WorldWideScience

Sample records for controlling energy transfer

  1. Regulation control and energy management scheme for wireless power transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, John M.

    2015-12-29

    Power transfer rate at a charging facility can be maximized by employing a feedback scheme. The state of charge (SOC) and temperature of the regenerative energy storage system (RESS) pack of a vehicle is monitored to determine the load due to the RESS pack. An optimal frequency that cancels the imaginary component of the input impedance for the output signal from a grid converter is calculated from the load of the RESS pack, and a frequency offset f* is made to the nominal frequency f.sub.0 of the grid converter output based on the resonance frequency of a magnetically coupled circuit. The optimal frequency can maximize the efficiency of the power transfer. Further, an optimal grid converter duty ratio d* can be derived from the charge rate of the RESS pack. The grid converter duty ratio d* regulates wireless power transfer (WPT) power level.

  2. Switching individual quantum dot emission through electrically controlling resonant energy transfer to graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiye; Bao, Wei; Ju, Long; Schuck, P James; Wang, Feng; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Electrically controlling resonant energy transfer of optical emitters provides a novel mechanism to switch nanoscale light sources on and off individually for optoelectronic applications. Graphene's optical transitions are tunable through electrostatic gating over a broad wavelength spectrum, making it possible to modulate energy transfer from a variety of nanoemitters to graphene at room temperature. We demonstrate photoluminescence switching of individual colloidal quantum dots by electrically tuning their energy transfer to graphene. The gate dependence of energy transfer modulation confirms that the transition occurs when the Fermi level is shifted over half the emitter's excitation energy. The modulation magnitude decreases rapidly with increasing emitter-graphene distance (d), following the 1/d(4) rate trend unique to the energy transfer process to two-dimensional materials.

  3. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-12-31

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''.

  4. Nanophotonic Control of the Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Christian; Zijlstra, Niels; Lagendijk, Ad

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the influence of the local density of optical states (LDOS) on the rate and efficiency of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a donor to an acceptor. The donors and acceptors are dye molecules that are separated by a short strand of double-stranded DNA. The LDOS...... is controlled by carefully positioning the FRET pairs near a mirror. We find that the energy transfer efficiency changes with LDOS, and that, in agreement with theory, the energy transfer rate is independent of the LDOS, which allows one to quantitatively control FRET systems in a new way. Our results imply...

  5. Rapid Energy Transfer Enabling Control of Emission Polarization in Perylene Bisimide Donor-Acceptor Triads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menelaou, Christopher; ter Schiphorst, Jeroen; Kendhale, Amol M; Parkinson, Patrick; Debije, Michael G; Schenning, Albertus P H J; Herz, Laura M

    2015-04-02

    Materials showing rapid intramolecular energy transfer and polarization switching are of interest for both their fundamental photophysics and potential for use in real-world applications. Here, we report two donor-acceptor-donor triad dyes based on perylene-bisimide subunits, with the long axis of the donors arranged either parallel or perpendicular to that of the central acceptor. We observe rapid energy transfer (energy transfer rate for the linearly arranged triad but severely underestimates it for the orthogonal case. We show that the rapid energy transfer arises from a combination of through-bond coupling and through-space transfer between donor and acceptor units. As they allow energy cascading to an excited state with controllable polarization, these triad dyes show high potential for use in luminescent solar concentrator devices.

  6. Can nanophotonics control the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, C.; Zijlstra, N.; Lagendijk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary form only given. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is the dominant nonradiative energy transfer mechanism between a donor and acceptor fluorophore in nanometer proximity. FRET plays a pivotal role in the photosynthetic apparatus of plants and bacteria and many applications, ranging...... from photovoltaics and lighting, to probing molecular distances and interactions.It is an intriguing open question whether the FRET rate γFRET and the energy transfer efficiency ηFRET can also be controlled by the nanoscale optical environment, characterized by the local density of optical states (LDOS......-defined distances (ranging from 60 nm to 270 nm) from a metallic mirror. The energy transfer rate γFRET and efficiency ηFRET are obtained by measuring the donor emission rate γDA in presence and the rate γD in absence of the acceptor using time-correlated single-photon counting based lifetime imaging. Our data...

  7. Nanophotonic control of the F\\"orster resonance energy transfer efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, Christian; Lagendijk, Ad; Wubs, Martijn; Mosk, Allard P; Subramaniam, Vinod; Vos, Willem L

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the influence of the local density of optical states (LDOS) on the rate and efficiency of F\\"orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a donor to an acceptor. The donors and acceptors are dye molecules that are separated by a short strand of double-stranded DNA. The LDOS is controlled by carefully positioning the FRET pairs near a mirror. We find that the energy transfer efficiency changes with LDOS, and that, in agreement with theory, the energy transfer rate is independent of the LDOS, which allows one to quantitatively control FRET systems in a new way. Our results imply a change in the characteristic F\\"orster distance, in contrast to common lore that this distance is fixed for a given FRET pair.

  8. Noninvasive control of the power transferred to an implanted device by an ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmilovitz, Doron; Ozeri, Shaul; Wang, Chua-Chin; Spivak, Boaz

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer is an effective method for powering implanted devices noninvasively. Nevertheless, the amount of power harvested by the implanted receiver is sensitive to the distance and orientation of the external transmitting transducer attached to the skin with respect to the implanted receiving transducer. This paper describes an ultrasonic power transfer link whose harvested power is controlled by an inductive link. A small (5 μF) storage capacitor voltage, which is part of the implanted unit, is allowed to swing between 3.8 and 3.5 V using hysteretic control. The two control states are indicated by excitation (while the implanted storage capacitor voltage decreases) or the absence of excitation of an implanted coil that is magnetically coupled to an external coil attached to the skin surface. A 35 mW Ultrasonic Transcutaneous Energy Transfer link was fabricated using two piezoelectric transducers of equal size (Fuji Ceramics C-2 PZT disc 15 mm × 3 mm) operated at a vibration frequency of 720 kHz. By applying the proposed hysteretic control, the captured power was effectively regulated for implantation depths of up to 85 mm.

  9. Controlling resonance energy transfer in nanostructure emitters by positioning near a mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeraddana, Dilusha; Premaratne, Malin; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Andrews, David L.

    2017-08-01

    The ability to control light-matter interactions in quantum objects opens up many avenues for new applications. We look at this issue within a fully quantized framework using a fundamental theory to describe mirror-assisted resonance energy transfer (RET) in nanostructures. The process of RET communicates electronic excitation between suitably disposed donor and acceptor particles in close proximity, activated by the initial excitation of the donor. Here, we demonstrate that the energy transfer rate can be significantly controlled by careful positioning of the RET emitters near a mirror. The results deliver equations that elicit new insights into the associated modification of virtual photon behavior, based on the quantum nature of light. In particular, our results indicate that energy transfer efficiency in nanostructures can be explicitly expedited or suppressed by a suitably positioned neighboring mirror, depending on the relative spacing and the dimensionality of the nanostructure. Interestingly, the resonance energy transfer between emitters is observed to "switch off" abruptly under suitable conditions of the RET system. This allows one to quantitatively control RET systems in a new way.

  10. Factors controlling the competition among rotational and vibrational energy transfer channels in glyoxal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmenter, C S; Clegg, S M; Krajnovich, D J; Lu, S

    1997-08-05

    The state-to-state transfer of rotational and vibrational energy has been studied for S1 glyoxal (CHOCHO) in collisions with D2, N2, CO and C2H4 using crossed molecular beams. A laser is used to pump glyoxal seeded in He to its S1 zero point level with zero angular momentum about its top axis (K' = 0). The inelastic scattering to each of at least 26 S1 glyoxal rotational and rovibrational levels is monitored by dispersed S1-S0 fluorescence. Various collision partners are chosen to investigate the relative influences of reduced mass and the collision pair interaction potential on the competition among the energy transfer channels. When the data are combined with that obtained previously from other collision partners whose masses range from 2 to 84 amu, it is seen that the channel competition is controlled primarily by the kinematics of the collisional interaction. Variations in the intermolecular potential play strictly a secondary role.

  11. Transient analysis of energy Transfer Control (ECT) and compressor bleed concepts of remote lift fan control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The transient performance of two concepts for control of vertical takeoff aircraft remote lift fans is analyzed and discussed. Both concepts employ flow transfer between pairs of lift fans located in separate parts of the aircraft in order to obtain attitude control moments for hover and low-speed flight. The results presented are from a digital computer, dynamic analysis of the YJ97/LF460 remote drive turbofan. The transient responses of the two systems are presented for step demands in lift and moment.

  12. Solar Energy: Heat Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat transfer is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The…

  13. Control of F\\"orster energy transfer in vicinity of metallic surfaces and hyperbolic metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Tumkur, Thejaswi U; Bonner, Carl E; Poddubny, Alexander N; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Noginov, Mikhail A

    2015-01-01

    Optical cavities, plasmonic structures, photonic band crystals, interfaces, as well as, generally speaking, any photonic media with homogeneous or spatially inhomogeneous dielectric permittivity (including metamaterials) have local densities of photonic states, which are different from that in vacuum. These modified density of states environments are known to control both the rate and angular distribution of spontaneous emission. In the present study, we ask the question whether the proximity to metallic and metamaterial surfaces can affect other physical phenomena of fundamental and practical importance. We show that the same substrates and the same nonlocal dielectric environments that boost spontaneous emission, also inhibit F\\"orster energy transfer between donor and acceptor molecules doped into a thin polymeric film. This finding correlates with the fact that in dielectric media, the rate of spontaneous emission is proportional to the index of refraction n, while the rate of the donor-acceptor energy tr...

  14. Dexter energy transfer pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Liu, Chaoren; Antoniou, Panayiotis; Virshup, Aaron M; Beratan, David N

    2016-07-19

    Energy transfer with an associated spin change of the donor and acceptor, Dexter energy transfer, is critically important in solar energy harvesting assemblies, damage protection schemes of photobiology, and organometallic opto-electronic materials. Dexter transfer between chemically linked donors and acceptors is bridge mediated, presenting an enticing analogy with bridge-mediated electron and hole transfer. However, Dexter coupling pathways must convey both an electron and a hole from donor to acceptor, and this adds considerable richness to the mediation process. We dissect the bridge-mediated Dexter coupling mechanisms and formulate a theory for triplet energy transfer coupling pathways. Virtual donor-acceptor charge-transfer exciton intermediates dominate at shorter distances or higher tunneling energy gaps, whereas virtual intermediates with an electron and a hole both on the bridge (virtual bridge excitons) dominate for longer distances or lower energy gaps. The effects of virtual bridge excitons were neglected in earlier treatments. The two-particle pathway framework developed here shows how Dexter energy-transfer rates depend on donor, bridge, and acceptor energetics, as well as on orbital symmetry and quantum interference among pathways.

  15. Factors controlling the competition among rotational and vibrational energy transfer channels in glyoxal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmenter, Charles S.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Krajnovich, Douglas J.; Lu, Shao-ping

    1997-01-01

    The state-to-state transfer of rotational and vibrational energy has been studied for S1 glyoxal (CHOCHO) in collisions with D2, N2, CO and C2H4 using crossed molecular beams. A laser is used to pump glyoxal seeded in He to its S1 zero point level with zero angular momentum about its top axis (K′ = 0). The inelastic scattering to each of at least 26 S1 glyoxal rotational and rovibrational levels is monitored by dispersed S1–S0 fluorescence. Various collision partners are chosen to investigate the relative influences of reduced mass and the collision pair interaction potential on the competition among the energy transfer channels. When the data are combined with that obtained previously from other collision partners whose masses range from 2 to 84 amu, it is seen that the channel competition is controlled primarily by the kinematics of the collisional interaction. Variations in the intermolecular potential play strictly a secondary role. PMID:11038560

  16. Optics and materials research for controlled radiant energy transfer in energy efficient buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldner, R.B.; Haas, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    During the past year important progress has been made in regard to uncovering and solving several key problems with respect to developing a lithium-based, monolithic, completely inorganic, reflectivity-modulating, robust electronic window to the point where its technology transfer can be smoothly accomplished. The major problems remaining to be solved are: (a) develop a counterelectrode layer which, as part of the multilayer window structure, is optically and electrochemically satisfactory; (b) develop an optically transparent lithium ion/water vapor blocking layer to prevent the irreversible loss of lithium; (c) develop an optically transparent capping layer; and (d) develop a recipe(s) necessary to obtain robust prototype electrochromic windows by a production-worthy process, such as reactive magnetron sputtering. 1 tab.

  17. Controlled transition dipole alignment of energy donor and energy acceptor molecules in doped organic crystals, and the effect on intermolecular Förster energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Yue, Bailing; Xie, Zengqi; Gao, Bingrong; Xu, Yuanxiang; Liu, Linlin; Sun, Hongbo; Ma, Yuguang

    2013-03-14

    The orientation factor κ(2) ranging from 0 to 4, which depends on the relative orientation of the transition dipoles of the energy donor (D) and the energy acceptor (A) in space, is one of the pivotal factors deciding the efficiency and directionality of resonance energy transfer (RET) in a D-A molecular system. In this work, tetracene (Tc) and pentacene (Pc) are successfully doped in a trans-1,4-distyrylbenzene (DSB) crystalline lattice to form definite D-A mutually perpendicular transition dipole orientations. The cross D-A dipole arrangement results in an extremely small orientation factor, which is about two orders smaller than that in the disordered films. The energy transfer properties from the host (DSB) to the guest (Tc/Pc) were investigated in detail by steady-state as well as time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Our experimental research results show that the small value of κ(2) allows less or partial energy transfer from the host (DSB) to the guest (Tc) in a wide range of guest concentration, with the Förster distance of around 1.5 nm. By controlling the doping concentrations in the Tc and Pc doubly doped DSB crystals, we demonstrate, as an example, for the first time the application of the restricted energy transfer by D-A cross transition dipole arrangement for preparation of a large-size, white-emissive organic crystal with the CIE coordinates of (0.36, 0.37) approaching an ideal white light. In contrast, Tc is also doped in an anthracene crystalline lattice to form head-to-tail D-A transition dipole alignment, which is proved to be highly effective to promote the intermolecular energy transfer. In this doped system, the orientation factor is relatively large and the Förster distance is around 7 nm.

  18. Quantum-biological control of energy transfer in hybrid quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Hood, Brady; Patty, Kira

    2016-09-01

    We show theoretically that when a semiconductor quantum dot and metallic nanoparticle system interacts with a laser field, quantum coherence can introduce a new landscape for the dynamics of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET). We predict adsorption of biological molecules to such a hybrid system can trigger dramatic changes in the way energy is transferred, blocking FRET while the distance between the quantum dot and metallic nanoparticle (R) and other structural specifications remain unchanged. We study the impact of variation of R on the FRET rate in the presence of quantum coherence and its ultrafast decay, offering a characteristically different dependency than the standard 1/R6. Application of the results for quantum nanosensors is discussed.

  19. Controlled Environment Specimen Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2014-01-01

    Specimen transfer under controlled environment conditions, such as temperature, pressure, and gas composition, is necessary to conduct successive complementary in situ characterization of materials sensitive to ambient conditions. The in situ transfer concept is introduced by linking an environme...

  20. Micellar control of the photooxidation pathways of 10-methyl phenothiazine: electron versus energy transfer mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manju, Thankamoniamma; Manoj, Narayanapillai; López Gejo, Juan; Braun, André M; Oliveros, Esther

    2014-02-01

    10-Methyl phenothiazine (MPS) was chosen as a model compound to investigate the effects of compartmentalisation and of charged interfaces on the primary mechanisms involved in the phototoxic reactions related to phenothiazine drugs. Two most important pathways resulting from the interaction of the triplet excited state of MPS ((3)MPS*) with molecular oxygen ((3)O2) have to be considered: (i) energy transfer producing singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and (ii) electron transfer generating the superoxide anion (O2˙(-)) and the radical cation (MPS˙(+)). The quantum yields of (1)O2 production by MPS solubilized in the dispersed pseudo-phase of aqueous micellar systems were found to be similar to those determined in solvents of various polarities, regardless of the anionic or cationic nature of the surfactant (SDS or CTAC). However, micellar compartmentalisation and surfactant charge affect considerably both the sensitized and the self-sensitized photooxidation of MPS. The formation of 10-methyl phenothiazine sulfoxide (MPSO), produced by the reaction of MPS with (1)O2, proceeds at a higher rate in SDS micelles than in neat polar solvents. This result may be explained by the protonation of the zwitterionic intermediate Z (MPS(+)OO(-)) at the micellar interface to yield the corresponding cation C (MPS(+)OOH) that is stabilized in the negatively charged micelles and reacts much faster with MPS than Z to yield MPSO. The electron transfer reaction from (3)MPS* to O2 yielding MPS˙(+) and O2˙(-) is also enhanced in SDS micelles, as back electron transfer (BET) is prevented by ejection of O2˙(-) to the aqueous bulk phase and stabilization of MPS˙(+) in the anionic micelles. The size of the SDS micelles modulates the relative contribution of each pathway (formation of MPSO or MPS˙(+)) to the overall conversion of MPS to its oxidation products. Photooxidation of MPS in cationic micelles is a very slow process, as the formation of neither C nor MPS˙(+) is favoured in positively

  1. Modeling of Wireless Energy Transfer Circuit and Implementation of Wi-tricity System Control using Infrared and PIC Microcontroller

    OpenAIRE

    N. R. Mohamad; A. Salleh; N.M.Z. Hashim; M. Z. A Abd Aziz; Zakaria, Z.

    2016-01-01

    A prototypes to prove and demonstrate the concept of Wireless Energy Transfer (WET) is proposed in this paper. The prototype is a simple structure consist of a transmitter as an electromagnetic resonator and a receiver to which the device to be powered is attached. It also implements with an ON/OFF control system using the Infrared (IR) module and Programmable Integrated Circuit (PIC) microcontroller. As a whole, experimental result proved that the distance between two coils is inversely d...

  2. Conformational Control of Energy Transfer: A Mechanism for Biocompatible Nanocrystal-Based Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, Euan R; Lee, Jungmin; Nocera, Daniel; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2012-01-01

    Fold-up fluorophore: A new paradigm for designing self-referencing fluorescent nanosensors is demonstrated by interfacing a pH-triggered molecular conformational switch with quantum dots. Analytedependent, large-amplitude conformational motion controls the distance between the nanocrystal energy donor and an organic FRET acceptor. The result is a fluorescence signal capable of reporting pH values from individual endosomes in living cells.

  3. Charge-controlled assembling of bacteriorhodopsin and semiconductor quantum dots for fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based nanophotonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Sukhanova, Alyona; Artemyev, Mikhail; Oleinikov, Vladimir A.; Troyon, Michel; Nabiev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and photochromic protein bacteriorhodopsin within its natural purple membrane (PM) is explored to monitor their assembling. It is shown that the efficiency of FRET may be controlled by variation of the surface charge and thickness of QD organic coating. Atomic force microscopy imaging revealed correlation between the surface charge of QDs and degree of their ordering on the surface of PM. The most FRET-efficient QD-PM complexes have the highest level of QDs ordering, and their assembling design may be further optimized to engineer hybrid materials with advanced biophotonic and photovoltaic properties.

  4. Energy Transfer in molecular devices

    CERN Document Server

    Caraglio, M

    2014-01-01

    Protein machines often exhibit long range interplay between different sites in order to achieve their biological tasks. We investigate and characterize the non--linear energy localization and the basic mechanisms of energy transfer in protein devices. By studying two different model protein machines, with different biological functions, we show that genuinely non--linear phenomena are responsible for energy transport between the different machine sites involved in the biological functions. The energy transfer turns out to be extremely efficient from an energetic point of view: by changing the energy initially provided to the model device, we identify a well defined range of energies where the time for the energy transport to occur is minimal and the amount of transferred energy is maximum. Furthermore, by introducing an implicit solvent, we show that the energy is localized on the internal residues of the protein structure, thus minimizing the dissipation.

  5. Rigid, Branched Porphyrin Antennas: Control over Cascades of Unidirectional Energy Funneling and Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Maximilian; Herrmann, Astrid; Hirsch, Andreas; Guldi, Dirk M

    2017-08-30

    Porphyrin arrays consisting of three peripheral Zinc porphyrins (ZnPs) and a central free base porphyrin (H2P)-all rigidly linked to each other-serve as light-harvesting antennas as well as electron donors and are flexibly coupled to an electron-accepting C60 to realize the unidirectional flow of (i) excited-state energy from the ZnPs at the periphery to the H2P, (ii) electrons to C60, and (iii) holes to H2P and, subsequently, to ZnP. Dynamics following photoexcitation are elucidated by time-resolved transient absorption measurements on the femto-, pico-, nano-, and microsecond time scales and are examined by multiwavelength as well as target analyses. Hereby, full control over the charge shift between H2P and ZnP to convert the (ZnP)3-H2P(•+)-C60(•-) charge-separated state into (ZnP)3(•+)-H2P-C60(•-) charge-separated state is enabled by the solvent polarity: It is deactivated/switched-off in apolar toluene, while in polar benzonitrile it is activated/switched-on. Activating/switching impacts the recovery of the ground state via charge recombination rates, which differ by up to 2 orders of magnitude. All charge-separated states lead to the repopulation of the ground state with dynamics that are placed in the inverted region of the Marcus parabola.

  6. Energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Francoise; Zhou, YE; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1995-01-01

    This letter investigates the compressible energy transfer process. We extend a methodology developed originally for incompressible turbulence and use databases from numerical simulations of a weak compressible turbulence based on Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the well known Helmholtz decomposition is used. While the compressible component has very little influence on the solenoidal part, we found that almost all of the compressible turbulence energy is received from its solenoidal counterpart. We focus on the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer process, the triadic interactions. This analysis leads us to conclude that, at low turbulent Mach number, the compressible energy transfer process is dominated by a local radiative transfer (absorption) in both inertial and energy containing ranges.

  7. Energy transfer processes in solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayer, M.D.

    1986-11-01

    By combining picosecond optical experiments and detailed statistical mechanics theory we continue to increase our understanding of the complex interplay of structure and dynamics in important energy transfer situations. A number of different types of problems will be focused on experimentally and theoretically. They are excitation transport among chromophores attached to finite size polymer coils; excitation transport among chromophores in monolayers, bilayers, and finite and infinite stacks of layers; excitation transport in large vesicle systems; and photoinduced electron transfer in glasses and liquids, focusing particularly on the back transfer of the electron from the photogenerated radical anion to the radical cation. 33 refs., 13 figs.

  8. Energy transfer properties and mechanisms. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, J.R.

    1995-02-03

    Collisional energy transfer is the controlling factor in many nonequilibrium chemical systems: combustion, laser-induced chemical reactions, shock-heated gases, atmospheric chemistry, etc. During this period, efforts were made in 3 areas: large molecule energy transfer experiments (organic compounds); triatomic V-T/R energy transfer (memory effects); and energy transfer in extreme environments (shock tube data on norbornene). Results are described very briefly.

  9. Energy transfer with semiconductor nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogach, A.L.; Klar, T.A.; Lupton, J.M.; Meijerink, A.; Feldmann, J.

    2009-01-01

    Fo¨ rster (or fluorescence) resonant energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful spectroscopic technique to study interactions, conformational and distance changes, in hybrid nanosystems. Semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as colloidal quantum dots, are highly efficient fluorophores with a strong band-

  10. Synthesis and photophysical properties of Ir(iii)/Re(i) dyads: control of Ir→Re photoinduced energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Suad T; Metherell, Alexander J; Baggaley, Elizabeth; Ward, Michael D

    2016-07-28

    A series of dinuclear Ir(iii)/Re(i) complexes has been prepared based on a family of symmetrical bridging ligands containing two bidentate N,N'-chelating pyrazolyl-pyridine termini, connected by a central aromatic or aliphatic spacer. The Ir(iii) termini are based on {Ir(F2ppy)2}(+) units (where F2ppy is the cyclometallating anion of a fluorinated phenylpyridine) and the Re(i) termini are based on {Re(CO)3Cl} units. Both types of terminus are luminescent, with the Ir-based unit showing characteristic strong, structured phosphorescence in the blue region (maximum 452 nm) with a triplet excited state energy of 22 200 cm(-1) and the Re-based unit showing much weaker and lower-energy phosphorescence (maximum 530 nm) with a triplet excited state energy of 21 300 cm(-1). The energy gradient between the two excited states allows for partial Ir→Re photoinduced energy-transfer, with substantial (but incomplete) quenching of the higher-energy Ir-based emission component and sensitised emission - evidenced by an obvious grow-in component - on the lower-energy Re-based emission. The Ir→Re energy-transfer rate constants vary over the range 1-8 × 10(7) s(-1) depending on the bridging ligand: there is no simple correlation between bridging ligand structure and energy-transfer rate, possibly because this will depend substantially on the conformation of these flexible molecules in solution. To test the role of ligand conformation further, we investigated a complex in which the bridging chain is a (CH2CH2O)6 unit whose conformation is known to be solvent-polarity dependent, with such chains adopting an open, elongated conformation in water and more compact, folded conformations in organic solvents. There was a clear link between the rate and extent of Ir→Re energy-transfer which reduced in polar solvents as the chain became elongated and the Ir/Re separation was larger; and increased in less polar solvents as the chain adopted a more compact conformation and the Ir

  11. Photon Upconversion Through Tb(3+) -Mediated Interfacial Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Yang, Weifeng; Han, Sanyang; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-10-28

    A strategy of interfacial energy transfer upconversion is demonstrated through the use of a terbium (Tb(3+) ) dopant as energy donor or energy migrator in core-shell-structured nanocrystals. This mechanistic investigation presents a new pathway for photon upconversion, and, more importantly, contributes to the better control of energy transfer at the nanometer length scale.

  12. Energy transfer in nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughn, Chelsea

    Energy transport and loss are critical to the performance of optoelectronic devices such as photovoltaics and terahertz imaging devices. Nanostructured materials provide many opportunities to tailor transport and loss parameters for specific device applications. However, it has been very difficult to correlate specific nanoscale structural parameters with changes in these performance metrics. I report the development of new ways of using time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) to probe charge and energy transport and loss dynamics. These techniques are applied to several types of nanostructured materials, including bulk semiconductors with defects, self-assembled quantum dots and colloidal quantum dots. First, GaAs/InP double heterostructures grown via metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) were characterized with TRPL. TRPL is typically used to extract minority carrier lifetimes, but we discovered that the measured lifetime depended critically on the intensity of the exciting laser. We developed a Shockley-Read-Hall model to extract trap state densities from intensity-dependent TRPL measurements. Second, we characterized energy and charge transfer between InAs quantum dots and ErAs nanoinclusions within III-V heterostructures. Using intensity- and temperature-dependent TRPL, we confirmed tunneling as the dominant mechanism of charge transport and characterized the electronic structure of the ErAs nanoparticles. Finally, we characterized energy transport in colloidal quantum dot cascade structures. These cascade structures utilize Forster Resonance Energy Transfer and trap state recycling to funnel excitons from donor layers to acceptor layers and suggest a promising method for avoiding losses associated with surface trap states. Collectively, the analysis of these disparate material types advances our understanding of energy dynamics in nanostructured materials and improves our ability to design the next generation of photovoltaic and optoelectronic

  13. Optimal Low Energy Earth-Moon Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesemer, Paul Ricord; Ocampo, Cesar; Cooley, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    The optimality of a low-energy Earth-Moon transfer is examined for the first time using primer vector theory. An optimal control problem is formed with the following free variables: the location, time, and magnitude of the transfer insertion burn, and the transfer time. A constraint is placed on the initial state of the spacecraft to bind it to a given initial orbit around a first body, and on the final state of the spacecraft to limit its Keplerian energy with respect to a second body. Optimal transfers in the system are shown to meet certain conditions placed on the primer vector and its time derivative. A two point boundary value problem containing these necessary conditions is created for use in targeting optimal transfers. The two point boundary value problem is then applied to the ballistic lunar capture problem, and an optimal trajectory is shown. Additionally, the ballistic lunar capture trajectory is examined to determine whether one or more additional impulses may improve on the cost of the transfer.

  14. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  15. Repetitive energy transfer from an inductive energy store

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honig, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental results of a research program aimed at finding practical ways to transfer energy repetitively from an inductive energy store to various loads are discussed. The objectives were to investigate and develop the high power opening switches and transfer circuits needed to enable high-repetition-rate operation of such systems, including a feasibility demonstration at a current level near 10 kA and a pulse repetition rate of 1-10 kpps with a 1-ohm load. The requirements of nonlinear, time-varying loads, such as the railgun electromagnetic launcher, were also addressed. Energy storage capability is needed for proper power conditioning in systems where the duty factor of the output pulse train is low. Inductive energy storage is attractive because it has both a high energy storage density and a fast discharge capability. By producing a pulse train with a peak power of 75 MW at a pulse repetition rate of 5 kpps in a one-ohm load system, this research program was the first to demonstrate fully-controlled, high-power, high-repetition-rate operation of an inductive energy storage and transfer system with survivable switches. Success was made possible by using triggered vacuum gap switches as repetitive, current-zero opening switches and developing several new repetitive transfer circuits using the counterpulse technique.

  16. Energy Transfer Using Unitary Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winny O'Kelly de Galway

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We study the unitary time evolution of a simple quantum Hamiltonian describing two harmonic oscillators coupled via a three-level system. The latter acts as an engine transferring energy from one oscillator to the other and is driven in a cyclic manner by time-dependent external fields. The S-matrix (scattering matrix of the cycle is obtained in analytic form. The total number of quanta contained in the system is a conserved quantity. As a consequence, the spectrum of the S-matrix is purely discrete, and the evolution of the system is quasi-periodic. The explicit knowledge of the S-matrix makes it possible to do accurate numerical evaluations of the time-dependent wave function. They confirm the quasi-periodic behavior. In particular, the energy flows back and forth between the two oscillators in a quasi-periodic manner.

  17. Energy transfer in macromolecular arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, David L.; Jenkins, Robert D.

    2003-11-01

    Macromolecular systems comprised of many light-sensitive centres (the photosynthetic unit, dendrimers, and other highly symmetric multichromophore arrays) are important structures offering challenges to theoreticians and synthetic chemists alike. Here we outline novel photophysical interactions predicted and observed in such arrays. Using the tools of molecular quantum electrodynamics (QED) we present quantum amplitudes for a variety of higher-order resonance energy transfer (RET) schemes associated with well-known nonlinear optical effects such as two- and three-photon absorption. The initial analysis is extended to account for situations where the participant donor species are identical and exist in a highly symmetric environment, leading to the possible formation of excitons. It emerges from the QED theory that such excitons are closely associated with the higher-order RET processes. General results are interpreted by analyzing particular molecular architectures which offer interesting features such as rate enhancement or limitation and exciton pathway quenching. Applications in the areas of photosynthesis, molecular logic gates and low-intensity fluorescence energy transfer are predicted.

  18. Shape-persistent macrocycles functionalised with coumarin dyes: acid-controlled energy- and electron-transfer processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansante, Carlo; Ceroni, Paola; Venturi, Margherita; Balzani, Vincenzo; Sakamoto, Junji; Schlüter, A Dieter

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the spectroscopic properties (absorption spectra, emission spectra, emission lifetimes) of three triads in CH(2)Cl(2): C2-M-C2, C343-M-C343, and C2-M-C343, in which M is a shape-persistent macrocyclic hexagonal backbone composed of two 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) units embedded in opposing sides, and C2 and C343 are coumarin 2 and coumarin 343, respectively. All the components are strongly fluorescent species (Phi=0.90, 0.79, and 0.93 for M, C2, and C343, respectively, as established by investigating suitable model compounds). In each triad excitation of M leads to almost quantitative energy transfer to the lowest coumarin-localised excited state. Upon addition of acid, the two bpy units of the M component undergo independent protonation leading to monoprotonated (e.g., C2-MH(+)-C2) and diprotonated (e.g., C2-M2 H(+)-C2) species. Further addition of acid leads to protonation of the coumarin component so that each triad is involved in four protonation equilibria. Protonation causes strong (and reversible, upon addition of base) changes in the absorption and fluorescence properties of the triads because of inversion of the excited-state order and/or the occurrence of electron-transfer quenching processes.

  19. Laser-Induced Energy Transfer in Solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, J.B.W.; Rullmann, Johan; Wiersma, Douwe

    1981-01-01

    Laser-induced energy transfer was observed and studied in the system pentacene doped into naphthalene. The transfer spectrum shows a remarkable correspondence with the host density of states function. The rate for laser-induced energy transfer is given and it is concluded that most likely, intermole

  20. Risk transfer via energy savings insurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Evan

    2001-10-01

    Among the key barriers to investment in energy efficiency improvements are uncertainties about attaining projected energy savings and apprehension about potential disputes over these savings. The fields of energy management and risk management are thus intertwined. While many technical methods have emerged to manage performance risks (e.g. building commissioning), financial risk transfer techniques are less developed in the energy management arena than in other more mature segments of the economy. Energy Savings Insurance (ESI) - formal insurance of predicted energy savings - is one method of transferring financial risks away from the facility owner or energy services contractor. ESI offers a number of significant advantages over other forms of financial risk transfer, e.g. savings guarantees or performance bonds. ESI providers manage risk via pre-construction design review as well as post-construction commissioning and measurement and verification of savings. We found that the two mos t common criticisms of ESI - excessive pricing and onerous exclusions - are not born out in practice. In fact, if properly applied, ESI can potentially reduce the net cost of energy savings projects by reducing the interest rates charged by lenders, and by increasing the level of savings through quality control. Debt service can also be ensured by matching loan payments to projected energy savings while designing the insurance mechanism so that payments are made by the insurer in the event of a savings shortfall. We estimate the U.S. ESI market potential of $875 million/year in premium income. From an energy-policy perspective, ESI offers a number of potential benefits: ESI transfers performance risk from the balance sheet of the entity implementing the energy savings project, thereby freeing up capital otherwise needed to ''self-insure'' the savings. ESI reduces barriers to market entry of smaller energy services firms who do not have sufficiently strong balance

  1. Synthesis and controlled self-assembly of covalently linked hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene/perylene diimide dyads as models to study fundamental energy and electron transfer processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dössel, Lukas F; Kamm, Valentin; Howard, Ian A; Laquai, Frédéric; Pisula, Wojciech; Feng, Xinliang; Li, Chen; Takase, Masayoshi; Kudernac, Tibor; De Feyter, Steven; Müllen, Klaus

    2012-04-04

    We report the synthesis and photophysical characterization of a series of hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC)/perylenetetracarboxy diimide (PDI) dyads that are covalently linked with a rigid bridge. Both the ratio of the two components and the conjugation of the bridging element are systematically modified to study the influence on self-assembly and energy and electron transfer between electron donor HBC and acceptor PDI. STM and 2D-WAXS experiments reveal that both in solution and in bulk solid state the dyads assemble into well-ordered two-dimensional supramolecular structures with controllable mutual orientations and distances between donor and acceptor at a nanoscopic scale. Depending on the symmetry of the dyads, either columns with nanosegregated stacks of HBC and PDI or interdigitating networks with alternating HBC and PDI moieties are observed. UV-vis, photoluminescence, transient photoluminescence, and transient absorption spectroscopy confirm that after photoexcitation of the donor HBC a photoinduced electron transfer between HBC and PDI can only compete with the dominant Förster resonance energy transfer, if facilitated by an intimate stacking of HBC and PDI with sufficient orbital overlap. However, while the alternating stacks allow efficient electron transfer, only the nanosegregated stacks provide charge transport channels in bulk state that are a prerequisite for application as active components in thin film electronic devices. These results have important implications for the further design of functional donor-acceptor dyads, being promising materials for organic bulk heterojunction solar cells and field-effect transistors.

  2. Insight into a reversible energy transfer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming Xuan; Zou, Hong Yan; Gao, Peng Fei; Liu, Yue; Li, Na; Li, Yuan Fang; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-09-15

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) processes have wide applications; these processes involve a unidirectional energy transfer from a particular donor to a particular acceptor. Here, we report a plasmonic resonance energy transfer (PRET), which occurs from the surface of gold nanoparticles to fluorescent organic dyes, and coexists with a nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) that operates in the reverse direction. The coexistence of both PRET and NSET in opposite directions means that the roles of both donor and acceptor can be interchanged, which could be identified by using spectrofluorometric measurements and light scattering dark field microscopic imaging. The experimental data could be further theoretically supported using Persson and Lang's model, the quasi-static approximation and finite-difference time-domain simulation. Moreover, disruption of the PRET process by altering the energy transfer pairs suggests that interactions occur inside the reversible energy transfer system, which manifest by increasing the fluorescence quenching efficiency of the NSET process.

  3. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeger, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

  4. Energy transfer in the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelbring, H.

    2013-12-01

    Different types of energy transfer are presented from the literature and are approached and commented on. It follows from these articles that energy transfer in addition to solar irradiation is less well understood by contemporary scientist. The transformation of energy between kinetic and potential energy in planetary orbits might be of crucial importance for understanding energy transfer between celestial bodies and the development of commensurabilities. There is evidence pointing to interactions (friction) between space and satellites producing volcanism. The reversible transfer of energy between the orbit of Moon and Earth's rotational energy is crucial to the creation of the 13.6-day and 27.3-day periods in both solar variables and Earth bound climate variables. It is hypothesized that the Earth-Moon system is modulating the sunspot numbers and creating both these periods, and that the great planets are responsible for the 11 yr solar cycle.

  5. Energy transfer dynamics and kinetics of elementary processes (promoted) by gas-phase CO2 -N2 collisions: Selectivity control by the anisotropy of the interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Andrea; Pirani, Fernando; Laganà, Antonio; Bartolomei, Massimiliano

    2016-06-15

    In this work, we exploit a new formulation of the potential energy and of the related computational procedures, which embodies the coupling between the intra and intermolecular components, to characterize possible propensities of the collision dynamics in energy transfer processes of interest for simulation and control of phenomena occurring in a variety of equilibrium and nonequilibrium environments. The investigation reported in the paper focuses on the prototype CO2 -N2 system, whose intramolecular component of the interaction is modeled in terms of a many body expansion while the intermolecular component is modeled in terms of a recently developed bonds-as-interacting-molecular-centers' approach. The main advantage of this formulation of the potential energy surface is that of being (a) truly full dimensional (i.e., all the variations of the coordinates associated with the molecular vibrations and rotations on the geometrical and electronic structure of the monomers, are explicitly taken into account without freezing any bonds or angles), (b) more flexible than other usual formulations of the interaction and (c) well suited for fitting procedures better adhering to accurate ab initio data and sensitive to experimental arrangement dependent information. Specific attention has been given to the fact that a variation of vibrational and rotational energy has a higher (both qualitative and quantitative) impact on the energy transfer when a more accurate formulation of the intermolecular interaction (with respect to that obtained when using rigid monomers) is adopted. This makes the potential energy surface better suited for the kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures in plasma, combustion and atmospheric chemistry computational applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Interactive Joint Transfer of Energy and Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovski, Petar; Fouladgar, A. M.; Simeone, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    In some communication networks, such as passive RFID systems, the energy used to transfer information between a sender and a recipient can be reused for successive communication tasks. In fact, from known results in physics, any system that exchanges information via the transfer of given physical...... key design insights. Index Terms— Two-way channel, interactive communication, energy transfer, energy harvesting....... resources, such as radio waves, particles and qubits, can conceivably reuse, at least part, of the received resources. This paper aims at illustrating some of the new challenges that arise in the design of communication networks in which the signals exchanged by the nodes carry both information and energy...

  7. Resonance energy transfer: Dye to metal nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wari, M. N.; Pujar, G. H.; Inamdar, S. R., E-mail: him-lax3@yahoo.com [Laser Spectroscopy Programme, Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad-580003 (India)

    2015-06-24

    In the present study, surface energy transfer (SET) from Coumarin 540A (C540 A) to Gold nanoparticle (Au) is demonstrated. The observed results show pronounced effect on the photoluminescence intensity and shortening of the lifetime of Coumarin 540A upon interaction with the spherical gold nanoparticle, also there are measured effects on radiative rate of the dye. Experimental results are analyzed with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and SET theories. The results obtained from distance-dependent quenching provide experimental evidence that the efficiency curve slope and distance of quenching is best modeled by surface energy transfer process.

  8. Dependence of the energy transfer to graphene on the excitation energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackowski, Sebastian, E-mail: mackowski@fizyka.umk.pl; Kamińska, Izabela [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2015-07-13

    Fluorescence studies of natural photosynthetic complexes on a graphene layer demonstrate pronounced influence of the excitation wavelength on the energy transfer efficiency to graphene. Ultraviolet light yields much faster decay of fluorescence, with average efficiencies of the energy transfer equal to 87% and 65% for excitation at 405 nm and 640 nm, respectively. This implies that focused light changes locally the properties of graphene affecting the energy transfer dynamics, in an analogous way as in the case of metallic nanostructures. Demonstrating optical control of the energy transfer is important for exploiting unique properties of graphene in photonic and sensing architectures.

  9. Energy transfer phenomena in lead sulphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that lead sulphate, PbSO4, shows Pb2+ emission with a large Stokes shift. Energy transfer has been observed from the Pb2+ ions to several luminescent centres, viz., tungstate, molybdate, vanadate and rare earths. No transfer occurs to the Pr3+ ion.

  10. Optical Energy Transfer and Conversion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, William C. (Inventor); Hogan, Bartholomew P. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An optical power transfer system comprising a fiber spooler, a fiber optic rotary joint mechanically connected to the fiber spooler, and an electrical power extraction subsystem connected to the fiber optic rotary joint with an optical waveguide. Optical energy is generated at and transferred from a base station through fiber wrapped around the spooler, through the rotary joint, and ultimately to the power extraction system at a remote mobility platform for conversion to another form of energy.

  11. Controlling non-radiative energy transfer in organic binary blends: a route towards colour tunability and white emission from single-active-layer light-emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisignano, Dario [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), c/o Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Mazzeo, Marco [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), c/o Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Gigli, Giuseppe [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), c/o Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Barbarella, Giovanna [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), ICOCEA, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Favaretto, Laura [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), ICOCEA, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Cingolani, Roberto [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia (INFM), c/o Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2003-10-21

    We show how colour tunability (including white) can be achieved by controlling non-radiative intermolecular energy transfer from the donor to the acceptor in binary blends of oligomeric compounds. Blends of different concentrations of a novel functionalized thiophene-based oligomer and a low-molar-mass diamine derivative (N, N'-diphenyl-N, N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-1, 1'-biphenyl-4.4'diamine) are used to tune both the photoluminescence and the electroluminescence (EL) from red to blue, including balanced white, according to the standards of the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage. The single-active-layer light-emitting devices, realized by spin-coating, exhibit good EL performance. In particular, the white-emitting device shows an EL efficiency of 5 x 10{sup -1} cd A{sup -1} and a luminance of more than 180 cd m{sup -2}.

  12. Self sensitized photooxidation of N-methyl phenothiazine: acidity control of the competition between electron and energy transfer mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manju, Thankamoniamma; Manoj, Narayanapillai; Braun, André M; Oliveros, Esther

    2012-11-01

    The reaction pathways following electronic excitation of 10-methyl phenothiazine (MPS) in the presence of oxygen have been investigated as a contribution to establish the mechanisms involved in the phototoxic reactions related to phenothiazine drugs. In the context of previously published results, the pathways of oxidation via the radical cation and/or by reactive oxygen species, such as singlet oxygen and superoxide anion, are of particular interest. The effects of polarity of the medium as well as of proton donors on the different reaction pathways, in particular on the formation of reactive oxygen species and the intermediates of the oxidation of 10-methyl phenothiazine, have been investigated. No reaction was observed in non-polar solvents. In polar solvents, both self-sensitized and sensitized singlet oxygen generation lead to the oxidation of MPS and the production of 10-methyl phenothiazine sulfoxide (MPSO) most probably via a zwitterionic persulfoxide. During self-sensitized photooxidation of MPS in the presence of proton donors, such as carboxylic acids, the zwitterionic intermediate is protonated to the corresponding cation that in turn facilitates the reaction with a second molecule of MPS. In the presence of strong acids however, the formation of the radical cation of MPS and of the superoxide anion, by electron transfer from the triplet excited state of MPS to molecular oxygen, competes efficiently with singlet oxygen formation. In this case, the scavenging of the superoxide anion by protons to yield its conjugated acid (hydroperoxyl radical) and the subsequent disproportionation of the latter prevents back electron transfer.

  13. Targeting Low-Energy Ballistic Lunar Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous low-energy ballistic transfers exist between the Earth and Moon that require less fuel than conventional transfers, but require three or more months of transfer time. An entirely ballistic lunar transfer departs the Earth from a particular declination at some time in order to arrive at the Moon at a given time along a desirable approach. Maneuvers may be added to the trajectory in order to adjust the Earth departure to meet mission requirements. In this paper, we characterize the (Delta)V cost required to adjust a low-energy ballistic lunar transfer such that a spacecraft may depart the Earth at a desirable declination, e.g., 28.5(white bullet), on a designated date. This study identifies the optimal locations to place one or two maneuvers along a transfer to minimize the (Delta)V cost of the transfer. One practical application of this study is to characterize the launch period for a mission that aims to launch from a particular launch site, such as Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrive at a particular orbit at the Moon on a given date using a three-month low-energy transfer.

  14. Energy Transfer between Colloids via Critical Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio A. Martínez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the observation of a temperature-controlled synchronization of two Brownian-particles in a binary mixture close to the critical point of the demixing transition. The two beads are trapped by two optical tweezers whose distance is periodically modulated. We notice that the motion synchronization of the two beads appears when the critical temperature is approached. In contrast, when the fluid is far from its critical temperature, the displacements of the two beads are uncorrelated. Small changes in temperature can radically change the global dynamics of the system. We show that the synchronisation is induced by the critical Casimir forces. Finally, we present the measure of the energy transfers inside the system produced by the critical interaction.

  15. Remote Control Effect of Li+, Na+, K+ Ions on the Super Energy Transfer Process in ZnMoO4:Eu3+, Bi3+ Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Weiguang; Wang, Lili; Tan, Lingling; Qu, Dan; Shi, Jinsheng

    2016-06-01

    Luminescent properties are affected by lattice environment of luminescence centers. The lattice environment of emission centers can be effectively changed due to the diversity of lattice environment in multiple site structure. But how precisely control the doped ions enter into different sites is still very difficult. Here we proposed an example to demonstrate how to control the doped ions into the target site for the first time. Alkali metal ions doped ZnMoO4:Bi3+, Eu3+ phosphors were prepared by the conventional high temperature solid state reaction method. The influence of alkali metal ions as charge compensators and remote control devices were respectively observed. Li+ and K+ ions occupy the Zn(2) sites, which impede Eu and Bi enter the adjacent Zn(2) sites. However, Na+ ions lie in Zn(1) sites, which greatly promoted the Bi and Eu into the adjacent Zn(2) sites. The Bi3+ and Eu3+ ions which lie in the immediate vicinity Zn(2) sites set off intense exchange interaction due to their short relative distance. This mechanism provides a mode how to use remote control device to enhance the energy transfer efficiency which expected to be used to design efficient luminescent materials.

  16. Maximizing energy transfer in vibrofluidized granular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windows-Yule, C.R.K.; Rosato, A.D.; Parker, D.J.; Thornton, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Using discrete particle simulations validated by experimental data acquired using the positron emission particle tracking technique, we study the efficiency of energy transfer from a vibrating wall to a system of discrete, macroscopic particles. We demonstrate that even for a fixed input energy from

  17. Nanophotonic boost of intermolecular energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    de Roque, P M; Sapienza, R

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for efficient long-range energy transfer between two distant light emitters separated by more than one wavelength of light, i.e. much beyond the classical Forster radius. A hybrid nanoantenna-waveguide system mediates the transmission of energy, showing enhancements up to 10^8 as compared to vacuum. Our model shows how energy transfer in nanostructured media can be boosted, beyond the simple donor Purcell enhancement, and in particular for large donor-acceptor separations. The scheme we propose connects realistic emitters and could lead to practical on-chip implementations.

  18. Energy transfer in double plate system dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katica (Stevanovic) Hedrih

    2008-01-01

    The study of energy transfer between coupled subsystems in a hybrid system is very important for applications. This paper presents an analytical analysis of energy transfer between plates of a visco-elastically connected double-plate system in free transversal vibrations. The analytical analysis shows that the visco-elastic connection between plates is responsible for the appearance of two-frequency regime in the time function, which corresponds to one eigen amplitude function of one mode, and also that time functions of different vibration modes are uncoupled, but energy transfer between plates in one eigen mode appears. It was shown for each shape of vibrations. Series of the two Lyapunov exponents corresponding to the one eigen amplitude mode are expressed by using the energy of the corresponding eigen amplitude time component.

  19. Excitation energy transfer in the photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Andrew N

    2012-09-25

    Photosystem I is a multimeric pigment protein complex in plants, green alage and cyanobacteria that functions in series with Photosystem II to use light energy to oxidize water and reduce carbon dioxide. The Photosystem I core complex contains 96 chlorophyll a molecules and 22 carotenoids that are involved in light harvesting and electron transfer. In eucaryotes, PSI also has a peripheral light harvesting complex I (LHCI). The role of specific chlorophylls in excitation and electron transfer are still unresolved. In particular, the role of so-called bridging chlorophylls, located between the bulk antenna and the core electron transfer chain, in the transfer of excitation energy to the reaction center are unknown. During the past funding period, site directed mutagenesis has been used to create mutants that effect the physical properties of these key chlorophylls, and to explore how this alters the function of the photosystem. Studying these mutants using ultrafast absorption spectroscopy has led to a better understanding of the process by which excitation energy is transferred from the antenna chlorophylls to the electron transfer chain chlorophylls, and what the role of connecting chlorophylls and A_0 chlorophylls is in this process. We have also used these mutants to investigate whch of the central group of six chlorophylls are involved in the primary steps of charge separation and electron transfer.

  20. Heat transfer and thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, A. L.

    Radiation heat transfer is considered along with conduction heat transfer, heat pipes, and thermal control. Attention is given to the radiative properties of a painted layer containing nonspherical pigment, bidirectional reflectance measurements of specular and diffuse surfaces with a simple spectrometer, the radiative equilibrium in a general plane-parallel environment, and the application of finite-element techniques to the interaction of conduction and radiation in participating medium, a finite-element approach to combined conductive and radiative heat transfer in a planar medium. Heat transfer in irradiated shallow layers of water, an analytical and experimental investigation of temperature distribution in laser heated gases, numerical methods for the analysis of laser annealing of doped semiconductor wafers, and approximate solutions of transient heat conduction in a finite slab are also examined. Consideration is also given to performance testing of a hydrogen heat pipe, heat pipe performance with gravity assist and liquid overfill, vapor chambers for an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory, a prototype heat pipe radiator for the German Direct Broadcasting TV Satellite, free convection in enclosures exposed to compressive heating, and a thermal analysis of a multipurpose furnace for material processing in space.

  1. Energy transfer in structured and unstructured environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iles-Smith, Jake; Dijkstra, Arend G.; Lambert, Neill

    2016-01-01

    We explore excitonic energy transfer dynamics in a molecular dimer system coupled to both structured and unstructured oscillator environments. By extending the reaction coordinate master equation technique developed by Iles-Smith et al. [Phys. Rev. A 90, 032114 (2014)], we go beyond the commonly...... used Born-Markov approximations to incorporate system-environment correlations and the resultant non-Markovian dynamical effects. We obtain energy transfer dynamics for both underdamped and overdamped oscillator environments that are in perfect agreement with the numerical hierarchical equations....... We find that though an enhancement of the dimer energy transfer rate can be obtained when compared to an unstructured environment, its magnitude is rather sensitive to both the dimer-peak resonance conditions and the relative strengths of the underdamped and overdamped contributions. (C) 2016 AIP...

  2. Intramolecular energy transfer reactions in polymetallic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, J.

    1990-11-01

    This report is concerned with intramolecular, energy-transfer reactions. The concept of preparing synthetically a complex molecular species, capable of absorbing a photon at one metal center (antenna fragment), transferring that energy to a second metal center (reactive fragment) via a bridging ligand was first reported by our group in 1979. It is now apparent that a major emphasis in inorganic chemistry in the future will involve these types of molecular ensembles. Complexes discussed include Rh, Ru, and Cu complexes. 23 refs., 14 tabs.

  3. Rotational Energy Transfer in N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    1994-01-01

    Using the N2-N2 intermolecular potential of van der Avoird et al. rotational energy transfer cross sections have been calculated using both the coupled state (CS) and infinite order sudden (IOS) approximations. The rotational energy transfer rate constants at 300 K, calculated in the CS approximation, are in reasonable agreement with the measurements of Sitz and Farrow. The IOS approximation qualitatively reproduces the dependence of the rate constants on the rotational quantum numbers, but consistently overestimates their magnitudes. The treatment of exchange symmetry will be discussed.

  4. Energy transfer in plasmonic photocatalytic composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Chao Ma; Ying Dai; Lin Yu; Bai-Biao Huang

    2016-01-01

    Among the many novel photocatalytic systems developed in very recent years,plasmonic photocatalytic composites possess great potential for use in applications and are one of the most intensively investigated photocatalytic systems owing to their high solar energy utilization efficiency.In these composites,the plasmonic nanoparticles (PNPs) efficiently absorb solar light through localized surface plasmon resonance and convert it into energetic electrons and holes in the nearby semiconductor.This energy transfer from PNPs to semiconductors plays a decisive role in the overall photocatalytic performance.Thus,the underlying physical mechanism is of great scientific and technological impertance and is one of the hottest topics in the area of plasmonic photocatalysts.In this review,we examine the very recent advances in understanding the energy transfer process in plasmonic photocatalytic composites,describing both the theoretical basis of this process and experimental demonstrations.The factors that affect the energy transfer efficiencies and how to improve the efficiencies to yield better photocatalytic performance are also discussed.Furthermore,comparisons are made between the various energy transfer processes,emphasizing their limitations/benefits for efficient operation of plasmonic photocatalysts.

  5. Nonclassical energy transfer in photosynthetic FMO complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramavicius Vytautas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Excitation energy transfer in a photosynthetic FMO complex has been simulated using the stochastic Schrödinger equation. Fluctuating chromophore transition energies are simulated from the quantum correlation function which allows to properly include the finite temperature. The resulting excitation dynamics shows fast thermalization of chromophore occupations into proper thermal equilibrium. The relaxation process is characterized by entropy dynamics, which shows nonclassical behavior.

  6. Energy Transfer in Scattering by Rotating Potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Volker Enss; Vadim Kostrykin; Robert Schrader

    2002-02-01

    Quantum mechanical scattering theory is studied for time-dependent Schrödinger operators, in particular for particles in a rotating potential. Under various assumptions about the decay rate at infinity we show uniform boundedness in time for the kinetic energy of scattering states, existence and completeness of wave operators, and existence of a conserved quantity under scattering. In a simple model we determine the energy transferred to a particle by collision with a rotating blade.

  7. Energy transfer during the hydroentanglement of fibres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moyo, D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available , and the resultant degree of fibre entanglement, determines the tensile strength of the nonwoven fabric as a consequence of the inter-fibre friction. Here, the relationship between hydroentangling energy from the waterjets and the changes it brings about... in the nonwoven fabric strength were studied. In the study, the energies of the waterjets transferred to every fabric sample as a function of the waterjet pressure, machine speed, machine efficiency and the web area weight were quantified, and the resultant...

  8. Efficient Radioisotope Energy Transfer by Gold Nanoclusters for Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga; Sun, Conroy; Stafford, Jason H; Koh, Ai Leen; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Zhen; Cui, Bianxiao; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2015-08-26

    Beta-emitting isotopes Fluorine-18 and Yttrium-90 are tested for their potential to stimulate gold nanoclusters conjugated with blood serum proteins (AuNCs). AuNCs excited by either medical radioisotope are found to be highly effective ionizing radiation energy transfer mediators, suitable for in vivo optical imaging. AuNCs synthesized with protein templates convert beta-decaying radioisotope energy into tissue-penetrating optical signals between 620 and 800 nm. Optical signals are not detected from AuNCs incubated with Technetium-99m, a pure gamma emitter that is used as a control. Optical emission from AuNCs is not proportional to Cerenkov radiation, indicating that the energy transfer between the radionuclide and AuNC is only partially mediated by Cerenkov photons. A direct Coulombic interaction is proposed as a novel and significant mechanism of energy transfer between decaying radionuclides and AuNCs.

  9. Energy transfer in structured and unstructured environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iles-Smith, Jake; Dijkstra, Arend G.; Lambert, Neill;

    2016-01-01

    We explore excitonic energy transfer dynamics in a molecular dimer system coupled to both structured and unstructured oscillator environments. By extending the reaction coordinate master equation technique developed by Iles-Smith et al. [Phys. Rev. A 90, 032114 (2014)], we go beyond the commonly ...

  10. Energy Efficient Storage and Transfer of Cryogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Cryogenics is globally linked to energy generation, storage, and usage. Thermal insulation systems research and development is an enabling part of NASA's technology goals for Space Launch and Exploration. New thermal testing methodologies and materials are being transferred to industry for a wide range of commercial applications.

  11. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical prediction of transport and optical properties of protein-pigment complexes is of significant importance when aiming at understanding the structure versus function relationship in such systems. Electronic energy transfer (EET) couplings represent a key property in this respect since...

  12. Coherent control of optical absorption and the energy transfer pathway of an infrared quantum dot hybridized with a VO2 nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatef, Ali; Zamani, Naser; Johnston, William

    2017-04-01

    We systematically investigate the optical response of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) hybridized with a vanadium dioxide nanoparticle (VO2NP) in the infrared (IR) region. The VO2NP features a semiconductor to metal phase change characteristic below and above a critical temperature that leads to an abrupt change in the particle’s optical properties. This feature means that the QD-VO2NP hybrid system can support the coherent coupling of exciton-polaritons and exciton-plasmon polaritons in the semiconductor and metal phases of the VO2NP, respectively. In our calculations, the VO2NP phase transition is modelled with a filling fraction (f), representing the fraction of the VO2NP in the metallic phase. The phase transition is driven by the hybrid system’s interaction with a continuous wave (CW) IR laser field. In this paper, we show how control over the filling fraction results in the enhancement or suppression of the QD’s linear absorption. These variations in the QD absorption is due to dramatic changes in the effective local field experienced by the QD and the non-radiative energy transfer from the QD to the VO2NP. The presented results have the potential to be applied to the design of thermal sensors at the nanoscale.

  13. Wireless energy transfer between anisotropic metamaterials shells

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Rubio, Ana; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of strongly coupled Radial Photonic Crystals shells is investigated as a potential alternative to transfer electromagnetic energy wirelessly. These sub-wavelength resonant microstructures, which are based on anisotropic metamaterials, can produce efficient coupling phenomena due to their high quality factor. A configuration of selected constitutive parameters (permittivity and permeability) is analyzed in terms of its resonant characteristics. The coupling to loss ratio between two coupled resonators is calculated as a function of distance, the maximum (in excess of 300) is obtained when the shells are separated by three times their radius. Under practical conditions an 83% of maximum power transfer has been also estimated.

  14. Vibrational control of electron-transfer reactions: a feasibility study for the fast coherent transfer regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, P; Ma, Z; Zhang, P; Beratan, D N; Skourtis, S S

    2015-12-14

    Molecular vibrations and electron-vibrational interactions are central to the control of biomolecular electron and energy-transfer rates. The vibrational control of molecular electron-transfer reactions by infrared pulses may enable the precise probing of electronic-vibrational interactions and of their roles in determining electron-transfer mechanisms. This type of electron-transfer rate control is advantageous because it does not alter the electronic state of the molecular electron-transfer system or irreversibly change its molecular structure. For bridge-mediated electron-transfer reactions, infrared (vibrational) excitation of the bridge linking the electron donor to the electron acceptor was suggested as being capable of influencing the electron-transfer rate by modulating the bridge-mediated donor-to-acceptor electronic coupling. This kind of electron-transfer experiment has been realized, demonstrating that bridge-mediated electron-transfer rates can be changed by exciting vibrational modes of the bridge. Here, we use simple models and ab initio computations to explore the physical constraints on one's ability to vibrationally perturb electron-transfer rates using infrared excitation. These constraints stem from the nature of molecular vibrational spectra, the strengths of the electron-vibrational coupling, and the interaction between molecular vibrations and infrared radiation. With these constraints in mind, we suggest parameter regimes and molecular architectures that may enhance the vibrational control of electron transfer for fast coherent electron-transfer reactions.

  15. Multi-Scale Analysis of Energy Transfer in Scalar Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Le; CUI Gui-Xiang; XU Chun-Xiao; ZHANG Zhao-Shun

    2005-01-01

    @@ The energy transfer of homogeneous scalar turbulence is studied numerically by triad interaction in spectral space.The different transfer properties between turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent scalar energy reveal that nonlocal energy transfer exists as important as the local energy transfer in scalar turbulence. The non-local energy transfer of scalar turbulence results from non-local triad interaction. As a result there will be longer inertiaconvective range in scalar turbulence than the inertial subrange in turbulent kinetic transfer at Reλ = Peλ. The non-local transfer of turbulent scalar energy generates more energy transfer into dissipation range. The discovery of non-local transfer of turbulent scalar energy indicates that this phenomenon should be concerned carefully in numerical scheme and subgrid modelling of direct numerical simulation or large eddy simulation scalar turbulence.

  16. Control over photoinduced energy and electron transfer in supramolecular polyads of covalently linked azaBODIPY-bisporphyrin 'molecular clip' hosting fullerene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Francis; Amin, Anu N; El-Khouly, Mohamed E; Subbaiyan, Navaneetha K; Zandler, Melvin E; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2012-01-11

    A 'molecular clip' featuring a near-IR emitting fluorophore, BF(2)-chelated tetraarylazadipyrromethane (aza-BODIPY) covalently linked to two porphyrins (MP, M = 2H or Zn) has been newly synthesized to host a three-dimensional electron acceptor fullerene via a 'two-point' metal-ligand axial coordination. Efficient singlet-singlet excitation transfer from (1)ZnP* to aza-BODIPY was witnessed in the dyad and triad in nonpolar and less polar solvents, such as toluene and o-dichlorobenzene, however, in polar solvents, additional electron transfer occurred along with energy transfer. A supramolecular tetrad was formed by assembling bis-pyridine functionalized fullerene via a 'two-point' metal-ligand axial coordination, and the resulted complex was characterized by optical absorption and emission, computational, and electrochemical methods. Electron transfer from photoexcited zinc porphyrin to C(60) is witnessed in the supramolecular tetrad from the femtosecond transient absorption spectral studies. Further, the supramolecular polyads (triad or tetrad) were utilized to build photoelectrochemical cells to check their ability to convert light into electricity by fabricating FTO/SnO(2)/polyad electrodes. The presence of azaBODIPY and fullerene entities of the tetrad improved the overall light energy conversion efficiency. An incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency of up to 17% has been achieved for the tetrad modified electrode.

  17. Distance dependence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Swathi; K L Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    Deviations from the usual -6 dependence of the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) on the distance between the donor and the acceptor have been a common scenario in the recent times. In this paper, we present a critical analysis of the distance dependence of FRET, and try to illustrate the non--6 type behaviour of the rate for the case of transfer from a localized electronic excitation on the donor, a dye molecule to three different energy acceptors with delocalized electronic excitations namely, graphene, a two-dimensional semiconducting sheet and the case of such a semiconducting sheet rolled to obtain a nanotube. We use simple analytic models to understand the distance dependence in each case.

  18. Vibrational energy transfer in shocked molecular crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Joe

    2010-01-07

    We consider the process of establishing thermal equilibrium behind an ideal shock front in molecular crystals and its possible role in initiating chemical reaction at high shock pressures. A new theory of equilibration via multiphonon energy transfer is developed to treat the scattering of shock-induced phonons into internal molecular vibrations. Simple analytic forms are derived for the change in this energy transfer at different Hugoniot end states following shock compression. The total time required for thermal equilibration is found to be an order of magnitude or faster than proposed in previous work; in materials representative of explosive molecular crystals, equilibration is predicted to occur within a few picoseconds following the passage of an ideal shock wave. Recent molecular dynamics calculations are consistent with these time scales. The possibility of defect-induced temperature localization due purely to nonequilibrium phonon processes is studied by means of a simple model of the strain field around an inhomogeneity. The specific case of immobile straight dislocations is studied, and a region of enhanced energy transfer on the order of 5 nm is found. Due to the rapid establishment of thermal equilibrium, these regions are unrelated to the shock sensitivity of a material but may allow temperature localization at high shock pressures. Results also suggest that if any decomposition due to molecular collisions is occurring within the shock front itself, these collisions are not enhanced by any nonequilibrium thermal state.

  19. Resonance Energy Transfer Molecular Imaging Application in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIE Da-hong1,2;TANG Gang-hua1,3

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Resonance energy transfer molecular imaging (RETI can markedly improve signal intensity and tissue penetrating capacity of optical imaging, and have huge potential application in the deep-tissue optical imaging in vivo. Resonance energy transfer (RET is an energy transition from the donor to an acceptor that is in close proximity, including non-radiative resonance energy transfer and radiative resonance energy transfer. RETI is an optical imaging technology that is based on RET. RETI mainly contains fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging (FRETI, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (BRETI, chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (CRETI, and radiative resonance energy transfer imaging (RRETI. RETI is the hot field of molecular imaging research and has been widely used in the fields of biology and medicine. This review mainly focuses on RETI principle and application in biomedicine.

  20. The effects of the SUN project on teacher knowledge and self-efficacy regarding biological energy transfer are significant and long-lasting: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiza, Ann Finney; Gruhl, Mary; Zhang, Bo; Harrington, Tom; Roberts, Marisa; LaFlamme, Donna; Haasch, Mary Anne; Knopp, Jonathan; Vogt, Gina; Goodsell, David; Hagedorn, Eric; Marcey, David; Hoelzer, Mark; Nelson, Dave

    2013-06-01

    Biological energy flow has been notoriously difficult to teach. Our approach to this topic relies on abiotic and biotic examples of the energy released by moving electrons in thermodynamically spontaneous reactions. A series of analogical model-building experiences was supported with common language and representations including manipulatives. These materials were designed to help learners understand why electrons move in a hydrogen explosion and hydrogen fuel cell, so they could ultimately understand the rationale for energy transfer in the mitochondrion and the chloroplast. High school biology teachers attended a 2-wk Students Understanding eNergy (SUN) workshop during a randomized controlled trial. These treatment group teachers then took hydrogen fuel cells, manipulatives, and other materials into their regular biology classrooms. In this paper, we report significant gains in teacher knowledge and self-efficacy regarding biological energy transfer in the treatment group versus randomized controls. Significant effects on treatment group teacher knowledge and self-efficacy were found not only post-SUN workshop but even 1 yr later. Teacher knowledge was measured with both a multiple-choice exam and a drawing with a written explanation. Teacher confidence in their ability to teach biological energy transfer was measured by a modified form of the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument, In-Service A. Professional development implications regarding this topic are discussed.

  1. Controlled quantum state transfer via parity measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this work,a scheme for controlled quantum state transfer is proposed using parity measurement in a cavity-waveguide system.As two special cases,two schemes of controlled quantum state transfer for one qubit and two qubits are investigated in detail.An important advantage is that controlled quantum state transfer can be completed by single-qubit rotations and the measurement of parity.Therefore,the present scheme might be realized in the scope of current experimental technology.

  2. Controlled quantum state transfer via parity measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Quan; LI JiuHui

    2009-01-01

    In this work, a scheme for controlled quantum state transfer is proposed using parity measurement in a cavity-waveguide system. As two special cases, two schemes of controlled quantum state transfer for one qubit and two qubits are investigated in detail. An important advantage is that controlled quantum state transfer can be completed by single-qubit rotations and the measurement of parity. Therefore, the present scheme might be realized in the scope of current experimental technology.

  3. Improvised Energy Meter Supporting Wireless Data Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Aravind

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to design a prototype model of an energy meter which has the ability of wireless data transfer such as sending emails and SMS. In the current energy monitoring scenario, manual energy meter monitoring is a cumbersome and tedious process for the electricity boards. It involves huge manpower and higher expenditure for a simple task. Manual energy meter monitoring is highly erroneous and amounts to great losses for both the consumers and the electricity boards. In this conventional technique, losing the bills and delay in the arrival of the official to note down the reading are common affairs. Complete digitalization of bill delivery and transaction processes eliminates such uneventful circumstances. The manual reading method is inefficient to meet the raising power demands. The invention described here has the potential to wipe of manual energy meter reading from the scene and replace it with a sophisticated automated system facilitating remote monitoring of energy consumption. In this proposed system, the Raspberry Pi performs all the essential functions of a microcontroller and supports features like sending emails and SMS with the aid of Wi-Fi dongle and GSM modem. This automated system enables continuous monitoring of energy consumption.

  4. Energy transfer and kinetics in mechanochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiliang; Lu, Shengyong; Mao, Qiongjing; Buekens, Alfons; Wang, Yuting; Yan, Jianhua

    2017-09-13

    Mechanochemistry (MC) exerts extraordinary degradation and decomposition effects on many chlorinated, brominated, and even fluorinated persistent organic pollutants (POPs). However, its application is still limited by inadequate study of its reaction kinetic aspects. In the present work, the ball motion and energy transfer in planetary ball mill are investigated in some detail. Almost all milling parameters are summarised in a single factor-total effective impact energy. Furthermore, the MC kinetic between calcium oxide/Al and hexachlorobenzene is well established and modelled. The results indicate that total effective impact energy and reagent ratio are the two factors sufficient for describing the MC degradation degree of POPs. The reaction rate constant only depends on the chemical properties of reactants, so it could be used as an important index to appraise the quality of MC additives. This model successfully predicts the reaction rate for different operating conditions, indicating that it could be suitably applied for conducting MC reactions in other reactors.

  5. WIRELESS ENERGY TRANSFER USING MICROSTRIP ANTENNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leong Kah Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a concept on wireless energy transmission using microstrip antenna pairs. Microstrip antenna is chosen in its implementation in wireless energy transfer application primarily due to its characteristics: Its ease of analysis, fabrication and their attractive radiation characteristics. The outcome of this research is the fabrication of two microstrip antennas with resonant frequency of 1.94 GHz and 2.5 GHz respectively. The performance and the power gain for each of microstrip antennas which act as the transmitter and receiver respectively were evaluated within certain distance. The limitations of the experiment as well as the possible solutions in increasing system efficiency are being discussed. Experiment shows that the microstrip antenna with a lower resonant frequency performs better in long distance wireless energy transmission.

  6. Distributed Wireless Power Transfer With Energy Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Zhang, Rui

    2017-04-01

    Energy beamforming (EB) is a key technique for achieving efficient radio-frequency (RF) transmission enabled wireless energy transfer (WET). By optimally designing the waveforms from multiple energy transmitters (ETs) over the wireless channels, they can be constructively combined at the energy receiver (ER) to achieve an EB gain that scales with the number of ETs. However, the optimal design of EB waveforms requires accurate channel state information (CSI) at the ETs, which is challenging to obtain practically, especially in a distributed system with ETs at separate locations. In this paper, we study practical and efficient channel training methods to achieve optimal EB in a distributed WET system. We propose two protocols with and without centralized coordination, respectively, where distributed ETs either sequentially or in parallel adapt their transmit phases based on a low-complexity energy feedback from the ER. The energy feedback only depends on the received power level at the ER, where each feedback indicates one particular transmit phase that results in the maximum harvested power over a set of previously used phases. Simulation results show that the two proposed training protocols converge very fast in practical WET systems even with a large number of distributed ETs, while the protocol with sequential ET phase adaptation is also analytically shown to converge to the optimal EB design with perfect CSI by increasing the training time. Numerical results are also provided to evaluate the performance of the proposed distributed EB and training designs as compared to other benchmark schemes.

  7. Wireless energy transfer through non-resonant magnetic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Liang; Breinbjerg, Olav; Mortensen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate by theoretical analysis and experimental verification that mid-range wireless energy transfer systems may take advantage of de-tuned coupling devices, without jeopardizing the energy transfer efficiency. Allowing for a modest de-tuning of the source coil, energy transfer systems...... could be properly designed to minimize undesired energy dissipation in the source coil when the power receiver is out of the range. Our basic observation paves the way for more flexible design and fabrication of non-resonant mid-range wireless energy transfer systems, thus potentially impacting...... practical implementations of wireless energy transfer....

  8. Controlled Energy Transfer from a Ligand to an Eu(III) Ion: A Unique Strategy To Obtain Bright-White-Light Emission and Its Versatile Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddula, Rajamouli; Singh, Kasturi; Giri, Santanab; Vaidyanathan, Sivakumar

    2017-09-05

    A new diphenylamine-functionalized ancillary-ligand-coordinated europium(III) β-diketonate complex showed incomplete photoexcitation energy transfer from a ligand to a Eu(III) ion. A solvatochromism study led to a balancing of the primary colors to obtain single-molecule white-light emission. Thermal-sensing analysis of the europium complex was executed. The europium complex, conjugated with a near-UV-light-emitting diode (395 nm), showed appropriate white-light-emission CIE color coordinates (x = 0.34 and y = 0.33) with a 5152 K correlated color temperature.

  9. Energy Transferring Dynamic Equalization for Battery Packs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The equivalent circuit model of battery and the analytic model of series battery uniformities are setup. The analysis shows that it is the key to maintain small voltage difference between cells in order to improve uniformities. Therefore a new technique combining low voltage difference, big current charging and bi-directional charge equalizer system is put forward and designed. The test shows that the energy transferring dynamic equalization system betters the series battery uniformities and protection during charging and discharging, improves the battery performance and extends the use life of series battery.

  10. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, Syed Arshad; Chakraborty, Sekhar; Saha, Jaba; Roy, Arpan Datta; Chakraborty, Santanu; Debnath, Pintu; Bhattacharjee, D

    2014-01-01

    The applications of Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have expanded tremendously in the last 25 years, and the technique has become a staple technique in many biological and biophysical fields. FRET can be used as spectroscopic ruler in various areas such as structural elucidation of biological molecules and their interactions, in vitro assays, in vivo monitoring in cellular research, nucleic acid analysis, signal transduction, light harvesting, and metallic nanomaterials etc. Based on the mechanism of FRET a variety of novel chemical sensors and Biosensors have been developed. This review highlights the recent applications of sensitive and selective ratiometric FRET based sensors.

  11. Low-Energy Ballistic Transfers to Lunar Halo Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent lunar missions have begun to take advantage of the benefits of low-energy ballistic transfers between the Earth and the Moon rather than implementing conventional Hohmann-like lunar transfers. Both Artemis and GRAIL plan to implement low-energy lunar transfers in the next few years. This paper explores the characteristics and potential applications of many different families of low-energy ballistic lunar transfers. The transfers presented here begin from a wide variety of different orbits at the Earth and follow several different distinct pathways to the Moon. This paper characterizes these pathways to identify desirable low-energy lunar transfers for future lunar missions.

  12. Theoretical Investigation on Triplet Excitation Energy Transfer in Fluorene Dimer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-bing Si; Xin-xin Zhong; Wei-wei Zhang; Yi Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Triplet-triplet energy transfer in fluorene dimer is investigated by combining rate theories with electronic structure calculations.The two key parameters for the control of energy transfer,electronic conpling and reorganization energy,are calculated based on the diabatic states constructed by the constrained density functional theory.The fluctuation of the electronic coupling is further revealed by molecular dynamics simulation.Succeedingly,the diagonal and off-diagonal fluctuations of thc Hamiltonian are mapped from the correlation functions of those parameters,and the rate is then estimated both from the perturbation theory and wavepacket diffusion method.The results manifest that both the static and dynamic fluctuations enhance the rate significantly,but the rate from the dynamic fluctuation is smaller than that from the static fluctuation.

  13. Heat transfer enhancement in medium temperature thermal energy storage system using a multitube heat transfer array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agyenim, Francis; Smyth, Mervyn [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, Ulster University, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    An experimental energy storage system has been designed using an horizontal shell and tube heat exchanger incorporating a medium temperature phase change material (PCM) with a melting point of 117.7 C. Two experimental configurations consisting of a control unit with one heat transfer tube and a multitube unit with four heat transfer tubes were studied. The thermal characteristics in the systems have been analysed using isothermal contour plots and temperature time curves. Temperature gradients along the three directions of the shell and tube systems; axial, radial and angular directions have been analysed and compared. The phase change in the multitube system was dominated by the effect of convective heat transfer compared to conductive heat transfer in the control system. The temperature gradient in the PCM during phase change was greatest in the radial direction for both the control and multitube systems. The temperature gradients recorded in the axial direction for the control and multitube systems during the change of phase were respectively 2.5 and 3.5% that of the radial direction, indicating essentially a two-dimensional heat transfer in the PCM. The onset of natural convection through the formation of multiple convective cells in the multitube system significantly altered the shape of the solid liquid interface fluid flow and indicates the requirement for an in-depth study of multitube arrangements. (author)

  14. Hierarchical control of electron-transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerhoff, Hans V.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Egger, Louis;

    1997-01-01

    In this chapter the role of electron transfer in determining the behaviour of the ATP synthesising enzyme in E. coli is analysed. It is concluded that the latter enzyme lacks control because of special properties of the electron transfer components. These properties range from absence of a strong...... back pressure by the protonmotive force on the rate of electron transfer to hierarchical regulation of the expression of the gens that encode the electron transfer proteins as a response to changes in the bioenergetic properties of the cell.The discussion uses Hierarchical Control Analysis...

  15. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yixuan; Liu, Baoan; Shen, Sheng; Yu, Zongfu

    2016-06-01

    Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a). In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics. Thermal extraction works by using a specially designed thermal extractor to convert and guide the near-field energy to the far field, as shown in Fig. 1b. The same blackbody as shown in Fig. 1a is placed closely below the thermal extractor with a spacing smaller than the thermal wavelength. The near-field coupling transfers radiative energy with a density greater than σT4. The thermal extractor, made from transparent and high-index or structured materials, does not emit or absorb any radiation. It transforms the near-field energy and sends it toward the far field. As a result, the total amount of far-field radiative heat dissipated by the same blackbody is greatly enhanced above SσT4, where S is the area of the emitter. This paper will review the progress in thermal

  16. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Yixuan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a. In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics.

  17. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  18. Nanophotonics: Energy Transfer towards Enhanced Luminescent Chemosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Aad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a recently proposed novel photonic approach for enhancing the fluorescence of extremely thin chemosensing polymer layers. We present theoretical and experimental results demonstrating the concept of gain-assisted waveguided energy transfer (G-WET on a very thin polymer nanolayer spincoated on an active ZnO thin film. The G-WET approach is shown to result in an 8-fold increase in polymer fluorescence. We then extend the G-WET concept to nanostructured media. The benefits of using active nanostructured substrates on the sensitivity and fluorescence of chemosensing polymers are discussed. Preliminary theoretical results on enlarged sensing surface and photonic band-gap are presented.

  19. Fluorescence energy transfer enhancement in aluminum nanoapertures

    CERN Document Server

    de Torres, Juan; Moparthi, Satish Babu; Grigoriev, Victor; Wenger, Jérome

    2015-01-01

    Zero-mode waveguides (ZMWs) are confining light into attoliter volumes, enabling single molecule fluorescence experiments at physiological micromolar concentrations. Among the fluorescence spectroscopy techniques that can be enhanced by ZMWs, F\\"{o}rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is one of the most widely used in life sciences. Combining zero-mode waveguides with FRET provides new opportunities to investigate biochemical structures or follow interaction dynamics at micromolar concentration with single molecule resolution. However, prior to any quantitative FRET analysis on biological samples, it is crucial to establish first the influence of the ZMW on the FRET process. Here, we quantify the FRET rates and efficiencies between individual donor-acceptor fluorophore pairs diffusing in aluminum zero-mode waveguides. Aluminum ZMWs are important structures thanks to their commercial availability and the large literature describing their use for single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. We also compare the ...

  20. Quantum dot-dye hybrid systems for energy transfer applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Ting

    2010-07-01

    In this thesis, we focus on the preparation of energy transfer-based quantum dot (QD)-dye hybrid systems. Two kinds of QD-dye hybrid systems have been successfully synthesized: QD-silica-dye and QD-dye hybrid systems. In the QD-silica-dye hybrid system, multishell CdSe/CdS/ZnS QDs were adsorbed onto monodisperse Stoeber silica particles with an outer silica shell of thickness 2-24 nm containing organic dye molecules (Texas Red). The thickness of this dye layer has a strong effect on the total sensitized acceptor emission, which is explained by the increase in the number of dye molecules homogeneously distributed within the silica shell, in combination with an enhanced surface adsorption of QDs with increasing dye amount. Our conclusions were underlined by comparison of the experimental results with Monte-Carlo simulations, and by control experiments confirming attractive interactions between QDs and Texas Red freely dissolved in solution. New QD-dye hybrid system consisting of multishell QDs and organic perylene dyes have been synthesized. We developed a versatile approach to assemble extraordinarily stable QD-dye hybrids, which uses dicarboxylate anchors to bind rylene dyes to QD. This system yields a good basis to study the energy transfer between QD and dye because of its simple and compact design: there is no third kind of molecule linking QD and dye; no spacer; and the affinity of the functional group to the QD surface is strong. The FRET signal was measured for these complexes as a function of both dye to QD ratio and center-to-center distance between QD and dye by controlling number of covered ZnS layers. Data showed that fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was the dominant mechanism of the energy transfer in our QD-dye hybrid system. FRET efficiency can be controlled by not only adjusting the number of dyes on the QD surface or the QD to dye distance, but also properly choosing different dye and QD components. Due to the strong stability, our QD

  1. Tb3+concentration dependent optical properties and energy transfer in

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹春燕

    2013-01-01

    By controlling the concentration of Tb3+, a series of GdF3 samples were synthesized by a hydrothermal method without any surfactant. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images, photoluminescence (PL) excitation and emission spectra as well as luminescent dynamic decay curves. The opti-cal properties of Tb3+, the concentration quenching phenomenon of Tb3+, and the energy transfer from host Gd3+to Tb3+were inves-tigated and discussed based on the concentration of Tb3+in the GdF3 samples. The experimental results suggested that the optical properties of Tb3+and the energy transfer from host Gd3+to Tb3+could be adjusted by the concentration of Tb3+in the samples.

  2. Kinetic energy transfer during the tennis serve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.L. de Subijana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have established the pattern used in the over arm hitting and throwing movements, however to date there has not been one which statistically expresses the Kinetic Link Principle of the tennis serve. The main goals of this study were: first to investigate the kinetic energy transmission pattern using a complete mechanical body model and second, to create a tool which could help evaluating the individual technique of a tennis player. This tool was a statistical procedure which expressed the individual technique of a player as a mathematical function. Fourteen and twelve flat tennis serves of two top tennis players landing in an aiming area were recorded with two synchronized video cameras at 125 Hz. The experimental technique was 3D photogrammetry. A 28 points body model with five solid-rigid (the pelvis, the thorax, the upper arms and the racquet was built. The kinetic energies from the body segments were considered the biomechanical parameters. The mean speeds of the balls were 41.9 m/s (150.9 km/hr and 38.1 m/s (137.2 km/hr. A Kinetic Sequential Action Muscle principle based on the kinetic energy transfer was probed statistically by mean a correlation analysis [3]. This pattern showed the existence of a proximal to distal sequence of kinetic energy maximums. A significant (p<0.05 discriminant function for each player could predict the category of the serve (“good” or “bad” in the 78.6% and 100% of the cases. This function facilitated the understanding of the individual technique of a tennis player showing that this could be a tool for the tennis training complementary to the qualitative (observational analysis.

  3. Transfer Function Control for Biometric Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Alan J. (Inventor); Humphreys, Bradley T. (Inventor); Grodinsky, Carlos M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A modular apparatus for acquiring biometric data may include circuitry operative to receive an input signal indicative of a biometric condition, the circuitry being configured to process the input signal according to a transfer function thereof and to provide a corresponding processed input signal. A controller is configured to provide at least one control signal to the circuitry to programmatically modify the transfer function of the modular system to facilitate acquisition of the biometric data.

  4. Intercombination Effects in Resonant Energy Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Vaillant, C L; Jones, M P A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of intercombination transitions in excitation hopping processes such as those found in F\\"orster resonance energy transfer. Taking strontium Rydberg states as our model system, the breakdown of $LS$-coupling leads to weakly allowed transitions between Rydberg states of different spin quantum number. We show that the long-range interactions between two Rydberg atoms can be affected by these weakly allowed spin transitions, and the effect is greatest when there is a near-degeneracy between the initial state and a state with a different spin quantum number. We also consider a case of four atoms in a spin chain, and show that a spin impurity can resonantly hop along the chain. By engineering the many-body energy levels of the spin-chain, the breakdown of $LS$ coupling due to inter-electronic effects in individual atoms can be mapped onto a spatial separation of the total spin and the total orbital angular momentum along the spin chain.

  5. Radiation energy transfer in RNA polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempner, E. S.; Salovey, R.; Bernstein, S. L.

    1996-11-01

    Ribozymes are a special class of polyribonucleotide (RNA) molecules which possess intrinsic catalytic activity, capable of cleaving nucleic acid substrates. RNA molecules were synthesized containing a hammerhead ribozyme moiety of 52 nucleotides linked to an inactive leader sequence, for total lengths of either 262 or 1226 nucleotides. These RNAs were frozen and irradiated with high energy electrons. Surviving ribozyme activity was determined, using the ability of the irradiated ribozymes to cleave a labeled substrate. From the same irradiated samples, the amount of intact RNA remaining was determined following denaturing gel electrophoresis. Radiation target analyses of these data revealed a structural target size of 80 kDa and a ribozyme activity target size of 15 kDa for the smaller ribozyme, and 319 and 16 kDa, respectively, for the larger ribozyme. The disparity in target size for activity vs structure indicates that, in contrast to proteins, there is no spread of radiation damage far from the primary site of ionization in RNA molecules. The smaller target size for activity indicates that only primary ionizations occurring in the specific active region are effective. This is similar to the case for oligosaccharides. It is concluded that the presence of the ribose sugar in the polymer chain restricts radiation damage to a small region and prevents major energy transfer throughout the molecule.

  6. Model Based Metal Transfer Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Sandberg

    2006-01-01

    In pulsed gas metal arc welding (pulsed GMAW) current pulses are used for detaching drops at the tip of the electrode. To obtain a high weld quality one drop should be detached for every pulse, and moreover, the amount of energy used for detachment should be kept at a minimum. Thus, each pulse mu...

  7. Excitation energy transfer in donor-bridge-acceptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albinsson, Bo; Mårtensson, Jerker

    2010-07-21

    This perspective will focus on the mechanistic aspects of singlet and triplet excitation energy transfer. Well defined donor-bridge-acceptor systems specifically designed for investigating the distance and energy gap dependencies of the energy transfer reactions are discussed along with some recent developments in computational modeling of the electronic coupling.

  8. Energy transfer processes in semiconductor quantum dots: bacteriorhodopsin hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakovich, Aliaksandra; Sukhanova, Alyona; Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Troyon, Michel; Cohen, Jacques H. M.; Rakovich, Yury; Donegan, John F.; Nabiev, Igor

    2009-05-01

    The potential impact of nanoscience on energy transfer processes in biomolecules was investigated on the example of a complex between fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals and photochromic membrane protein. The interactions between colloidal CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and bacteriorhodopsin (bR) protein were studied by a variety of spectroscopic techniques, including integrated and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies, zeta potential and size measurement, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. QDs' luminescence was found to be strongly modulated by bacteriorhodopsin, but in a controllable way. Decreasing emission lifetimes and blue shifts in QDs' emission at increasing protein concentrations suggest that quenching occurs via Förster resonance energy transfer. On the other hand, concave Stern-Volmer plots and sigmoidal photoluminescence quenching curves imply that the self-assembling of NCs and bR exists, and the number of nanocrystals (NCs) per bacteriorhodopsin contributing to energy transfer can be determined from the inflection points of sigmoidal curves. This number was found to be highly dependent not only on the spectral overlap between NC emission and bR absorption bands, but also on nanocrystal surface charge. These results demonstrate the potential of how inorganic nanoscale materials can be employed to improve the generic molecular functions of biomolecules. The observed interactions between CdTe nanocrystals and bacteriorhodopsin can provide the basis for the development of novel functional materials with unique photonic properties and applications in areas such as all-optical switching, photovoltaics and data storage.

  9. Energy and charge transfer in nanoscale hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basché, Thomas; Bottin, Anne; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Kim, Jeong-Hee; Sohn, Byeong-Hyeok; Prabhakaran, Prem; Lee, Kwang-Sup

    2015-06-01

    Hybrid materials composed of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots and π-conjugated organic molecules and polymers have attracted continuous interest in recent years, because they may find applications in bio-sensing, photodetection, and photovoltaics. Fundamental processes occurring in these nanohybrids are light absorption and emission as well as energy and/or charge transfer between the components. For future applications it is mandatory to understand, control, and optimize the wide parameter space with respect to chemical assembly and the desired photophysical properties. Accordingly, different approaches to tackle this issue are described here. Simple organic dye molecules (Dye)/quantum dot (QD) conjugates are studied with stationary and time-resolved spectroscopy to address the dynamics of energy and ultra-fast charge transfer. Micellar as well as lamellar nanostructures derived from diblock copolymers are employed to fine-tune the energy transfer efficiency of QD donor/dye acceptor couples. Finally, the transport of charges through organic components coupled to the quantum dot surface is discussed with an emphasis on functional devices.

  10. Energy transfer processes in phycobilisome model complex at 77 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Ultra time-resolved fluorescence spectra were used to study the energy transfer processes and mechanism of complex PEC/PC/APC at 77 K, which was reconstructed with phycobiliproteins (PEC, PC and APC) of Anabaena variabilis, and has intact light-harvesting system and single terminal emitter. The energy transfer relationships between different chromophores especially between rod and core were also discussed based on fluorescence decay kinetic under different detected wavelengths. As a result, we got the possible energy transfer pathways and transfer time constants to be 29 ps between two PEC trimers, 12 ps between PEC and C-PC, 51 ps between rod and core.

  11. Ultrafast Energy Transfer in an Artificial Photosynthetic Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Grondelle R.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We temporally resolved energy transfer kinetics in an artificial light-harvesting dyad composed of a phthalocyanine covalently linked to a carotenoid. Upon carotenoid photo-excitation, energy transfers within ≈100fs (≈52% efficiency to the phthalocyanine.

  12. Significance of a Recurring Function in Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Subodha

    2017-01-01

    The appearance of a unique function in the energy transfer from one system to the other in different physical situations such as electrical, mechanical, optical, and quantum mechanical processes is established in this work. Though the laws governing the energy transformation and its transfer from system to system are well known, here we notice a…

  13. Reversible Triplet Energy Transfer between Neo- Alloocimene and Anthracene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorman, A. A.; Hamblett, I.; Jensen, Niels-Henrik

    1984-01-01

    The rate constants for triplet energy transfer between neo-alloocimene and anthracene have been redetermined by a combination of pulsed laser photolysi......The rate constants for triplet energy transfer between neo-alloocimene and anthracene have been redetermined by a combination of pulsed laser photolysi...

  14. Phonon-assisted excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Xin; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong

    2016-09-01

    The phonon-assisted process of energy transfer aiming at exploring the newly emerging frontier between biology and physics is an issue of central interest. This article shows the important role of the intramolecular vibrational modes for excitation energy transfer in the photosynthetic systems. Based on a dimer system consisting of a donor and an acceptor modeled by two two-level systems, in which one of them is coupled to a high-energy vibrational mode, we derive an effective Hamiltonian describing the vibration-assisted coherent energy transfer process in the polaron frame. The effective Hamiltonian reveals in the case that the vibrational mode dynamically matches the energy detuning between the donor and the acceptor, the original detuned energy transfer becomes resonant energy transfer. In addition, the population dynamics and coherence dynamics of the dimer system with and without vibration-assistance are investigated numerically. It is found that, the energy transfer efficiency and the transfer time depend heavily on the interaction strength of the donor and the high-energy vibrational mode, as well as the vibrational frequency. The numerical results also indicate that the initial state and dissipation rate of the vibrational mode have little influence on the dynamics of the dimer system. Results obtained in this article are not only helpful to understand the natural photosynthesis, but also offer an optimal design principle for artificial photosynthesis. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174233).

  15. Minimum energy control and optimal-satisfactory control of Boolean control network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fangfei, E-mail: li_fangfei@163.com; Lu, Xiwen

    2013-12-09

    In the literatures, to transfer the Boolean control network from the initial state to the desired state, the expenditure of energy has been rarely considered. Motivated by this, this Letter investigates the minimum energy control and optimal-satisfactory control of Boolean control network. Based on the semi-tensor product of matrices and Floyd's algorithm, minimum energy, constrained minimum energy and optimal-satisfactory control design for Boolean control network are given respectively. A numerical example is presented to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  16. Critical Role of Energy Transfer Between Terbium Ions for Suppression of Back Energy Transfer in Nonanuclear Terbium Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omagari, Shun; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Seki, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Koji; Ito, Hajime; Meijerink, Andries; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-11-15

    Lanthanide (Ln(III)) complexes form an important class of highly efficient luminescent materials showing characteristic line emission after efficient light absorption by the surrounding ligands. The efficiency is however lowered by back energy transfer from Ln(III) ion to the ligands, especially at higher temperatures. Here we report a new strategy to reduce back energy transfer losses. Nonanuclear lanthanide clusters containing terbium and gadolinium ions, TbnGd9-n clusters ([TbnGd9-n(μ-OH)10(butylsalicylate)16](+)NO3(-), n = 0, 1, 2, 5, 8, 9), were synthesized to investigate the effect of energy transfer between Tb(III) ions on back energy transfer. The photophysical properties of TbnGd9-n clusters were studied by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques and revealed a longer emission lifetime with increasing number of Tb(III) ions in TbnGd9-n clusters. A kinetic analysis of temperature dependence of the emission lifetime show that the energy transfer between Tb(III) ions competes with back energy transfer. The experimental results are in agreement with a theoretical rate equation model that confirms the role of energy transfer between Tb(III) ions in reducing back energy transfer losses. The results provide a new strategy in molecular design for improving the luminescence efficiency in lanthanide complexes which is important for potential applications as luminescent materials.

  17. Visual prosthesis wireless energy transfer system optimal modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueping; Yang, Yuan; Gao, Yong

    2014-01-16

    Wireless energy transfer system is an effective way to solve the visual prosthesis energy supply problems, theoretical modeling of the system is the prerequisite to do optimal energy transfer system design. On the basis of the ideal model of the wireless energy transfer system, according to visual prosthesis application condition, the system modeling is optimized. During the optimal modeling, taking planar spiral coils as the coupling devices between energy transmitter and receiver, the effect of the parasitic capacitance of the transfer coil is considered, and especially the concept of biological capacitance is proposed to consider the influence of biological tissue on the energy transfer efficiency, resulting in the optimal modeling's more accuracy for the actual application. The simulation data of the optimal model in this paper is compared with that of the previous ideal model, the results show that under high frequency condition, the parasitic capacitance of inductance and biological capacitance considered in the optimal model could have great impact on the wireless energy transfer system. The further comparison with the experimental data verifies the validity and accuracy of the optimal model proposed in this paper. The optimal model proposed in this paper has a higher theoretical guiding significance for the wireless energy transfer system's further research, and provide a more precise model reference for solving the power supply problem in visual prosthesis clinical application.

  18. Energy transfers and magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Rohit; Samtaney, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    In this letter we investigate the dynamics of magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo by studying energy transfers, mainly energy fluxes and shell-to-shell energy transfers. We perform dynamo simulation for magnetic Prandtl number $\\mathrm{Pm}=20$ on $1024^3$ grid using pseudospectral method. We demonstrate using flux and shell-to-shell energy transfer computations that the magnetic energy growth is caused by nonlocal energy transfers from the large scale velocity field to small scale magnetic field. The energy transfers $U2U$ (velocity to velocity) and $B2B$ (magnetic to magnetic) are forward and local. We also show that the magnetic energy grows exponentially with time, and it tends to have equipartition with kinetic energy.

  19. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeger, R.K.; Dugan, V.L.

    1983-01-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs in geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel technologies have been effective in transferring research concepts to applications in private industry. This report updates the previous summary (SAND82-0211, March 1982) to include recent technology transfers and to reflect recent changes in philosophy on technology transfer. Over 40 items transferred to industry have been identified in the areas of Hardware, Risk Removal and Understanding. Successful transfer is due largely to personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staffs of private industry.

  20. Kinetics of energy transfer processes in C-phycocyanin complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵井泉; 李晔

    1999-01-01

    The antenna system of algae for photosynthesis is a functional entity composed of various phycobiliproteins and the linker polypeptides. Up to now, high-resolution crystal structure data have been available only for the isolated phycobiliproteins. To have an understanding of the functional connection between different phycobiliproteins, it is necessary to study the complexes composed of different phycobiliproteins. The energy transfer processes in C-phycocyanin complexes were studied through computer simulation because it is difficult to be studied by conventional experimental methods. The main pathways of energy flow and the dynamic property of the energy transfer were obtained. A fast transfer process between two neighboring disks was observed through analyzing the distribution curves of excitation energy over time. According to the definition of the time constants for energy transfer in time-resolved spectrum techniques, for a complex with three C-phycoeyanin hexamer disks, a fluorescence-rising comp

  1. Elastic Energy Transfer in Turbulence of Dilute Polymer Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Xu, Haitao

    2012-11-01

    We present an experimental study of the energy transfer in the bulk of a turbulent flow with small amount long-chain polymer additives. By varying the Reynolds numbers Rλ, Wissenberg number Wi and polymer concentration φ. We test quantitively the elastic theory proposed by de Gennes and Tabor (Europhys. Lett., 1986; Physica A, 1986). The rate of energy transfer by polymer elasticity as inferred from the theory is consistent with that measured from the second order Eulerian structure functions. The unknown parameter n in the theory, which represents the flow topology of the stretching field, is found to be nearly 1. Based on energy transfer rate balance, We propose an elastic length scale, rɛ, which describes the effect of polymer elasticity on turbulence energy cascade and captures the scale dependence of the elastic energy transfer rate. We are grateful to the Max Planck Society, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft for their support.

  2. A planning framework for transferring building energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhar, B C; Brown, M A; Mohler, B L; Wilde, M; Abel, F H

    1990-07-01

    Accelerating the adoption of new and existing cost-effective technologies has significant potential to reduce the energy consumed in US buildings. This report presents key results of an interlaboratory technology transfer planning effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (OBT). A guiding assumption for planning was that OBT's R D program should forge linkages with existing programs whose goals involved enhancing energy efficiency in buildings. An ad hoc Technology Transfer Advisory Group reviewed the existing analysis and technology transfer program, brainstormed technology transfer approaches, interviewed DOE program managers, identified applicable research results, and developed a framework that management could use in deciding on the best investments of technology transfer resources. Representatives of 22 organizations were interviewed on their views of the potential for transferring energy efficiency technologies through active linking with OBT. The report describes these programs and interview results; outlines OBT tools, technologies, and practices to be transferred; defines OBT audiences; identifies technology transfer functions and presents a framework devised using functions and audiences; presents some 60 example technology transfer activities; and documents the Advisory Group's recommendations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Anomalous surplus energy transfer observed with multiple FRET acceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinagesh V Koushik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET is a mechanism where energy is transferred from an excited donor fluorophore to adjacent chromophores via non-radiative dipole-dipole interactions. FRET theory primarily considers the interactions of a single donor-acceptor pair. Unfortunately, it is rarely known if only a single acceptor is present in a molecular complex. Thus, the use of FRET as a tool for measuring protein-protein interactions inside living cells requires an understanding of how FRET changes with multiple acceptors. When multiple FRET acceptors are present it is assumed that a quantum of energy is either released from the donor, or transferred in toto to only one of the acceptors present. The rate of energy transfer between the donor and a specific acceptor (k(D-->A can be measured in the absence of other acceptors, and these individual FRET transfer rates can be used to predict the ensemble FRET efficiency using a simple kinetic model where the sum of all FRET transfer rates is divided by the sum of all radiative and non-radiative transfer rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The generality of this approach was tested by measuring the ensemble FRET efficiency in two constructs, each containing a single fluorescent-protein donor (Cerulean and either two or three FRET acceptors (Venus. FRET transfer rates between individual donor-acceptor pairs within these constructs were calculated from FRET efficiencies measured after systematically introducing point mutations to eliminate all other acceptors. We find that the amount of energy transfer observed in constructs having multiple acceptors is significantly greater than the FRET efficiency predicted from the sum of the individual donor to acceptor transfer rates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that either an additional energy transfer pathway exists when multiple acceptors are present, or that a theoretical assumption on which the kinetic model prediction is based is

  4. On the revised concept of linear energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Kellerer, A M; Rossi, H H

    1995-03-01

    The quantities linear energy transfer or restricted linear energy transfer are utilized in calculations that link absorbed dose to the fluence distribution of a radiation field. The computations provide approximations to absorbed dose in terms of the intermediate quantity cema or reduced cema. With the definition of the restricted linear energy transfer, L delta, given in ICRU Report 33, the approximation remains imperfect. This study deals with the resulting need for a modified definition of L delta, as proposed in a draft report of ICRU. Essential differences between the old and the new definitions are demonstrated. The changed definition permits a rigorous formulation of the dependence between fluence and absorbed dose.

  5. A new approach to study energy transfer in turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Gaurav; Verma, Mahendra K.; Eswaran, V.

    2000-01-01

    The unit of nonlinear interaction in Navier-Stokes and the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is a wavenumber triad ({\\bf k,p,q}) satisfying ${\\bf k+p+q=0}$. The expression for the combined energy transfer from two of these wavenumbers to the third wavenumber is known. In this paper we introduce the idea of an effective energy transfer between a pair of modes through the mediation of the third mode and then find an expression for it. In fluid turbulence, energy transfer takes place between a...

  6. Energy transfer processes in phycobilisome model complex at 77 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧; 赵井泉; 蒋丽金

    2000-01-01

    Ultra time-resoived huorescence spectra were used to study the energy transter processes and mechanism of complex PEC/PC/APC at 77 K, which was reconstructed with phycobiliproteins (PEC, PC and APC) of Anabaena variabilis, and has intact light-harvesting system and single terminal emitter. The energy transfer relationships between different chromophores especially between rod and core were also discussed based on fluorescence decay kinetic under different detected wavelengths. As a result, we got the possible energy transfer pathways and transfer time constants to be 29 ps between two PEC trimers, 12 ps between PEC and C-PC, 51 ps between rod and core.

  7. Energy Transfer and Triadic Interactions in Compressible Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, F.; Zhou, Ye; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1997-01-01

    Using a two-point closure theory, the Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) approximation, we have investigated the energy transfer process and triadic interactions of compressible turbulence. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the Helmholtz decomposition is used. The following issues were addressed: (1) What is the mechanism of energy exchange between the solenoidal and compressible modes, and (2) Is there an energy cascade in the compressible energy transfer process? It is concluded that the compressible energy is transferred locally from the solenoidal part to the compressible part. It is also found that there is an energy cascade of the compressible mode for high turbulent Mach number (M(sub t) greater than or equal to 0.5). Since we assume that the compressibility is weak, the magnitude of the compressible (radiative or cascade) transfer is much smaller than that of solenoidal cascade. These results are further confirmed by studying the triadic energy transfer function, the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer.

  8. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  9. Energy efficient building design. A transfer guide for local governments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The fundamental concepts of the building design process, energy codes and standards, and energy budgets are introduced. These tools were combined into Energy Design Guidelines and design contract requirements. The Guidelines were repackaged for a national audience and a videotape for selling the concept to government executives. An effort to test transfer of the Guidelines to outside agencies is described.

  10. Energy Transfer and a Recurring Mathematical Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the interesting work of a previous contributor concerning the analogies between physical phenomena such as mechanical collisions and the transfer of power in an electric circuit. Emphasis is placed on a mathematical function linking these different areas of physics. This unifying principle is seen as an exciting opportunity to…

  11. Energy Transfer and a Recurring Mathematical Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the interesting work of a previous contributor concerning the analogies between physical phenomena such as mechanical collisions and the transfer of power in an electric circuit. Emphasis is placed on a mathematical function linking these different areas of physics. This unifying principle is seen as an exciting opportunity to…

  12. Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Approaches to Study GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Mohammed Akli

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute one of the most studied proteins leading to important discoveries and perspectives in terms of their biology and implication in physiology and pathophysiology. This is mostly linked to the remarkable advances in the development and application of the biophysical resonance energy transfer (RET)-based approaches, including bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BRET and FRET, respectively). Indeed, BRET and FRET have been extensively applied to study different aspects of GPCR functioning such as their activation and regulation either statically or dynamically, in real-time and intact cells. Consequently, our view on GPCRs has considerably changed opening new challenges for the study of GPCRs in their native tissues in the aim to get more knowledge on how these receptors control the biological responses. Moreover, the technological aspect of this field of research promises further developments for robust and reliable new RET-based assays that may be compatible with high-throughput screening as well as drug discovery programs.

  13. OGO-6 gas-surface energy transfer experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeown, D.; Dummer, R. S.; Bowyer, J. M., Jr.; Corbin, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The kinetic energy flux of the upper atmosphere was analyzed using OGO-6 data. Energy transfer between 10 microwatts/sq cm and 0.1 W/sq cm was measured by short-term frequency changes of temperature-sensitive quartz crystals used in the energy transfer probe. The condition of the surfaces was continuously monitored by a quartz crystal microbalance to determine the effect surface contamination had on energy accommodation. Results are given on the computer analysis and laboratory tests performed to optimize the operation of the energy transfer probe. Data are also given on the bombardment of OGO-6 surfaces by high energy particles. The thermoelectrically-cooled quartz crystal microbalance is described in terms of its development and applications.

  14. INTRAMOLECULAR CHARGE AND ENERGY TRANSFER IN MULTICHROMOPHORIC AROMATIC SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward C. Lim

    2008-09-09

    A concerted experimental and computational study of energy transfer in nucleic acid bases and charge transfer in dialkylaminobenzonitriles, and related electron donor-acceptor molecules, indicate that the ultrafast photoprocesses occur through three-state conical interactions involving an intermediate state of biradical character.

  15. Energy transfers and magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Rohit Raj

    2013-12-01

    In this letter we investigate the dynamics of magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo by studying energy transfers, mainly energy fluxes and shell-to-shell energy transfers. We perform dynamo simulations for the magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 20 on 10243 grid using the pseudospectral method. We demonstrate that the magnetic energy growth is caused by nonlocal energy transfers from the large-scale or forcing-scale velocity field to small-scale magnetic field. The peak of these energy transfers moves towards lower wave numbers as dynamo evolves, which is the reason why the integral scale of the magnetic field increases with time. The energy transfers U2U (velocity to velocity) and B2B (magnetic to magnetic) are forward and local. Copyright © EPLA, 2013.

  16. Heat transfer, thermal control, and heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olstad, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    This volume provides information on recent progress in spacecraft thermal control and the supporting disciplines of conduction, thermal radiation, and heat pipe theory and application. Four problem areas are considered: conduction heat transfer, radiation heat transfer, thermal control, and heat pipes. The topics covered include finite-element methodology for transient conduction/forced-convection thermal analysis; effects of surface finish on thermal contact resistance between different materials; mathematical models for wide-band nongray gas radiation in spherical and cylindrical geometries; thermal design, analysis and testing of the Shuttle remote manipulator arm; porous heat pipe; and transient behavior of liquid trap heat-pipe thermal diodes. Also discussed is the thermal design concept for a high-resolution UV spectrometer.

  17. Forster resonance energy transfer rate in any dielectric nanophotonic medium with weak dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubs, Martijn; Vos, Willem L.

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the ongoing debate about nanophotonic control of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET), notably by the local density of optical states (LDOS), we study FRET and spontaneous emission in arbitrary nanophotonic media with weak dispersion and weak absorption in the frequency overlap...... to the mirror, typically a few nm. Finally, we discuss the consequences of our results to applications of Forster resonance energy transfer, for instance in quantum information processing....

  18. Intermodal Energy Transfer in a Tapered Optical Fiber: Optimizing Transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Ravets, S; Kordell, P R; Wong-Campos, J D; Rolston, S L; Orozco, L A

    2013-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of the energy transfer between modes during the tapering process of an optical nanofiber through spectrogram analysis. The results allow optimization of the tapering process, and we measure transmission in excess of 99.95% for the fundamental mode. We quantify the adiabaticity condition through calculations and place an upper bound on the amount of energy transferred to other modes at each step of the tapering, giving practical limits to the tapering angle.

  19. Wireless Information Transfer with Opportunistic Energy Harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Liang; Chua, Kee-Chaing

    2012-01-01

    Energy harvesting is a promising solution to prolong the operation of energy-constrained wireless networks. In particular, scavenging energy from ambient radio signals, namely wireless energy harvesting (WEH), has recently drawn significant attention. In this paper, we consider a point-to-point wireless link over the flat-fading channel subject to the time-varying co-channel interference. It is assumed that the receiver has no fixed power supplies and thus needs to replenish energy via WEH from the unintended interference and/or the intended signal sent by the transmitter. We further assume a single-antenna receiver that can only decode information or harvest energy at any given time due to the practical circuit limitation. As a result, it is important to investigate when the receiver should switch between the two modes of information decoding (ID) and energy harvesting (EH), based on the instantaneous channel and interference conditions. In this paper, we derive the optimal mode switching rule at the receive...

  20. Energy transfer probability in organic electrophosphorescence device with dopant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Guo-Zhang; Li, Hong-Jian; Pan, Yan-Zhi; Dai, Xiao-Yu; Xie, Qiang

    2005-12-01

    Based on the energy transfer process from host to dopant in an organic electrophosphorescent (EP) device, the expression of energy transfer probability (η) between the host (TPD) and guest (Ir(ppy)3) EP systems was proposed. The results show that: (1) The rate of the triplet energy transfer (KHG and KGH) increases exponentially with increasing donor-acceptor molecular distance (R), whereas decreases as the intermolecular distance (RHH) increases from 0.8 to 2.4 nm. Furthermore, KGH changes more quickly than KHG. (2) The energy transfer probability (η) increases as R reduces and the RHH changes can be safely neglected for R1.1nm, the transfer probability will be below zero. Here, the energy transfer principle may be less important and the high electroluminescence (EL) quantum efficiency of phosphorescent system will be attributed to the direct electron-hole recombination in phosphorescent molecules. (3) The η will increase when the Forster radius (R0) increases or Gibb's energy decreases.

  1. Energy transfer probability in organic electrophosphorescence device with dopant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Guo-Zhang; Li Hong-Jian; Pan Yan-Zhi; Dai Xiao-Yu; Xie Qiang

    2005-01-01

    Based on the energy transfer process from host to dopant in an organic electrophosphorescent (EP) device, the expression of energy transfer probability (η) between the host (TPD) and guest (Ir(ppy)3) EP systems was proposed.The results show that: (1) The rate of the triplet energy transfer (KHG and KGH) increases exponentially with increasing donor-acceptor molecular distance (R), whereas decreases as the intermolecular distance (RHH) increases from 0.8 to 2.4 nm. Furthermore, KGH changes more quickly than KHG. (2) The energy transfer probability (η) increases as R reduces, and the RHH changes can be safely neglected for R <0.9 nm. The situation changes for 0.9nm< R < 1.1nm,RHH (< 1nm) plays an essential role when η changes and increases with the latter. However, if R > 1.1nm, the transfer probability will be below zero. Here, the energy transfer principle may be less important, and the high electroluminescence (EL) quantum efficiency of phosphorescent system will be attributed to the direct electron-hole recombination in phosphorescent molecules. (3) The ηwill increase when the Forster radius (R0) increases or Gibb's energy decreases.

  2. On Kinetics Modeling of Vibrational Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, John O.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Two models of vibrational energy exchange are compared at equilibrium to the elementary vibrational exchange reaction for a binary mixture. The first model, non-linear in the species vibrational energies, was derived by Schwartz, Slawsky, and Herzfeld (SSH) by considering the detailed kinetics of vibrational energy levels. This model recovers the result demanded at equilibrium by the elementary reaction. The second model is more recent, and is gaining use in certain areas of computational fluid dynamics. This model, linear in the species vibrational energies, is shown not to recover the required equilibrium result. Further, this more recent model is inconsistent with its suggested rate constants in that those rate constants were inferred from measurements by using the SSH model to reduce the data. The non-linear versus linear nature of these two models can lead to significant differences in vibrational energy coupling. Use of the contemporary model may lead to significant misconceptions, especially when integrated in computer codes considering multiple energy coupling mechanisms.

  3. Exciton Transfer in Carbon Nanotube Aggregates for Energy Harvesting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoody, Amirhossein; Karimi, Farhad; Knezevic, Irena

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising building blocks for organic photovoltaic devices, owing to their tunable band gap, mechanical and chemical stability. We study intertube excitonic energy transfer between pairs of CNTs with different orientations and band gaps. The optically bright and dark excitonic states in CNTs are calculated by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We calculate the exciton transfer rates due to the direct and exchange Coulomb interactions, as well as the second-order phonon-assisted processes. We show the importance of phonons in calculating the transfer rates that match the measurements. In addition, we discuss the contribution of optically inactive excited states in the exciton transfer process, which is difficult to determine experimentally. Furthermore, we study the effects of sample inhomogeneity, impurities, and temperature on the exciton transfer rate. The inhomogeneity in the CNT sample dielectric function can increase the transfer rate by about a factor of two. We show that the exciton confinement by impurities has a detrimental effect on the transfer rate between pairs of similar CNTs. The exciton transfer rate increases monotonically with increasing temperature. Support by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-SC0008712.

  4. Real-space investigation of energy transfer in heterogeneous molecular dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Hiroshi; Miwa, Kuniyuki; Imai-Imada, Miyabi; Kawahara, Shota; Kimura, Kensuke; Kim, Yousoo

    2016-10-01

    Given its central role in photosynthesis and artificial energy-harvesting devices, energy transfer has been widely studied using optical spectroscopy to monitor excitation dynamics and probe the molecular-level control of energy transfer between coupled molecules. However, the spatial resolution of conventional optical spectroscopy is limited to a few hundred nanometres and thus cannot reveal the nanoscale spatial features associated with such processes. In contrast, scanning tunnelling luminescence spectroscopy has revealed the energy dynamics associated with phenomena ranging from single-molecule electroluminescence, absorption of localized plasmons and quantum interference effects to energy delocalization and intervalley electron scattering with submolecular spatial resolution in real space. Here we apply this technique to individual molecular dimers that comprise a magnesium phthalocyanine and a free-base phthalocyanine (MgPc and H2Pc) and find that locally exciting MgPc with the tunnelling current of the scanning tunnelling microscope generates a luminescence signal from a nearby H2Pc molecule as a result of resonance energy transfer from the former to the latter. A reciprocating resonance energy transfer is observed when exciting the second singlet state (S2) of H2Pc, which results in energy transfer to the first singlet state (S1) of MgPc and final funnelling to the S1 state of H2Pc. We also show that tautomerization of H2Pc changes the energy transfer characteristics within the dimer system, which essentially makes H2Pc a single-molecule energy transfer valve device that manifests itself by blinking resonance energy transfer behaviour.

  5. Real-space investigation of energy transfer in heterogeneous molecular dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Hiroshi; Miwa, Kuniyuki; Imai-Imada, Miyabi; Kawahara, Shota; Kimura, Kensuke; Kim, Yousoo

    2016-10-20

    Given its central role in photosynthesis and artificial energy-harvesting devices, energy transfer has been widely studied using optical spectroscopy to monitor excitation dynamics and probe the molecular-level control of energy transfer between coupled molecules. However, the spatial resolution of conventional optical spectroscopy is limited to a few hundred nanometres and thus cannot reveal the nanoscale spatial features associated with such processes. In contrast, scanning tunnelling luminescence spectroscopy has revealed the energy dynamics associated with phenomena ranging from single-molecule electroluminescence, absorption of localized plasmons and quantum interference effects to energy delocalization and intervalley electron scattering with submolecular spatial resolution in real space. Here we apply this technique to individual molecular dimers that comprise a magnesium phthalocyanine and a free-base phthalocyanine (MgPc and H2Pc) and find that locally exciting MgPc with the tunnelling current of the scanning tunnelling microscope generates a luminescence signal from a nearby H2Pc molecule as a result of resonance energy transfer from the former to the latter. A reciprocating resonance energy transfer is observed when exciting the second singlet state (S2) of H2Pc, which results in energy transfer to the first singlet state (S1) of MgPc and final funnelling to the S1 state of H2Pc. We also show that tautomerization of H2Pc changes the energy transfer characteristics within the dimer system, which essentially makes H2Pc a single-molecule energy transfer valve device that manifests itself by blinking resonance energy transfer behaviour.

  6. Vibration-assisted resonance in photosynthetic excitation energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Irish, E K; Lovett, B W

    2013-01-01

    Coherent quantum energy transfer, as observed in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, is inhibited by energetic disorder. While this difficulty can be overcome to some extent by the addition of environmental noise, it has recently has begun to be appreciated that discrete intra- and/or intermolecular vibrational modes may play an important role in quantum dynamics. We present a microscopic mechanism by which intramolecular vibrational modes create resonant energy transfer pathways, enhancing the efficiency of both coherent and dephasing-assisted transfer. The principles of this vibration-assisted resonance are illustrated in a simple model based on one energy-transfer branch of the well-characterised Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. Despite its simplicity, this model captures the interplay between strong electronic coupling that produces delocalised exciton states and resonance-enhanced weak coupling to local vibrational modes. Analytical and numerical results show that intramolecular vibrations can enhance...

  7. Energy transfer in porous anodic alumina/rhodamine 110 nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhouichet, H., E-mail: habib.elhouichet@fst.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Mineraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Materiaux, B.P. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, University of Tunis Elmanar 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Harima, N.; Koyama, H. [Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Kato, Hyogo 673-1494 (Japan); Gaponenko, N.V. [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, P. Browki St. 6, 220013 Minsk (Belarus)

    2012-09-15

    We have used porous anodic alumina (PAA) films as templates for embedding rhodamine 110 (Rh110) molecules and examined their photoluminescence (PL) properties in detail. The analysis of the polarization memory (PM) of PL strongly suggests that there is a significant energy transfer from PAA to Rh110 molecules. The effect of annealing the PAA layer on the PL properties of the nanocomposite has been studied. The results show that the energy transfer becomes more efficient in annealed PAA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Porous anodic alumina-rhodamine 110 nanocomposites are elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient energy transfer from the host to Rh110 molecules is evidenced from measurements of photoluminescence and degree of polarization memory spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal annealing of porous anodic alumina can improve the process of excitation transfer.

  8. Energy transfers in dynamos with small magnetic Prandtl numbers

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Rohit

    2015-06-25

    We perform numerical simulation of dynamo with magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 0.2 on 10243 grid, and compute the energy fluxes and the shell-to-shell energy transfers. These computations indicate that the magnetic energy growth takes place mainly due to the energy transfers from large-scale velocity field to large-scale magnetic field and that the magnetic energy flux is forward. The steady-state magnetic energy is much smaller than the kinetic energy, rather than equipartition; this is because the magnetic Reynolds number is near the dynamo transition regime. We also contrast our results with those for dynamo with Pm = 20 and decaying dynamo. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  9. A solar energy controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurentiu, A.

    1981-05-30

    A simplified design of a flat solar energy collector with an absorber made from plastic, and a housing stamped from polyethylene with a thermal insulation layer made from porous plastic is patented. The thermal insulation layer is also stamped out as a hole part in the necessary shape. A transparency made from transparent plastic in the form of a cover is applied to the housing. The cover has edges that attach to the vertical walls of the housing. In order to improve the seal of the internal area of the collector, the edges of the transparency fit into the gap between the vertical walls of the housing and the attachment piece on the walls. The collector is characterized by simplicity in assembly and low cost.

  10. Remote controlled mover for disposal canister transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suikki, M. [Optimik Oy, Turku (Finland)

    2013-10-15

    This working report is an update for an earlier automatic guided vehicle design (Pietikaeinen 2003). The short horizontal transfers of disposal canisters manufactured in the encapsulation process are conducted with remote controlled movers both in the encapsulation plant and in the underground areas at the canister loading station of the disposal facility. The canister mover is a remote controlled transfer vehicle mobile on wheels. The handling of canisters is conducted with the assistance of transport platforms (pallets). The very small automatic guided vehicle of the earlier design was replaced with a commercial type mover. The most important reasons for this being the increased loadbearing requirement and the simpler, proven technology of the vehicle. The larger size of the vehicle induced changes to the plant layouts and in the principles for dealing with fault conditions. The selected mover is a vehicle, which is normally operated from alongside. In this application, the vehicle steering technology must be remote controlled. In addition, the area utilization must be as efficient as possible. This is why the vehicle was downsized in its outer dimensions and supplemented with certain auxiliary equipment and structures. This enables both remote controlled operation and improves the vehicle in terms of its failure tolerance. Operation of the vehicle was subjected to a risk analysis (PFMEA) and to a separate additional calculation conserning possible canister toppling risks. The total cost estimate, without value added tax for manufacturing the system amounts to 730 000 euros. (orig.)

  11. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Energy Transfer Processes in Crystal Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-30

    Computer molecular dynamics studies have been carried out on the problem of attaining a fundamental understanding of shock-induced initiation of...intramolecular energy exchange in shock-loaded systems are presented. Originator-supplied keywords include: Molecular dynamics , Energy transfer, Shock front, Shock wave, Explosives, Shock structure.

  12. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Using Spiropyran and Diarylethene Photochromic Acceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Jares-Erijman

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the preparation and photophysical characterization of two model compounds designed to test a new approach for the quantitative determination of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET in biological systems. The method enables modulation of FRET by exploiting the unique reversible spectral properties of photochromic diarylethenes and spiropyrans to create switchable energy acceptors.

  13. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang, E-mail: zgw@cheme.caltech.edu [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule’s permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  14. Triangulating Nucleic Acid Conformations Using Multicolor Surface Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskowski, Ryan A; Armstrong, Rachel E; Greenbaum, Nancy L; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2016-02-23

    Optical ruler methods employing multiple fluorescent labels offer great potential for correlating distances among several sites, but are generally limited to interlabel distances under 10 nm and suffer from complications due to spectral overlap. Here we demonstrate a multicolor surface energy transfer (McSET) technique able to triangulate multiple points on a biopolymer, allowing for analysis of global structure in complex biomolecules. McSET couples the competitive energy transfer pathways of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) with gold-nanoparticle mediated Surface Energy Transfer (SET) in order to correlate systematically labeled points on the structure at distances greater than 10 nm and with reduced spectral overlap. To demonstrate the McSET method, the structures of a linear B-DNA and a more complex folded RNA ribozyme were analyzed within the McSET mathematical framework. The improved multicolor optical ruler method takes advantage of the broad spectral range and distances achievable when using a gold nanoparticle as the lowest energy acceptor. The ability to report distance information simultaneously across multiple length scales, short-range (10-50 Å), mid-range (50-150 Å), and long-range (150-350 Å), distinguishes this approach from other multicolor energy transfer methods.

  15. The feasibility of coherent energy transfer in microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Travis John Adrian; Friesen, Douglas; Mane, Jonathan; Hameroff, Stuart; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2014-11-06

    It was once purported that biological systems were far too 'warm and wet' to support quantum phenomena mainly owing to thermal effects disrupting quantum coherence. However, recent experimental results and theoretical analyses have shown that thermal energy may assist, rather than disrupt, quantum coherent transport, especially in the 'dry' hydrophobic interiors of biomolecules. Specifically, evidence has been accumulating for the necessary involvement of quantum coherent energy transfer between uniquely arranged chromophores in light harvesting photosynthetic complexes. The 'tubulin' subunit proteins, which comprise microtubules, also possess a distinct architecture of chromophores, namely aromatic amino acids, including tryptophan. The geometry and dipolar properties of these aromatics are similar to those found in photosynthetic units indicating that tubulin may support coherent energy transfer. Tubulin aggregated into microtubule geometric lattices may support such energy transfer, which could be important for biological signalling and communication essential to living processes. Here, we perform a computational investigation of energy transfer between chromophoric amino acids in tubulin via dipole excitations coupled to the surrounding thermal environment. We present the spatial structure and energetic properties of the tryptophan residues in the microtubule constituent protein tubulin. Plausibility arguments for the conditions favouring a quantum mechanism of signal propagation along a microtubule are provided. Overall, we find that coherent energy transfer in tubulin and microtubules is biologically feasible.

  16. Efficiency of pulse high-current generator energy transfer into plasma liner energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshkin, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    The efficiency of capacitor-bank energy transfer from a high-current pulse generator into kinetic energy of a plasma liner has been analyzed. The analysis was performed using a model including the circuit equations and equations of the cylindrical shell motion. High efficiency of the energy transfer into kinetic energy of the liner is shown to be achieved only by a low-inductance generator. We considered an "ideal" liner load in which the load current is close to zero in the final of the shell compression. This load provides a high (up to 80%) efficiency of energy transfer and higher stability when compressing the liner.

  17. Effect of Pulse Shaping on Observing Coherent Energy Transfer in Single Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Bai, Shuming; Shi, Qiang

    2016-11-17

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies have revealed that quantum coherence plays an important role in the excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting (LH) complexes. Inspired by the recent single-molecule two-color double-pump experiment, we theoretically investigate the effect of pulse shaping on observing coherent energy transfer in the single bacterial LH2 complex. It is found that quantum coherent energy transfer can be observed when the time delay and phase difference between the two laser pulses are controlled independently. However, when the two-color pulses are generated using the pulse-shaping method, how the laser pulses are prepared is crucial to the observation of quantum coherent energy transfer in single photosynthetic complexes.

  18. Color-Tunable Resonant Photoluminescence and Cavity-Mediated Multistep Energy Transfer Cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Daichi; Nakamura, Takashi; Braam, Daniel; Dao, Thang Duy; Ishii, Satoshi; Nagao, Tadaaki; Lorke, Axel; Nabeshima, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Yohei

    2016-07-26

    Color-tunable resonant photoluminescence (PL) was attained from polystyrene microspheres doped with a single polymorphic fluorescent dye, boron-dipyrrin (BODIPY) 1. The color of the resonant PL depends on the assembling morphology of 1 in the microspheres, which can be selectively controlled from green to red by the initial concentration of 1 in the preparation process of the microspheres. Studies on intersphere PL propagation with multicoupled microspheres, prepared by micromanipulation technique, revealed that multistep photon transfer takes place through the microspheres, accompanying energy transfer cascade with stepwise PL color change. The intersphere energy transfer cascade is direction selective, where energy donor-to-acceptor down conversion direction is only allowed. Such cavity-mediated long-distance and multistep energy transfer will be advantageous for polymer photonics device application.

  19. Theoretical study of excitation energy transfer in DNA photolyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuehe; Garcia, Jorge; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2008-07-24

    Photolyase (PL) is a DNA repair enzyme which splits UV light-induced thymine dimers on DNA by an electron transfer reaction occurring between the photoactivated FADH(-) cofactor and the DNA dimer in the DNA/PL complex. The crystal structure of the DNA/photolyase complex from Anacystis nidulans has been solved. Here, using the experimental crystal structure, we re-examine the details of the repair electron transfer reaction and address the question of energy transfer from the antenna HDF to the redox active FADH(-) cofactor. The photoactivation of FADH(-) immediately preceding the electron transfer is a key step in the repair mechanism that is largely left unexamined theoretically. An important butterfly thermal motion of flavin is identified in ab initio calculations; we propose its role in the back electron transfer from DNA to photolyase. Molecular dynamics simulation of the whole protein/DNA complex is carried out to obtain relevant cofactor conformations for ZINDO/S spectroscopic absorption and fluorescence calculations. We find that significant thermal broadening of the spectral lines, due to protein dynamics, as well as the alignment of the donor HDF and the acceptor FADH(-) transition dipole moments both contribute to the efficiency of energy transfer. The geometric factor of Förster's dipolar coupling is calculated to be 1.82, a large increase from the experimentally estimated 0.67. Using Förster's mechanism, we find that the energy transfer occurs with remarkable efficiency, comparable with the experimentally determined value of 98%.

  20. Correlated energy transfer between two ultracold atomic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krönke, Sven; Knörzer, Johannes; Schmelcher, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We study a single atom as an open quantum system, which is initially prepared in a coherent state of low energy and oscillates in a one-dimensional harmonic trap through an interacting ensemble of NA bosons, held in a displaced trap [arXiv:1410.8676]. The non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of the total system is simulated by means of an ab-initio method, giving us access to all properties of the open system and its finite environment. In this talk, we focus on unraveling the interplay of energy exchange and correlations between the subsystems, which are coupled in such a spatio-temporally localized manner. We show that an inter-species interaction-induced level splitting accelerates the energy transfer between the atomic species for larger NA, which becomes less complete at the same time. System-environment correlations prove to be significant except for times when the excess energy distribution among the subsystems is highly imbalanced. These correlations result in incoherent energy transfer processes, which accelerate the early energy donation of the single atom. By analyzing correlations between intra-subsystem excitations, certain energy transfer channels are shown to be (dis-)favored depending on the instantaneous direction of transfer.

  1. Radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to study radiative interactions in gray as well as nongray gases under different physical and flow conditions. After preliminary fluid-dynamical considerations, essential governing equations for radiative transport are presented that are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Auxiliary relations for relaxation times and spectral absorption models are also provided. For specific applications, several simple gaseous systems are analyzed. The first system considered consists of a gas bounded by two parallel plates having the same temperature. Within the gas there is a uniform heat source per unit volume. For this system, both vibrational nonequilibrium effects and radiation conduction interactions are studied. The second system consists of fully developed laminar flow and heat transfer in a parallel plate duct under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For this system, effects of gray surface emittance are studied. With the single exception of a circular geometry, the third system is considered identical to the second system. Here, the influence of nongray walls is also studied.

  2. Conformational disorder in energy transfer: beyond Förster theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Tammie; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Roitberg, Adrian E; Tretiak, Sergei

    2013-06-21

    Energy transfer in donor-acceptor chromophore pairs, where the absorption of each species is well separated while donor emission and acceptor absorption overlap, can be understood through a Förster resonance energy transfer model. The picture is more complex for organic conjugated polymers, where the total absorption spectrum can be described as a sum of the individual contributions from each subunit (chromophore), whose absorption is not well separated. Although excitations in these systems tend to be well localized, traditional donors and acceptors cannot be defined and energy transfer can occur through various pathways where each subunit (chromophore) is capable of playing either role. In addition, fast torsional motions between individual monomers can break conjugation and lead to reordering of excited state energy levels. Fast torsional fluctuations occur on the same timescale as electronic transitions leading to multiple trivial unavoided crossings between excited states during dynamics. We use the non-adiabatic excited state molecular dynamics (NA-ESMD) approach to simulate energy transfer between two poly-phenylene vinylene (PPV) oligomers composed of 3-rings and 4-rings, respectively, separated by varying distances. The change in the spatial localization of the transient electronic transition density, initially localized on the donors, is used to determine the transfer rate. Our analysis shows that evolution of the intramolecular transition density can be decomposed into contributions from multiple transfer pathways. Here we present a detailed analysis of ensemble dynamics as well as a few representative trajectories which demonstrate the intertwined role of electronic and conformational processes. Our study reveals the complex nature of energy transfer in organic conjugated polymer systems and emphasizes the caution that must be taken in performing such an analysis when a single simple unidirectional pathway is unlikely.

  3. Exploiting energy transfer in hybrid metal and semiconductor nanoparticle systems for biosensing and energy harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayilo, Sergiy

    2009-06-19

    In this work, gold and semiconductor nanoparticles are used as building blocks for nanostructures, in which energy transfer is investigated. Fluorescence quenching by gold nanoparticles is investigated and used to develop novel immunoassays for medically relevant molecules. The influence of gold nanoparticles on radiative and non-radiative rates of Cy3 and Cy3B dyes is studied here. A competitive, homogeneous immunoassay for digoxigenin and digoxin, a drug used to cure heart diseases, is developed. The assay has a limit of detection of 0.5 nM in buffer and 50 nM in serum. Time resolved spectroscopy reveals that the quenching is due to energy transfer with an efficiency of 70%. A homogeneous sandwich immunoassay for cardiac troponin T, an indicator of damage to the heart muscle, is developed. Gold nanoparticles and fluorophores are functionalized with anti-troponin T antibodies. In the presence of troponin T the nanoparticles and fluorophores form a sandwich structure, in which the dye fluorescence is quenched by a gold nanoparticle. The limit of detection of the immunoassay in buffer is 0.02 nM and 0.11 nM in serum. Energy transfer is demonstrated in clusters of CdTe nanocrystals assembled using three methods. In the first method, clusters of differently-sized water soluble CdTe nanocrystals capped by negatively charged mercaptoacid stabilizers are produced through electrostatic interactions with positively charged Ca{sup 2+} cations. The two other methods employ covalent binding through dithiols and thiolated DNA as linkers between nanocrystals. Energy transfer from smaller nanocrystals to larger nanocrystals in aggregates is demonstrated by means of steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, paving the way for nanocrystal-based light harvesting structures in solution. Multi-shell onion-like CdSe/ZnS/CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals are presented. The shade of the white light can be controlled by annealing the particles. Evidence for intra

  4. Production and transfer of energy and information in Hamiltonian systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris G Antonopoulos

    Full Text Available We present novel results that relate energy and information transfer with sensitivity to initial conditions in chaotic multi-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. We show the relation among Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, Lyapunov exponents, and upper bounds for the Mutual Information Rate calculated in the Hamiltonian phase space and on bi-dimensional subspaces. Our main result is that the net amount of transfer from kinetic to potential energy per unit of time is a power-law of the upper bound for the Mutual Information Rate between kinetic and potential energies, and also a power-law of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Therefore, transfer of energy is related with both transfer and production of information. However, the power-law nature of this relation means that a small increment of energy transferred leads to a relatively much larger increase of the information exchanged. Then, we propose an "experimental" implementation of a 1-dimensional communication channel based on a Hamiltonian system, and calculate the actual rate with which information is exchanged between the first and last particle of the channel. Finally, a relation between our results and important quantities of thermodynamics is presented.

  5. Production and transfer of energy and information in Hamiltonian systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonopoulos, Chris G; Bianco-Martinez, Ezequiel; Baptista, Murilo S

    2014-01-01

    We present novel results that relate energy and information transfer with sensitivity to initial conditions in chaotic multi-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. We show the relation among Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, Lyapunov exponents, and upper bounds for the Mutual Information Rate calculated in the Hamiltonian phase space and on bi-dimensional subspaces. Our main result is that the net amount of transfer from kinetic to potential energy per unit of time is a power-law of the upper bound for the Mutual Information Rate between kinetic and potential energies, and also a power-law of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Therefore, transfer of energy is related with both transfer and production of information. However, the power-law nature of this relation means that a small increment of energy transferred leads to a relatively much larger increase of the information exchanged. Then, we propose an "experimental" implementation of a 1-dimensional communication channel based on a Hamiltonian system, and calculate the actual rate with which information is exchanged between the first and last particle of the channel. Finally, a relation between our results and important quantities of thermodynamics is presented.

  6. Paths to Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, B. R.

    2014-02-01

    Theodor Förster (1910-1974) developed a phenomenological theory of nonradiative resonance energy transfer which proved to be transformative in the fields of chemistry, biochemistry, and biology. This paper explores the experimental and the theoretical antecedents of Förster's theory of resonance energy transfer (FRET). Early studies of sensitized fluorescence, fluorescence depolarization, and photosynthesis demonstrated the phenomena of long-range energy transfer. At the same time physicists developed theoretical models which contained common physical mechanisms and parameters: oscillating dipoles as models for the atoms or molecules, dipole-dipole coupling for the interaction, and a distance R0 that is optimal for resonance energy transfer. Early theories predicted R0 that was too large as compared to experiments. Finally, in 1946 Förster developed a classical theory and in 1948 he developed a quantum mechanical theory; both theories predicted an inverse sixth power dependence of the rate of energy transfer and a R0 that agreed with experiments. This paper attempts to determine why Förster succeeded when the other theoreticians failed to develop the correct theory. The putative roles of interdisciplinary education and collaborative research are discussed. Furthermore, I explore the role of science journals and their specific audiences in the popularization of FRET to a broad interdisciplinary community.

  7. Control of Solar Energy Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Camacho, Eduardo F; Rubio, Francisco R; Martínez, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Control of Solar Energy Systems details the main solar energy systems, problems involved with their control, and how control systems can help in increasing their efficiency.  After a brief introduction to the fundamental concepts associated with the use of solar energy in both photovoltaic and thermal plants, specific issues related to control of solar systems are embarked upon. Thermal energy systems are then explored in depth, as well as  other solar energy applications such as solar furnaces and solar refrigeration systems. Problems of variable generation profile and of the contribution of many solar plants to the same grid system are considered with the necessary integrated and supervisory control solutions being discussed. The text includes material on: ·         A comparison of basic and advanced control methods for parabolic troughs from PID to nonlinear model-based control; ·         solar towers and solar tracking; ·         heliostat calibration, characterization and off...

  8. Energy transfer and distribution; Energietransport und -verteilung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markewitz, Peter; Heinrichs, Heidi; Linssen, Jochen; Pesch, Thiemo [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung, Systemforschung und Technologische Entwicklung (IEK-STE)

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear phase-out resolved by the Federal Government as well as the intensified expansion of the electricity supply are significant challenges for all actors involved. In retrospect, in the winter 2011/2012 the Federal Network Agency (Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany) had found out that the situation in the electricity grids is under significant pressure. In December 2012, the Federal Government has decided the Federal Consumption Plan Law regarding the urgency and energy-related necessity of important grid expansion objects. Especially, the disruption of the natural gas supply in February 2012 has shown the very tight connection of the electricity supply and natural gas supply. There exists an enormous operative and legislative need for adaptation. With the completion of the North-Stream-Pipeline, a strategic infrastructure project with an enhanced priority was established. This strategic infrastructure project is a component of the Trans-European energy networks Plans of the European Union. In the further distribution of natural gas to other European countries Germany as a transit country has a particular role.

  9. An estimate of spherical impactor energy transfer for mechanical frequency up-conversion energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, L. R.; Ma, D. T.

    2016-08-01

    Vibration energy harvesters, which use the impact mechanical frequency up-conversion technique, utilize an impactor, which gains kinetic energy from low frequency ambient environmental vibrations, to excite high frequency systems that efficiently convert mechanical energy to electrical energy. To take full advantage of the impact mechanical frequency up-conversion technique, it is prudent to understand the energy transfer from the low frequency excitations, to the impactor, and finally to the high frequency systems. In this work, the energy transfer from a spherical impactor to a multi degree of freedom spring / mass system, due to Hertzian impact, is investigated to gain insight on how best to design impact mechanical frequency up-conversion energy harvesters. Through this academic work, it is shown that the properties of the contact (or impact) area, i.e., radius of curvature and material properties, only play a minor role in energy transfer and that the equivalent mass of the target system (i.e., the spring / mass system) dictates the total amount of energy transferred during the impact. The novel approach of utilizing the well-known Hertzian impact methodology to gain an understanding of impact mechanical frequency up-conversion energy harvesters has made it clear that the impactor and the high frequency energy generating systems must be designed together as one system to ensure maximum energy transfer, leading to efficient ambient vibration energy harvesters.

  10. Spatial dependence of magnetopause energy transfer: Cluster measurements verifying global simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dandouras

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatial variation of magnetopause energy conversion and transfer using Cluster spacecraft observations of two magnetopause crossing events as well as using a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD simulation GUMICS-4. These two events, (16 January 2001, and 26 January 2001 are similar in all other aspects except for the sign of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF y-component that has earlier been found to control the spatial dependence of energy transfer. In simulations of the two events using observed solar wind parameters as input, we find that the GUMICS-4 energy transfer agrees with the Cluster observations spatially and is about 30 % lower in magnitude. According to the simulation, most of the the energy transfer takes place in the plane of the IMF (as previous modelling results have suggested, and the locations of the load and generator regions on the magnetopause are controlled by the IMF orientation. Assuming that the model results are as well in accordance with the in situ observations also on other parts of the magnetopause, we are able to pin down the total energy transfer during the two Cluster magnetopause crossings. Here, we estimate that the instantaneous total power transferring through the magnetopause during the two events is at least 1500–2000 GW, agreeing with ε scaled using the mean magnetopause area in the simulation. Hence the combination of the simulation results and the Cluster observations indicate that the ε parameter is probably underestimated by a factor of 2–3.

  11. Resonance Energy Transfer in Upconversion Nanoplatforms for Selective Biodetection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qianqian; Feng, Wei; Yang, Dongpeng; Li, Fuyou

    2017-01-17

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) describes the process that energy is transferred from an excited donor to an acceptor molecule, leading to a reduction in the fluorescence emission intensity of the donor and an increase in that of the acceptor. By this technique, measurements with the good sensitivity can be made about distance within 1 to 10 nm under physiological conditions. For this reason, the RET technique has been widely used in polymer science, biochemistry, and structural biology. Recently, a number of RET systems incorporated with nanoparticles, such as quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, and upconversion nanoparticles, have been developed. These nanocrystals retain their optical superiority and can act as either a donor or a quencher, thereby enhancing the performance of RET systems and providing more opportunities in excitation wavelength selection. Notably, lanthanide-doped upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) have attracted considerable attention due to their inherent advantages of large anti-Stoke shifts, long luminescence lifetimes, and absence of autofluorescence under low energy near-infrared (NIR) light excitation. These nanoparticles are promising for the biodetection of various types of analytes. Undoubtedly, the developments of those applications usually rely on resonance energy transfer, which could be regarded as a flexible technology to mediate energy transfer from upconversion phosphor to acceptor for the design of luminescent functional nanoplatforms. Currently, researchers have developed many RET-based upconversion nanosystems (RET-UCNP) that respond to specific changes in the biological environments. Specifically, small organic molecules, biological molecules, metal-organic complexes, or inorganic nanoparticles were carefully selected and bound to the surface of upconversion nanoparticles for the preparation of RET-UCNP nanosystems. Benefiting from the advantage and versatility offered by this technology, the research of RET

  12. Significance of a Recurring Function in Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Subodha

    2017-05-01

    The appearance of a unique function in the energy transfer from one system to the other in different physical situations such as electrical, mechanical, optical, and quantum mechanical processes is established in this work. Though the laws governing the energy transformation and its transfer from system to system are well known, here we notice a unity in diversity; a unique function appears in various cases of energy transfer whether it is a classical or a quantum mechanical process. We consider four examples, well known in elementary physics, from the fields of electricity, mechanics, optics, and quantum mechanics. We find that this unique function is in fact the transfer function corresponding to all these physical situations, and the interesting and intriguing finding is that the inverse Laplace transform of this transfer function, which is the impulse-response function of the systems when multiplied by a factor of -½, is the solution of a linear differential equation for an "instantly forced critically damped harmonic oscillator." It is important to note that though the physical phenomena considered are quite distinct, the underlying process in the language of impulse-response of the system in the time domain is a unique one. To the best of our knowledge we have not seen anywhere the above analysis of determining the unique function or its description as a transfer function in literature.

  13. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  14. Determination of stepsize parameters for intermolecular vibrational energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tardy, D.C.

    1992-03-01

    Intermolecular energy transfer of highly excited polyatomic molecules plays an important role in many complex chemical systems: combustion, high temperature and atmospheric chemistry. By monitoring the relaxation of internal energy we have observed trends in the collisional efficiency ({beta}) for energy transfer as a function of the substrate's excitation energy and the complexities of substrate and deactivator. For a given substrate {beta} increases as the deactivator's mass increase to {approximately}30 amu and then exhibits a nearly constant value; this is due to a mass mismatch between the atoms of the colliders. In a homologous series of substrate molecules (C{sub 3}{minus}C{sub 8}) {beta} decreases as the number of atoms in the substrate increases; replacing F with H increases {beta}. All substrates, except for CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CF{sub 2}HCl below 10,000 cm{sup {minus}1}, exhibited that {beta} is independent of energy, i.e. <{Delta}E>{sub all} is linear with energy. The results are interpreted with a simple model which considers that {beta} is a function of the ocillators energy and its vibrational frequency. Limitations of current approximations used in high temperature unimolecular reactions were evaluated and better approximations were developed. The importance of energy transfer in product yields was observed for the photoactivation of perfluorocyclopropene and the photoproduction of difluoroethyne. 3 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Hole-transfer induced energy transfer in perylene diimide dyads with a donor-spacer-acceptor motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölle, Patrick; Pugliesi, Igor; Langhals, Heinz; Wilcken, Roland; Esterbauer, Andreas J; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Riedle, Eberhard

    2015-10-14

    We investigate the photoinduced dynamics of perylene diimide dyads based on a donor-spacer-acceptor motif with polyyne spacers of varying length by pump-probe spectroscopy, time resolved fluorescence, chemical variation and quantum chemistry. While the dyads with pyridine based polyyne spacers undergo energy transfer with near-unity quantum efficiency, in the dyads with phenyl based polyyne spacers the energy transfer efficiency drops below 50%. This suggests the presence of a competing electron transfer process from the spacer to the energy donor as the excitation sink. Transient absorption spectra, however, reveal that the spacer actually mediates the energy transfer dynamics. The ground state bleach features of the polyyne spacers appear due to the electron transfer decay with the same time constant present in the rise of the ground state bleach and stimulated emission of the perylene energy acceptor. Although the electron transfer process initially quenches the fluorescence of the donor it does not inhibit energy transfer to the perylene energy acceptor. The transient signatures reveal that electron and energy transfer processes are sequential and indicate that the donor-spacer electron transfer state itself is responsible for the energy transfer. Through the introduction of a Dexter blocker unit into the spacer we can clearly exclude any through bond Dexter-type energy transfer. Ab initio calculations on the donor-spacer and the donor-spacer-acceptor systems reveal the existence of a bright charge transfer state that is close in energy to the locally excited state of the acceptor. Multipole-multipole interactions between the bright charge transfer state and the acceptor state enable the energy transfer. We term this mechanism coupled hole-transfer FRET. These dyads represent a first example that shows how electron transfer can be connected to energy transfer for use in novel photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices.

  16. Conformational control of benzophenone-sensitized charge transfer in dinucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Thomas; Wenninger, Matthias; Weinberger, Michael; Riedle, Eberhard; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim; Schütz, Martin

    2013-11-14

    Charge transfer in DNA cannot be understood without addressing the complex conformational flexibility, which occurs on a wide range of timescales. In order to reduce this complexity four dinucleotide models 1X consisting of benzophenone linked by a phosphodiester to one of the natural nucleosides X = A, G, T, C were studied in water and methanol. The theoretical work focuses on the dynamics and electronic structure of 1G. Predominant conformations in the two solvents were obtained by molecular dynamics simulations. 1G in MeOH adopts mainly an open geometry with a distance of 12–16 Å between the two aromatic parts. In H2O the two parts of 1G form primarily a stacked conformation yielding a distance of 5–6 Å. The low-lying excited states were investigated by electronic structure theory in a QM/MM environment for representative snapshots of the trajectories. Photo-induced intramolecular charge transfer in the S1 state occurs exclusively in the stacked conformation. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy with 1X reveals fast charge transfer from S1 in both solvents with varying yields. Significant charge transfer from the T1 state is only found for the nucleobases with the lowest oxidation potential: in H2O, charge transfer occurs with 3.2 × 10(9) s(-1) for 1A and 6.0 × 10(9) s(-1) for 1G. The reorganization energy remains nearly unchanged going from MeOH to the more polar H2O. The electronic coupling is rather low even for the stacked conformation with H(AB) = 3 meV and explains the moderate charge transfer rates. The solvent controls the conformational distribution and therefore gates the charge transfer due to differences in distance and stacking.

  17. Spectrum and energy transfer in steady Burgers turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.; Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    The spectrum, energy transfer, and spectral interactions in steady Burgers turbulence are studied using numerically generated data. The velocity field is initially random and the turbulence is maintained steady by forcing the amplitude of a band of low wavenumbers to be invariant in time, while permitting the phase to change as dictated by the equation. The spectrum, as expected, is very different from that of Navier-Stokes turbulence. It is demonstrated that the far range of the spectrum scales as predicted by Burgers. Despite the difference in their spectra, in matters of the spectral energy transfer and triadic interactions Burgers turbulence is similar to Navier-Stokes turbulence.

  18. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Gas Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Rotational energy transfer between two N2 molecules is a fundamental process of some importance. Exchange is expected to play a role, but its importance is somewhat uncertain. Rotational energy transfer cross sections of N2 also have applications in many other fields including modeling of aerodynamic flows, laser operations, and linewidth analysis in nonintrusive laser diagnostics. A number of N2-N2 rigid rotor potential energy surface (PES) has been reported in the literature.

  19. Solar wind energy transfer through the magnetopause of an open magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L. C.; Roederer, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    An expression is derived for the total power, transferred from the solar wind to an open magnetosphere, which consists of the electromagnetic energy rate and the particle kinetic energy rate. The total rate of energy transferred from the solar wind to an open magnetosphere mainly consists of kinetic energy, and the kinetic energy flux is carried by particles, penetrating from the solar wind into the magnetosphere, which may contribute to the observed flow in the plasma mantle and which will eventually be convected slowly toward the plasma sheet by the electric field as they flow down the tail. While the electromagnetic energy rate controls the near-earth magnetospheric activity, the kinetic energy rate should dominate the dynamics of the distant magnetotail.

  20. Optimal Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipeng Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is one of the most essential biological processes in which specialized pigment-protein complexes absorb solar photons, and with a remarkably high efficiency, guide the photo-induced excitation energy toward the reaction center to subsequently trigger its conversion to chemical energy. In this work, we review the principles of optimal energy transfer in various natural and artificial light harvesting systems. We begin by presenting the guiding principles for optimizing the energy transfer efficiency in systems connected to dissipative environments, with particular attention paid to the potential role of quantum coherence in light harvesting systems. We will comment briefly on photo-protective mechanisms in natural systems that ensure optimal functionality under varying ambient conditions. For completeness, we will also present an overview of the charge separation and electron transfer pathways in reaction centers. Finally, recent theoretical and experimental progress on excitation energy transfer, charge separation, and charge transport in artificial light harvesting systems is delineated, with organic solar cells taken as prime examples.

  1. Optimal Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lipeng; Shenai, Prathamesh; Zheng, Fulu; Somoza, Alejandro; Zhao, Yang

    2015-08-20

    Photosynthesis is one of the most essential biological processes in which specialized pigment-protein complexes absorb solar photons, and with a remarkably high efficiency, guide the photo-induced excitation energy toward the reaction center to subsequently trigger its conversion to chemical energy. In this work, we review the principles of optimal energy transfer in various natural and artificial light harvesting systems. We begin by presenting the guiding principles for optimizing the energy transfer efficiency in systems connected to dissipative environments, with particular attention paid to the potential role of quantum coherence in light harvesting systems. We will comment briefly on photo-protective mechanisms in natural systems that ensure optimal functionality under varying ambient conditions. For completeness, we will also present an overview of the charge separation and electron transfer pathways in reaction centers. Finally, recent theoretical and experimental progress on excitation energy transfer, charge separation, and charge transport in artificial light harvesting systems is delineated, with organic solar cells taken as prime examples.

  2. Temperature of the thermosphere. [Titan atmospheric model with energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The vertical temperature contrast for the thermosphere of Titan is estimated considering heating by absorption of solar energy, energy loss through infrared radiation by polyatomic molecules, and energy transfer by thermal conduction between the regions of energy deposition and loss. Current observational data suggest a CH4/H2 mixing ratio of approximately greater than 1, and a vertical temperature contrast smaller than 10 K. However, it is highly probable that H2 and CH4 are not in equilibrium in the thermosphere if there are large H2 escape rates.

  3. Ultrafast charge- and energy-transfer dynamics in conjugated polymer: cadmium selenide nanocrystal blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Frederik S F; Rao, Akshay; Böhm, Marcus L; Kist, René J P; Vaynzof, Yana; Greenham, Neil C

    2014-02-25

    Hybrid nanocrystal-polymer systems are promising candidates for photovoltaic applications, but the processes controlling charge generation are poorly understood. Here, we disentangle the energy- and charge-transfer processes occurring in a model system based on blends of cadmium selenide nanocrystals (CdSe-NC) with poly[2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MDMO-PPV) using a combination of time-resolved absorption and luminescence measurements. The use of different capping ligands (n-butylamine, oleic acid) as well as thermal annealing allows tuning of the polymer-nanocrystal interaction. We demonstrate that energy transfer from MDMO-PPV to CdSe-NCs is the dominant exciton quenching mechanism in nonannealed blends and occurs on ultrafast time scales (<1 ps). Upon thermal annealing electron transfer becomes competitive with energy transfer, with a transfer rate of 800 fs independent of the choice of the ligand. Interestingly, we find hole transfer to be much less efficient than electron transfer and to extend over several nanoseconds. Our results emphasize the importance of tuning the organic-nanocrystal interaction to achieve efficient charge separation and highlight the unfavorable hole-transfer dynamics in these blends.

  4. Dynamic modeling, simulation and control of energy generation

    CERN Document Server

    Vepa, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses the core issues involved in the dynamic modeling, simulation and control of a selection of energy systems such as gas turbines, wind turbines, fuel cells and batteries. The principles of modeling and control could be applied to other non-convention methods of energy generation such as solar energy and wave energy.A central feature of Dynamic Modeling, Simulation and Control of Energy Generation is that it brings together diverse topics in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, electro-chemistry, electrical networks and electrical machines and focuses on their appli

  5. Spectral Gap Energy Transfer in Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, S.; Walters, K.; Barros, A. P.; Nogueira, M.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental measurements of atmospheric turbulence energy spectra show E(k) ~ k-3 slopes at synoptic scales (~ 600 km - 2000 km) and k-5/3 slopes at the mesoscales (transfer, energy arrest at macroscales must be introduced. The most commonly used turbulence models developed to mimic the above energy transfer include the energy backscatter model for 2D turbulence in the horizontal plane via Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models, dissipative URANS models in the vertical plane, and Ekman friction for the energy arrest. One of the controversial issues surrounding the atmospheric turbulence spectra is the explanation of the generation of the 2D and 3D spectra and transition between them, for energy injection at the synoptic scales. Lilly (1989) proposed that the existence of 2D and 3D spectra can only be explained by the presence of an additional energy injection in the meso-scale region. A second issue is related to the observations of dual peak spectra with small variance in meso-scale, suggesting that the energy transfer occurs across a spectral gap (Van Der Hoven, 1957). Several studies have confirmed the spectral gap for the meso-scale circulations, and have suggested that they are enhanced by smaller scale vertical convection rather than by the synoptic scales. Further, the widely accepted energy arrest mechanism by boundary layer friction is closely related to the spectral gap transfer. This study proposes an energy transfer mechanism for atmospheric turbulence with synoptic scale injection, wherein the generation of 2D and 3D spectra is explained using spectral gap energy transfer. The existence of the spectral gap energy transfer is validated by performing LES for the interaction of large scale circulation with a wall, and studying the evolution of the energy spectra both near to and far from the wall. Simulations are also performed using the Advanced Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF-ARW) for moist zonal flow over Gaussian ridge, and the energy spectra close

  6. Direct observation of coherent energy transfer in nonlinear micromechanical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changyao; Zanette, Damián H.; Czaplewski, David A.; Shaw, Steven; López, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Energy dissipation is an unavoidable phenomenon of physical systems that are directly coupled to an external environmental bath. In an oscillatory system, it leads to the decay of the oscillation amplitude. In situations where stable oscillations are required, the energy dissipated by the vibrations is usually compensated by replenishment from external energy sources. Consequently, if the external energy supply is removed, the amplitude of oscillations start to decay immediately, since there is no means to restitute the energy dissipated. Here, we demonstrate a novel dissipation engineering strategy that can support stable oscillations without supplying external energy to compensate losses. The fundamental intrinsic mechanism of resonant mode coupling is used to redistribute and store mechanical energy among vibrational modes and coherently transfer it back to the principal mode when the external excitation is off. To experimentally demonstrate this phenomenon, we exploit the nonlinear dynamic response of microelectromechanical oscillators to couple two different vibrational modes through an internal resonance.

  7. Direct observation of coherent energy transfer in nonlinear micromechanical oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changyao; Zanette, Damián H; Czaplewski, David A; Shaw, Steven; López, Daniel

    2017-05-26

    Energy dissipation is an unavoidable phenomenon of physical systems that are directly coupled to an external environmental bath. In an oscillatory system, it leads to the decay of the oscillation amplitude. In situations where stable oscillations are required, the energy dissipated by the vibrations is usually compensated by replenishment from external energy sources. Consequently, if the external energy supply is removed, the amplitude of oscillations start to decay immediately, since there is no means to restitute the energy dissipated. Here, we demonstrate a novel dissipation engineering strategy that can support stable oscillations without supplying external energy to compensate losses. The fundamental intrinsic mechanism of resonant mode coupling is used to redistribute and store mechanical energy among vibrational modes and coherently transfer it back to the principal mode when the external excitation is off. To experimentally demonstrate this phenomenon, we exploit the nonlinear dynamic response of microelectromechanical oscillators to couple two different vibrational modes through an internal resonance.

  8. Energy transfer pathways in semiconducting carbon nanotubes revealed using two-dimensional white-light spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlenbacher, Randy D.; McDonough, Thomas J.; Grechko, Maksim; Wu, Meng-Yin; Arnold, Michael S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2015-04-01

    Thin film networks of highly purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being explored for energy harvesting and optoelectronic devices because of their exceptional transport and optical properties. The nanotubes in these films are in close contact, which permits energy to flow through the films, although the pathways and mechanisms for energy transfer are largely unknown. Here we use a broadband continuum to collect femtosecond two-dimensional white-light spectra. The continuum spans 500 to 1,300 nm, resolving energy transfer between all combinations of bandgap (S1) and higher (S2) transitions. We observe ultrafast energy redistribution on the S2 states, non-Förster energy transfer on the S1 states and anti-correlated energy levels. The two-dimensional spectra reveal competing pathways for energy transfer, with S2 excitons taking routes depending on the bandgap separation, whereas S1 excitons relax independent of the bandgap. These observations provide a basis for understanding and ultimately controlling the photophysics of energy flow in CNT-based devices.

  9. A Design Study Of A Wireless Power Transfer System For Use To Transfer Energy From A Vibration Energy Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabham, N. J.; Harden, C.; Vincent, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    A wirelessly powered remote sensor node is presented along with its design process. The purpose of the node is the further expansion of the sensing capabilities of the commercial Perpetuum system used for condition monitoring on trains and rolling stock which operates using vibration energy harvesting. Surplus harvested vibration energy is transferred wirelessly to a remote satellite sensor to allow measurements over a wider area to be made. This additional data is to be used for long term condition monitoring. Performance measurements made on the prototype remote sensor node are reported and advantages and disadvantages of using the same RF frequency for power and data transfer are identified.

  10. Fluorescent resonant excitation energy transfer in linear polyenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mousumi; Ramasesha, S

    2010-03-28

    We have studied the dynamics of excitation transfer between two conjugated polyene molecules whose intermolecular separation is comparable to the molecular dimensions. We have employed a correlated electron model that includes both the charge-charge, charge-bond, and bond-bond intermolecular electron repulsion integrals. We have shown that the excitation transfer rate varies as inverse square of donor-acceptor separation R(-2) rather than as R(-6), suggested by the Forster type of dipolar approximation. Our time-evolution study also shows that the orientational dependence on excitation transfer at a fixed short donor-acceptor separation cannot be explained by Forster type of dipolar approximation beyond a certain orientational angle of rotation of an acceptor polyene with respect to the donor polyene. The actual excitation transfer rate beyond a certain orientational angle is faster than the Forster type of dipolar approximation rate. We have also studied the excitation transfer process in a pair of push-pull polyenes for different push-pull strengths. We have seen that, depending on the push-pull strength, excitation transfer could occur to other dipole coupled states. Our study also allows for the excitation energy transfer to optically dark states which are excluded by Forster theory since the one-photon transition intensity to these states (from the ground state) is zero.

  11. Fluorescent resonant excitation energy transfer in linear polyenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mousumi; Ramasesha, S.

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the dynamics of excitation transfer between two conjugated polyene molecules whose intermolecular separation is comparable to the molecular dimensions. We have employed a correlated electron model that includes both the charge-charge, charge-bond, and bond-bond intermolecular electron repulsion integrals. We have shown that the excitation transfer rate varies as inverse square of donor-acceptor separation R-2 rather than as R-6, suggested by the Förster type of dipolar approximation. Our time-evolution study also shows that the orientational dependence on excitation transfer at a fixed short donor-acceptor separation cannot be explained by Förster type of dipolar approximation beyond a certain orientational angle of rotation of an acceptor polyene with respect to the donor polyene. The actual excitation transfer rate beyond a certain orientational angle is faster than the Förster type of dipolar approximation rate. We have also studied the excitation transfer process in a pair of push-pull polyenes for different push-pull strengths. We have seen that, depending on the push-pull strength, excitation transfer could occur to other dipole coupled states. Our study also allows for the excitation energy transfer to optically dark states which are excluded by Förster theory since the one-photon transition intensity to these states (from the ground state) is zero.

  12. Nonequilibrium Energy Transfer at Nanoscale: A Unified Theory from Weak to Strong Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Ren, Jie; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-07-08

    Unraveling the microscopic mechanism of quantum energy transfer across two-level systems provides crucial insights to the optimal design and potential applications of low-dimensional nanodevices. Here, we study the non-equilibrium spin-boson model as a minimal prototype and develop a fluctuation-decoupled quantum master equation approach that is valid ranging from the weak to the strong system-bath coupling regime. The exact expression of energy flux is analytically established, which dissects the energy transfer as multiple boson processes with even and odd parity. Our analysis provides a unified interpretation of several observations, including coherence-enhanced heat flux and negative differential thermal conductance. The results will have broad implications for the fine control of energy transfer in nano-structural devices.

  13. Excitation energy transfer processes in condensed matter theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Jai

    1994-01-01

    Applying a unified quantum approach, contributors offer fresh insights into the theoretical developments in the excitation energy transfer processes in condensed matter This comprehensive volume examines Frenkel and Wannier excitonic processes; rates of excitonic processes; theory of laser sputter and polymer ablation; and polarons, excitonic polarons and self-trapping

  14. Plasmon resonance energy transfer and plexcitonic solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Fan; Ding, Si-Jing; Ma, Liang; Cheng, Zi-Qiang; Zhong, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Ya-Fang; Qiu, Yun-Hang; Li, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Li; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-08-11

    Plasmon-mediated energy transfer is highly desirable in photo-electronic nanodevices, but the direct injection efficiency of "hot electrons" in plasmonic photo-detectors and plasmon-sensitized solar cells (plasmon-SSCs) is poor. On another front, Fano resonance induced by strong plasmon-exciton coupling provides an efficient channel of coherent energy transfer from metallic plasmons to molecular excitons, and organic dye molecules have a much better injection efficiency in exciton-SSCs than "hot electrons". Here, we investigate enhanced light-harvesting of chlorophyll-a molecules strongly coupled to Au nanostructured films via Fano resonance. The enhanced local field and plasmon resonance energy transfer are experimentally revealed by monitoring the ultrafast dynamical processes of the plexcitons and the photocurrent flows of the assembled plexciton-SSCs. By tuning the Fano factor and anti-resonance wavelengths, we find that the local field is largely enhanced and the efficiency of plexciton-SSCs consisting of ultrathin TiO2 films is significantly improved. Most strikingly, the output power of the plexciton-SSCs is much larger than the sum of those of the individual plasmon- and exciton-SSCs. Our observations provide a practical approach to monitor energy and electron transfer in plasmon-exciton hybrids at a strong coupling regime and also offer a new strategy to design photovoltaic nanodevices.

  15. New perspectives on ultrafast Förster Resonant Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauffmann H.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that perylene diimide dyads based on a donor-spacer-acceptor motif violate Förster's dipole-dipole interaction picture for energy transfer in the low picosecond to sub-100 femtosecond regime. First theoretical explanations are presented.

  16. An optimized surface plasmon photovoltaic structure using energy transfer between discrete nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Albert; Fu, Sze-Ming; Chung, Yen-Kai; Lai, Shih-Yun; Tseng, Chi-Wei

    2013-01-14

    Surface plasmon enhancement has been proposed as a way to achieve higher absorption for thin-film photovoltaics, where surface plasmon polariton(SPP) and localized surface plasmon (LSP) are shown to provide dense near field and far field light scattering. Here it is shown that controlled far-field light scattering can be achieved using successive coupling between surface plasmonic (SP) nano-particles. Through genetic algorithm (GA) optimization, energy transfer between discrete nano-particles (ETDNP) is identified, which enhances solar cell efficiency. The optimized energy transfer structure acts like lumped-element transmission line and can properly alter the direction of photon flow. Increased in-plane component of wavevector is thus achieved and photon path length is extended. In addition, Wood-Rayleigh anomaly, at which transmission minimum occurs, is avoided through GA optimization. Optimized energy transfer structure provides 46.95% improvement over baseline planar cell. It achieves larger angular scattering capability compared to conventional surface plasmon polariton back reflector structure and index-guided structure due to SP energy transfer through mode coupling. Via SP mediated energy transfer, an alternative way to control the light flow inside thin-film is proposed, which can be more efficient than conventional index-guided mode using total internal reflection (TIR).

  17. STAND-ALONE WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEM WITH MAXIMUM POWER TRANSFER CONTROL SISTEMA AISLADO DE CONVERSIÓN EÓLICA CON CONTROL DE MÁXIMA TRANSFERENCIA DE POTENCIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel López

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A controlled wind generation system for a stand alone application is presented in this paper. A cascaded step-up/step-down power electronic converters topology is proposed to control the wind power system in the whole wind speed range. For the low wind speed range, the control strategy is aimed to follow the wind turbine’s maximal power coefficient by adjusting the generator’s rotational speed. For high wind speeds, the system power regulation is also made by controlling the generator speed. This control is made by the DC/DC power electronic converter, which modifies its input voltage, changing the machine voltage and consequently varying the generator’s rotor speed. The proposed system is validated by computer simulation. The proposed control system shows a good performance for its application in autonomous wind energy systems.Un sistema de generación eólica para una aplicación aislada es presentado en este artículo. Una topología de convertidores electrónicos de potencia elevador y reductor conectados en cascada es propuesta para controlar la producción eólica en todo el rango de velocidades del viento. Para el rango de vientos suaves, la estrategia de control permite seguir el máximo coeficiente de potencia de turbina eólica mediante el ajuste de la velocidad de rotación del generador. En el rango de vientos fuertes, la regulación de la potencia del sistema se hace igualmente por control de la velocidad de giro del generador. La acción de control es realizada mediante el convertidor DC/DC de potencia el cual modifica su tensión de entrada, cambiando así la tensión en los terminales de la máquina y por consecuencia variando la velocidad de rotación del generador. El sistema propuesto es validado mediante simulación por computador. Los resultados muestran que el sistema de control propuesto actúa de buena manera para su aplicación en sistemas autónomos de generación eólica.

  18. Network-based representation of energy transfer in unsteady separated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Aditya; Taira, Kunihiko

    2015-11-01

    We construct a network-based representation of energy pathways in unsteady separated flows using a POD-Galerkin projection model. In this formulation, we regard the POD modes as the network nodes and the energy transfer between the modes as the network edges. Based on the energy transfer analysis performed by Noack et al. (2008), edge weights are characterized on the interaction graph. As an example, we examine the energy transfer within the two-dimensional incompressible flow over a circular cylinder. In particular, we analyze the energy pathways involved in flow transition from the unstable symmetric steady state to periodic shedding cycle. The growth of perturbation energy over the network is examined to highlight key features of flow physics and to determine how the energy transfer can be influenced. Furthermore, we implement closed-loop flow control on the POD-Galerkin model to alter the energy interaction path and modify the global behavior of the wake dynamics. The insights gained will be used to perform further network analysis on fluid flows with added complexity. Work supported by US Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0386) and US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (YIP: FA9550-13-1-0183).

  19. Energy Transfer from Phycobilisomes to Photosystems of Nostoc flagelliforme Born. et Flah. During the Rewetting Course and Its Physiological Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui HUANG; Ke-Zhi BAI; Ze-Pu ZHONG; Liang-Bi LI; Ting-Yun KUANG

    2005-01-01

    During the non-frost season, the condensation of dew makes Nostocflagelliforme Born. et Flah., a highly drought-tolerant terrestrial cyanobacterium, frequently undergo rehydration-dehydration.Rehydration begins in the dark at night. After rewetting in the dark, photochemical activity and the structure of photosystem (PS) Ⅱ were not recovered at all; the structure of PSⅠ, energy transfer in phycobilisomes, and energy transfer from phycobilisomes to PSⅠ were recovered within 5 min, as in the light. The recovery of energy transfer from phycobilisomes to PSⅡ was light dependent and energy transfer from phycobilisomes to PSⅡ was only partially recovered in the dark. These results suggest that the two-trigger control (water and light) of photosynthetic recovery may make N. flagelliforme avoid unnecessary energy consumption and, at the same time, the partial recovery of energy transfer from phycobilisomes to PSⅡ in the dark could help N. flagelliforme accumulate more photosynthetic products during the transient period of rehydrationdehydration.

  20. Long range energy transfer in graphene hybrid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Hugo; Bernardo, César; Moura, Cacilda; Ferreira, R. A. S.; André, P. S.; Stauber, Tobias; Belsley, Michael; Schellenberg, Peter

    2016-08-01

    In this work we quantify the distance dependence for the extraction of energy from excited chromophores by a single layer graphene flake over a large separation range. To this end hybrid structures were prepared, consisting of a thin (2 nm) layer of a polymer matrix doped with a well chosen strongly fluorescent organic molecule, followed by an un-doped spacer layer of well-defined thicknesses made of the same polymer material and an underlying single layer of pristine, undoped graphene. The coupling strength is assessed through the variation of the fluorescence decay kinetics as a function of distance between the graphene and the excited chromophore molecules. Non-radiative energy transfer to the graphene was observed at distances of up to 60 nm a range much greater than typical energy transfer distances observed in molecular systems.

  1. The Feasibility of Coherent Energy Transfer in Microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Craddock, Travis John Adrian; Mane, Jonathan; Hameroff, Stuart; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2014-01-01

    It was once purported that biological systems were far too warm and wet to support quantum phenomena mainly due to thermal effects disrupting quantum coherence. However recent experimental results and theoretical analyses have shown that thermal energy may assist, rather than disrupt, quantum coherence, especially in the dry hydrophobic interiors of biomolecules. Specifically, evidence has been accumulating for the necessary involvement of quantum coherence and entanglement between uniquely arranged chromophores in light harvesting photosynthetic complexes. Amazingly, the tubulin subunit proteins, which comprise microtubules, also possess a distinct architecture of chromophores, namely aromatic amino acids including tryptophan. The geometry and dipolar properties of these aromatics are similar to those found in photosynthetic units indicating that tubulin may support coherent energy transfer. Tubulin aggregated into microtubule geometric lattices may support such energy transfer, which could be of import for ...

  2. Wireless energy transfer platform for medical sensors and implantable devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Hackworth, Steven A; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Haiyan; Sclabassi, Robert J; Sun, Mingui

    2009-01-01

    Witricity is a newly developed technique for wireless energy transfer. This paper presents a frequency adjustable witricity system to power medical sensors and implantable devices. New witricity resonators are designed for both energy transmission and reception. A prototype platform is described, including an RF power source, two resonators with new structures, and inductively coupled input and output stages. In vitro experiments, both in open air and using a human head phantom consisting of simulated tissues, are employed to verify the feasibility of this platform. An animal model is utilized to evaluate in vivo energy transfer within the body of a laboratory pig. Our experiments indicate that witricity is an effective new tool for providing a variety of medical sensors and devices with power.

  3. Wireless energy transfer: Dielectric lens antennas for beam shaping in wireless power-transfer applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ricardo; Carvalho, Nuno B.; Pinho, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    In the current contest of wireless systems, the last frontier remains the cut of the power cord. In that sense, the interest over wireless energy transfer technologies in the past years has grown exponentially. However, there are still many challenges to be overcome in order to enable wireless energy transfer full potential. One of the focus in the development of such systems is the design of very-high-gain, highly efficient, antennas that can compensate for the propagation loss of radio signals over the air. In this paper, we explore the design and manufacturing process of dielectric lenses, fabricated using a professional-grade desktop 3D printer. Lens antennas are used in order to increase beam efficiency and therefore maximize the efficiency of a wireless power-transfer system operating at microwave frequencies in the Ku band. Measurements of two fabricated prototypes showcase a large directivity, as predicted with simulations. xml:lang="fr"

  4. Laser control of double proton transfer in porphycenes. Towards an ultrafast switch for photonic molecular wires

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Latif, Mahmoud K

    2010-01-01

    Electronic excitation energy transfer along a molecular wire depends on the relative orientation of the electronic transition dipole moments of neighboring chromophores. In porphycenes this orientation is changed upon double proton transfer in the electronic ground state. We explore the possibility to trigger such a double proton transfer reaction by means of an infrared pump-dump laser control scheme. To this end a quantum chemical characterization of an asymmetrically substituted porphycene is performed using density functional theory. Ground state geometries, the topology of the potential energy surface for double proton transfer, and S0->S1 transition energies are compared with the parent compound porphycene and a symmetric derivative. Employing a simple two-dimensional model for the double proton transfer, which incorporates sequential and concerted motions, quantum dynamics simulations of the laser driven dynamics are performed which demonstrate tautomerization control. Based on the orientation of the t...

  5. Analysis of medium-energy transfers to the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Kenta; Topputo, Francesco; Campagnola, Stefano; Yanao, Tomohiro

    2017-03-01

    This study analyzes a recently discovered class of exterior transfers to the Moon. These transfers terminate in retrograde ballistic capture orbits, i.e., orbits with negative Keplerian energy and angular momentum with respect to the Moon. Yet, their Jacobi constant is relatively low, for which no forbidden regions exist, and the trajectories do not appear to mimic the dynamics of the invariant manifolds of the Lagrange points. This paper shows that these orbits shadow instead lunar collision orbits. We investigate the dynamics of singular, lunar collision orbits in the Earth-Moon planar circular restricted three-body problem, and reveal their rich phase space structure in the medium-energy regime, where invariant manifolds of the Lagrange point orbits break up. We show that lunar retrograde ballistic capture trajectories lie inside the tube structure of collision orbits. We also develop a method to compute medium-energy transfers by patching together orbits inside the collision tube and those whose apogees are located in the appropriate quadrant in the Sun-Earth system. The method yields the novel family of transfers as well as those ending in direct capture orbits, under particular energetic and geometrical conditions.

  6. State-of-the-Art Developments of Acoustic Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Rabiul Awal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic energy transfer (AET technology has drawn significant industrial attention recently. This paper presents the reviews of the existing AETs sequentially, preferably, from the early stage. From the review, it is evident that, among all the classes of wireless energy transfer, AET is the safest technology to adopt. Thus, it is highly recommended for sensitive area and devices, especially implantable devices. Though, the efficiency for relatively long distances (i.e., >30 mm is less than that of inductive or capacitive power transfer; however, the trade-off between safety considerations and performances is highly suitable and better than others. From the presented statistics, it is evident that AET is capable of transmitting 1.068 kW and 5.4 W of energy through wall and in-body medium (implants, respectively. Progressively, the AET efficiency can reach up to 88% in extension to 8.6 m separation distance which is even superior to that of inductive and capacitive power transfer.

  7. Condensed droplet jumping: Capillary to inertial energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Morris, Michael; Wang, Evelyn

    2013-03-01

    When condensed droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump from the surface due to the release of excess surface energy. This behavior has been shown to follow a simple inertial-capillary scaling. However, questions remain regarding the nature of the energy conversion process linking the excess surface energy of the system before coalescence and the kinetic energy of the jumping droplet. Furthermore, the primary energy dissipation mechanisms limiting this jumping behavior remain relatively unexplored. In this work, we present new experimental data from a two-camera setup capturing the trajectory of jumping droplets on nanostructured surfaces with a characteristic surface roughness length scale on the order of 10 nm. Coupled with a model developed to capture the main details of the bridging flow during coalescence, our findings suggest that: 1. the excess surface energy available for jumping is a fraction of that suggested by simple scaling due to incomplete energy transfer, 2. internal viscous dissipation is not a limiting factor on the jumping process at droplet sizes on the order of 10 μm and 3. jumping performance is strongly affected by forces associated with the external flow and fields around the droplet. This work suggests bounds on the heat transfer performance of superhydrophobic condensation surfaces.

  8. Basic DTU Wind Energy controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Henriksen, Lars Christian

    This report contains a description and documentation, including source code, of the basic DTU Wind Energy controller applicable for pitch-regulated, variable speed wind turbines. The controller features both partial and full load operation capabilities as well as switching mechanisms ensuring...... in the feedback. The controller relies on generator speed as the primary feedback sensor. Additionally, the reference generator power is used as a feedback term to smoothen the switching between partial and full load operation. Optionally, a low-pass filtered wind speed measurement can be used for wind speed...... dependent minimum blade pitch in partial load operation. The controller uses the collective blade pitch angle and electromagnetic generator torque to control the wind turbine. In full load operation a feedback term from the collective blade pitch angle is used to schedule the gains of the proportional...

  9. Rates of mass, momentum, and energy transfer at the magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    Empirical estimates of the global rates of transfer of solar wind mass, tangential momentum, and energy at the Earth's magnetopause are presented for comparison against model estimates based on the four principal mechanisms that have been proposed to explain such transfer. The comparisons, although not quite conclusive, strongly favor a model that incorporates some combination of direct magnetic connection and anomalous cross field diffusion. An additional global constraint, the rate at which magnetic flux is cycled through the magnetospheric convection system, strongly suggests that direct magnetic connection plays a significant if not dominant role in the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction.

  10. The energy transfer between the ports of an implemented gyrator using LM13700 operational transconductance amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatai, Ildiko; Zaharie, Ioan

    2012-11-01

    In this paper a gyrator implementation using a LM13700 operational transconductance amplifier is analyzed. It was first verified under PSpice simulation and experimentally the antireciprocity of this gyrator, i.e., its properties. This type of gyrator can be used for controlling the energy transfer from one port to the other by modifying the bias currents of the operational transconductance amplifier.

  11. The energy transfer between the ports of an implemented gyrator using LM13700 operational transconductance amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatai, Ildiko; Zaharie, Ioan

    2012-11-01

    In this paper a gyrator implementation using a LM13700 operational transconductance amplifier is analyzed. It was first verified under PSpice simulation and experimentally the antireciprocity of this gyrator, i.e., its properties. This type of gyrator can be used for controlling the energy transfer from one port to the other by modifying the bias currents of the operational transconductance amplifier.

  12. Detection of three porcine vesicular viruses using multiplex real-time primer-probe energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Aguero, M.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid identification of the etiologic agent in infected animals is important for the control of an outbreak of vesicular disease in livestock. We have in the present study developed a multiplex real-time reverse transcription-PCR, based on primer-probe energy transfer (PriProET), for simultaneous...

  13. Energy Efficiency of Distributed Environmental Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalifa, H. Ezzat; Isik, Can; Dannenhoffer, John F. III

    2011-02-23

    s thermal dissatisfaction below a given threshold. The DECS energy usage was calculated using the simplified thermal model. OSFA control; providing a uniform temperature to the entire building, and occupant-selected HIYW control with a thermostat at each workstation were implemented for 3 cities representing 3 different climatic regions and control scenarios. It is shown that optimization allows DECS to deliver a higher level of individual and population thermal comfort while achieving annual energy savings between 14 and 26% compared to OSFA. The optimization model also allowed us to study the influence of the partitions’ thermal resistance and the variability of internal loads at each office. These influences didn’t make significant changes in the optimized energy consumption relative to OSFA. The results show that it is possible to provide thermal comfort for each occupant while saving energy compared to OSFA Furthermore, to simplify the implementation of this approach, a fuzzy logic system has been developed to generalize the overall optimization strategy. Its performance was almost as good as the gradient system. The fuzzy system provided thermal comfort to each occupant and saved energy compared to OSFA. The energy savings of the fuzzy system were not as high as for the gradient-optimized system, but the fuzzy system avoided complete connectivity, and the optimization did not have to be repeated for each population. 3. We employed a detailed CFD model of adjacent occupied cubicles to extend the thermal-circuit model in three significant ways: (a) relax the “office wall” requirement by allowing energy to flow between zones via advection as well as conduction, (b) improve the comfort model to account both for radiation as well as convection heat transfer, and (c) support ventilation systems in which the temperature is stratified, such as in underfloor air distribution systems. Initially, three-dimensional CFD simulations of several cubicle configurations, with

  14. Sudden Chain Energy Transfer Events in Vibrated Granular Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Nicolás; Ponce, Suomi; Soto, Rodrigo; Cordero, Patricio; Mujica, Nicolás; Risso, Dino; Gallet, Basille

    2012-02-01

    In a mixture of two species of grains of equal size but different mass, placed in a vertically vibrated shallow box, there is spontaneous segregation. Once the system is at least partly segregated and clusters of the heavy particles have formed, there are sudden peaks of the horizontal kinetic energy of the heavy particles, that is otherwise small. Together with the energy peaks the clusters rapidly expand and the segregation is partially lost. The process repeats once segregation has taken place again, either randomly or with some regularity in time depending on the experimental or numerical parameters. An explanation for these events is provided based on the existence of a fixed point for an isolated particle bouncing with only vertical motion. The horizontal energy peaks occur when the energy stored in the vertical motion is partly transferred into horizontal energy through a chain reaction of collisions between heavy particles.

  15. Mesoscopic order and the dimensionality of long-range resonance energy transfer in supramolecular semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Clément; Makereel, François; Herz, Laura M.; Hoeben, Freek J. M.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Schenning, Albertus P. H. J.; Meijer, E. W.; Silva, Carlos

    2008-09-01

    We present time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on two series of oligo-p-phenylenevinylene materials that self-assemble into supramolecular nanostructures with thermotropic reversibility in dodecane. One set of derivatives form chiral helical stacks, while the second set form less organized "frustrated" stacks. Here we study the effects of supramolecular organization on the resonance energy transfer rates. We measure these rates in nanoassemblies formed with mixed blends of oligomers and compare them with the rates predicted by Förster theory. Our results and analysis show that control of supramolecular order in the nanometer length scale has a dominant effect on the efficiency and dimensionality of resonance energy transfer.

  16. Time-resolved energy transfer spectroscopy for measuring mitochondrial metabolism in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Gschwend, Michael H.; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Sailer, Reinhard; Bauer, Manfred; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1997-12-01

    Energy transfer from NADH to the mitochondrial marker rhodamine 123 (R123) was used to probe mitochondrial malfunction of cultivated endothelial cells incubated with various inhibitors of specific enzyme complexes of the respiratory chain. Pronounced differences of 'energy transfer efficacy' of incubated cells as compared to controls were deduced from the ratio of fluorescence intensity and intracellular amount of the acceptor. A combination of cw and time-gated (nanosecond) fluorescence spectroscopy appeared to be an appropriate tool for probing mitochondrial malfunction in various kinds of diseases.

  17. Quantum electrodynamical theory of high-efficiency excitation energy transfer in laser-driven nanostructure systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeraddana, Dilusha; Premaratne, Malin; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Andrews, David L.

    2016-08-01

    A fundamental theory is developed for describing laser-driven resonance energy transfer (RET) in dimensionally constrained nanostructures within the framework of quantum electrodynamics. The process of RET communicates electronic excitation between suitably disposed emitter and detector particles in close proximity, activated by the initial excitation of the emitter. Here, we demonstrate that the transfer rate can be significantly increased by propagation of an auxiliary laser beam through a pair of nanostructure particles. This is due to the higher order perturbative contribution to the Förster-type RET, in which laser field is applied to stimulate the energy transfer process. We construct a detailed picture of how excitation energy transfer is affected by an off-resonant radiation field, which includes the derivation of second and fourth order quantum amplitudes. The analysis delivers detailed results for the dependence of the transfer rates on orientational, distance, and laser intensity factor, providing a comprehensive fundamental understanding of laser-driven RET in nanostructures. The results of the derivations demonstrate that the geometry of the system exercises considerable control over the laser-assisted RET mechanism. Thus, under favorable conformational conditions and relative spacing of donor-acceptor nanostructures, the effect of the auxiliary laser beam is shown to produce up to 70% enhancement in the energy migration rate. This degree of control allows optical switching applications to be identified.

  18. Basic DTU Wind Energy controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartvig Hansen, M.; Henriksen, Lars Christian

    2013-01-15

    This report contains a description and documentation, including source code, of the basic DTU Wind Energy controller applicable for pitch-regulated, variable speed wind turbines. The controller features both partial and full load operation capabilities as well as switching mechanisms ensuring smooth switching between the two modes of operation. The partial and full load controllers are both based on classical proportional-integral control theory as well as additional filters such as an optional drive train damper and a notch filter mitigating the influence of rotor speed dependent variations in the feedback. The controller relies on generator speed as the primary feedback sensor. Additionally, the reference generator power is used as a feedback term to smoothen the switching between partial and full load operation. Optionally, a low-pass filtered wind speed measurement can be used for wind speed dependent minimum blade pitch in partial load operation. The controller uses the collective blade pitch angle and electromagnetic generator torque to control the wind turbine. In full load operation a feedback term from the collective blade pitch angle is used to schedule the gains of the proportional-integral controller to counter the effects of changing dynamics of the wind turbine for different wind speeds. Blade pitch servo and generator models are not included in this controller and should be modeled separately, if they are to be included in the simulations. (Author)

  19. Reduced density matrix hybrid approach: application to electronic energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkelbach, Timothy C; Markland, Thomas E; Reichman, David R

    2012-02-28

    Electronic energy transfer in the condensed phase, such as that occurring in photosynthetic complexes, frequently occurs in regimes where the energy scales of the system and environment are similar. This situation provides a challenge to theoretical investigation since most approaches are accurate only when a certain energetic parameter is small compared to others in the problem. Here we show that in these difficult regimes, the Ehrenfest approach provides a good starting point for a dynamical description of the energy transfer process due to its ability to accurately treat coupling to slow environmental modes. To further improve on the accuracy of the Ehrenfest approach, we use our reduced density matrix hybrid framework to treat the faster environmental modes quantum mechanically, at the level of a perturbative master equation. This combined approach is shown to provide an efficient and quantitative description of electronic energy transfer in a model dimer and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and is used to investigate the effect of environmental preparation on the resulting dynamics.

  20. 2013 MOLECULAR ENERGY TRANSFER GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE (JANUARY 13-18, 2013 - VENTURA BEACH MARRIOTT, VENTURA CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Scott A. [Marquette University

    2012-10-18

    Sessions covered all areas of molecular energy transfer, with 10 sessions of talks and poster sessions covering the areas of :  Energy Transfer in Inelastic and Reactive Scattering  Energy Transfer in Photoinitiated and Unimolecular Reactions  Non-adiabatic Effects in Energy TransferEnergy Transfer at Surfaces and Interfaces  Energy Transfer in Clusters, Droplets, and Aerosols  Energy Transfer in Solution and Solid  Energy Transfer in Complex Systems  Energy Transfer: New vistas and horizons  Molecular Energy Transfer: Where Have We Been and Where are We Going?

  1. Nanophotonic enhancement of the F\\"orster resonance energy transfer rate on single DNA molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ghenuche, Petru; Moparthi, Satish Babu; Grigoriev, Victor; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Nanophotonics achieves accurate control over the luminescence properties of a single quantum emitter by tailoring the light-matter interaction at the nanoscale and modifying the local density of optical states (LDOS). This paradigm could also benefit to F\\"orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) by enhancing the near-field electromagnetic interaction between two fluorescent emitters. Despite the wide applications of FRET in nanosciences, using nanophotonics to enhance FRET remains a debated and complex challenge. Here, we demonstrate enhanced energy transfer within single donor-acceptor fluorophore pairs confined in gold nanoapertures. Experiments monitoring both the donor and the acceptor emission photodynamics at the single molecule level clearly establish a linear dependence of the FRET rate on the LDOS in nanoapertures. These findings are applied to enhance the FRET rate in nanoapertures up to six times, demonstrating that nanophotonics can be used to intensify the near-field energy transfer and improve t...

  2. Controlling an electron-transfer reaction at a metal surface by manipulating reactant motion and orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Nils; Krüger, Bastian C; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Schäfer, Tim

    2014-12-08

    The loss or gain of vibrational energy in collisions of an NO molecule with the surface of a gold single crystal proceeds by electron transfer. With the advent of new optical pumping and orientation methods, we can now control all molecular degrees of freedom important to this electron-transfer-mediated process, providing the most detailed look yet into the inner workings of an electron-transfer reaction and showing how to control its outcome. We find the probability of electron transfer increases with increasing translational and vibrational energy as well as with proper orientation of the reactant. However, as the vibrational energy increases, translational excitation becomes unimportant and proper orientation becomes less critical. One can understand the interplay of all three control parameters from simple model potentials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Electromagnetic Energy Absorption due to Wireless Energy Transfer: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syafiq A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews an implementation of evaluating compliance of wireless power transfer systems with respect to human electromagnetic exposure limits. Methods for both numerical analysis and measurements are discussed. The objective is to evaluate the rate of which energy is absorbed by the human body when exposed to a wireless energy transfer, although it can be referred to the absorption of other forms of energy by tissue. An exposure assessment of a representative wireless power transfer system, under a limited set of operating conditions, is provided in order to estimate the maximum SAR levels. The aim of this review is to conclude the possible side effect to the human body when utilizing wireless charging in daily life so that an early severe action can be taken when using wireless transfer.

  4. Light harvesting via energy transfer in the dye solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegers, Conrad

    2007-11-09

    The PhD-thesis ''Light Harvesting via Energy Transfer in the Dye Solar Cell'' (University of Freiburg, July 2007) describes the conceptual design, synthesis and testing of energy donor acceptor sensitizers for the dye solar cell (DSC). Under monochromatic illumination solar cells sensitized with the novel donor acceptor systems revealed a higher power conversion efficiency than cells containing exclusively the acceptor component. The following approach led to this conclusion: (i) the choice of suitable chromophores as energy donor and acceptor moieties according to the Foerster-theory, (ii) the synthesis of different donor acceptor systems, (iii) the development of a methodology allowing the quantification of energy transfer within dye solar cells, and (iv) the evaluation of characteristics of DSCs that were sensitized with the different donor acceptor systems. The acceptor chromophores used in this work were derived from [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl (dcbpy = 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridin, acac = acetylacetonato). This complex offered the opportunity to introduce substituents at the acac-ligand's terminal CH3 groups without significantly affecting its excellent photoelectrochemical properties. Alkylated 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimides (termed Fluorols in the following) were used as energy donor chromophores. This class of compounds fulfils the requirements for efficient energy transfer to [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl. Covalently linking donor and acceptor chromophores to one another was achieved by two different concepts. A dyad comprising one donor and one acceptor chromophore was synthesized by subsequent hydrosilylation steps of an olefin-bearing donor and an acceptor precursor to the dihydrosilane HSiMe2-CH2CH2-SiMe2H. A series of polymers comprising multiple donor and acceptor units was made by the addition of alkyne-bearing chromophores to hyperbranched polyglycerol azide (''Click-chemistry''). In this series the donor acceptor

  5. Light harvesting via energy transfer in the dye solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegers, Conrad

    2007-11-09

    The PhD-thesis ''Light Harvesting via Energy Transfer in the Dye Solar Cell'' (University of Freiburg, July 2007) describes the conceptual design, synthesis and testing of energy donor acceptor sensitizers for the dye solar cell (DSC). Under monochromatic illumination solar cells sensitized with the novel donor acceptor systems revealed a higher power conversion efficiency than cells containing exclusively the acceptor component. The following approach led to this conclusion: (i) the choice of suitable chromophores as energy donor and acceptor moieties according to the Foerster-theory, (ii) the synthesis of different donor acceptor systems, (iii) the development of a methodology allowing the quantification of energy transfer within dye solar cells, and (iv) the evaluation of characteristics of DSCs that were sensitized with the different donor acceptor systems. The acceptor chromophores used in this work were derived from [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl (dcbpy = 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridin, acac = acetylacetonato). This complex offered the opportunity to introduce substituents at the acac-ligand's terminal CH3 groups without significantly affecting its excellent photoelectrochemical properties. Alkylated 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimides (termed Fluorols in the following) were used as energy donor chromophores. This class of compounds fulfils the requirements for efficient energy transfer to [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl. Covalently linking donor and acceptor chromophores to one another was achieved by two different concepts. A dyad comprising one donor and one acceptor chromophore was synthesized by subsequent hydrosilylation steps of an olefin-bearing donor and an acceptor precursor to the dihydrosilane HSiMe2-CH2CH2-SiMe2H. A series of polymers comprising multiple donor and acceptor units was made by the addition of alkyne-bearing chromophores to hyperbranched polyglycerol azide (''Click-chemistry''). In this series the donor acceptor

  6. Energy transfer and dual cascade in kinetic magnetized plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunk, G G; Tatsuno, T

    2011-04-22

    The question of how nonlinear interactions redistribute the energy of fluctuations across available degrees of freedom is of fundamental importance in the study of turbulence and transport in magnetized weakly collisional plasmas, ranging from space settings to fusion devices. In this Letter, we present a theory for the dual cascade found in such plasmas, which predicts a range of new behavior that distinguishes this cascade from that of neutral fluid turbulence. These phenomena are explained in terms of the constrained nature of spectral transfer in nonlinear gyrokinetics. Accompanying this theory are the first observations of these phenomena, obtained via direct numerical simulations using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. The basic mechanisms that are found provide a framework for understanding the turbulent energy transfer that couples scales both locally and nonlocally.

  7. Excitation energy transfer from dye molecules to doped graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Swathi; K L Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we have reported theoretical studies on the rate of energy transfer from an electronically excited molecule to graphene. It was found that graphene is a very efficient quencher of the electronically excited states and that the rate -4. The process was found to be effective up to 30 which is well beyond the traditional FRET limit. In this report, we study the transfer of an amount of energy $\\hbar$ from a dye molecule to doped graphene. We find a crossover of the distance dependence of the rate from -4 to exponential as the Fermi level is increasingly shifted into the conduction band, with the crossover occurring at a shift of the Fermi level by an amount $\\hbar$ /2.

  8. Modelling excitonic-energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental study of energy transfer in photosynthesis has revealed an interesting transport regime, which lies at the borderline between classical transport dynamics and quantum-mechanical interference effects. Dissipation is caused by the coupling of electronic degrees of freedom to vibrational modes and leads to a directional energy transfer from the antenna complex to the target reaction-center. The dissipative driving is robust and does not rely on fine-tuning of specific vibrational modes. For the parameter regime encountered in the biological systems new theoretical tools are required to directly compare theoretical results with experimental spectroscopy data. The calculations require to utilize massively parallel graphics processor units (GPUs) for efficient and exact computations.

  9. Modelling excitonic-energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Tobias; Kreisbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental study of energy transfer in photosynthesis has revealed an interesting transport regime, which lies at the borderline between classical transport dynamics and quantum-mechanical interference effects. Dissipation is caused by the coupling of electronic degrees of freedom to vibrational modes and leads to a directional energy transfer from the antenna complex to the target reaction-center. The dissipative driving is robust and does not rely on fine-tuning of specific vibrational modes. For the parameter regime encountered in the biological systems new theoretical tools are required to directly compare theoretical results with experimental spectroscopy data. The calculations require to utilize massively parallel graphics processor units (GPUs) for efficient and exact computations.

  10. Energy-donor phosphorescence quenching study of triplet–triplet energy transfer between UV absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Azusa; Nakabai, Yuya [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Oguchi-Fujiyama, Nozomi; Miyazawa, Kazuyuki [Shiseido Research Center, Hayabuchi, Tsuzuki-ku, Yokohama 224-8558 (Japan); Yagi, Mikio, E-mail: yagimiki@ynu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    The intermolecular triplet–triplet energy transfer from a photounstable UV-A absorber, 4-tert-butyl-4′-methoxydibenzoylmethane (BMDBM), to UV-B absorbers, 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate (octyl methoxycinnamate, OMC), octocrylene (OCR) and dioctyl 4-methoxybenzylidenemalonate (DOMBM) has been observed using a 355 nm laser excitation in rigid solutions at 77 K. The decay curves of the energy-donor phosphorescence in the presence of the UV-B absorbers deviate from the exponential decay at the initial stage of the decay. The Stern–Volmer formulation is not valid in rigid solutions because molecular diffusion is impossible. The experimental results indicate that the rate constant of triplet–triplet energy transfer from BMDBM to the UV-B absorbers, k{sub T–T}, decreases in the following order: k{sub T–T} (BMDBM–DOMBM)>k{sub T–T} (BMDBM–OMC)≥k{sub T–T} (BMDBM–OCR). The presence of DOMBM enhances the photostability of the widely used combination of UV-A and UV-B absorbers, BMDBM and OCR. The effects of the triplet–triplet energy transfer on the photostability of BMDBM are discussed. - Highlights: • The intermolecular triplet–triplet energy transfer between UV absorbers was observed. • The phosphorescence decay deviates from exponential at the initial stage of decay. • The effects of triplet–triplet energy transfer on the photostability are discussed.

  11. Optimizing energy transfer efficiency in highly branched nanoplasmonic waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronine, Dmitri; Traverso, Andrew; Wang, Kai; Yi, Zhenhuan; Sokolov, Alexei

    2011-03-01

    Energy transfer in highly branched nanoplasmonic particle waveguides is simulated and optimized by varying the waveguide branching geometry and composition. The periodically branched nanostructures provide a new route towards efficient nanoscale light concentration and local field enhancement. On the one hand, they mimick the analogous randomly branched plasmonic nanostructures which have been previously used for surface-enhanced optical spectroscopy such as SERS. On the other hand, the design is inspired by branched molecular aggregates used for energy funneling. The proposed nanostructures may find applications in sensing, light harvesting and nanophotonics.

  12. Mechanisms for control of biological electron transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Heather R; Dow, Brian A; Davidson, Victor L

    2014-12-01

    Electron transfer (ET) through and between proteins is a fundamental biological process. The rates and mechanisms of these ET reactions are controlled by the proteins in which the redox centers that donate and accept electrons reside. The protein influences the magnitudes of the ET parameters, the electronic coupling and reorganization energy that are associated with the ET reaction. The protein can regulate the rates of the ET reaction by requiring reaction steps to optimize the system for ET, leading to kinetic mechanisms of gated or coupled ET. Amino acid residues in the segment of the protein through which long range ET occurs can also modulate the ET rate by serving as staging points for hopping mechanisms of ET. Specific examples are presented to illustrate these mechanisms by which proteins control rates of ET reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Information Exchange via Surface Modified Resonance Energy Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Boström, Mathias; Huang, Dan; Ninham, Barry W; Sernelius, Bo E

    2013-01-01

    The theory is presented for resonance interaction between two atoms in an excited configuration: one atom, the "receptor" of information (i.e. energy), adsorbed on a phospholipid surface and the other atom, the "emitter" of information (i.e. energy), a long distance away. The dielectric function for a specific phospholipid membrane is obtained from density functional theory calculations. We present numerical results comparing the range and magnitude of non-specific Casimir-Polder interactions with the much more long-ranged, and highly specific, resonance interaction. A study of the resonance interaction with one or both atoms adsorbed on a phospholipid membrane surface reveals a possibility to have a cross over from attraction to repulsion or from repulsion to attraction at separations between receptor and emitter atoms exceeding several hundred {\\AA}ngstr\\"oms. The energy transfer and the observed transitions in the sign of the interaction energies near surfaces provide potential new ways to start recognitio...

  14. Experimental study of targeted energy transfer from an acoustic system to a nonlinear membrane absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellet, R.; Cochelin, B.; Herzog, P.; Mattei, P.-O.

    2010-07-01

    This paper deals with the application of the concept of targeted energy transfer to the field of acoustics, providing a new approach to passive sound control in the low frequency domain, where no efficient dissipative mechanism exists. The targeted energy transfer, also called energy pumping, is a phenomenon that we observe by combining a pure nonlinear oscillator with a linear primary system. It corresponds to an almost irreversible transfer of vibration energy from the linear system to the auxiliary nonlinear one, where the energy is finally dissipated. In this study, an experimental set-up has been developed using the air inside a tube as the acoustic linear system, a thin circular visco-elastic membrane as an essentially cubic oscillator and the air inside a box as a weak coupling between those two elements. In this paper, which mainly deals with experimental results, it is shown that several regimes exist under sinusoidal forcing, corresponding to the different nonlinear normal modes of the system. One of these regimes is the quasi-periodic energy pumping regime. The targeted energy transfer phenomenon is also visible on the free oscillations of the system. Indeed, above an initial excitation threshold, the sound extinction in the tube follows a quasi-linear decrease that is much faster than the usual exponential one. During this linear decrease, the energy of the acoustic medium is irreversibly transferred to the membrane and then damped into this element called nonlinear energy sink. We present also the frequency responses of the system which shows a clipping of the original resonance peak of the acoustic medium and we finally demonstrate the ability of the nonlinear absorber to operate in a large frequency band, tuning itself to any linear system.

  15. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Andrew F; Singh, Ved P; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  16. Analysis of the Coupling Coefficient in Inductive Energy Transfer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Mendes Duarte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In wireless energy transfer systems, the energy is transferred from a power source to an electrical load without the need of physical connections. In this scope, inductive links have been widely studied as a way of implementing these systems. Although high efficiency can be achieved when the system is operating in a static state, it can drastically decrease if changes in the relative position and in the coupling coefficient between the coils occur. In this paper, we analyze the coupling coefficient as a function of the distance between two planar and coaxial coils in wireless energy transfer systems. A simple equation is derived from Neumann’s equation for mutual inductance, which is then used to calculate the coupling coefficient. The coupling coefficient is computed using CST Microwave Studio and compared to calculation and experimental results for two coils with an excitation signal of up to 10 MHz. The results showed that the equation presents good accuracy for geometric parameters that do not lead the solution of the elliptic integral of the first kind to infinity.

  17. metal-induced energy transfer (MIET) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karedla, Narain V. S.; Isbaner, Sebastian; Chizhik, Alexey I.; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Joerg; Chizhik, Anna M.

    2017-02-01

    We present a new concept for measuring distance values of single molecules from a surface with nanometer accuracy using the energy transfer from the excited molecule to surface plasmons of a metal film [1]. We measure the fluorescence lifetime of individual dye molecules deposited on a dielectric spacer as a function of a spacer thickness. By using our theoretical model [2], we convert the lifetime values into the axial distance of individual molecules. Similar to Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), this allows emitters to be localized with nanometer accuracy, but in contrast to FRET the distance range at which efficient energy transfer takes place is an order of magnitude larger. Together with orientation measurements [3], one can potentially use smMIET to localize single emitters with a nanometer precision isotropically, which will facilitate intra- and intermolecular distance measurements in biomolecules and complexes, circumventing the requirement of the knowledge of mutual orientations between two dipole emitters which severely limits the quantification of such distances from a conventional single-pair FRET (spFRET) experiment. [1] Karedla, N., Chizhik, A.I., Gregor, I., Chizhik, A.M., Schulz, O., Enderlein, J., ChemPhysChem, 15, 705-711 (2014). [2] Enderlein J., Biophyical Journal, 78, 2151-8 (2000). [3] Karedla, N., Stein, S. C., Hähnel, D., Gregor, I., Chizhik, A., and Enderlein, J., Physical Review Letters, 115, 173002 (2015).

  18. Collision Induced Dissociation and Energy Transfer in Molecular Hydroge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandy, Margot E.

    2006-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen is a significant constituent in giant molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. Shocks in these clouds are associated with star formation. The cooling of the shocks is governed by competition of collisional energy transfer and dissociation with radiative cooling by quadrupole emission. Thus a detailed understanding of collisional behaviour of molecular hydrogen is needed. Work in this group has examined energy transfer and dissociation in molecular energy transfer as the result of collisions with H, D, He, and H2. Using quasiclassical trajectories and chemically accurate ab initio potentials state-to-state rate coefficients have been determined. The uncertainties of the cross sections are propagated rigourously to give uncertainties of the rate coefficients and the rate coefficients are parameterized as a function of temperature. Comparisons with quantum calculations are discussed and the proposed website is described.This work was supported by a grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. The calculations were carried out using the high performance computing facility jointly supported by the Canadian Foundation for Innovation, the British Columbia Knowledge Development Fund, and Silicon Graphics at the University of Northern British Columbia.

  19. Controlling time scales for electron transfer through proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot Wherland

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Electron transfer processes within proteins constitute key elements in biological energy conversion processes as well as in a wide variety of biochemical transformations. Pursuit of the parameters that control the rates of these processes is driven by the great interest in the latter reactions. Here, we review a considerable body of results emerging from investigation of intramolecular electron transfer (ET reactions in two types of proteins, all done by the use of the pulse-radiolysis method: first are described results of extensive studies of a model system, the bacterial electron mediating protein azurin, where an internal ET between the disulfide radical ion and the Cu(II is induced. Impact of specific structural changes introduced into azurin on the reaction rates and the parameters controlling it are discussed. Then, the presentation is extended to results of investigations of intra-protein ET reactions that are part of catalytic cycles of multi-copper containing enzymes. Again, the rates and the parameters controlling them are presented and discussed in the context of their efficacy and possible constraints set on their evolution.

  20. Energy transfer and constrained simulations in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Javier

    1993-01-01

    The defining characteristic of turbulent flows is their ability to dissipate energy, even in the limit of zero viscosity. The Euler equations, if constrained in such a way that the velocity derivatives remain bounded, conserve energy. But when they arise as the limit of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, when the Reynolds number goes to infinity, there is persuasive empirical evidence that the gradients become singular as just the right function of Re for the dissipation to remain non-zero and to approach a well defined limit. It is generally believed that this limiting value of the dissipation is a property of the Euler equations themselves, independent of the particular dissipative mechanism involved, and that it can be normalized with the large scale properties of the turbulent flow (e.g. the kinetic energy per unit volume u'(exp 2)/2, and the integral scale L) without reference to the Reynolds number or to other dissipative quantities. This is usually taken to imply that the low wave number end of the energy spectrum, far from the dissipative range, is also independent of the particular mechanism chosen to dispose of the energy transfer. In the following sections, we present some numerical experiments on the effect of substituting different dissipation models into the truncated Euler equations. We will see that the effect is mainly felt in the 'near dissipation' range of the energy spectrum, but that this range can be quite wide in some cases, contaminating a substantial range of wave numbers. In the process, we will develop a 'practical' approximation to the subgrid energy transfer in isotropic turbulence, and we will gain insight into the structure of the nonlinear interactions among turbulent scales of comparable size, and into the nature of energy backscatter. Some considerations on future research directions are offered at the end.

  1. Heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ben

    The demand for clean and environmentally benign energy resources has been a great concern in the last two decades. To alleviate the associated environmental problems, reduction of the use of fossil fuels by developing more cost-effective renewable energy technologies becomes more and more significant. Among various types of renewable energy sources, solar energy and bioenergy take a great proportion. This dissertation focuses on the heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems, specifically for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) systems in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants and open-channel algal culture raceways for biofuel production. The first part of this dissertation is the discussion about mathematical modeling, numerical simulation and experimental investigation of solar TES system. First of all, in order to accurately and efficiently simulate the conjugate heat transfer between Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) and filler material in four different solid-fluid TES configurations, formulas of an e?ective heat transfer coe?cient were theoretically developed and presented by extending the validity of Lumped Capacitance Method (LCM) to large Biot number, as well as verifications/validations to this simplified model. Secondly, to provide design guidelines for TES system in CSP plant using Phase Change Materials (PCM), a general storage tank volume sizing strategy and an energy storage startup strategy were proposed using the enthalpy-based 1D transient model. Then experimental investigations were conducted to explore a novel thermal storage material. The thermal storage performances were also compared between this novel storage material and concrete at a temperature range from 400 °C to 500 °C. It is recommended to apply this novel thermal storage material to replace concrete at high operating temperatures in sensible heat TES systems. The second part of this dissertation mainly focuses on the numerical and experimental study of an open-channel algae

  2. Energy and Information Transfer Via Coherent Exciton Wave Packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoning

    Electronic excitons are bound electron-hole states that are generated when light interacts with matter. Such excitations typically entangle with phonons and rapidly decohere; the resulting electronic state dynamics become diffusive as a result. However, if the exciton-phonon coupling can be reduced, it may be possible to construct excitonic wave packets that offer a means of efficiently transmitting information and energy. This thesis is a combined theory/computation investigation to design condensed matter systems which support the requisite coherent transport. Under the idealizing assumption that exciton-phonon entanglement could be completely suppressed, the majority of this thesis focuses on the creation and manipulation of exciton wave packets in quasi-one-dimensional systems. While each site could be a silicon quantum dot, the actual implementation focused on organic molecular assemblies for the sake of computational simplicity, ease of experimental implementation, potential for coherent transport, and promise because of reduced structural uncertainty. A laser design was derived to create exciton wave packets with tunable shape and speed. Quantum interference was then exploited to manipulate these packets to block, pass, and even dissociate excitons based on their energies. These developments allow exciton packets to be considered within the arena of quantum information science. The concept of controllable excitonic wave packets was subsequently extended to consider molecular designs that allow photons with orbital angular momentum to be absorbed to create excitons with a quasi-angular momentum of their own. It was shown that a well-defined measure of topological charge is conserved in such light-matter interactions. Significantly, it was also discovered that such molecules allow photon angular momenta to be combined and later emitted. This amounts to a new way of up/down converting photonic angular momentum without relying on nonlinear optical materials. The

  3. Correlation Between Energy Transfer Rate and Atomization Energy of Some Trinitro Aromatic Explosive Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-hong Ge; Xin-lu Cheng; Zheng-lai Liu; Xiang-dong Yang; Fang-fang Dong

    2008-01-01

    An assumptive theoretical relationship is suggested to describe the property of molecular atomization energy and energy transfer rate in the initiation of explosions. To investigate the relationship between atomization energy and energy transfer rate, the number of doorway modes of explosives is estimated by the theory of Dlott and Fayer in which the rate is proportional to the number of normal mode vibrations. It was evaluated frequencies of normal mode vibrations of eight molecules by means of density functional theory (DFT) at the b3p86/6-31G(d,p) level. It is found that the number of doorway modes shows a linear correlation to the atomization energies of the molecules, which were also calculated by means of the same method. A mechanism of this correlation is discussed. It is also noted that in those explosives with similar molecular structure and molecular weight, the correlation between the atomization energy and the number of doorway modes is higher.

  4. Dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay between tunable upconversion nanoparticles and controlled gold nanoparticles for the simultaneous detection of Pb²⁺ and Hg²⁺.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shijia; Duan, Nuo; Shi, Zhao; Fang, Congcong; Wang, Zhouping

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we presented a novel dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system for the simultaneous detection of Pb(2+) and Hg(2+). This system employed two color upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as the donors, and controlled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the acceptors. The two donor-acceptor pairs were fabricated by hybridizing the aptamers and their corresponding complementary DNA. Thus, the green and red upconversion fluorescence could be quenched because of a good overlap between the UCNPs fluorescence emission and the AuNPs absorption spectrum. In the presence of Pb(2+) and Hg(2+), the aptamers preferred to bind to their corresponding analytes and formed a G-quadruplexes structure for Pb(2+) and the hairpin-like structure for Hg(2+). As a result, the dual FRET was disrupted, and the green and red upconversion fluorescence was restored. Under optimized experimental conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity increased as the metal ion concentrations were increased, allowing for the quantification of Pb(2+) and Hg(2+). The relationships between the fluorescence intensity and plotting logarithms of ion concentrations were linear in the range from 0.1 to 100 nM for Pb(2+) and 0.5 to 500 nM for Hg(2+), and the detection limits of Pb(2+) and Hg(2+) were 50 pM and 150 pM, respectively. As a practical application, the aptasensor was used to monitor Pb(2+) and Hg(2+) levels in naturally contaminated samples and human serum samples. Ultimately, this type of dual FRET could be used to detect other metal ions or contaminants in food safety analysis and environment monitoring.

  5. Solvent control of intramolecular proton transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manolova, Y.; Marciniak, Heinz; Tschierlei, S.

    2017-01-01

    The solvent dependent excited state dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-(piperidin-1-ylmethyl)-1-naphthaldehyde (compound 2), a candidate for a molecular switch based on intramolecular proton transfer, was investigated by ultrafast spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations. In acetonitrile a mixture...... of molecules in the enol and zwitterionic proton transfer (PT) form exists in the ground state. However, the zwitterion is the energetically favored one in the electronically excited state. Optical excitation of the enol form results in intramolecular proton transfer and formation of the PT form within 1.4 ps....... In addition we observe the appearance of a long living species with a rate of 1/(330 ps) which returns to the original ground state on time scales beyond 2 ns and which is attributed to the triplet state. In toluene the enol form is the only observed ground state tautomer, but no light induced proton transfer...

  6. Dynamical control of quantum state transfer within hybrid open systems

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, B M; Clausen, J; Kurizki, G; Davidovich, L

    2010-01-01

    We analyze quantum state-transfer optimization within hybrid open systems, from a "noisy" (write-in) qubit to its "quiet" counterpart (storage qubit). Intriguing interplay is revealed between our ability to avoid bath-induced errors that profoundly depend on the bath-memory time and the limitations imposed by leakage out of the operational subspace. Counterintuitively, under no circumstances is the fastest transfer optimal (for a given transfer energy).

  7. Potential Energy Diagrams: A Conceptual Tool in the Study of Electron Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nita A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes how the potential energy diagram may be used to theoretically describe the processes involved in a system undergoing electron transfer. Examines factors important in electron transfer reactions and discusses several classes of electron transfer reactions. (CS)

  8. Vibrational energy transfer dynamics in ruthenium polypyridine transition metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoseeva, Marina; Delor, Milan; Parker, Simon C; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Weinstein, Julia A

    2015-01-21

    Understanding the dynamics of the initial stages of vibrational energy transfer in transition metal complexes is a challenging fundamental question which is also of crucial importance for many applications, such as improving the performance of solar devices or photocatalysis. The present study investigates vibrational energy transport in the ground and the electronic excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2, a close relative of the efficient "N3" dye used in dye-sensitized solar cells. Using the emerging technique of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we show that, similarly to other transition-metal complexes, the central Ru heavy atom acts as a "bottleneck" making the energy transfer from small ligands with high energy vibrational stretching frequencies less favorable and thereby affecting the efficiency of vibrational energy flow in the complex. Comparison of the vibrational relaxation times in the electronic ground and excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2 shows that it is dramatically faster in the latter. We propose to explain this observation by the intramolecular electrostatic interactions between the thiocyanate group and partially oxidised Ru metal center, which increase the degree of vibrational coupling between CN and Ru-N modes in the excited state thus reducing structural and thermodynamic barriers that slow down vibrational relaxation and energy transport in the electronic ground state. As a very similar behavior was earlier observed in another transition-metal complex, Re(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2'-bpy)(CO)3Cl, we suggest that this effect in vibrational energy dynamics might be common for transition-metal complexes with heavy central atoms.

  9. 40 CFR 52.255 - Gasoline transfer vapor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline transfer vapor control. 52.255... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.255 Gasoline transfer vapor control. (a) “Gasoline” means any petroleum distillate having a Reid vapor pressure of 4 pounds or...

  10. 40 CFR 52.787 - Gasoline transfer vapor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline transfer vapor control. 52.787... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.787 Gasoline transfer vapor control. (a) Gasoline means any petroleum distillate having a Reid vapor pressure of 4 pounds or...

  11. Gamma-ray transfer and energy deposition in supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Sutherland, Peter G.; Harkness, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    Solutions to the energy-independent (gray) radiative transfer equations are compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Ni-56 and Co-56 decay gamma-ray energy deposition in supernovae. The comparison shows that an effective, purely absorptive, gray opacity, kappa(sub gamma) approximately (0. 06 +/- 0.01)Y(sub e) sq cm/g, where Y is the total number of electrons per baryon, accurately describes the interaction of gamma-rays with the cool supernova gas and the local gamma-ray energy deposition within the gas. The nature of the gamma-ray interaction process (dominated by Compton scattering in the relativistic regime) creates a weak dependence of kappa(sub gamma) on the optical thickness of the (spherically symmetric) supernova atmosphere: The maximum value of kappa(sub gamma) applies during optically thick conditions when individual gamma-rays undergo multiple scattering encounters and the lower bound is reached at the phase characterized by a total Thomson optical depth to the center of the atmosphere tau(sub e) approximately less than 1. Gamma-ray deposition for Type Ia supernova models to within 10% for the epoch from maximum light to t = 1200 days. Our results quantitatively confirm that the quick and efficient solution to the gray transfer problem provides an accurate representation of gamma-ray energy deposition for a broad range of supernova conditions.

  12. Firefly Luciferase-Based Sequential Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET)-Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Protease Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchini, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyzes yellow-green (560 nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-Infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41 nM for caspase 3, 1.0 nM for thrombin, and 58 nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. This method successfully employs an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence to assay physiologically important protease activities and should be generally applicable to the measurement of any endoprotease lacking accessible cysteine residues.

  13. Subphthalocyanines: tuneable molecular scaffolds for intramolecular electron and energy transfer processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, David; Torres, Tomás; Guldi, Dirk M; Rivera, José; Herranz, Maria Angeles; Echegoyen, Luis

    2004-05-26

    A series of four subphthalocyanine-C(60) fullerene dyads have been prepared through axial functionalization of the macrocycle with m-hydroxybenzaldehyde and a subsequent dipolar cycloaddition reaction. The subphthalocyanine moiety has been peripherally functionalized with substituents of different electronic character, namely fluorine or iodine atoms and ether or amino groups, thus reaching a control over its electron-donating properties. This is evidenced in cyclic voltammetry experiments by a progressive shift to lower potentials, by ca. 200 mV, of the first oxidation event of the SubPc unit in the dyads. As a consequence, the energy level of the SubPc(*)(+)-C(60)(*)(-) charge-transfer state may be tuned so as to compete with energy transfer deactivation pathways upon selective excitation of the SubPc component. For instance, excitation of those systems where the level of the radical pair lies high in energy triggers a sequence of exergonic photophysical events that comprise (i) nearly quantitative singlet-singlet energy transfer to the C(60) moiety, (ii) fullerene intersystem crossing, and (iii) triplet-triplet energy transfer back to the SubPc. On the contrary, the stabilization of the SubPc(*)(+)-C(60)(*)(-) radical pair state by increasing the polarity of the medium or by lowering the donor-acceptor redox gap causes charge transfer to dominate. In the case of 1c in benzonitrile, the thus formed radical pair has a lifetime of 0.65 ns and decays via the energetically lower lying triplet excited state. Further stabilization is achieved for dyad 1d, whose charge-transfer state would lie now below both triplets. The radical pair lifetime consequently increases in more than 2 orders of magnitude with respect to 1c and presents a significant stabilization in less polar solvents, revealing a low reorganization energy for this kind of SubPc-C(60) systems.

  14. Information systems and technology transfer programs on geothermal energy and other renewable sources of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippmann, M.J.; Antunez, E.

    1996-01-01

    In order to remain competitive, it is necessary to stay informed and use the most advanced technologies available. Recent developments in communication, like the Internet and the World Wide Web, enormously facilitate worldwide data and technology transfer. A compilation of the most important sources of data on renewable energies, especially geothermal, as well as lists of relevant technology transfer programs are presented. Information on how to gain access to, and learn more about them, is also given.

  15. Geometrical effects on energy transfer in disordered open quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mohseni, M; Lloyd, S; Omar, Y; Rabitz, H

    2013-01-01

    We explore various design principles for efficient excitation energy transport in complex quantum systems. We investigate energy transfer efficiency in randomly disordered geometries consisting of up to 20 chromophores to explore spatial and spectral properties of small natural/artificial Light-Harvesting Complexes (LHC). We find significant statistical correlations among highly efficient random structures with respect to ground state properties, excitonic energy gaps, multichromophoric spatial connectivity, and path strengths. These correlations can even exist beyond the optimal regime of environment-assisted quantum transport. For random configurations embedded in spatial dimensions of 30 A and 50 A, we observe that the transport efficiency saturates to its maximum value if the systems contain 7 and 14 chromophores respectively. Remarkably, these optimum values coincide with the number of chlorophylls in (Fenna-Matthews-Olson) FMO protein complex and LHC II monomers, respectively, suggesting a potential nat...

  16. Rotational Energy Transfer and Collisional Induced Raman Linewidths in N2 Gas. 1; Energy Transfer Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Green, Sheldon; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotationally inelastic transitions of N2 have been studied in the coupled state (CS) and infinite-order-sudden (IOS) approximations, using the N2-N2 rigidrotor potential of van der Avoird et al. For benchmarking purposes, close coupling (CC) calculations have also been carried out over a limited energy range. The CC and CS cross sections have been obtained both with and without identical molecule exchange symmetry, whereas exchange was neglected in the IOS calculations. The CS results track the CC cross sections rather well; between 113 - 219 cm(exp -1) the average deviation is 14%. Comparison between the CS and IOS cross sections at the high energy end of the CS calculation, 500 - 680 cm(exp -1), shows that IOS is sensitive to the amount of inelasticity and the results for large DELTA J transitions are subject to larger errors. It is found that the state-to-state cross sections with even and odd exchange symmetry agree to better than 2% and are well represented as a sum of direct and exchange cross sections for distinguishable molecules, an indication of the applicability of a classical treatment for this system. This result, however, does not apply to partial cross sections for given total J, but arises from a near cancellation in summing over partial waves. In order to use rigid-rotor results for the calculation of effective rotational excitation rates of N2 in the v=1 vibrational level colliding with bath N2 molecules in the v=0 level, it is assumed that exchange scattering between molecules in different vibrational levels is negligible and direct scattering is independent of Y. Good agreement with room temperature experimental data is obtained. The effective rates determined using the IOS and energy corrected sudden (ECS) approximations are also in reasonable agreement with experiment, with the ECS results being somewhat better. The problem with a degeneracy factor in earlier cross section expressions for collisions between identical molecules is pointed out

  17. Energy transfer efficiency of a spherical theta-pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teske, Christian; Fedjuschenko, Andreas; Jacoby, Joachim; Schweizer, Waldemar [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A spherical theta-pinch device for VUV generation and plasma stripper applications with an operating frequency of 12 kHz has been developed. The setup consists of a series resonance circuit with a load capacitance of 27 {mu}F and a large diameter induction coil surrounding a spherical discharge vessel with a discharge volume of 4000 ml. First measurements have been made to evaluate the transfer efficiency of the pulsed inductive discharge in Argon with 2.8% Hydrogen at gas pressures from 0.6 Pa up to 100 Pa at load voltages from 4 kV to 8 kV. Pulsed coil currents reached a maximum value of 18 kA with current rise times of 2 kA/mys while achieving a maximum energy transfer efficiency of 85% between the driving circuit and the plasma. Pulsed power peak values inside the plasma reached more than 2 MW.

  18. On the properties of energy transfer in solar wind turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Marino, Raffaele; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Wicks, Robert; Nigro, Giuseppina

    2017-04-01

    Spacecraft observations have shown that the solar wind plasma is heated during its expansion in the heliosphere. The necessary energy is made available at small scales by a turbulent cascade, although the nature of the heating processes is still debated. Because of the intermittent nature of turbulence, the small-scale energy is inhomogeneously distributed in space, resulting for example in the formation of highly localized current sheets and eddies. In order to understand the small-scale plasma processes occurring in the solar wind, the global and local properties of such energy distribution must be known. Here we study such properties using a proxy derived from the Von Karman-Howart relation for magnetohydrodynamics. The statistical properties of the energy transfer rate in the fluid range of scales are studied in detail using WIND spacecraft plasma and magnetic field measurements and discussed in the framework of the multifractal turbulent cascade. Dependence of the energy dissipation proxy on the solar wind conditions (speed, type, solar activity...) is analysed, and its evolution during solar wind expansion in the heliosphere is described using Helios II and Ulysses measurements. A comparison with other proxies, such as the PVI, is performed. Finally, the local singularity properties of the energy dissipation proxy are conditionally compared to the corresponding particle velocity distributions. This allows the identification of specific plasma features occurring near turbulent dissipation events, and could be used as enhanced mode trigger in future space missions.

  19. Competition between Förster resonance energy transfer and electron transfer in stoichiometrically assembled semiconductor quantum dot-fullerene conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Michael H; Huston, Alan L; Scott, Amy M; Oh, Eunkeu; Algar, W Russ; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Susumu, Kimihiro; Jain, Vaibhav; Prasuhn, Duane E; Blanco-Canosa, Juan; Dawson, Philip E; Medintz, Igor L

    2013-10-22

    Understanding how semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) engage in photoinduced energy transfer with carbon allotropes is necessary for enhanced performance in solar cells and other optoelectronic devices along with the potential to create new types of (bio)sensors. Here, we systematically investigate energy transfer interactions between C60 fullerenes and four different QDs, composed of CdSe/ZnS (type I) and CdSe/CdS/ZnS (quasi type II), with emission maxima ranging from 530 to 630 nm. C60-pyrrolidine tris-acid was first coupled to the N-terminus of a hexahistidine-terminated peptide via carbodiimide chemistry to yield a C60-labeled peptide (pepC60). This peptide provided the critical means to achieve ratiometric self-assembly of the QD-(pepC60) nanoheterostructures by exploiting metal affinity coordination to the QD surface. Controlled QD-(pepC60)N bioconjugates were prepared by discretely increasing the ratio (N) of pepC60 assembled per QD in mixtures of dimethyl sulfoxide and buffer; this mixed organic/aqueous approach helped alleviate issues of C60 solubility. An extensive set of control experiments were initially performed to verify the specific and ratiometric nature of QD-(pepC60)N assembly. Photoinitiated energy transfer in these hybrid organic-inorganic systems was then interrogated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence along with ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. Coordination of pepC60 to the QD results in QD PL quenching that directly tracks with the number of peptides displayed around the QD. A detailed photophysical analysis suggests a competition between electron transfer and Förster resonance energy transfer from the QD to the C60 that is dependent upon a complex interplay of pepC60 ratio per QD, the presence of underlying spectral overlap, and contributions from QD size. These results highlight several important factors that must be considered when designing QD-donor/C60-acceptor systems for potential optoelectronic and biosensing

  20. Transfer of mechanical energy during the shot put.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błażkiewicz, Michalina; Łysoń, Barbara; Chmielewski, Adam; Wit, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse transfer of mechanical energy between body segments during the glide shot put. A group of eight elite throwers from the Polish National Team was analysed in the study. Motion analysis of each throw was recorded using an optoelectronic Vicon system composed of nine infrared camcorders and Kistler force plates. The power and energy were computed for the phase of final acceleration of the glide shot put. The data were normalized with respect to time using the algorithm of the fifth order spline and their values were interpolated with respect to the percentage of total time, assuming that the time of the final weight acceleration movement was different for each putter. Statistically significant transfer was found in the study group between the following segments: Right Knee - Right Hip (p = 0.0035), Left Hip - Torso (p = 0.0201), Torso - Right Shoulder (p = 0.0122) and Right Elbow - Right Wrist (p = 0.0001). Furthermore, the results of cluster analysis showed that the kinetic chain used during the final shot acceleration movement had two different models. Differences between the groups were revealed mainly in the energy generated by the hips and trunk.

  1. Energy transfer in mesoscopic vibrational systems enabled by eigenfrequency fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalaya, Juan

    Energy transfer between low-frequency vibrational modes can be achieved by means of nonlinear coupling if their eigenfrequencies fulfill certain nonlinear resonance conditions. Because of the discreteness of the vibrational spectrum at low frequencies, such conditions may be difficult to satisfy for most low-frequency modes in typical mesoscopic vibrational systems. Fluctuations of the vibrational eigenfrequencies can also be relatively strong in such systems. We show that energy transfer between modes can occur in the absence of nonlinear resonance if frequency fluctuations are allowed. The case of three modes with cubic nonlinear coupling and no damping is particularly interesting. It is found that the system has a non-thermal equilibrium state which depends only on the initial conditions. The rate at which the system approaches to such state is determined by the parameters such as the noise strength and correlation time, the nonlinearity strength and the detuning from exact nonlinear resonance. We also discuss the case of many weakly coupled modes. Our results shed light on the problem of energy relaxation of low-frequency vibrational modes into the continuum of high-frequency vibrational modes. The results have been obtained with Mark Dykman. Alternative email: jatalaya2012@gmail.com.

  2. Detecting Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer with Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augspurger, Ashley E. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Stender, Anthony S. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Han, Rui [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Fang, Ning [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-12-30

    Gold nanoparticles are ideal probes for studying intracellular environments and energy transfer mechanisms due to their plasmonic properties. Plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) relies on a plasmonic nanoparticle to donate energy to a nearby resonant acceptor molecule, a process which can be observed due to the plasmonic quenching of the donor nanoparticle. In this study, a gold nanosphere was used as the plasmonic donor, while the metalloprotein cytochrome c was used as the acceptor molecule. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy allows for simultaneous monitoring of complex environments and noble metal nanoparticles in real time. Using DIC and specially designed microfluidic channels, we were able to monitor PRET at the single gold particle level and observe the reversibility of PRET upon the introduction of phosphate-buffered saline to the channel. In an additional experiment, single gold particles were internalized by HeLa cells and were subsequently observed undergoing PRET as the cell hosts underwent morphological changes brought about by ethanol-induced apoptosis.

  3. Transfer of mechanical energy during the shot put

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błażkiewicz Michalina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse transfer of mechanical energy between body segments during the glide shot put. A group of eight elite throwers from the Polish National Team was analysed in the study. Motion analysis of each throw was recorded using an optoelectronic Vicon system composed of nine infrared camcorders and Kistler force plates. The power and energy were computed for the phase of final acceleration of the glide shot put. The data were normalized with respect to time using the algorithm of the fifth order spline and their values were interpolated with respect to the percentage of total time, assuming that the time of the final weight acceleration movement was different for each putter. Statistically significant transfer was found in the study group between the following segments: Right Knee – Right Hip (p = 0.0035, Left Hip - Torso (p = 0.0201, Torso – Right Shoulder (p = 0.0122 and Right Elbow – Right Wrist (p = 0.0001. Furthermore, the results of cluster analysis showed that the kinetic chain used during the final shot acceleration movement had two different models. Differences between the groups were revealed mainly in the energy generated by the hips and trunk.

  4. Linear energy relationships in ground state proton transfer and excited state proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P; Magomedov, Artiom; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R I

    2015-02-12

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes are elementary chemical reactions involved in a broad range of radical and redox reactions. Elucidating fundamental PCET reaction mechanisms are thus of central importance for chemical and biochemical research. Here we use quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT), time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), and the algebraic diagrammatic-construction through second-order (ADC(2)) to study the mechanism, thermodynamic driving force effects, and reaction barriers of both ground state proton transfer (pT) and photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) between nitrosylated phenyl-phenol compounds and hydrogen-bonded t-butylamine as an external base. We show that the obtained reaction barriers for the ground state pT reactions depend linearly on the thermodynamic driving force, with a Brønsted slope of 1 or 0. Photoexcitation leads to a PCET reaction, for which we find that the excited state reaction barrier depends on the thermodynamic driving force with a Brønsted slope of 1/2. To support the mechanistic picture arising from the static potential energy surfaces, we perform additional molecular dynamics simulations on the excited state energy surface, in which we observe a spontaneous PCET between the donor and the acceptor groups. Our findings suggest that a Brønsted analysis may distinguish the ground state pT and excited state PCET processes.

  5. Transfer and temporary storage of mechanical energy through rotary movement; Uebertragung und voruebergehende Speicherung mechanischer Energie mithilfe der Drehbewegung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamerak, Kurt

    2012-07-01

    One of the most important form of mechanical energy is the rotational energy. By means of this rotational energy, mechanical energy is transferred from the actuating driving motor to the driven machine. Under this aspect, the author of the contribution under consideration reports on the transfer of mechanical energy by means of rotary motion. The author describes the circular movement, rotational energy of a rigid body, angular momentum, performance and angular momentum of an asynchronous motor, transfer of rotational energy through a shaft, gear as a transformer for the rotational energy, Coriolis effect.

  6. Boosting infrared energy transfer in 3D nanoporous gold antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoli, D; Calandrini, E; Bozzola, A; Ortolani, M; Cattarin, S; Barison, S; Toma, A; De Angelis, F

    2017-01-05

    The applications of plasmonics to energy transfer from free-space radiation to molecules are currently limited to the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum due to the intrinsic optical properties of bulk noble metals that support strong electromagnetic field confinement only close to their plasma frequency in the visible/ultraviolet range. In this work, we show that nanoporous gold can be exploited as a plasmonic material for the mid-infrared region to obtain strong electromagnetic field confinement, co-localized with target molecules into the nanopores and resonant with their vibrational frequency. The effective optical response of the nanoporous metal enables the penetration of optical fields deep into the nanopores, where molecules can be loaded thus achieving a more efficient light-matter coupling if compared to bulk gold. In order to realize plasmonic resonators made of nanoporous gold, we develop a nanofabrication method based on polymeric templates for metal deposition and we obtain antenna arrays resonating at mid-infrared wavelengths selected by design. We then coat the antennas with a thin (3 nm) silica layer acting as the target dielectric layer for optical energy transfer. We study the strength of the light-matter coupling at the vibrational absorption frequency of silica at 1240 cm(-1) through the analysis of the experimental Fano lineshape that is benchmarked against identical structures made of bulk gold. The boost in the optical energy transfer from free-space mid-infrared radiation to molecular vibrations in nanoporous 3D nanoantenna arrays can open new application routes for plasmon-enhanced physical-chemical reactions.

  7. Power Loss Analysis and Comparison of Segmented and Unsegmented Energy Coupling Coils for Wireless Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sai Chun; McDannold, Nathan J

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigated the power losses of unsegmented and segmented energy coupling coils for wireless energy transfer. Four 30-cm energy coupling coils with different winding separations, conductor cross-sectional areas, and number of turns were developed. The four coils were tested in both unsegmented and segmented configurations. The winding conduction and intrawinding dielectric losses of the coils were evaluated individually based on a well-established lumped circuit model. We found that the intrawinding dielectric loss can be as much as seven times higher than the winding conduction loss at 6.78 MHz when the unsegmented coil is tightly wound. The dielectric loss of an unsegmented coil can be reduced by increasing the winding separation or reducing the number of turns, but the power transfer capability is reduced because of the reduced magnetomotive force. Coil segmentation using resonant capacitors has recently been proposed to significantly reduce the operating voltage of a coil to a safe level in wireless energy transfer for medical implants. Here, we found that it can naturally eliminate the dielectric loss. The coil segmentation method and the power loss analysis used in this paper could be applied to the transmitting, receiving, and resonant coils in two- and four-coil energy transfer systems.

  8. Single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bräuchle, Christoph; Michaelis, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Closing a gap in the literature, this handbook gathers all the information on single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer. It covers all aspects of this hot and modern topic, from detecting virus entry to membrane diffusion, and from protein folding using spFRET to coupled dye systems, as well recent achievements in the field. Throughout, the first-class editors and top international authors present content of the highest quality, making this a must-have for physical chemists, spectroscopists, molecular physicists and biochemists.

  9. Charge and Energy Transfer Dynamics in Molecular Systems

    CERN Document Server

    May, Volkhard

    2004-01-01

    This second edition is based on the successful concept of the first edition in presenting a unified perspective on molecular charge and energy transfer processes. The authors bridge the regimes of coherent and dissipative dynamics, thus establishing the connection between classic rate theories and modern treatments of ultrafast phenomena. The book serves as an introduction for graduate students and researchers. Among the new topics of this second edition are. - semiclassical and quantum-classical hybrid formulations of molecular dynamics. - the basics of femtosecond nonlinear spectroscopy. - e

  10. Nanoparticles for heat transfer and thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dileep; Cingarapu, Sreeram; Timofeeva, Elena V.; Moravek, Michael

    2015-07-14

    An article of manufacture and method of preparation thereof. The article of manufacture and method of making the article includes an eutectic salt solution suspensions and a plurality of nanocrystalline phase change material particles having a coating disposed thereon and the particles capable of undergoing the phase change which provides increase in thermal energy storage. In addition, other articles of manufacture can include a nanofluid additive comprised of nanometer-sized particles consisting of copper decorated graphene particles that provide advanced thermal conductivity to heat transfer fluids.

  11. Energy transfer from lower energy to higher-energy electrons mediated by whistler waves in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyar, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    We study the problem of energy exchange between waves and particles, which leads to energization of the latter, in an unstable plasma typical of the radiation belts. The ongoing Van Allen Probes space mission brought this problem among the most discussed in space physics. A free energy which is present in an unstable plasma provides the indispensable condition for energy transfer from lower energy particles to higher-energy particles via resonant wave-particle interaction. This process is studied in detail by the example of electron interactions with whistler mode wave packets originated from lightning-induced emission. We emphasize that in an unstable plasma, the energy source for electron energization is the energy of other particles, rather than the wave energy as is often assumed. The way by which the energy is transferred from lower energy to higher-energy particles includes two processes that operate concurrently, in the same space-time domain, or sequentially, in different space-time domains, in which a given wave packet is located. In the first process, one group of resonant particles gives the energy to the wave. The second process consists in wave absorption by another group of resonant particles, whose energy therefore increases. We argue that this mechanism represents an efficient means of electron energization in the radiation belts.

  12. Energy Efficiency of Distributed Environmental Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalifa, H. Ezzat; Isik, Can; Dannenhoffer, John F. III

    2011-02-23

    s thermal dissatisfaction below a given threshold. The DECS energy usage was calculated using the simplified thermal model. OSFA control; providing a uniform temperature to the entire building, and occupant-selected HIYW control with a thermostat at each workstation were implemented for 3 cities representing 3 different climatic regions and control scenarios. It is shown that optimization allows DECS to deliver a higher level of individual and population thermal comfort while achieving annual energy savings between 14 and 26% compared to OSFA. The optimization model also allowed us to study the influence of the partitions’ thermal resistance and the variability of internal loads at each office. These influences didn’t make significant changes in the optimized energy consumption relative to OSFA. The results show that it is possible to provide thermal comfort for each occupant while saving energy compared to OSFA Furthermore, to simplify the implementation of this approach, a fuzzy logic system has been developed to generalize the overall optimization strategy. Its performance was almost as good as the gradient system. The fuzzy system provided thermal comfort to each occupant and saved energy compared to OSFA. The energy savings of the fuzzy system were not as high as for the gradient-optimized system, but the fuzzy system avoided complete connectivity, and the optimization did not have to be repeated for each population. 3. We employed a detailed CFD model of adjacent occupied cubicles to extend the thermal-circuit model in three significant ways: (a) relax the “office wall” requirement by allowing energy to flow between zones via advection as well as conduction, (b) improve the comfort model to account both for radiation as well as convection heat transfer, and (c) support ventilation systems in which the temperature is stratified, such as in underfloor air distribution systems. Initially, three-dimensional CFD simulations of several cubicle configurations, with

  13. On the use of Lineal Energy Measurements to Estimate Linear Energy Transfer Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David A.; Howell, Leonard W., Jr.; Adam, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the error resulting from using a lineal energy spectrum to represent a linear energy transfer spectrum for applications in the space radiation environment. Lineal energy and linear energy transfer spectra are compared in three diverse but typical space radiation environments. Different detector geometries are also studied to determine how they affect the error. LET spectra are typically used to compute dose equivalent for radiation hazard estimation and single event effect rates to estimate radiation effects on electronics. The errors in the estimations of dose equivalent and single event rates that result from substituting lineal energy spectra for linear energy spectra are examined. It is found that this substitution has little effect on dose equivalent estimates in interplanetary quiet-time environment regardless of detector shape. The substitution has more of an effect when the environment is dominated by solar energetic particles or trapped radiation, but even then the errors are minor especially if a spherical detector is used. For single event estimation, the effect of the substitution can be large if the threshold for the single event effect is near where the linear energy spectrum drops suddenly. It is judged that single event rate estimates made from lineal energy spectra are unreliable and the use of lineal energy spectra for single event rate estimation should be avoided.

  14. Crossed-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seka, W; Edgell, D H; Michel, D T; Froula, D H; Goncharov, V N; Craxton, R S; Divol, L; Epstein, R; Follett, R; Kelly, J H; Kosc, T Z; Maximov, A V; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, P; Myatt, J F; Sangster, T C; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S

    2012-05-22

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have showed discrepancies between simulations of the scattered (non-absorbed) light levels and measured ones that indicate the presence of a mechanism that reduces laser coupling efficiency by 10%-20%. This appears to be due to crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) that involves electromagnetic-seeded, low-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering. CBET scatters energy from the central portion of the incoming light beam to outgoing light, reducing the laser absorption and hydrodynamic efficiency of implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET show good agreement with all observables in implosion experiments on OMEGA. Three strategies to mitigate CBET and improve laser coupling are considered: the use of narrow beams, multicolor lasers, and higher-Z ablators. Experiments on OMEGA using narrow beams have demonstrated improvements in implosion performance.

  15. Protein Transfer Free Energy Obeys Entropy-Enthalpy Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Eric A; Plotkin, Steven S

    2015-11-05

    We have found significant entropy-enthalpy compensation for the transfer of a diverse set of two-state folding proteins from water into water containing a diverse set of cosolutes, including osmolytes, denaturants, and crowders. In extracting thermodynamic parameters from experimental data, we show the potential importance of accounting for the cosolute concentration-dependence of the heat capacity change upon unfolding, as well as the potential importance of the temperature-dependence of the heat capacity change upon unfolding. We introduce a new Monte Carlo method to estimate the experimental uncertainty in the thermodynamic data and use this to show by bootstrapping methods that entropy-enthalpy compensation is statistically significant, in spite of large, correlated scatter in the data. We show that plotting the data at the transition midpoint provides the most accurate experimental values by avoiding extrapolation errors due to uncertainty in the heat capacity, and that this representation exhibits the strongest evidence of compensation. Entropy-enthalpy compensation is still significant at lab temperature however. We also find that compensation is still significant when considering variations due to heat capacity models, as well as typical measurement discrepancies lab-to-lab when such data is available. Extracting transfer entropy and enthalpy along with their uncertainties can provide a valuable consistency check between experimental data and simulation models, which may involve tests of simulated unfolded ensembles and/or models of the transfer free energy; we include specific applications to cold shock protein and protein L.

  16. Autologous Germline Mitochondrial Energy Transfer (AUGMENT) in Human Assisted Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Dori C; Tilly, Jonathan L

    2015-11-01

    Ovarian aging is characterized by a decline in both the total number and overall quality of oocytes, the latter of which has been experimentally tied to mitochondrial dysfunction. Clinical studies in the late 1990s demonstrated that transfer of cytoplasm aspirated from eggs of young female donors into eggs of infertile women at the time of intracytoplasmic sperm injection improved pregnancy success rates. However, donor mitochondria were identified in offspring, and the United States Food and Drug Administration raised questions about delivery of foreign genetic material into human eggs at the time of fertilization. Accordingly, heterologous cytoplasmic transfer, while promising, was in effect shut down as a clinical protocol. The recent discovery of adult oogonial (oocyte-generating) stem cells in mice, and subsequently in women, has since re-opened the prospects of delivering a rich source of pristine and patient-matched germline mitochondria to boost egg health and embryonic developmental potential without the need for young donor eggs to obtain cytoplasm. Herein we overview the science behind this new protocol, which has been patented and termed autologous germline mitochondrial energy transfer, and its use to date in clinical studies for improving pregnancy success in women with a prior history of assisted reproduction failure.

  17. Transfer Function Model of Multirate Feedback Control Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the suitably defined multivariable version of Krancoperators and the extended input and output vectors, the multirate sampling plant is transformed to a equivalent time invariant single rate one, then the transfer function model of the multivariable multirate sampling plant is obtained. By combining this plant model with the time invariant description of the multirate controller in terms of extended vectors, the closed-loop transfer function model of the multirate feedback control system can be determinated. This transfer function model has a very simple structure, and can be used as a basis for the analysis and synthesis of the multirate sampling feedback control systems in the frequency domain.

  18. Charge Transfer and Ionization by Intermediate-Energy Heavy Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toburen, L. H. [East Carolina University; McLawhorn, S. L. [East Carolina University; McLawhorn, R. A. [East Carolina University; Evans, N. L. [East Carolina University; Justiniano, E. L. B. [East Carolina University; Shinpaugh, J. L. [East Carolina University; Schultz, David Robert [ORNL; Reinhold, Carlos O [ORNL

    2006-11-01

    The use of heavy ion beams for microbeam studies of mammalian cell response leads to a need to better understand interaction cross sections for collisions of heavy ions with tissue constituents. For ion energies of a few MeV u-1 or less, ions capture electrons from the media in which they travel and undergo subsequent interactions as partially 'dressed' ions. For example, 16 MeV fluorine ions have an equilibrium charge of 7+, 32 MeV sulphur ions have an equilibrium charge of approx. 11+, and as the ion energies decrease the equilibrium charge decreases dramatically. Data for interactions of partially dressed ions are extremely rare, making it difficult to estimate microscopic patterns of energy deposition leading to damage to cellular components. Such estimates, normally obtained by Monte Carlo track structure simulations, require a comprehensive database of differential and total ionisation cross sections as well as charge transfer cross sections. To provide information for track simulation, measurement of total ionisation cross sections have been initiated at East Carolina University using the recoil ion time-of-flight method that also yields cross sections for multiple ionisation processes and charge transfer cross sections; multiple ionisation is prevalent for heavy ion interactions. In addition, measurements of differential ionisation cross sections needed for Monte Carlo simulation of detailed event-by-event particle tracks are under way. Differential, total and multiple ionisation cross sections and electron capture and loss cross sections measured for C+ ions with energies of 100 and 200 keV u-1 are described.

  19. Charge transfer and ionisation by intermediate-energy heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toburen, L H; McLawhorn, S L; McLawhorn, R A; Evans, N L; Justiniano, E L B; Shinpaugh, J L; Schultz, D R; Reinhold, C O

    2006-01-01

    The use of heavy ion beams for microbeam studies of mammalian cell response leads to a need to better understand interaction cross sections for collisions of heavy ions with tissue constituents. For ion energies of a few MeV u(-1) or less, ions capture electrons from the media in which they travel and undergo subsequent interactions as partially 'dressed' ions. For example, 16 MeV fluorine ions have an equilibrium charge of 7(+), 32 MeV sulphur ions have an equilibrium charge of approximately 11(+), and as the ion energies decrease the equilibrium charge decreases dramatically. Data for interactions of partially dressed ions are extremely rare, making it difficult to estimate microscopic patterns of energy deposition leading to damage to cellular components. Such estimates, normally obtained by Monte Carlo track structure simulations, require a comprehensive database of differential and total ionisation cross sections as well as charge transfer cross sections. To provide information for track simulation, measurement of total ionisation cross sections have been initiated at East Carolina University using the recoil ion time-of-flight method that also yields cross sections for multiple ionisation processes and charge transfer cross sections; multiple ionisation is prevalent for heavy ion interactions. In addition, measurements of differential ionisation cross sections needed for Monte Carlo simulation of detailed event-by-event particle tracks are under way. Differential, total and multiple ionisation cross sections and electron capture and loss cross sections measured for C(+) ions with energies of 100 and 200 keV u(-1) are described.

  20. Heat transfer and energy efficiency in infrared paper dryers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Magnus

    1999-11-01

    Infrared (IR) dryers are widely used in the paper industry, mainly in the production of coated paper grades. The thesis deals with various aspects of heat transfer and energy use in infrared heaters and dryers as employed in the paper industry. Both gas-fired and electric IR dryers are considered and compared. The thesis also provides an introduction to infrared heaters and infrared drying, including a review of recent literature in the field. The transport of thermal radiation inside a paper sheet was investigated and different IR dryers were compared in terms of their ability to transfer energy to the internal parts of a paper sheet. Although there were evident differences in the absorption of radiation between gas-fired and electric IR dryers, the distinction was found not to be as important as has generally been believed. The main differences appeared to be due to the choice of a one- or a two-sided dryer solution, rather than the spectral distributions emitted by the dryers. A method for evaluating the radiation efficiency of IR heaters was proposed. An electric IR heater was evaluated in the laboratory. The radiation efficiency of the heater was shown to be strongly dependent on the power level. The maximum efficiency, found at high power level, was close to 60 %. A procedure for evaluation of the total energy transfer efficiency of an infrared paper dryer was proposed and used in the evaluation of an electric IR dryer operating in an industrial coating machine. The efficiency of the dryer was roughly 40 %. A model for an electric IR heater was developed. The model includes non-grey radiative heat transfer between the different parts of the heater, as well as conduction in reflector material and convective cooling of the surfaces. Using IR module voltage as the only input, model predictions of temperatures and heat flux were found to agree well with experimental data both at steady state and under transient conditions. The model was also extended to include

  1. Architecture for Combined Energy and Attitude Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim M. Mehedi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining the energy and attitude control system is a feasible technology for small satellites to improve the space missions. In this Combined Energy and Attitude Control System (CEACS a double rotating flywheel is used to replace the conventional battery for energy storage as well as to control the attitude of an earth oriented satellite. Each flywheel is to be controlled in the torque mode. The energy and attitude inputs for the flywheels' control architecture are also in the torque mode. All related mathematical representation along with the relevant transfer functions and the required numerical calculation are developed. The goals are to analyze the attitude performance with respect to the ideal and non-ideal test cases for a chosen reference mission.

  2. Constructing Interfacial Energy Transfer for Photon Up- and Down-Conversion from Lanthanides in a Core-Shell Nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Tao, Lili; Chai, Yang; Lau, Shu Ping; Zhang, Qinyuan; Tsang, Yuen Hong

    2016-09-26

    We report a new mechanistic strategy for controlling and modifying the photon emission of lanthanides in a core-shell nanostructure by using interfacial energy transfer. By taking advantage of this mechanism with Gd(3+) as the energy donor, we have realized efficient up- and down-converted emissions from a series of lanthanide emitters (Eu(3+) , Tb(3+) , Dy(3+) , and Sm(3+) ) in these core-shell nanoparticles, which do not need a migratory host sublattice. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the Gd(3+) -mediated interfacial energy transfer, in contrast to energy migration, is the leading process contributing to the photon emission of lanthanide dopants for the NaGdF4 @NaGdF4 core-shell system. Our finding suggests a new direction for research into better control of energy transfer at the nanometer length scale, which would help to stimulate new concepts for designing and improving photon emission of the lanthanide-based luminescent materials.

  3. Coherent versus incoherent excitation energy transfer in molecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hung-Tzu; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2012-10-28

    We investigate the Markovian limit of a polaronic quantum master equation for coherent resonance energy transfer proposed recently by Jang et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 101104 (2008)]. An expression for the rate of excitation energy transfer (EET) is derived and shown to exhibit both coherent and incoherent contributions. We then apply this theory to calculated EET rates for model dimer systems, and demonstrate that the small-polaron approach predicts a variety of dynamical behaviors. Notably, the results indicate that the EET dynamical behaviors can be understood by the interplay between noise-assisted EET and dynamical localization, while both are well captured by the polaron theory. Finally, we investigate bath correlation effects on the rate of EET and show that bath correlations (or anti-correlations) can either enhance or suppress EET rate depending on the strength of individual system-bath couplings. In summary, we introduce the small-polaron approach as an intuitive physical framework to consolidate our understanding of EET dynamics in the condensed phase.

  4. Mode-to-mode energy transfers in convective patterns

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra K Verma; Krishna Kumar; Bhaskar Kamble

    2006-12-01

    We investigate the energy transfer between various Fourier modes in a low-dimensional model for thermal convection. We have used the formalism of mode-to-mode energy transfer rate in our calculation. The evolution equations derived using this scheme is the same as those derived using the hydrodynamical equations for thermal convection in Boussinesq fluids. Numerical and analytical studies of this model show that convective rolls appear as the Rayleigh number is raised above its critical value c. Further increase of Rayleigh number generates rolls in the perpendicular directions as well, and we obtain a dynamic asymmetric square pattern. This pattern is due to Hopf bifurcation. There are two sets of limit cycles corresponding to the two competing asymmetric square patterns. When the Rayleigh number is increased further, the limit cycles become unstable simultaneously, and chaotic motion sets in. The onset of chaos is via intermittent route. The trajectories wander for quite a long time almost periodically before jumping irregularly to one of the two ghost limit cycles.

  5. Miniature fiber optic sensor based on fluorescence energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, David L.; Schultz, Jerome S.

    1992-04-01

    Optical fiber biosensors based on fluorescence assays have several distinct advantages when measuring biological analytes such as metabolites, cofactors, toxins, etc. Not only are optical signals immune to electronic interferences, but the polychromatic nature of most fluorochemical assays provides more potentially useful data about the system being studied. One of the most common difficulties normally encountered with optical biosensors is the inability to routinely recalibrate the optical and electronic components of the system throughout the life of the sensor. With this in mind, we present an optical fiber assay system for glucose based on a homogeneous singlet/singlet energy transfer assay along with the electronic instrumentation built to support the sensor system. In the sensor probe, glucose concentrations are indirectly measured from the level of fluorescence quenching caused by the homogeneous competition assay between TRITC labeled concanavalin A (receptor) and FITC labeled Dextran (ligand). The FITC signal is used to indicate glucose concentrations and the TRITC signal is used for internal calibration. Data is also presented on a protein derivatization procedure that was used to prevent aggregation of the receptor protein in solution. Also, a molecular model is described for the singlet/singlet energy transfer interactions that can occur in a model system composed of a monovalent ligand (FITC labeled papain) and a monovalent receptor (TRITC labeled concanavalin A).

  6. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The work we have done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. We have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed us prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). We have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived ( > 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, we have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  7. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The work done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. The authors have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed them to prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). They have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived (> 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, the authors have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  8. Elementary Energy Transfer Pathways in Allochromatium vinosum Photosynthetic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lüer, Larry; Carey, Anne-Marie; Henry, Sarah; Maiuri, Margherita; Hacking, Kirsty; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2015-11-01

    Allochromatium vinosum (formerly Chromatium vinosum) purple bacteria are known to adapt their light-harvesting strategy during growth according to environmental factors such as temperature and average light intensity. Under low light illumination or low ambient temperature conditions, most of the LH2 complexes in the photosynthetic membranes form a B820 exciton with reduced spectral overlap with LH1. To elucidate the reason for this light and temperature adaptation of the LH2 electronic structure, we performed broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy as a function of excitation wavelength in A. vinosum membranes. A target analysis of the acquired data yielded individual rate constants for all relevant elementary energy transfer (ET) processes. We found that the ET dynamics in high-light-grown membranes was well described by a homogeneous model, with forward and backward rate constants independent of the pump wavelength. Thus, the overall B800→B850→B890→ Reaction Center ET cascade is well described by simple triexponential kinetics. In the low-light-grown membranes, we found that the elementary backward transfer rate constant from B890 to B820 was strongly reduced compared with the corresponding constant from B890 to B850 in high-light-grown samples. The ET dynamics of low-light-grown membranes was strongly dependent on the pump wavelength, clearly showing that the excitation memory is not lost throughout the exciton lifetime. The observed pump energy dependence of the forward and backward ET rate constants suggests exciton diffusion via B850→ B850 transfer steps, making the overall ET dynamics nonexponential. Our results show that disorder plays a crucial role in our understanding of low-light adaptation in A. vinosum.

  9. Elementary Energy Transfer Pathways in Allochromatium vinosum Photosynthetic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüer, Larry; Carey, Anne-Marie; Henry, Sarah; Maiuri, Margherita; Hacking, Kirsty; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Allochromatium vinosum (formerly Chromatium vinosum) purple bacteria are known to adapt their light-harvesting strategy during growth according to environmental factors such as temperature and average light intensity. Under low light illumination or low ambient temperature conditions, most of the LH2 complexes in the photosynthetic membranes form a B820 exciton with reduced spectral overlap with LH1. To elucidate the reason for this light and temperature adaptation of the LH2 electronic structure, we performed broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy as a function of excitation wavelength in A. vinosum membranes. A target analysis of the acquired data yielded individual rate constants for all relevant elementary energy transfer (ET) processes. We found that the ET dynamics in high-light-grown membranes was well described by a homogeneous model, with forward and backward rate constants independent of the pump wavelength. Thus, the overall B800→B850→B890→ Reaction Center ET cascade is well described by simple triexponential kinetics. In the low-light-grown membranes, we found that the elementary backward transfer rate constant from B890 to B820 was strongly reduced compared with the corresponding constant from B890 to B850 in high-light-grown samples. The ET dynamics of low-light-grown membranes was strongly dependent on the pump wavelength, clearly showing that the excitation memory is not lost throughout the exciton lifetime. The observed pump energy dependence of the forward and backward ET rate constants suggests exciton diffusion via B850→ B850 transfer steps, making the overall ET dynamics nonexponential. Our results show that disorder plays a crucial role in our understanding of low-light adaptation in A. vinosum.

  10. Size-Independent Energy Transfer in Biomimetic Nanoring Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Supramolecular antenna-ring complexes are of great interest due to their presence in natural light-harvesting complexes. While such systems are known to provide benefits through robust and efficient energy funneling, the relationship between molecular structure, strain (governed by nuclear coordinates and motion), and energy dynamics (arising from electronic behavior) is highly complex. We present a synthetic antenna-nanoring system based on a series of conjugated porphyrin chromophores ideally suited to explore such effects. By systematically varying the size of the acceptor nanoring, we reveal the interplay between antenna-nanoring binding, local strain, and energy dynamics on the picosecond time scale. Binding of the antenna unit creates a local strain in the nanoring, and this strain was measured as a function of the size of the nanoring, by UV–vis-NIR titration, providing information on the conformational flexibility of the system. Strikingly, the energy-transfer rate is independent of nanoring size, indicating the existence of strain-localized acceptor states, spread over about six porphyrin units, arising from the noncovalent antenna-nanoring association. PMID:27176553

  11. Size-Independent Energy Transfer in Biomimetic Nanoring Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Patrick; Kamonsutthipaijit, Nuntaporn; Anderson, Harry L; Herz, Laura M

    2016-06-28

    Supramolecular antenna-ring complexes are of great interest due to their presence in natural light-harvesting complexes. While such systems are known to provide benefits through robust and efficient energy funneling, the relationship between molecular structure, strain (governed by nuclear coordinates and motion), and energy dynamics (arising from electronic behavior) is highly complex. We present a synthetic antenna-nanoring system based on a series of conjugated porphyrin chromophores ideally suited to explore such effects. By systematically varying the size of the acceptor nanoring, we reveal the interplay between antenna-nanoring binding, local strain, and energy dynamics on the picosecond time scale. Binding of the antenna unit creates a local strain in the nanoring, and this strain was measured as a function of the size of the nanoring, by UV-vis-NIR titration, providing information on the conformational flexibility of the system. Strikingly, the energy-transfer rate is independent of nanoring size, indicating the existence of strain-localized acceptor states, spread over about six porphyrin units, arising from the noncovalent antenna-nanoring association.

  12. The energy control; La maitrise de l'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-01-15

    Because of strong constraints, the energy control has not been a priority of the public choices. With the market liberalization, the framework of the energy control is modified. But the new program became not sufficient. This study aims to present the necessary new policy of the energy control, which must be integrated in the attitudes and must imply the local government. (A.L.B.)

  13. On modal energy in civil structural control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao PANG; Tie-jiong LOU; Ming ZHAO

    2008-01-01

    A new control strategy based on modal energy criterion is proposed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the control system in reducing structural earthquake responses. The modal control algorithm combining LQR (linear quadratic regulator) control algorithm is adopted in the discrete time-history analysis. The various modal energy forms are derived by definition of the generalized absolute displacement vector. A preliminary numerical study of the effectiveness of this control strategy is carried out on a 20-storey framed steel structural model. The controlled performance of the model is studied from the perspectives of both response and modal energy. Results show that the modal energy-based control strategy is very effective in reducing structural responses as well as in consuming a large amount of modal energy, while augmentation of additional generalized control force corresponding to the modes that contain little modal energy is unnecessary, as it does little help to improve the controlled structural performance.

  14. Energy transfer in “parasitic” cancer metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Tykocinski, Mark L; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Machado, Fabiana S; Tanowitz, Herbert B

    2011-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that the tumor microenvironment promotes cancer cell growth and metastasis via changes in cytokine secretion and extra-cellular matrix remodeling. However, the role of tumor stromal cells in providing energy for epithelial cancer cell growth is a newly emerging paradigm. For example, we and others have recently proposed that tumor growth and metastasis is related to an energy imbalance. Host cells produce energy-rich nutrients via catabolism (through autophagy, mitophagy and aerobic glycolysis), which are then transferred to cancer cells, to fuel anabolic tumor growth. Stromal cell derived L-lactate is taken up by cancer cells and is used for mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), to produce ATP efficiently. However, “parasitic” energy transfer may be a more generalized mechanism in cancer biology than previously appreciated. Two recent papers in Science and Nature Medicine now show that lipolysis in host tissues also fuels tumor growth. These studies demonstrate that free fatty acids produced by host cell lipolysis are re-used via β-oxidation (β-OX) in cancer cell mitochondria. Thus, stromal catabolites (such as lactate, ketones, glutamine and free fatty acids) promote tumor growth by acting as high-energy onco-metabolites. As such, host catabolism via autophagy, mitophagy and lipolysis may explain the pathogenesis of cancer-associated cachexia and provides exciting new druggable targets for novel therapeutic interventions. Taken together, these findings also suggest that tumor cells promote their own growth and survival by behaving as a “parasitic organism.” Hence, we propose the term “parasitic cancer metabolism” to describe this type of metabolic-coupling in tumors. Targeting tumor cell mitochondria (OXPHOS and β-OX) would effectively uncouple tumor cells from their hosts, leading to their acute starvation. In this context, we discuss new evidence that high-energy onco-metabolites (produced by the stroma

  15. Using DNA nanostructures to harvest light and create energy transfer and harvesting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Sebastián. A.; Buckhout-White, Susan; Brown, Carl W.; Samanta, Anirban; Klein, William P.; Ancona, Mario G.; Dwyer, Chris L.; Goldman, Ellen R.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Cunningham, Paul D.; Spillmann, Chris M.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2016-12-01

    DNA is a biocompatible scaffold that allows for the design of a variety of nanostructures, from straightforward double stranded DNA to more complex DNA origami and 3-D structures. By modifying the structures, with dyes, nanoparticles, or enzymes, they can be used to create light harvesting and energy transfer systems. We have focused on using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between organic fluorophores separated with nanometer precision based on the DNAs defined positioning. Using FRET theory we can control the direction of the energy flow and optimize the design parameters to increase the systems efficiency. The design parameters include fluorophore selection, separation, number, and orientation among others. Additionally the use of bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) allowed the use of chemical energy, as opposed to photonic, to activate the systems. Here we discuss a variety of systems, such as the longest reported DNA-based molecular photonic wires (> 30 nm), dendrimeric light harvesting systems, and semiconductor nanocrystals integrated systems where they act as both scaffold and antennae for the original excitation. Using a variety of techniques, a comparison of different types of structures as well as heterogeneous vs. homogenous FRET was realized.

  16. 78 FR 13661 - Energy Transfer Fuel, LP; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Energy Transfer Fuel, LP; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on February 15, 2013, Energy Transfer Fuel, LP filed for approval of rates for...

  17. Modeling the cooperative energy transfer dynamics of quantum cutting for solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Meijerink, Andries

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative energy transfer (ET) is a quantum cutting (or downconversion) process where a luminescent center splits its excited state energy in two by simultaneous transfer to two nearby acceptor centers, thus yielding two low-energy photons for each high-energy photon absorbed. It has the potential

  18. Photophysical properties and energy transfer mechanism of PFO/Fluorol 7GA hybrid thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Asbahi, Bandar Ali, E-mail: alasbahibandar@gmail.com [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sana' a University (Yemen); Jumali, Mohammad Hafizuddin Haji, E-mail: hafizhj@ukm.my [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Chi Chin; Flaifel, Moayad Husein [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Salleh, Muhamad Mat [Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-10-15

    Photophysical properties of poly (9,9′-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2.7-diyl) (PFO)/2-butyl-6- (butylamino)benzo [de] isoquinoline-1,3-dione (Fluorol 7GA) and energy transfer between them have been investigated. In this work, both PFO and Fluorol 7GA act as donor and acceptor, respectively. Based on the absorption and luminescence measurements, the photophysical and energy transfer properties such as fluorescence quantum yield (Φ{sub f}), fluorescence lifetime (τ), radiative rate constant (k{sub r}), non-radiative rate constant (k{sub nr}), quenching rate constant (k{sub SV}), energy transfer rate constant (k{sub ET}), energy transfer probability (P{sub DA}), energy transfer efficiency (η), critical concentration of acceptor (C{sub o}), energy transfer time (τ{sub ET}) and critical distance of energy transfer (R{sub o}) were calculated. Large values of k{sub SV}, k{sub ET} and R{sub o} suggested that Förster-type energy transfer was the dominant mechanism for the energy transfer between the excited donor and ground state acceptor molecules. It was observed that the Förster energy transfer together with the trapping process are crucial for performance improvement in ITO/(PFO/Fluorol7GA)/Al device. -- Highlights: • The efficient of energy transfer from PFO to Fluorol 7GA was evidenced. • The resonance energy transfer (Förster type) is the dominant mechanism. • Hsu et al. model was used to calculate Φ{sub f}, τ, k{sub r} and k{sub nr} of PFO thin film. • Several of the photophysical and energy transfer properties were calculated. • Trapping process and Förster energy transfer led to improve the device performance.

  19. Bumpless Transfer between Observer-based Gain Scheduled Controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Stoustrup, Jakob; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with bumpless transfer between a number of observer-based controllers in a gain scheduling architecture. Linear observer-based controllers are designed for a number of linear approximations of a nonlinear system in a set of operating points, and gain scheduling control can...

  20. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, L. D.; Wongkham, W.; Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Wanichapichart, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-06-01

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  1. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wongkham, W. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wanichapichart, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkla 90112 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2013-06-15

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  2. Gamma-ray transfer and energy deposition in supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Swartz, D A; Harkness, R P; Swartz, Douglas A; Sutherland, Peter G; Harkness, Robert P

    1995-01-01

    Solutions to the energy-independent (gray) radiative transfer equations are compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations of the \\Ni\\ and \\Co\\ radioactive decay \\GR\\ energy deposition in supernovae. The comparison shows that an effective, purely absorptive, gray opacity, \\KG\\ \\sim (0.06 \\pm 0.01)Y_e cm^2 g^{-1}, where Y_e is the total number of electrons per baryon, accurately describes the interaction of \\GRs\\ with the cool supernova gas and the local \\GR\\ energy deposition within the gas. The nature of the \\GR\\ interaction process (dominated by Compton scattering in the relativistic regime) creates a weak dependence of \\KG\\ on the optical thickness of the (spherically symmetric) supernova atmosphere: The maximum value of \\KG\\ applies during optically thick conditions when individual \\GRs\\ undergo multiple scattering encounters and the lower bound is reached at the phase characterized by a total Thomson optical depth to the center of the atmosphere \\te\\ \\LA\\ 1. Our results quantitatively confirm that the qu...

  3. Local operator partitioning of electronic energy for electronic energy transfer: An efficient algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul

    2013-01-01

    An efficient computational algorithm to implement a local operator approach to partitioning electronic energy in general molecular systems is presented. This approach, which rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule, gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. We apply the technique to the $9-$(($1-$naphthyl)$-$methyl)-anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH$_2-$naphthyl groups as subsystems, and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using Configuration Interaction Singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety of different behaviors amongst these excited electronic states.

  4. Tradeoff Transfer Informasi dan Energi pada Sistem Komunikasi Nirkabel yang Memanfaatkan Panen Energi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktavia Ayu Permata

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Transfer informasi dan energi secara bersamaan melalui kanal nirkabel menawarkan keuntungan pada pengguna mobile. Akan tetapi desain receiver yang digunakan untuk memanen energi dari sinyal radio belum dapat mendekodekan carrier informasi secara langsung. Olehkarena itu diusulkan sebuah operasi umum pada receiver yang disebut Dynamic Power Splitting (DPS.DPS akan membagi sinyal terima dengan penyesuaian daya untuk panen energi dan dekoding informasi. Tipe dari arsitektur ini dinamakan tipe arsitekturreceiver pemisah.Dimana untuk panen energi akan dilakukan oleh receiver energi dan untuk dekoding informasi akan dilakukan oleh receiver informasi. Dua skema yang diusulkan pada DPS yaitu Time Switching (TSdan Static Power Splitting (SPS. Tradeoff rate energi dari sistem dikarakteristikkan sebagai rate-energi region. Pada tugas akhir ini, diasumsikan untuk komunikasi link wireless point to point. Dari hasil simulasi diketahui bahwa besarnya noise konversi hasil perpindahan dari RF band ke baseband sangat mempengaruhi nilai rate energi. Untuk skema SPS, menghasilkan rate energi yang lebih optimal dibandingkan dengan skema TS. Pada sistem ini, tradeoff untuk informasi dan energi bisa dicapai dengan menggunakan asumsi dan parameter yang telah ditentukan.Pada receiver informasi, untuk dapat mendekodingkan informasi dengan kesalahan yang kecil diperlukan alokasi daya terima yang besar untuk mengimbangi noise konversi yang muncul setelah power splitter.

  5. Air-sea transfer of gas phase controlled compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M.; Bell, T. G.; Blomquist, B. W.; Fairall, C. W.; Brooks, I. M.; Nightingale, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    Gases in the atmosphere/ocean have solubility that spans several orders of magnitude. Resistance in the molecular sublayer on the waterside limits the air-sea exchange of sparingly soluble gases such as SF6 and CO2. In contrast, both aerodynamic and molecular diffusive resistances on the airside limit the exchange of highly soluble gases (as well as heat). Here we present direct measurements of air-sea methanol and acetone transfer from two open cruises: the Atlantic Meridional Transect in 2012 and the High Wind Gas Exchange Study in 2013. The transfer of the highly soluble methanol is essentially completely airside controlled, while the less soluble acetone is subject to both airside and waterside resistances. Both compounds were measured concurrently using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer, with their fluxes quantified by the eddy covariance method. Up to a wind speed of 15 m s-1, observed air-sea transfer velocities of these two gases are largely consistent with the expected near linear wind speed dependence. Measured acetone transfer velocity is ∼30% lower than that of methanol, which is primarily due to the lower solubility of acetone. From this difference we estimate the “zero bubble” waterside transfer velocity, which agrees fairly well with interfacial gas transfer velocities predicted by the COARE model. At wind speeds above 15 m s-1, the transfer velocities of both compounds are lower than expected in the mean. Air-sea transfer of sensible heat (also airside controlled) also appears to be reduced at wind speeds over 20 m s-1. During these conditions, large waves and abundant whitecaps generate large amounts of sea spray, which is predicted to alter heat transfer and could also affect the air-sea exchange of soluble trace gases. We make an order of magnitude estimate for the impacts of sea spray on air-sea methanol transfer.

  6. Resonance energy transfer: The unified theory via vector spherical harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinter, Roger; Jones, Garth A

    2016-08-21

    In this work, we derive the well-established expression for the quantum amplitude associated with the resonance energy transfer (RET) process between a pair of molecules that are beyond wavefunction overlap. The novelty of this work is that the field of the mediating photon is described in terms of a spherical wave rather than a plane wave. The angular components of the field are constructed in terms of vector spherical harmonics while Hankel functions are used to define the radial component. This approach alleviates the problem of having to select physically correct solution from non-physical solutions, which seems to be inherent in plane wave derivations. The spherical coordinate system allows one to easily decompose the photon's fields into longitudinal and transverse components and offers a natural way to analyse near-, intermediate-, and far-zone RET within the context of the relative orientation of the transition dipole moments for the two molecules.

  7. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “Chemistry Department, Kenyatta University, P. 0. Box 43844 ... harvester (X) [L 2] in a manner consistent with the following Forster equation for long range energy transfer [3-7]. .... sensitive foods, chemical reactors and essences. Recently we ...

  8. Energy Management Controls. Course Syllabus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen County Vocational-Technical High School, Hackensack, NJ.

    This course is one of four in a solar systems and energy management program developed by the Bergen County Vocational-Technical Schools to help tradespeople (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning; mechanics; plumbers; and electricians) to develop an awareness of alternate energy sources and to gain skills in the areas of solar installations…

  9. Long-range excitation energy transfer in Langmuir-Blodgett multilayer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.; Aussenegg, Franz R.

    1989-07-01

    In Langmuir-Blodgett films containing organic dyes, efficient energy transfer over distances exceeding 100 nm is observed. This exceptionally long-range transfer is interpreted as due to special mutual orientation of the dye molecules.

  10. Variety in excitation energy transfer processes from phycobilisomes to photosystems I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Niwa, Kyosuke; Abe, Tomoko; Murakami, Akio; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2017-09-01

    The light-harvesting antennas of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms capture light energy and transfer it to the reaction centers of their photosystems. The light-harvesting antennas of cyanobacteria and red algae, called phycobilisomes (PBSs), supply light energy to both photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). However, the excitation energy transfer processes from PBS to PSI and PSII are not understood in detail. In the present study, the energy transfer processes from PBS to PSs in various cyanobacteria and red algae were examined in vivo by selectively exciting their PSs or PBSs, and measuring the resulting picosecond to nanosecond time-resolved fluorescences. By observing the delayed fluorescence spectrum of PBS-selective excitation in Arthrospira platensis, we demonstrated that energy transfer from PBS to PSI via PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer) occurs even for PSI trimers. The contribution of PBS→PSII→PSI transfer was species dependent, being largest in the wild-type of red alga Pyropia yezoensis (formerly Porphyra yezoensis) and smallest in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Comparing the time-resolved fluorescence after PSs- and PBS-selective excitation, we revealed that light energy flows from CP43 to CP47 by energy transfer between the neighboring PSII monomers in PBS-PSII supercomplexes. We also suggest two pathways of energy transfer: direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI (PBS→PSI transfer) and indirect transfer through PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer). We also infer that PBS→PSI transfer conveys light energy to a lower-energy red chlorophyll than PBS→PSII→PSI transfer.

  11. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jae-ik [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Division of Heavy Ion Clinical Research, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seyjoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Chiyoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sungkoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se Byeong, E-mail: sblee@ncc.re.kr [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hyun [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jung Sook [Department of refinement education, Dongseo University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jung Keun [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Incerti, Sebastien [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Université Bordeaux 1, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2015-04-15

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the ‘NETSCAN’ method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion.

  12. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Quantum Dot-Protein Kinase Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Yildiz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In search of viable strategies to identify selective inhibitors of protein kinases, we have designed a binding assay to probe the interactions of human phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1 with potential ligands. Our protocol is based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between semiconductor quantum dots (QDs and organic dyes. Specifically, we have expressed and purified the catalytic kinase domain of PDK1 with an N-terminal histidine tag [His6-PDK1(ΔPH]. We have conjugated this construct to CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs coated with dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA and tested the response of the resulting assembly to a molecular dyad incorporating an ATP ligand and a BODIPY chromophore. The supramolecular association of the BODIPY-ATP dyad with the His6-PDK1(ΔPH-QD assembly encourages the transfer of energy from the QDs to the BODIPY dyes upon excitation. The addition of ATP results in the displacement of BODIPY-ATP from the binding domain of the His6-PDK1(ΔPH conjugated to the nanoparticles. The competitive binding, however, does not prevent the energy transfer process. A control experiment with QDs, lacking the His6-PDK1(ΔPH, indicates that the BODIPY-ATP dyad adsorbs nonspecifically on the surface of the nanoparticles, promoting the transfer of energy from the CdSe core to the adsorbed BODIPY dyes. Thus, the implementation of FRET-based assays to probe the binding domain of PDK1 with luminescent QDs requires the identification of energy acceptors unable to interact nonspecifically with the surface of the nanoparticles.

  13. Incident energy transfer equation and its solution by collocation spectral method for one-dimensional radiative heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhang-Mao; Tian, Hong; Li, Ben-Wen; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Yan-Shan; Ruan, Min; Chen, Dong-Lin

    2017-10-01

    The ray-effect is a major discretization error in the approximate solution method for the radiative transfer equation (RTE). To overcome this problem, the incident energy transfer equation (IETE) is proposed. The incident energy, instead of radiation intensity, is obtained by directly solving this new equation. Good numerical properties are found for the incident energy transfer equation. To show the properties of numerical solution, the collocation spectral method (CSM) is employed to solve the incident energy transfer equation. Three test cases are taken into account to verify the performance of the incident energy transfer equation. The result shows that the radiative heat flux obtained based on IETE is much more accurate than that based on RTE, which means that the IETE is very effective in eliminating the impacts of ray-effect on the heat flux. However, on the contrary, the radiative intensity obtained based on IETE is less accurate than that based on RTE due to the ray-effect. So, this equation is more suitable for those radiative heat transfer problems, in which the radiation heat flux and incident energy are needed rather than the radiation intensity.

  14. 77 FR 2293 - AmeriGas Propane, L.P., AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P., and Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... AmeriGas Propane, L.P., AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P., and Energy Transfer...'') with AmeriGas Propane, L.P. (``AmeriGas''), AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P. (``ETP''), and Energy Transfer Partners GP, L.P. (``ETP GP''), which is designed to guard...

  15. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-05-07

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  16. West Valley transfer cart control system design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, E.C.; Crutcher, R.I.; Halliwell, J.W.; Hileman, M.S.; Moore, M.R.; Nodine, R.N.; Ruppel, F.R.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1993-01-01

    Detail design of the control system for the West Valley Nuclear Services Vitrification Facility transfer cart has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report documents the requirements and describes the detail design of that equipment and control software. Copies of significant design documents including analysis and testing reports and design drawings are included in the Appendixes.

  17. Energy-transfer processes in Er3+-doped and Er3+,Pr3+-codoped ZBLAN glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golding, P.S.; Jackson, S.D.; King, T.A.; Pollnau, Markus

    2000-01-01

    We present a detailed characterization of energy transfer processes in Er3+-doped and Er3+,Pr3+-codoped ZBLAN bulk glasses. For several Er3+ (0.25–8.75 mol%) and Pr3+ (0.25–1.55 mol%) concentrations, we investigate energy transfer upconversion (ETU) and cross relaxation in Er3+ as well as energy

  18. 76 FR 49764 - Steve Mason Enterprises, Inc., Green Energy Trans, LLC; Notice of Transfer of Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Steve Mason Enterprises, Inc., Green Energy Trans, LLC; Notice of Transfer... transferred ownership of its exempted project property and facilities for Project No. 7742 to Green...

  19. Photon Cascade Emission through Energy Transfer in Pr3+ and Er3+ Codoped System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Energy transfer processes in Pr3+ and Er3+-codoped CaAl12O 19 crystal from 12 to 290 K were studied. Energy transfer from Pr3+ t o Er3+ ions in this system was observed. The transfer can partially conve rt the 1 S0 UV fluorescence of Pr3+ into green emission of the characteristic of Er3+. The efficiency of the energy transfer was estimat ed based of the spectroscopic data. The temperature dependence on the transfer was also discussed.

  20. Active control of near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qimei; Zhou, Ting; Wang, Tongbiao; Liu, Wenxing; Liu, Jiangtao; Yu, Tianbao; Liao, Qinghua; Liu, Nianhua

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered metamaterials is investigated. The electric surface plasmons (SPs) supported by metamaterials can be coupled with the SPs supported by graphene. The near-field heat transfer between the graphene-covered metamaterials is significantly larger than that between metamaterials because of the strong coupling in our studied frequency range. The relationship between heat flux and chemical potential is studied for different vacuum gaps. Given that the chemical potential of graphene can be tuned by the external electric field, heat transfer can be actively controlled by modulating the chemical potential. The heat flux for certain vacuum gaps can reach a maximum value when the chemical potential is at a particular value. The results of this study are beneficial for actively controlling energy transfer.

  1. Nonlinear targeted energy transfer of two coupled cantilever beams coupled to a bistable light attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, P.-O.; Ponçot, R.; Pachebat, M.; Côte, R.

    2016-07-01

    In order to control the sound radiation by a structure, one aims to control vibration of radiating modes of vibration using "Energy Pumping" also named "Targeted Energy Transfer". This principle is here applied to a simplified model of a double leaf panel. This model is made of two beams coupled by a spring. One of the beams is connected to a nonlinear absorber. This nonlinear absorber is made of a 3D-printed support on which is clamped a buckled thin small beam with a small mass fixed at its centre having two equilibrium positions. The experiments showed that, once attached onto a vibrating system to be controlled, under forced excitation of the primary system, the light bistable oscillator allows a reduction of structural vibration up to 10 dB for significant amplitude and frequency range around the first two vibration modes of the system.

  2. Carotenoid to chlorophyll energy transfer in the peridinin–chlorophyll-a–protein complex involves an intramolecular charge transfer state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigmantas, Donatas; Hiller, Roger G.; Sundström, Villy; Polívka, Tomáš

    2002-01-01

    Carotenoids are, along with chlorophylls, crucial pigments involved in light-harvesting processes in photosynthetic organisms. Details of carotenoid to chlorophyll energy transfer mechanisms and their dependence on structural variability of carotenoids are as yet poorly understood. Here, we employ femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy to reveal energy transfer pathways in the peridinin–chlorophyll-a–protein (PCP) complex containing the highly substituted carotenoid peridinin, which includes an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state in its excited state manifold. Extending the transient absorption spectra toward near-infrared region (600–1800 nm) allowed us to separate contributions from different low-lying excited states of peridinin. The results demonstrate a special light-harvesting strategy in the PCP complex that uses the ICT state of peridinin to enhance energy transfer efficiency. PMID:12486228

  3. Impact Vibration Attenuation for a Flexible Robotic Manipulator through Transfer and Dissipation of Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushu Bian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the presence of system flexibility, impact can excite severe large amplitude vibration responses of the flexible robotic manipulator. This impact vibration exhibits characteristics of remarkable nonlinearity and strong energy. The main goal of this study is to put forward an energy-based control method to absorb and attenuate large amplitude impact vibration of the flexible robotic manipulator. The method takes advantage of internal resonance and is implemented through a vibration absorber based on the transfer and dissipation of energy. The addition of the vibration absorber to the flexible arm generates a coupling effect between vibration modes of the system. By means of analysis on 2:1 internal resonance, the exchange of energy is proven to be existent. The impact vibrational energy can be transferred from the arm to the absorber and dissipated through the damping of the absorber. The results of numerical simulations are promising and preliminarily verify that the method is feasible and can be used to combat large amplitude impact vibration of the flexible manipulator undergoing rigid motion.

  4. Characterization and Modeling of Received Signal Strength and Charging Time for Wireless Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uthman Baroudi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks can provide effective means for monitoring and controlling a wide range of applications. Recently, tremendous effort was directed towards devising sensors powered from ambient sources such as heat, wind, and vibration. Wireless energy transfer is another source that has attractive features that make it a promising candidate for supplying power to wireless sensor nodes. This paper is concerned with characterizing and modeling the charging time and received signal strength indicator for wireless energy transfer system. These parameters play a vital role in deciding the geometry of sensor network and the routing protocols to be deployed. The development of communication protocols for wireless-powered wireless sensor networks is also improved with the knowledge of such models. These two quantities were computed from data acquired at various coordinates of the harvester relative to a fixed position of RF energy source. Data was acquired for indoor and outdoor scenarios using the commercially available PowerCast energy harvester and evaluation board. Mathematical models for both indoor and outdoor environments were developed and analyzed. A few guidelines on how to use these models were suggested. Finally, the possibility of harvesting the energy from the ambient RF power to energize wireless sensor nodes was also investigated.

  5. Interfacial energies of aqueous mixtures and porous coverings for enhancing pool boiling heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez, Elva [CIICAp, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, 62210 (Mexico); Reyes, Rene [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Alimentos, Universidad de las Americas Puebla, Santa Catarina Martir Cholula, Puebla 72820 (Mexico)

    2006-08-15

    The interfacial energies effects on pool boiling were measured for combinations of aqueous ethanol mixtures and cationic surfactants. The mixture with 16% ethanol by weight had the lowest contact angle (associated to the highest wettability) and produced the highest convective heat transfer coefficient, h, among the aqueous ethanol mixtures. The surfactant sodium-lauryl-sulfate added at 100 ppm (its calculated critical micelle concentration CMC) to the 16% ethanol aqueous mixture produced an additional increment of the wettability of the mixture and of the h values; other concentrations of the surfactant reduced de contact angle and h values. The effect of these interfacial energies represents a mass-transfer contribution to pool boiling and the proposal of mixture effects both as increased spreadability and as micelle states. Several randomly constructed porous coverings, contributing to the breakage of vapor slugs around the heater, were tested; produced the highest h values for average pore diameters of 0.5 mm, and covering thickness of 0.972 mm. The synergistic effect on h of the interfacial energies of mixtures at their critical micelle concentration, and porous coverings was measured. Therefore, the independent driving forces combined in this study for increasing pool boiling heat transfer are (a) spreadability of the liquid on the solid; (b) the bubble's size reduction, achieved by micelle states; and (c) the bubble's breakage, induced by the porous coverings, for vapor flow not under pressure drop control. (author)

  6. DNA base pair resolution measurements using resonance energy transfer efficiency in lanthanide doped nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Delplanque

    Full Text Available Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles are of considerable interest for biodetection and bioimaging techniques thanks to their unique chemical and optical properties. As a sensitive luminescence material, they can be used as (bio probes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET where trivalent lanthanide ions (La3+ act as energy donors. In this paper we present an efficient method to transfer ultrasmall (ca. 8 nm NaYF4 nanoparticles dispersed in organic solvent to an aqueous solution via oxidation of the oleic acid ligand. Nanoparticles were then functionalized with single strand DNA oligomers (ssDNA by inducing covalent bonds between surface carboxylic groups and a 5' amine modified-ssDNA. Hybridization with the 5' fluorophore (Cy5 modified complementary ssDNA strand demonstrated the specificity of binding and allowed the fine control over the distance between Eu3+ ions doped nanoparticle and the fluorophore by varying the number of the dsDNA base pairs. First, our results confirmed nonradiative resonance energy transfer and demonstrate the dependence of its efficiency on the distance between the donor (Eu3+ and the acceptor (Cy5 with sensitivity at a nanometre scale.

  7. Long-Range Plasmon Assisted Energy Transfer Between Two Fluorescent Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchet, D; Carminati, R; De Wilde, Y; Krachmalnicoff, V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate plasmon assisted energy transfer between two fluorophores located at distances up to $7\\; \\mu$m on the top of a thin silver film. Thanks to the strong confinement and large propagation length of surface plasmon polaritons, the range of the energy transfer is almost two orders of magnitude larger than the values reported in the literature so far. The parameters driving the energy transfer range are thoroughly characterized and are in very good agreement with theoretically expected values. This work shows the potential of plasmonic structures for efficient long-range energy transfer and opens rich perspectives for the study of collective emission phenomena.

  8. Organic Solar Cells: Understanding the Role of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Dastoor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by F¨orster resonance energy transfer (FRET theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of F¨orster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells.

  9. Organic Solar Cells: Understanding the Role of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feron, Krishna; Belcher, Warwick J.; Fell, Christopher J.; Dastoor, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of Förster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells. PMID:23235328

  10. Nonradiative resonant energy transfer between PbS QDs in porous matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakova, Elena V.; Litvin, Aleksandr P.; Parfenov, Peter S.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Cherevkov, Sergei A.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2013-09-01

    Nonradiative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between lead sulfide quantum dots (QDs) of two different sizes embedded in porous matrix is observed by a fluorescence spectroscopy. Analysis of decays of photoluminescence from QD mixture shows that energy transfer in studied systems is determined by static quenching, specific for direct contact between QD-donor and QD-acceptor in the QDs close-packed ensembles. From steady-state spectral analysis it was found that efficiency of energy transfer depends on the molar ratio QD-donor/QD-acceptor and energy transfer from the donor to the acceptor passes by several channels.

  11. Organic solar cells: understanding the role of Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feron, Krishna; Belcher, Warwick J; Fell, Christopher J; Dastoor, Paul C

    2012-12-12

    Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by F¨orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of F¨orster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells.

  12. Conjugated-polymer-based energy-transfer systems for antimicrobial and anticancer applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huanxiang; Wang, Bing; Lv, Fengting; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2014-10-29

    Conjugated polymers (CPs) attract a lot of attention in sensing, imaging, and biomedical applications because of recent achievements that are highlighted in this Research News article. A brief review of recent progress in the application of CP-based energy-transfer systems in antimicrobial and anticancer treatments is provided. The transfer of excitation energy from CPs to photosensitizers leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are able to efficiently kill pathogenic microorganisms and cancer cells in the surroundings. Both fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET) modes are discussed.

  13. Shell-to-shell energy transfer in magnetohydrodynamics. I. Steady state turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, Alexandros; Mininni, Pablo D; Pouquet, Annick

    2005-10-01

    We investigate the transfer of energy from large scales to small scales in fully developed forced three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) turbulence by analyzing the results of direct numerical simulations in the absence of an externally imposed uniform magnetic field. Our results show that the transfer of kinetic energy from large scales to kinetic energy at smaller scales and the transfer of magnetic energy from large scales to magnetic energy at smaller scales are local, as is also found in the case of neutral fluids and in a way that is compatible with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence. However, the transfer of energy from the velocity field to the magnetic field is a highly nonlocal process in Fourier space. Energy from the velocity field at large scales can be transferred directly into small-scale magnetic fields without the participation of intermediate scales. Some implications of our results to MHD turbulence modeling are also discussed.

  14. Non-Radiative Energy Transfer Mediated by Hybrid Light-Matter States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaolan; Chervy, Thibault; Wang, Shaojun; George, Jino; Thomas, Anoop; Hutchison, James A; Devaux, Eloise; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-05-17

    We present direct evidence of enhanced non-radiative energy transfer between two J-aggregated cyanine dyes strongly coupled to the vacuum field of a cavity. Excitation spectroscopy and femtosecond pump-probe measurements show that the energy transfer is highly efficient when both the donor and acceptor form light-matter hybrid states with the vacuum field. The rate of energy transfer is increased by a factor of seven under those conditions as compared to the normal situation outside the cavity, with a corresponding effect on the energy transfer efficiency. The delocalized hybrid states connect the donor and acceptor molecules and clearly play the role of a bridge to enhance the rate of energy transfer. This finding has fundamental implications for coherent energy transport and light-energy harvesting.

  15. Energy monitoring and control Systems - which one

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agase, H.D.

    1980-01-01

    Considering the high cost and general limitations of energy supplies, there is no better source of energy than simple conservation. It is the cheapest, the safest and the most productive alternative available today. This overview of Energy Monitoring and Control System types, and what to consider in their selection, will relate to conservation and significant dollar savings potential to the user.

  16. The transfer of Cfunc contextual control through equivalence relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, William F; Fidalgo, Adriana P; Kovac, Roberta; Nico, Yara C

    2015-05-01

    Derived relational responding is affected by contextual stimuli (Cfunc) that select specific stimulus functions. The present study investigated the transfer of Cfunc contextual control through equivalence relations by evaluating both (a) the maintenance of Cfunc contextual control after the expansion of a relational network, and (b) the establishment of novel contextual stimuli by the transfer of Cfunc contextual control through equivalence relations. Initially, equivalence relations were established and contingencies were arranged so that colors functioned as Cfunc stimuli controlling participants' key-pressing responses in the presence of any stimulus from a three-member equivalence network. To investigate the first research question, the three-member equivalence relations were expanded to five members and the novel members were presented with the Cfunc stimuli in the key-pressing task. To address the second goal of this study, the colors (Cfunc) were established as equivalent to certain line patterns. The transfer of contextual cue function (Cfunc) was tested replacing the colored backgrounds with line patterns in the key-pressing task. Results suggest that the Cfunc contextual control was transferred to novel stimuli that were added to the relational network. In addition, the line patterns indirectly acquired the contextual cue function (Cfunc) initially established for the colored backgrounds. The conceptual and applied implications of Cfunc contextual control are discussed. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  17. Boundary-controlled spin chains for robust quantum state transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Zwick, Analia; Stolze, Joachim; Osenda, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Quantum state transfer in the presence of noise is one of the main challenges for building quantum computers. We compare the quantum state transfer properties for two classes of qubit chains under the influence of static randomness. In fully engineered chains all nearest-neighbor couplings are tuned in such a way that a single-qubit state can be transferred perfectly between the ends of the chain, while in boundary-controlled chains only the two couplings between the transmitting and receiving qubits and the remainder of the chain can be optimized. We study how the noise in the couplings affects the state transfer fidelity depending on the noise model and strength as well as the chain type and length. We show that the desired level of fidelity and transfer time are important factors in designing a chain. In particular we demonstrate that transfer efficiency comparable or better than that of the most robust engineered systems can also be reached in boundary-controlled chains without the demanding engineering o...

  18. Single-collision studies of energy transfer and chemical reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, J.J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The research focus in this group is state-to-state dynamics of reaction and energy transfer in collisions of free radicals such as H, OH, and CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2}, alkanes, alcohols and other hydrogen-containing molecules. The motivation for the work is the desire to provide a detailed understanding of the chemical dynamics of prototype reactions that are important in the production and utilization of energy sources, most importantly in combustion. The work is primarily experimental, but with an important and growing theoretical/computational component. The focus of this research program is now on reactions in which at least one of the reactants and one of the products is polyatomic. The objective is to determine how the high dimensionality of the reactants and products differentiates such reactions from atom + diatom reactions of the same kinematics and energetics. The experiments use highly time-resolved laser spectroscopic methods to prepare reactant states and analyze the states of the products on a single-collision time scale. The primary spectroscopic tool for product state analysis is coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. CARS is used because of its generality and because the extraction of quantum state populations from CARS spectra is straightforward. The combination of the generality and easy analysis of CARS makes possible absolute cross section measurements (both state-to-state and total), a particularly valuable capability for characterizing reactive and inelastic collisions. Reactant free radicals are produced by laser photolysis of appropriate precursors. For reactant vibrational excitation stimulated Raman techniques are being developed and implemented.

  19. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis; Frutos, Luis Manuel, E-mail: luisma.frutos@uah.es [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad de Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Acuña, A. Ulises [Instituto de Química Física “Rocasolano”, C.S.I.C., Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfer processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail.

  20. Thermal energy storage apparatus, controllers and thermal energy storage control methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2016-05-03

    Thermal energy storage apparatus, controllers and thermal energy storage control methods are described. According to one aspect, a thermal energy storage apparatus controller includes processing circuitry configured to access first information which is indicative of surpluses and deficiencies of electrical energy upon an electrical power system at a plurality of moments in time, access second information which is indicative of temperature of a thermal energy storage medium at a plurality of moments in time, and use the first and second information to control an amount of electrical energy which is utilized by a heating element to heat the thermal energy storage medium at a plurality of moments in time.

  1. Modelling the Transfer Function for the Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C; Wechsler, R H; Refregier, A; Amara, A; Rykoff, E; Becker, M R; Bruderer, C; Gamper, L; Leistedt, B; Peiris, H; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Banerji, M; Bernstein, R A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Desai, S; da Costa, L N; Cunha, C E; Eifler, T; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Gerdes, D; Gruen, D; James, D; Kuehn, K; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Ogando, R; Plazas, A; Sanchez, E; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, C; Soares-Santos, M; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Zuntz, J

    2014-01-01

    We present a forward-modelling simulation framework designed to model the data products from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This forward-model process can be thought of as a transfer function -- a mapping from cosmological and astronomical signals to the final data products used by the scientists. Using output from the cosmological simulations (the Blind Cosmology Challenge), we generate simulated images (the Ultra Fast Image Simulator, Berge et al. 2013) and catalogs representative of the DES data. In this work we simulate the 244 sq. deg coadd images and catalogs in 5 bands for the DES Science Verification (SV) data. The simulation output is compared with the corresponding data to show that major characteristics of the images and catalogs can be captured. We also point out several directions of future improvements. Two practical examples, star/galaxy classification and proximity effects on object detection, are then used to demonstrate how one can use the simulations to address systematics issues in data ana...

  2. Indicators based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsien, Roger Y

    2009-07-01

    One of the major new trends in the design of indicators for optically imaging biochemical and physiological functions of living cells has been the exploitation of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). FRET is a well-known spectroscopic technique for monitoring changes in the proximity and mutual orientation of pairs of chromophores. It has long been used in biochemistry and cell biology to assess distances and orientations between specific labeling sites within a single macromolecule or between two separate molecules. More recently, macromolecules or molecular pairs have been engineered to change their FRET in response to biochemical and physiological signals such as membrane potential, cyclic AMP (cAMP), protease activity, free Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-calmodulin (CaM) concentrations, protein-protein heterodimerization, phosphorylation, and reporter-gene expression. Because FRET is general, nondestructive, and easily imaged, it has proven to be one of the most versatile spectroscopic readouts available to the designer of new probes. FRET is particularly amenable to emission ratioing, which is more reliably quantifiable than single-wavelength monitoring and better suited than excitation ratioing to high-speed and laser-excited imaging. This article summarizes the photophysical principles of FRET and the types of indicators used.

  3. People bouncing on trampolines: dramatic energy transfer, a table-top demonstration, complex dynamics and a zero sum game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Srinivasan

    Full Text Available Jumping on trampolines is a popular backyard recreation. In some trampoline games (e.g., "seat drop war", when two people land on the trampoline with only a small time-lag, one person bounces much higher than the other, as if energy has been transferred from one to the other. First, we illustrate this energy-transfer in a table-top demonstration, consisting of two balls dropped onto a mini-trampoline, landing almost simultaneously, sometimes resulting in one ball bouncing much higher than the other. Next, using a simple mathematical model of two masses bouncing passively on a massless trampoline with no dissipation, we show that with specific landing conditions, it is possible to transfer all the kinetic energy of one mass to the other through the trampoline - in a single bounce. For human-like parameters, starting with equal energy, the energy transfer is maximal when one person lands approximately when the other is at the bottom of her bounce. The energy transfer persists even for very stiff surfaces. The energy-conservative mathematical model exhibits complex non-periodic long-term motions. To complement this passive bouncing model, we also performed a game-theoretic analysis, appropriate when both players are acting strategically to steal the other player's energy. We consider a zero-sum game in which each player's goal is to gain the other player's kinetic energy during a single bounce, by extending her leg during flight. For high initial energy and a symmetric situation, the best strategy for both subjects (minimax strategy and Nash equilibrium is to use the shortest available leg length and not extend their legs. On the other hand, an asymmetry in initial heights allows the player with more energy to gain even more energy in the next bounce. Thus synchronous bouncing unstable is unstable both for passive bouncing and when leg lengths are controlled as in game-theoretic equilibria.

  4. Heat Transfer Fluid Temperature Control in a Thermoelectric Solar Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes A. Barcia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelectric solar plants transform solar energy into electricity. Unlike photovoltaic plants, the sun’s energy heats a fluid (heat transfer fluid (HTF and this, in turn, exchanges its energy, generating steam. Finally, the steam generates electricity in a Rankine cycle. One of the main advantages of this double conversion (sun energy to heat in the HTF-Rankine cycle is the fact that it facilitates energy storage without using batteries. It is possible to store the heat energy in melted salts in such a way that this energy will be recovered when necessary, i.e., during the night. These molten salts are stored in containers in a liquid state at high temperature. The HTF comes into the solar field at a given temperature and increases its energy thanks to the solar collectors. In order to optimize the sun to HTF energy transference, it is necessary to keep an adequate temperature control of the fluid at the output of the solar fields. This paper describes three different algorithms to control the HTF output temperature.

  5. Control structure selection for energy integrated distillation column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.E.; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1998-01-01

    This paper treats a case study on control structure selection for an almost binary distillation column. The column is energy integrated with a heat pump in order to transfer heat from the condenser to the reboiler. This integrated plant configuration renders the possible control structures somewhat...... different from what is usual for binary distillation columns. Further the heat pump enables disturbances to propagate faster through the system. The plant has six possible actuators of which three must be used to stabilize the system. Hereby three actuators are left for product purity control. An MILP...

  6. Automatic control algorithm effects on energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnerney, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model was developed using actual wind time series and turbine performance data to simulate the power produced by the Sandia 17-m VAWT operating in automatic control. The model was used to investigate the influence of starting algorithms on annual energy production. The results indicate that, depending on turbine and local wind characteristics, a bad choice of a control algorithm can significantly reduce overall energy production. The model can be used to select control algorithms and threshold parameters that maximize long term energy production. The results from local site and turbine characteristics were generalized to obtain general guidelines for control algorithm design.

  7. Relaxation dynamics and exciton energy transfer in the low-temperature phase of MEH-PPV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consani, Cristina; Koch, Federico [Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Panzer, Fabian; Unger, Thomas; Köhler, Anna [Lehrstuhl Experimentalphysik II, Universität Bayreuth, Universitätsstraße 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Brixner, Tobias, E-mail: brixner@phys-chemie.uni-wuerzburg.de [Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Center for Nanosystems Chemistry (CNC), Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany)

    2015-06-07

    Understanding the effects of aggregation on exciton relaxation and energy transfer is relevant to control photoinduced function in organic electronics and photovoltaics. Here, we explore the photoinduced dynamics in the low-temperature aggregated phase of a conjugated polymer by transient absorption and coherent electronic two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy. Coherent 2D spectroscopy allows observing couplings among photoexcited states and discriminating band shifts from homogeneous broadening, additionally accessing the ultrafast dynamics at various excitation energies simultaneously with high spectral resolution. By combining the results of the two techniques, we differentiate between an initial exciton relaxation, which is not characterized by significant exciton mobility, and energy transport between different chromophores in the aggregate.

  8. Modeling the efficiency of Förster resonant energy transfer from energy relay dyes in dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hoke, Eric T.

    2010-02-11

    Förster resonant energy transfer can improve the spectral breadth, absorption and energy conversion efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells. In this design, unattached relay dyes absorb the high energy photons and transfer the excitation to sensitizing dye molecules by Förster resonant energy transfer. We use an analytic theory to calculate the excitation transfer efficiency from the relay dye to the sensitizing dye accounting for dynamic quenching and relay dye diffusion. We present calculations for pores of cylindrical and spherical geometry and examine the effects of the Förster radius, the pore size, sensitizing dye surface concentration, collisional quenching rate, and relay dye lifetime. We find that the excitation transfer efficiency can easily exceed 90% for appropriately chosen dyes and propose two different strategies for selecting dyes to achieve record power conversion efficiencies. © 2010 Optical Society of America.

  9. Reorganization energy, activation energy, and mechanism of hole transfer process in DNA: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arshad

    2008-02-21

    The density functional calculations with aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets on cationic guanine-cytosine (GC(+)) and adenine-thymine (AT(+)) base pairs suggest that the cationic charge is almost entirely localized on the G and A units with significant changes in the N-H and N...O distances around the H-bonded area. While the calculated intramolecular reorganization energy (lambda(v)) for a GC base pair (0.75 eV) is remarkably larger than that for an isolated G base (0.49 eV), for the AT base pairs these values (0.44 and 0.40 eV) are almost the same. The gas phase activation energies (E(a)) for GC(+)GC-->GCGC(+), AT(+)AT-->ATAT(+), and GC(+)AT-->GCAT(+) hole transfer processes are 0.19, 0.11, and 0.73 eV with rate constants of 1.69 x 10(11), 3.15 x 10(11), and 4.61(0.168) s(-1), respectively, at 298 K. An alternative mechanism of hole transfer has been proposed on the basis of energy barriers.

  10. Intramolecular triplet energy transfer in anthracene-based platinum acetylide oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongjun; Köse, Muhammet E; Schanze, Kirk S

    2013-08-01

    Platinum acetylide oligomers that contain an anthracene moiety have been synthesized and subjected to photophysical characterization. Spectroscopic measurement and DFT calculations reveal that both the singlet and triplet energy levels of the anthracene segment are lower than those of the platinum acetylide segment. Thus, the platinum acetylide segment acts as a sensitizer to populate the triplet state of the anthrancene segment via intramolecular triplet-triplet energy transfer. The objective of this work is to understand the mechanisms of energy-transfer dynamics in these systems. Fluorescence quenching and the dominant triplet absorption that arises from the anthracene segment in the transient absorption spectrum of Pt4An give clear evidence that energy transfer adopts an indirect mechanism, which begins with singlet-triplet energy transfer from the anthracene segment to the platinum acetylide segment followed by triplet-triplet energy transfer to the anthracene segment.

  11. SPECTRAL-WEIGHT TRANSFER - BREAKDOWN OF LOW-ENERGY-SCALE SUM-RULES IN CORRELATED SYSTEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEINDERS, MBJ; ESKES, H; SAWATZKY, GA

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we study the spectral-weight transfer from the high- to the low-energy scale by means of exact diagonalization of finite clusters for the Mott-Hubbard and charge-transfer model. We find that the spectral-weight transfer is very sensitive to the hybridization strength as well as to the

  12. ISTP Global Geospace Science. Energy transfer in geospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Solar-terrestrial physics concerns the study of the generation, flow, and dissipation of mass, momentum, and energy between the Sun and the Earth. Mass, momentum, and energy are carried by charged particles that compose the solar wind. When the solar wind reaches the Earth, some solar-wind particles enter the magnetosphere; this coupling between the solar wind and the Earth means that the solar wind can influence the Earth's upper atmosphere. As the first step in addressing the behavior of this solar-terrestrial system, the Global Geospace Science (GGS) Initiative will use the Wind and Polar satellites, provided by NASA, and the Geotail satellite provided by the Japanese Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), to perform simultaneous and closely coordinated measurements of the key geospace regions and will add data from equatorial missions. Magnetic field and particle changes that occur when particles are energized during auroral events will be monitored. The intention behind the GGS Initiative is to understand the physical mechanisms and various regions controlling the transport of mass, momentum, and energy in geospace. A summary of the GGS Initiative is presented.

  13. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  14. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N. [Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); Proton Therapy, Inc., Colton, California 92324 (United States); Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States) and Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum, Universitaetsklinikum, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45147 Essen (Germany); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States) and ProCure Treatment Centers, Inc., Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to {+-}21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than {+-}3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies.

  15. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N.

    2009-01-01

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to ±21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than ±3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies. PMID:19610318

  16. Piezoelectric energy harvesting computer controlled test bench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Rodriguez, M; Jiménez, F J; de Frutos, J; Alonso, D

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a new computer controlled (C.C.) laboratory test bench is presented. The patented test bench is made up of a C.C. road traffic simulator, C.C. electronic hardware involved in automating measurements, and test bench control software interface programmed in LabVIEW™. Our research is focused on characterizing electronic energy harvesting piezoelectric-based elements in road traffic environments to extract (or "harvest") maximum power. In mechanical to electrical energy conversion, mechanical impacts or vibrational behavior are commonly used, and several major problems need to be solved to perform optimal harvesting systems including, but no limited to, primary energy source modeling, energy conversion, and energy storage. It is described a novel C.C. test bench that obtains, in an accurate and automatized process, a generalized linear equivalent electrical model of piezoelectric elements and piezoelectric based energy store harvesting circuits in order to scale energy generation with multiple devices integrated in different topologies.

  17. Piezoelectric energy harvesting computer controlled test bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Rodriguez, M.; Jiménez, F. J.; de Frutos, J.; Alonso, D.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a new computer controlled (C.C.) laboratory test bench is presented. The patented test bench is made up of a C.C. road traffic simulator, C.C. electronic hardware involved in automating measurements, and test bench control software interface programmed in LabVIEW™. Our research is focused on characterizing electronic energy harvesting piezoelectric-based elements in road traffic environments to extract (or "harvest") maximum power. In mechanical to electrical energy conversion, mechanical impacts or vibrational behavior are commonly used, and several major problems need to be solved to perform optimal harvesting systems including, but no limited to, primary energy source modeling, energy conversion, and energy storage. It is described a novel C.C. test bench that obtains, in an accurate and automatized process, a generalized linear equivalent electrical model of piezoelectric elements and piezoelectric based energy store harvesting circuits in order to scale energy generation with multiple devices integrated in different topologies.

  18. Solvent-Controlled Acceleration of Electron Transfer in Binary Mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pugžlys, Audrius; Hartog, Harald P. den; Baltuška, Andrius; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Umapathy, Siva; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    2001-01-01

    We report a 5-fold acceleration of the backward intermolecular electron transfer between a rhodamine 800 dye molecule and N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA). This effect results from the controlled variation of the solvent dynamical properties in binary mixtures of DMA and acetonitrile. The observed

  19. Contextual Control by Function and Form of Transfer of Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, David R.; Dougher, Michael J.; Greenway, David E.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated conditions leading to contextual control by stimulus topography over transfer of functions. Three 4-member stimulus equivalence classes, each consisting of four (A, B, C, D) topographically distinct visual stimuli, were established for 5 college students. Across classes, designated A stimuli were open-ended linear figures,…

  20. Influence of environment induced correlated fluctuations in electronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer dynamics in model photosynthetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F

    2012-03-21

    harvesting complex, we explore the influence of including correlations in inter-chromophore couplings between different chromophore dimers that share a common chromophore. We find that the relative sign of the different correlations can have profound influence on decoherence time and energy transfer rate and can provide sensitive control of relaxation in these complex quantum dynamical open systems.

  1. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO2: the effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M; Powell, Amber L; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO2 and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm(-1)) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E' = ∼41,000 cm(-1) was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S1→S0*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO2 via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO2 using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO2 were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E') was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E') and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E') and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E'). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  2. Imaging and Manipulating Energy Transfer Among Quantum Dots at Individual Dot Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nguyen, Huy A; Lyding, Joseph W; Gruebele, Martin

    2017-06-27

    Many processes of interest in quantum dots involve charge or energy transfer from one dot to another. Energy transfer in films of quantum dots as well as between linked quantum dots has been demonstrated by luminescence shift, and the ultrafast time-dependence of energy transfer processes has been resolved. Bandgap variation among dots (energy disorder) and dot separation are known to play an important role in how energy diffuses. Thus, it would be very useful if energy transfer could be visualized directly on a dot-by-dot basis among small clusters or within films of quantum dots. To that effect, we report single molecule optical absorption detected by scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM) to image energy pooling from donor into acceptor dots on a dot-by-dot basis. We show that we can manipulate groups of quantum dots by pruning away the dominant acceptor dot, and switching the energy transfer path to a different acceptor dot. Our experimental data agrees well with a simple Monte Carlo lattice model of energy transfer, similar to models in the literature, in which excitation energy is transferred preferentially from dots with a larger bandgap to dots with a smaller bandgap.

  3. Quasiclassical trajectory study of collisional energy transfer in toluene systems. I. Argon bath gas: Energy dependence and isotope effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kieran F.

    1994-05-01

    Experimental studies of collisional energy transfer from highly vibrationally excited toluene to various bath gases have recently been reported [Toselli and Barker, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 1809 (1992), and references therein]. A quasiclassical trajectory investigation for toluene in argon bath gas at 300 K for initial internal energies E'=41 000, 30 000, and 15 000 cm-1 is reported here. Collisional energy transfer is almost linearly dependent on E'. Predictions of energy transfer quantities are very sensitive to the average well depth of the assumed individual pairwise potentials, but is less sensitive to the detailed shape. Qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiment is obtained where the overall well depth is physically realistic. Isotope studies using 40Ar and pseudohelium (4Ar) bath gases indicate that energy transfer is independent of the mass of the bath-gas collider, but perdeuteration increases 1/2 by 13% over the undeuterated values.

  4. Energy transfer between octahedral tungstate and uranate groups in oxides with perovskite structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, A.C. van der; Hair, J.Th.W. de; Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    Energy transfer between tungstate and uranate groups in oxides with perovskite structure is reported. The critical distance for this process is about 25 Å. Evidence is given for energy transfer between tungstate groups. In this case the critical distance is estimated to be about 8 Å.

  5. Energy transfer between octahedral tungstate and uranate groups in oxides with perovskite structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, A.C. van der; Hair, J.Th.W. de; Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    Energy transfer between tungstate and uranate groups in oxides with perovskite structure is reported. The critical distance for this process is about 25 Å. Evidence is given for energy transfer between tungstate groups. In this case the critical distance is estimated to be about 8 Å.

  6. CHARGE-TRANSFER AND ENERGY-TRANSFER IN THE PHOTO-INDUCED COPOLYMERIZATION OF 2-VINYLNAPHTHALENE WITH MALEIC ANHYDRIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tong; LUO Bin; LI Shanjun; CHU Guobei

    1990-01-01

    The initiation mechanism of the copolymerization of 2-vinylnaphthalene with maleic anhydride was studied under irradiation of 365 nm. The excited complex was formed from ( 1 ) the local excitation of 2-vinylnaphthalene followed by the charge-transfer interaction with maleic anhydride and ( 2 ) the excitation of the ground state charge-transfer complex, and then it collapsed to 1,4-tetramethylene biradical for initiation. A 1:1 alternating copolymer was formed in different monomer feeds. Addition of benzophenone could greatly enhance the rate of copolymerization through energy-transfer mechanism.

  7. Irradiation of atactic polystyrene: linear energy transfer effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, M; Ngono-Ravache, Y; Picq, V; Balanzat, E

    2008-09-01

    Atactic glassy polystyrene (PS) has been irradiated in anoxic conditions by electron and ion beams. The induced modifications were followed, in situ, by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). In-film modifications and hydrocarbon gas release were followed. In-situ measurements allowed one to avoid any spurious oxidation of the films after irradiation and also permitted studying in detail the evolution with dose of the FTIR spectra. The data were quantitatively analyzed, and we present a complete analysis of the effects of the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) on the radiation chemical yields of several radiation-induced modifications (alkynes, allenes, alkenes, benzene, and disubstituted benzenes). For a better understanding of the LET effects, the in-film modifications are compared to H2 release data from the literature and to our measurements of hydrocarbon gaseous molecule yields obtained by us. The overall destruction yield becomes very significant at high LET, and the radiation sensitivity of this aromatic polymer merges with typical values of aliphatic polymers: the radiation resistance conferred at low LET to polystyrene by the phenyl side groups is lost at high LET. This loss of radiation resistance equally affects the aromatic and aliphatic moieties. Monosubstituted alkynes are created above a LET threshold, whereas the other radiation-induced modifications are observed in the whole LET range. Several observations indicate that the phenyl ring is broken at high LET. Comparison of the alkyne yield in PS, polyethylene, and polycarbonate as well as the formation of nitrile bonds in poly(vinylpyridine- co-styrene) are consistent with a cleavage of the phenyl ring as the prominent source of alkynes. As the competing damage mechanisms do not have the same LET evolution, the relative importance of a specific modification on the global damage depends on LET. Some (benzene and disubstituted benzenes) dominate at low LET, while others (in-film alkyne and

  8. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A new N2-N2 rigid-rotor surface has been determined using extensive Ab Initio quantum chemistry calculations together with recent experimental data for the second virial coefficient. Rotational energy transfer is studied using the new potential energy surface (PES) employing the close coupling method below 200 cm(exp -1) and coupled state approximation above that. Comparing with a previous calculation based on the PES of van der Avoird et al.,3 it is found that the new PES generally gives larger cross sections for large (delta)J transitions, but for small (delta)J transitions the cross sections are either comparable or smaller. Correlation between the differences in the cross sections and the two PES will be attempted. The computed cross sections will also be compared with available experimental data.

  9. Foerster resonance energy transfer rate and local density of optical states are uncorrelated in any dielectric nanophotonic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Wubs, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the ongoing debate about nanophotonic control of Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET), notably by the local density of optical states (LDOS), we study an analytic model system wherein a pair of ideal dipole emitters - donor and acceptor - exhibit energy transfer in the vicinity of an ideal mirror. The FRET rate is controlled by the mirror up to distances comparable to the donor-acceptor distance, that is, the few-nanometer range. For vanishing distance, we find a complete inhibition or a four-fold enhancement, depending on dipole orientation. For mirror distances on the wavelength scale, where the well-known `Drexhage' modification of the spontaneous-emission rate occurs, the FRET rate is constant. Hence there is no correlation between the Foerster (or total) energy transfer rate and the LDOS. At any distance to the mirror, the total energy transfer between a closely-spaced donor and acceptor is dominated by Foerster transfer, i.e., by the static dipole-dipole interaction that yields the cha...

  10. Energy model of projected transfer with additional mechanical force in the welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the theory of electrodynamics and other relational subjects,through introducing "Surface Evolver" as the means of FEM analysis, by computing and describing the energy (electromagnetic, gravity, and so on) in the droplet transfer system, an energy model was accomplished for studying the mechanism of projected transfer mode.Furthermore, the behavior of droplet transfer was studied by analyzing its menisci with FEM, and the theoretical results coincide well with the experiment results.

  11. Tailoring liquid/solid interfacial energy transfer: fabrication and application of multiscale metallic surfaces with engineered heat transfer and electrolysis properties via femtosecond laser surface processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Troy P.; Wilson, Chris; Zuhlke, Craig A.; Kruse, Corey; Hassebrook, Anton; Somanas, Isra; Ndao, Sidy; Gogos, George; Alexander, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    Femtosecond Laser Surface Processing (FLSP) is a powerful technique for the fabrication of self-organized multiscale surface structures on metals that are critical for advanced control over energy transfer at a liquid/solid interface in applications such as electrolysis. The efficiency of the hydrogen evolution reaction on stainless steel 316 electrodes in a 1 molar potassium hydroxide solution is used to analyze the role of surface geometry to facilitate the phase conversion of the liquid to a gaseous state in the vicinity of the interface. It is found that the efficiency of the electrolysis process is directly related to the separation of micro-scale features on an electrode surface. The enhancement is attributed to the size of the valleys between microstructures controlling the contact between an evolving vapor bubble and the electrode surface. The results suggest an alternative pathway for the tailoring of interfacial energy transfer on structured surfaces separate from traditional benchmarks such as surface area and contact angle.

  12. A New Seamless Transfer Control Strategy of the Microgrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyun Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A microgrid may operate under two typical modes; the seamless transfer control of the microgrid is very important. The mode conversion controller is installed in microgrid and the control logic of master power is optimized for microgrid mode conversion. In the proposed scheme, master power is very important. The master-power is under the PQ control when microgrid is under grid-connected. And it is under V/F control when the microgrid is under islanding. The microgrid mode controller is used to solve the planned conversion. Three types of conversion are simulated in this paper. The simulation results show the correctness and validity of the mode control scheme. Finally, the implementation and application of the operation and control device are described.

  13. A new seamless transfer control strategy of the microgrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyun; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    A microgrid may operate under two typical modes; the seamless transfer control of the microgrid is very important. The mode conversion controller is installed in microgrid and the control logic of master power is optimized for microgrid mode conversion. In the proposed scheme, master power is very important. The master-power is under the PQ control when microgrid is under grid-connected. And it is under V/F control when the microgrid is under islanding. The microgrid mode controller is used to solve the planned conversion. Three types of conversion are simulated in this paper. The simulation results show the correctness and validity of the mode control scheme. Finally, the implementation and application of the operation and control device are described.

  14. Energy transfer during stress relaxation of contracting frog muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, M; Heglund, N C; Cavagna, G A

    2001-12-15

    (o) after Delta t(isom): a maximum of approximately 5 nm per half-sarcomere is attained when the fast tension decay is almost complete, i.e. 30 ms after the stretch at 4 degrees C and 10 ms after the stretch at 14 degrees C. After slow stretch, when fast tension decay is small or nil, the increase in phase 2 shortening is negligible. 5. The increase in phase 2 work during fast tension decay (Delta W(out)) is a constant fraction of the elastic energy simultaneously set free by the recoil of the undamped elastic elements. 6. Delta W(out) is accompanied by a decrease in stiffness, indicating that it is not due to a greater number of cross-bridges. 7. It is concluded that, during the fast tension decay following a fast ramp stretch, a transfer of energy occurs from the undamped elastic elements to damped elements within the sarcomeres by a temperature-dependent mechanism with a dominant rate constant consistent with the theory proposed by A. F. Huxley and R. M. Simmons in 1971.

  15. Peningkatan Available Transfer Capability Mengggunakan Unified Power Flow Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyatmoko Wirananto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Available Transfer Capability (ATC adalah kemampuan transfer yang masih mungkin bisa dilakukan pada sistem tenaga listrik. Pemasangan perangkat FACTS, yaitu Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC dilakukan untuk meningkatkan nilai ATC. UPFC akan mengontrol injeksi daya reaktif dan mengontrol tegangan pada saluran transmisi yang dipasangi UPFC sehingga akan merubah aliran daya pada sistem tenaga listrik. Melalui analisis optimal power flow pada Sistem IEEE 14 bus, variabel-variabel kontrol akan diinjeksikan dari UPFC ke aliran daya Sistem IEEE 14 bus. Setelah dipasang UPFC sistem mampu mencapai nilai load margin maksimal pada 0,1511 ketika UPFC dipasang di Saluran 2-5, dengan ATC yang dicapai adalah 35,38 MW.

  16. Controllable coherent population transfers in superconducting qubits for quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, L F; Johansson, J R; Cen, L X; Ashhab, S; Nori, Franco

    2008-03-21

    We propose an approach to coherently transfer populations between selected quantum states in one- and two-qubit systems by using controllable Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passages. These evolution-time insensitive transfers, assisted by easily implementable single-qubit phase-shift operations, could serve as elementary logic gates for quantum computing. Specifically, this proposal could be conveniently demonstrated with existing Josephson phase qubits. Our proposal can find an immediate application in the readout of these qubits. Indeed, the broken parity symmetries of the bound states in these artificial atoms provide an efficient approach to design the required adiabatic pulses.

  17. Excitation energy transfer in organic materials: from fundamentals to optoelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laquai, Frédéric; Park, Young-Seo; Kim, Jang-Joo; Basché, Thomas

    2009-07-16

    In this review, we discuss investigations of electronic excitation energy transfer in conjugated organic materials at the bulk and single molecule level and applications of energy transfer in fluorescent and phosphorescent organic light emitting devices. A brief overview of common descriptions of energy transfer mechanisms is given followed by a discussion of some basic photophysics of conjugated materials including the generation of excited states and their subsequent decay through various channels. In particular, various examples of bimolecular excited state annihilation processes are presented. Energy transfer studies at the single molecule level provide a new tool to study electronic couplings in simple donor/acceptor dyads and conjugated polymers. Finally, energy transfer in organic electronic devices is discussed with particular emphasis on triplet emitter doped OLEDs and blends for white light emission.

  18. Geometry effect on energy transfer rate in a coupled-quantum-well structure: nonlinear regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavati-fard, T.; Vazifehshenas, T.

    2014-12-01

    We study theoretically the effect of geometry on the energy transfer rate at nonlinear regime in a coupled-quantum-well system using the balance equation approach. To investigate comparatively the effect of both symmetric and asymmetric geometry, different structures are considered. The random phase approximation dynamic dielectric function is employed to include the contributions from both quasiparticle and plasmon excitations. Also, the short-range exchange interaction is taken into account through the Hubbard approximation. Our numerical results show that the energy transfer rate increases by increasing the well thicknesses in symmetric structures. Furthermore, by increasing spatial asymmetry, the energy transfer rate decreases for the electron temperature range of interest. From numerical calculations, it is obtained that the nonlinear energy transfer rate is proportional to the square of electron drift velocity in all structures and also, found that the influence of Hubbard local field correction on the energy transfer rate gets weaker by increasing the strength of applied electric field.

  19. Climate Control Using Nuclear Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Modgil, Moninder Singh

    2008-01-01

    We examine implications of anthropogenic low pressure regions, - created by injecting heat from nuclear reactors, into atmosphere. We suggest the possibility that such artificially generated low pressure regions, near hurricanes could disrupt their growth, path, and intensity. This method can also create controlled tropical stroms, which lead to substantial rainfall in arid areas, such as - (1)Sahara desert, (2) Australian interior desert, and (3) Indian Thar desert. A simple vortex suction model is developed to study, effect on atmospheric dynamics, by such a nuclear heat injection system.

  20. Energy Management Dynamic Control Topology In MANET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudan, G.; Kumar, TNR

    2017-08-01

    Topology management via per-node transmission power adjustment has been shown effective in extending network lifetime. The existing algorithms constructs static topologies which fail to take the residual energy of network nodes, and cannot balance energy consumption efficiently. To address this problem, a Light Weighted Distributed Topology Control algorithm EMDCT(Energy Management Dynamic Control Topology ) is proposed in this paper. Based on the link metric of the network, both the energy consumption rate level and residual energy levels at the two end nodes are considered. EMDCT generates a Dynamic Topology that changes with the variation of node energy without the aid of location information, each node determines its transmission power according to local network information, which reduces the overhead complexity of EMDCT greatly. The experiment results show that EMDCT preserves network connectivity and manitains minimum-cost property of the network also it can extend network lifetime more remarkably.

  1. Controller reduction by preserving impulse response energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Su, Tzu-Jeng

    1989-01-01

    A model order reduction algorithm based on a Krylov recurrence formulation is developed to reduce order of controllers. The reduced-order controller is obtained by projecting the full-order LQG controller onto a Krylov subspace in which either the controllability or the observability grammian is equal to the identity matrix. The reduced-order controller preserves the impulse response energy of the full-order controller and has a parameter-matching property. Two numerical examples drawn from other controller reduction literature are used to illustrate the efficacy of the proposed reduction algorithm.

  2. Energy transfer and energy level decay processes of Er3+ in water-free tellurite glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Laercio; Rhonehouse, Daniel; Nguyen, Dan T.; Zong, Jie; Chavez-Pirson, Arturo; Jackson, Stuart D.

    2015-12-01

    This report details the fundamental spectroscopic properties of a new class of water-free tellurite glasses studied for future applications in mid-infrared light generation. The fundamental excited state decay processes relating to the 4I11/2 → 4I13/2 transition in singly Er3+-doped Tellurium Zinc Lanthanum glass have been investigated using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The excited state dynamics was analyzed for Er2O3 concentrations between 0.5 mol% and 4 mol%. Selective laser excitation of the 4I11/2 energy level at 972 nm and selective laser excitation of the 4I13/2 energy level at 1485 nm has established that in a similar way to other Er3+-doped glasses, a strong energy-transfer upconversion by way of a dipole-dipole interaction between two excited erbium ions in the 4I13/2 level populates the 4I11/2 upper laser level of the 3 μm transition. The 4I13/2 and 4I11/2 energy levels emitted luminescence with peaks located at 1532 nm and 2734 nm respectively with luminescence efficiencies of 100% and 8% for the higher (4 mol.%) concentration sample. Results from numerical simulations showed that a population inversion is reached at a threshold pumping intensity of ∼57 kW cm-2 for a CW laser pump at 976 nm for [Er2O3] = 2 mol.%.

  3. Control of Energy Regeneration for Electric Vehicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi; MAO Xiao-jian; LI Li-ming; ZHUO Bn

    2008-01-01

    To extend electric vehicle (EV) running distance, the vehicle energy regeneration (ER) method and vehicle control strategy were designed based on the original vehicle braking system. The ER principle of direct current (DC) brushless motor was studied, the motor mathematical model and PI control method with torque close-loop were built. This control method was applied to pure EV and the real road tests were evaluated.The ER control does not make any significant uncomfortable influence brake feeling and can save about 10% battery energy based on 3 times economic commission for Europe (ECE) driving cycles.

  4. Regulation of excitation energy transfer in diatom PSII dimer: How does it change the destination of excitation energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokono, Makio; Nagao, Ryo; Tomo, Tatsuya; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Energy transfer dynamics in dimeric photosystem II (PSII) complexes isolated from four diatoms, Chaetoceros gracilis, Cyclotella meneghiniana, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, are examined. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements were conducted in the range of 0-80ns. Delayed fluorescence spectra showed a clear difference between PSII monomer and PSII dimer isolated from the four diatoms. The difference can be interpreted as reflecting suppressed energy transfer between PSII monomers in the PSII dimer for efficient energy trapping at the reaction center. The observation was especially prominent in C. gracilis and T. pseudonana. The pathways seem to be suppressed under a low pH condition in isolated PSII complexes from C. gracilis, and excitation energy may be quenched with fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding protein (FCP) that was closely associated with PSII in C. gracilis. The energy transfer between PSII monomers in the PSII dimer may play a role in excitation energy regulation in diatoms.

  5. Energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions with matter revisited: A step-by-step illustrated approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Rahman, W., E-mail: wabdel@medphys.mcgill.c [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Medical Physics Unit, 1650 avenue Cedar, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1A4 (Canada); Podgorsak, E.B. [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Medical Physics Unit, 1650 avenue Cedar, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    A clear understanding of energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions with matter is essential for the understanding of radiation dosimetry and development of new dosimetry techniques. The concepts behind the two quantities have been enunciated many years ago and described in many scientific papers, review articles, and textbooks. Data dealing with energy transfer and energy absorption as well as the associated mass energy transfer coefficient and the mass energy absorption coefficient are readily available in web-based tabular forms. However, tables, even when available in detailed and easy to access form, do not lend themselves to serve as visual aid to promote better understanding of the dosimetric quantities related to energy transfer and energy absorption as well as their relationship to the photon energy and absorber atomic number. This paper uses graphs and illustrations, in addition to well-known mathematical relationships, to guide the reader in a systematic manner through the various stages involved in the derivation of energy absorbed in medium and its associated quantity, the mass energy absorption coefficient, from the mass attenuation coefficient.

  6. Energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions with matter revisited: A step-by-step illustrated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, W.; Podgorsak, E. B.

    2010-05-01

    A clear understanding of energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions with matter is essential for the understanding of radiation dosimetry and development of new dosimetry techniques. The concepts behind the two quantities have been enunciated many years ago and described in many scientific papers, review articles, and textbooks. Data dealing with energy transfer and energy absorption as well as the associated mass energy transfer coefficient and the mass energy absorption coefficient are readily available in web-based tabular forms. However, tables, even when available in detailed and easy to access form, do not lend themselves to serve as visual aid to promote better understanding of the dosimetric quantities related to energy transfer and energy absorption as well as their relationship to the photon energy and absorber atomic number. This paper uses graphs and illustrations, in addition to well-known mathematical relationships, to guide the reader in a systematic manner through the various stages involved in the derivation of energy absorbed in medium and its associated quantity, the mass energy absorption coefficient, from the mass attenuation coefficient.

  7. Quantum Coherence as a Witness of Vibronically Hot Energy Transfer in Bacterial Reaction Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Paleček, David; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Zigmantas, Donatas

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic proteins have evolved over billions of years so as to undergo optimal energy transfer to the sites of charge separation. Based on spectroscopically detected quantum coherences, it has been suggested that this energy transfer is partially wavelike. This conclusion critically depends on assignment of the coherences to the evolution of excitonic superpositions. Here we demonstrate for a bacterial reaction centre protein that long-lived coherent spectroscopic oscillations, which bear canonical signatures of excitonic superpositions, are essentially vibrational excited state coherences shifted to the ground state of the chromophores . We show that appearance of these coherences is brought about by release of electronic energy during the energy transfer. Our results establish how energy migrates on vibrationally hot chromophores in the reaction centre and they call for a re-examination of claims of quantum energy transfer in photosynthesis.

  8. Energy transfer and thermal studies of Pr3+ doped cerium oxalate crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Pragash; Gijo Jose; N V Unnikrishnan; C Sudarsanakumar

    2011-07-01

    Energy transfer process at room temperature for cerium (sensitizer) oxalate single crystals doped with different concentrations (10, 13, 15, 17 and 20%) of praseodymium ions (activator) grown by hydro silica gel method has been evaluated. The analysis of energy level diagrams of cerium and praseodymium ions indicates that the energy gap between the sensitizer and the activator ions varies in a small range suggesting a possible energy transfer from the Ce3+ to Pr3+. The emission and absorption spectra of these crystals were recorded. The overlapping of the absorption spectra of Pr3+ and emission spectra of Ce3+ at wavelengths 484 and 478 nm, respectively, strongly supports the possible energy transfer process in this system. From the absorption spectra, oscillator strength, electric dipole moment, branching ratio and Judd–Ofelt parameters of this system were evaluated by least square programming. The quantum efficiency, energy transfer probabilities and thermal properties have been studied.

  9. Ultrafast Non-Förster Intramolecular Donor-Acceptor Excitation Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulos, Stavros; Alfonso Hernandez, Laura; Beljonne, David; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Tretiak, Sergei

    2017-04-06

    Ultrafast intramolecular electronic energy transfer in a conjugated donor-acceptor system is simulated using nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics. After initial site-selective photoexcitation of the donor, transition density localization is monitored throughout the S2 → S1 internal conversion process, revealing an efficient unidirectional donor → acceptor energy-transfer process. Detailed analysis of the excited-state trajectories uncovers several salient features of the energy-transfer dynamics. While a weak temperature dependence is observed during the entire electronic energy relaxation, an ultrafast initially temperature-independent process allows the molecular system to approach the S2-S1 potential energy crossing seam within the first ten femtoseconds. Efficient energy transfer occurs in the absence of spectral overlap between the donor and acceptor units and is assisted by a transient delocalization phenomenon of the excited-state wave function acquiring Frenkel-exciton character at the moment of quantum transition.

  10. Magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfers at the top of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Amit, Hagay; Alboussière, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    We develop the theory for the magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer between different spherical harmonic degrees due to the interaction of fluid flow and radial magnetic field at the top of the Earth's core. We show that non-zero secular variation of the total magnetic energy could be significant and may provide evidence for the existence of stretching secular variation, which suggests the existence of radial motions at the top of the Earth's core-whole core convection or MAC waves. However, the uncertainties of the small scales of the geomagnetic field prevent a definite conclusion. Combining core field and flow models we calculate the detailed magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer matrices. The magnetic to magnetic energy transfer shows a complex behaviour with local and non-local transfers. The spectra of magnetic to magnetic energy transfers show clear maxima and minima, suggesting an energy cascade. The kinetic to magnetic energy transfers, which are much weaker due to the weak poloidal flow, are either local or non-local between degree one and higher degrees. The patterns observed in the matrices resemble energy transfer patterns that are typically found in 3-D MHD numerical simulations.

  11. Syntheses, photophysical properties, and application of through-bond energy-transfer cassettes for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Thoresen, Lars H; Kim, Taeg Gyum; Haaland, Wade C; Gao, Feng; Topp, Michael R; Hochstrasser, Robin M; Metzker, Michael L; Burgess, Kevin

    2006-10-16

    We have designed fluorescent "through-bond energy-transfer cassettes" that can harvest energy of a relatively short wavelength (e.g., 490 nm), and emit it at appreciably longer wavelengths without significant loss of intensity. Probes of this type could be particularly useful in biotechnology for multiplexing experiments in which several different outputs are to be observed from a single excitation source. Cassettes 1-4 were designed, prepared, and studied as model systems to achieve this end. They were synthesized through convergent routes that feature coupling of specially prepared fluorescein- and rhodamine-derived fragments. The four cassettes were shown to emit strongly, with highly efficient energy transfer. Their emission maxima cover a broad range of wavelengths (broader than the four dye cassettes currently used for most high-throughput DNA sequencing), and they exhibit faster energy-transfer rates than a similar through-space energy-transfer cassette. Specifically, energy-transfer rates in these cassettes is around 6-7 ps, in contrast to a similar through-space energy-transfer system shown to have a decay time of around 35 ps. Moreover, the cassettes are considerably more stable to photobleaching than fluorescein, even though they each contain fluorescein-derived donors. This was confirmed by bulk fluorescent measurements, and in single-molecule-detection studies. Modification of a commercial automated DNA-sequencing apparatus to detect the emissions of these four energy-transfer cassettes enabled single-color dye-primer sequencing.

  12. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Core/Shell Quantum Dots and Bacteriorhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H. Griep

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An energy transfer relationship between core-shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs and the optical protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR is shown, demonstrating a distance-dependent energy transfer with 88.2% and 51.1% of the QD energy being transferred to the bR monomer at separation distances of 3.5 nm and 8.5 nm, respectively. Fluorescence lifetime measurements isolate nonradiative energy transfer, other than optical absorptive mechanisms, with the effective QD excited state lifetime reducing from 18.0 ns to 13.3 ns with bR integration, demonstrating the Förster resonance energy transfer contributes to 26.1% of the transferred QD energy at the 3.5 nm separation distance. The established direct energy transfer mechanism holds the potential to enhance the bR spectral range and sensitivity of energies that the protein can utilize, increasing its subsequent photocurrent generation, a significant potential expansion of the applicability of bR in solar cell, biosensing, biocomputing, optoelectronic, and imaging technologies.

  13. A Theoretical Investigation Into Energy Transfer In Photosynthetic Open Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkins, David M

    2015-01-01

    This thesis looks at the electronic energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex, in which evidence of long-lived coherence has been observed in 2-dimensional infrared experiments. I use three techniques: the numerically exact Hierarchical Equations of Motion, and the perturbative Redfield and Foerster theories, the latter of which ignores quantum coherence in the transfer. Both of the approximate methods perform very well - and while oscillations in site populations (a hallmark of coherence) are present in the exact transfer dynamics and absent in the dynamics of Foerster theory, the latter gives a reasonable prediction of transfer rates and steady-state populations, despite being incoherent - suggesting that coherence is not vital for the dynamics of transfer. Since Foerster theory is very inexpensive to run and performs so well, I then apply it to calculate the effects of static disorder in bacteriochlorophyll site energies and of a more structured spectral density. Ultimately, the energy transfer i...

  14. Energy and Charge Transfer from Guest to Host in Doped Organic Electroluminescent Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宏建; 彭景翠; 许雪梅; 瞿述; 罗小华; 赵楚军

    2002-01-01

    The luminescence properties of doped organic electroluminescent devices are explained by means off Hamiltonian model. The results show that there is a corresponding relation between the amount of transferred charge and the change of the energy originating from charge transfer, and the relation can be influenced by dopant concentration.As the amount of transferred charge increases, the total energy decreases and the luminescence intensity increases.Therefore, we deduce that the energy transfer from guest to host may be derived from the charge transfer. For a given organic electroluminescent device, the maximum value of the conductivity can be observed in a specific dopant concentration. The calculated results show that the greater the transferred charges, the higher the conductivities in doped organic electroluminescent devices. The results agree basically with experimental results.

  15. Localized surface plasmon mediated energy transfer in the vicinity of core-shell nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishodia, Manmohan Singh; Juneja, Soniya

    2016-05-01

    Multipole spectral expansion based theory of energy transfer interactions between a donor and an acceptor molecule in the vicinity of a core-shell (nanoshell or core@shell) based plasmonic nanostructure is developed. In view of the diverse applications and rich plasmonic features such as tuning capability of surface plasmon (SP) frequencies, greater sensitivity to the change of dielectric environment, controllable redirection of electromagnetic radiation, closed form expressions for Energy Transfer Rate Enhancement Factor (ETREF) near core-shell particle are reported. The dependence of ETREF on different parameters is established through fitting equations, perceived to be of key importance for developing appropriate designs. The theoretical approach developed in the present work is capable of treating higher order multipoles, which, in turn, are also shown to play a crucial role in the present context. Moreover, closed form expressions derived in the present work can directly be used as formula, e.g., for designing SP based biosensors and estimating energy exchange between proteins and excitonic interactions in quantum dots.

  16. Localized surface plasmon mediated energy transfer in the vicinity of core-shell nanoparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishodia, Manmohan Singh, E-mail: manmohan@gbu.ac.in; Juneja, Soniya [Department of Applied Physics, School of Vocational Studies and Applied Sciences, Gautam Buddha University, Greater Noida 201308 (India)

    2016-05-28

    Multipole spectral expansion based theory of energy transfer interactions between a donor and an acceptor molecule in the vicinity of a core-shell (nanoshell or core@shell) based plasmonic nanostructure is developed. In view of the diverse applications and rich plasmonic features such as tuning capability of surface plasmon (SP) frequencies, greater sensitivity to the change of dielectric environment, controllable redirection of electromagnetic radiation, closed form expressions for Energy Transfer Rate Enhancement Factor (ETREF) near core-shell particle are reported. The dependence of ETREF on different parameters is established through fitting equations, perceived to be of key importance for developing appropriate designs. The theoretical approach developed in the present work is capable of treating higher order multipoles, which, in turn, are also shown to play a crucial role in the present context. Moreover, closed form expressions derived in the present work can directly be used as formula, e.g., for designing SP based biosensors and estimating energy exchange between proteins and excitonic interactions in quantum dots.

  17. Technology transfer for the US Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program: Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneau, C.L.; Fassbender, L.L.

    1988-10-01

    This document contains the appendices to Technology Transfer Recommendations for the US Department of Energy's Storage Program (PNL-6484, Vol. 1). These appendices are a list of projects, publications, and presentations connected with the Energy Storage (STOR) program. In Volume 1, the technology transfer activities of the STOR program are examined and mechanisms for increasing the effectiveness of those activities are recommended.

  18. Nanoscale heat transfer and thermoelectrics for alternative energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In the area of alternative energy, thermoelectrics have experienced an unprecedented growth in popularity because of their ability to convert waste heat into electricity. Wired in reverse, thermoelectrics can act as refrigeration devices, where they are promising because they are small in size and lightweight, have no moving parts, and have rapid on/off cycles. However, due to their low efficiencies bulk thermoelectrics have historically been a niche market. Only in the last decade has thermoelectric efficiency exceeded ~ 20 % due to fabrication of nanostructured materials. Nanoscale materials have this advantage because electronic and acoustic confinement effects can greatly increase thermoelectric efficiency beyond bulk values. In this talk, I will introduce our work in the area of nanoscale heat transfer with the goal of more efficient thermoelectrics. I will discuss our experiments and methods to study acoustic confinement in nanostructures and present some of our new nanostructured thermoelectric materials. To study acoustic confinement we are building a nanoscale phonon spectrometer. The instrument can excite phonon modes in nanostructures in the ~ 100 s of GHz. Ballistic phonons from the generator are used to probe acoustic confinement and surface scattering effects. Transmission studies using this device will help optimize materials and morphologies for more efficient nanomaterial-based thermoelectrics. For materials, our group has synthesized nano-layer superlattices of Na x Co O2 . Sodium cobaltate was recently discovered to have a high Seebeck coeficent and is being studied as an oxide thermoelectric material. The thickness of our nano-layers ranges from 5 nm to 300 nm while the lengths can be varied between 10 μ m and 4 mm. Typical aspect ratios are 40 nm: 4 mm, or 1:100,000. Thermoelectric characterization of samples with tilted multiple-grains along the measurement axis indicate a thermoelectric efficiency on par with current polycrystalline samples

  19. Biomolecular interactions probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Daniela Charlotte

    2000-09-01

    This thesis describes how a physical phenomenon, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), can be exploited for the study of interactions between biomolecules. The physical basis of this phenomenon is discussed and it is described how some of its characteristics can be exploited in measurement. A recently introduced method, photobleaching FRET microscopy, was implemented and its image analysis refined to suit our biological context. Further, a new technique is proposed, which combines FRET with confocal laser scanning microscopy to optimize resolution and to allow for 3D-studies in living cells. The first part of this thesis presents the application of FRET to the study of oligomerization of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which was performed at the Fraser Laboratories at McGill University in Montreal. It is demonstrated how FRET microscopy allowed us to circumvent problems of traditional biochemical approaches and provided the first direct evidence for GPCR oligomerization in intact cells. We found that somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) functionally interact by forming oligomers with their own kind, with different SSTR isoforms, and even with distantly related GPCRs, such as dopamine receptors, the latter of which is breaking with the dogma that GPCRs would only pair up with their own kind. The high sensitivity of the FRET technique allowed us to characterize these interactions under more physiological conditions, which lead to the observation that oligomerization is induced by receptor agonist. We further studied the differential effects of agonists and antagonists on receptor oligomerization, leading to a model for the molecular mechanism underlying agonist/antagonist function and receptor activation. The second part was carried out at the Neurobiology Laboratory of the VA Medical Center in Newington, CT. The objective was to further our understanding of Niemann- Pick type C disease, which is characterized by a defect in intracellular cholesterol

  20. Optimal control for perfect state transfer in linear quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2017-03-01

    A quantum memory is a system that enables transfer, storage, and retrieval of optical quantum states by ON/OFF switching of the control signal in each stage of the memory. In particular, it is known that, for perfect transfer of a single-photon state, appropriate shaping of the input pulse is required. However, in general, such a desirable pulse shape has a complicated form, which would be hard to generate in practice. In this paper, for a wide class of linear quantum memory systems, we develop a method that reduces the complexity of the input pulse shape of a single photon while maintaining the perfect state transfer. The key idea is twofold; (i) the control signal is allowed to vary continuously in time to introduce an additional degree of freedom, and then (ii) an optimal control problem is formulated to design a simple-formed input pulse and the corresponding control signal. Numerical simulations are conducted for Λ-type atomic media and networked atomic ensembles, to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Analysis on spatial transfer model of energy development layout and the ecological footprint affection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jinfang

    2017-01-01

    Consider the global energy interconnection, the global is concentrating on carrying out clean energy alternative, which is mainly focusing on using the clean energy to take place of fossil energy, and change the global energy layout and ecological atmosphere condition. This research gives the energy spatial transfer model of energy development layout to analyse the global energy development layout condition and ecological affection. And it is a fast and direct method to analyse its energy usage process and environmental affection. The paper also gives out a system dynamics model of energy spatial transfer shows, which electric power transmission is better than original energy usage and transportation. It also gives the comparison of different parameters. The energy spatial transfer can affect the environment directly. Consider its three environmental factors, including energy saving, climate changing and conventional pollutant emission reduction, synthetic combine with the spatial transfer model, it can get the environmental change parameters, which showed that with the clean energy wide usage, the ecological footprint affection will be affected significantly.

  2. What Controls the Rate of Ultrafast Charge Transfer and Charge Separation Efficiency in Organic Photovoltaic Blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakowetz, Andreas C; Böhm, Marcus L; Zhang, Jiangbin; Sadhanala, Aditya; Huettner, Sven; Bakulin, Artem A; Rao, Akshay; Friend, Richard H

    2016-09-14

    In solar energy harvesting devices based on molecular semiconductors, such as organic photovoltaics (OPVs) and artificial photosynthetic systems, Frenkel excitons must be dissociated via charge transfer at heterojunctions to yield free charges. What controls the rate and efficiency of charge transfer and charge separation is an important question, as it determines the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of these systems. In bulk heterojunctions between polymer donor and fullerene acceptors, which provide a model system to understand the fundamental dynamics of electron transfer in molecular systems, it has been established that the first step of photoinduced electron transfer can be fast, of order 100 fs. But here we report the first study which correlates differences in the electron transfer rate with electronic structure and morphology, achieved with sub-20 fs time resolution pump-probe spectroscopy. We vary both the fullerene substitution and donor/fullerene ratio which allow us to control both aggregate size and the energetic driving force for charge transfer. We observe a range of electron transfer times from polymer to fullerene, from 240 fs to as short as 37 fs. Using ultrafast electro-optical pump-push-photocurrent spectroscopy, we find the yield of free versus bound charges to be weakly dependent on the energetic driving force, but to be very strongly dependent on fullerene aggregate size and packing. Our results point toward the importance of state accessibility and charge delocalization and suggest that energetic offsets between donor and acceptor levels are not an important criterion for efficient charge generation. This provides design rules for next-generation materials to minimize losses related to driving energy and boost PCE.

  3. Excitation energy transfer from a fluorophore to single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathi, R S; Sebastian, K L

    2010-03-14

    We study the process of electronic excitation energy transfer from a fluorophore to the electronic energy levels of a single-walled carbon nanotube. The matrix element for the energy transfer involves the Coulombic interaction between the transition densities on the donor and the acceptor. In the Forster approach, this is approximated as the interaction between the corresponding transition dipoles. For energy transfer from a dye to a nanotube, one can use the dipole approximation for the dye, but not for the nanotube. We have therefore calculated the rate using an approach that avoids the dipole approximation for the nanotube. We find that for the metallic nanotubes, the rate has an exponential dependence if the energy that is to be transferred, variant Planck's over 2piOmega is less than a threshold and a d(-5) dependence otherwise. The threshold is the minimum energy required for a transition other than the k(i, perpendicular)=0 and l=0 transition. Our numerical evaluation of the rate of energy transfer from the dye pyrene to a (5,5) carbon nanotube, which is metallic leads to a distance of approximately 165 A up to which energy transfer is appreciable. For the case of transfer to semiconducting carbon nanotubes, apart from the process of transfer to the electronic energy levels within the one electron picture, we also consider the possibility of energy transfer to the lowest possible excitonic state. Transfer to semiconducting carbon nanotubes is possible only if variant Planck's over 2piOmega > or = epsilon(g)-epsilon(b). The long range behavior of the rate of transfer has been found to have a d(-5) dependence if variant Planck's over 2piOmega > or = epsilon(g). But, when the emission energy of the fluorophore is in the range epsilon(g) > variant Planck's over 2piOmega > or = epsilon(g)-epsilon(b), the rate has an exponential dependence on the distance. For the case of transfer from pyrene to the semiconducting (6,4) carbon nanotube, energy transfer is found to

  4. Analytic Methods for Predicting Significant Multi-Quanta Effects in Collisional Molecular Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, Ronald J.

    1996-01-01

    Collision-induced transitions can significantly affect molecular vibrational-rotational populations and energy transfer in atmospheres and gaseous systems. This, in turn. can strongly influence convective heat transfer through dissociation and recombination of diatomics. and radiative heat transfer due to strong vibrational coupling. It is necessary to know state-to-state rates to predict engine performance and aerothermodynamic behavior of hypersonic flows, to analyze diagnostic radiative data obtained from experimental test facilities, and to design heat shields and other thermal protective systems. Furthermore, transfer rates between vibrational and translational modes can strongly influence energy flow in various 'disturbed' environments, particularly where the vibrational and translational temperatures are not equilibrated.

  5. Photoinduced energy and electron transfer in rubrene-benzoquinone and rubrene-porphyrin systems

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Jafar Iqbal

    2014-11-01

    Excited-state electron and energy transfer from singlet excited rubrene (Ru) to benzoquinone (BQ) and tetra-(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAPP) were investigated by steady-state absorption and emission, time-resolved transient absorption, and femtosecond (fs)-nanosecond (ns) fluorescence spectroscopy. The low reduction potential of BQ provides the high probability of electron transfer from the excited Ru to BQ. Steady-state and time-resolved results confirm such an excited electron transfer scenario. On the other hand, strong spectral overlap between the emission of Ru and absorption of TAPP suggests that energy transfer is a possible deactivation pathway of the Ru excited state.

  6. Sequential energy and electron transfer in a three-component system aligned on a clay nanosheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Takuya; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Ishida, Yohei; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan

    2016-02-21

    To achieve the goal of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer across three molecules, a phenomenon often utilized in artificial light harvesting systems, we have assembled a light absorber (that also serves as an energy donor), an energy acceptor (that also serves as an electron donor) and an electron acceptor on the surface of an anionic clay nanosheet. Since neutral organic molecules have no tendency to adsorb onto the anionic surface of clay, a positively charged water-soluble organic capsule was used to hold neutral light absorbers on the above surface. A three-component assembly was prepared by the co-adsorption of a cationic bipyridinium derivative, cationic zinc porphyrin and cationic octaamine encapsulated 2-acetylanthracene on an exfoliated anionic clay surface in water. Energy and electron transfer phenomena were monitored by steady state fluorescence and picosecond time resolved fluorescence decay. The excitation of 2-acetylanthracene in the three-component system resulted in energy transfer from 2-acetylanthracene to zinc porphyrin with 71% efficiency. Very little loss due to electron transfer from 2-acetylanthracene in the cavitand to the bipyridinium derivative was noticed. Energy transfer was followed by electron transfer from the zinc porphyrin to the cationic bipyridinium derivative with 81% efficiency. Analyses of fluorescence decay profiles confirmed the occurrence of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer. Merging the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry we realized sequential energy and electron transfer between three hydrophobic molecules in water. Exfoliated transparent saponite clay served as a matrix to align the three photoactive molecules at a close distance in aqueous solutions.

  7. Laboratory Transferability of Optimally Shaped Laser Pulses for Quantum Control

    CERN Document Server

    Tibbetts, Katharine Moore; Rabitz, Herschel

    2013-01-01

    Optimal control experiments can readily identify effective shaped laser pulses, or "photonic reagents", that achieve a wide variety of objectives. For many practical applications, an important criterion is that a particular photonic reagent prescription still produce a good, if not optimal, target objective yield when transferred to a different system or laboratory, {even if the same shaped pulse profile cannot be reproduced exactly. As a specific example, we assess the potential for transferring optimal photonic reagents for the objective of optimizing a ratio of photoproduct ions from a family of halomethanes through three related experiments.} First, applying the same set of photonic reagents with systematically varying second- and third-order chirp on both laser systems generated similar shapes of the associated control landscape (i.e., relation between the objective yield and the variables describing the photonic reagents). Second, optimal photonic reagents obtained from the first laser system were found...

  8. Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEntee, Jarlath [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Polagye, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Fabien, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Thomson, Jim [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Kilcher, Levi [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Marnagh, Cian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Donegan, James [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices (Project) investigated, analyzed and modeled advanced turbine control schemes with the objective of increasing the energy harvested by hydrokinetic turbines in turbulent flow. Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) implemented and validated a feedforward controller to increase power capture; and applied and tested the controls on ORPC’s RivGen® Power Systems in Igiugig, Alaska. Assessments of performance improvements were made for the RivGen® in the Igiugig environment and for ORPC’s TidGen® Power System in a reference tidal environment. Annualized Energy Production (AEP) and Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) improvements associated with implementation of the recommended control methodology were made for the TidGen® Power System in the DOE reference tidal environment. System Performance Advancement (SPA) goals were selected for the project. SPA targets were to improve Power to Weight Ratio (PWR) and system Availability, with the intention of reducing Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE). This project focused primarily reducing in PWR. Reductions in PWR of 25.5% were achieved. Reductions of 20.3% in LCOE were achieved. This project evaluated four types of controllers which were tested in simulation, emulation, a laboratory flume, and the field. The adaptive Kω2 controller performs similarly to the non-adaptive version of the same controller and may be useful in tidal channels where the mean velocity is continually evolving. Trends in simulation were largely verified through experiments, which also provided the opportunity to test assumptions about turbine responsiveness and control resilience to varying scales of turbulence. Laboratory experiments provided an essential stepping stone between simulation and implementation on a field-scale turbine. Experiments also demonstrated that using “energy loss” as a metric to differentiate between well-designed controllers operating at

  9. Robust Control of Laddermill Wind Energy System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podgaets, A.R.; Ockels, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Laddermill flight control problem with closed loop is considered in this paper. Laddermill is an alternative concept for energy production using high altitude kites. The kites have been simulated as rigid bodies and the cable as a thin elastic line. Euler angles and cable speed are controls. Flight

  10. Energy efficient control of a refrigeration plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Larsen, Lars F. S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method for superheat and capacity control of refrigeration systems. The new idea is to control the superheat by the compressor speed and capacity by the refrigerant flow. A new low order nonlinear model of the evaporator is developed and used in a backstepping design o...... and the methods are evaluated with respect to energy efficiency....

  11. Discrete control of resonant wave energy devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, A H; Babarit, A

    2012-01-28

    Aiming at amplifying the energy productive motion of wave energy converters (WECs) in response to irregular sea waves, the strategies of discrete control presented here feature some major advantages over continuous control, which is known to require, for optimal operation, a bidirectional power take-off able to re-inject energy into the WEC system during parts of the oscillation cycles. Three different discrete control strategies are described: latching control, declutching control and the combination of both, which we term latched-operating-declutched control. It is shown that any of these methods can be applied with great benefit, not only to mono-resonant WEC oscillators, but also to bi-resonant and multi-resonant systems. For some of these applications, it is shown how these three discrete control strategies can be optimally defined, either by analytical solution for regular waves, or numerically, by applying the optimal command theory in irregular waves. Applied to a model of a seven degree-of-freedom system (the SEAREV WEC) to estimate its annual production on several production sites, the most efficient of these discrete control strategies was shown to double the energy production, regardless of the resource level of the site, which may be considered as a real breakthrough, rather than a marginal improvement.

  12. Demonstration of Single Axis Combined Attitude Control and Energy Storage Using Two Flywheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Jansen, Ralph; Kascak, Peter; Dever, Timothy; Santiago, Walter

    2004-01-01

    The energy storage and attitude control subsystems of the typical satellite are presently distinct and separate. Energy storage is conventionally provided by batteries, either NiCd or NiH, and active attitude control is accomplished with control moment gyros (CMGs) or reaction wheels. An overall system mass savings can be realized if these two subsystems are combined using multiple flywheels for simultaneous kinetic energy storage and momentum transfer. Several authors have studied the control of the flywheels to accomplish this and have published simulation results showing the feasibility and performance. This paper presents the first experimental results showing combined energy storage and momentum control about a single axis using two flywheels.

  13. Whither the legal control of nuclear energy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Peter [Leicester School of Law (United Kingdom). Environmental Law Unit

    1995-12-31

    International nuclear trade is governed by the regime of legal control of nuclear energy, nuclear materials, knowledge of nuclear processes and weapons. Nuclear trade is under pinned by international agreements concerning physical protection and safeguards, the control of nuclear weapons, the protection of nuclear materials from terrorist action and third part liability. The political and geographical boundary changes of the past two years have significantly altered the background against which this regime has developed. Such changes have affected nuclear trade. The paper summarised the legal control of nuclear energy between States, identifies the areas of change which may affect this regime and the consequences for international trade. Conclusions are drawn as to the development of the international legal control of nuclear energy. (author). 21 refs.

  14. Mass transfer controlled by fracturing in micritic carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, James; Coulon, Michel; Gaviglio, Patrick

    2002-05-01

    The fractured Coniacian chalk from the Omey area (Paris Basin, France) displays strong evidence of modifications controlled by brittle deformation. Fracturing is associated with important changes in pore space (decrease in total porosity and pore interconnection, change in distribution of pore access diameters and capillary characteristics), nannofacies (gradual evolution from a point-contact fabric to a welded, interlocked or coalescent fabric) and chemical composition (Sr concentration decrease). These modifications result from fluid-rock interaction that control significant mass transfer (percentage of secondary calcite >50%). Sr is a remarkable indicator of these mass transfers. Sr analyses allowed us to prove that the deformed zone (26.7 m) is wider than the fractured zone (11.3 m). They also indicate that the footwall block is less affected than the hanging wall block. A physicochemical model of the deformation mechanism is proposed. It shows that a cyclic process of fracturing controls the temporal evolution of the fluid saturation and fluid pressure and, consequently, the mass transfer.

  15. Plasmon-Induced Resonant Energy Transfer: a coherent dipole-dipole coupling mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Alan D.; Cushing, Scott K.; Li, Jiangtian; Wu, Nianqiang

    Metal-insulator-semiconductor core-shell nanoparticles have been used to demonstrate a dipole-dipole coupling mechanism that is entirely dependent on the dephasing time of the localized plasmonic resonance. Consequently, the short-time scale of the plasmons leads to broad energy uncertainty that allows for excitation of charge carriers in the semiconductor via stimulation of photons with energies below the energy band gap. In addition, this coherent energy transfer process overcomes interfacial losses often associated with direct charge transfer. This work explores the efficiency of the energy transfer process, the dipole-dipole coupling strength with dipole separation, shell thickness and plasmonic resonance overlap. We demonstrate limits where the coherent nature of the coupling is switched off and charge transfer processes can dominate. Experiments are performed using transient absorption spectroscopy. Results are compared to calculations using a quantum master equation. These nanostructures show strong potential for improving solar light-harvesting for power and fuel generation.

  16. Controllability of wind energy; Regelbaarheid van windenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, A. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    First, an explanation is offered as to why the controllability of wind energy is limited. Then the capacity adjustment at farm level is outlined and various control targets are discussed. Finally the current and future wind farm control systems are discussed. [Dutch] Eerst wordt uitgelegd waarom windenergie beperkt regelbaar is. Daarna volgt een schets van vermogensregeling op parkniveau en passeren verschillende regeldoelstellingen de revue. Tenslotte komen de huidige en de toekomstige windparkregelingen aan de orde.

  17. Intense energy transfer and superharmonic resonance in a system of two coupled oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Agnessa; Manevitch, Leonid; Manevitch, Elina

    2010-05-01

    The paper presents the analytic study of energy exchange in a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators subject to superharmonic resonance. The attention is given to complete irreversible energy transfer that occurs in a system with definite initial conditions corresponding to a so-called limiting phase trajectory (LPT). We show that the energy imparted in the system is partitioned among the principal and superharmonic modes but energy exchange can be due to superharmonic oscillations. Using the LPT concept, we construct approximate analytic solutions describing intense irreversible energy transfer in a harmonically excited Duffing oscillator and a system of two nonlinearly coupled oscillators. Numerical simulations confirm the accuracy of the analytic approximations.

  18. Photon Cascade Emission through Energy Transfer in Pr3+and Er3+Codoped System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王笑军; 黄世华; 等

    2002-01-01

    Energy transfer processes in Pr3+-codoped CaAl12O19crystal from 12 to 290K were studied.Energy transfer from Pr3+toEr3+ions in this system was observed,The transfer can partially convert the 1S0UVfluorescence of Pr3+into green emission of the characteristic of Er3+,The efficiency of the energy transfer was estimated based of the spectroscopic data,The temperature dependence on the transfer was also discussed.

  19. Energy Efficiency Maximization for WSNs with Simultaneous Wireless Information and Power Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongyan; Zhang, Yongqiang; Guo, Songtao; Yang, Yuanyuan; Ji, Luyue

    2017-08-18

    Recently, the simultaneous wireless information and power transfer (SWIPT) technique has been regarded as a promising approach to enhance performance of wireless sensor networks with limited energy supply. However, from a green communication perspective, energy efficiency optimization for SWIPT system design has not been investigated in Wireless Rechargeable Sensor Networks (WRSNs). In this paper, we consider the tradeoffs between energy efficiency and three factors including spectral efficiency, the transmit power and outage target rate for two different modes, i.e., power splitting (PS) and time switching modes (TS), at the receiver. Moreover, we formulate the energy efficiency maximization problem subject to the constraints of minimum Quality of Service (QoS), minimum harvested energy and maximum transmission power as non-convex optimization problem. In particular, we focus on optimizing power control and power allocation policy in PS and TS modes to maximize energy efficiency of data transmission. For PS and TS modes, we propose the corresponding algorithm to characterize a non-convex optimization problem that takes into account the circuit power consumption and the harvested energy. By exploiting nonlinear fractional programming and Lagrangian dual decomposition, we propose suboptimal iterative algorithms to obtain the solutions of non-convex optimization problems. Furthermore, we derive the outage probability and effective throughput from the scenarios that the transmitter does not or partially know the channel state information (CSI) of the receiver. Simulation results illustrate that the proposed optimal iterative algorithm can achieve optimal solutions within a small number of iterations and various tradeoffs between energy efficiency and spectral efficiency, transmit power and outage target rate, respectively.

  20. Thickness and local field effects on energy transfer rate in coupled quantum wells system: Linear regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazifehshenas, T.; Bahrami, B. [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-fard, T., E-mail: taha@udel.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    We investigate theoretically the dependence of energy transfer rate in Double-Quantum-Well system on the well thickness by using the balance equation formalism. Also, by including the local field correction in our calculations through the zero- and finite-temperature Hubbard approximations, we study the effect of the short-range interactions on the energy transfer phenomenon. Calculations consider both the static and dynamic screening approximations. Our numerical results predict that the energy transfer rate increases considerably by increasing the layers' thicknesses and by taking into account the short-range interactions, as well.

  1. Energy transfer properties and mechanisms. Technical progress report, 1 March 1991--15 August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    Since no single experimental technique is the best method for energy transfer experiments, we have used both time-dependent infrared fluorescence (IRF) and time-dependent thermal lensing (TDTL) to study energy transfer in various systems. We are investigating pump-probe techniques employing resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). IRF was used to study benzene, azulene, and toluene. TDTL was used to study CS{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} (data not given for latter). Large molecule energy transfer mechanisms are discussed. 10 figs.

  2. Noise-assisted energy transfer in quantum networks and light-harvesting complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, Alex W; Caruso, Filippo; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2009-01-01

    We provide physically intuitive mechanisms for the effect of noise on excitation energy transfer (EET) in networks. Using these mechanisms of dephasing-assisted transport (DAT) in a hybrid basis of both excitons and sites, we shed new light on how noise enables energy transfer with efficiencies well above 90% across light harvesting molecules, like the Fenna-Matthew-Olson (FMO) complex. We demonstrate explicitly how noise alters the pathways of energy transfer across the complex, suppressing ineffective pathways and facilitating direct ones to the reaction centre. This understanding opens up a new paradigm of `noise-engineering' by which EET can be optimized in artificial light-harvesting structures.

  3. Analysis of resonance energy transfer in model membranes: role of orientational effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanov, Yegor A; Gorbenko, Galina P

    2002-10-16

    The model of resonance energy transfer (RET) in membrane systems containing donors randomly distributed over two parallel planes separated by fixed distance and acceptors confined to a single plane is presented. Factors determining energy transfer rate are considered with special attention being given to the contribution from orientational heterogeneity of the donor emission and acceptor absorption transition dipoles. Analysis of simulated data suggests that RET in membranes, as compared to intramolecular energy transfer, is substantially less sensitive to the degree of reorientational freedom of chromophores due to averaging over multiple donor-acceptor pairs. The uncertainties in the distance estimation resulting from the unknown mutual orientation of the donor and acceptor are analyzed.

  4. Increasing efficiency of a wireless energy transfer system by spatial translational transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shichao; An, Di; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    An optical translational projector (OTP) designed by transformation optics is applied to improve the energy transfer efficiency in a wireless energy transfer (WET) system. Numerical simulation results show our OTP can greatly enhance the energy transfer efficiency (e.g. nearly 2 orders, compared to the case without our OTP) in WET systems, which is much larger than previous methods (e.g. magnetic super-lens). A 3D reduced OTP composed by layered isotropic magnetic materials is designed, whose performance has been verified by 3D numerical simulations in 10MHz. We also study the influence of loss of metamaterials on the performance of proposed OTP.

  5. Studies on Intermolecular Energy Transfer and Relaxation Processes in Solid Rare Earth Complexes by Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍荣护; 赵化章; 于锡娟; 宋慧宇; 苏庆德

    2001-01-01

    The photoacoustic spectra of Eu(benz)3*(phen)2 (benz: benzoate, phen: phenanthroline) and Eu0.8Ln0.2(benz)3*(phen)2 (Ln3+: La3+ or Nd3+) were reported. The intermolecular energy transfer processes were studied from the point of the nonradiative transitions. Combined with the fluorescence spectroscopy, photoacoustic spectroscopy reflects the variation of the luminescence efficiencies of solid samples. The luminescence efficiency increases when La3+ is introduced, but it decreases greatly when Nd3+ is added, which is due to the difference of intermolecular energy transfer processes. The models of intramolecular and intermolecular energy transfer and relaxation processes were established.

  6. Energy transfer in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: formalism and numerical results

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Gaurav; Verma, Mahendra K.; Eswaran, V.

    2001-01-01

    The basic entity of nonlinear interaction in Navier-Stokes and the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is a wavenumber triad ({\\bf k,p,q}) satisfying ${\\bf k+p+q=0}$. The expression for the combined energy transfer from two of these wavenumbers to the third wavenumber is known. In this paper we introduce the idea of an effective energy transfer between a pair of modes by the mediation of the third mode, and find an expression for it. Then we apply this formalism to compute the energy transfer...

  7. Energy Transfer of Excitons Between Quantum Wells Separated by a Wide Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LYO,SUNGKWUN K.

    1999-12-06

    We present a microscopic theory of the excitonic Stokes and anti-Stokes energy transfer mechanisms between two widely separated unequal quantum wells with a large energy mismatch ({Delta}) at low temperatures (T). Exciton transfer through dipolar coupling, photon-exchange coupling and over-barrier ionization of the excitons through exciton-exciton Auger processes are examined. The energy transfer rate is calculated as a function of T and the center-to-center distance d between the two wells. The rates depend sensitively on T for plane-wave excitons. For located excitons, the rates depend on T only through the T-dependence of the localization radius.

  8. Spectroscopic evidence of resonance energy transfer mechanism from PbS QDs to bulk silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernechea M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study the efficiency of the resonance energy transfer from PbS quantum dots to bulk silicon. We present spectroscopic evidence that resonance energy transfer from PbS quantum dots to bulk silicon can be an efficient process for separation distances below 12 nm. Temperature measurements are also presented for PbS quantum dots deposited on glass and silicon with 5 nm and 20nm spacer thicknesses substrates. Our findings show that the resonance energy transfer efficiency remains constant over the 50K to 300K temperature range.

  9. Effects of Herzberg--Teller vibronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hou-Dao; Xu, Rui-Xue; Yan, YiJing

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the effects of non-Condon vibronic coupling on the quantum coherence of excitation energy transfer, via the exact dissipaton-equation-of-motion (DEOM) evaluations on excitonic model systems. Field-triggered excitation energy transfer dynamics and two dimensional coherent spectroscopy are simulated for both Condon and non-Condon vibronic couplings. Our results clearly demonstrate that the non-Condon vibronic coupling intensifies the dynamical electronic-vibrational energy transfer and enhances the total system-and-bath quantum coherence. Moreover, the hybrid bath dynamics for non-Condon effects enriches the theoretical calculation, and further sheds light on the interpretation of the experimental nonlinear spectroscopy.

  10. Selective detection of mitochondrial malfunction in situ by energy transfer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Gschwend, Michael H.; Sailer, Reinhard; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Schoch, Lars; Schuh, Alexander; Stock, Karl; Steiner, Rudolf W.; Zipfl, Peter

    1999-01-01

    To establish optical in situ detection of mitochondrial malfunction, non-radiative energy transfer from the coenzyme NADH to the mitochondrial marker rhodamine 123 (R123) was examined. Dual excitation of R123 via energy transfer from excited NADH molecules as well as by direct absorption of light results in two fluorescence signals whose ratio is a measure of mitochondrial NADH. These signals are detected simultaneously using a time-gated (nanosecond) technique for energy transfer measurements and a frequency selective technique for direct excitation and fluorescence monitoring of R123. Optical and electronic components of the experimental setup are described and compared with a previously established microscopic system.

  11. Resonance Energy Transfer in Hybrid Devices in the Presence of a Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii; Huck, Alexander; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima

    2014-01-01

    We have studied room-temperature, nonradiative resonant energy transfer from InGaN/GaN quantum wells to CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals separated by aluminum oxide layers of different thicknesses. Nonradiative energy transfer from the quantum wells to the nanocrystals at separation distances of up...... to approximately 10 nm was observed. By comparing the carrier dynamics of the quantum wells and the nanocrystals, we found that nonradiative recombination via surface states, generated during dry etching of the wafer, counteracts the nonradiative energy-transfer process to the nanocrystals and therefore decreases...

  12. Multiway study of hybridization in nanoscale semiconductor labeled DNA based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Somayeh; Kompany Zare, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    The resolution of the ternary-binary complex competition of a target sequence and of its two complementary probes in sandwich DNA hybridization is reported. To achieve this goal, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between oligonucleotide-functionalized quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes (QD...... in the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) plot. From the obtained data, energy transfer efficiency and Forster radius (R-0) were calculated. In particular, our results demonstrated that energy transfer by using QD donor-QD acceptor FRET pairs is more efficient in comparison with QD donor-organic dye acceptor pairs. Soft...

  13. Energy transfers in shell models for magnetohydrodynamics turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessinnes, Thomas; Carati, Daniele; Verma, Mahendra K

    2009-06-01

    A systematic procedure to derive shell models for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is proposed. It takes into account the conservation of ideal quadratic invariants such as the total energy, the cross helicity, and the magnetic helicity, as well as the conservation of the magnetic energy by the advection term in the induction equation. This approach also leads to simple expressions for the energy exchanges as well as to unambiguous definitions for the energy fluxes. When applied to the existing shell models with nonlinear interactions limited to the nearest-neighbor shells, this procedure reproduces well-known models but suggests a reinterpretation of the energy fluxes.

  14. Measuring distances within unfolded biopolymers using fluorescence resonance energy transfer: The effect of polymer chain dynamics on the observed fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Dmitrii E.; Plaxco, Kevin W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have seen a number of investigations in which distances within unfolded proteins, polypeptides, and other biopolymers are probed via fluorescence resonance energy transfer, a method that relies on the strong distance dependence of energy transfer between a pair of dyes attached to the molecule of interest. In order to interpret the results of such experiments it is commonly assumed that intramolecular diffusion is negligible during the excited state lifetime. Here we explore the conditions under which this “frozen chain” approximation fails, leading to significantly underestimated donor-acceptor distances, and describe a means of correcting for polymer dynamics in order to estimate these distances more accurately. PMID:19725638

  15. Shape similarity of charge-transfer (CT) excitation energy curves in a series of donor-acceptor complexes and its description with a transferable energy of CT orbital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, O. V.

    2017-08-01

    A simple nature of charge-transfer (CT) in the prototype complexes Dp -F2 (Dp =NH3 , H2O) manifests itself in a very close shape of their CT excitation energy curves ωCT (R) along the donor-acceptor separation R. It affords a simple orbital description in terms of the CT orbitals (CTOs) obtained with a transformation of the virtual orbitals of the standard local density approximation (LDA). The transferable energy of the relevant CTO as a function of R closely approximates the common shape of ωCT (R) , while the height of the individual curve is determined with the ionization potential of Dp .

  16. Effect of phenol and halogenated phenols on energy transfer reactions of rat liver mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izushi,Fumio

    1988-02-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro effects of phenol and p-halogenated phenols on mitochondrial energy transfer reactions were examined using isolated rat liver mitochondria. The relationship between physiochemical properties of phenolic compounds and their effects on mitochondria were studied. Phenol and p-halogenated phenols induced the release of K+ ions from mitochondria, suggesting a change in permeability to K+ ions. A decrease in the respiratory control index, an increase in K+ release and stimulation of latent ATPase activity were observed with these compounds in the descending order of p-iodophenol, p-bromophenol, p-chlorophenol, p-fluorophenol and phenol. The concentrations of the phenolic compounds resulting in fifty percent inhibition of the respiratory control index and those resulting in fifty percent release of K+ ions significantly correlated with Hammett's substituent constant (sigma and the hydrophobic binding constant (pi of the compounds.

  17. Biophysical Insights from Temperature-Dependent Single-Molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques can be used in combination with micrometer length-scale temperature control and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in order to gain detailed information about fundamental biophysical phenomena. In particular, this combination of techniques has helped foster the development of remarkable quantitative tools for studying both time- and temperature-dependent structural kinetics of biopolymers. Over the past decade, multiple research efforts have successfully incorporated precise spatial and temporal control of temperature into single-molecule FRET (smFRET)-based experiments, which have uncovered critical thermodynamic information on a wide range of biological systems such as conformational dynamics of nucleic acids. This review provides an overview of various temperature-dependent smFRET approaches from our laboratory and others, highlighting efforts in which such methods have been successfully applied to studies of single-molecule nucleic acid folding.

  18. Biophysical Insights from Temperature-Dependent Single-Molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-05-27

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques can be used in combination with micrometer length-scale temperature control and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in order to gain detailed information about fundamental biophysical phenomena. In particular, this combination of techniques has helped foster the development of remarkable quantitative tools for studying both time- and temperature-dependent structural kinetics of biopolymers. Over the past decade, multiple research efforts have successfully incorporated precise spatial and temporal control of temperature into single-molecule FRET (smFRET)-based experiments, which have uncovered critical thermodynamic information on a wide range of biological systems such as conformational dynamics of nucleic acids. This review provides an overview of various temperature-dependent smFRET approaches from our laboratory and others, highlighting efforts in which such methods have been successfully applied to studies of single-molecule nucleic acid folding.

  19. Low-energy state-selective charge transfer by multiply charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubinski, G; Juhasz, Z; Morgenstern, R; Hoekstra, R

    2001-01-01

    We present a combined rf-guided ion beam and photon emission spectroscopy method, which facilitates state-selective charge-transfer measurements at energies of direct relevance for astrophysics and fusion-plasma diagnostics and modeling. Ion energies have been varied from 1000 eV/amu down to energie

  20. Direct measurements of anisotropic energy transfers in a rotating turbulence experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lamriben, Cyril; Moisy, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the influence of a background rotation on the energy transfers in decaying grid turbulence. The anisotropic energy flux density, ${\\bf F} ({\\bf r}) = $, where $\\delta {\\bf u}$ is the vector velocity increment over separation ${\\bf r}$, is determined for the first time using Particle Image Velocimetry. We show that rotation induces an anisotropy of the energy flux $\

  1. 78 FR 2985 - Moretown Hydro Energy Company; Ampersand Moretown Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Moretown Hydro Energy Company; Ampersand Moretown Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On September 25,...

  2. Quasiclassical trajectory study of collisional energy transfer in toluene systems. II. Helium bath gas: Energy and temperature dependences, and angular momentum transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kieran F.

    1994-11-01

    The collisional deactivation of highly vibrationally excited toluene-d0 and toluene-d8 by helium bath gas has been investigated using quasiclassical trajectory simulations. Collisional energy transfer was found to increase with initial toluene internal energy, in agreement with the experiments of Toselli and Barker [J. Chem. Phys. 97, 1809 (1992), and references therein]. The temperature dependence of 1/2 is predicted to be T(0.44±0.10), in agreement with the experiments of Heymann, Hippler, and Troe [J. Chem. Phys. 80, 1853 (1984)]. Toluene is found to have no net angular-momentum (rotational-energy) transfer to helium bath gas, although 1/2 has a temperature dependence of T(0.31±0.07). Re-evaluation of earlier calculations [``Paper I:'' Lim, J. Chem. Phys. 100, 7385 (1994)] found that rotational energy transfer could be induced by increasing the mass of the collider, or by increasing the strength of the intermolecular interaction: in these cases, angular-momentum transfer depended on the initial excitation energy. In all cases, the final rotational distributions remained Boltzmann.

  3. Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2012-09-04

    Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods are described. According to one aspect, an electrical energy consumption control apparatus includes processing circuitry configured to receive a signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by a plurality of loads at a site, to compare the signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by the plurality of loads at the site with a desired substantially sinusoidal waveform of current of electrical energy which is received at the site from an electrical power system, and to use the comparison to control an amount of the electrical energy which is consumed by at least one of the loads of the site.

  4. Energy spectrum transfer equations of solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, C.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    The recent studies of transfer equations for solar wind magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are reviewed with emphasis on the comparison with the statistical observational results. Helios and Voyager missions provide an opportunity to study the the radial evolution of the power spectrum. the cross-helicity the Alfven ratio and the minimum variance direction. Spectrum transfer equations are considered as a tool to explore the nature of this radial evolution of the fluctuations. The transfer equations are derived from incompressible MHD equations. Generally one needs to make assumptions about the nature of the fluctuations and the nature of the turbulent non-linear interactions to obtain numerical results which can be compared with the observations. Some special model results for several simple cases SUCH as for structures or strong mixing. for Alfven waves with weak turbulent interactions. and for a superposition of structures and Alfven waves. are discussed. The difference between the various approaches to derive and handle the transfer equations are also addressed. Finally some theoretical description of the compressible fluctuations are also briefly reviewed.

  5. Ultrafast electron and energy transfer in dye-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Huse, Nils

    2013-01-01

    –310 fs were found for all samples. Comparison between TA dynamics on uncoated and dye-sensitized hematite nanoparticles revealed the dye de-excitation pathway to consist of a competition between electron and energy transfer to the nanoparticles. We analyzed the TA data for hematite nanoparticles using...... a four-state model of the dye-sensitized system, finding electron and energy transfer to occur on the same ultrafast timescale. The interfacial electron transfer rates for iron oxides are very close to those previously reported for DCF-sensitized titanium dioxide (for which dye–oxide energy transfer...... photo-initiated interfacial electron transfer. This approach enables time-resolved study of the fate and mobility of electrons within the solid phase. However, complete analysis of the ultrafast processes following dye photoexcitation of the sensitized iron(iii) oxide nanoparticles has not been reported...

  6. Collisional energy transfer from highly excited CS{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimbayo, A.; Barker, J.R. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Toselli, B.M. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina)

    1995-12-31

    We have used Time Dependent Thermal Lensing (TDTL) to monitor energy deposition from laser excited CS{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} in baths of rare gas at pressures from 50 Torr to 600 Torr. The experimental TDTL signals are simulated by using a unified theory of Thermal lensing and an assumed expression for k{sub e}(E), the energy dependent rate coefficient for V-T energy transfer. By empirically adjusting the parameters and form of k{sub e}(E) to obtain the best simulations, we find energy transfer to be significantly more efficient when the collision frequency is low. These results are interpreted in terms of a phenomenological model in which the excited species loses energy in a collision and is left with a nascent intramolecular energy distribution which cannot transfer energy efficiently by collisions. This distribution then undergoes collision free relaxation with a single time constant to one which is more favorable for subsequent collisional energy transfer. If the next collision occurs before the intramolecular relaxation is complete, energy transfer is less efficient.

  7. Chemical Dynamics Simulations of Intermolecular Energy Transfer: Azulene + N2 Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsik; Paul, Amit K; Pratihar, Subha; Hase, William L

    2016-07-14

    Chemical dynamics simulations were performed to investigate collisional energy transfer from highly vibrationally excited azulene (Az*) in a N2 bath. The intermolecular potential between Az and N2, used for the simulations, was determined from MP2/6-31+G* ab initio calculations. Az* is prepared with an 87.5 kcal/mol excitation energy by using quantum microcanonical sampling, including its 95.7 kcal/mol zero-point energy. The average energy of Az* versus time, obtained from the simulations, shows different rates of Az* deactivation depending on the N2 bath density. Using the N2 bath density and Lennard-Jones collision number, the average energy transfer per collision ⟨ΔEc⟩ was obtained for Az* as it is collisionally relaxed. By comparing ⟨ΔEc⟩ versus the bath density, the single collision limiting density was found for energy transfer. The resulting ⟨ΔEc⟩, for an 87.5 kcal/mol excitation energy, is 0.30 ± 0.01 and 0.32 ± 0.01 kcal/mol for harmonic and anharmonic Az potentials, respectively. For comparison, the experimental value is 0.57 ± 0.11 kcal/mol. During Az* relaxation there is no appreciable energy transfer to Az translation and rotation, and the energy transfer is to the N2 bath.

  8. Energy Optimal Control of Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Flemming

    This thesis deals with energy optimal control of small and medium-size variable speed induction motor drives for especially Heating, Ventilation and Air-Condition (HVAC) applications. Optimized efficiency is achieved by adapting the magnetization level in the motor to the load, and the basic...... purpose is demonstrate how this can be done for low-cost PWM-VSI drives without bringing the robustness of the drive below an acceptable level. Four drives are investigated with respect to energy optimal control: 2.2 kW standard and high-efficiency motor drives, 22 kW and 90 kW standard motor drives....... The method has been to make extensive efficiency measurements within the specified operating area with optimized efficiency and with constant air-gap flux, and to establish reliable converter and motor loss models based on those measurements. The loss models have been used to analyze energy optimal control...

  9. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  10. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  11. A model for energy transfer in collisions of atoms with highly excited molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Paul L; Conte, Riccardo; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-05-21

    A model for energy transfer in the collision between an atom and a highly excited target molecule has been developed on the basis of classical mechanics and turning point analysis. The predictions of the model have been tested against the results of trajectory calculations for collisions of five different target molecules with argon or helium under a variety of temperatures, collision energies, and initial rotational levels. The model predicts selected moments of the joint probability distribution, P(Jf,ΔE) with an R(2) ≈ 0.90. The calculation is efficient, in most cases taking less than one CPU-hour. The model provides several insights into the energy transfer process. The joint probability distribution is strongly dependent on rotational energy transfer and conservation laws and less dependent on vibrational energy transfer. There are two mechanisms for rotational excitation, one due to motion normal to the intermolecular potential and one due to motion tangential to it and perpendicular to the line of centers. Energy transfer is found to depend strongly on the intermolecular potential and only weakly on the intramolecular potential. Highly efficient collisions are a natural consequence of the energy transfer and arise due to collisions at "sweet spots" in the space of impact parameter and molecular orientation.

  12. Synchronous generator wind energy conversion control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, A.L.R. [Wind Energy Group, Recife (Brazil); Lima, A.M.N.; Jacobina, C.B.; Simoes, F.J. [DEE, Campina Grande (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the performance evaluation and the design of the control system of a WECS (Wind Energy Conversion System) that employs a synchronous generator based on its digital simulation. The WECS discussed in this paper is connected to the utility grid through two Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) power converters. The structure of the proposed WECS enables us to achieve high performance energy conversion by: (i) maximizing the wind energy capture and (ii) minimizing the reactive power flowing between the grid and the synchronous generator. 8 refs., 19 figs.

  13. The Effects of the SUN Project on Teacher Knowledge and Self-Efficacy regarding Biological Energy Transfer Are Significant and Long-Lasting: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiza, Ann Finney; Gruhl, Mary; Zhang, Bo; Harrington, Tom; Roberts, Marisa; LaFlamme, Donna; Haasch, Mary Anne; Knopp, Jonathan; Vogt, Gina; Goodsell, David; Hagedorn, Eric; Marcey, David; Hoelzer, Mark; Nelson, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Biological energy flow has been notoriously difficult to teach. Our approach to this topic relies on abiotic and biotic examples of the energy released by moving electrons in thermodynamically spontaneous reactions. A series of analogical model-building experiences was supported with common language and representations including manipulatives.…

  14. Gyrokinetic turbulence: between idealized estimates and a detailed analysis of nonlinear energy transfers

    CERN Document Server

    Teaca, Bogdan; Told, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Using large resolution numerical simulations of GK turbulence, spanning an interval ranging from the end of the fluid scales to the electron gyroradius, we study the energy transfers in the perpendicular direction for a proton-electron plasma in a slab magnetic geometry. In addition, to aid our understanding of the nonlinear cascade, we use an idealized test representation for the energy transfers between two scales, mimicking the dynamics of turbulence in an infinite inertial range. For GK turbulence, a detailed analysis of nonlinear energy transfers that account for the separation of energy exchanging scales is performed. We show that locality functions associated with the energy cascade across dyadic (i.e. multiple of two) separated scales achieve an asymptotic state, recovering clear values for the locality exponents. We relate these exponents to the energy exchange between two scales, diagnostics that are less computationally intensive than the locality functions. It is the first time asymptotic locality...

  15. Clustered Geometries Exploiting Quantum Coherence Effects for Efficient Energy Transfer in Light Harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Ai, Qing; Jin, Bih-Yaw; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating quantum coherence effects and geometrical factors for efficient energy transfer in photosynthesis has the potential to uncover non-classical design principles for advanced organic materials. We study energy transfer in a linear light-harvesting model to reveal that dimerized geometries with strong electronic coherences within donor and acceptor pairs exhibit significantly improved efficiency, which is in marked contrast to predictions of the classical F\\"orster theory. We reveal that energy tuning due to coherent delocalization of photoexcitations is mainly responsible for the efficiency optimization. This coherence-assisted energy-tuning mechanism also explains the energetics and chlorophyll arrangements in the widely-studied Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. We argue that a clustered network with rapid energy relaxation among donors and resonant energy transfer from donor to acceptor states provides a basic formula for constructing efficient light-harvesting systems, and the general principles revea...

  16. Bispectral experimental estimation of the nonlinear energy transfer in two-dimensional plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manz, P.; Ramisch, M.; Stroth, U.

    2008-01-01

    -wave turbulence. The density fluctuations, which at the realistic collisionality are advected as a passive scalar with the vorticity, show power transfer from large to small scales, while the spectral power in potential fluctuations, which represents the energy, is transferred as an inverse cascade to larger...

  17. Simulation of Flywheel Energy Storage System Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Long V.; Wolff, Frederick J.; Dravid, Narayan

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the progress made in the controller design and operation of a flywheel energy storage system. The switching logic for the converter bridge circuit has been redefined to reduce line current harmonics, even at the highest operating speed of the permanent magnet motor-generator. An electromechanical machine model is utilized to simulate charge and discharge operation of the inertial energy in the flywheel. Controlling the magnitude of phase currents regulates the rate of charge and discharge. The resulting improvements are demonstrated by simulation.

  18. Energy transfer mechanism and probability analysis of submarine pipe laterally impacted by dropped objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jing; Yu, Jian-xing; Yu, Yang; Lam, W.; Zhao, Yi-yu; Duan, Jing-hui

    2016-06-01

    Energy transfer ratio is the basic-factor affecting the level of pipe damage during the impact between dropped object and submarine pipe. For the purpose of studying energy transfer and damage mechanism of submarine pipe impacted by dropped objects, series of experiments are designed and carried out. The effective yield strength is deduced to make the quasi-static analysis more reliable, and the normal distribution of energy transfer ratio caused by lateral impact on pipes is presented by statistic analysis of experimental results based on the effective yield strength, which provides experimental and theoretical basis for the risk analysis of submarine pipe system impacted by dropped objects. Failure strains of pipe material are confirmed by comparing experimental results with finite element simulation. In addition, impact contact area and impact time are proved to be the major influence factors of energy transfer by sensitivity analysis of the finite element simulation.

  19. Investigation of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Jaba; Datta Roy, Arpan; Dey, Dibyendu; Chakraborty, Santanu; Bhattacharjee, D.; Paul, P. K.; Hussain, Syed Arshad

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between two organic dyes Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G was investigated in aqueous solution in presence and absence of synthetic clay laponite. Spectroscopic studies suggest that both the dyes were present mainly as monomer in solution. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer occurred from Fluorescein to Rhodamine 6G in solutions. Energy transfer efficiency increases in presence of laponite and the maximum efficiency was 72.00% in aqueous laponite dispersion. Energy transfer efficiency was found to be pH sensitive. It has been demonstrated that with proper calibration it is possible to use the present system under investigation to sense pH over a wide range from 1.5 to 8.0.

  20. Energy Transfer in Isolated LHC Ⅱ Studied by Femtosecond Pump-Probe Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨毅; 郭立俊; 刘源; 刘伟民; 朱荣毅; 钱士雄; 徐春和

    2003-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer in the isolated light-harvesting chlorophyll (Chl)-a/b protein complex of photosystem Ⅱ (LHC Ⅱ) was studied by the one-colour pump-probe technique with femtosecond time resolution. After exciting Chl-b by 638 nm beam, the dynamic behaviour shows that the ultrafast energy transfer from Chl-b at positions of B2, B3, and B5 to the corresponding Chl-a molecules in monomeric subunit of LHC Ⅱ is in the time scale of 230 fs. While with the excitation of Chl-a at 678 nm, the energy transfer between excitons of Chl-a molecules has the lifetime of about 370 fs, and two other slow decay components are due to the energy transfer between different Chl-a molecules in a monomeric subunit of LHC Ⅱ or in different subunits, or due to change of molecular conformation.

  1. Energy transfer in isolated LHC II studied by femtosecond pump-probe technique

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Yi; Liu Yuan; Liu Wei Min; Zhu Rong Yi; Qian Shi Xiong; Xu Chun He

    2003-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer in the isolated light-harvesting chlorophyll (Chl)-a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC II) was studied by the one-colour pump-probe technique with femtosecond time resolution. After exciting Chl-b by 638nm beam, the dynamic behaviour shows that the ultrafast energy transfer from Chl-b at positions of B2, B3, and B5 to the corresponding Chl-a molecules in monomeric subunit of LHC II is in the time scale of 230fs. While with the excitation of Chl-a at 678nm, the energy transfer between excitons of Chl-a molecules has the lifetime of about 370 fs, and two other slow decay components are due to the energy transfer between different Chl-a molecules in a monomeric subunit of LHC II or in different subunits, or due to change of molecular conformation. (20 refs).

  2. Resonant electronic excitation energy transfer by Dexter mechanism in the quantum dot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samosvat, D. M.; Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Vyatkin, V. M.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2016-11-01

    In present work the energy transfer between quantum dots by the exchange (Dexter) mechanism is analysed. The interdot Coulomb interaction is taken into consideration. It is assumed that the quantum dot-donor and the quantum dot-acceptor are made from the same compound A3B5 and embedded in the matrix of other material creating potential barriers for electron and holes. The dependences of the energy transfer rate on the quantum-dot system parameters are found using the Kane model that provides the most adequate description spectra of semiconductors A3B5. Numerical calculations show that the rate of the energy transfer by Dexter mechanism is comparable to the rate of the energy transfer by electrostatic mechanism at the distances approaching to the contact ones.

  3. Direct observation of the ultrafast energy transfer in a porphyrin and ruthenium dyad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Shen; Hui Wang; Jie Liu; Yong Shen; Jinwang Huang; Liangnian Ji

    2009-01-01

    The luminescence dynamics of a polypyridyl ruthenium Ⅱ [Ru(phen)2(ip)]2+ and 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (H2TPP) dyad have been measured by using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The transient luminescent spectra of the dyad show an ultrafast energy transfer within 300 ps after pho-toexcitation of the [Ru(phen)2(ip)]2+ at 453 nm. However, no energy transfer has been observed as the excitation wavelength is 400 nm, corresponding to the absorption peak of H2TPP. The origin of the energy transfer from [Ru(phen)2(ip)]2+ to H2TPP has been analyzed according to the Forster energy-transfer theory.

  4. Energy transfer kinetics of phycoerythrocyanins (PECs) from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis(Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张景民; 张建平; 杨紫萱; 赵井泉; 蒋丽金; 陈建新; 叶彤; 张启元

    1997-01-01

    The excitation energy transfer processes in nionomeric phycoerythrocyanins ( PEC)have been studied in detail using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectra techniques as well as the deconvolution fech nique of spectra.The results indicate that the energy transfer processes should take place between α84 PVB md β8 or β155-PCB chromophores,the time constants of energy transfer are 34.7 and 130 ps individually;the component with lifetime of 1.57 ns originates from the fluorescence lifetime of the terminal emitter of β84 and /or β155 PCB chre-mophores; and the component with lifetime of 515 ps might be assigned to the energy transfer between two PCB chro mophores of β subunit.

  5. Investigation on energy transfer from Er3+ to Nd3+ in teilurite glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Xiang; NIE Qiuhua; XU Tiefeng; DAI Shixun; WANG Xunsi

    2008-01-01

    A study of energy transfer of Er3+/Nd3+ codoped tellurite glasses was presented. By Nd3+ co-doping, both the Er3+ green emission corresponding to the Er3+: (4S3/2,2H11/2)→4I15/2 transitions and the red emission corresponding to the Er3+: 4F9/2→4I15/2 transitions were quenched. The energy transfer mechanism between Er3+ and Nd3+ was discussed based on their energy level characteristics. The interaction parameters, CD-A, for the energy transfer processes from Er3+ to Nd3+ in tellurites glass were calculated. Finally, the resonant transfer Er3+: 4I9/2→Nd3+: (4F5/2, 2H9/2) was proposed to be the most probable microscopic process to occur in contrast with the other processes.

  6. Wind energy systems control engineering design

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Sanz, Mario

    2012-01-01

    IntroductionBroad Context and MotivationConcurrent Engineering: A Road Map for EnergyQuantitative Robust ControlNovel CAD Toolbox for QFT Controller DesignOutline Part I: Advanced Robust Control Techniques: QFT and Nonlinear SwitchingIntroduction to QFTQuantitative Feedback TheoryWhy Feedback? QFT OverviewInsight into the QFT TechniqueBenefits of QFTMISO Analog QFT Control SystemIntroductionQFT Method (Single-Loop MISO System)Design Procedure OutlineMinimum-Phase System Performance SpecificationsJ LTI Plant ModelsPlant Templates of P?(s), P( j_i )Nominal PlantU-Contour (Stability Bound)Trackin

  7. 40 CFR 74.47 - Transfer of allowances from the replacement of thermal energy-combustion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and End of Year Compliance § 74.47 Transfer of allowances from the replacement of thermal energy... seeking to transfer allowances based on the replacement of thermal energy. (3) Contents. Each thermal... energy plan, the Administrator will annually transfer allowances to the compliance account of each...

  8. Elucidating energy and electron transfer dynamics within molecular assemblies for solar energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morseth, Zachary Aaron

    The use of sunlight to make chemical fuels (i.e. solar fuels) is an attractive approach in the quest to develop sustainable energy sources. Using nature as a guide, assemblies for artificial photosynthesis will need to perform multiple functions. They will need to be able to harvest light across a broad region of the solar spectrum, transport excited-state energy to charge-separation sites, and then transport and store redox equivalents for use in the catalytic reactions that produce chemical fuels. This multifunctional behavior will require the assimilation of multiple components into a single macromolecular system. A wide variety of different architectures including porphyrin arrays, peptides, dendrimers, and polymers have been explored, with each design posing unique challenges. Polymer assemblies are attractive due to their relative ease of production and facile synthetic modification. However, their disordered nature gives rise to stochastic dynamics not present in more ordered assemblies. The rational design of assemblies requires a detailed understanding of the energy and electron transfer events that follow light absorption, which can occur on timescales ranging from femtoseconds to hundreds of microseconds, necessitating the use of sophisticated techniques. We have used a combination of time-resolved absorption and emission spectroscopies with observation times that span nine orders of magnitude to follow the excited-state evolution within single-site and polymer-based molecular assemblies. We complement experimental observations with electronic structure calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and kinetic modeling to develop a microscopic view of these dynamics. This thesis provides an overview of work on single-site molecular assemblies and polymers decorated with pendant chromophores, both in solution and on surfaces. This work was made possible through extensive collaboration with Dr. Kirk Schanze's and Dr. John Reynolds' research groups who

  9. Energy transfer method in membrane studies: some theoretical and practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbenko, Galina P; Domanov, Yegor A

    2002-06-28

    Some applications of resonance energy transfer (RET) method to distance estimation in membrane systems are considered. The model of energy transfer between donors and acceptors randomly distributed over parallel planes localized at the outer and inner membrane leaflets is presented. It is demonstrated that RET method can provide evidence for specific orientation of the fluorophore relative to the lipid-water interface. An approach to estimating the depth of the protein penetration in lipid bilayer is suggested.

  10. Investigation of energy transfer in organic photovoltaic cells and impact on exciton diffusion length measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luhman, Wade A.; Holmes, Russell J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2011-02-22

    Energy transfer in organic photovoltaic materials is theoretically and experimentally investigated. Foerster radii for many commonly used donor-acceptor material combinations are extracted that correlate well with theoretical calculations. Independent diffusion length measurements with varying degrees of energy transfer are performed to obtain an average exciton diffusion length for boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) of 7.7 nm. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. The 2H(e, e' p)n reaction at large energy transfers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willering, Hendrik Willem

    2003-01-01

    At the ELSA accelerator facillity in Bonn, Germany, we have measured the deutron "breakup" reaction 2H(e,e' p)n at four-momentum transfers around Q2 = -0 .20(GeV/c)2 with an electron beam energy of E0 = 1.6 GeV. The cross section has been determined for energy transfers extending from the quasielast

  12. Effect of energy transfer from atomic electron shell to an α particle emitted by decaying nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igashov, S. Yu., E-mail: igashov@theor.mephi.ru [All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (Russian Federation); Tchuvil’sky, Yu. M. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The process of energy transfer from the electron shell of an atom to an α particle propagating through the shell is formulated mathematically. Using the decay of the {sup 226}Ra nucleus as an example, it is demonstrated that this phenomenon increases the α-decay intensity in contrast with other known effects of similar type. Moreover, the α decay of the nucleus is more strongly affected by the energy transfer than by all other effects taken together.

  13. Fluorescence energy transfer in quantum dot/azo dye complexes in polymer track membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromova, Yulia A.; Orlova, Anna O.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2013-10-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in complexes of semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with molecules of heterocyclic azo dyes, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol and 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol, formed at high quantum dot concentration in the polymer pore track membranes were studied by steady-state and transient PL spectroscopy. The effect of interaction between the complexes and free quantum dots on the efficiency of the fluorescence energy transfer and quantum dot luminescence quenching was found and discussed.

  14. New energy-transfer upconversion process in Er3+:ZBLAN mid-infrared fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson-Sapir, Ori; Munch, Jesper; Ottaway, David J

    2016-04-04

    We report a new energy-transfer process in erbium doped ZBLAN glass, which is critical for optimizing the operation of lasers that use the 3.5 μm band 4F9/2 to 4I9/2 transition. The magnitude of this energy-transfer process is measured for two different doping levels in Er3+:ZBLAN and the requirement for low doping in these lasers established.

  15. Synthetic molecular systems based on porphyrins as models for the study of energy transfer in photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Nadezhda V.; Evstigneeva, Rima P.; Luzgina, Valentina N.

    2001-11-01

    The published data on the synthesis and photochemical properties of porphyrin-based molecular ensembles which represent models of natural photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes are generalised and systematised. The dependence of the transfer of excitation energy on the distance between donor and acceptor components, their mutual arrangement, electronic and environmental factors are discussed. Two mechanisms of energy transfer reactions, viz., 'through space' and 'through bond', are considered. The bibliography includes 96 references.

  16. Single-sphere model for solvent reorganization energy and its application to electron transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the authors give detailed deductions and develop the single-sphere model of solvent reorganization energy in electron transfer with point dipole approximation. At the level of DFT/6- 31++G**, the electron transfer between 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane and its anion has been investigated. Using the novel single-sphere model, the authors evaluate the solvent reorganization energy of this system, and the computational result proves rational in comparison with the experimental estimations.

  17. Excitation energy transfer in the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus: A specific effect of 1-hexanol on the optical properties of baseplate and energy transfer processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimuro, M; Nishimura, Y; Yamazaki, I; Kobayashi, M; Wang, Z Y; Nozawa, T; Shimada, K; Matsuura, K

    1996-05-01

    The effect of 1-hexanol on spectral properties and the processes of energy transfer of the green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was investigated with reference to the baseplate region. On addition of 1-hexanol to a cell suspension in a concentration of one-fourth saturation, a specific change in the baseplate region was induced: that is, a bleach of the 793-nm component, and an increase in absorption of the 813-nm component. This result was also confirmed by fluorescence spectra of whole cells and isolated chlorosomes. The processes of energy transfer were affected in the overall transfer efficiency but not kinetically, indicating that 1-hexanol suppressed the flux of energy flow from the baseplate to the B806-866 complexes in the cytoplasmic membranes. The fluorescence excitation spectrum suggests a specific site of interaction between bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c with a maximum at 771 nm in the rod elements and BChl a with a maximum at 793 nm in the baseplate, which is a funnel for a fast transfer of energy to the B806-866 complexes in the membranes. The absorption spectrum of chlorosomes was resolved to components consistently on the basis, including circular dichroism and magnetic circular dichroism spectra; besides two major BChl c forms, bands corresponding to tetramer, dimer, and monomer were also discernible, which are supposed to be intermediary components for a higher order structure. A tentative model for the antenna system of C. aurantiacus is proposed.

  18. Experimental evidence for quantum cutting co-operative energy transfer process in Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) ions co-doped fluorotellurite glass: dispute over energy transfer mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Sathravada; Ghosh, Debarati; Biswas, Kaushik; Gupta, Gaurav; Annapurna, Kalyandurg

    2016-12-07

    Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) doped materials have been widely reported as quantum-cutting materials in recent times. However, the question of the energy transfer mechanism in the Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) pair in light of the quantum-cutting phenomenon still remains unanswered. In view of that, we explored a series of Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) co-doped low phonon fluorotellurite glass systems to estimate the probability of different energy transfer mechanisms. Indeed, a novel and simple way to predict the probability of the proper energy transfer mechanism in the Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) pair is possible by considering the donor Pr(3+) ion emission intensities and the relative ratio dependence in the presence of acceptor Yb(3+) ions. Moreover, the observed results are very much in accordance with other estimated results that support the quantum-cutting phenomena in Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) pairs, such as sub-linear power dependence of Yb(3+) NIR emission upon visible ∼450 nm laser excitation, integrated area of the donor Pr(3+) ion's visible excitation spectrum recorded by monitoring the acceptor Yb(3+) ion's NIR emission, and the experimentally obtained absolute quantum yield values using an integrating sphere setup. Our results give a simple way of estimating the probability of an energy transfer mechanism and the factors to be considered, particularly for the Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) pair.

  19. Long-distance electronic energy transfer in light-harvesting supramolecular polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiger, Christian B; Li, Shaoguang; Kumar, Ganesh R; Langenegger, Simon M; Häner, Robert

    2014-12-01

    The efficient collection of solar energy relies on the design and construction of well-organized light-harvesting systems. Herein we report that supramolecular phenanthrene polymers doped with pyrene are effective collectors of light energy. The linear polymers are formed through the assembly of short amphiphilic oligomers in water. Absorption of light by phenanthrene residues is followed by electronic energy transfer along the polymer over long distances (>100 nm) to the accepting pyrene molecules. The high efficiency of the energy transfer, which is documented by large fluorescence quantum yields, suggests a quantum coherent process.

  20. A comparison of heat transfer enhancement in a medium temperature thermal energy storage heat exchanger using fins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agyenim, Francis; Smyth, Mervyn [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    An experimental energy storage system has been designed using a horizontal concentric tube heat exchanger incorporating a medium temperature phase change material (PCM) Erythritol, with a melting point of 117.7 C. Three experimental configurations, a control system with no heat transfer enhancement and systems augmented with circular and longitudinal fins have been studied. The results presented compare the system heat transfer characteristics using isotherm plots and temperature-time curves. The system with longitudinal fins gave the best performance with increased thermal response during charging and reduced subcooling in the melt during discharging. The experimentally measured data for the control, circular finned and longitudinal finned systems have been shown to vindicate the assumption of axissymmetry (direction parallel to the heat transfer fluid flow) using temperature gradients in the axial, radial and angular directions in the double pipe PCM system. (author)

  1. Ion atmosphere relaxation controlled electron transfers in cobaltocenium polyether molten salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Amanda S; Leone, Anthony M; Lee, Dongil; Wang, Wei; Ranganathan, Srikanth; Williams, Mary Elizabeth; Murray, Royce W

    2005-10-13

    A room-temperature redox molten salt for the study of electron transfers in semisolid media, based on combining bis(cyclopentadienyl)cobalt with oligomeric polyether counterions, [Cp2Co](MePEG350SO3), is reported. The transport properties of the new molten salt can be varied (plasticized) by varying the polyether content. The charge transport rate during voltammetric reduction of the ionically conductive [Cp2Co](MePEG350SO3) molten salt exceeds the actual physical diffusivity of [Cp2Co]+ because of rapid [Cp2Co](+/0) electron self-exchanges. The measured [Cp2Co](+/0) electron self-exchange rate constants (k(EX)) are proportional to the diffusion coefficients (D(CION)) of the counterions in the melt. The electron-transfer activation barrier energies are also close to those of ionic diffusion but are larger than those derived from optical intervalent charge-transfer results. Additionally, the [Cp2Co](+/0) rate constant results are close to those of dissimilar redox moieties in molten salts where D(CION) values are similar. All of these characteristics are consistent with the rates of electron transfers of [Cp2Co](+/0) (and the other donor-acceptor pairs) being controlled not by the intrinsic electron-transfer rates but by the rate of relaxation of the ion atmosphere around the reacting pair. In the low driving force regime of mixed-valent concentration gradients, the ion atmosphere relaxation is competitive with electron transfer. The results support the generality of the recently proposed model of ionic atmosphere relaxation control of electron transfers in ionically conductive, semisolid materials.

  2. Pollution Control Guidance for Geothermal Energy Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, Robert P.

    1978-06-01

    This report summarizes the EPA regulatory approach toward geothermal energy development. The state of knowledge is described with respect to the constituents of geothermal effluents and emissions, including water, air, solid wastes, and noise. Pollutant effects are discussed. Pollution control technologies that may be applicable are described along with preliminary cost estimates for their application. Finally discharge and emission limitations are suggested that may serve as interim guidance for pollution control during early geothermal development.

  3. Control and automation, and energy system engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tai-hoon [Hannam Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Adeli, Hojjat [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Stoica, Adrian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Kang, Byeong-Ho (eds.) [Tasmania Univ., Hobart, TAS (Australia)

    2011-07-01

    This book comprises selected papers of the International Conferences, CA and CES3 2011, held as Part of the Future Generation Information Technology Conference, FGIT 2011, in Conjunction with GDC 2011, Jeju Island, Korea, in December 2011. The papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions and focused on the various aspects of control and automation, and circuits, control, communication, electricity, electronics, energy, system, signal and simulation. (orig.)

  4. Linker proteins enable ultrafast excitation energy transfer in the phycobilisome antenna system of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganou, C; David, L; Adir, N; Mkandawire, M

    2016-01-01

    We applied a femtosecond flash method, using induced transient absorption changes, to obtain a time-resolved view of excitation energy transfer in intact phycobilisomes of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus at room temperature. Our measurement of an excitation energy transfer rate of 888 fs in phycobilisomes shows the existence of ultrafast kinetics along the phycocyanin rod subcomplex to the allophycocyanin core that is faster than expected for previous excitation energy transfer based on Förster theory in phycobilisomes. Allophycocyanin in the core further transfers energy to the terminal emitter(s) in 17 ps. In the phycobilisome, rod doublets composed of hexameric phycocyanin discs and internal linker proteins are arranged in a parallel fashion, facilitating direct rod-rod interactions. Excitonic splitting likely drives rod absorption at 635 nm as a result of strong coupling between β84 chromophores (20 ± 1 Å) in adjacent hexamers. In comparison to the absorbance of the phycobilisome antenna system of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina, which possesses a single rod structure, the linkers in T. vulcanus rods induce a 17 nm red shift in the absorbance spectrum. Furthermore, the kinetics of 888 fs indicates that the presence of the linker protein induces ultrafast excitation energy transfer between phycocyanin and allophycocyanin inside the phycobilisome, which is faster than all previous excitation energy transfer in phycobilisome subunits or sub-complexes reported to date.

  5. Dynamic Modeling and Control of Distributed Heat Transfer Mechanisms: Application to a Membrane Distillation Module

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2015-12-01

    Sustainable desalination technologies are the smart solution for producing fresh water and preserve the environment and energy by using sustainable renewable energy sources. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology which can be driven by renewable energy. It is an innovative method for desalinating seawater and brackish water with high quality production, and the gratitude is to its interesting potentials. MD includes a transfer of water vapor from a feed solution to a permeate solution through a micro-porous hydrophobic membrane, rejecting other non-volatile constituents present in the influent water. The process is driven by the temperature difference along the membrane boundaries. Different control applications and supervision techniques would improve the performance and the efficiency of the MD process, however controlling the MD process requires comprehensive mathematical model for the distributed heat transfer mechanisms inside the process. Our objective is to propose a dynamic mathematical model that accounts for the time evolution of the involved heat transfer mechanisms in the process, and to be capable of hosting intermittent energy supplies, besides managing the production rate of the process, and optimizing its energy consumption. Therefore, we propose the 2D Advection-Diffusion Equation model to account for the heat diffusion and the heat convection mechanisms inside the process. Furthermore, experimental validations have proved high agreement between model simulations and experiments with less than 5% relative error. Enhancing the MD production is an anticipated goal, therefore, two main control strategies are proposed. Consequently, we propose a nonlinear controller for a semi-discretized version of the dynamic model to achieve an asymptotic tracking for a desired temperature difference. Similarly, an observer-based feedback control is used to track sufficient temperature difference for better productivity. The second control strategy

  6. Energy Transfer among Chlorophylls in Trimeric Light-harvesting Complex Ⅱ of Bryopsis corticulans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Juan ZHANG; Shui-Cai WANG; Jun-Fang HE; Hui CHEN

    2006-01-01

    A study on energy transfer among chlorophylls (Chls) in the trimeric unit of the major light-harvesting complex Ⅱ (LHC Ⅱ) from Bryopsis corriculan, was carried out using time-correlated single photon counting. In the chlorophyll Q region of LHC Ⅱ, six molecules characterized as Chlb628, Chlb646,Chlb654,657 652 , Chla666 664 , Chla677,680 674, and Chla683 682 were discriminated according to their absorption spectrum and fluorescence emission spectrum. Then, excited by pulsed light of 628 nm, fluorescence kinetics spectra in the chlorophyll Q region were measured. In accordance with the principles of fluorescence kinetics, these kinetics data were analyzed with a multi-exponential model. Time constants on energy transfer were obtained.An overwhelming percentage of energy transfer among chlorophylls undergoes a process longer than 97 picoseconds (ps), which shows that, before transferring energy to another Chl, the excited Chl might convert energy to vibrations of a lower state with different multiplicity (intersystem crossing). Energy transfer at the level of approximately 10 ps was also obtained, which was interpreted as the excited Chls may go through internal conversion before transferring energy to another Chl. Although with a higher standard deviation, time constants at the femtosecond level can not be entirely excluded, which can be attributed to the ultrafast process of direct energy transfer. Owing to the arrangement and direction of the dipole moment of Chls in LHC Ⅱ, the probability of these processes is different. The fluorescence lifetimes of Chlb652 654,657, Chla666 664,Chla674 677,680, and Chla683 682 were determined to be 1.44 ns, 1.43 ns, 636 ps and 713 ps, respectively. The percentages of energy dissipation in the pathway of fluorescence emission were no more than 40% in the trimeric unit of LHC Ⅱ. These results are important for a better understanding of the relationship between the structure and function of LHC Ⅱ.

  7. Nonlinear Lyapunov-based boundary control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms in membrane distillation plant

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear Lyapunov-based boundary control for the temperature difference of a membrane distillation boundary layers. The heat transfer mechanisms inside the process are modeled with a 2D advection-diffusion equation. The model is semi-descretized in space, and a nonlinear state-space representation is provided. The control is designed to force the temperature difference along the membrane sides to track a desired reference asymptotically, and hence a desired flux would be generated. Certain constraints are put on the control law inputs to be within an economic range of energy supplies. The effect of the controller gain is discussed. Simulations with real process parameters for the model, and the controller are provided. © 2015 American Automatic Control Council.

  8. Control of near-field radiative heat transfer via surface phonon-polariton coupling in thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Francoeur, M.; Mengüç, M. Pınar; Vaillon, R.

    2010-01-01

    The possibily of controlling near-field radiative heat transfer via thin films supporting surface phonon-polaritons (SPhPs) is explored. Local density of electromagnetic states (LDOS) within the nanometric gap formed between two silicon carbide (SiC) films and the radiative heat flux exchanged between the thin layers are calculated. Using this information, engineering of desired heat transfer profiles can be obtained, which can be used for the next generation energy harvesting device. Kent...

  9. Numerical simulations of energy transfer in two collisionless interpenetrating plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ion stream instabilities are essential for collisionless shock formation as seen in astrophysics. Weakly relativistic shocks are considered as candidates for sources of high energy cosmic rays. Laboratory experiments may provide a better understanding of this phenomenon. High intensity short pulse laser systems are opening possibilities for efficient ion acceleration to high energies. Their collision with a secondary target could be used for collisionless shock formation. In this paper, using particle-in-cell simulations we are studying interaction of a sub-relativistic, laser created proton beam with a secondary gas target. We show that the ion bunch initiates strong electron heating accompanied by the Weibel-like filamentation and ion energy losses. The energy repartition between ions, electrons and magnetic fields are investigated. This yields insight on the processes occurring in the interstellar medium (ISM and gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  10. Mechanical energy transfers across lower limb segments during stair ascent and descent in young and healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Alison C; Li, Qingguo; Yang, Shuozhi; Brouwer, Brenda

    2011-07-01

    Older adults present with altered movement patterns during stair negotiation although the extent to which modifications in pattern and speed influence mechanical efficiency is unknown. This study evaluated mechanical energy transfers attributed to active force production during stair negotiation in young and older adults to provide insight into age-related changes in mechanical efficiency. Secondary analysis on data obtained from 23 young (23.7±3.0 years) and 32 older adults (67.0±8.2 years) during self-paced stair ascent and descent was conducted. Mechanical energy expenditures (MEE) during concentric transfer, eccentric transfer and no-transfer phases were determined for the ankle, knee and hip power profiles in the sagittal plane. Mechanical energy compensations (MEC) were also determined at each joint. During ascent, MEEs were similar for young and older adults although older adults compensated ankle muscles to a lesser extent during concentric muscle action. Controlling for cadence eliminated this difference. During descent, older adults demonstrated lower energy expenditures at the ankle and hip and similar expenditures at the knee compared to young adults. Changes in joint MEE in the older group resulted in reduced energy compensation at the ankle during concentric and eccentric activity and at the knee during eccentric activity. These age-related differences in mechanical energy transfers and related adjustments in MEC were not a function of the slower cadence in older adults and suggest a loss in mechanical efficiency. These results provide a benchmark against which physical impairments in older adults may be explored.

  11. Electrochemical Electron Transfer and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Effects of Double Layer and Ionic Environment on Solvent Reorganization Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumya; Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-06-14

    Electron transfer and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions at electrochemical interfaces play an essential role in a broad range of energy conversion processes. The reorganization energy, which is a measure of the free energy change associated with solute and solvent rearrangements, is a key quantity for calculating rate constants for these reactions. We present a computational method for including the effects of the double layer and ionic environment of the diffuse layer in calculations of electrochemical solvent reorganization energies. This approach incorporates an accurate electronic charge distribution of the solute within a molecular-shaped cavity in conjunction with a dielectric continuum treatment of the solvent, ions, and electrode using the integral equations formalism polarizable continuum model. The molecule-solvent boundary is treated explicitly, but the effects of the electrode-double layer and double layer-diffuse layer boundaries, as well as the effects of the ionic strength of the solvent, are included through an external Green’s function. The calculated total reorganization energies agree well with experimentally measured values for a series of electrochemical systems, and the effects of including both the double layer and ionic environment are found to be very small. This general approach was also extended to electrochemical PCET and produced total reorganization energies in close agreement with experimental values for two experimentally studied PCET systems. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  12. Transfer calibration of the transmission of electron-energy spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J. L.; Samson, J. A. R.

    1975-01-01

    Relative intensities of strong peaks in the Hel photoelectron spectra of N2, CO2, CO, and O2 are tabulated. These data were measured with an electron energy analyzer whose relative transmission was calibrated to an accuracy of + or - 5%. The tables are useful for calibrating the transmission of other analyzers for electron energies below 9 eV. Correction for angular distribution effects is discussed.

  13. A Responsive Battery with Controlled Energy Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jian; Cheng, Zhihua; Chen, Nan; Qu, Liangti

    2016-11-14

    A new type of responsive battery with the fascinating feature of pressure perceptibility has been developed, which can spontaneously, timely and reliably control the power outputs (e.g., current and voltage) in response to pressure changes. The device design is based on the structure of the Zn-air battery, in which graphene-coated sponge serves as pressure-sensitive air cathode that endows the whole system with the capability of self-controlled energy release. The responsive batteries exhibit superior battery performance with high open-circuit voltage (1.3 V), and competitive areal capacity of 1.25 mAh cm(-2) . This work presents an important move towards next-generation intelligent energy storage devices with energy management function. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEntee, Jarlath [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Polagye, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Fabien, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Thomson, Jim [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Kilcher, Levi [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Marnagh, Cian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Donegan, James [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices (Project) investigated, analyzed and modeled advanced turbine control schemes with the objective of increasing the energy harvested by hydrokinetic turbines in turbulent flow. Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) implemented and validated a feedforward controller to increase power capture; and applied and tested the controls on ORPC’s RivGen® Power Systems in Igiugig, Alaska. Assessments of performance improvements were made for the RivGen® in the Igiugig environment and for ORPC’s TidGen® Power System in a reference tidal environment. Annualized Energy Production (AEP) and Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) improvements associated with implementation of the recommended control methodology were made for the TidGen® Power System in the DOE reference tidal environment. System Performance Advancement (SPA) goals were selected for the project. SPA targets were to improve Power to Weight Ratio (PWR) and system Availability, with the intention of reducing Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE). This project focused primarily reducing in PWR. Reductions in PWR of 25.5% were achieved. Reductions of 20.3% in LCOE were achieved. This project evaluated four types of controllers which were tested in simulation, emulation, a laboratory flume, and the field. The adaptive Kω2 controller performs similarly to the non-adaptive version of the same controller and may be useful in tidal channels where the mean velocity is continually evolving. Trends in simulation were largely verified through experiments, which also provided the opportunity to test assumptions about turbine responsiveness and control resilience to varying scales of turbulence. Laboratory experiments provided an essential stepping stone between simulation and implementation on a field-scale turbine. Experiments also demonstrated that using “energy loss” as a metric to differentiate between well-designed controllers operating at

  15. Matrix converter controlled with the direct transfer function approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, J.; Silva, E.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    Power electronics is an emerging technology. New power circuits are invented and have to be introduced into the power electronics curriculum. One of the interesting new circuits is the matrix converter (MC), and this paper analyses its working principles. A simple model is proposed to represent...... the power circuit, including the input filter. The power semiconductors are modelled as ideal bidirectional switches and the MC is controlled using a direct transfer function approach. The modulation strategy of the converter is explained in a complete and clear form. The commutation problem of two switches...

  16. A New Reaction-controlled Phase-transfer Catalyst System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Qiang LI; Xi Gao JIAN; Gui Mei WANG; Yan YU

    2004-01-01

    A new reaction-controlled phase-transfer catalyst system was designed and synthesized. In this system, heteropolytungstate [C7H7N(CH3)3]9PW9O34 was used for catalytic epoxidation of cyclohexene with H2O2 as the oxidant. The conversion of H2O2 was 100% and the yield of cyclohexene oxide was 87.1% based on cyclohexene. Infrared spectra showed that both fresh catalyst and the recovered catalyst do have completely same absorption peak, indicating the structure of catalyst is very stability and can be recycled.

  17. Isotopic Effect and Temperature Dependent Intramolecular Excitation Energy Transfer in a Model Donor-Acceptor Dyad

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Jaykrishna; Bittner, Eric R.

    2010-01-01

    We consider here the non-adiabatic energy transfer dynamics for a model bi-chromophore system consisting of a perylenediimide unit linked to a ladder-type poly-(para-phenylene) oligomer. Starting from a semi-empirical parameterization of a model electron/phonon Hamiltonian, we compute the golden-rule rate for energy transfer from the LPPP5 donor to the PDI acceptor. Our results indicate that the non-adiabatic transfer is promoted by the out-of-plane wagging modes of the C-H bonds even though ...

  18. Degrees of locality of energy transfer in the inertial range. [Kolmogoroff notion in turbulence theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, YE

    1993-01-01

    Measured raw transfer interactions from which local energy transfer is argued to result are summed in a way that directly indicates the scale disparity (s) of contributions to the net energy flux across the spectrum. It is found that the dependence upon s closely follows the s exp -4/3 form predicted by classical arguments. As a result, it is concluded that direct numerical simulation measurements lend support to the classical Kolmogorov phenomenology of local interactions and local transfer in an inertial range.

  19. Smart energy control systems for sustainable buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Spataru, Catalina; Howlett, Robert; Jain, Lakhmi

    2017-01-01

    There is widespread interest in the way that smart energy control systems, such as assessment and monitoring techniques for low carbon, nearly-zero energy and net positive buildings can contribute to a Sustainable future, for current and future generations. There is a turning point on the horizon for the supply of energy from finite resources such as natural gas and oil become less reliable in economic terms and extraction become more challenging, and more unacceptable socially, such as adverse public reaction to ‘fracking’. Thus, in 2016 these challenges are having a major influence on the design, optimisation, performance measurements, operation and preservation of: buildings, neighbourhoods, cities, regions, countries and continents. The source and nature of energy, the security of supply and the equity of distribution, the environmental impact of its supply and utilization, are all crucial matters to be addressed by suppliers, consumers, governments, industry, academia, and financial institutions. Thi...

  20. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between conjugated molecules infiltrated in three-dimensional opal photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Lu; Sui, Ning; Wang, Ying-Hui, E-mail: yinghui_wang@jlu.edu.cn; Qian, Cheng; Ma, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Han-Zhuang, E-mail: zhanghz@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-02-15

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Coumarin 6 (C-6) to Sulforhodamine B (S-B) infiltrated into opal PMMA (poly-methyl-methacrylate) photonic crystals (PCs) has been studied in detail. The intrinsic mesh micro-porous structure of opal PCs could increase the luminescent efficiency through inhibiting the intermolecular interaction. Meanwhile, its structure of periodically varying refractive indices could also modify the FRET through affecting the luminescence characteristics of energy donor or energy acceptor. The results demonstrate that the FRET efficiency between conjugated dyes was easily modified by opal PCs. - Highlights: • We investigate the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two kinds of dyes. • These two kinds of dyes are infiltrated in PMMA opal photonic crystals. • The structure of opal PCs could improve the luminescent characteristics. • The structure of opal PCs could improve the energy transfer characteristics.