE STRUCTURE CONTROL SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Two new approximation laws of sliding mode for discrete-time variable structure control systems are proposed in this paper. By applying the proposed approximation laws of sliding mode to discrete-time variable structure control systems,the stability of origin can be guaranteed,and the chattering along the switching surface caused by discrete-time variable structure control can be restrained effectively. In designing of these approximation laws,the problem that the system control input is restricted is also ...

  7. Flowering phenology shifts in response to biodiversity loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Amelia A.; Zavaleta, Erika S; Selmants, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    Observational studies and experimental evidence agree that rising global temperatures have altered plant phenology—the timing of life events, such as flowering, germination, and leaf-out. Other large-scale global environmental changes, such as nitrogen deposition and altered precipitation regimes, have also been linked to changes in flowering times. Despite our increased understanding of how abiotic factors influence plant phenology, we know very little about how biotic interactions can affect flowering times, a significant knowledge gap given ongoing human-caused alteration of biodiversity and plant community structure at the global scale. We experimentally manipulated plant diversity in a California serpentine grassland and found that many plant species flowered earlier in response to reductions in diversity, with peak flowering date advancing an average of 0.6 days per species lost. These changes in phenology were mediated by the effects of plant diversity on soil surface temperature, available soil N, and soil moisture. Peak flowering dates were also more dispersed among species in high-diversity plots than expected based on monocultures. Our findings illustrate that shifts in plant species composition and diversity can alter the timing and distribution of flowering events, and that these changes to phenology are similar in magnitude to effects induced by climate change. Declining diversity could thus contribute to or exacerbate phenological changes attributed to rising global temperatures.

  8. Overexpression of AtBMI1C, a polycomb group protein gene, accelerates flowering in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Polycomb group protein (PcG-mediated gene silencing is emerging as an essential developmental regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic organisms. PcGs inactivate or maintain the silenced state of their target chromatin by forming complexes, including Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1 and 2 (PRC2. Three PRC2 complexes have been identified and characterized in Arabidopsis; of these, the EMF and VRN complexes suppress flowering by catalyzing the trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 of FLOWER LOCUS T (FT and FLOWER LOCUS C (FLC. However, little is known about the role of PRC1 in regulating the floral transition, although AtRING1A, AtRING1B, AtBMI1A, and AtBMI1B are believed to regulate shoot apical meristem and embryonic development as components of PRC1. Moreover, among the five RING finger PcGs in the Arabidopsis genome, four have been characterized. Here, we report that the fifth, AtBMI1C, is a novel, ubiquitously expressed nuclear PcG protein and part of PRC1, which is evolutionarily conserved with Psc and BMI1. Overexpression of AtBMI1C caused increased H2A monoubiquitination and flowering defects in Arabidopsis. Both the suppression of FLC and activation of FT were observed in AtBMI1C-overexpressing lines, resulting in early flowering. No change in the H3K27me3 level in FLC chromatin was detected in an AtBMI1C-overexpressing line. Our results suggest that AtBMI1C participates in flowering time control by regulating the expression of FLC; moreover, the repression of FLC by AtBMI1C is not due to the activity of PRC2. Instead, it is likely the result of PRC1 activity, into which AtBMI1C is integrated.

  9. Flower color as a model system for studies of plant evo-devo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Sobel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Even though pigmentation traits have had substantial impacts on the field of animal evolutionary developmental biology, they have played only relatively minor roles in plant evo-devo. This is surprising given the often direct connection between flower color and fitness variation mediated through the effects of pollinators. At the same time, ecological and evolutionary genetic studies have utilized the molecular resources available for the anthocyanin pathway to generate several examples of the molecular basis of putatively adaptive transitions in flower color. Despite this opportunity to synthesize experimental approaches in ecology, evolution, and developmental biology, the investigation of many fundamental questions in evo-devo using this powerful model is only at its earliest stages. For example, a long-standing question is whether predictable genetic changes accompany the repeated evolution of a trait. Due to the conserved nature of the biochemical and regulatory control of anthocyanin biosynthesis, it has become possible to determine whether, and under what circumstances, different types of mutations responsible for flower color variation are preferentially targeted by natural selection. In addition, because plants use anthocyanin and related compounds in vegetative tissue for other important physiological functions, the identification of naturally occurring transitions from unpigmented to pigmented flowers provides the opportunity to examine the mechanisms by which regulatory networks are co-opted into new developmental domains. Here, we review what is known about the ecological and molecular basis of anthocyanic flower color transitions in natural systems, focusing on the evolutionary and developmental features involved. In doing so, we provide suggestions for future work on this trait and suggest that there is still much to be learned from the evolutionary development of flower color transitions in nature.

  10. WRKY71 accelerates flowering via the direct activation of FLOWERING LOCUS T and LEAFY in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanchong; Liu, Zhenhua; Wang, Long; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Seo, Pil J; Qiao, Meng; Wang, Nan; Li, Shuo; Cao, Xiaofeng; Park, Chung-Mo; Xiang, Fengning

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is crucial for achieving reproductive success. A large number of well-delineated factors affecting flowering are involved in complex genetic networks in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the underlying part played by the WRKY transcription factors in this process is not yet clear. Here, we report that WRKY71 is able to accelerate flowering in Arabidopsis. An activation-tagged mutant WRKY71-1D and a constitutive over-expresser of WRKY71 both flowered earlier than the wild type (WT). In contrast, both the RNA interference-based multiple WRKY knock-out mutant (w71w8 + 28RNAi) and the dominant repression line (W71-SRDX) flowered later. Gene expression analysis showed that the transcript abundance of the flowering time integrator gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and the floral meristem identity genes LEAFY (LFY), APETALA1 (AP1) and FRUITFULL (FUL) were greater in WRKY71-1D than in the WT, but lower in w71w8 + 28RNAi and W71-SRDX. Further, WRKY71 was shown to bind to the W-boxes in the FT and LFY promoters in vitro and in vivo. The suggestion is that WRKY71 activity hastens flowering via the direct activation of FT and LFY.

  11. Determination of Optimal Control Strength of Delayed Feedback Control Using Time Series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hua-Wei; LU Wei-Ping; WANG Peng-Ye

    2004-01-01

    @@ We study controlling chaos using time-delayed feedback control based on chaotic time series without prior knowl edge of dynamical systems, and determine the optimal control parameters for stabilizing unstable periodic orbits with maximal stability.

  12. Uniformed model of networked control systems with long time delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Qixin; Liu Hongli; Hu Shousong

    2008-01-01

    Feedback control systems wherein the control loops are closed through a real-time network are called networked control systems (NCS). The defining feature of an NCS is that information is exchanged using a network among control system components. Two new concepts including long time delay and short time delay are proposed.The sensor is almost always clock driven. The controller or the actuator is either clock driven or event driven. Four possible driving modes of networked control systems are presented. The open loop mathematic models of networked control systems with long time delay are developed when the system is driven by anyone of the four different modes.The uniformed modeling method of networked control systems with long time delay is proposed. The simulation results are given in the end.

  13. Simultaneous time-frequency control of bifurcation and chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-Kun; Suh, C. Steve

    2012-06-01

    Control scheme facilitated either in the time- or frequency-domain alone is insufficient in controlling route-to-chaos, where the corresponding response deteriorates in the time and frequency domains simultaneously. A novel chaos control scheme is formulated by addressing the fundamental characteristics inherent of chaotic response. The proposed control scheme has its philosophical basis established in simultaneous time-frequency control, on-line system identification, and adaptive control. Physical features that embody the concept include multiresolution analysis, adaptive Finite Impulse Response (FIR) filter, and Filtered-x Least Mean Square (FXLMS) algorithm. A non-stationary Duffing oscillator is investigated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the control methodology. Results presented herein indicate that for the control of dynamic instability including chaos to be deemed viable, mitigation has to be adaptive and engaged in the time and frequency domains at the same time.

  14. Discrete-time inverse optimal control for nonlinear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Edgar N

    2013-01-01

    Discrete-Time Inverse Optimal Control for Nonlinear Systems proposes a novel inverse optimal control scheme for stabilization and trajectory tracking of discrete-time nonlinear systems. This avoids the need to solve the associated Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation and minimizes a cost functional, resulting in a more efficient controller. Design More Efficient Controllers for Stabilization and Trajectory Tracking of Discrete-Time Nonlinear Systems The book presents two approaches for controller synthesis: the first based on passivity theory and the second on a control Lyapunov function (CLF). Th

  15. Occupational allergy caused by flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, N W; Vermeulen, A M; Gerth van Wijk, R; de Groot, H

    1998-02-01

    We describe 14 consecutive patients with complaints due to the handling of flowers. The symptoms varied from allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma to urticaria. Most patients had professions in the flower industry. Skin prick tests (SPT) were performed with home-made pollen extracts from 17 different flowers known to be the most commonly grown and sold in The Netherlands RAST against mugwort, chrysanthemum, and solidago was performed. The diagnosis of atopy against flowers was based on work-related symptoms due to the handling of flowers, positive SPT with flower extracts, and positive RAST. The concordance between SPT and case history was 74%, and that between SPT and RAST was 77% Extensive cross-sensitization was seen to pollen of several members of the Compositae family (e.g., Matricaria, chrysanthemum, solidago) and to pollen of the Amaryllidaceae family (Alstroemeria and Narcissus). Homemade flower extracts can be used to confirm IgE-mediated flower allergy. Mugwort can be used as a screening test for possible flower allergy. For most patients, the allergy led to a change of profession.

  16. Perceived Time, Temporal Order and Control in Boundaryless Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Lambrecht; Hvid, Helge Søndergaard; Kamp, Annette

    2010-01-01

    , habits, breaks, norms and meetings that occur through the inter-personal relationships. Therefore work life research can make use of time sociology concepts to understand and study how control is gained and lost in contemporary work. The results of our study show that individualized time conflicts leave...... ways. The way work has developed, the concept of time becomes a key to understand the actual degree of employee control. We cannot study control without taking the qualities of time into consideration. Hence to understand control we must study the qualities of time by looking into common routines...

  17. The Timing and Fast Control Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jiheng; Gustafsson, Leif

    In this thesis, the feasibility of an FPGA to host a system for generating and distributing clocks as well as distributing synchronous and asynchronous commands is tested. This system will be an imitation of the SHiP (Search for Hidden Particle) DAQ (Data Acquisition) system led by CERN. The practical implementation is to mainly apply Altera Cyclone V GT development board attached with SFP+ daughter card to achieve accurate timing and high speed performance. Experiments include three loopback test implementations. Loopback test is the simplest technique to assess a channel’s integration. The first one is the Ethernet loopback test. An Ethernet card daughter board is inserted to the HSMC port of the Cyclone V GT development board. After that, a SFP card is applied alternatively on the same port to do the similar loopback test but at a much higher speed via optical fibers. And finally, a more advanced XAUI to SFP+ card daughter board will be used to replace the previous SFP card in order to get a further spee...

  18. A genomic approach to elucidating grass flower development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dornelas Marcelo C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In sugarcane (Saccharum sp as with other species of grass, at a certain moment of its life cycle the vegetative meristem is converted into an inflorescence meristem which has at least two distinct inflorescence branching steps before the spikelet meristem terminates in the production of a flower (floret. In model dicotyledonous species such successive conversions of meristem identities and the concentric arrangement of floral organs in specific whorls have both been shown to be genetically controlled. Using data from the Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tag (EST Project (SUCEST database, we have identified all sugarcane proteins and genes putatively involved in reproductive meristem and flower development. Sequence comparisons of known flower-related genes have uncovered conserved evolutionary pathways of flower development and flower pattern formation between dicotyledons and monocotyledons, such as some grass species. We have paid special attention to the analysis of the MADS-box multigene family of transcription factors that together with the APETALA2 (AP2 family are the key elements of the transcriptional networks controlling plant reproductive development. Considerations on the evolutionary developmental genetics of grass flowers and their relation to the ABC homeotic gene activity model of flower development are also presented.

  19. Finite time control of a class of time-varying unified chaotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yang; Guopei, Chen

    2013-09-01

    This paper considers the problem of finite time control for a class of time-varying unified chaotic system. First, based on the finite-time stability theory, a novel adaptive control technique is presented to achieve finite-time stabilization for time-varying unified chaotic system. Comparing with the existing methods, the proposed controller only need to be added on one state variable of systems and it is easy to be implemented. Then, a finite time control technique is provided to realize the tracking of any target function with second-order derivatives. Finally, Simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Flowering patterns of long-lived Heliconia inflorescences: implications for visiting and resident nectarivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin, David S

    1984-10-01

    Flowering patterns of four Heliconia (Heliconiaceae) species in Trinidad, West Indies were examined for their predictability and availability to the nectarivores that rely on Heliconia floral nectar. Principal flower visitors are trapling hermit hummingbirds; inflorescences are inhabited by nectarivorous hummingbird flower mites that move between inflorescences by riding in the hummingbirds' nares. Heliconia inflorescences flower for 40-200 days, providing long-term sources of copious nectar (30-60 μl per flower), but each Heliconia flower lasts only a single day. As an inflorescence ages the interval increases between open flowers within a bract; wet-season inflorescences produce open flowers more slowly than dry-season conspecifics.Estimated daily energy expenditures for hermit hummingbirds demonstrate that slow production of short-lived open flowers plus low inflorescence density preclude territorial defense of Heliconia by the hermits. Heliconia flowering patterns are viewed as a means of (i) regulating reproductive investment by the plants through staggered flower production over long periods of time, and (ii) maintaining outcrossing by necessitating a traplining visitation pattern by its hummingbird pollinators. I suggest that Heliconia exhibit a two-tiered pollination system by using hermit hummingbirds primarily for outcrossing and using hummingbird flower mites primarily for self-pollination.

  1. Flowering and tuberization: a tale of two nightshades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelenda, José A; Navarro, Cristina; Prat, Salomé

    2014-02-01

    The concept of florigen, postulated in the early 1930s, has taken form after the identification of the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) protein as the flowering-inducing signal. Besides their role in flowering, FT genes were subsequently reported to play additional functions in other biological processes. This is particularly relevant in the nightshades, where the FT genes appear to have undergone considerable expansion at the functional level and gained a new role in the control of storage organ formation in potato (Solanum tuberosum). Neofunctionalization of FT homologs in the nightshades identifies these proteins as a new class of primary signaling components that modulate development and organogenesis in these agronomic relevant species.

  2. Discrete-Time LPV Current Control of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    further complications. The synthesis method is applied to the model, yielding an LPV discrete-time controller. Finally, the efficiency of the control scheme is validated via simulations as well as on the actual induction motor, both in open-loop current control and when an outer speed control loop......In this paper we apply a new method for gain-scheduled output feedback control of nonlinear systems to current control of an induction motor. The method relies on recently developed controller synthesis results for linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems, where the controller synthesis is formulated...... as a set of linear matrix inequalities with full-block multipliers. A standard nonlinear model of the motor is constructed and written on LPV form. We then show that, although originally developed in continuous time, the controller synthesis results can be applied to a discrete-time model as well without...

  3. Discrete-Time LPV Current Control of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we apply a new method for gain-scheduled output feedback control of nonlinear systems to current control of an induction motor. The method relies on recently developed controller synthesis results for linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems, where the controller synthesis is formulated...... as a set of linear matrix inequalities with full-block multipliers. A standard nonlinear model of the motor is constructed and written on LPV form. We then show that, although originally developed in continuous time, the controller synthesis results can be applied to a discrete-time model as well without...... further complications. The synthesis method is applied to the model, yielding an LPV discrete-time controller. Finally, the efficiency of the control scheme is validated via simulations as well as on the actual induction motor, both in open-loop current control and when an outer speed control loop...

  4. Characterization of the procera tomato mutant shows novel functions of the SlDELLA protein in the control of flower morphology, cell division and expansion, and the auxin-signaling pathway during fruit-set and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Esther; Ruiz-Rivero, Omar; Peres, Lazaro Eustaquio Pereira; Atares, Alejandro; Garcia-Martinez, Jose Luis

    2012-11-01

    procera (pro) is a tall tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant carrying a point mutation in the GRAS region of the gene encoding SlDELLA, a repressor in the gibberellin (GA) signaling pathway. Consistent with the SlDELLA loss of function, pro plants display a GA-constitutive response phenotype, mimicking wild-type plants treated with GA₃. The ovaries from both nonemasculated and emasculated pro flowers had very strong parthenocarpic capacity, associated with enhanced growth of preanthesis ovaries due to more and larger cells. pro parthenocarpy is facultative because seeded fruits were obtained by manual pollination. Most pro pistils had exserted stigmas, thus preventing self-pollination, similar to wild-type pistils treated with GA₃ or auxins. However, Style2.1, a gene responsible for long styles in noncultivated tomato, may not control the enhanced style elongation of pro pistils, because its expression was not higher in pro styles and did not increase upon GA₃ application. Interestingly, a high percentage of pro flowers had meristic alterations, with one additional petal, sepal, stamen, and carpel at each of the four whorls, respectively, thus unveiling a role of SlDELLA in flower organ development. Microarray analysis showed significant changes in the transcriptome of preanthesis pro ovaries compared with the wild type, indicating that the molecular mechanism underlying the parthenocarpic capacity of pro is complex and that it is mainly associated with changes in the expression of genes involved in GA and auxin pathways. Interestingly, it was found that GA activity modulates the expression of cell division and expansion genes and an auxin signaling gene (tomato AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7) during fruit-set.

  5. Efeito do Paclobutrazol no controle da diferenciação floral natural do abacaxizeiro cv. Smooth Cayenne Effect of Paclobutrazol in the control of the natural flowering difference of 'Smooth Cayenne' pineapple plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Maria Antunes

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O abacaxizeiro é uma planta de grande importância econômica, porém seu florescimento natural causa sérios problemas, tornando seu manejo difícil devido à desuniformidade de frutos e colheitas, elevando o custo de produção. O objetivo deste trabalho foi manipular o florescimento do abacaxizeiro, contribuindo para uma produção uniforme colocada no mercado, nos meses de menor oferta. Utilizou-se o Paclobutrazol (PBZ nas concentrações de 100; 150 e 200 mg L-1, em 2; 3 ou 4 aplicações via foliar, em plantas de abacaxi cv. Smooth Cayenne, no município de Presidente Alves-SP. O delineamento empregado foi em blocos ao acaso, com 10 tratamentos e três repetições, com 40 plantas por parcela experimental. No período de 100 a 150 dias após a primeira aplicação dos tratamentos, efetuaram-se as contagens de inflorescências presentes no centro da roseta foliar das plantas. Todos os tratamentos com Paclobutrazol inibiram a diferenciação floral natural do abacaxizeiro, recomendando-se a concentração de 150 mg L-1 em duas aplicações, com início em abril, a intervalo de 15 dias.The pineapple plant is a plant of great economical importance, however, its natural flowering causes serious problems, turning it difficult to manage it due to the fruit and harvest irregularity, elevating the production's cost. The objective of this work was to manipulate the pineapple flowering contributing indeed for a more uniform production on the market, during the months of lower offer. The Paclobutrazol was used in pineapple plants cv. Smooth Cayenne at concentrations of 100; 150 and 200 mg L-1 and applied in 2, 3 or 4 times, in Presidente Alves-SP. The experimental design was randomized blocks with 10 treatments and three replications, each experimental portion of 40 plants. In the period of 100 to 150 days after the first application of the treatments, the number of inflorescences present in the center of the plants were counted each week. All of the

  6. Discrete-Time Sliding Mode Control for Uncertain Networked System Subject to Time Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo C. Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We deal with uncertain systems with networked sliding mode control, subject to time delay. To minimize the degenerative effects of the time delay, a simpler format of state predictor is proposed in the control law. Some ultimate bounded stability analyses and stabilization conditions are provided for the uncertain time delay system with proposed discrete-time sliding mode control strategy. A numerical example is presented to corroborate the analyses.

  7. The Durham adaptive optics real-time controller

    CERN Document Server

    Basden, Alastair; Myers, Richard; Younger, Eddy

    2010-01-01

    The Durham adaptive optics real-time controller was initially a proof of concept design for a generic adaptive optics control system. It has since been developed into a modern and powerful CPU based real-time control system, capable of using hardware acceleration (including FPGAs and GPUs), based primarily around commercial off the shelf hardware. It is powerful enough to be used as the real-time controller for all currently planned 8~m class telescope adaptive optics systems. Here we give details of this controller and the concepts behind it, and report on performance including latency and jitter, which is less than 10~$\\mu$s for small adaptive optics systems.

  8. Impulsive control of nonlinear systems with time-varying delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yong-Bin; Bao Jing-Fu; Zhang Hong-Bin; Zhong Qi-Shui; Liao Xiao-Feng; Yu Jue-Sang

    2008-01-01

    A whole impulsive control scheme of nonlinear systems with time-varying delays, which is an extension for impulsive control of nonlinear systems without time delay, is presented in this paper. Utilizing the Lyapunov functions and the impulsive-type comparison principles, we establish a series of different conditions under which impulsively controlled nonlinear systems with time-varying delays are asymptotically stable. Then we estimate upper bounds of impulse interval and time-varying delays for asymptotically stable control. Finally a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the method.

  9. Identification of common scale insects of courtyard flowers and trees and its comprehensive control measures%常见庭院花木介壳虫的识别及综合防治措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽丽

    2012-01-01

    介绍吹绵蚧、粉蚧、盾蚧、蜡蚧、绵蚧及球坚蚧等几种庭院花木常见介壳虫的形态特征、识别方法、发生规律及为害症状,并总结了检疫工作、栽培管理、化学防治、生物防治等综合防治措施。%The morphological characteristics,recognition method,occurrence regularity and harmful symptom of common scale insects of courtyard flowers and trees,including Icerya purchasi,mealybug,armored scale,wax scale,Monophlebinae,Didesmococcus koreanus and so on,were introduced in this paper.The comprehensive control measures were summarized,including quarantine,cultivation management,chemical control,biological control,etc.

  10. GmFT2a, a soybean homolog of FLOWERING LOCUS T, is involved in flowering transition and maintenance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Flowering reversion can be induced in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr., a typical short-day (SD dicot, by switching from SD to long-day (LD photoperiods. This process may involve florigen, putatively encoded by FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, little is known about the potential function of soybean FT homologs in flowering reversion. METHODS: A photoperiod-responsive FT homologue GmFT (renamed as GmFT2a hereafter was cloned from the photoperiod-sensitive cultivar Zigongdongdou. GmFT2a gene expression under different photoperiods was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR. In situ hybridization showed direct evidence for its expression during flowering-related processes. GmFT2a was shown to promote flowering using transgenic studies in Arabidopsis and soybean. The effects of photoperiod and temperature on GmFT2a expression were also analyzed in two cultivars with different photoperiod-sensitivities. RESULTS: GmFT2a expression is regulated by photoperiod. Analyses of GmFT2a transcripts revealed a strong correlation between GmFT2a expression and flowering maintenance. GmFT2a transcripts were observed continuously within the vascular tissue up to the shoot apex during flowering. By contrast, transcripts decreased to undetectable levels during flowering reversion. In grafting experiments, the early-flowering, photoperiod-insensitive stock Heihe27 promotes the appearance of GmFT2a transcripts in the shoot apex of scion Zigongdongdou under noninductive LD conditions. The photothermal effects of GmFT2a expression diversity in cultivars with different photoperiod-sensitivities and a hypothesis is proposed. CONCLUSION: GmFT2a expression is associated with flowering induction and maintenance. Therefore, GmFT2a is a potential target gene for soybean breeding, with the aim of increasing geographic adaptation of this crop.

  11. Absolute Stability for Lurie Control System with Unbound Time Delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王天成; 王耀才; 洪留荣

    2004-01-01

    Time delay existes widely in various real engineering systems and can result in unsatisfactory performance or even an instability of control systems. Therefore, to investigate the stability for time delay systems is of vitul importance in control theory and its applications. Many researchers have studied the stability criteria of systems with constant delay or bound varying time delay, but few of them studied large time delay or unbound time delay. Large time delay existes commonly in various engineering applications. In this paper, the absolute stability of Lurie type direct control systems and indirect control systems with several time delays are discussed. Based on Lyapunov theory, the new delay dependent absolute stability criteria are derived. In our theorem, time delays can be unbound functions, which shows that the results are less conservative than that of existed criteria.

  12. ZCN8 encodes a potential orthologue of Arabidopsis FT florigen that integrates both endogenous and photoperiod flowering signals in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazakis, Chloë M; Coneva, Viktoriya; Colasanti, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    Higher plants use multiple perceptive measures to coordinate flowering time with environmental and endogenous cues. Physiological studies show that florigen is a mobile factor that transmits floral inductive signals from the leaf to the shoot apex. Arabidopsis FT protein is widely regarded as the archetype florigen found in diverse plant species, particularly in plants that use inductive photoperiods to flower. Recently, a large family of FT homologues in maize, the Zea CENTRORADIALIS (ZCN) genes, was described, suggesting that maize also contains FT-related proteins that act as a florigen. The product of one member of this large family, ZCN8, has several attributes that make it a good candidate as a maize florigen. Mechanisms underlying the floral transition in maize are less well understood than those of other species, partly because flowering in temperate maize is dependent largely on endogenous signals. The maize indeterminate1 (id1) gene is an important regulator of maize autonomous flowering that acts in leaves to mediate the transmission or production of florigenic signals. This study finds that id1 acts upstream of ZCN8 to control its expression, suggesting a possible new link to flowering in day-neutral maize. Moreover, in teosinte, a tropical progenitor of maize that requires short-day photoperiods to induce flowering, ZCN8 is highly up-regulated in leaves under inductive photoperiods. Finally, vascular-specific expression of ZCN8 in Arabidopsis complements the ft-1 mutation, demonstrating that leaf-specific expression of ZCN8 can induce flowering. These results suggest that ZCN8 may encode a florigen that integrates both endogenous and environmental signals in maize.

  13. Unified Modeling of Complex Real-Time Control Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hai, He; Chi-Lan, Cai

    2011-01-01

    Complex real-time control system is a software dense and algorithms dense system, which needs modern software engineering techniques to design. UML is an object-oriented industrial standard modeling language, used more and more in real-time domain. This paper first analyses the advantages and problems of using UML for real-time control systems design. Then, it proposes an extension of UML-RT to support time-continuous subsystems modeling. So we can unify modeling of complex real-time control systems on UML-RT platform, from requirement analysis, model design, simulation, until generation code.

  14. Sliding mode control method having terminal convergence in finite time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Subramanian T. (Inventor); Gulati, Sandeep (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An object of this invention is to provide robust nonlinear controllers for robotic operations in unstructured environments based upon a new class of closed loop sliding control methods, sometimes denoted terminal sliders, where the new class will enforce closed-loop control convergence to equilibrium in finite time. Improved performance results from the elimination of high frequency control switching previously employed for robustness to parametric uncertainties. Improved performance also results from the dependence of terminal slider stability upon the rate of change of uncertainties over the sliding surface rather than the magnitude of the uncertainty itself for robust control. Terminal sliding mode control also yields improved convergence where convergence time is finite and is to be controlled. A further object is to apply terminal sliders to robot manipulator control and benchmark performance with the traditional computed torque control method and provide for design of control parameters.

  15. Low-complexity controllers for time-delay systems

    CERN Document Server

    Özbay, Hitay; Bonnet, Catherine; Mounier, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    This volume in the newly established series Advances in Delays and Dynamics (ADD@S) provides a collection of recent results on the design and analysis of Low Complexity Controllers for Time Delay Systems. A widely used indirect method to obtain low order controllers for time delay systems is to design a controller for the reduced order model of the plant. In the dual indirect approach, an infinite dimensional controller is designed first for the original plant model; then, the controller is approximated by keeping track of the degradation in performance and stability robustness measures. The present volume includes new techniques used at different stages of the indirect approach. It also includes new direct design methods for fixed structure and low order controllers. On the other hand, what is meant by low complexity controller is not necessarily low order controller. For example, Smith predictor or similar type of controllers include a copy of the plant internally in the controller, so they are technically ...

  16. Stop and Paint the Flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Shelley

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art lesson where students used watercolors to paint a flower bouquet arranged in a vase. Explains that the students viewed examples of flower bouquets by artists such as Vincent van Gogh and Odilon Redon. Discusses, in detail, the process of creating the artworks. (CMK)

  17. Flowers free from the environment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijl, van der L.

    1958-01-01

    At the jubilee of Professor Lam it seems suitable to contribute a paper on the flower as a functional unit, though it is in the form of a kind of book-review. Lam himself wrote on the more fundamental connections between flowering and lower plants and on the basal morphological elements of the

  18. Teaching Flowers: A Photo Essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Federico

    2017-01-01

    "Teaching Flowers" reflects on humanity's deep connections to horticulture by gathering varied thoughts from seminal writers in the field. In addition, this visual article draws attention to labor issues within the U.S. floral industry by documenting the author's exploration of flowers as social sculpture in New York City.

  19. Effect of Mentha pulegium extract and 8-hydroxy quinoline sulphate to extend the quality and vase life of rose (Rosa hybrid) cut flower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemabadi, Davood; Torkashvand, Ali Mohammadi; Kaviani, Behzad; Bagherzadeh, Maryam; Rezaalipour, Mohaddeseh; Zarchini, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Rose is an ornamental plant which contains one of the world's top cut flowers. Vase life of cut rose flower is short. Extracts of Mentha pulegium and 8-hydroxy quinoline sulphate (8-HQS) were used as two preservative solutions, aiming to extend the vase life of cut rose (Rosa hybrid L.) flowers. Rose flowers were treated with a vase solution containing the extract of M. pulegium, at concentrations of 0, 10, 20 and 30%, in combination with 8-HQS at concentrations of 0, 200, 400 and 600 mg l(-1). Longevity of cut roses flowers was determined on the basis of wilting and chlorophyll retention. Cut roses flowers were kept at room temperature (20 ± 2 degrees C) under normal day light and natural ventilation. The vase life of cut flowers studied was prolonged by all 8-HQS and extract treatments. The best concentration of 8-HQS and extractwere 400 mg l(-1) and 10%, respectively. Our results indicated that the flowers treated with the extract and 8-HQS had longer vase life, higher rate of solution uptake and lower SPAD value (total chlorophyll) compared to the control. Also, cut flowers treated with the extract and 8-HQS had least bacterial colonies. The greatest longevity of vase life by 11.20 and 10.25 days was related to 400 mg I(-1) 8-HQS and 10% of extract, respectively. These treatments improved cut vase life more than the control treatment. The maximum solution uptake (1.85 ml g(-1) f.wt.) and minimum SPAD value (2.19) were calculated in 30% extract along with 200 mg l(-1) 8-HQS, and 200 mg l(-1) 8-HQS, respectively. The lowest number of bacterial colonies (55.75) was obtained in treatment of 600 mg l(-1) 8-HQS. Flower quality of specimens treated with extract and 8-HQS was better than those of the control. The experiments were repeated three times with three replicates and a completely randomized design had been used. The present study concludes that it would be possible to use preservative solutions containing extract of M. pulegium L. and 8-HQS to extend vase

  20. BrFLC2 (flowering locus C) as a candidate gene for a vernalization response QTL in Brassica rapa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jianjun Zhao, Jianjun; Kulkarni, V.; Liu, Nini; Pino del Carpio, D.; Bonnema, A.B.

    2010-01-01

    Flowering time is an important agronomic trait, and wide variation exists among Brassica rapa. In Arabidopsis, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) plays an important role in modulating flowering time and the response to vernalization. Brassica rapa contains several paralogues of FLC at syntenic regions. BrFLC2

  1. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression of MiSOC1: A Homolog of the Flowering Gene SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 from Mango (Mangifera indica L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junya; Liu, Debing; Liu, Guoyin; Tang, Jie; Chen, Yeyuan

    2016-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factor plays a crucial role in plant development, especially controlling the formation and development of floral organs. Mango (Mangifera indica L) is an economically important fruit crop, but its molecular control of flowering is largely unknown. To better understand the molecular basis of flowering regulation in mango, we isolated and characterized the MiSOC1, a putative mango orthologs for the Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1/AGAMOUS-LIKE 20 (SOC1/AGL20) with homology-based cloning and RACE. The full-length cDNA (GenBank accession No.: KP404094) is 945 bp in length including a 74 bp long 5' UTR and a 189 bp long 3' UTR and the open reading frame was 733 bps, encoding 223 amino acids with molecular weight 25.6 kD. Both sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis all indicated that deduced protein contained a conservative MADS-box and semi-conservative K domain and belonged to the SOC1/TM3 subfamily of the MADS-box family. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to investigate the expression profiles of MiSOC1 gene in different tissues/organs including root, stem, leaves, flower bud, and flower. The result indicated MiSOC1 was widely expressed at different levels in both vegetative and reproductive tissues/organs with the highest expression level in the stems' leaves and inflorescences, low expression in roots and flowers. The expression of MiSOC1 in different flower developmental stages was different while same tissue -specific pattern among different varieties. In addition, MiSOC1 gene expression was affect by ethephon while high concentration ethephon inhibit the expression of MiSOC1. Overexpression of MiSOC1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis. In conclusion, these results suggest that MiSOC1 may act as induce flower function in mango.

  2. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression of MiSOC1: A Homolog of the Flowering Gene SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 from Mango (Mangifera indica L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junya; Liu, Debing; Liu, Guoyin; Tang, Jie; Chen, Yeyuan

    2016-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factor plays a crucial role in plant development, especially controlling the formation and development of floral organs. Mango (Mangifera indica L) is an economically important fruit crop, but its molecular control of flowering is largely unknown. To better understand the molecular basis of flowering regulation in mango, we isolated and characterized the MiSOC1, a putative mango orthologs for the Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1/AGAMOUS-LIKE 20 (SOC1/AGL20) with homology-based cloning and RACE. The full-length cDNA (GenBank accession No.: KP404094) is 945 bp in length including a 74 bp long 5′ UTR and a 189 bp long 3′ UTR and the open reading frame was 733 bps, encoding 223 amino acids with molecular weight 25.6 kD. Both sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis all indicated that deduced protein contained a conservative MADS-box and semi-conservative K domain and belonged to the SOC1/TM3 subfamily of the MADS-box family. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to investigate the expression profiles of MiSOC1 gene in different tissues/organs including root, stem, leaves, flower bud, and flower. The result indicated MiSOC1 was widely expressed at different levels in both vegetative and reproductive tissues/organs with the highest expression level in the stems’ leaves and inflorescences, low expression in roots and flowers. The expression of MiSOC1 in different flower developmental stages was different while same tissue –specific pattern among different varieties. In addition, MiSOC1 gene expression was affect by ethephon while high concentration ethephon inhibit the expression of MiSOC1. Overexpression of MiSOC1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis. In conclusion, these results suggest that MiSOC1 may act as induce flower function in mango. PMID:27965680

  3. Discrete-Time LPV Current Control of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we apply a new method for gain-scheduled output feedback control of nonlinear systems to current control of an induction motor. The method relies on recently developed controller synthesis results for linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems, where the controller synthesis is formulated...... as a set of linear matrix inequalities with full-block multipliers. A standard nonlinear model of the motor is then constructed and written on LPV form. We then show that, although originally developed in continuous time, the controller synthesis results can be applied to a discrete-time model as well...... without further complications. The synthesis method is applied to the model, yielding an LPV discrete-time controller. Finally, the efficiency of the control scheme is validated via simulations as well as experimentally on the actual induction motor, both in open-loop current control and when an outer...

  4. F-box proteins in flowering plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathway has been shown to control several key biological processes such as cell division, development, metabolism and immune response. F-box proteins, as a part of SCF (Skp1-Cullin (or Cdc53)-F-box) complex, functioned by interacting with substrate proteins, leading to their subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. To date, several F-box proteins identified in Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum have been shown to play important roles in auxin signal transduction, floral organ formation, flowering and leaf senescence. Arabidopsis genome sequence analysis revealed that it encodes over 1000 predicted F-box proteins accounting for about 5% of total predicted proteins. These results indicate that the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation involving the F-box proteins is an important mechanism controlling plant gene expression. Here, we review the known F-box proteins and their functionsin flowering plants.

  5. Functional mapping of ontogeny in flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiyang; Tong, Chunfa; Pang, Xiaoming; Wang, Zhong; Guo, Yunqian; Du, Fang; Wu, Rongling

    2012-05-01

    All organisms face the problem of how to perform a sequence of developmental changes and transitions during ontogeny. We revise functional mapping, a statistical model originally derived to map genes that determine developmental dynamics, to take into account the entire process of ontogenetic growth from embryo to adult and from the vegetative to reproductive phase. The revised model provides a framework that reconciles the genetic architecture of development at different stages and elucidates a comprehensive picture of the genetic control mechanisms of growth that change gradually from a simple to a more complex level. We use an annual flowering plant, as an example, to demonstrate our model by which to map genes and their interactions involved in embryo and postembryonic growth. The model provides a useful tool to study the genetic control of ontogenetic growth in flowering plants and any other organisms through proper modifications based on their biological characteristics.

  6. 甜瓜雄花采摘时间及贮藏温度对花粉生活力的影响%Effect of Different Male-flower Picking Time and Storage Temperature on Melon Pollen Viability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永平; 杨少军; 陈幼源

    2011-01-01

    Taking 3 stable inbred-lines of melon ( Cucumis melon L. ) as experimental material, we studied the effects of different male-flower picking time and storage temperature on their pollen viabilities.The results indicated that the pollen viabilities of 3 melon cultivars were the best at 8:00 am and then decreased gradually as time extended. Under low temperature of 4 ℃, the pollen viability could maintain in good condition and as time flew, it also drop down. But pollen viabilities and retaining times of different melon cultivars were different.%以3个甜瓜品系的稳定自交系为试材,研究了甜瓜鲜雄花不同采摘时间及贮藏温度对花粉生活力的影响.结果表明:3个甜瓜品系在早晨8:00花粉生活力最佳,随着时间的推移,花粉生活力下降;在4℃条件下,花粉生活力保持最好,随着温度的升高和时间的延长,花粉生活力逐渐下降,但不同甜瓜品系的花粉生活力及保持时间不同.

  7. Psidium guajava and Piper betle Leaf Extracts Prolong Vase Life of Cut Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus Flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of leaf extracts of Psidium guajava and Piper betle on prolonging vase life of cut carnation flowers was studied. “Carola” and “Pallas Orange” carnation flowers, at bud stage, were pulsed 24 hours with a floral preservative. Then, flowers were placed in a vase solution containing sprite and a “germicide” (leaf extracts of P. guajava and P. betle, 8-HQC, or a copper coin. Flowers treated with 8-HQC, copper coin, and leaf extracts had longer vase life, larger flower diameter, and higher rate of water uptake compared to control (tap water. The leaf extracts of P. guajava and P. betle showed highest antibacterial and antifungal activities compared to the other treatments. Both showed similar effects on flower quality as the synthetic germicide, 8-HQC. Therefore, these extracts are likely natural germicides to prolong vase life of cut flowers.

  8. Psidium guajava and Piper betle leaf extracts prolong vase life of cut carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M M; Ahmad, S H; Lgu, K S

    2012-01-01

    The effect of leaf extracts of Psidium guajava and Piper betle on prolonging vase life of cut carnation flowers was studied. "Carola" and "Pallas Orange" carnation flowers, at bud stage, were pulsed 24 hours with a floral preservative. Then, flowers were placed in a vase solution containing sprite and a "germicide" (leaf extracts of P. guajava and P. betle, 8-HQC, or a copper coin). Flowers treated with 8-HQC, copper coin, and leaf extracts had longer vase life, larger flower diameter, and higher rate of water uptake compared to control (tap water). The leaf extracts of P. guajava and P. betle showed highest antibacterial and antifungal activities compared to the other treatments. Both showed similar effects on flower quality as the synthetic germicide, 8-HQC. Therefore, these extracts are likely natural germicides to prolong vase life of cut flowers.

  9. Methylation mediated by an anthocyanin, O-methyltransferase, is involved in purple flower coloration in Paeonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hui; Wu, Jie; Ji, Kui-Xian; Zeng, Qing-Yin; Bhuiya, Mohammad-Wadud; Su, Shang; Shu, Qing-Yan; Ren, Hong-Xu; Liu, Zheng-An; Wang, Liang-Sheng

    2015-11-01

    Anthocyanins are major pigments in plants. Methylation plays a role in the diversity and stability of anthocyanins. However, the contribution of anthocyanin methylation to flower coloration is still unclear. We identified two homologous anthocyanin O-methyltransferase (AOMT) genes from purple-flowered (PsAOMT) and red-flowered (PtAOMT) Paeonia plants, and we performed functional analyses of the two genes in vitro and in vivo. The critical amino acids for AOMT catalytic activity were studied by site-directed mutagenesis. We showed that the recombinant proteins, PsAOMT and PtAOMT, had identical substrate preferences towards anthocyanins. The methylation activity of PsAOMT was 60 times higher than that of PtAOMT in vitro. Interestingly, this vast difference in catalytic activity appeared to result from a single amino acid residue substitution at position 87 (arginine to leucine). There were significant differences between the 35S::PsAOMT transgenic tobacco and control flowers in relation to their chromatic parameters, which further confirmed the function of PsAOMT in vivo. The expression levels of the two homologous AOMT genes were consistent with anthocyanin accumulation in petals. We conclude that AOMTs are responsible for the methylation of cyanidin glycosides in Paeonia plants and play an important role in purple coloration in Paeonia spp.

  10. Application of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the production of cut flower roses under commercial-like conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garmendia, I.; Mangas, V. J.

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this work was to study the influence of two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) Glomus mosseae (Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerd. and Trappe, and G. intraradices (Schenck and Smith) on cut flower yield of rose (Rosa hybrida L. cv. Grand Gala) under commercial-like greenhouse conditions. Flower production was positively influenced by G. mosseae inoculation. Both inocula tested caused low levels of mycorrhizal root colonization, with higher percentages in Rosa associated with G. mosseae. Significant improvement of plant biomass, leaf nutritional status or flower quality was not detected in inoculated plants probably due to the low symbiosis establishment. However, G. mosseae reduced by one month the time needed for 80% of the plants to flower and slightly increased number of cut flowers relative to non-mycorrhizal controls on the fourth, sixth and eighth months after transplanting. It is suggested that an altered carbohydrate metabolism could contribute to this positive effect. Low colonization of rose roots supports the idea that more effort is required to ensure successful application of AMF in ornamental production systems. (Author) 40 refs.

  11. Approximation law for discrete-time variable structure control systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan ZHENG; Yuanwei JING

    2006-01-01

    Two approximation laws of sliding mode for discrete-time variable structure control systems are proposed to overcome the limitations of the exponential approximation law and the variable rate approximation law. By applying the proposed approximation laws of sliding mode to discrete-time variable structure control systems, the stability of origin can be guaranteed, and the chattering along the switching surface caused by discrete-time variable structure control can be restrained effectively. In designing of approximation laws, the problem that the system control input is restricted is also considered, which is very important in practical systems. Finally a simulation example shows the effectiveness of the two approximation laws proposed.

  12. Controlled release of an extract of Calendula officinalis flowers from a system based on the incorporation of gelatin-collagen microparticles into collagen I scaffolds: design and in vitro performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Ronald A; Millán, Diana; Suesca, Edward; Sosnik, Alejandro; Fontanilla, Marta R

    2015-06-01

    Aiming to develop biological skin dresses with improved performance in the treatment of skin wounds, acellular collagen I scaffolds were modified with polymeric microparticles and the subsequent loading of a hydroglycolic extract of Calendula officinalis flowers. Microparticles made of gelatin-collagen were produced by a water-in-oil emulsion/cross-linking method. Thereafter, these microparticles were mixed with collagen suspensions at three increasing concentrations and the resulting mixtures lyophilized to make microparticle-loaded porous collagen scaffolds. Resistance to enzymatic degradation, ability to associate with the C. officinalis extract, and the extract release profile of the three gelatin-collagen microparticle-scaffold prototypes were assessed in vitro and compared to collagen scaffolds without microparticles used as control. Data indicated that the incorporation of gelatin-collagen microparticles increased the resistance of the scaffolds to in vitro enzymatic degradation, as well as their association with the C. officinalis flower extract. In addition, a sharp decrease in cytotoxicity, as well as more prolonged release of the extract, was attained. Overall results support the potential of these systems to develop innovative dermal substitutes with improved features. Furthermore, the gelatin-collagen mixture represents a low-cost and scalable alternative with high clinical transferability, especially appealing in developing countries.

  13. Discrete-time optimal control and games on large intervals

    CERN Document Server

    Zaslavski, Alexander J

    2017-01-01

    Devoted to the structure of approximate solutions of discrete-time optimal control problems and approximate solutions of dynamic discrete-time two-player zero-sum games, this book presents results on properties of approximate solutions in an interval that is independent lengthwise, for all sufficiently large intervals. Results concerning the so-called turnpike property of optimal control problems and zero-sum games in the regions close to the endpoints of the time intervals are the main focus of this book. The description of the structure of approximate solutions on sufficiently large intervals and its stability will interest graduate students and mathematicians in optimal control and game theory, engineering, and economics. This book begins with a brief overview and moves on to analyze the structure of approximate solutions of autonomous nonconcave discrete-time optimal control Lagrange problems.Next the structures of approximate solutions of autonomous discrete-time optimal control problems that are discret...

  14. Neuromorphic Continuous-Time State Space Pole Placement Adaptive Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢钊; 孙明伟

    2003-01-01

    A neuromorphic continuous-time state space pole assignment adaptive controller is proposed, which is particularly appropriate for controlling a large-scale time-variant state-space model due to the parallely distributed nature of neurocomputing. In our approach, Hopfield neural network is exploited to identify the parameters of a continuous-time state-space model, and a dedicated recurrent neural network is designed to compute pole placement feedback control law in real time. Thus the identification and the control computation are incorporated in the closed-loop, adaptive, real-time control system. The merit of this approach is that the neural networks converge to their solutions very quickly and simultaneously.

  15. Landing-Time-Controlled Management Of Air Traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzberger, Heinz; Tobias, Leonard

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual system controls aircraft with old and new guidance equipment. Report begins with overview of concept, then reviews controller-interactive simulations. Describes fuel-conservative-trajectory algorithm, based on equations of motion for controlling landing time. Finally, presents results of piloted simulations.

  16. Finite-Time Reentry Attitude Control Using Time-Varying Sliding Mode and Disturbance Observer

    OpenAIRE

    Xuzhong Wu; Shengjing Tang; Jie Guo; Yao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the finite-time attitude control problem for reentry vehicle with redundant actuators in consideration of planet uncertainties and external disturbances. Firstly, feedback linearization technique is used to cancel the nonlinearities of equations of motion to construct a basic mode for attitude controller. Secondly, two kinds of time-varying sliding mode control methods with disturbance observer are integrated with the basic mode in order to enhance the control performance ...

  17. Discrete-Time LPV Current Control of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we apply a new method for gain-scheduled output feedback control of nonlinear systems to current control of an induction motor. The method relies on recently developed controller synthesis results for linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems, where the controller synthesis is formulated...... as a set of linear matrix inequalities with full-block multipliers. A standard nonlinear model of the motor is constructed and written on LPV form. We then show that, although originally developed in continuous time, the controller synthesis results can be applied to a discrete-time model as well without...

  18. Real-time simulation of hand motion for prosthesis control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blana, Dimitra; Chadwick, Edward K; van den Bogert, Antonie J; Murray, Wendy M

    2017-04-01

    Individuals with hand amputation suffer substantial loss of independence. Performance of sophisticated prostheses is limited by the ability to control them. To achieve natural and simultaneous control of all wrist and hand motions, we propose to use real-time biomechanical simulation to map between residual EMG and motions of the intact hand. Here we describe a musculoskeletal model of the hand using only extrinsic muscles to determine whether real-time performance is possible. Simulation is 1.3 times faster than real time, but the model is locally unstable. Methods are discussed to increase stability and make this approach suitable for prosthesis control.

  19. An Ada run-time control architecture for telerobots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaram, J.; Rodriguez, G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the architecture and Ada language implementation of a process-level run-time control subystem for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) telerobot system. The concept of run-time control in a combined robot-teleoperation environment is examined and the telerobot system at JPL is described. An Ada language implementation of the JPL Telerobot Run-Time Controller (RTC) is described by highlighting the functional behavior of the subsystem, defining the internal modules, and providing a functional flow time sequence of internal module activity.

  20. Engineering applications of discrete-time optimal control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui; Ravn, Hans V.

    1990-01-01

    of some well-known and new results in discrete time optimal control methods applicable to practical problem solving within engineering. Emphasis is placed on dynamic programming, the classical maximum principle and generalized versions of the maximum principle for optimal control of discrete time systems......Many problems of design and operation of engineering systems can be formulated as optimal control problems where time has been discretisized. This is also true even if 'time' is not involved in the formulation of the problem, but rather another one-dimensional parameter. This paper gives a review...

  1. Engineering applications of discrete-time optimal control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui; Ravn, Hans V.

    1990-01-01

    Many problems of design and operation of engineering systems can be formulated as optimal control problems where time has been discretisized. This is also true even if 'time' is not involved in the formulation of the problem, but rather another one-dimensional parameter. This paper gives a review...... of some well-known and new results in discrete time optimal control methods applicable to practical problem solving within engineering. Emphasis is placed on dynamic programming, the classical maximum principle and generalized versions of the maximum principle for optimal control of discrete time systems...

  2. Discrete-Time Nonlinear Control of VSC-HVDC System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TianTian Qian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Because VSC-HVDC is a kind of strong nonlinear, coupling, and multi-input multioutput (MIMO system, its control problem is always attracting much attention from scholars. And a lot of papers have done research on its control strategy in the continuous-time domain. But the control system is implemented through the computer discrete sampling in practical engineering. It is necessary to study the mathematical model and control algorithm in the discrete-time domain. The discrete mathematical model based on output feedback linearization and discrete sliding mode control algorithm is proposed in this paper. And to ensure the effectiveness of the control system in the quasi sliding mode state, the fast output sampling method is used in the output feedback. The results from simulation experiment in MATLAB/SIMULINK prove that the proposed discrete control algorithm can make the VSC-HVDC system have good static, dynamic, and robust characteristics in discrete-time domain.

  3. Approximate Controllability of Abstract Discrete-Time Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuevas Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximate controllability for semilinear abstract discrete-time systems is considered. Specifically, we consider the semilinear discrete-time system , , where are bounded linear operators acting on a Hilbert space , are -valued bounded linear operators defined on a Hilbert space , and is a nonlinear function. Assuming appropriate conditions, we will show that the approximate controllability of the associated linear system implies the approximate controllability of the semilinear system.

  4. Plant-herbivore synchrony and selection on plant flowering phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelström, Elsa; Olofsson, Martin; Posledovich, Diana; Wiklund, Christer; Dahlgren, Johan P; Ehrlén, Johan

    2017-03-01

    Temporal variation in natural selection has profound effects on the evolutionary trajectories of populations. One potential source of variation in selection is that differences in thermal reaction norms and temperature influence the relative phenology of interacting species. We manipulated the phenology of the butterfly herbivore Anthocharis cardamines relative to genetically identical populations of its host plant, Cardamine pratensis, and examined the effects on butterfly preferences and selection acting on the host plant. We found that butterflies preferred plants at an intermediate flowering stage, regardless of the timing of butterfly flight relative to flowering onset of the population. Consequently, the probability that plant genotypes differing in timing of flowering should experience a butterfly attack depended strongly on relative phenology. These results suggest that differences in spring temperature influence the direction of herbivore-mediated selection on flowering phenology, and that climatic conditions can influence natural selection also when phenotypic preferences remain constant.

  5. Output regulation problem for discrete-time linear time-delay systems by output feedback control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yamin YAN; Jie HUANG

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the output regulation problem of discrete linear time-delay systems by output feedback control. We have established some results parallel to those for the output regulation problem of continuous linear time-delay systems.

  6. Promoting flowering, lateral shoot outgrowth, leaf development, and flower abscission in tobacco plants overexpressing cotton FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)-like gene GhFT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Yannan; Zhang, Kun; Guo, Danli; Cui, Baiming; Wang, Xiyin; Huang, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) encodes a mobile signal protein, recognized as major component of florigen, which has a central position in regulating flowering, and also plays important roles in various physiological aspects. A mode is recently emerging for the balance of indeterminate and determinate growth, which is controlled by the ratio of FT-like and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1)-like gene activities, and has a strong influence on the floral transition and plant architecture. Orthologs of GhFT1 was previously isolated and characterized from Gossypium hirsutum. We demonstrated that ectopic overexpression of GhFT1 in tobacco, other than promoting flowering, promoted lateral shoot outgrowth at the base, induced more axillary bud at the axillae of rosette leaves, altered leaf morphology, increased chlorophyll content, had higher rate of photosynthesis and caused flowers abscission. Analysis of gene expression suggested that flower identity genes were significantly upregulated in transgenic plants. Further analysis of tobacco FT paralogs indicated that NtFT4, acting as flower inducer, was upregulated, whereas NtFT2 and NtFT3 as flower inhibitors were upregulated in transgenic plants under long-day conditions, but downregulated under short-day conditions. Our data suggests that sufficient level of transgenic cotton FT might disturb the balance of the endogenous tobacco FT paralogs of inducers and repressors and resulted in altered phenotype in transgenic tobacco, emphasizing the expanding roles of FT in regulating shoot architecture by advancing determine growth. Manipulating the ratio for indeterminate and determinate growth factors throughout FT-like and TFL1-like gene activity holds promise to improve plant architecture and enhance crop yield.

  7. Promoting Flowering, Lateral Shoot Outgrowth, Leaf Development, and Flower Abscission in Tobacco Plants Overexpressing Cotton FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT-Like Gene GhFT1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eLi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT encodes a mobile signal protein, recognized as major component of florigen, which has a central position in regulating flowering, and also plays important roles in various physiological aspects. A mode is recently emerging for the balance of indeterminate and determinate growth, which is controlled by the ratio of FT-like and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1-like gene activities, and has a strong influence on the floral transition and plant architecture. Orthologs of GhFT1 was previously isolated and characterized from Gossypium hirsutum. We demonstrated that ectopic overexpression of GhFT1 in tobacco, other than promoting flowering, promoted lateral shoot outgrowth at the base, induced more axillary bud at the axillae of rosette leaves, altered leaf morphology, increased chlorophyll content, had higher photosynthesis and caused flowers abscission. Analysis of gene expression suggested that flower identity genes were significantly upregulated in transgenic plants. Further analysis of tobacco FT paralogs indicated that NtFT4, acting as flower inducer, was upregulated, whereas NtFT2 and NtFT3 as flower inhibitors were upregulated in transgenic plants under long-day conditions, but downregulated under short-day conditions. Our data suggested that sufficient level of foreign FT might disturb the balance of the endogenous FT paralogs of inducers and repressors and resulted in altered phenotype in transgenic tobacco, emphasizing the expanding roles of FT in regulating shoot architecture by advancing determine growth. Manipulating the ratio for indeterminate and determinate growth factors throughout FT-like and TFL1-like gene activity holds promise to improve plant architecture and enhance crop yield.

  8. Design and Control of Nonlinear Mechanical Systems for Minimum Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Cardoso

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an integrated methodology for optimal design and control of nonlinear flexible mechanical systems, including minimum time problems. This formulation is implemented in an optimum design code and it is applied to the nonlinear behavior dynamic response. Damping and stiffness characteristics plus control driven forces are considered as decision variables. A conceptual separation between time variant and time invariant design parameters is presented, this way including the design space into the control space and considering the design variables as control variables not depending on time. By using time integrals through all the derivations, design and control problems are unified. In the optimization process we can use both types of variables simultaneously or by interdependent levels. For treating minimum time problems, a unit time interval is mapped onto the original time interval, then treating equally time variant and time invariant problems. The dynamic response and its sensitivity are discretized via space-time finite elements, and may be integrated either by at-once integration or step-by-step. Adjoint system approach is used to calculate the sensitivities.

  9. Logical Time for Decentralized Control of Material Handling Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Seibold, Zäzilia

    2016-01-01

    The fourth industrial revolution aims to transform production systems. In this work, Logical Time which is a control principle for distributed systems is transferred to material handling systems with decentralized control. The GridSorter, a modular sorter with grid-like structure, is chosen as showcase system. The system is proven to be deadlock-free and is robust against varying transport times. The time-window-based route reservation process is described as Iterative Deepening A*.

  10. Solving Nonlinear Time Delay Control Systems by Fourier series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Farahi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a method to find the solution of time-delay optimal control systems using Fourier series. The method is based upon expanding various time functions in the system as their truncated Fourier series. Operational matrices of integration and delay are presented and are utilized to reduce the solution of time-delay control systems to the solution of algebraic equations. Illustrative examples are included to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the technique.

  11. Ehd4 encodes a novel and Oryza-genus-specific regulator of photoperiodic flowering in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Gao

    Full Text Available Land plants have evolved increasingly complex regulatory modes of their flowering time (or heading date in crops. Rice (Oryza sativa L. is a short-day plant that flowers more rapidly in short-day but delays under long-day conditions. Previous studies have shown that the CO-FT module initially identified in long-day plants (Arabidopsis is evolutionary conserved in short-day plants (Hd1-Hd3a in rice. However, in rice, there is a unique Ehd1-dependent flowering pathway that is Hd1-independent. Here, we report isolation and characterization of a positive regulator of Ehd1, Early heading date 4 (Ehd4. ehd4 mutants showed a never flowering phenotype under natural long-day conditions. Map-based cloning revealed that Ehd4 encodes a novel CCCH-type zinc finger protein, which is localized to the nucleus and is able to bind to nucleic acids in vitro and transactivate transcription in yeast, suggesting that it likely functions as a transcriptional regulator. Ehd4 expression is most active in young leaves with a diurnal expression pattern similar to that of Ehd1 under both short-day and long-day conditions. We show that Ehd4 up-regulates the expression of the "florigen" genes Hd3a and RFT1 through Ehd1, but it acts independently of other known Ehd1 regulators. Strikingly, Ehd4 is highly conserved in the Oryza genus including wild and cultivated rice, but has no homologs in other species, suggesting that Ehd4 is originated along with the diversification of the Oryza genus from the grass family during evolution. We conclude that Ehd4 is a novel Oryza-genus-specific regulator of Ehd1, and it plays an essential role in photoperiodic control of flowering time in rice.

  12. RNA-seq analysis of apical meristem reveals integrative regulatory network of ROS and chilling potentially related to flowering in Litchi chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xingyu; Li, Jingjing; Chen, Houbin; Hu, Jiaqi; Liu, Pengxu; Zhou, Biyan

    2017-08-31

    Litchi is an important woody fruit tree. Floral initiation in litchi is triggered by low temperatures. However, defective flowering is a major challenge for litchi production in times of climate change and global warming. Previous studies have shown that the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by methyl viologen dichloride hydrate (MV) promotes flowering. In this study, potted trees were transferred to growth chambers for low-temperature (LT), medium-temperature (MT), and high-temperature (HT) treatments. Trees at MT were subjected to ROS treatment to promote flowering, and those at LT were induced to flower. RNA-sequencing was applied to obtain a global transcriptome of the apical meristem and reveal potential gene networks controlling the transformation from vegetative meristems (VM) into inflorescence meristems (IM). We assembled 73,117 unigenes with a mean size of 790 bp and 11741 unigenes were identified as both chilling and ROS responsive genes (CRRGs), of which 48 were identified as flowering-related CRRGs, 59 were plant hormone signal transduction CRRGs, and 146 were plant hormone biosynthesis-related CRRGs. Genes co-expression network analysis indicated inner relationships, suggesting that ROS and chilling promotes the VM to IM transition through a regulatory gene network of transcription factors, hormones, and flowering regulators.

  13. Effect Mechanism of SVP Gene Regulation on Bolting and Flowering%抽薹开花调控基因SVP的作用机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨修勤; 王志敏; 汤青林; 宋明

    2013-01-01

    SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE(SVP)基因属于MADS盒基因,它编码的蛋白转录因子对开花具有抑制作用.SVP主要在营养生长阶段表达,受自主途径等多个开花路径调控,并可以调节开花途径整合子FLOWERING LOCUS T(FT),SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC 1)的表达,从而调控抽薹开花时间.本文综述了SVP基因调控抽薹开花的作用机制,并结合SVP基因的研究现状展望了未来的研究方向.%SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE ( SVP) encoded MADS-box protein is a represser of bolting and flowering in Cruciferous plants. SVP is mainly expressed in vegetative growth stage, which is regulated by some flowering pathways, such as autonomous pathway. It can control flowering time by regulating several floral signal integrators, such as FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 ( SOC1 ). This paper summarizes the effect mechanism of SVP gene regulation on bolting and flowering. It also discusses about the prospects of future research activities, according to present research status on SVP gene.

  14. Phenolic antioxidants from Rosa soulieana flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Fu; Zhang, Xiaolong; Wang, Lun; Zhou, Zhiqiong; Wang, Mingkui

    2013-01-01

    Rosa soulieana has been widely used in traditional medicine to treat cardiovascular disorders. In this study, antioxidant activity-guided fractionation and purification of the methanol extract from the flowers of R. soulieana has led to the isolation of nine phenolic antioxidants, which were identified as catechin (1), tiliroside (2), astragalin (3), isoquercitrin (4), nicotiflorin (5), eugenol 4-O-β-d-(6'-O-galloyl) glucoside (6), michehedyosides D (7), citrusin C (8) and strictinin (9), respectively. Among them, compounds 5-9 were reported from the genus Rosa for the first time. All the compounds were also assayed by in vitro ABTS [2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) diammonium salt] radical cation scavenging activity. Among these bioactive isolates (1-9), compounds 1, 6, 7 and 9 exhibited strong scavenging activity in ABTS (SC50 = 10.17, 7.38, 8.60, 4.72 μmol/L, respectively) compared with the positive control l-ascorbic acid (SC50 = 15.97 μmol/L).

  15. State Predictive Model Following Control System for Linear Time Delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Zhong Wang; Shu-Jing Wu; Shigenori Okubo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new state predictive model following control system (MFCS). The considered system has linear time delays. With the MFCS method, we obtain a simple input control law. The bounded property of the internal states for the control is given and the utility of this control design is guaranteed. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. ControlShell - A real-time software framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stanley A.; Ullman, Marc A.; Chen, Vincent W.

    1991-01-01

    ControlShell is designed to enable modular design and impplementation of real-time software. It is an object-oriented tool-set for real-time software system programming. It provides a series of execution and data interchange mechansims that form a framework for building real-time applications. These mechanisms allow a component-based approach to real-time software generation and mangement. By defining a set of interface specifications for intermodule interaction, ControlShell provides a common platform that is the basis for real-time code development and exchange.

  17. Listening to the sound of flower blooming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN; Wei-fang

    2015-01-01

    The most beautiful thing in our life is the first glance,and the most beautiful point of fireworks is its evanescent bloom.Thing’s beautiful is usually due to its evanescent exist.It might exist shortly but in our mind for a long time.As for me,the most beautiful thing is to listen to the sound of flower blooming.

  18. A theory of Markovian time-inconsistent stochastic control in discrete time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjork, Tomas; Murgoci, Agatha

    2014-01-01

    We develop a theory for a general class of discrete-time stochastic control problems that, in various ways, are time-inconsistent in the sense that they do not admit a Bellman optimality principle. We attack these problems by viewing them within a game theoretic framework, and we look for subgame...... function. Most known examples of time-inconsistent stochastic control problems in the literature are easily seen to be special cases of the present theory. We also prove that for every time-inconsistent problem, there exists an associated time-consistent problem such that the optimal control.